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Sample records for organizational support provider

  1. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  2. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  3. Evidence-based practice implementation: the impact of public versus private sector organization type on organizational support, provider attitudes, and adoption of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sommerfeld, David H; Walrath-Greene, Christine M

    2009-12-31

    The goal of this study is to extend research on evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation by examining the impact of organizational type (public versus private) and organizational support for EBP on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Both organization theory and theory of innovation uptake and individual adoption of EBP guide the approach and analyses in this study. We anticipated that private sector organizations would provide greater levels of organizational support for EBPs leading to more positive provider attitudes towards EBPs and EBP use. We also expected attitudes toward EBPs to mediate the association of organizational support and EBP use. Participants were mental health service providers from 17 communities in 16 states in the United States (n = 170). Path analyses were conducted to compare three theoretical models of the impact of organization type on organizational support for EBP and of organizational support on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Consistent with our predictions, private agencies provided greater support for EBP implementation, and staff working for private agencies reported more positive attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Organizational support for EBP partially mediated the association of organization type on provider attitudes toward EBP. Organizational support was significantly positively associated with attitudes toward EBP and EBP use in practice. This study offers further support for the importance of organizational context as an influence on organizational support for EBP and provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. The study demonstrates the role organizational support in provider use of EBP in practice. This study also suggests that organizational support for innovation is a malleable factor in supporting use of EBP. Greater attention should be paid to organizational influences that can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of EBPs in community settings.

  4. Evidence-based practice implementation: The impact of public versus private sector organization type on organizational support, provider attitudes, and adoption of evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The goal of this study is to extend research on evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation by examining the impact of organizational type (public versus private) and organizational support for EBP on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Both organization theory and theory of innovation uptake and individual adoption of EBP guide the approach and analyses in this study. We anticipated that private sector organizations would provide greater levels of organizational support for EBPs leading to more positive provider attitudes towards EBPs and EBP use. We also expected attitudes toward EBPs to mediate the association of organizational support and EBP use. Methods Participants were mental health service providers from 17 communities in 16 states in the United States (n = 170). Path analyses were conducted to compare three theoretical models of the impact of organization type on organizational support for EBP and of organizational support on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Results Consistent with our predictions, private agencies provided greater support for EBP implementation, and staff working for private agencies reported more positive attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Organizational support for EBP partially mediated the association of organization type on provider attitudes toward EBP. Organizational support was significantly positively associated with attitudes toward EBP and EBP use in practice. Conclusion This study offers further support for the importance of organizational context as an influence on organizational support for EBP and provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. The study demonstrates the role organizational support in provider use of EBP in practice. This study also suggests that organizational support for innovation is a malleable factor in supporting use of EBP. Greater attention should be paid to organizational influences that can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of EBPs in community settings. PMID

  5. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Scammon, Debra L.; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H.; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W.; Waitzman, Norman J.; Magill, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Assess 1) provider satisfaction with specific elements of PCMH; 2) clinic organizational cultures; 3) associations between provider satisfaction and clinic culture. Methods Cross sectional study with surveys conducted in 2011 with providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design™. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Results Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (M=4.14; scale=1–5) and interactions with patients (M=4.12) and least satisfied with time spent working (M=3.47), paper work (M =3.45) and compensation (M=3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics with family/clan and hierarchical the most common. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included: family/clan negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical negatively correlated with Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Discussion Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Conclusions Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended. PMID:24610184

  6. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Scammon, Debra L; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W; Waitzman, Norman J; Magill, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is key to the successful implementation of major improvement strategies. Transformation to a patient-centered medical home (PCHM) is such an improvement strategy, requiring a shift from provider-centric care to team-based care. Because this shift may impact provider satisfaction, it is important to understand the relationship between provider satisfaction and organizational culture, specifically in the context of practices that have transformed to a PCMH model. This was a cross-sectional study of surveys conducted in 2011 among providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (mean, 4.14; scale of 1-5) and interactions with patients (mean, 4.12) and were least satisfied with time spent working (mean, 3.47), paperwork (mean, 3.45), and compensation (mean, 3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics, with family/clan and hierarchical cultures the most common. Significant correlations (P ≤ .05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included family/clan culture negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial culture positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational culture positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical culture negatively correlated with the Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended.

  7. The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support and Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayir, Funda

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: It can be said that one of the key factors ensuring teachers adaptation to developments is teachers' level of commitment to their schools. In this commitment, the teacher is expected to internalize the organizational objectives. The teacher's perception of organizational support is important for him to internalize the…

  8. [Providing Effective Behavior Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SAIL: Technical Assistance Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue addresses the provision of behavioral support for students with behavior disorders. The first article, "Providing Effective Behavior Support to All Students: Procedures and Processes" (George Sugai), summarizes the literature on the effectiveness of various interventions and offers several models for examining the…

  9. Family Day Care Provider Support Services Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galblum, Trudi W.; Boyer-Shesol, Cathy

    This directory profiles numerous organizational support services for family day care providers in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The first chapter, on operating a family day care home, concerns licensing and registration, the processes of starting and marketing a day care business, zoning and municipal regulation, and substitute providers. The…

  10. Organizational Stress as Moderator of Relationship Between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment.

    PubMed

    Green, Amy E; Dishop, Christopher R; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk of emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Variables were analyzed with moderated multilevel regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when the work environment is less stressful; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain adaptable employees.

  11. Organizational Stress Moderates the Relationship between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Amy E.; Dishop, Christopher; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk for emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examines the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Methods Variables were analyzed using moderated multi-level regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Results Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low, but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Conclusions In the current study, providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when characterized by lower levels of stressfulness; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain desirable employees. PMID:27301760

  12. Why Does Mentoring Work? The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    PubMed Central

    Baranik, Lisa; Roling, Elizabeth A; Eby, Lillian T

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the mediating role of perceived organizational support in the relationship between mentoring support received and work attitudes. Perceived organizational support partly mediated the relationship between specific types of mentoring support and job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. Specifically, sponsorship, exposure and visibility, and role-modeling appear to be related to job satisfaction and organizational commitment through perceived organizational support. Perceived organizational support did not appear to mediate the relationship between other specific forms of mentoring support and job satisfaction and organizational commitment. PMID:20401322

  13. Why Does Mentoring Work? The Role of Perceived Organizational Support.

    PubMed

    Baranik, Lisa; Roling, Elizabeth A; Eby, Lillian T

    2010-06-01

    The authors examined the mediating role of perceived organizational support in the relationship between mentoring support received and work attitudes. Perceived organizational support partly mediated the relationship between specific types of mentoring support and job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. Specifically, sponsorship, exposure and visibility, and role-modeling appear to be related to job satisfaction and organizational commitment through perceived organizational support. Perceived organizational support did not appear to mediate the relationship between other specific forms of mentoring support and job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

  14. The Relationship between Work Engagement Behavior and Perceived Organizational Support and Organizational Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köse, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between work engagement and perceived organizational support and organizational climate. The present study, in which quantitative methods have been used, is carried out in the relational screening model. Perceived organizational support scale, organizational climate scale, and work…

  15. The Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support and Organizational Cynicism of Research Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasalak, Gamze; Bilgin Aksu, Mualla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to ascertain to what extent organizational cynicism may be predicted based on the level of perceived organizational support by determining the relationship between research assistants' perceived organizational support and organizational cynicism. The population of the study consists of 214 research assistants working…

  16. Moderating effects of nurses' organizational support on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to investigate whether job satisfaction enhances organizational commitment among nursing personnel while exploring whether organizational support perception has a moderating effect on the relationship between their job satisfaction and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional survey was sent to 400 nurses; 386 valid questionnaires were collected, with a valid response rate of 96.5%. According to the research findings, nurses' job satisfaction has a positive and significant influence on organizational commitment. Results also indicated that the moderating effect of nurses' organizational support perception on the relationship between their job satisfaction and organizational commitment was stronger for high organizational support perception than it was for low organizational support perception. This study suggests that organizational support perception will develop a sense of belonging, and this will help improve nurses' job satisfaction and organizational commitment. This kind of relationship is rarely discussed in the research literature, and it can be applied for human resources management of nursing staff.

  17. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  18. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  19. Why Does Mentoring Work? The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranik, Lisa E.; Roling, Elizabeth A.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the mediating role of perceived organizational support in the relationship between mentoring support received and work attitudes. Perceived organizational support partly mediated the relationship between specific types of mentoring support and job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. Specifically, sponsorship,…

  20. Why Does Mentoring Work? The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranik, Lisa E.; Roling, Elizabeth A.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the mediating role of perceived organizational support in the relationship between mentoring support received and work attitudes. Perceived organizational support partly mediated the relationship between specific types of mentoring support and job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment. Specifically, sponsorship,…

  1. Organizational and cultural changes for providing safe patient care.

    PubMed

    Odwazny, Richard; Hasler, Scott; Abrams, Richard; McNutt, Robert

    2005-01-01

    To describe an approach and experience with fostering a culture of patient safety. (1) Organizational Change-The Department of Medicine established a patient safety committee (PSC) and charged it with reviewing adverse events. (2) Cultural Change-PSC sponsors and participants work to promote a culture of collaboration, study, learning, and prevention versus a culture of blame. (3) Collaboration-The PSC includes chief residents and members from medical informatics, nursing, pharmacy, quality assurance, risk management, and utilization management. (4) Evolution-The duties of the PSC progressed from merely learning from adverse event reports to implementing patient safety and quality improvement projects. (5) Standardization-The PSC uses standard definitions and procedures when reviewing cases of adverse events, and when conducting patient safety and quality improvement projects. (1) Developed an online adverse event reporting system, shortening the average report collection time by 2 days and increasing the number of adverse events reported. (2) Established a model for change using (a) safety rounds with residents, (b) e-mail safety alerts, and, in some cases, (c) decision alerts using electronic order entry. These changes in culture and capability led to improvements in care and improved financial results. Senior management support of a culture of learning and prevention and an organizational structure that promotes collaboration has provided an environment in which patient safety initiatives can flourish by providing not only safer and higher quality patient care but also a positive financial return on investment.

  2. Organizational analysis of three community support program models.

    PubMed

    Reinke, B; Greenley, J R

    1986-06-01

    Little attention has been paid to the organizational and administrative characteristics of effective community support programs for the chronic mentally ill. The authors analyzed three successful support programs in Wisconsin that employ three different models of service delivery: one provides services through caseworkers who carry specialized caseloads, another through local nonprofessionals who work with a centrally located program coordinator, and the third through a team of various mental health workers. Each program has tailored its organizational process to suit the types of clients it sees, the size of its catchment area, and the availability of other professional resources. The interrelated strengths and weaknesses of each model are discussed.

  3. Organizational Support for Action Learning in South Korean Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yonjoo; Egan, Toby

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to examine the impact of organizational support on employee learning and performance and (2) to elaborate on the context of organizational support for action learning in South Korean organizations. For this inquiry, two central questions were posed: What are employee reactions to organizational support for action…

  4. Organizational Support for Action Learning in South Korean Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yonjoo; Egan, Toby

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to examine the impact of organizational support on employee learning and performance and (2) to elaborate on the context of organizational support for action learning in South Korean organizations. For this inquiry, two central questions were posed: What are employee reactions to organizational support for action…

  5. The relationships between perceived organizational support, affective commitment, psychological contract breach, organizational citizenship behaviour and work engagement.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Agarwal, Upasna A; Khatri, Naresh

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the factors that mediate and moderate the relationships of perceived organizational support with work engagement and organization citizenship behaviour. Specifically, affective commitment is posited to mediate and psychological contract breach to moderate the above relationships. Nurses play a critical role in delivering exemplary health care. For nurses to perform at their best, they need to experience high engagement, which can be achieved by providing them necessary organizational support and proper working environment. Data were collected via a self-reported survey instrument. A questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 750 nurses in nine large hospitals in India during 2013-2014. Four hundred and seventy-five nurses (63%) responded to the survey. Hierarchical multiple regression was used for statistical analysis of the moderated-mediation model. Affective commitment was found to mediate the positive relationships between perceived organizational support and work outcomes (work engagement, organizational citizenship behaviour). The perception of unfulfilled expectations (psychological contract breach) was found to moderate the perceived organizational support-work outcome relationships adversely. The results of this study indicate that perceived organizational support exerts its influence on work-related outcomes and highlight the importance of taking organizational context, such as perceptions of psychological contract breach, into consideration when making sense of the influence of perceived organizational support on affective commitment, work engagement and citizenship behaviours of nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Perceived Organizational Support as a Mediator between Relational Exchange and Organizational Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sluss, David M.; Klimchak, Malayka; Holmes, Jeanne J.

    2008-01-01

    Using cross-level data from 364 supervisor-subordinate dyads, we examined how relational exchange quality, perceived organizational support (POS), and organizational identification interrelate. We found subordinate POS mediates the relationship between leader-member exchange (i.e., LMX) and organizational identification. We also found the…

  7. Mental health providers confronting organizational change: process, problems, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gabel, S; Oster, G D

    1998-01-01

    Under the influence of managed care and diminished funding, the mental health field is undergoing a major transformation. Existing mental health programs, departments, and agencies are downsizing and restructuring to develop new types of service delivery systems. Organizations must change to survive; yet necessary and adaptive change may be resisted in numerous ways by providers whose reactions and behaviors may reduce the viability of their own programs and agencies. This paper explores various characteristics and reactions of mental health care professionals as they face great stress, professional devaluation, and necessary organizational change and restructuring. Adaptive and maladaptive patterns in response to potential organizational change are explored. The role of the leader in guiding and implementing programmatic changes and in dealing with denial and resistance is highlighted. Strategies to enhance the prospects for adaptive organizational change are offered.

  8. Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment and Psychological Well-Being: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panaccio, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Using longitudinal data (N=220), we examined the contribution of perceived organizational support and four mindsets of organizational commitment (affective, normative, perceived sacrifice associated with leaving and perceived lack of alternatives) to employee psychological well-being. In order to assess the contribution of support and commitment…

  9. Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment and Psychological Well-Being: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panaccio, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Using longitudinal data (N=220), we examined the contribution of perceived organizational support and four mindsets of organizational commitment (affective, normative, perceived sacrifice associated with leaving and perceived lack of alternatives) to employee psychological well-being. In order to assess the contribution of support and commitment…

  10. Teacher Views on Organizational Support and Psychological Contract Violation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argon, Türkan; Ekinci, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between secondary school teachers' view regarding Organizational Support and Psychological Contract Violation. The study conducted with relational screening model included 230 secondary school teachers employed in Bolu central district in 2014-2015 academic year. Perceived Organizational Support Scale…

  11. Total Quality Management, Organizational Commitment, Perceived Organizational Support, and Intraorganizational Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Myria W.; Brady, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates positive claims about total quality management (TQM), comparing employee responses from an organization not implementing TQM with those from two organizations using TQM. Finds organizational commitment and perceived organizational support to be higher in TQM organizations, along with more positive employee-top management and coworker…

  12. Building organizational supports for research-minded practitioners.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Dal Santo, Teresa S; Lee, Chris

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing human service organizations is the proliferation of information from inside and outside the agency that needs to be managed if it is to be of use. The concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge can inform an approach to this challenge. Tacit knowledge is stored in the minds of practitioners (often called practice wisdom) and the explicit knowledge is often found in organizational procedure manuals and educational and training materials. Building on this perspective, this analysis provides a preliminary definition of research-minded practitioners by explicating the elements of curiosity, critical reflection, and critical thinking. The organizational implications of developing a cadre of research-minded practitioners include the commitment of top management to support "link officers", evidence request services, research and development units, and service standards. The challenges include the capacity to identify/support research-minded practitioners, promote an organizational culture of evidence-informed practice, redefine staff development and training, redefine job descriptions, and specify the nature of managerial leadership.

  13. Which Dominates? The Relative Importance of Work-Family Organizational Support and General Organizational Context on Employee Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behson, Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    Dominance analysis investigated the effects of organizational context and work-family organizational support on several outcomes for 147 employees. Work-family support contributes to job satisfaction and organizational commitment most strongly through its impact on work-family conflict. However, variance in employee affect is better explained by…

  14. The Effect of Organizational Justice and Perceived Organizational Support on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Organizational Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2015-01-01

    Problem of Study: Research on social exchange relationships does not take into account another vital component of organizational life--namely an individual's sense of belonging and identity. Organizational identification is one of the most crucial factors holding employees together and keeping them committed to the organization. Many studies…

  15. Exchange relationships: examining psychological contracts and perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M; Conway, Neil

    2005-07-01

    The authors surveyed 347 public sector employees on 4 measurement occasions to investigate the conceptual distinctiveness of the psychological contract and perceived organizational support (POS) and how they are associated over time. Results support the distinctiveness of the 2 concepts. In terms of their interrelationships over time, by drawing on psychological contract theory the authors found little support for a reciprocal relationship between POS and psychological contract fulfillment. Under an alternative set of hypotheses, by drawing on organizational support theory and by separating psychological contract fulfillment into its 2 components (perceived employer obligations and inducements), the authors found that perceived employer inducements were positively related to POS, which, in turn, was negatively related to perceived employer obligations. The results suggest that POS and the components of psychological contract fulfillment are more important in predicting organizational citizenship behavior than psychological contract fulfillment.

  16. Nurses' intentions to provide continuous labor support to women.

    PubMed

    Payant, Laura; Davies, Barbara; Graham, Ian D; Peterson, Wendy E; Clinch, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    To examine the determinants of nurses' intentions to practice continuous labor support. A descriptive survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. A large, urban Canadian hospital with 2 sites and 7,000 births per year. Ninety-seven registered nurses from 2 birthing units. Scores measuring nurses' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions regarding continuous labor support for women with epidural analgesia were significantly lower than those for women without epidural analgesia (p<.0001). Multiple regression analyses revealed that previous labor support courses, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control explained 55% of the variance in nurses' intentions to provide continuous labor support to women without epidural analgesia while 88% of the variance in intentions to provide continuous labor support to women with epidural analgesia was explained by subjective norms and attitudes. Subjective norms made the most significant contribution to the variance in nurses' intentions to provide continuous labor support. Top perceived organizational barriers to continuous labor support included unit acuity and method of patient assignment. Nurses' intentions to provide continuous labor support are lower for women receiving epidural analgesia and are influenced by the perceived social pressures on their unit. Nurses view organizational barriers as important factors influencing their ability to provide continuous labor support.

  17. Providing support to family members.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, Ruth; Dowd, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Providing recognition and simple information can be powerful and reassure a family member who is anxious and worried about an ill relative. While "answers" concerning the procedure are often not available, providing information that is available--the locations of the rest rooms and coffee shop; approximately how long the procedure will take; where to wait; and the process involved in the radiological procedure, reading and getting the results--can give some feeling of control, and thus reduce feelings of powerlessness. Most importantly, family members who are recognized and included with the patient in the treatment process will be reassured of the competency of the staff and gain hopefulness about the outcome of the diagnostic and treatment experience. And providing hope in the healthcare setting is a radiology professional's most important job.

  18. Organizational Strategies for End-User Computing Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmun, Robert R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Effective support for end users of computers has been an important issue in higher education from the first applications of general purpose mainframe computers through minicomputers, microcomputers, and supercomputers. The development of end user support is reviewed and organizational models are examined. (Author/MLW)

  19. Perceived military organizational support and peacekeeper distress: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J Ben; Nickerson, Angela; Adler, Amy B; Litz, Brett T

    2013-05-01

    Many professions vital to the safety of society require workers to face high magnitude and potentially traumatizing events. Because this routine exposure can cause high levels of stress in workers, it is important to investigate factors that contribute to both risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and healthy responses to stress. Although some research has found social support to mitigate the effects of posttraumatic stress symptoms, scant research has investigated organizational support. The aim of the present study is to investigate the temporal relationship between stress symptoms and perceived organizational support in a sample of 1,039 service members deployed to the peacekeeping mission to Kosovo. Participants completed self-report measures of stress symptoms and perceived organizational support at 4 study time points. Bivariate latent difference score structural equation modeling was utilized to examine the temporal relationship among stress and perceived organizational support. In general, across the 4 time points, latent PCL scores evidenced a salient and negative relationship to subsequent POS latent difference scores. However, no significant relationship was found between latent POS variables and subsequent PCL latent difference scores. Findings suggest that prior stress symptoms are influencing service member's perceptions of the supportiveness of their organization such that increased prior stress is associated with worsening perceptions of support. These results illustrate that targeting stress directly may potentiate the positive influence of organizational support and that institutional support programs should be adapted to better account for the negative biases increased distress may encourage. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Strategies for organizational change from group homes to individualized supports.

    PubMed

    Walker, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to transform. Although the approach taken by each organization was unique, there were also some common strategies, which included generating commitment to common values and mission, a turn or return to authentic person-centered planning, shifting power and control, using community supports and relationships, moving away from facility-based settings, and nurturing staff engagement. Ultimately, organizational change is an ongoing process that requires organizational perseverance and commitment.

  1. The Effect of Supportive Organizational Leadership, Organizational Socialization, and Satisfaction with Supervision on Turnover as Mediated by Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction in Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowhorn, Greg L.

    2009-01-01

    This study utilized a predictive, multivariate research design to test the relationship between three independent variables--supportive organizational leadership, organizational socialization, and satisfaction with supervision--and the dependent variable--turnover intent--as mediated by organizational commitment and job satisfaction. The…

  2. 24 CFR 92.302 - Housing education and organizational support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Housing education and organizational support. 92.302 Section 92.302 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Community Housing...

  3. Changing Group and Organizational Cultures To Support Healthy Lifestyles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    Group and organizational cultures play an important role in helping people to adopt healthier lifestyles. Culture can be assessed by looking at social expectations for behavior, called group norms. Cultural norms can be changed to support healthy lifestyles through a systematic and participatory process. Such a change effort would modify: (1)…

  4. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  5. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  6. Perceived Organizational Support: Further Evidence of Construct Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of scores from the Survey of Perceived Organizational Support (SPOS)(R. Eisenberger and others, 1986) using responses of 205 college faculty and staff members. Consistent with previous research, the SPOS was found to be unidimensional and distinguishable from two similarly…

  7. The organizational social context of mental health medicaid waiver programs with family support services: implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Peer family support specialists (FSS) are parents with practical experience in navigating children's mental health care systems who provide support, advocacy, and guidance to the families of children who need mental health services. Their experience and training differ from those of formally trained mental health clinicians, creating potential conflicts in priorities and values between FSS and clinicians. We hypothesized that these differences could negatively affect the organizational cultures and climates of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and mental health clinicians, and lower the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of FSS. The Organizational Social Context measure was administered on site to 209 FSS and clinicians in 21 mental health programs in New York State. The study compared the organizational-level culture and climate profiles of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and formally trained clinicians to national norms for child mental health clinics, assessed individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment as a function of job (FSS vs. clinician) and other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics, and tested whether FSS and clinicians job attitudes were differentially associated with organizational culture and climate. The programs organizational culture and climate profiles were not significantly different from national norms. Individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment were unrelated to position (FSS vs. clinician) or other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics except for culture and climate. Both FSS' and clinicians' individual-level work attitudes were associated similarly with organizational culture and climate.

  8. HIV health-care providers' burnout: can organizational culture make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ginossar, Tamar; Oetzel, John; Hill, Ricky; Avila, Magdalena; Archiopoli, Ashley; Wilcox, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing those working with people living with HIV (PLWH) is the increased potential for burnout, which results in increased turnover and reduces quality of care provided for PLWH. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship among HIV health-care providers' burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational culture including teamwork, involvement in decision-making, and critical appraisal. Health-care providers for PLWH (N = 47) in federally funded clinics in a southwestern state completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire about their perceptions of organizational culture and burnout. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that positive organizational culture (i.e., teamwork) was negatively related to emotional burnout (p < .005, R(2) = .18). Further negative organizational culture (i.e., critical appraisal) was positively related to depersonalization (p < .005, R(2) = .18). These findings suggest that effective organizational communication interventions might protect HIV health-care providers from burnout.

  9. Eldercare Demands, Strain, and Work Engagement: The Moderating Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Hannes; Winter, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Demographic changes give rise to an increasing number of middle-aged employees providing home-based care to an elderly family member. However, the potentially important role of employees' perceptions of organizational support for eldercare has so far not been investigated. The goal of this study was to examine a stressor-strain-outcome model…

  10. Using Hypertext Functionality To Provide Understanding Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davalos, Sergio

    1997-01-01

    Presents a computer-based information system developed to support information understanding based on knowledge structures in hypermedia contexts. Examines the development and implementation of an understanding support system (USS), providing computational support for representation and access of knowledge structures. Discusses adding link-based…

  11. Organizational strategies for promoting patient and provider uptake of personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susan; Rozenblum, Ronen; Park, Andrea; Dunn, Marie; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate organizational strategies to promote personal health records (PHRs) adoption with a focus on patients with chronic disease. Methods Using semi-structured interviews and a web-based survey, we sampled US health delivery organizations which had implemented PHRs for at least 12 months, were recognized as PHR innovators, and had scored highly in national patient satisfaction surveys. Respondents had lead positions for clinical information systems or high-risk population management. Using grounded theory approach, thematic categories were derived from interviews and coupled with data from the survey. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants from 16 identified organizations. Organizational strategies were directed towards raising patient awareness via multimedia communications, and provider acceptance and uptake. Strategies for providers were grouped into six main themes: organizational vision, governance and policies, work process redesign, staff training, information technology (IT) support, and monitoring and incentives. Successful organizations actively communicated their vision, engaged leaders at all levels, had clear governance, planning, and protocols, set targets, and celebrated achievement. The most effective strategy for patient uptake was through health professional encouragement. No specific outreach efforts targeted patients with chronic disease. Registration and PHR activity was routinely measured but without reference to a denominator population or high risk subpopulations. Discussion and conclusion Successful PHR implementation represents a social change and operational project catalyzed by a technical solution. The key to clinician acceptance is making their work easier. However, organizations will likely not achieve the value they want from PHRs unless they target specific populations and monitor their uptake. PMID:25326601

  12. Organizational strategies for promoting patient and provider uptake of personal health records.

    PubMed

    Wells, Susan; Rozenblum, Ronen; Park, Andrea; Dunn, Marie; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate organizational strategies to promote personal health records (PHRs) adoption with a focus on patients with chronic disease. Using semi-structured interviews and a web-based survey, we sampled US health delivery organizations which had implemented PHRs for at least 12 months, were recognized as PHR innovators, and had scored highly in national patient satisfaction surveys. Respondents had lead positions for clinical information systems or high-risk population management. Using grounded theory approach, thematic categories were derived from interviews and coupled with data from the survey. Interviews were conducted with 30 informants from 16 identified organizations. Organizational strategies were directed towards raising patient awareness via multimedia communications, and provider acceptance and uptake. Strategies for providers were grouped into six main themes: organizational vision, governance and policies, work process redesign, staff training, information technology (IT) support, and monitoring and incentives. Successful organizations actively communicated their vision, engaged leaders at all levels, had clear governance, planning, and protocols, set targets, and celebrated achievement. The most effective strategy for patient uptake was through health professional encouragement. No specific outreach efforts targeted patients with chronic disease. Registration and PHR activity was routinely measured but without reference to a denominator population or high risk subpopulations. Successful PHR implementation represents a social change and operational project catalyzed by a technical solution. The key to clinician acceptance is making their work easier. However, organizations will likely not achieve the value they want from PHRs unless they target specific populations and monitor their uptake. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  13. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sawitzky, Angelina C.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice. PMID:17183411

  14. Assessing the effects of pharmacists' perceived organizational support, organizational commitment and turnover intention on provision of medication information at community pharmacies in Lithuania: a structural equation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Kubilienė, Loreta; Kubilius, Raimondas; Urbonienė, Aušra

    2015-03-01

    As a member of a pharmacy organization, a pharmacist is not only bound to fulfill his/her professional obligations but is also affected by different personal and organizational factors that may influence his/her behavior and, consequently, the quality of the services he/she provides to patients. The main purpose of the research was to test a hypothesized model of the relationships among several organizational variables, and to investigate whether any of these variables affects the service of provision of medication information at community pharmacies. During the survey, pharmacists working at community pharmacies in Lithuania were asked to express their opinions on the community pharmacies at which they worked and to reflect on their actions when providing information on medicines to their patients. The statistical data were analyzed by applying a structural equation modeling technique to test the hypothesized model of the relationships among the variables of Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment, Turnover Intention, and Provision of Medication Information. The final model revealed that Organizational Commitment had a positive direct effect on Provision of Medication Information (standardized estimate = 0.27) and a negative direct effect (standardized estimate = -0.66) on Turnover Intention. Organizational Commitment mediated the indirect effects of Perceived Organizational Support on Turnover Intention (standardized estimate = -0.48) and on Provision of Medication Information (standardized estimate = 0.20). Pharmacists' Turnover Intention had no significant effect on Provision of Medication Information. Community pharmacies may be viewed as encouraging, to some extent, the service of provision of medication information. Pharmacists who felt higher levels of support from their organizations also expressed, to a certain extent, higher commitment to their organizations by providing more consistent medication information to patients. However, the

  15. Perceived Organizational Support for Enhancing Welfare at Work: A Regression Tree Model.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Dubin, David; Perez, Javier Fiz

    2016-01-01

    When trying to examine outcomes such as welfare and well-being, research tends to focus on main effects and take into account limited numbers of variables at a time. There are a number of techniques that may help address this problem. For example, many statistical packages available in R provide easy-to-use methods of modeling complicated analysis such as classification and tree regression (i.e., recursive partitioning). The present research illustrates the value of recursive partitioning in the prediction of perceived organizational support in a sample of more than 6000 Italian bankers. Utilizing the tree function party package in R, we estimated a regression tree model predicting perceived organizational support from a multitude of job characteristics including job demand, lack of job control, lack of supervisor support, training, etc. The resulting model appears particularly helpful in pointing out several interactions in the prediction of perceived organizational support. In particular, training is the dominant factor. Another dimension that seems to influence organizational support is reporting (perceived communication about safety and stress concerns). Results are discussed from a theoretical and methodological point of view.

  16. Perceived Organizational Support for Enhancing Welfare at Work: A Regression Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Dubin, David; Perez, Javier Fiz

    2016-01-01

    When trying to examine outcomes such as welfare and well-being, research tends to focus on main effects and take into account limited numbers of variables at a time. There are a number of techniques that may help address this problem. For example, many statistical packages available in R provide easy-to-use methods of modeling complicated analysis such as classification and tree regression (i.e., recursive partitioning). The present research illustrates the value of recursive partitioning in the prediction of perceived organizational support in a sample of more than 6000 Italian bankers. Utilizing the tree function party package in R, we estimated a regression tree model predicting perceived organizational support from a multitude of job characteristics including job demand, lack of job control, lack of supervisor support, training, etc. The resulting model appears particularly helpful in pointing out several interactions in the prediction of perceived organizational support. In particular, training is the dominant factor. Another dimension that seems to influence organizational support is reporting (perceived communication about safety and stress concerns). Results are discussed from a theoretical and methodological point of view. PMID:28082924

  17. The Organizational Social Context of Mental Health Medicaid Waiver Programs with Family Support Services: Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J.; Green, Philip; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peer family support specialists (FSS) are parents with practical experience in navigating children’s mental health care systems who provide support, advocacy and guidance to the families of children who need mental health services. Their experience and training differ from those of formally trained mental health clinicians, creating potential conflicts in priorities and values between FSS and clinicians. We hypothesized that these differences could negatively affect the organizational cultures and climates of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and mental health clinicians, and lower the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of FSS. Method The Organizational Social Context (OSC) measure was administered on site to 209 FSS and clinicians in 21 mental health programs in New York State. The study compared the organizational-level culture and climate profiles of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and formally trained clinicians to national norms for child mental health clinics, assessed individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment as a function of job (FSS vs. clinician) and other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics, and tested whether FSS and clinicians’ job attitudes are differentially associated with organizational culture and climate. Results The programs’ organizational culture and climate profiles were not significantly different from national norms. Individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment were unrelated to position (FSS vs. clinician) or other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics except for culture and climate. Conclusions Organizational culture and climate are not related to the employment of FSS. Both FSS’ and clinicians’ individual-level work attitudes are associated similarly with organizational culture and climate. PMID:24065458

  18. How an Intranet Provides Opportunities for Learning Organizational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Elisabeth E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a qualitative case study that addresses how an intranet can provide opportunities for learning about an organization's culture. Four primary findings are discussed with the study concluding that cultural knowledge is conveyed and renewed through an intranet in a learning process that emphasizes informal learning and…

  19. Providing support to siblings of hospitalised children.

    PubMed

    Newton, Amanda S; Wolgemuth, Amy; Gallivan, Jennifer; Wrightson, Dawn

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child life services provided to siblings of hospitalised children and the resources associated with these services in major paediatric hospitals throughout the United States (U.S.) and Canada. Cross-sectional data on sibling support services and resources needed for capacity building were collected via a web-based survey from administrative and clinical practice leads in identified Child Life Departments. The 34-item survey targeted three domains: Facility Demography, Sibling Support Resources, and Capacity Building and Funding. Surveys were sent to 217 leads and 109 responded (50% response rate). Of the 109 respondents, 48% indicated their facilities provided sibling support including grief or palliative support (90% of facilities) and therapeutic play (94% of facilities). More than 50% indicated that these services were not evaluated for improved family or sibling outcomes. Twenty-six percent of the respondents indicated having monies earmarked for sibling support from the following sources: hospital budget (34%), private donation (25%), foundation (22%), other (14%) and government (4%). There was a significant relationship between respondents who indicated sibling support services and funding (chi(2)= 0.0001). Resources identified included staff availability and funding as needed for sibling support capacity building. Given the limited sibling support available in major paediatric hospitals across the U.S. and Canada, hospitals with existing resources should act as exemplars and evaluate the impact of their services with clear dissemination to other facilities. In addition to defining service effectiveness, this evaluation can help to determine the most fiscally responsible ways to deliver sibling support in their established facilities and others.

  20. The role of fair treatment and rewards in perceptions of organizational support and leader-member exchange.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Sandy J; Shore, Lynn M; Bommer, William H; Tetrick, Lois E

    2002-06-01

    This study examined a model of the antecedents and consequences of perceived organizational support (POS) and leader-member exchange (LMX). It was predicted that organizational justice (procedural and distributive justice) and organizational practices that provide recognition to the employee (feelings of inclusion and recognition from upper management) would influence POS. For LMX, it was predicted that leader reward (distributive justice and contingent rewards) and punishment behavior would be important antecedents. Results based on a sample of 211 employee-supervisor dyads indicated that organizational justice, inclusion, and recognition were related to POS and contingent rewards were related to LMX. In terms of consequences, POS was related to employee commitment and organizational citizenship behavior, whereas LMX predicted performance ratings.

  1. The Key to Unit Effectiveness - A Supportive Organizational Climate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-16

    have been numerous studies, books and articles that have directly examined the topics of Army Culture, organizational climate , leadership and... organizational climate and the impact that culture and climate have on organizational effectiveness. Fewer still have focused on determining how best to select

  2. Influences on Employee Perceptions of Organizational Work-Life Support: Signals and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcour, Monique; Ollier-Malaterre, Ariane; Matz-Costa, Christina; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Brown, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictors of employee perceptions of organizational work-life support. Using organizational support theory and conservation of resources theory, we reasoned that workplace demands and resources shape employees' perceptions of work-life support through two mechanisms: signaling that the organization cares about their work-life…

  3. The Relative Contribution of Formal and Informal Organizational Work-Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behson, Scott J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work-family research has proposed that informal means of organizational work-family support (e.g., managerial support) are more useful than formal means of organizational work-family support (e.g., work-family benefit availability) in explaining variance in employee affective, intentional, and behavioral outcomes. However, the relative…

  4. Influences on Employee Perceptions of Organizational Work-Life Support: Signals and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcour, Monique; Ollier-Malaterre, Ariane; Matz-Costa, Christina; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Brown, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined predictors of employee perceptions of organizational work-life support. Using organizational support theory and conservation of resources theory, we reasoned that workplace demands and resources shape employees' perceptions of work-life support through two mechanisms: signaling that the organization cares about their work-life…

  5. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A; Dulmus, Catherine N; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the working conditions in programs that currently use ESTs. METHOD: This study compared the culture and climate scores of a large organization's programs that use ESTs and those programs indicating no EST usage. RESULTS: Of the total 55 different programs (1,273 frontline workers), 27 programs used ESTs. Results indicate that the programs offering an EST had significantly more rigid and resistant cultures, compared to those without any ESTs. In regard to climate, programs offering an EST were significantly less engaged, less functional, and more stressed. CONCLUSION: Outcomes indicate a significant disruption in organizational culture and climate for programs offering ESTs.

  6. Exploring relationships among anger, perceived organizational support, and workplace outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Olivia A; Vandenberg, Robert J; Dejoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G

    2009-07-01

    The present study examines anger within a perceived organizational support (POS) theory framework. Using structural equation modeling, the authors explored relationships among POS, anger, and workplace outcomes in a sample of 1,136 employees in 21 stores of a U.S. retail organization. At both individual and store levels, low POS was directly associated with greater anger. At the individual level, anger partially mediated relationships among low POS and turnover intentions, absences, and accidents on the job. Anger had direct and indirect effects on alcohol consumption and health-related risk taking. At the store level, anger had direct negative effects on inventory loss and turnover. The authors interpret these findings in light of social exchange theory and emotion regulation theory.

  7. Mental health nursing in Jordan: an investigation into experience, work stress and organizational support.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas; Puskar, Kathryn; Yacoub, Mohammad; Marini, Anita

    2011-04-01

    Changes in mental health services have an impact on the role and practice of mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' experiences of providing mental health care, their work-related stress, and organizational support received. A descriptive correlation design was used. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. The result of this study revealed that mental health nurses shared a high level of agreement on the importance of most nursing tasks. Mental health nurses reported a moderate level of stress, with a lack of resources and relationship and conflict with other professionals being the most frequent stressors. Nurses perceived a low level of support for their work from their supervisors. Work stress and conflict with other professionals had a significant, negative correlation with the perception the nurses had of their immediate supervisors (r = -0.29, P < 0.001; r = -0.31, P < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between work stress, organizational support, and the nurses' age, sex, or level of education. This study has clinical implications in terms of developing strategies for reducing stress and improving organizational support among mental health nurses, and it should help in future research.

  8. Graduating to Postdoc: Information-Sharing in Support of Organizational Structures and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Lucas, Paul J.; Compton, Michael M.; Stewart, Helen J.; Baya, Vinod; DelAlto, Martha

    1999-01-01

    The deployment of information-sharing systems in large organizations can significantly impact existing policies and procedures with regard to authority and control over information. Unless information-sharing systems explicitly support organizational structures and needs, these systems will be rejected summarily. The Postdoc system is a deployed Web-based information-sharing system created specifically to address organizational needs. Postdoc contains various organizational support features including a shared, globally navigable document space, as well as specialized access control, distributed administration, and mailing list features built around the key notion of hierarchical group structures. We review successes and difficulties in supporting organizational needs with Postdoc

  9. Working together? Organizational and market determinants of collaboration between public health and medical care providers.

    PubMed

    Halverson, P K; Mays, G P; Kaluzny, A D

    2000-12-01

    This study examines organizational characteristics and market conditions likely to influence collaborative relationships between public health agencies and community medical care providers. Public health directors in 60 US counties were surveyed by telephone concerning their relationships with area community hospitals (n = 263) and community health centers (n = 85). Multivariate models were used to estimate the effects of organizational and market characteristics on collaboration. Collaboration was reported among 55% of the hospitals and 64% of the health centers. Certain forms of collaboration were more likely in markets characterized by higher HMO penetration and lower HMO competition. Targeted efforts to facilitate collaboration may be required in settings where institutional and market incentives are lacking.

  10. Procedural justice, supervisor autonomy support, work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance: the mediating role of need satisfaction and perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Nicolas; Colombat, Philippe; Michinov, Estelle; Pronost, Anne-Marie; Fouquereau, Evelyne

    2013-11-01

    To test a model linking procedural justice, supervisor autonomy support, need satisfaction, organizational support, work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. Research in industrial and organizational psychology has shown that procedural justice and supervisor autonomy support lead to positive outcomes. However, very little research related to this subject has been conducted in healthcare settings. Moreover, few studies have examined mechanisms that could account for these positive relationships. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. Convenience sampling was used and a sample of 500 nurses working in haematology, oncology and haematology/oncology units in France was surveyed in 2011. The final sample consisted of 323 nurses (64.6% response rate). The hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modelling. Procedural justice and supervisor autonomy support significantly and positively influenced need satisfaction and perceived organizational support, which in turn positively predicted work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. Organizations could deliver training programmes for their managers aimed at enhancing the use of fair procedures in allocating outcomes and developing their autonomy-supportive behaviours to improve nurses' work satisfaction, organizational identification and job performance. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Translating research into practice: organizational issues in implementing automated decision support for hypertension in three medical centers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Mary K; Coleman, Robert W; Tu, Samson W; Shankar, Ravi D; O'Connor, Martin J; Musen, Mark A; Martins, Susana B; Lavori, Philip W; Shlipak, Michael G; Oddone, Eugene; Advani, Aneel A; Gholami, Parisa; Hoffman, Brian B

    2004-01-01

    Information technology can support the implementation of clinical research findings in practice settings. Technology can address the quality gap in health care by providing automated decision support to clinicians that integrates guideline knowledge with electronic patient data to present real-time, patient-specific recommendations. However, technical success in implementing decision support systems may not translate directly into system use by clinicians. Successful technology integration into clinical work settings requires explicit attention to the organizational context. We describe the application of a "sociotechnical" approach to integration of ATHENA DSS, a decision support system for the treatment of hypertension, into geographically dispersed primary care clinics. We applied an iterative technical design in response to organizational input and obtained ongoing endorsements of the project by the organization's administrative and clinical leadership. Conscious attention to organizational context at the time of development, deployment, and maintenance of the system was associated with extensive clinician use of the system.

  12. Quality Indicators for Family Support Services and Their Relationship to Organizational Social Context

    PubMed Central

    Olin, S. Serene; Williams, Nate; Pollock, Michele; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Kutash, Krista; Glisson, Charles; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2013-01-01

    Quality measurement is an important component of healthcare reform. The relationship of quality indicators (QIs) for parent-delivered family support services to organizational social contexts known to improve quality is unexamined. This study employs data collected from 21 child mental health programs that deliver team-based family support services. Performance on two levels of QIs —those targeting the program and staff -- were significantly associated with organizational social context profiles and dimensions. High quality program policies are associated with positive organizational cultures and engaging climates. Inappropriate staff practices are associated with resistant cultures. Implications for organizational strategies to improve service quality are discussed. PMID:23709286

  13. Relationships among organizational family support, job autonomy, perceived control, and employee well-being.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cynthia A; Prottas, David J

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyzed data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (N = 3,504) to investigate relationships among availability of formal organizational family support (family benefits and alternative schedules), job autonomy, informal organizational support (work-family culture, supervisor support, and coworker support), perceived control, and employee attitudes and well-being. Using hierarchical regression, the authors found that the availability of family benefits was associated with stress, life satisfaction, and turnover intentions, and the availability of alternative schedules was not related to any of the outcomes. Job autonomy and informal organizational support were associated with almost all the outcomes, including positive spillover. Perceived control mediated most of the relationships.

  14. Job attitudes among workers with disabilities: The importance of family support in addition to organizational support.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Vanesa; Alcover, Carlos-María; Chambel, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    In the case of workers with disabilities, family support is often essential to gain access to the labor market and achieve personal autonomy and financial independence, in addition to fostering job satisfaction and permanence in the organization. Moreover, the support offered by organizations is particularly valued by workers with disabilities, as the organizations that hire such people generally go to considerable lengths to ensure their adaptation and integration in the workplace, contributing to job satisfaction and permanence in the organization. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between organizational support and family support with job satisfaction and intention to quit the organization among workers with disabilities employed in ordinary firms. Our study surveyed 204 workers using a questionnaire, and we used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analyses to test these relationships. Our results show that organizational support is a significant explanatory factor in the levels of job satisfaction. Moreover, our results indicate that the participants perceived high levels of support from their families, facilitating the conciliation of work and family life. Our results have practical implications in order to improve full integration and normalization of workers with disabilities in ordinary jobs.

  15. Organizational Domains and Variation in Attitudes of Intensive Care Providers Toward the ABCDE Bundle.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Leanne M; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik; Mion, Lorraine C

    2017-05-01

    The ABCDE interprofessional bundle (Awakening and Breathing Coordination, Delirium monitoring and management, and Early mobility) reduces delirium and weakness in critically ill patients. To understand the relationship between organizational domains and provider attitudes. A 1-time electronic survey of 315 care providers in 10 intensive care units across the country to examine associations between organizational domains (policy/protocol factors, unit milieu, tasks, labor quality, labor quantity, and physical environment) and provider attitudes about perceived ease of completion, perceived safety, confidence, and perceived strength of evidence regarding the ABCDE bundle. Spearman correlations (rs) were used to examine the associations between organizational domains and provider attitude subscales (rs ≥ 0.32 was considered clinically important). Protocol attributes (rs = 0.37-0.58), role clarity (rs = 0.38-0.59), training/understanding (rs = 0.33-0.46), coordination (rs = 0.32-0.46), and peer advocates (rs = 0.37-0.48) were associated with less difficulty performing the bundle and better confidence, perceived safety, and strength of evidence. Participants also reported less difficulty carrying out the bundle when the team worked well together. Task autonomy was associated with better perceived safety (rs = 0.35) and confidence (rs = 0.47) related to the bundle. Focusing interventions on policy and protocol factors, unit milieu, and task autonomy, which have the strongest associations with providers' attitudes, may facilitate ABCDE bundle uptake. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Antecedents of organizational engagement: exploring vision, mood and perceived organizational support with emotional intelligence as a moderator

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Edward G.; Taylor, Scott N.; Boyatzis, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    As organizational leaders worry about the appalling low percentage of people who feel engaged in their work, academics are trying to understand what causes an increase in engagement. We collected survey data from 231 team members from two organizations. We examined the impact of team members’ emotional intelligence (EI) and their perception of shared personal vision, shared positive mood, and perceived organizational support (POS) on the members’ degree of organizational engagement. We found shared vision, shared mood, and POS have a direct, positive association with engagement. In addition, shared vision and POS interact with EI to positively influence engagement. Besides highlighting the importance of shared personal vision, positive mood, and POS, our study contributes to the emergent understanding of EI by revealing EI’s amplifying effect on shared vision and POS in relation to engagement. We conclude by discussing the research and practical implications of this study. PMID:25477845

  17. Providing R-Tree Support for Mongodb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Longgang; Shao, Xiaotian; Wang, Dehao

    2016-06-01

    Supporting large amounts of spatial data is a significant characteristic of modern databases. However, unlike some mature relational databases, such as Oracle and PostgreSQL, most of current burgeoning NoSQL databases are not well designed for storing geospatial data, which is becoming increasingly important in various fields. In this paper, we propose a novel method to provide R-tree index, as well as corresponding spatial range query and nearest neighbour query functions, for MongoDB, one of the most prevalent NoSQL databases. First, after in-depth analysis of MongoDB's features, we devise an efficient tabular document structure which flattens R-tree index into MongoDB collections. Further, relevant mechanisms of R-tree operations are issued, and then we discuss in detail how to integrate R-tree into MongoDB. Finally, we present the experimental results which show that our proposed method out-performs the built-in spatial index of MongoDB. Our research will greatly facilitate big data management issues with MongoDB in a variety of geospatial information applications.

  18. Impact of Teachers' Perceptions of Organizational Support, Management Openness and Personality Traits on Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Sahin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the impact of perceived organizational support and management openness and teacher personality traits on teacher voice. Voice is defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions or concerns about work-related issues with the intent to improve organizational functioning. Sample of the study…

  19. Impact of Teachers' Perceptions of Organizational Support, Management Openness and Personality Traits on Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Sahin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the impact of perceived organizational support and management openness and teacher personality traits on teacher voice. Voice is defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions or concerns about work-related issues with the intent to improve organizational functioning. Sample of the study…

  20. An Ontology to Support the Classification of Learning Material in an Organizational Learning Environment: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valaski, Joselaine; Reinehr, Sheila; Malucelli, Andreia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material classification in a specific knowledge area. Design/methodology/approach: An ontology for recommending learning material was integrated in the organizational learning environment…

  1. Protean and Boundaryless Career Attitudes and Organizational Commitment: The Effects of Perceived Supervisor Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakmak-Otluoglu, K. Ovgu

    2012-01-01

    Despite the traditional sentiment that protean and boundaryless career attitudes indicate a decline in organizational commitment, little empirical evidence is available. The present study examined the relation of protean and boundaryless career attitudes to organizational commitment and whether the perceived supervisor support moderated these…

  2. Investigation of Organizational Interaction and Support in an NGO through Computer-Mediated Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Chang, Yao-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Discussion forums have been used to support organizational communication and they have become a candidate for study of organizational behaviors. However, online behaviors of NGOs have been insufficiently studied compared to those studies conducted in education and industries. Our empirical study examined how social workers in one NGO used an…

  3. Protean and Boundaryless Career Attitudes and Organizational Commitment: The Effects of Perceived Supervisor Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakmak-Otluoglu, K. Ovgu

    2012-01-01

    Despite the traditional sentiment that protean and boundaryless career attitudes indicate a decline in organizational commitment, little empirical evidence is available. The present study examined the relation of protean and boundaryless career attitudes to organizational commitment and whether the perceived supervisor support moderated these…

  4. Perceived organizational support and job involvement in the Iranian health care system: A case study of emergency room nurses in general hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Etemadi, Manal; Hoseini, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Researchers believe that there are social exchanges between the employers and employees, because the employees would be interested in their organization and trust it based on how the organization values them and their welfare, comfort, and security. This belief is known as perceived organizational support that makes employees consider themselves as a part of their organization and have a commitment to it. The literature review is very limited in both variables in Iran and thus few studies also report the perceived organizational support and job involvement at the lower levels in our country. This research aimed at studying the levels of perceived organizational support and job involvement, relationship between this two, and the demographic factors relationship with both of them. Materials and Methods: This research was a descriptive analytical study conducted in 2012. The population included 123 emergency nurses in General Hospitals of Qom. Data were collected through Perceived Organizational Support and Job Involvement Questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation and Chi-square test. Results: Both mean scores for perceived organizational support and job involvement were in average level, 146/12 and 35/38, respectively. There was a significant relationship between perceived organizational support and age, education, tenure, organizational position, and job shift. There was also a significant relationship between job involvement and age and education and finally between perceived organizational support and job involvement (P = 0/029). Discussion: The high correlation between perceived organizational support and job involvement indicates that the improvement of perceived organizational support are necessary through motivating the employees, showing interest in them, paying attention to them, respecting them, and providing development opportunity in the organization. These should be always

  5. Perceived organizational support and job involvement in the Iranian health care system: A case study of emergency room nurses in general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Etemadi, Manal; Hoseini, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Researchers believe that there are social exchanges between the employers and employees, because the employees would be interested in their organization and trust it based on how the organization values them and their welfare, comfort, and security. This belief is known as perceived organizational support that makes employees consider themselves as a part of their organization and have a commitment to it. The literature review is very limited in both variables in Iran and thus few studies also report the perceived organizational support and job involvement at the lower levels in our country. This research aimed at studying the levels of perceived organizational support and job involvement, relationship between this two, and the demographic factors relationship with both of them. This research was a descriptive analytical study conducted in 2012. The population included 123 emergency nurses in General Hospitals of Qom. Data were collected through Perceived Organizational Support and Job Involvement Questionnaires and analyzed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation and Chi-square test. Both mean scores for perceived organizational support and job involvement were in average level, 146/12 and 35/38, respectively. There was a significant relationship between perceived organizational support and age, education, tenure, organizational position, and job shift. There was also a significant relationship between job involvement and age and education and finally between perceived organizational support and job involvement (P = 0/029). The high correlation between perceived organizational support and job involvement indicates that the improvement of perceived organizational support are necessary through motivating the employees, showing interest in them, paying attention to them, respecting them, and providing development opportunity in the organization. These should be always considered by managers to improve job involvement.

  6. Providing comfort and support to older people.

    PubMed

    Triggle, Nick

    2012-10-01

    This article reports on a scheme run by Age UK at Hillingdon Hospital, Middlesex, to help support emergency department (ED) staff with the care of older people. The A&E support-worker team assists patients with non-clinical activities, such as going to the toilet, eating meals and finding out care-related information. The support-worker scheme has been running for nine years and its success has prompted Age UK to consider expanding it nationally. It comes at a time when there is a growing focus on the care Solder patients receive in hospitals.

  7. Changing dynamics in the Canadian voluntary sector: challenges in sustaining organizational capacity to support healthy communities.

    PubMed

    Steedman, Eric; Rabinowicz, Jane

    2006-11-01

    The voluntary sector is recognized, by citizens, industry and government, as an increasingly vital contributor to healthy communities within Canadian society, called upon to provide front-line service delivery in areas of community support that were in the past often served by government and or religious charity. (The voluntary sector is large, consisting of an estimated 180,000 non-profit organizations [of which 80,000 are registered as charities] and hundreds of thousands more volunteer groups that are not incorporated [Statistics Canada, 2002].) The dynamics of the sector have changed considerably over the past decade, as government has pulled back the level of core organizational funding support and the role of the church has diminished. As community health is directly related to the organizational health of service-providing non-profits and charities, these organizations are looking increasingly towards corporate and individual donors, along with new self-financing approaches that generate revenues. They are also facing challenges in attracting and retaining skilled and motivated volunteers. As the scope of the voluntary sector and its overall influence grows, so do the organizational and financial challenges it faces. This article will address in particular the issue of funding support for healthy communities and examine a number of potential and existing best practices for sustaining community health in Canada. We will also look at the issue of volunteerism and human resource capacity challenges for organizations. This is an area in which the Canadian government has decided to focus as a result of explicit policy decisions taken in the late 1990s.

  8. Reducing the adverse consequences of workplace aggression and violence: the buffering effects of organizational support.

    PubMed

    Schat, Aaron C H; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2003-04-01

    This study examined the buffering effects of 2 types of organizational support--instrumental and informational--on the relationships between workplace violence/aggression and both personal and organizational outcomes. Based on data from 225 employees in a health care setting, a series of moderated multiple regression analyses demonstrated that organizational support moderated the effects of physical violence, vicariously experienced violence, and psychological aggression on emotional well-being, somatic health, and job-related affect, but not on fear of future workplace violence and job neglect. These findings have implications for both research and intervention related to workplace violence.

  9. Organizational Support of Technology Integration in One School in Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgheib, Rosine S.

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been at the center of heated debates in educational settings driving schools to compete for the best technological equipments. However, in Lebanon there is a lag in technology integration matching twenty first century advances. Several barriers related to teacher attitudes, lack of technical skills and organizational constraints to…

  10. Organizational Support of Technology Integration in One School in Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zgheib, Rosine S.

    2013-01-01

    Technology has been at the center of heated debates in educational settings driving schools to compete for the best technological equipments. However, in Lebanon there is a lag in technology integration matching twenty first century advances. Several barriers related to teacher attitudes, lack of technical skills and organizational constraints to…

  11. Assessing Institutional Support for Service-Learning: A Case Study of Organizational Sensemaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Scott A.; Pawlowski, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an example of how institutional service-learning assessment data can be used to drive organizational change. Furco's (1999) self-assessment rubric for the institutionalization of service-learning in higher education is used in modified form as the instrument through which organizational-level assessments were made. The process…

  12. Perceived supervisor support: contributions to perceived organizational support and employee retention.

    PubMed

    Eisenberger, Robert; Stinglhamber, Florence; Vandenberghe, Christian; Sucharski, Ivan L; Rhoades, Linda

    2002-06-01

    Three studies investigated the relationships among employees' perception of supervisor support (PSS), perceived organizational support (POS), and employee turnover. Study 1 found, with 314 employees drawn from a variety of organizations, that PSS was positively related to temporal change in POS, suggesting that PSS leads to POS. Study 2 established, with 300 retail sales employees, that the PSS-POS relationship increased with perceived supervisor status in the organization. Study 3 found, with 493 retail sales employees, evidence consistent with the view that POS completely mediated a negative relationship between PSS and employee turnover. These studies suggest that supervisors, to the extent that they are identified with the organization, contribute to POS and, ultimately, to job retention.

  13. Providing Support for English Language Learner Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Elia; Armour, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Encouraging literacy and academic success among English language learners (ELLs) is becoming an increasingly common challenge for educators. In the course of the authors work of training teachers or providing training for implementation of materials, they have found that the resources of the school library media center are invaluable for helping…

  14. In Providing Supports for Students, Language Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Lee Ann

    2017-01-01

    What's the difference between accommodations and modifications, and why does the distinction matter? In this article, professor Lee Ann Jung explains that accommodations "provide access to the general curriculum but do not fundamentally alter the learning goal or grade level standard." For instance, if the purpose of an assessment is to…

  15. Air Systems Provide Life Support to Miners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Through a Space Act Agreement with Johnson Space Center, Paragon Space Development Corporation, of Tucson, Arizona, developed the Commercial Crew Transport-Air Revitalization System, designed to provide clean air for crewmembers on short-duration space flights. The technology is now being used to help save miners' lives in the event of an underground disaster.

  16. Providing Support for English Language Learner Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Elia; Armour, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Encouraging literacy and academic success among English language learners (ELLs) is becoming an increasingly common challenge for educators. In the course of the authors work of training teachers or providing training for implementation of materials, they have found that the resources of the school library media center are invaluable for helping…

  17. The influence of supervisor support, peer support, and Organizational culture among early career social workers in Child Welfare Services.

    PubMed

    Chenot, David; Benton, Amy D; Kim, Hansung

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that those who are in the first years of Child Welfare Services (CWS) employment are at particularly high risk for turnover. This study explored how the effects of support and organizational culture on retention (as the antidote for turnover) vary across different stages of CWS careers. A sample of 767 workers was divided into subgroups based on their years in CWS. A series of multilevel models were used to examine the differences between the groups. Findings include the crucial role supervisor support plays in retaining workers not only in their agencies, but in the field of CWS. In addition, passive defensive organizational culture has a negative effect on early career workers, but not on mid or late career workers. This suggests that a unique sensitivity to passive defensive organizational cultures exists early in CWS workers' careers that appears to dissipate over time. Implications for organizational practices are discussed.

  18. Antecedents and outcomes of organizational support for development: the critical role of career opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kraimer, Maria L; Seibert, Scott E; Wayne, Sandy J; Liden, Robert C; Bravo, Jesus

    2011-05-01

    This study examines antecedents and behavioral outcomes of employees' perceptions of organizational support for development. We first propose that employees' past participation in formal developmental activities and experience with developmental relationships positively relate to their perceptions of organizational support for development. We then propose that perceived career opportunity within the organization moderates the relationship between organizational support for development and employee performance and turnover. Using a sample of 264 exempt-level employees and their supervisors, we found that participation in training classes, leader-member exchange, and career mentoring were each positively related to employees' perceptions of organizational support for development. We also found support for the moderator hypotheses. Specifically, development support positively related to job performance, but only when perceived career opportunity within the organization was high. Further, development support was associated with reduced voluntary turnover when perceived career opportunity was high, but it was associated with increased turnover when perceived career opportunity was low. Our study demonstrates that social exchange and career motivation theory work together to explain when and how employees' perceptions of organizational support for development relate to turnover and job performance.

  19. Organizational principles of cloud storage to support collaborative biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, Lara J; Shalish, Wissam; Robles-Rubio, Carlos A; Precup, Doina; Brown, Karen; Sant'Anna, Guilherme M; Kearney, Robert E

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes organizational guidelines and an anonymization protocol for the management of sensitive information in interdisciplinary, multi-institutional studies with multiple collaborators. This protocol is flexible, automated, and suitable for use in cloud-based projects as well as for publication of supplementary information in journal papers. A sample implementation of the anonymization protocol is illustrated for an ongoing study dealing with Automated Prediction of EXtubation readiness (APEX).

  20. Performance Support Engineering: An Emerging Development Methodology for Enabling Organizational Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybould, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of electronic performance support systems (EPSS) focuses on performance support engineering and its role in designing performance support systems. Highlights include the organizational performance/learning cycle model; a systems approach to EPSS; computer-based training and other EPSS methodologies; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  1. Social Support Reciprocity and Occupational Self-Efficacy Beliefs during Mothers' Organizational Re-Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeckel, Dalit; Seiger, Christine P.; Orth, Ulrich; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the effects of a lack of social support reciprocity at work on employees' occupational self-efficacy beliefs. We assume that the self-efficacy effects of received support and support reciprocity depend on the specific work context (e.g., phase in the process of organizational socialization). 297 women who returned to…

  2. Social Support Reciprocity and Occupational Self-Efficacy Beliefs during Mothers' Organizational Re-Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeckel, Dalit; Seiger, Christine P.; Orth, Ulrich; Wiese, Bettina S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study assesses the effects of a lack of social support reciprocity at work on employees' occupational self-efficacy beliefs. We assume that the self-efficacy effects of received support and support reciprocity depend on the specific work context (e.g., phase in the process of organizational socialization). 297 women who returned to…

  3. Organizational analysis of Canadian supported employment programs for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Menear, Matthew; Reinharz, Daniel; Corbière, Marc; Houle, Nathalie; Lanctôt, Nathalie; Goering, Paula; Goldner, Elliot M; Kirsh, Bonnie; Lecomte, Tania

    2011-04-01

    Supported employment (SE) is widely considered to be the most effective intervention for helping people with psychiatric disabilities integrate into the competitive workforce. While fidelity to principles and standards of evidence-based SE, i.e., the Individual Placement and Support model, is positively associated with vocational outcomes, studies have revealed significant heterogeneity in SE programs implemented in Canada. This qualitative study thus aimed to shed light on organizational and contextual factors influencing SE implementation in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec). The study adopted several key concepts from the field of organizational studies (e.g., coalitions, archetypes, isomorphism) to guide data collection and analysis. Overall, 20 SE programs provided by 15 different agencies were examined. Findings revealed that agencies' exposure to different institutional pressures, their interactions and relationships with other groups and organizations, as well as their values, beliefs and ideologies played determining roles in shaping the evolution of SE services in each province. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of regular and contractual primary health care providers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Mehra, Anu; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Motivated and committed employees deliver better health care, which results in better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction. To assess the Organizational Commitment and Intrinsic Motivation of Primary Health Care Providers (HCPs) in New Delhi, India. Study was conducted in 2013 on a sample of 333 HCPs who were selected using multistage stage random sampling technique. The sample includes medical officers, auxiliary nurses and midwives, and pharmacists and laboratory technicians/assistants among regular and contractual staff. Data were collected using the pretested structured questionnaire for organization commitment (OC), job satisfiers, and intrinsic job motivation. Analysis was done by using SPSS version 18 and appropriate statistical tests were applied. The mean score for OC for entire regular staff is 1.6 ± 0.39 and contractual staff is 1.3 ± 0.45 which has statistically significant difference (t = 5.57; P = 0.00). In both regular and contractual staff, none of them show high emotional attachment with the organization and does not feel part of the family in the organization. Contractual staff does not feel proud to work in a present organization for rest of their career. Intrinsic motivation is high in both regular and contractual groups but intergroup difference is significant (t = 2.38; P < 0.05). Contractual staff has more dissatisfier than regular, and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of contractual staff are lesser than the permanent staff. Appropriate changes are required in the predictors of organizational commitment and factors responsible for satisfaction in the organization to keep the contractual human resource motivated and committed to the organization.

  5. Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of regular and contractual primary health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Mehra, Anu; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Motivated and committed employees deliver better health care, which results in better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction. Objective: To assess the Organizational Commitment and Intrinsic Motivation of Primary Health Care Providers (HCPs) in New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted in 2013 on a sample of 333 HCPs who were selected using multistage stage random sampling technique. The sample includes medical officers, auxiliary nurses and midwives, and pharmacists and laboratory technicians/assistants among regular and contractual staff. Data were collected using the pretested structured questionnaire for organization commitment (OC), job satisfiers, and intrinsic job motivation. Analysis was done by using SPSS version 18 and appropriate statistical tests were applied. Results: The mean score for OC for entire regular staff is 1.6 ± 0.39 and contractual staff is 1.3 ± 0.45 which has statistically significant difference (t = 5.57; P = 0.00). In both regular and contractual staff, none of them show high emotional attachment with the organization and does not feel part of the family in the organization. Contractual staff does not feel proud to work in a present organization for rest of their career. Intrinsic motivation is high in both regular and contractual groups but intergroup difference is significant (t = 2.38; P < 0.05). Contractual staff has more dissatisfier than regular, and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of contractual staff are lesser than the permanent staff. Appropriate changes are required in the predictors of organizational commitment and factors responsible for satisfaction in the organization to keep the contractual human resource motivated and committed to the organization. PMID:27453851

  6. Measuring Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice: Consideration of Organizational Context and Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of innovation in general, and toward evidence-based practice (EBP) in particular, are important in considering how best to disseminate and implement EBPs. This article first explores the role of attitudes in acceptance of innovation and proposes a model of organizational and individual factors that may affect or be affected by attitudes toward adoption of EBP. Next, a recently developed measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of EBP is presented along with a summary of preliminary reliability and validity findings. Attitudes toward adoption of EBP are then discussed in regard to provider individual differences and the context of mental health services. Finally, potential applications of attitude research to adoption of EBP are discussed. PMID:15694785

  7. Using Knowledge-Based Systems to Support Learning of Organizational Knowledge: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Nash, Rebecca L.; Phan, Tu-Anh T.; Bailey, Teresa R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a knowledge system to support learning of organizational knowledge at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a US national research laboratory whose mission is planetary exploration and to 'do what no one has done before.' Data collected over 19 weeks of operation were used to assess system performance with respect to design considerations, participation, effectiveness of communication mechanisms, and individual-based learning. These results are discussed in the context of organizational learning research and implications for practice.

  8. Using Knowledge-Based Systems to Support Learning of Organizational Knowledge: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Nash, Rebecca L.; Phan, Tu-Anh T.; Bailey, Teresa R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the deployment of a knowledge system to support learning of organizational knowledge at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a US national research laboratory whose mission is planetary exploration and to 'do what no one has done before.' Data collected over 19 weeks of operation were used to assess system performance with respect to design considerations, participation, effectiveness of communication mechanisms, and individual-based learning. These results are discussed in the context of organizational learning research and implications for practice.

  9. Transformational Leadership and the New Zealand Defence Force: Supporting Effective Organizational Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    motivation that will enable them to exceed individual and organizational performance expectations; even if this sometimes means putting aside their own...transactional leadership [Contingent Reward] was a better predictor of performance at the individual task [in-role] level.107 These results support...exceptional performance and organizational change, but must continually assess its efficacy and be prepared to adapt their techniques to suit the unique

  10. Supporting organizational learning: a comparative approach to evaluation in action research.

    PubMed

    Livesey, Heather; Challender, Shelia

    2002-05-01

    For well over a decade, the organizational context of nursing in the United Kingdom has been one of change and reform with a policy shift towards primary and community led health care. Such a major shift in policy provides nurses with an opportunity to re-think their approaches towards the individuals and communities they serve in order to promote self-care, recognize achievable health goals and provide family and community support. Although there is a growing appreciation of action research as an useful approach to this kind of development, it can be difficult to evaluate published studies because of the diverse nature of the literature. This paper will present and evaluate two case studies using a particular conceptual device (The Normative Information Model-based Systems Analysis and Design) in order to explore a possible alternative to the interpretative narrative or positivistic hypothesis-testing models used to report other kinds of nursing research and enlarge the debate about process evaluation.

  11. Chronic and Episodic Anger and Gratitude Toward the Organization: Relationships With Organizational and Supervisor Supportiveness and Extrarole Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael T; Wang, Yanxia; Jin, Jiafei; Eisenberger, Robert

    2017-02-13

    Gratitude and anger represent 2 fundamental moral emotions in response to help or harm. Research suggests that individuals perceive organizations to have humanlike qualities and thus hold them responsible for helpful or harmful treatment. Given this line of reasoning, we hypothesized that workers direct gratitude toward their organizations in response to supportive treatment and anger toward their organizations in response to unsupportive treatment. Gratitude and anger, in turn, were expected to influence daily extrarole behavior. After developing short measures of organization-directed anger and gratitude in 2 pilot studies, we tested these hypotheses in a daily diary study of 54 workers providing 421 daily reports. Results indicate that perceived organizational support was related to chronic gratitude and anger, which is stable from day to day, and chronic gratitude was in turn related to chronic differences in organizational citizenship behavior. Episodic anger and gratitude, which vary daily, were related to daily supervisor interactional justice and helping behavior, respectively, and in turn predicted daily episodic variance in organizational citizenship and counterproductive work behavior. These findings suggest that the moral emotions of gratitude and anger toward the organization are indicators of employee affective well-being and play a mediating role in the effects of organizational and supervisor supportiveness on employee performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. [Psychologica well-being, perceived organizational support and job satisfaction amongst Chilean prison employees].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Yáñez, C; Jiménez-Figueroa, A

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to identify the relationship between job satisfaction, psychological well-being and Perceived Organizational Support amongst prison officials. 190 officials working in one state prison and one privately-run prison were evaluated using the Job Satisfaction Questionnaire¹, Psychological Well-being Scale² and Scale of Perceived Organizational Support³. The main results show a significant positive correlation between job satisfaction, psychological well-being and perceived organizational support, so that those who are satisfied with their jobs tend to feel better psychologically and perceive that they receive support from their organizations. Furthermore the study variables showed no significant differences between officials at both prisons. As regards socio-demographic figures, gender differences were found in terms of job satisfaction and psychological well-being, while no differences were found according to unit.

  13. Individual reactions to high involvement work processes: investigating the role of empowerment and perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Butts, Marcus M; Vandenberg, Robert J; DeJoy, David M; Schaffer, Bryan S; Wilson, Mark G

    2009-04-01

    This study sought to understand how high involvement work processes (HIWP) are processed at the employee level. Using structural equation modeling techniques, the authors tested and supported a model in which psychological empowerment mediated the effects of HIWP on job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job performance, and job stress. Furthermore, perceived organizational support (POS) was hypothesized to moderate the relationships between empowerment and these outcomes. With exception for the empowerment-job satisfaction association, support was found for our predictions. Future directions for research and the practical implications of our findings for both employees and organizations are discussed.

  14. Motivational Interviewing in permanent supportive housing: The role of organizational culture

    PubMed Central

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Patterson Silver Wolf (Adelv unegv Waya), David A.; Ramsey, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated motivational interviewing (MI) in a permanent supportive housing agency. The agency’s contradictory social service and business missions resulted in an incompatible organizational culture theorized to diminish MI’s effectiveness. A combination of observational, interview, and archival data collected over 3 years were used to examine MI implementation within an incompatible supportive housing agency. Two major themes arose: how MI is used to categorize and change clients in permanent supportive housing and how worker–worker relationships affect MI implementation. The results suggest that within incompatible organizational environments, key elements of effective MI implementation are greatly weakened. PMID:25129815

  15. Motivational interviewing in permanent supportive housing: the role of organizational culture.

    PubMed

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Patterson Silver Wolf, David A; Ramsey, Alex

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated motivational interviewing (MI) in a permanent supportive housing agency. The agency's contradictory social service and business missions resulted in an incompatible organizational culture theorized to diminish MI's effectiveness. A combination of observational, interview, and archival data collected over 3 years were used to examine MI implementation within an incompatible supportive housing agency. Two major themes arose: how MI is used to categorize and change clients in permanent supportive housing and how worker-worker relationships affect MI implementation. The results suggest that within incompatible organizational environments, key elements of effective MI implementation are greatly weakened.

  16. The structural relationships between organizational commitment, global job satisfaction, developmental experiences, work values, organizational support, and person-organization fit among nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Antonio P; Candela, Lori L; Carver, Lara

    2012-07-01

    GUTIERAIM: The aim of this correlational study was to examine the relations between organizational commitment, perceived organizational support, work values, person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction among nursing faculty. The global nursing shortage is well documented. At least 57 countries have reported critical shortages. The lack of faculty is finally being recognized as a major issue directly influencing the ability to admit and graduate adequate numbers of nurses. As efforts increase to both recruit and retain faculty, the concept of organizational commitment and what it means to them is important to consider. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. The present study investigated the underlying structure of various organizational factors using structural equation modelling. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of nurse faculty during the academic year 2006-2007. The final model demonstrated that perceived organizational support, developmental experiences, person-organization fit, and global job satisfaction positively predicted nurse faculty's organizational commitment to the academic organization. Cross-validation results indicated that the final full SEM is valid and reliable. Nursing faculty administrators able to use mentoring skills are well equipped to build positive relationships with nursing faculty, which in turn, can lead to increased organizational commitment, productivity, job satisfaction, and perceived organizational support, among others. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Work stressors, role-based performance, and the moderating influence of organizational support.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J Craig; Edwards, Bryan D; Arnold, Todd; Frazier, M Lance; Finch, David M

    2009-01-01

    As a test of the 2-dimensional model of work stressors, the present study proposed differential relationships between challenge stressors and hindrance stressors and role-based performance, which were expected to be moderated by organizational support. In a sample of 215 employees across 61 offices of a state agency, the authors obtained a positive relationship between challenge stressors and role-based performance and a negative relationship between hindrance stressors and role-based performance. In addition, organizational support moderated the relationship between challenge stressors and role-based performance but did not moderate the relationship between hindrance stressors and role-based performance. This suggests that organizations would benefit from increasing challenges in the workplace as long as they are supportive of employees and removing hindrances. Further implications for organizational theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Effect of perceived organizational support on suicidal ideation of young employees: The mediator role of self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jinyan; Ji, Yongbao; Li, Ping; Zhao, Hao

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationships among perceived organizational support, self-esteem, and suicidal ideation of young employees. A total of 447 unmarried employees completed the survey of perceived organizational support, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, and suicide ideation scale. The results revealed that perceived organizational support, self-esteem, and suicidal ideation were significantly correlated with each other. Stepwise regression analysis and path analysis both indicated that self-esteem partially mediated the effect of perceived organizational support on suicidal ideation.

  19. Nurse practitioners as primary care providers with their own patient panels and organizational structures: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Liu, Jianfang; Norful, Allison A

    2017-05-25

    Health care systems globally are facing challenges of meeting the growing demand for primary care services due to a shortage of primary care physicians. Policy makers and administrators are searching for solutions to increase the primary care capacity. The effective utilization of nurse practitioners (NPs) has been proposed as a solution. However, organizations utilize NPs in variable capacities. In some settings, NPs serve as primary care providers delivering ongoing continuous care to their patients, referred to as patient panels, whereas in other settings they deliver episodic care. Little is known about why organizations deploy NPs differently. Investigate the NP role in care delivery-primary care providers with the own patient panels or delivering episodic care-within their organizations and understand how work environments affect their role. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from primary care NPs. The study was conducted in one state in the United States (Massachusetts). Data from 163 primary care organizations was obtained, which employed between one to 12 NPs. 807 NPs recruited from the Massachusetts Provider Database received mail surveys; 314 completed and returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 40%. The survey contained measures of NP role in care delivery and work environment. NP role was measured by an item asking NPs to report if they deliver ongoing continuous care to their patient panel or if they do not have patient panel. The work environment was measured with the Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Organizational Climate Questionnaire (NP-PCOCQ). The multilevel Cox regression models investigated the influence of organization-level work environment on NP role in care delivery. About 45% of NPs served as primary care providers with their own patient panel. Organization-level Independent Practice and Support subscale, an NP-PCOCQ subscale, had a significant positive effect on NP role (risk ratio=2.33; 95% CI: 1

  20. Supervisor and organizational factors associated with supervisor support of job accommodations for low back injured workers

    PubMed Central

    Kristman, Vicki L; Shaw, William S.; Reguly, Paula; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Soklaridis, Sophie; Loisel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Temporary job accommodations contribute to the prevention of chronic work disability due to low back pain (LBP) through the facilitation of early return to work; yet, workplace dimensions of job accommodation are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine supervisor and organizational factors associated with supervisors’ support for temporary job accommodations for LBP injured workers. METHODS Supervisors were recruited from 19 workplaces in the USA and Canada and completed an online survey regarding job accommodation practices and potential associated factors with respect to a case vignette of a worker with LBP. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify the most parsimonious set of factors associated with supervisors’ support for accommodations. RESULTS A total of 804 supervisors participated with 796 eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The final set of factors explained 21% of the variance in supervisors’ support for temporary job accommodations. Considerate leadership style (β = .261; 95 % CI: .212, .310), workplace disability management policies and practices (β = .243; 95 % CI: .188, .298), and supervisor autonomy for designing and providing workplace accommodations (β = .156; 95 % CI: .071, .241) had the largest effect on supervisor support for accommodations. CONCLUSION Factors predicting supervisors’ likelihood to accommodate LBP injured workers include use of considerate leadership style, workplace disability management policies and practices, and supervisor autonomy. Workplace interventions targeting these factors should be developed and evaluated for their ability to improve work disability prevention outcomes. PMID:27032398

  1. Providing end-of-life care in disability community living services: An organizational capacity-building model using a public health approach.

    PubMed

    Grindrod, Andrea; Rumbold, Bruce

    2017-05-24

    There is broad consensus within the disability field that the end-of-life care offered to people with intellectual disabilities should be of a quality consistent with that advocated by contemporary palliative care. In practice, however, various barriers are encountered when applying palliative care strategies to the end-of-life care of people with intellectual disabilities, particularly those in disability community living services. A mixed-methods approach was used. Quantitative data were gathered through a survey of disability support staff working in government-managed community living services in the Australian state of Victoria. These quantitative data informed the collection of qualitative data through focus groups and research interviews. A public health palliative care framework provided the basis for developing an organizational change model from the consolidated data. There is a strong relationship between organizational structure and culture, and both influence end-of-life practice in community living services. Barriers to good practice arise from the differing attitudes of paid carers involved, and from uncoordinated approaches reflecting misaligned service systems in the disability and palliative care fields. Organizational reorientation is crucial to achieving sustainable change that will support healthy dying. End-of-life care requires the collaboration of disability and palliative care services, but for care to achieve palliative care goals, the collaboration must be led by disability services. We outline here an organizational model we have developed from public health principles to manage end-of-life care in community living services. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Does organizational support promote citizenship in service settings? The moderating role of service climate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Ling

    2009-12-01

    The present study integrates social exchange, role theory, and climate research to suggest that employees who have contact with customers ("contact employees") will reciprocate felt obligations of high-quality employment relationships (i.e., perceived organizational support [POS]). They do this by expanding their role in ways that are consistent with contextual behavioral expectations. A longitudinal survey of 1,387 contact employees and 666 supervisors in a large supermarket chain in Taiwan demonstrated that the positive relationship between POS and service-oriented organizational citizenship behavior (SOCB) role definitions was strengthened by service climate. In summary, organizational support resulted in expanded SOCB role definitions within a strong service climate, while this relationship was much weaker and not significant in weak service climate, I discuss theoretical and managerial implications through this empirical examination.

  3. Volunteer recruitment: the role of organizational support and anticipated respect in non-volunteers' attraction to charitable volunteer organizations.

    PubMed

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2008-09-01

    In 3 experiments the authors examined how specific characteristics of charitable volunteer organizations contribute to the recruitment of new volunteers. In line with predictions, Study 1 revealed that providing non-volunteers with information about organizational support induced anticipated feelings of respect, which subsequently enhanced their attraction to the volunteer organization. However, information about the current success of the volunteer organization did not affect anticipated pride (as among those who seek paid employment) and in fact caused potential volunteers to perceive the organization as being in less need for additional volunteers. Study 2 further showed that information about support from the volunteer organization is a more relevant source of anticipated respect and organizational attraction than support from co-volunteers. Study 3 finally showed that information about task and emotional support for volunteers contributes to anticipated respect and organizational attractiveness and that this increases the actual willingness of non-volunteers to participate in the volunteer organization. Interventions aimed at attracting volunteers and avenues for further research are discussed.

  4. District nurses' knowledge development in wound management: ongoing learning without organizational support.

    PubMed

    Friman, Anne; Wahlberg, Anna Carin; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine; Ebbeskog, Britt

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe district nurses' (DNs') experiences of their knowledge development in wound management when treating patients with different types of wounds at healthcare centers. In primary healthcare, DNs are mainly responsible for wound management. Previous research has focused on DNs' level of expertise regarding wound management, mostly based on quantitative studies. An unanswered question concerns DNs' knowledge development in wound management. The present study therefore intends to broaden understanding and to provide deeper knowledge in regard to the DNs' experiences of their knowledge development when treating patients with wounds. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Subjects were a purposeful sample of 16 DNs from eight healthcare centers in a metropolitan area in Stockholm, Sweden. The study was conducted with qualitative interviews and qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The content analysis resulted in three categories and 11 sub-categories. The first category, 'ongoing learning by experience,' was based on experiences of learning alongside clinical practice. The second category 'searching for information,' consisted of various channels for obtaining information. The third category, 'lacking organizational support,' consisted of experiences related to the DNs' work organization, which hindered their development in wound care knowledge. The DNs experienced that they were in a constant state of learning and obtained their wound care knowledge to a great extent through practical work, from their colleagues as well as from various companies. A lack of organizational structures and support from staff management made it difficult for DNs to develop their knowledge and skills in wound management, which can lead to inadequate wound management.

  5. Organizational support in the recruitment and transition of overseas-qualified nurses: lessons learnt from a study tour.

    PubMed

    Ohr, Se Ok; Jeong, Sarah; Parker, Vicki; McMillan, Margaret

    2014-06-01

    The migration of nurses has been a global phenomenon, and the integration of overseas-qualified nurses within host countries has led to debate worldwide. Evidence suggests that support provided by organizations can vary and that there is minimal information on the nature and extent of organizational support required to enhance a smooth transition of overseas-qualified nurses into nursing practice. This explorative study tour examined the organizational support provided to enhance overseas-qualified nurses' transition into the nursing workforce in two countries. The various support mechanisms provided to overseas-qualified nurses in different organizations include transition, acculturation, mentoring programs, and initial settlement assistance. The successful transition of overseas-qualified nurses into a host country is a complex issue. A robust support system for these nurses should be based on ethical considerations and a team approach that is linked to strong leadership. In addition, education and support for existing staff is essential for a successful transition of overseas-qualified nurses into practice. Lessons learnt from this study tour might also be relevant to the transition of other overseas-qualified health professionals, such as doctors and allied health professionals, in host countries.

  6. Organizational Support in Online Learning Environments: Examination of Support Factors in Corporate Online Learning Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Thomas L.; Correia, Ana-Paula

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the role of different types of support in corporate online learning programs. Most research has not specifically focused on all of the support factors required to provide a corporate online learning program, although many research studies address several in regards to the research outcome. An effort was made in this article…

  7. Organizational Support in Online Learning Environments: Examination of Support Factors in Corporate Online Learning Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Thomas L.; Correia, Ana-Paula

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the role of different types of support in corporate online learning programs. Most research has not specifically focused on all of the support factors required to provide a corporate online learning program, although many research studies address several in regards to the research outcome. An effort was made in this article…

  8. Home Health Aide Training: An Appeal for Organizational Support.

    PubMed

    Palesy, Debra

    2016-01-01

    How home healthcare aides (HHAs) adapt their classroom training to their workplaces is central to their own safety and that of their care recipients. A qualitative approach was adopted for this inquiry, where new workers were interviewed in-depth following their classroom training. Findings suggest a perceived lack of supervisor support for classroom training and lack of follow-up in the workplace. Moreover, the need for more peer support was contended, and more comprehensive written materials in clients' homes may also assist workers' learning and enacting safe manual handling techniques in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for supporting HHAs' learning, and includes suggestions for future research.

  9. The Organizational Impact of a Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, James A.; Cross, Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a follow-up evaluation of a decision support system installed 5 years ago at Guilford College are reported. Changes in the system, resulting procedures, and the organization are described. (Author/MLW)

  10. Size Matters: The Link between Staff Size and Perceived Organizational Support in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Dora; Lee, Moosung; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between staff size and perceived organizational support (POS) in early childhood education (ECE) organizations. Design/methodology/approach: A territory-wide questionnaire survey was designed to investigate the perceptions of preschool teachers in Hong Kong on four dimensions of…

  11. Work-Life Benefits and Job Pursuit Intentions: The Role of Anticipated Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Wendy J.; Buffardi, Louis C.

    2004-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of two work-life benefits, work schedule flexibility, and dependent care assistance, on applicants' intentions to pursue jobs with potential employers. The study also explored whether anticipated organizational support would mediate the relationships between these two work-life benefits and job pursuit…

  12. COMPASS: Collaborative Organizational Model to Promote Aligned Support Structures. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Lisa; Philp, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, Iredell-Statesville Schools was awarded an Investing in Innovation grant (i3) from the Office of Innovation and Improvement within the Federal Department of Education. Collaborative Organizational Model to Promote Aligned Support Structures (COMPASS) is a development grant that seeks to meet the needs of students with disabilities,…

  13. Happiness, Work Engagement, and Perception of Organizational Support of Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempfling, Michele Sheets

    2015-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the work engagement, subjective happiness, or perceived organizational support of student affairs professionals. In this study, 299 professionals in the American College Personnel Association were surveyed utilizing the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Subjective Happiness Scale, and the Survey of Perceived…

  14. Happiness, Work Engagement, and Perception of Organizational Support of Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempfling, Michele Sheets

    2015-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the work engagement, subjective happiness, or perceived organizational support of student affairs professionals. In this study, 299 professionals in the American College Personnel Association were surveyed utilizing the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Subjective Happiness Scale, and the Survey of Perceived…

  15. Development of Assessment Tools To Measure Organizational Support for Employee Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golaszewski, Thomas; Barr, Donald; Pronk, Nico

    2003-01-01

    Describes one working group's attempts to develop and utilize assessment tools for measuring and changing organizational support for employee health. Originally designed as part of a heart health related intervention, the system has evolved into a managed care evaluation and major chronic disease inventory. Findings indicate the potential of…

  16. The Costs of Today's Jobs: Job Characteristics and Organizational Supports as Antecedents of Negative Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotto, Angela R.; Lyness, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined job characteristics and organizational supports as antecedents of negative work-to-nonwork spillover for 1178 U.S. employees. Based on hierarchical regression analyses of 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce data and O*NET data, job demands (requirements to work at home beyond scheduled hours, job complexity, time and…

  17. Size Matters: The Link between Staff Size and Perceived Organizational Support in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Dora; Lee, Moosung; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between staff size and perceived organizational support (POS) in early childhood education (ECE) organizations. Design/methodology/approach: A territory-wide questionnaire survey was designed to investigate the perceptions of preschool teachers in Hong Kong on four dimensions of…

  18. Development of Assessment Tools To Measure Organizational Support for Employee Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golaszewski, Thomas; Barr, Donald; Pronk, Nico

    2003-01-01

    Describes one working group's attempts to develop and utilize assessment tools for measuring and changing organizational support for employee health. Originally designed as part of a heart health related intervention, the system has evolved into a managed care evaluation and major chronic disease inventory. Findings indicate the potential of…

  19. The Costs of Today's Jobs: Job Characteristics and Organizational Supports as Antecedents of Negative Spillover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotto, Angela R.; Lyness, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined job characteristics and organizational supports as antecedents of negative work-to-nonwork spillover for 1178 U.S. employees. Based on hierarchical regression analyses of 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce data and O*NET data, job demands (requirements to work at home beyond scheduled hours, job complexity, time and…

  20. Understanding competition between healthcare providers: Introducing an intermediary inter-organizational perspective.

    PubMed

    Westra, Daan; Angeli, Federica; Carree, Martin; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Pro-competitive policy reforms have been introduced in several countries, attempting to contain increasing healthcare costs. Yet, research proves ambiguous when it comes to the effect of competition in healthcare, with a number of studies highlighting unintended and unwanted effects. We argue that current empirical work overlooks the role of inter-organizational relations as well as the interplay between policy at macro level, inter-organizational networks at meso level, and outcomes at micro level. To bridge this gap and stimulate a more detailed understanding of the effect of competition in health care, this article introduces a cross-level conceptual framework which emphasizes the intermediary role of cooperative inter-organizational relations at meso level. We discuss how patient transfers, specialist affiliations, and interlocking directorates constitute three forms of inter-organizational relations in health care which can be used within this framework. The paper concludes by deriving several propositions from the framework which can guide future research.

  1. The influence of partnership centrality on organizational perceptions of support: a case study of the AHLN structure

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Spencer; Smith, Cynthia; Simpson, Tammy; Minke, Sharlene Wolbeck

    2006-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the structure and character of inter-organizational relationships found among health promotion organizations is a prerequisite for the development of evidence-based network-level intervention activities. The Alberta Healthy Living Network (AHLN) mapped the inter-organizational structure of its members to examine the effects of the network environment on organizational-level perceptions. This exploratory analysis examines whether network structure, specifically partnership ties among AHLN members, influences organizational perceptions of support after controlling for organizational-level attributes. Methods Organizational surveys were conducted with representatives from AHLN organizations as of February 2004 (n = 54). Organizational attribute and inter-organizational data on various network dimensions were collected. Organizations were classified into traditional and non-traditional categories. We examined the partnership network dimension. In- and out-degree centrality scores on partnership ties were calculated for each organization and tested against organizational perceptions of available financial support. Results Non-traditional organizations are more likely to view financial support as more readily available for their HEALTR programs and activities than traditional organizations (1.57, 95% CI: .34, 2.79). After controlling for organizational characteristics, organizations that have been frequently identified by other organizations as valuable partners in the AHLN network were found significantly more likely to perceive a higher sense of funding availability (In-degree partnership value) (.03, 95% CI: .01, .05). Conclusion Organizational perceptions of a supportive environment are framed not only by organizational characteristics but also by an organization's position in an inter-organizational network. Network contexts can influence the way that organizations perceive their environment and potentially the actions that organizations may

  2. Electronic surveillance systems in infection prevention: organizational support, program characteristics, and user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Grota, Patti G; Stone, Patricia W; Jordan, Sarah; Pogorzelska, Monika; Larson, Elaine

    2010-09-01

    The use of electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) is gradually increasing in infection prevention and control programs. Little is known about the characteristics of hospitals that have a ESS, user satisfaction with ESSs, and organizational support for implementation of ESSs. A total of 350 acute care hospitals in California were invited to participate in a Web-based survey; 207 hospitals (59%) agreed to participate. The survey included a description of infection prevention and control department staff, where and how they spent their time, a measure of organizational support for infection prevention and control, and reported experience with ESSs. Only 23% (44/192) of responding infection prevention and control departments had an ESS. No statistically significant difference was seen in how and where infection preventionists (IPs) who used an ESS and those who did not spend their time. The 2 significant predictors of whether an ESS was present were score on the Organizational Support Scale (odds ratio [OR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.18) and hospital bed size (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.00-1.007). Organizational support also was positively correlated with IP satisfaction with the ESS, as measured on the Computer Usability Scale (P = .02). Despite evidence that such systems may improve efficiency of data collection and potentially improve patient outcomes, ESSs remain relatively uncommon in infection prevention and control programs. Based on our findings, organizational support appears to be a major predictor of the presence, use, and satisfaction with ESSs in infection prevention and control programs.

  3. Emotional and organizational supports for preschoolers' emotion regulation: Relations with school adjustment.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Craig S; Denham, Susanne A; Curby, Timothy W; Bassett, Hideko H

    2016-03-01

    Preschool teachers, like parents, support children in ways that promote the regulation capacities that drive school adjustment, especially for children struggling to succeed in the classroom. The purpose of this study was to explore the emotionally and organizationally supportive classroom processes that contribute to the development of children's emotion regulation and executive control. Emotion regulation and executive control were assessed in 312 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children. The 44 teachers of these children completed questionnaires asking about 3 components of children's school adjustment: Positive/Engaged, Independent/Motivated, and Prosocial/Connected. Observations of classroom emotional and organizational supports were conducted. Results of multilevel models indicated emotion regulation was significantly associated with the Positive/Engaged school adjustment component, but only when teachers' emotional and organizational supports were taken into account. Children with lower levels of emotion regulation, who were also in less supportive classrooms, had the lowest scores on the Positive/Engaged component. Children's executive control was associated with the Independent/Motivated and Prosocial/Connected components independently of teacher effects. In general, moderate support was found for the notion that teachers' supports can be particularly helpful for children struggling to regulate their emotions to be better adjusted to school. Children's emotionally salient classroom behaviors, and teachers' emotion scaffolding, are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Making Supportability A Reality: Applying the Principles of Organizational Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This study applies change management theories and models to analyze what...Implementation of the Supportability policy requires transformational change in the services. This study applies change management theories and models to...BECKHARD AND HARRIS MODEL OF CHANGE MANAGEMENT

  5. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the…

  6. Test of a Mediation Model of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhen Xiong; Aryee, Samuel; Lee, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the mediating influence of trust in organization (TIO) and organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) on the relationship between perceived organization support (POS) and its work outcomes. Data were obtained from employee-supervisor dyads from multiple organizations located in a major city in southern China. Structural equation…

  7. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the…

  8. Organizational Alignment Supporting Distance Education in Post-Secondary Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestera, Gustavo E.; Moller, Leslie A.

    Leveraging Internet technologies, distance education is enjoying a renaissance of sorts. With its newfound popularity comes greater resource as well as higher expectations and great scrutiny. If distance education programs are to support their dramatic growth and outlive the hype, they must demonstrate performance results. Performance, however,…

  9. Exploring the effect of organizational culture on consumer perceptions of agency support for mental health recovery.

    PubMed

    Clossey, Laurene; Rheinheimer, David

    2014-05-01

    This research explores the impact of mental health agency culture on consumers' perceptions of agency support for their recovery. This study hypothesized that a constructive organizational culture must be present for consumers to perceive agency support for recovery. A sample of 12 mental health agencies in rural Pennsylvania participated in the research. Agency administrators completed an instrument called the recovery oriented service environment, which measured the number of recovery model program components offered by the agency. Consumers completed the recovery oriented services indicators, which taps into their perception of agency support for recovery. Direct service staff completed the organizational social context, which measured their agency's culture. Results showed that in this sample stronger consumer perceptions of agency support for recovery were correlated with higher ratings of agency constructive culture. The results suggest that agency culture is an important variable to target when implementing recovery model programming.

  10. Family supportive supervisor behaviors and organizational culture: Effects on work engagement and performance.

    PubMed

    Rofcanin, Yasin; Las Heras, Mireia; Bakker, Arnold B

    2017-04-01

    Informed by social information processing (SIP) theory, in this study, we assessed the associations among family supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSBs) as perceived by subordinates, subordinate work engagement, and supervisor-rated work performance. Moreover, we explored the role of family supportive organizational culture as a contextual variable influencing our proposed associations. Our findings using matched supervisor-subordinate data collected from a financial credit company in Mexico (654 subordinates; 134 supervisors) showed that FSSBs influenced work performance through subordinate work engagement. Moreover, the positive association between subordinates' perceptions of FSSBs and work engagement was moderated by family supportive organizational culture. Our results contribute to emerging theories on flexible work arrangements, particularly on family supportive work policies. Moreover, our findings carry practical implications for improving employee work engagement and work performance. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Perceived organizational support and intention to remain: The mediating roles of career success and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingying; Liu, Yan-Hui

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among perceived organizational support, career success, self-esteem and intention to remain. A cross-sectional study was designed, and subjects were recruited from six nonprofit organizations in China in spring 2015. A convenience sample of 610 nurses answered a survey with questions related to their ideas about their work. Structural equation modelling analyses were conducted. The results revealed that perceived organizational support was positively associated with intention to remain and career success, which, in turn, mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and intention to remain. We also found that self-esteem mediated the relationships between perceived organizational support and career success and between career success and intention to remain. Higher perceived organizational support, career success and self-esteem can increase intention to remain in Chinese nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009); (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011). A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008). With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS) as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003); (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005); (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011). At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1) a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs); and 2) a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI), Computer Science (CS), Information Science (IS), and Information Technology (IT) disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the establishment of a

  13. What's in a setting?: Influence of organizational culture on provider adherence to clinical guidelines for treating tobacco use.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy Y; Leidig, Robynn; Shelley, Donna R

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is an important but underinvestigated feature of the work environment that can impact provider behavior, including adherence to clinical practice guidelines. There is substantial evidence that physician assistance to smokers can produce significant reductions in tobacco use. However, this evidence has not been well translated into practice, as only a small proportion of smokers receive recommended treatment during medical visits. This study examines organizational culture as a contextual feature of primary care clinics and its impact on adherence to evidence-based guidelines for treating tobacco use. Cross-sectional survey data were collected from 500 primary care providers in 60 community clinics located in New York City. Relationships between provider adherence to "5A" clinical guidelines, as recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service, and both provider and organizational covariates were described. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine the associations between clinic culture and provider treatment patterns. Providers in clinics with stronger "group/clan," "hierarchical," and "rational" culture types, as compared with a "developmental" culture, reported greater adherence to 5A guidelines (p < .05). System-level structures and care processes were positively associated (p < .01), whereas number of ongoing quality initiatives was negatively associated with 5A delivery (p < .05). Provider familiarity with guidelines (p < .01), confidence with cessation counseling (p < .05), and perceived effectiveness in helping smokers quit were associated with more frequent 5A intervention (p < .01). Findings suggest that organizational culture can influence provider adherence to cessation treatment guidelines, even when controlling for other factors known to affect practice patterns. Specifically, cultures that emphasize human resources and performance standards are conducive to integrating 5A guidelines into routine practice. Understanding the

  14. How Providing Mentoring Relates to Career Success and Organizational Commitment: A Study in the General Managerial Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozionelos, Nikos; Bozionelos, Giorgos; Kostopoulos, Konstantinos; Polychroniou, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationship of mentoring provided with career success and organizational commitment in the general managerial population. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 194 native British who were employed in a variety of jobs, professions and industries in the United Kingdom. Findings: Mentoring…

  15. How Providing Mentoring Relates to Career Success and Organizational Commitment: A Study in the General Managerial Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozionelos, Nikos; Bozionelos, Giorgos; Kostopoulos, Konstantinos; Polychroniou, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationship of mentoring provided with career success and organizational commitment in the general managerial population. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were 194 native British who were employed in a variety of jobs, professions and industries in the United Kingdom. Findings: Mentoring…

  16. Married Couples in Assisted Living: Adult Children's Experiences Providing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Candace L.

    2012-01-01

    Being married in later life often prevents relocation to long-term care settings, but couples do relocate to these environments. Typically, this transition does not mark the end of support provided by families, especially adult children. Little is known about children's experiences providing support in care settings when both parents are involved.…

  17. Married Couples in Assisted Living: Adult Children's Experiences Providing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Candace L.

    2012-01-01

    Being married in later life often prevents relocation to long-term care settings, but couples do relocate to these environments. Typically, this transition does not mark the end of support provided by families, especially adult children. Little is known about children's experiences providing support in care settings when both parents are involved.…

  18. Organizational factors and mental health in community volunteers. The role of exposure, preparation, training, tasks assigned, and support.

    PubMed

    Thormar, Sigridur Bjork; Gersons, Berthold P R; Juen, Barbara; Djakababa, Maria Nelden; Karlsson, Thorlakur; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    During disasters, aid organizations often respond using the resources of local volunteer members from the affected population who are not only inexperienced, but who additionally take on some of the more psychologically and physically difficult tasks in order to provide support for their community. Although not much empirical evidence exists to justify the claim, it is thought that preparation, training, and organizational support limit (or reduce) a volunteer's risk of developing later psychopathology. In this study, we examined the effects of preparation, training, and organizational support and assigned tasks on the mental health of 506 Indonesian Red Cross volunteers who participated in the response to a massive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2006. Controlling for exposure level, the volunteers were assessed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and subjective health complaints (SHCs) 6, 12, and 18 months post-disaster. Results showed high levels of PTSD and SHCs up to 18 months post-disaster, while anxiety and depression levels remained in the normal range. Higher levels of exposure as well as certain tasks (e.g., provision of psychosocial support to beneficiaries, handling administration, or handing out food aid) made the volunteers more vulnerable. Sense of safety, expressed general need for support at 6 months, and a lack of perceived support from team leaders and the organization were also related to greater psychopathology at 18 months. The results highlight the importance of studying organizational factors. By incorporating these results into future volunteer management programs the negative effects of disaster work on volunteers can be ameliorated.

  19. Making housing first happen: organizational leadership in VA's expansion of permanent supportive housing.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Stefan G; Austin, Erika Laine; Holmes, Sally K; Pollio, David E; Schumacher, Joseph E; White, Bert; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen

    2014-12-01

    While most organizational literature has focused on initiatives that transpire inside the hospital walls, the redesign of American health care increasingly asks that health care institutions address matters outside their walls, targeting the health of populations. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)'s national effort to end Veteran homelessness represents an externally focused organizational endeavor. Our aim was to evaluate the role of organizational practices in the implementation of Housing First (HF), an evidence-based homeless intervention for chronically homeless individuals. This was an interview-based comparative case study conducted across eight VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). Front line staff, mid-level managers, and senior leaders at VA Medical Centers were interviewed between February and December 2012. Using a structured narrative and numeric scoring, we assessed the correlation between successful HF implementation and organizational practices devised according to the organizational transformation model (OTM). Scoring results suggested a strong association between HF implementation and OTM practice. Strong impetus to house Veterans came from national leadership, reinforced by Medical Center directors closely tracking results. More effective Medical Center leaders differentiated themselves by joining front-line staff in the work (at public events and in process improvement exercises), by elevating homeless-knowledgeable persons into senior leadership, and by exerting themselves to resolve logistic challenges. Vertical alignment and horizontal integration advanced at sites that fostered work groups cutting across service lines and hierarchical levels. By contrast, weak alignment from top to bottom typically also hindered cooperation across departments. Staff commitment to ending homelessness was high, though sustainability planning was limited in this baseline year of observation. Key organizational practices correlated with more successful

  20. Supervisor and Organizational Factors Associated with Supervisor Support of Job Accommodations for Low Back Injured Workers.

    PubMed

    Kristman, Vicki L; Shaw, William S; Reguly, Paula; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Soklaridis, Sophie; Loisel, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Temporary job accommodations contribute to the prevention of chronic work disability due to low back pain (LBP) through the facilitation of early return to work; yet, workplace dimensions of job accommodation are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine supervisor and organizational factors associated with supervisors' support for temporary job accommodations for LBP injured workers. Methods Supervisors were recruited from 19 workplaces in the USA and Canada and completed an online survey regarding job accommodation practices and potential associated factors with respect to a case vignette of a worker with LBP. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify the most parsimonious set of factors associated with supervisors' support for accommodations. Results A total of 804 supervisors participated with 796 eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The final set of factors explained 21 % of the variance in supervisors' support for temporary job accommodations. Considerate leadership style (β = 0.261; 95 % CI 0.212, 0.310), workplace disability management policies and practices (β = 0.243; 95 % CI 0.188, 0.298), and supervisor autonomy for designing and providing workplace accommodations (β = 0.156; 95 % CI 0.071, 0.241) had the largest effect on supervisor support for accommodations. Conclusion Factors predicting supervisors' likelihood to accommodate LBP injured workers include use of considerate leadership style, workplace disability management policies and practices, and supervisor autonomy. Workplace interventions targeting these factors should be developed and evaluated for their ability to improve work disability prevention outcomes.

  1. Online Learning and Performance Support in Organizational Environments Using Performance Support Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gal, Eran; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    An electronic performance support system (EPSS) is a method that integrates learning and task performance into one single action by providing information and guidance during performance. Wide-range EPSS effectiveness research has been conducted by Tel Aviv University in tandem with a large telecommunications firm implementing EPSS solutions. The…

  2. Online Learning and Performance Support in Organizational Environments Using Performance Support Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gal, Eran; Nachmias, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    An electronic performance support system (EPSS) is a method that integrates learning and task performance into one single action by providing information and guidance during performance. Wide-range EPSS effectiveness research has been conducted by Tel Aviv University in tandem with a large telecommunications firm implementing EPSS solutions. The…

  3. The Impact of Training Interventions on Organizational Readiness to Support Innovations in Juvenile Justice Offices

    PubMed Central

    Taxman, Faye S.; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. METHODS A clinical trial was conducted examining the mpact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a one day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive three-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. RESULTS External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building

  4. The impact of training interventions on organizational readiness to support innovations in juvenile justice offices.

    PubMed

    Taxman, Faye S; Henderson, Craig; Young, Doug; Farrell, Jill

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials on technology transfer models are rare, even with the interest in advancing the uptake of evidence-based practices in social service agencies. This article presents the results from a trial examining different transfer strategies to assist juvenile justice caseworkers in using screening, assessment, and case planning practices to address mental health and substance use needs. Study findings examine factors that promote organizational readiness. A clinical trial was conducted examining the impact of three post-training strategies: an external coach to build the social network of the justice office (build social climate), an external coach to educate staff (build skills and knowledge), and a control condition consisting of traditional management directives (directives to staff of agency priorities). All groups were exposed to a 1 day refresher course in motivational interviewing. The social network and skill building groups also attended an intensive 3-day training followed by three on-site booster sessions over a 12 month period of time. Twelve juvenile justice offices (with their 231 juvenile justice staff) were assigned to one of three conditions. The study examined the impact of different transfer conditions on organizational readiness to implement the innovation of screening, assessment, and referral strategies. External coaching targeting the social climate of the justice office to support innovations improved organizational readiness to change, regardless of office size. Coaching that targeted either the social climate or staff knowledge and skills both improved organizational readiness for change compared to management directives, but social climate coaching resulted in greater improvements in receptivity to change. No individual level features of case workers (e.g., age, gender, years of experience) significantly predicted organizational readiness to change. Unexpectedly, the skill and knowledge building approach did not perform any better

  5. An Analysis of the Organizational Structures Supporting PPBE within the Military Departments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    ASN(FM&C) Office Structure ........................................................................80 Figure 27. The N8 Organizational Chart ...different parts of the organizations, the formal and informal communication methods and coordinating mechanisms, the training of employees to fill...Class work conducted at Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) provided the initial knowledge base. Many of the figures and charts were gathered from various

  6. Empowerment of Non-Academic Personnel in Higher Education: Exploring Associations with Perceived Organizational Support for Innovation and Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Wing Keung Jason

    2010-01-01

    Employee empowerment has long been associated with organizational outcomes such as innovation, greater effectiveness, and better performance. Non-academic professional employees in higher education are responsible for the important day-to-day operations of a university; therefore, organizational strategies such as employee empowerment that…

  7. Empowerment of Non-Academic Personnel in Higher Education: Exploring Associations with Perceived Organizational Support for Innovation and Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Wing Keung Jason

    2010-01-01

    Employee empowerment has long been associated with organizational outcomes such as innovation, greater effectiveness, and better performance. Non-academic professional employees in higher education are responsible for the important day-to-day operations of a university; therefore, organizational strategies such as employee empowerment that…

  8. The work-family interface and job performance: moderating effects of conscientiousness and perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Witt, L A; Carlson, Dawn S

    2006-10-01

    Based on conservation of resources (COR) theory, the authors hypothesized that two aspects of the work-family interface--family-to-work conflict (FWC) and family-to-work enrichment (FWE)--are related to job performance. The authors also hypothesized that two variables moderate those relationships--individual differences in conscientiousness and aspects of the work environment in terms of perceived organizational support (POS). Data collected from a matched set of 136 private sector workers and their respective supervisors revealed that high FWC was more strongly related to lower job performance: (1) among high- than low-conscientiousness workers and (2) among workers reporting low rather than high levels of organizational support. However, FWE was unrelated to job performance.

  9. The roles of individual and organizational factors in burnout among community-based mental health service providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Amy E; Albanese, Brian J; Shapiro, Nicole M; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-02-01

    Public-sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout, which negatively affects not only provider well-being but also the quality of services for clients and the functioning of organizations. This study examines the influence of demographics, work characteristic, and organizational variables on levels of burnout among child and adolescent mental health service providers operating within a public-sector mental health service system. Additionally, given the dearth of research examining differences in burnout levels among mental health subdisciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, marital and family therapy) and mental health programs (e.g., outpatient, day treatment, wraparound, case management), analyses were conducted to compare levels of burnout among multiple mental health disciplines and program types. Surveys were completed by 285 providers across 49 mental health programs in a large urban public mental health system. Variables representing dimensions of organizational climate and transformational leadership accounted for the greatest amount of variance in provider reported burnout. Analyses demonstrated significantly lower levels of depersonalization among wraparound providers compared to traditional case managers. Age was the only demographic variable related to burnout. Additionally, no significant effects were found for provider discipline or for agency tenure and caseload size. Results suggest the need to consider organizational development strategies aimed at creating more functional and less stressful climates and increasing levels of transformational leadership behaviors in order to reduce levels of burnout among clinicians working in public mental health settings for youth and families.

  10. The Roles of Individual and Organizational Factors in Burnout among Community-Based Mental Health Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Amy E.; Albanese, Brian J.; Shapiro, Nicole M.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout which negatively affects not only provider well-being but also the quality of services for clients and the functioning of organizations. This study examines the influence of demographics, work characteristic, and organizational variables on levels of burnout among child and adolescent mental health service providers operating within a public sector mental health service system. Additionally, given the dearth of research examining differences in burnout levels among mental health sub-disciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, marital and family therapy) and mental health programs (e.g., outpatient, day treatment, Wraparound, case management), analyses were conducted to compare levels of burnout among multiple mental health disciplines and program types. Surveys were completed by 285 providers across 49 mental health programs in a large urban public mental health system. Variables representing dimensions of organizational climate and transformational leadership accounted for the greatest amount of variance in provider reported burnout. Analyses demonstrated significantly lower levels of depersonalization among Wraparound providers compared to traditional case managers. Age was the only demographic variable related to burnout. Additionally, no significant effects were found for provider discipline or for agency tenure and caseload size. Results suggest the need to consider organizational development strategies aimed at creating more functional and less stressful climates and increasing levels of transformational leadership behaviors in order to reduce levels of burnout among clinicians working in public mental health settings for youth and families. PMID:24564442

  11. Lessons from VET Providers Delivering Degrees: Case Studies. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Victor J.; Bowman, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in the number of registered vocational education and training (VET) providers delivering associate degrees and bachelor degrees in their own right has been well publicized. However, little is known about why these VET providers have made this transition, what support is being provided to their staff and students, and how the…

  12. Organizational Support Systems for Innovation and Intrapreneurship: A Comparative Analysis of Innovative Cases from R&D Centres and Operating Departments of Large Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manimala, Mathew J.; Jose, P.D.; Thomas, K. Raju

    2007-01-01

    The research literature is rich on innovations in R&D-specific organizations and provides useful information on support systems and other organizational features associated with such specialized organizations. An implied assumption of many studies is that R&D exists as an independent entity, without controls or influences from the other…

  13. Organizational Support Systems for Innovation and Intrapreneurship: A Comparative Analysis of Innovative Cases from R&D Centres and Operating Departments of Large Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manimala, Mathew J.; Jose, P.D.; Thomas, K. Raju

    2007-01-01

    The research literature is rich on innovations in R&D-specific organizations and provides useful information on support systems and other organizational features associated with such specialized organizations. An implied assumption of many studies is that R&D exists as an independent entity, without controls or influences from the other…

  14. CALM: Complex Adaptive System (CAS)-Based Decision Support for Enabling Organizational Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Koehn, David J.

    Guiding organizations through transformational changes such as restructuring or adopting new technologies is a daunting task. Such changes generate workforce uncertainty, fear, and resistance, reducing morale, focus and performance. Conventional project management techniques fail to mitigate these disruptive effects, because social and individual changes are non-mechanistic, organic phenomena. CALM (for Change, Adaptation, Learning Model) is an innovative decision support system for enabling change based on CAS principles. CALM provides a low risk method for validating and refining change strategies that combines scenario planning techniques with "what-if" behavioral simulation. In essence, CALM "test drives" change strategies before rolling them out, allowing organizations to practice and learn from virtual rather than actual mistakes. This paper describes the CALM modeling methodology, including our metrics for measuring organizational readiness to respond to change and other major CALM scenario elements: prospective change strategies; alternate futures; and key situational dynamics. We then describe CALM's simulation engine for projecting scenario outcomes and its associated analytics. CALM's simulator unifies diverse behavioral simulation paradigms including: adaptive agents; system dynamics; Monte Carlo; event- and process-based techniques. CALM's embodiment of CAS dynamics helps organizations reduce risk and improve confidence and consistency in critical strategies for enabling transformations.

  15. Organization structure as a moderator of the relationship between procedural justice, interactional justice, perceived organizational support, and supervisory trust.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Maureen L; Schminke, Marshall

    2003-04-01

    Organizational justice researchers recognize the important role organization context plays in justice perceptions, yet few studies systematically examine contextual variables. This article examines how 1 aspect of context--organizational structure--affects the relationship between justice perceptions and 2 types of social exchange relationships, organizational and supervisory. The authors suggest that under different structural conditions, procedural and interactional justice will play differentially important roles in determining the quality of organizational social exchange (as evidenced by perceived organizational support [POS]) and supervisory social exchange (as evidenced by supervisory trust). In particular, the authors hypothesized that the relationship between procedural justice and POS would be stronger in mechanistic organizations and that the relationship between interactional justice and supervisory trust would be stronger in organic organizations. The authors' results support these hypotheses.

  16. The impact of organizational support and leader-member exchange on the work-related behaviour of nursing professionals: the moderating effect of professional and organizational identification.

    PubMed

    Trybou, Jeroen; Gemmel, Paul; Pauwels, Yarrid; Henninck, Charlene; Clays, Els

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relations between perceived organizational support, the quality of leader-member exchange, in-role and extra-role behaviour, professional identification and organizational identification among registered nurses and nurse assistants. Theoretically, employees will reciprocate received beneficial treatment with positive attitudes and behaviour. Recently, it has been shown that this principle may be more complex than originally anticipated. A quantitative, cross-sectional survey design was used. The quality of social exchange and identification was scored by the involved registered nurses and nurse assistants; in-role and extra-role behaviour was rated by the head nurse. The survey was administered to nurses and nurse assistants (n = 196) working in five Belgian nursing homes. Data were collected from February-March 2012. Pearson correlation analyses, t-test analyses and hierarchical regression were used to analyse the data. Our results showed no relationship between perceived organizational support and leader-member exchange and in-role behaviour. A positive relationship was found between perceived organizational support and extra-role behaviour and a trend towards significance between leader-member exchange and extra-role behaviour. Organizational and professional identification moderated the relationship between perceived organizational support and extra-role behaviour. Our study demonstrates the importance of social exchange to nurses and nurse assistants and therefore nursing administrators and leaders. When registered nurses and nurse assistants perceive high-quality social exchange, they are more likely to go the extra mile on behalf of the organization. Fostering social identification could enhance this. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Peer-driven quality improvement among health workers and traditional birth attendants in Sierra Leone: linkages between providers' organizational skills and relationships.

    PubMed

    Higgins-Steele, Ariel; Waller, Kathryn; Fotso, Jean Christophe; Vesel, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Sierra Leone has among the poorest maternal and child health indicators in the world and investments in public health have been predominately to increase demand for services, with fewer initiatives targeting supply side factors that influence health workers' work environment. This paper uses data from the Quality Circles project in a rural district of Sierra Leone to achieve three objectives. First, we examine the effect of the intervention on organizational skills and relationships among coworkers as well as between health workers and traditional birth attendants. Second, we examine whether changes in organizational skills are associated with changes in relationships among and between formal and informal health providers and between health providers and clients. Third, we aim to further understand these changes through the perspectives of health workers and traditional birth attendants. The Quality Circles project was implemented in Kailahun District in the Eastern province of Sierra Leone from August 2011 to June 2013, with adjacent Tonkolili District serving as the control site. Using a mixed-methods approach, the evaluation included a quantitative survey, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Mean values of the variables of interest were compared across sub-populations, and correlation analyses were performed between changes in organizational skills and changes in relationships. The results demonstrate that the Quality Circles intervention had positive effects on organizational skills and relationships. Furthermore, improvements in all organizational skill variables - problem-solving, strategizing and negotiation skills - were strongly associated with a change in the overall relationship variable. The Quality Circles approach has the potential to support health workers to improve their organizational skills and relationships, which in turn can contribute to improving the interpersonal dimensions of

  18. Evaluation of organizational support for use of online information resources in nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Zahra; Kazemzadeh, Farzaneh

    2014-12-01

    While there is general agreement concerning the barriers to use online information resources in nursing decisions, there have not been any studies that demonstrate how healthcare organizations have overcome these obstacles in developing countries. The purpose of this present study was to evaluate organizational support of healthcare organizations after introducing information technology for the use of online information resources in nursing care. This study was performed on nurses and nursing students in hospitals affiliated to the Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The findings showed that the use of online information resources was not adequately supported by healthcare social networks and the role of leadership has received minimal attention. There appears to be little confidence in the usefulness of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing care in Iranian society. The development of organizational norms for EBP behavior within an organization is important, and in order to monitor the development of these behaviors, the cultural competence in the healthcare institutions should be assessed and measured. However, it is far more difficult to develop a robust design, which encompasses the implementation of EBP across an entire organization. Such studies are highly complex and would need to be adapted as the organization changed, in addition, they would be likely to take considerable time to complete. Nevertheless, such studies are essential if a full understanding of organizational approaches to promoting EBP in developing countries is to occur. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Relationship between ethical work climate and nurses' perception of organizational support, commitment, job satisfaction and turnover intent.

    PubMed

    Abou Hashish, Ebtsam Aly

    2017-03-01

    Healthcare organizations are now challenged to retain nurses' generation and understand why they are leaving their nursing career prematurely. Acquiring knowledge about the effect of ethical work climate and level of perceived organizational support can help organizational leaders to deal effectively with dysfunctional behaviors and make a difference in enhancing nurses' dedication, commitment, satisfaction, and loyalty to their organization. This study aims to determine the relationship between ethical work climate, and perceived organizational support and nurses' organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. A descriptive correlational research design was conducted in all inpatient care units at three major hospitals affiliated to different health sectors at Alexandria governorate. All nurses working in these previous hospitals were included in the study (N = 500). Ethical Climate Questionnaire, Survey of Perceived Organizational Support, Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, Index of Job Satisfaction, and Intention to Turnover scale were used to measure study variables. Ethical considerations: Approval was obtained from Ethics Committee at Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University. Privacy and confidentiality of data were maintained and assured by obtaining subjects' informed consent to participate in the research before data collection. The result revealed positive significant correlations between nurses' perception of overall ethical work climate and each of perceived organizational support, commitment, as well as their job satisfaction. However, negative significant correlations were found between nurses' turnover intention and each of these variables. Also, approximately 33% of the explained variance of turnover intention is accounted by ethical work climate, organizational support, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction, and these variables independently contributed significantly in the prediction of turnover intention

  20. Participatory design of computer-supported organizational learning in health care: methods and experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, T.; Sjöberg, C.; Hallberg, N.; Eriksson, H.; Lindblom, P.; Hedblom, P.; Svensson, B.; Marmolin, H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines a Computer-Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) system for primary care and presents from its participatory design process time consumption, costs, and experiences. The system integrates a hypermedia environment, a computerized patient record, and an electronicmessage system. It is developed to coordinate organizational learning in primary care from micro to macro levels by connecting strategic planning to monitoring of patient routines. Summing up design experiences, critical issues for making CSCW systems support cost-effectiveness of health care are discussed. PMID:8563401

  1. Participatory design of computer-supported organizational learning in health care: methods and experiences.

    PubMed

    Timpka, T; Sjöberg, C; Hallberg, N; Eriksson, H; Lindblom, P; Hedblom, P; Svensson, B; Marmolin, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper outlines a Computer-Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) system for primary care and presents from its participatory design process time consumption, costs, and experiences. The system integrates a hypermedia environment, a computerized patient record, and an electronicmessage system. It is developed to coordinate organizational learning in primary care from micro to macro levels by connecting strategic planning to monitoring of patient routines. Summing up design experiences, critical issues for making CSCW systems support cost-effectiveness of health care are discussed.

  2. Findings from an organizational network analysis to support local public health management.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline; Caldwell, Michael; Rockoff, Maxine L; Gebbie, Kristine; Carley, Kathleen M; Bakken, Suzanne

    2008-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using organizational network analysis in a local public health organization. The research setting was an urban/suburban county health department with 156 employees. The goal of the research was to study communication and information flow in the department and to assess the technique for public health management. Network data were derived from survey questionnaires. Computational analysis was performed with the Organizational Risk Analyzer. Analysis revealed centralized communication, limited interdependencies, potential knowledge loss through retirement, and possible informational silos. The findings suggested opportunities for more cross program coordination but also suggested the presences of potentially efficient communication paths and potentially beneficial social connectedness. Managers found the findings useful to support decision making. Public health organizations must be effective in an increasingly complex environment. Network analysis can help build public health capacity for complex system management.

  3. Findings from an Organizational Network Analysis to Support Local Public Health Management

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Michael; Rockoff, Maxine L.; Gebbie, Kristine; Carley, Kathleen M.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using organizational network analysis in a local public health organization. The research setting was an urban/suburban county health department with 156 employees. The goal of the research was to study communication and information flow in the department and to assess the technique for public health management. Network data were derived from survey questionnaires. Computational analysis was performed with the Organizational Risk Analyzer. Analysis revealed centralized communication, limited interdependencies, potential knowledge loss through retirement, and possible informational silos. The findings suggested opportunities for more cross program coordination but also suggested the presences of potentially efficient communication paths and potentially beneficial social connectedness. Managers found the findings useful to support decision making. Public health organizations must be effective in an increasingly complex environment. Network analysis can help build public health capacity for complex system management. PMID:18481183

  4. WORKPLACE SOCIAL SUPPORT AND WORK–FAMILY CONFLICT: A META-ANALYSIS CLARIFYING THE INFLUENCE OF GENERAL AND WORK–FAMILY-SPECIFIC SUPERVISOR AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; PICHLER, SHAUN; BODNER, TODD; HAMMER, LESLIE B.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses meta-analysis to develop a model integrating research on relationships between employee perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor and organizational support and work–family conflict. Drawing on 115 samples from 85 studies comprising 72,507 employees, we compared the relative influence of 4 types of workplace social support to work–family conflict: perceived organizational support (POS); supervisor support; perceived organizational work–family support, also known as family-supportive organizational perceptions (FSOP); and supervisor work–family support. Results show work–family-specific constructs of supervisor support and organization support are more strongly related to work–family conflict than general supervisor support and organization support, respectively. We then test a mediation model assessing the effects of all measures at once and show positive perceptions of general and work–family-specific supervisor indirectly relate to work–family conflict via organizational work–family support. These results demonstrate that work–family-specific support plays a central role in individuals’ work–family conflict experiences. PMID:21691415

  5. Nature contact and organizational support during office working hours: Benefits relating to stress reduction, subjective health complaints, and sick leave.

    PubMed

    Bjørnstad, Siv; Patil, Grete G; Raanaas, Ruth K

    2015-01-01

    Improving social support, and providing nature contact at work are potential health promoting workplace interventions. The objective was to investigate whether nature contact at work is associated with employee's health and participation, and to study whether the possible associations between nature contact and health can be explained by perceived organizational support. Data were collected through a web-based, cross-sectional survey of employees in seven public and private office workplaces in Norway (n = 707, 40% response rate). Multiple linear and logistic regression analysis were performed on 565 participants fulfilling inclusion criteria. A greater amount of indoor nature contact at work was significantly associated with less job stress (B = -0.18, CI = -0.318 to -0.042), fewer subjective health complaints (B = -0.278, CI = -0.445 to -0.112) and less sickness absence (B = -0.061, CI = -0.009 to -0.002). Perceived organizational support mediated the associations between indoor nature contact and job stress and sickness absence, and partly mediated the association with subjective health complaints. Outdoor nature contact showed no reliable association with the outcomes in this study. Extending nature contact in the physical work environment in offices, can add to the variety of possible health-promoting workplace interventions, primarily since it influences the social climate on the workplace.

  6. The impact of strategic planning process variation on superior organizational performance in nonprofit human service organizations providing mental health services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Karun Krishna

    This research investigated the question: What is the impact of strategic planning process variation on superior organizational performance in nonprofit human service organizations providing mental health services? The study employed a retrospective, cross-sectional, comparison group design using a combination of survey data, unobtrusive agency backup data, and follow-up in-person interview data. The sample was comprised of two main groups of organizations, those that were doing strategic planning and those that were not engaged in strategic planning. Responses were obtained from the chief executive officers of 306 of the 380 randomly selected organizations resulting in a response rate of 81%. Hypotheses were tested using multiple and logistic regression procedures. The major finding of this study was that complete strategic planning is highly correlated with superior organizational performance. The implications of the findings for administration, policy, research, and the social work profession are discussed.

  7. Supportive Accountability: A Model for Providing Human Support to Enhance Adherence to eHealth Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of and adherence to eHealth interventions is enhanced by human support. However, human support has largely not been manualized and has usually not been guided by clear models. The objective of this paper is to develop a clear theoretical model, based on relevant empirical literature, that can guide research into human support components of eHealth interventions. A review of the literature revealed little relevant information from clinical sciences. Applicable literature was drawn primarily from organizational psychology, motivation theory, and computer-mediated communication (CMC) research. We have developed a model, referred to as “Supportive Accountability.” We argue that human support increases adherence through accountability to a coach who is seen as trustworthy, benevolent, and having expertise. Accountability should involve clear, process-oriented expectations that the patient is involved in determining. Reciprocity in the relationship, through which the patient derives clear benefits, should be explicit. The effect of accountability may be moderated by patient motivation. The more intrinsically motivated patients are, the less support they likely require. The process of support is also mediated by the communications medium (eg, telephone, instant messaging, email). Different communications media each have their own potential benefits and disadvantages. We discuss the specific components of accountability, motivation, and CMC medium in detail. The proposed model is a first step toward understanding how human support enhances adherence to eHealth interventions. Each component of the proposed model is a testable hypothesis. As we develop viable human support models, these should be manualized to facilitate dissemination. PMID:21393123

  8. Social support, organizational characteristics, psychological well-being, and group appraisal in three self-help group populations.

    PubMed

    Maton, K I

    1988-02-01

    This study examined the relationship of three social support and three organizational variables to two well-being and two group appraisal variables among 144 members of Compassionate Friends, Multiple Sclerosis, and Overeaters Anonymous self-help groups. An anonymous questionnaire was the major research instrument. Receiving social support was not significantly related to depression or anxiety but was positively related to perceived group benefits and group satisfaction. Providing social support and friendship were each positively related to one well-being and one group appraisal variable. Bidirectional supporters (i.e., individuals high on both receiving and providing support) reported more favorable well-being and group appraisal than Receivers, Providers, and Low Supporters. At the group level of analysis (n = 15 groups), groups with higher levels of role differentiation, greater order and organization, and in which leaders were perceived as more capable contained members who reported more positive well-being and group appraisal. The implications for future research and professional consultation to self-help groups are discussed.

  9. Perceived organizational support, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and stigma in soldiers returning from combat.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Christie L; Britt, Thomas W; Adler, Amy B; Bliese, Paul D

    2014-05-01

    Research has shown that perceived organizational support (POS), or how much employees believe their organizations value their contributions and well-being, is an important predictor of employee mental health outcomes. To support employee mental health in high-risk occupations, organizations may want to identify variables that explain the relationship between POS and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Using a longitudinal design and a military sample, the present study found a relationship between POS and stigma as well as PTSD symptoms. Stigma partially mediated the relationship between POS at Time 1 and PTSD symptoms at Time 2. The partial mediation indicates that a supportive environment may also create a climate of reduced stigma in which soldiers may be comfortable addressing PTSD symptoms. Both results suggest positive actions that organizations can take to support employee mental health. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Motivating adult children to provide support to a family caregiver.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Neena; Miller, Megan M; Brannon, Laura A

    2013-10-01

    This study compared altruistically and egoistically framed messages for encouraging adult children to support a parent providing care for an elderly relative. Undergraduate students imagined their mother filling a caregiving role while reading a message about family caregiving and the physical and psychological stresses it involves. The message encouraged participants to support the caregiver either for altruistic (other-oriented) or egoistic (self-oriented) reasons. Thereafter, participants completed self-assessment surveys of attachment style and willingness to provide support. Securely attached (less self-oriented) participants were not differentially influenced by the two messages. However, insecurely attached (more self-oriented) participants were more willing to help if they received the egoistic message than if they received the altruistic message. Thus, knowledge of a family member's attachment style can be useful for selecting an appropriate method for encouraging caregiver support. Whereas the type of message used does not matter for securely attached individuals, an egoistically framed message may be more influential than an altruistically framed message among insecurely attached individuals. It is important that clinicians work with families to establish appropriate levels of individual commitment to caregiving responsibilities or supportive behaviours such that involvement is beneficial to the health of the caregiver, the care recipient and supporters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lactation Consultants' Perceived Barriers to Providing Professional Breastfeeding Support.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Erica H; Coulter, Martha; Jevitt, Cecilia M; Perrin, Kay M; Dabrow, Sharon; Klasko-Foster, Lynne B; Daley, Ellen M

    2017-08-01

    Addressing suboptimal breastfeeding initiation and duration rates is a priority in the United States. To address challenges to improving these rates, the voices of the providers who work with breastfeeding mothers should be heard. Research aim: The purpose of this study was to explore lactation consultants' perceived barriers to managing early breastfeeding problems. This qualitative study was conducted with a grounded theory methodological approach. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 International Board Certified Lactation Consultants across Florida. Lactation consultants were from a range of practice settings, including hospitals, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children clinics, private practice, and pediatric offices. Data were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in Atlas.ti. A range of barriers was identified and grouped into the following categories/themes: indirect barriers (social norms, knowledge, attitudes); direct occupational barriers (institutional constraints, lack of coordination, poor service delivery); and direct individual barriers (social support, mother's self-efficacy). A model was developed illustrating the factors that influence the role enactment of lactation consultants in managing breastfeeding problems. Inadequate support for addressing early breastfeeding challenges is compounded by a lack of collaboration among various healthcare providers and the family. Findings provide insight into the professional management issues of early breastfeeding problems faced by lactation consultants. Team-based, interprofessional approaches to breastfeeding support for mothers and their families are needed; improving interdisciplinary collaboration could lead to better integration of lactation consultants who are educated and experienced in providing lactation support and management of breastfeeding problems.

  12. Foundation Content Knowledge: Providing Support for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsell, Chris; Ingram, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the assessment of primary pre-service teachers' mathematics content knowledge and the associated support services provided at the University of Otago during 2013. Most pre-service teachers believed that the results from the assessments accurately reflected their mathematics knowledge and gave them useful feedback about…

  13. Escalation research: Providing new frontiers for applying behavior analysis to organizational behavior

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2000-01-01

    Decision fiascoes such as escalation of commitment, the tendency of decision makers to “throw good money after bad,” can have serious consequences for organizations and are therefore of great interest in applied research. This paper discusses the use of behavior analysis in organizational behavior research on escalation. Among the most significant aspects of behavior-analytic research on escalation is that it has indicated that both the patterns of outcomes that decision makers have experienced for past decisions and the patterns of responses that they make are critical for understanding escalation. This research has also stimulated the refinement of methods by researchers to better assess decision making and the role reinforcement plays in it. Finally, behavior-analytic escalation research has not only indicated the utility of reinforcement principles for predicting more complex human behavior but has also suggested some additional areas for future exploration of decision making using behavior analysis. PMID:22478347

  14. Dimensions of Principal Support Behaviors and Their Relationship to Organizational Citizenship Behaviors and Student Achievement in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindle, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed with the primary purpose of identifying the dimensions of principal support perceived by public high school teachers in Virginia and identifying the relationship between principal support and organizational citizenship behaviors. In addition, this study also examined the relationship between principal support and student…

  15. Dimensions of Principal Support Behaviors and Their Relationship to Organizational Citizenship Behaviors and Student Achievement in High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindle, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed with the primary purpose of identifying the dimensions of principal support perceived by public high school teachers in Virginia and identifying the relationship between principal support and organizational citizenship behaviors. In addition, this study also examined the relationship between principal support and student…

  16. Interaction of core self-evaluations and perceived organizational support on work-to-family enrichment.

    PubMed

    McNall, Laurel A; Masuda, Aline D; Shanock, Linda Rhoades; Nicklin, Jessica M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to offer an empirical test of J. H. Greenhaus and G. N. Powell's (2006) model of work-family enrichment by examining dispositional (i.e., core self-evaluations; CSEs) and situational (i.e., perceived organizational support; POS) factors associated with work-to-family enrichment (WFE) and whether these variables interact in predicting WFE. In a survey of 220 employed adults, our hierarchical regression analysis revealed that in highly supportive work environments, individuals reported high WFE regardless of CSE. However, when POS was low, individuals high in CSEs reported higher WFE than those low in CSEs, in support of conservation of resources theory (S. E. Hobfoll, 2002). Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  17. Providing Field Support for the Behavior Response Study (BRS-08)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    pp. Evans, D.I. and G.R. England. (2001) Joint interim report Bahamas marine mammal stranding event of 15 – 16 March 2000. National Oceanographic...Providing Field Support for the Behavior Response Study (BRS-08) Diane Elaine Claridge Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation P.O. Box AB...took place in 2008, known as BRS-08. Specific objectives were: 1) To work with the Marine Mammal Monitoring (M3R) program at the Atlantic Undersea

  18. Examining Practitioner Competencies, Organizational Support and Barriers to Engaging Fathers in Parenting Interventions.

    PubMed

    Tully, L A; Collins, D A J; Piotrowska, P J; Mairet, K S; Hawes, D J; Moul, C; Lenroot, R K; Frick, P J; Anderson, V A; Kimonis, E R; Dadds, M R

    2017-05-18

    Evidence-based parenting interventions have been developed and evaluated largely with mothers. This study examined practitioner reports of rates of father attendance, barriers to engagement, organizational support for father-inclusive practice, participation in training in father engagement, and competencies in working with fathers. It also explored predictors of practitioner competence and rates of father attendance. Practitioners (N = 210) who delivered parenting interventions completed an online survey. Participants reported high levels of confidence in engaging fathers, but only one in three had participated in training and levels of father attendance in parenting interventions were low. Logistic regressions showed that high levels of practitioner competence were predicted by participation in training. Moderate levels of father attendance (vs. low levels) were predicted by greater number of years of experience while high levels of attendance (vs. low levels) were predicted by greater experience, higher levels of competence and higher levels of organizational support. The implications of the findings to informing policy and practice for enhancing father engagement are discussed.

  19. Young elite athletes and social support: coping with competitive and organizational stress in "Olympic" competition.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, E; Roberts, G C

    2010-08-01

    Elite adolescent sport is a relatively unexplored research field. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how the Norwegian Olympic Youth Team (N=29) experienced competitive and organizational stress during the European Youth Olympic Festival in July 2007 and how they coped with the stressors. Participants were aged 14-17 and competed in handball, track and field, swimming, and judo. We used a qualitative methodology with interviews and open-ended questionnaires. Qualitative content analyses revealed that the athletes experienced competitive stressors because of the size and importance of the competition, and organizational stressors (e.g., housing, lining up for food, and transportation) exacerbated by the extreme heat during the Festival. The elite competitive experience was novel to all and overwhelming for some of the more "inexperienced" athletes. The athletes used cognitive coping strategies to some extent in addition to relying on different types of social support. The findings revealed the need for social support for adolescent athletes, and underlined the importance of a good coach-athlete relationship in order to perform well and enjoy the competitive experience.

  20. Providers' Response to Clinical Decision Support for QT Prolonging Drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Martijn Bos, J; Tarrell, Robert F; Simon, Gyorgy J; Morlan, Bruce W; Ackerman, Michael J; Caraballo, Pedro J

    2017-09-02

    Commonly used drugs in hospital setting can cause QT prolongation and trigger life-threatening arrhythmias. We evaluate changes in prescribing behavior after the implementation of a clinical decision support system to prevent the use of QT prolonging medications in the hospital setting. We conducted a quasi-experimental study, before and after the implementation of a clinical decision support system integrated in the electronic medical record (QT-alert system). This system detects patients at risk of significant QT prolongation (QTc>500ms) and alerts providers ordering QT prolonging drugs. We reviewed the electronic health record to assess the provider's responses which were classified as "action taken" (QT drug avoided, QT drug changed, other QT drug(s) avoided, ECG monitoring, electrolytes monitoring, QT issue acknowledged, other actions) or "no action taken". Approximately, 15.5% (95/612) of the alerts were followed by a provider's action in the pre-intervention phase compared with 21% (228/1085) in the post-intervention phase (p=0.006). The most common type of actions taken during pre-intervention phase compared to post-intervention phase were ECG monitoring (8% vs. 13%, p=0.002) and QT issue acknowledgment (2.1% vs. 4.1%, p=0.03). Notably, there was no significant difference for other actions including QT drug avoided (p=0.8), QT drug changed (p=0.06) and other QT drug(s) avoided (p=0.3). Our study demonstrated that the QT alert system prompted a higher proportion of providers to take action on patients at risk of complications. However, the overall impact was modest underscoring the need for educating providers and optimizing clinical decision support to further reduce drug-induced QT prolongation.

  1. Perceived organizational support and turnover intention: the mediating effects of personal sacrifice and job fit.

    PubMed

    Dawley, David; Houghton, Jeffery D; Bucklew, Neil S

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the mediating role of job fit on the relationship between perceived supervisor support (PSS) and perceived organizational support (POS), and the mediating role of personal sacrifice on the relationship between POS and turnover intention. We use structural equation modeling (SEM) with a data set consisting of a sample of 346 individuals in a manufacturing firm to test our proposed model of PSS, POS, and turnover intention. Consistent with prior literature, our hypothesized model confirms that PSS is a predictor of POS and that POS is a predictor of turnover intention. By testing two additional competing and theoretically derived nested models, our findings indicate that job fit partially mediates the relationship between PSS and POS, and that personal sacrifice partially mediates the relationship between POS and turnover intention. Our study is among the first to examine job fit and personal sacrifice as mediators within the POS-turnover intention model.

  2. Should Nurses Be Knowledge Brokers? Competencies and Organizational Resources to Support the Role.

    PubMed

    Catallo, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Registered nurses with graduate preparation are in a unique position to act as knowledge brokers owing to their extensive clinical experience and ability to be seen as a credible and respected resource by their peers. Nurse knowledge brokers can bridge the gap between research producers and those that need evidence for decision-making and support capacity development for evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM). Knowledge broker competencies include graduate-level education with exposure to research methods; experience with the EIDM process; and established networking skills to bring researchers, decision-makers, stakeholders and policymakers together. For the knowledge broker to be successful, the nurse leader can cultivate an organizational culture supportive of evidence use with advocacy for mandates that require evidence for decisions, structures in place for each stage of the EIDM process, and physical resources such as library services for evidence retrieval.

  3. Providing social support in a persuasive context: forms of social support reported by organ procurement coordinators.

    PubMed

    Anker, Ashley E; Akey, Jessica E; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Eighty-five organ procurement coordinators (OPCs) completed face-to-face interviews designed to elicit the emotional and instrumental social support strategies communicated to potential donor families throughout the request for deceased organ donation. OPCs identified six forms of emotional support and eight forms of instrumental support, with greater reported use of instrumental support strategies. In terms of instrumental support, OPCs most frequently ensured in-hospital comfort (61.2%) or met the nutritional needs of family members (51.8%). With respect to emotional support, OPCs most often expressed sympathy (31.8%) to families and provided support in the form of physical contact (27.1%) with family members. Identifying the forms of social support used by OPCs is a first step toward understanding the strategies that are more (or less) effective in achieving persuasive and support goals.

  4. A program to provide resources and support for clinical associates.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Caralise W; Curtis, Amy M; Sanderson, Bonnie K

    2013-06-01

    Clinical associates are necessary and valued contributors to nursing education. All those involved in student instruction need to have clearly defined expectations that are aligned with the conceptual framework and program outcomes. Additionally, they must have the necessary resources to facilitate their ability to effectively instruct and evaluate nursing students in the clinical setting. Preparing competent clinical associates to provide effective clinical instruction requires detailed planning and development that includes guided mentoring from faculty. This article describes the development of an orientation course and ongoing resources and support designed to facilitate the transition into a clinical instructor role for registered nurses teaching in a baccalaureate nursing program. The Clinical Associate Resources and Support program was designed to enhance learning experiences for both clinical associates and the recipients of clinical education, nursing students. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Providing holistic support for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Vera

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are life-long, complex conditions. They are characterised by periods of exacerbation and remission and surgical intervention may be required in severe cases. Drugs employed in the management of IBD are used to induce remission and maintain remission. IBD has a physical, psychological and sociological impact on individuals and IBD quality standards have been developed to provide a framework for addressing the services and care that should be available for them. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies play an important role in the holistic approach to management of IBD as they are being increasingly used alongside conventional medical treatments. Community nurses have an important role to play in the management and care of individuals with IBD and in supporting them in making informed and appropriate choices that support their wellbeing and quality of life.

  6. Providing information promotes greater public support for potable recycled water.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Kelly S; Roiko, Anne H

    2014-09-15

    In spite of the clear need to address water security through sourcing new and alternative water supplies, there has been marked resistance from some communities to the introduction of recycled water for potable use. The present studies tested the effectiveness of providing relatively brief information about the recycled water process and the safety of recycled water on cognitive, emotional and behavioral responses. Three information conditions (basic information or basic information plus information about pollutants in the water, or information that puts the risk of chemicals in the water in perspective) were compared to a no information control condition. Across three experiments there was general support for the hypothesis that providing information would result in more positive cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses to recycled water. Information increased comfort with potable recycled water and, in general, participants in the information conditions expressed more positive emotions (Experiment 1 & 3), less negative emotions (Experiment 3), more support (Experiment 1 & 3), and lower risk perceptions (Experiment 1 & 3) than those in the no information control condition. Participants who received information also drank more recycled water than control participants (Experiment 1 & 2, although the differences between conditions was not statistically significant) and were significantly more likely to vote in favor of the introduction of a recycled water scheme (Experiment 3). There was evidence, however, that providing information about the level of pollutants in recycled water may lead to ambivalent responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of family-supportive supervisor training on employee job performance and attitudes: An organizational work-family intervention.

    PubMed

    Odle-Dusseau, Heather N; Hammer, Leslie B; Crain, Tori L; Bodner, Todd E

    2016-07-01

    Training supervisors to increase their family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB) has demonstrated significant benefits for employee physical health, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among employees with high levels of family-to-work conflict in prior research in a grocery store context. We replicate and extend these results in a health care setting with additional important employee outcomes (i.e., employee engagement, organizational commitment, and supervisor ratings of job performance), and consider the role of the 4 dimensions underlying the FSSB. Using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 143 health care employees completed surveys at 2 time periods approximately 10 months apart, along with their supervisors who provided ratings of employees' job performance. Between these surveys, we offered their supervisors FSSB training; 86 (71%) of these supervisors participated. Results demonstrated significant and beneficial indirect effects of FSSB training on changes in employee job performance, organizational commitment, engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions through changes in employee perceptions of their supervisor's overall FSSBs. Further analyses suggest that these indirect effects are due primarily to changes in the creative work-family management dimension of FSSB. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The relationship between job performance and perceived organizational support in faculty members at Chinese universities: a questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although several studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between perceived organizational support (POS) and job performance (JP), it remains unclear whether this relationship is appropriate for faculty members at Chinese universities. The objectives of this study were to (a) examine the correlation between POS andJP; (b) identify the predictors of POS, including demographic and organizational characteristics among faculty members at a Chinese university; (c) investigate the influence of mediating factors between POS and JP; and (d) compare the findings of this study with related studies. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was used in this study. The questionnaire was administered to 700 faculty members who were randomly selected from all faculty members at six universities. A total of 581 questionnaires were obtained. A statistical model for JP was developed based on the literature review. Results The analysis results indicated that the relationship between POS and JP was mediated by job satisfaction (JS), positive affectivity (PA), and affective commitment (AC). In addition, procedural and distributive justice contribute to POS. Conclusions The study concludes that the relationship between POS and JP is mediated by JS, PA, and AC and is influenced by POS. These results can provide evidence for university administrators to improve POS and increase the JP of faculty members at universities. PMID:24624932

  9. Health information support provided by professional associations in Canada.

    PubMed

    Chatterley, Trish; Storie, Dale; Chambers, Thane; Buckingham, Jeanette; Shiri, Ali; Dorgan, Marlene

    2012-09-01

    Healthcare practitioners in Alberta and across Canada have varying levels of access to information resources depending on their institutional and professional affiliations, yet access to current health information is critical for all. To determine what information resources and services are provided by Albertan and Canadian professional health associations to their members. Representatives of professional colleges and associations were interviewed regarding information resources and services offered to members and perceptions of their members' information needs. National-level associations are more likely to provide resources than provincial ones. There is a clear distinction between colleges and associations in terms of information offered: colleges provide regulatory information, while associations are responsible for provision of clinical information resources. Only half of the associations interviewed provide members with access to licensed databases, with cost being a major barrier. There is considerable variation in the number of electronic resources and the levels of information support provided by professional health associations in Alberta and Canada. Access and usage vary among the health professions. National licensing of resources or creation of a portal linking to freely available alternatives are potential options for increasing access and awareness. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  10. Supporting continuous learning in a large organization: the role of group and organizational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Paul; Zdrahal, Zdenek; Domingue, John

    2005-03-01

    Many organizations recognize the need to continuously adapt and learn in order to survive and remain competitive. Learning and therefore change in organizations is driven in two ways. First, there is strategically driven learning, motivated by high-level factors such as market changes, company mergers and newly emerging approaches to organizational management and workplace learning. These changes reveal themselves in the introduction of new training programmes, recruitment strategies and knowledge management methodologies. Second, there is local, continuous learning occurring from the ground up. This is revealed as workers become more adept at their job through experience and collaboration with colleagues. Continuous learning is more gradual and requires local autonomy. This paper describes an experiment in supporting local, continuous learning, and its dissemination, but driven by a strategic initiative of the organization. This work raised many issues concerning the difficulty of integrating local and global organizational influences on learning. We outline lessons learned and suggestions as to the extent to which it is possible to align continuous learning with a company-wide perspective.

  11. Writing for publication: institutional support provides an enabling environment.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Beverley; Libhaber, Elena

    2016-04-18

    Due to the excessive service delivery loads in public hospitals supported by academic institutions in developing environments, researchers at these institutions have little time to develop scientific writing skills or to write up their research. It is imperative to expand the writing skills of researchers and train the next generation of health sciences academics in order to disseminate research findings. This study reports on the implementation of approaches for writing and publication and the extent of support to staff suffering from the overload of service delivery and of heavy teaching duties. Workshops in scientific writing and writing retreats were initiated and were offered to all staff. Feedback from participants of the writing skills workshops indicated that the workshops provided an injection of confidence and proficiency. Protected writing time resulted in 132 papers submitted to journals and 95 in preparation from 230 participants of the writing retreats over a two year period. Staff commended the off-site, collegial environment, which also supported future collaboration with new-found colleagues. This enabling environment facilitates not only the development of writing skills per se, but also the dissemination of the generated scientific knowledge. In addition, the training in writing skills of this generation will be of value in the training of future cohorts in countries with similar health care deliverables.

  12. How the 'warped' relationships between nurses' emotions, attitudes, social support and perceived organizational conditions impact customer orientation.

    PubMed

    Gountas, Sandra; Gountas, John

    2016-02-01

    Much research focuses on organizational culture and its impact on customer orientation or emotional states and their impact on job satisfaction and well-being. This study aims to combine the complex roles of nurses' emotion states and job satisfaction in a model that identifies the effects of standards for service delivery (organizational culture), supervisor and co-worker support and the development of customer orientation. A previous study examined the relationships between nurses' personal resources, job satisfaction and customer orientation. This study examines how these variables relate to organizational standards and social support. A cross-sectional survey using a self-completion questionnaire with validated, existing scales to measure standards for service delivery, supervisor and co-worker support, job satisfaction, empathic concern, emotional exhaustion and customer orientation. Nurses (159) completed the questionnaire in 2010. The data were analysed using WarpPLS, a structural equation modelling software package. The results indicate that the final model fits the data well and explains 84% of the variance in customer orientation. The findings show the importance of standard for service delivery (organizational culture), supervisor and co-worker support on customer orientation. Nurses' personal resources interact with these, particularly supervisor and co-worker support, to develop staff job satisfaction and empathy. The need for support mechanisms in stressful times is discussed. We propose that training in compassion and empathy would help leaders to model desirable attributes that contribute towards customer orientation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Empirically Supported Treatment’s Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate

    PubMed Central

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the working conditions in programs that currently use ESTs. Method This study compared the culture and climate scores of a large organization’s programs that use ESTs and those programs indicating no EST usage. Results Of the total 55 different programs (1,273 frontline workers), 27 programs used ESTs. Results indicate that the programs offering an EST had significantly more rigid and resistant cultures, compared to those without any ESTs. In regard to climate, programs offering an EST were significantly less engaged, less functional, and more stressed. Conclusion Outcomes indicate a significant disruption in organizational culture and climate for programs offering ESTs. PMID:23243379

  14. Testing the effort-reward imbalance model among Finnish managers: the role of perceived organizational support.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru; Mäkikangas, Anne

    2008-04-01

    The present study is aimed at examining the combined effects of effort-reward imbalance (ERI), overcommitment (OVC), and perceived organizational support (POS) on turnover intentions and work engagement, among Finnish managers (n = 1,301). Consequently, the study contributes to the research literature by examining how the ERI-outcomes relationship was dependent simultaneously on OVC and POS. The results showed that ERI x OVC x POS interaction was significant only for turnover intentions. The ERI-turnover intentions relationship was strongest under conditions of high OVC and low POS. In addition, the relationship between ERI and decreased work engagement, especially dedication, was strengthened among overcommitted managers, compared to their less committed counterparts. Altogether, the results indicate that interventions aimed at reducing turnover intentions and increasing work engagement by increasing ERI should consider OVC and POS.

  15. Rapid Deterioration of Basic Life Support Skills in Dentists With Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider

    PubMed Central

    Nogami, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Shogo; Ichiyama, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between basic life support skills in dentists who had completed the American Heart Association's Basic Life Support (BLS) Healthcare Provider qualification and time since course completion. Thirty-six dentists who had completed the 2005 BLS Healthcare Provider course participated in the study. We asked participants to perform 2 cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a mannequin and evaluated basic life support skills. Dentists who had previously completed the BLS Healthcare Provider course displayed both prolonged reaction times, and the quality of their basic life support skills deteriorated rapidly. There were no correlations between basic life support skills and time since course completion. Our results suggest that basic life support skills deteriorate rapidly for dentists who have completed the BLS Healthcare Provider. Newer guidelines stressing chest compressions over ventilation may help improve performance over time, allowing better cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dental office emergencies. Moreover, it may be effective to provide a more specialized version of the life support course to train the dentists, stressing issues that may be more likely to occur in the dental office. PMID:27269662

  16. Services provided by the 222-S laboratory for regulatory support

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.P.

    1993-11-01

    This document defines the services the 222-S Laboratory shall provide Regulatory Support (RS) and the samples RS plans to submit to the 222-S Laboratory throughout the calendar year for analysis. Analysis of effluent (liquid and air discharges) and environmental (air, liquid, animal, and vegetative) samples is required using standard laboratory procedures, in accordance with regulatory and control requirements cited in Quality Assurance Program Plan for Radionuclide Airborne Emissions Monitoring, Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Activities, and Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan. Radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site and the resulting effective dose equivalent to any member of the public from those emissions are reported. This report complies with the reporting requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, ``Protection of the Environment, `` Part 61, ``National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, `` Subpart H, ``National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclide Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities.``

  17. Use of Intranasal Naloxone by Basic Life Support Providers.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Scott G; Mitchell, Patricia M; Temin, Elizabeth S; Langlois, Breanne K; Dyer, K Sophia

    2017-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of naloxone to reverse the effects of opioid overdose by Advanced Life Support (ALS) providers has been studied in several prehospital settings. In 2006, in response to the increase in opioid-related overdoses, a special waiver from the state allowed administration of intranasal naloxone by Basic Life Support (BLS) providers in our city. This study aimed to determine: 1) if patients who received a 2-mg dose of nasal naloxone administered by BLS required repeat dosing while in the emergency department (ED), and 2) the disposition of these patients. This was a retrospective review of patients transported by an inner-city municipal ambulance service to one of three academic medical centers. We included patients aged 18 and older that were transported by ambulance between 1/1/2006 and 12/12/2012 and who received intranasal naloxone by BLS providers as per a state approved protocol. Site investigators matched EMS run data to patients from each hospital's EMR and performed a chart review to confirm that the patient was correctly identified and to record the outcomes of interest. Descriptive statistics were then generated. A total of 793 patients received nasal naloxone by BLS and were transported to three hospitals. ALS intervened and transported 116 (14.6%) patients, and 11 (1.4%) were intubated in the field. There were 724 (91.3%) patients successfully matched to an ED chart. Hospital A received 336 (46.4%) patients, Hospital B received 210 (29.0%) patients, and Hospital C received 178 (24.6%) patients. Mean age was 36.2 (SD 10.5) years and 522 (72.1%) were male; 702 (97.1%) were reported to have abused heroin while 21 (2.9%) used other opioids. Nasal naloxone had an effect per the prehospital record in 689 (95.2%) patients. An additional naloxone dose was given in the ED to 64 (8.8%) patients. ED dispositions were: 507 (70.0%) discharged, 105 (14.5%) admitted, and 112 (15.5%) other (e.g., left against medical advice, left without being seen, or

  18. A Framework for Supporting Organizational Transition Processes Towards Sustainable Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Rajesh

    Economic development over the last century has driven a tripling of the world's population, a twenty-fold increase in fossil fuel consumption, and a tripling of traditional biomass consumption. The associated broad income and wealth inequities are retaining over 2 billion people in poverty. Adding to this, fossil fuel combustion is impacting the environment across spatial and temporal scales and the cost of energy is outpacing all other variable costs for most industries. With 60% of world energy delivered in 2008 consumed by the commercial and industrial sector, the fragmented and disparate energy-related decision making within organizations are largely responsible for the inefficient and impacting use of energy resources. The global transition towards sustainable development will require the collective efforts of national, regional, and local governments, institutions, the private sector, and a well-informed public. The leadership role in this transition could be provided by private and public sector organizations, by way of sustainability-oriented organizations, cultures, and infrastructure. The diversity in literature exemplifies the developing nature of sustainability science, with most sustainability assessment approaches and frameworks lacking transformational characteristics, tending to focus on analytical methods. In general, some shortfalls in sustainability assessment processes include lack of: · thorough stakeholder participation in systems and stakeholder mapping, · participatory envisioning of future sustainable states, · normative aggregation of results to provide an overall measure of sustainability, and · influence within strategic decision-making processes. Specific to energy sustainability assessments, while some authors aggregate results to provide overall sustainability scores, assessments have focused solely on energy supply scenarios, while including the deficits discussed above. This paper presents a framework for supporting

  19. Burnout: Interpreting the Perception of Iranian Primary Rural Health Care Providers from Working and Organizational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. Methods: The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; “instability and frequent changes”, “involved in laws and regulations”, “pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower”, “helplessness in performing the tasks and duties”, “sense of identity threat and low self-concept”, and “deprivation of professional development”. The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called “burnout”. Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community. PMID:22826774

  20. A reference basic life support provider course for Europe.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Robert Sebastian; Handley, Anthony J

    2006-06-01

    Good scientific evidence is scarce in relation to the effectiveness of different methods of teaching basic life support (BLS) to the general public. In order to test new courses or methods a reference course is needed as a comparative standard. To propose a reference BLS provider course that can be used as a comparator when testing new courses or teaching methods. All national resuscitation councils that are represented in the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) were sent a questionnaire about the BLS provider courses run by them or under their auspices. Sixteen national resuscitation councils responded to the enquiry. Their responses regarding organisation, structure, content and methods of the courses were found to be remarkably consistent between European countries. Few issues had a high variance. Based on the responses received, a reference BLS provider course for lay persons is suggested as a tool for research. The course duration is 3 h 15 min (excluding breaks), with 2 h 15 min practice time for the participants, 30 min for theory and 20 min for practical demonstrations by the instructor. A manual is distributed at the start of the course. The ratio of instructors to participants is one to six. The lectures are interactive between the instructor and the participants. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is practised on manikins in groups of six. A formal BLS scenario test may be held at the end of the course as part of a research study or if the candidates so request. It is suggested that by using this reference course during research into lay person BLS teaching, it will be easier to make comparisons between different studies.

  1. The development of an online decision support tool for organizational readiness for change

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much importance has been placed on assessing readiness for change as one of the earliest steps of implementation, but measuring it can be a complex and daunting task. Organizations and individuals struggle with how to reliably and accurately measure readiness for change. Several measures have been developed to help organizations assess readiness, but these are often underused due to the difficulty of selecting the right measure. In response to this challenge, we will develop and test a prototype of a decision support tool that is designed to guide individuals interested in implementation in the selection of an appropriate readiness assessment measure for their setting. Methods A multi-phase approach will be used to develop the decision support tool. First, we will identify key measures for assessing organizational readiness for change from a recently completed systematic review. Included measures will be those developed for healthcare settings (e.g., acute care, public health, mental health) and that have been deemed valid and reliable. Second, study investigators and field experts will engage in a mapping exercise to categorize individual items of included measures according to key readiness constructs from an existing framework. Third, a stakeholder panel will be recruited and consulted to determine the feasibility and relevance of the selected measures using a modified Delphi process. Fourth, findings from the mapping exercise and stakeholder consultation will inform the development of a decision support tool that will guide users in appropriately selecting change readiness measures. Fifth, the tool will undergo usability testing. Discussion Our proposed decision support tool will address current challenges in the field of organizational change readiness by aiding individuals in selecting a valid and reliable assessment measure that is relevant to user needs and practice settings. We anticipate that implementers and researchers who use our tool will

  2. The development of an online decision support tool for organizational readiness for change.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sobia; Timmings, Caitlyn; Moore, Julia E; Marquez, Christine; Pyka, Kasha; Gheihman, Galina; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-05-10

    Much importance has been placed on assessing readiness for change as one of the earliest steps of implementation, but measuring it can be a complex and daunting task. Organizations and individuals struggle with how to reliably and accurately measure readiness for change. Several measures have been developed to help organizations assess readiness, but these are often underused due to the difficulty of selecting the right measure. In response to this challenge, we will develop and test a prototype of a decision support tool that is designed to guide individuals interested in implementation in the selection of an appropriate readiness assessment measure for their setting. A multi-phase approach will be used to develop the decision support tool. First, we will identify key measures for assessing organizational readiness for change from a recently completed systematic review. Included measures will be those developed for healthcare settings (e.g., acute care, public health, mental health) and that have been deemed valid and reliable. Second, study investigators and field experts will engage in a mapping exercise to categorize individual items of included measures according to key readiness constructs from an existing framework. Third, a stakeholder panel will be recruited and consulted to determine the feasibility and relevance of the selected measures using a modified Delphi process. Fourth, findings from the mapping exercise and stakeholder consultation will inform the development of a decision support tool that will guide users in appropriately selecting change readiness measures. Fifth, the tool will undergo usability testing. Our proposed decision support tool will address current challenges in the field of organizational change readiness by aiding individuals in selecting a valid and reliable assessment measure that is relevant to user needs and practice settings. We anticipate that implementers and researchers who use our tool will be more likely to conduct

  3. Examining the Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support, Transfer of Training and Service Quality in the Malaysian Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumrah, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationships among perceived organizational support (POS), transfer of training outcomes to the workplace and service quality in the context of public sector organizations in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The data for this study have been collected from three sources, the employees of public…

  4. The Impact of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the Organizational Health of Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Koth, Christine W.; Bevans, Katherine B.; Ialongo, Nicholas; Leaf, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a universal, school-wide prevention strategy that is currently implemented in over 7,500 schools across the nation to reduce disruptive behavior problems through the application of behavioral, social learning, and organizational behavioral principles. PBIS aims to alter school environments…

  5. The Impact of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the Organizational Health of Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Koth, Christine W.; Bevans, Katherine B.; Ialongo, Nicholas; Leaf, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a universal, school-wide prevention strategy that is currently implemented in over 7,500 schools across the nation to reduce disruptive behavior problems through the application of behavioral, social learning, and organizational behavioral principles. PBIS aims to alter school environments…

  6. Work-Family Supportiveness Organizational Perceptions: Important for the Well-Being of Male Blue-Collar Hourly Workers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandey, Alicia A.; Cordeiro, Bryanne L.; Michael, Judd H.

    2007-01-01

    The current study questions whether organizational perceptions of family supportiveness predict work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction for an atypical sample of male hourly workers in a manufacturing organization, and whether those relationships depend on work (number of work hours) and family (number of family roles) demands. A…

  7. The Temporal Effect of Training Utility Perceptions on Adopting a Trained Method: The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madera, Juan M.; Steele, Stacey T.; Beier, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the temporal effect of perceived training utility on adoption of a trained method and how perceived organizational support influences the relationship between perceived training utility perceptions and adoption of a trained method. With the use of a correlational-survey-based design, this longitudinal study required…

  8. The Relationship between the Perceived Level of Organizational Support for Families and Spouse Satisfaction with Military Life. Technical Report 874.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.; Neenan, Peter A.

    This study examined the relationship of satisfaction with the perceived level of organizational support for families and overall satisfaction with military life among civilian spouses of Army members. The report is based on an analysis of the responses of 2,814 Army spouses of the 1985 Department of Defense Survey of Military Spouses. The…

  9. Professionals' Perspectives on Organizational Factors that Support or Hinder the Successful Implementation of Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Alexandra; Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory, qualitative study whose objective was to identify professionals' perceptions of organizational factors that support or hinder the implementation of family-centered practice (FCP). Two disability services organizations in Manitoba, Canada, were selected as the research sites. In 2002, all staff…

  10. Examining the Relationship between Perceived Organizational Support, Transfer of Training and Service Quality in the Malaysian Public Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zumrah, Abdul Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the relationships among perceived organizational support (POS), transfer of training outcomes to the workplace and service quality in the context of public sector organizations in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The data for this study have been collected from three sources, the employees of public…

  11. Professionals' Perspectives on Organizational Factors that Support or Hinder the Successful Implementation of Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Alexandra; Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory, qualitative study whose objective was to identify professionals' perceptions of organizational factors that support or hinder the implementation of family-centered practice (FCP). Two disability services organizations in Manitoba, Canada, were selected as the research sites. In 2002, all staff…

  12. The effects of perceived organizational support, perceived supervisor support and perceived co-worker support on safety and health compliance.

    PubMed

    Puah, Lee Na; Ong, Lin Dar; Chong, Wei Ying

    2016-09-01

    Although knowledge is cumulating, very little is known about the effects of various sources of support on safety and health compliance. This study goes beyond previous research by investigating the relationships among perceived support from organizations, supervisors and co-workers, and employees' safety and health compliance behaviour at chemical and petroleum process plants. The results of this study show that the support from organizations, supervisors and co-workers was significantly related to employees' safety and health compliance. Also, the findings reveal that perceived supervisor support has the strongest influence in ensuring employees' safety and health compliance behaviour.

  13. The role of same-sex mentorship and organizational support in encouraging women to pursue surgery.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Erynne A; McCrary, Hilary C; Milinic, Tijana; Hassanzadeh, Tania; Roward, Simin G; Neumayer, Leigh A

    2017-10-01

    While women represent approximately half of all medical students, only 38% of general surgery residents are women. The objective of this study is to explore how access to mentors and organizational support affects career choices. In June of 2016, a survey was sent to medical students at a single institution (n = 472). Questions utilized a 5-point Likert scale. A two-sample t-test was used to evaluate data. A total of 160 students participated in the survey. Among MS1/MS2 students, women were more likely to rank same-sex role models as a positive influence (mean 3.1 vs. 2.4; p < 0.05). Similar results were seen among MS3/MS4 students (mean 3.6 vs. 2.5; p < 0.05). More women ranked the presence of organizations that support women in surgery as being important (mean 4.6 vs. 4.1; p < 0.05). Exposure to same-sex mentors was highly rated among female participants. These findings encourage the creation of national mentorship programs. Early involvement in organizations can positively influence career choice. Addressing gaps in mentorship opportunities and widening accessibility to national organizations are important in reducing barriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Guide to Youth Mentoring: Providing Effective Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Pat; Brady, Bernadine

    2011-01-01

    Youth mentoring can be an effective way of supporting troubled youth, helping them sustain positive mental health, cope with stress, and lead successful lives through adolescence and into adulthood. This book is a comprehensive guide to youth mentoring programmes, illustrating how, if managed well, they can increase the social support available to…

  15. Academic Supports Provided for Struggling High School Students. Evaluation Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaughey, Trisha A.; Wade, Julie H.; Zhao, Huafang

    2013-01-01

    This brief describes an evaluation of academic intervention supports available to high school students in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) during the 2012-2013 school year. A website review identified information about academic supports available to students or parents within each high school's web pages. A survey of school staff gathered…

  16. Organizational Structures and Processes to Support and Sustain Effective Technical Assistance in a State-Wide Multi-Tiered System of Support Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Russell, Christine; Dyer, Stephanie; Metcalf, Terri; Rahschulte, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the national proliferation of technical assistance as a driver for school reform and as a model for embedded and sustained professional development, very little is known about the organizational structures and processes needed to support technical assistance. The purpose of this paper is to describe a structured needs assessment process…

  17. Predicting employee intentions to support organizational change: an examination of identification processes during a re-brand.

    PubMed

    Jimmieson, Nerina L; White, Katherine M

    2011-06-01

    This study examined if organizational identification can account for the mechanisms by which two-change management practices (communication and participation) influence employees' intentions to support change. The context was a sample of 82 hotel employees in the early stages of a re-brand. Identification with the new hotel fully mediated the relationship between communication and adaptive and proactive intentions to support change, as well as between participation and proactive intentions. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  18. The changing health care marketplace: current industry trends, new provider organizational structures, and effects on plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Krieger, L M

    1998-09-01

    Current market forces are driving the health care industry in new directions. The managed care industry is currently undergoing a market shakeout, as manifested by consolidation, increased competition, and lower profits. Medicare is fighting to remain solvent by lowering fees paid to providers, driving patients into managed care plans, and cracking down on billing irregularities. For providers, the combined effect of these trends is lower fees, increased risk-sharing, and increased overhead. Plastic surgeons face new demands in this environment. They must increase their efficiency and form new alliances with other providers. These alliances allow plastic surgeons to maintain a steady stream of patients, to manage risk, to negotiate more lucrative contracts with managed care organizations, and to increase efficiency. To achieve these alliances, plastic surgeons must alter the organizational structure of their practices. Several corporate practice models are becoming more prevalent; these include large group practices, physician practice management companies, and integrated delivery systems. Each structure has advantages for plastic surgeons, but each also requires plastic surgeons to trade varying degrees of financial and professional autonomy for market strength.

  19. Can Industrial-Organizational Psychology Survive the Advancement of Professional Psychology? Speciality Standards for Providers of I/O Psychological Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tice, Thomas E.

    The Revised Standards for Providers of Psychological Services, developed by a committee of the American Psychological Association, have an important impact on industrial/organizational psychologists. Currently, four types of controls exist as assurances to the public that appropriate psychological services are being provided. They are: graduate…

  20. Can Industrial-Organizational Psychology Survive the Advancement of Professional Psychology? Speciality Standards for Providers of I/O Psychological Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tice, Thomas E.

    The Revised Standards for Providers of Psychological Services, developed by a committee of the American Psychological Association, have an important impact on industrial/organizational psychologists. Currently, four types of controls exist as assurances to the public that appropriate psychological services are being provided. They are: graduate…

  1. Social support moderates the impact of demands on burnout and organizational connectedness: a two-wave study of volunteer firefighters.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Jasmine Y; Xanthopoulou, Despoina; Winefield, Anthony H

    2013-01-01

    This two-wave study of volunteers examined the effect of family and friend support on the relationship between volunteer demands (emotional demands and work-home conflict) on the one hand, and burnout (exhaustion and cynicism) and organizational connectedness on the other hand. It was hypothesized that family and friend support would moderate the relationship between (a) demands at Time 1 (T1) and burnout at Time 2 (T2); and (b) demands at T1 and organizational connectedness at T2. Hypotheses were tested among 126 Australian volunteer firefighters, who were followed up over 1 year. Results showed that support moderated the relationship between work-home conflict and exhaustion, but not between emotional demands and exhaustion. In addition, family and friend support moderated the relationship between both volunteer demands at T1 and cynicism and organizational connectedness at T2. These results suggest that support from family and friends is a critical resource in coping with the demands related to volunteer work and may protect volunteers from burnout, while helping them to stay connected to volunteering. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Consumers as community support providers: issues created by role innovation.

    PubMed

    Mowbray, C T; Moxley, D P; Thrasher, S; Bybee, D; McCrohan, N; Harris, S; Clover, G

    1996-02-01

    Using data from a CSP-funded research demonstration project designed to expand vocational services offered by case management teams serving people with serious mental illness, this paper examines the issues created by employing consumers as peer support specialists for the project. Roles and benefits of these positions are analyzed. Challenges experienced by specialists created by serving peers, the structure of the position, the mental health system and the community, and personal issues are analyzed using data from focus groups and the project's management information system. Implications for consumer role definition, supports for role effectiveness, and the structuring of these types of positions are discussed.

  3. Health and safety matters! Associations between organizational practices and personal support workers' life and work stress in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U; Denton, Margaret; Brookman, Catherine; Davies, Sharon; Sayin, Firat K

    2017-06-21

    The home and community care sector is one of the fastest growing sectors globally and most prominently in mature industrialized countries. Personal support workers (PSWs) are the largest occupational group in the sector. This paper focuses on the emotional health of PSWs working in the home and community care sector in Ontario, Canada. The purpose of this paper is to present evidence on the associations between PSWs' life and work stress and organizational practices of full-time and guaranteed hours, and PSWs' perceptions of support at work and preference for hours. Data come from our 2015 survey of 1543 PSWs. Dependent variables are life and work stress. Independent variables are: objective organizational practices of full-time and guaranteed hours, and subjective organizational practices of perceived support at work, and preferred hours of work. Descriptive statistics, correlations and ordinary least square regression analyses with collinearity tests are conducted. Organizational practices of employing PSWs in full-time or guaranteed hours are not associated with their life and work stress. However, those who perceive support from their organizations are also the ones reporting lower life and work stress. In addition, those PSWs perceiving support from their supervisor report lower work stress. PSWs would like to work in their preferred hours, and those who prefer to work more hours report lower life and work stress, and conversely, those who prefer to work less hours report life and work stress. For PSWs in home and community care, perceived support from their organizations and supervisors, and employment in preferred hours are important factors related to their life and work stress.

  4. A large-scale longitudinal study indicating the importance of perceived effectiveness, organizational and management support for innovative culture.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Bal, Roland; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-04-01

    Teams participating in QI collaboratives reportedly enhance innovative culture in long-term care, but we currently lack empirical evidence of the ability of such teams to enhance (determinants of) innovative culture over time. The objectives of our study are therefore to explore innovative cultures in QI teams over time and identify its determinants. The study included QI teams participating between 2006 and 2011 in a national Dutch quality program (Care for Better), using an adapted version of the Breakthrough Method. Each QI team member received a questionnaire by mail within one week after the second (2-3 months post-implementation of the collaborative = T0) and final conference (12 months post-implementation = T1). A total of 859 (out of 1161) respondents filled in the questionnaire at T0 and 541 at T1 (47% response). A total of 307 team members filled in the questionnaire at both T0 and T1. We measured innovative culture, respondent characteristics (age, gender, education), perceived team effectiveness, organizational support, and management support. Two-tailed paired t-tests showed that innovative culture was slightly but significantly lower at T1 compared to T0 (12 months and 2-3 months after the start of the collaborative, respectively). Univariate analyses revealed that perceived effectiveness, organizational and management support were significantly related to innovative culture at T1 (all at p ≤ 0.001). Multilevel analyses showed that perceived effectiveness, organizational support, and management support predicted innovative culture. Our QI teams were not able to improve innovative culture over time, but their innovative culture scores were higher than non-participant professionals. QI interventions require organizational and management support to enhance innovative culture in long-term care settings.

  5. Changing access to mental health care and social support when people living with HIV/AIDS become service providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Alan Tai-Wai; Wales, Joshua; Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing; Owino, Maureen; Perreault, Yvette; Miao, Andrew; Maseko, Precious; Guiang, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    As people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) achieve more stable health, many have taken on active peer support and professional roles within AIDS service organizations. Although the increased engagement has been associated with many improved health outcomes, emerging program and research evidence have identified new challenges associated with such transition. This paper reports on the results of a qualitative interpretive study that explored the effect of this role transition on PHA service providers' access to mental health support and self care. A total of 27 PHA service providers of diverse ethno-racial backgrounds took part in the study. Results show that while role transition often improves access to financial and health-care benefits, it also leads to new stress from workload demands, emotional triggers from client's narratives, feeling of burnout from over-immersion in HIV at both personal and professional levels, and diminished self care. Barriers to seeking support included: concerns regarding confidentiality; self-imposed and enacted stigma associated with accessing mental health services; and boundary issues resulting from changes in relationships with peers and other service providers. Evolving support mechanisms included: new formal and informal peer support networks amongst colleagues or other PHA service providers to address both personal and professional challenges, and having access to professional support offered through the workplace. The findings suggest the need for increased organizational recognition of HIV support work as a form of emotional labor that places complex demands on PHA service providers. Increased access to employer-provided mental health services, supportive workplace policies, and adequate job-specific training will contribute to reduced work-related stress. Community level strategies that support expansion of social networks amongst PHA service providers would reduce isolation. Systemic policies to increase access to insurance

  6. College Syllabi: Providing Support for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Gloria; Dorow, Laura G.; Fisch, Lois A.

    2006-01-01

    Syllabi from undergraduate and graduate courses offered at a small, private liberal arts college in central New York were examined to determine what percentage contained information that would make it easier for students with disabilities to access supports or accommodations to improve their success in the course. A total of 111 syllabi were…

  7. School Processes in Providing Reading Support in GCSE Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Dominic; Woods, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Against a background of increasing student eligibility for "access arrangements" in examinations for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), this article examines the processes within schools that structure a student's access to the provision of reading support, including staff and student viewpoints. Dominic Griffiths,…

  8. PREFER: a European service providing forest fire management support products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftychidis, George; Laneve, Giovanni; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Sebastian Lopez, Ana; Lourenco, Louciano; Clandillon, Stephen; Tampellini, Lucia; Hirn, Barbara; Diagourtas, Dimitris; Leventakis, George

    2015-06-01

    PREFER is a Copernicus project of the EC-FP7 program which aims developing spatial information products that may support fire prevention and burned areas restoration decisions and establish a relevant web-based regional service for making these products available to fire management stakeholders. The service focuses to the Mediterranean region, where fire risk is high and damages from wildfires are quite important, and develop its products for pilot areas located in Spain, Portugal, Italy, France and Greece. PREFER aims to allow fire managers to have access to online resources, which shall facilitate fire prevention measures, fire hazard and risk assessment, estimation of fire impact and damages caused by wildfire as well as support monitoring of post-fire regeneration and vegetation recovery. It makes use of a variety of products delivered by space borne sensors and develop seasonal and daily products using multi-payload, multi-scale and multi-temporal analysis of EO data. The PREFER Service portfolio consists of two main suite of products. The first refers to mapping products for supporting decisions concerning the Preparedness/Prevention Phase (ISP Service). The service delivers Fuel, Hazard and Fire risk maps for this purpose. Furthermore the PREFER portfolio includes Post-fire vegetation recovery, burn scar maps, damage severity and 3D fire damage assessment products in order to support relative assessments required in context of the Recovery/Reconstruction Phase (ISR Service) of fire management.

  9. The Director of Linking Agents: Providing Management and Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Claire W.

    The locus of operation for management and support of linking agents in Florida is the Teacher Education Center (TEC), with the linkage strategy being the Florida Linkage System (FLS). FLS is a problem-solving model being field tested in eight TECs incorporating twenty-eight site schools, through an R&D utilization project funded by the…

  10. School Processes in Providing Reading Support in GCSE Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Dominic; Woods, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Against a background of increasing student eligibility for "access arrangements" in examinations for the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), this article examines the processes within schools that structure a student's access to the provision of reading support, including staff and student viewpoints. Dominic Griffiths,…

  11. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. (a) The maximum support distance is the distance from the health care...

  12. Improving job satisfaction of Chinese doctors: the positive effects of perceived organizational support and psychological capital.

    PubMed

    Fu, J; Sun, W; Wang, Y; Yang, X; Wang, L

    2013-10-01

    The huge population basic and the transformational changes to healthcare system in China have gained wide public attention in recent years. Along with these issues is a growing literature about doctor's job satisfaction; however, more is known about its negative related factors. Thus, this study was an attempt to assess the level of job satisfaction among Chinese doctors and to explore factors that enhance their job satisfaction. Cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the period of September/October 2010. A questionnaire containing job satisfaction assessed by Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ), demographic characteristics, work conditions, psychological capital (PsyCap) and perceived organizational support (POS) was distributed to 1300 registered doctors in Liaoning province. A total of 984 respondents became our subjects (effective response rate 75.7%). Hierarchical regression was performed to explore the factors associated with satisfaction. The average MSQ score was 65.86 (level ranking for MSQ, 20-100) in our study population. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that POS (β = 0.412, P < 0.001), PsyCap (β = 0.255, P < 0.001), incentive system (β = 0.119, P < 0.001) and educational background (β = 0.056, P = 0.042) were positively associated with job satisfaction. The job satisfaction of Chinese doctors was at a moderate level. POS and PsyCap seemed to be the most crucial factors in relation to job satisfaction. Therefore, efficient measures such as building a supportive work environment and developing doctors' PsyCap should be considered by health administrators in order to promote job satisfaction among Chinese doctors. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Implementation of a Program of Evaluation To Support Improvement of Organizational Components in a Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Alice Frazeur

    This practicum's goal was to improve the organizational components of a university child care center through the development and implementation of a comprehensive program of evaluation. Several evaluation models were considered. The Context-Input-Process-Product Model was selected for its flexibility in providing formative and summative results,…

  14. SupportNet for Frontline Behavioral Health Providers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    mission readiness for soldiers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue , job stress, burnout, behavioral health providers...rates for secondary trauma, burnout, and compassion fatigue in military mental health providers. Objective 2: We will evaluate the utility of...job burnout and secondary traumatic stress were measured within the framework of compassion fatigue . 1. Cieslak, R., Shoji, K., Lesnierowska, M

  15. Understanding Emotional Development: Helping Early Childhood Providers Better Support Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nicole Megan

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended to provide early childhood providers with a concise overview of emerging emotional development in young children (birth-5), the important role of primary caregivers, and the link between parenting, emotional development, and behavior. Specific suggestions that have been shared with urban Head Start mothers are offered,…

  16. Civilian Contractors Providing Logistics and Support on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-19

    compensated by contractors who are able to fill in and complete the tasks required for the mission. -Colonel Ronda G. Urey US Army...have continued to support 1 Colonel Ronda G. Urey , USAWC Strategy Research Project, Civilian...Contractors Killed in Iraq.” Associated Press, 23 Feb 2007 Urey , Ronda G., Colonel, USA. “Civilian Contractors on the 15 Battlefield.” (USAWC

  17. Designing a system for patients controlling providers' access to their electronic health records: organizational and technical challenges.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jeremy C; Cummins, Jonathan A; Schwartz, Peter H; Martin, Douglas K; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are proliferating, and financial incentives encourage their use. Applying Fair Information Practice principles to EHRs necessitates balancing patients' rights to control their personal information with providers' data needs to deliver safe, high-quality care. We describe the technical and organizational challenges faced in capturing patients' preferences for patient-controlled EHR access and applying those preferences to an existing EHR. We established an online system for capturing patients' preferences for who could view their EHRs (listing all participating clinic providers individually and categorically-physicians, nurses, other staff) and what data to redact (none, all, or by specific categories of sensitive data or patient age). We then modified existing data-viewing software serving a state-wide health information exchange and a large urban health system and its primary care clinics to allow patients' preferences to guide data displays to providers. Patients could allow or restrict data displays to all clinicians and staff in a demonstration primary care clinic, categories of providers (physicians, nurses, others), or individual providers. They could also restrict access to all EHR data or any or all of five categories of sensitive data (mental and reproductive health, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, and substance abuse) and for specific patient ages. The EHR viewer displayed data via reports, data flowsheets, and coded and free text data displayed by Google-like searches. Unless patients recorded restrictions, by default all requested data were displayed to all providers. Data patients wanted restricted were not displayed, with no indication they were redacted. Technical barriers prevented redacting restricted information in free textnotes. The program allowed providers to hit a "Break the Glass" button to override patients' restrictions, recording the date, time, and next screen viewed. Establishing patient

  18. Vicarious exposure to trauma and growth in therapists: the moderating effects of sense of coherence, organizational support, and empathy.

    PubMed

    Brockhouse, Rebecca; Msetfi, Rachel M; Cohen, Keren; Joseph, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    Therapists who work with traumatized individuals can experience psychological growth following this vicarious exposure to trauma. The purpose of the present study is to examine the variables that may moderate such vicarious posttraumatic growth. Therapists (N = 118) completed measures of vicarious exposure to trauma and growth, as well as empathy, sense of coherence, and perceived organizational support. Results showed that having a strong sense of coherence negatively predicted growth (β = -.28, p = .001), whereas empathy was a positive predictor (β = .37, p < .001). Empathy also moderated the exposure to growth relationship when growth involved relating to others (β = -.20; p = .018). Organizational support did not predict growth. The results have implications for the recruitment, training, and supervision of therapists working with individuals who have experienced trauma. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  19. Measuring factors affecting implementation of health innovations: a systematic review of structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level measures.

    PubMed

    Chaudoir, Stephenie R; Dugan, Alicia G; Barr, Colin H I

    2013-02-17

    Two of the current methodological barriers to implementation science efforts are the lack of agreement regarding constructs hypothesized to affect implementation success and identifiable measures of these constructs. In order to address these gaps, the main goals of this paper were to identify a multi-level framework that captures the predominant factors that impact implementation outcomes, conduct a systematic review of available measures assessing constructs subsumed within these primary factors, and determine the criterion validity of these measures in the search articles. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify articles reporting the use or development of measures designed to assess constructs that predict the implementation of evidence-based health innovations. Articles published through 12 August 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the journal Implementation Science. We then utilized a modified five-factor framework in order to code whether each measure contained items that assess constructs representing structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level factors. Further, we coded the criterion validity of each measure within the search articles obtained. Our review identified 62 measures. Results indicate that organization, provider, and innovation-level constructs have the greatest number of measures available for use, whereas structural and patient-level constructs have the least. Additionally, relatively few measures demonstrated criterion validity, or reliable association with an implementation outcome (e.g., fidelity). In light of these findings, our discussion centers on strategies that researchers can utilize in order to identify, adapt, and improve extant measures for use in their own implementation research. In total, our literature review and resulting measures compendium increases the capacity of researchers to conceptualize and measure implementation-related constructs in their ongoing and

  20. Measuring factors affecting implementation of health innovations: a systematic review of structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level measures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two of the current methodological barriers to implementation science efforts are the lack of agreement regarding constructs hypothesized to affect implementation success and identifiable measures of these constructs. In order to address these gaps, the main goals of this paper were to identify a multi-level framework that captures the predominant factors that impact implementation outcomes, conduct a systematic review of available measures assessing constructs subsumed within these primary factors, and determine the criterion validity of these measures in the search articles. Method We conducted a systematic literature review to identify articles reporting the use or development of measures designed to assess constructs that predict the implementation of evidence-based health innovations. Articles published through 12 August 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the journal Implementation Science. We then utilized a modified five-factor framework in order to code whether each measure contained items that assess constructs representing structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level factors. Further, we coded the criterion validity of each measure within the search articles obtained. Results Our review identified 62 measures. Results indicate that organization, provider, and innovation-level constructs have the greatest number of measures available for use, whereas structural and patient-level constructs have the least. Additionally, relatively few measures demonstrated criterion validity, or reliable association with an implementation outcome (e.g., fidelity). Discussion In light of these findings, our discussion centers on strategies that researchers can utilize in order to identify, adapt, and improve extant measures for use in their own implementation research. In total, our literature review and resulting measures compendium increases the capacity of researchers to conceptualize and measure implementation

  1. Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities," [ED495181] and is an added resource for further information. That study examined the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to…

  2. Services provided in support of the planetary quarantine requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favero, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the dry heat resistance at 125 C of a naturally occurring bacterial spore population in a mixture of sieved vacuum cleaner dusts from Cape Kennedy. The dust was aerosolized in a special chamber and was allowed to settle on 32 Teflon ribbons to provide approximately 500,000 spores per ribbon.

  3. Optimization of a Virtual Power Plant to Provide Frequency Support.

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Johnson, Jay; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Lave, Matthew Samuel; Delhotal, Jarod James

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the penetration of distributed renewable sources, including photovoltaic (PV) sources, poses technical challenges for grid management. The grid has been optimized over decades to rely upon large centralized power plants with well-established feedback controls, but now non-dispatchable, renewable sources are displacing these controllable generators. This one-year study was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot program and is intended to better utilize those variable resources by providing electric utilities with the tools to implement frequency regulation and primary frequency reserves using aggregated renewable resources, known as a virtual power plant. The goal is to eventually enable the integration of 100s of Gigawatts into US power systems.

  4. Providing rapid climate risk assessments to support cities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Solecki, W.; Horton, R. M.; Bader, D.; Ali, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast of the United States on October 29, 2012 and brought the issue of urban resilience to the forefront of public discussion not only in New York City, but in cities around the world. While Hurricane Sandy as an individual extreme climate event cannot be attributed to climate change, it can serve as a warning for cities regarding disaster risks, focus attention on the importance of reducing climate vulnerability, and the need to include increasing climate risks and resilience into rebuilding programs. As severe as Sandy was, the the storm could have been much worse. The science behind potential impacts was ';in place' and ';in time,' i.e., climate risks were well understood before the storm, due to work by scientists in the region starting in the late 1990s. In the wake of this transformative storm, the rebuilding process in New York is being informed by the potential for a changing climate. The $20 billion Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) Plan for New York is grounded upon climate risk information provided by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC). This expert panel, tasked with advising on the City on climate-related issues, completed a 'rapid response' climate assessment with updated climate projections and coastal flood maps. Cities are emerging as the ';first responders' to climate change in both adaptation and mitigation. Their efforts are playing a role in catalyzing national and international responses as well. New York City's actions in the wake of Hurricane Sandy are an example of a positive tipping-point response. The Urban Climate Change Research Network, a consortium of over 450 scholars and practitioners in developing and developed country cities around the world, was established in 2007 to enhance science-based decision-making on climate and other sustainability related issues in urban areas around the world. The UCCRN's first major publication is the First UCCRN Assessment Report on

  5. Providing Epistemic Support For Assessments Through Mobile-Supported Sharing Activities1

    PubMed Central

    Raclaw, Joshua; Robles, Jessica S.; DiDomenico, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how participants in face-to-face conversation employ mobile phones as a resource for social action. We focus on what we call mobile-supported sharing activities, in which participants use a mobile phone to share text or images with others by voicing text aloud from their mobile or providing others with visual access to the device’s display screen. Drawing from naturalistic video recordings, we focus on how mobile-supported sharing activities invite assessments by providing access to an object that is not locally accessible to the participants. Such practices make relevant co-participants’ assessment of these objects and allow for different forms of co-participation across sequence types. We additionally examine how the organization of assessments during these sharing activities displays sensitivity to preference structure. The analysis illustrates the relevance of embodiment, local objects, and new communicative technologies to the production of action in co-present interaction. Data are in American English. PMID:28936031

  6. Providing visualisation support for the analysis of anatomy ontology data

    PubMed Central

    Dadzie, Aba-Sah; Burger, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Background Improvements in technology have been accompanied by the generation of large amounts of complex data. This same technology must be harnessed effectively if the knowledge stored within the data is to be retrieved. Storing data in ontologies aids its management; ontologies serve as controlled vocabularies that promote data exchange and re-use, improving analysis. The Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project stores the developmental stages of the mouse embryo in anatomy ontologies. This project is looking at the use of visual data overviews for intuitive analysis of the ontology data. Results A prototype has been developed that visualises the ontologies using directed acyclic graphs in two dimensions, with the ability to study detail in regions of interest in isolation or within the context of the overview. This is followed by the development of a technique that layers individual anatomy ontologies in three-dimensional space, so that relationships across multiple data sets may be mapped using physical links drawn along the third axis. Conclusion Usability evaluations of the applications confirmed advantages in visual analysis of complex data. This project will look next at data input from multiple sources, and continue to develop the techniques presented to provide intuitive identification of relationships that span multiple ontologies. PMID:15790390

  7. Nursing in general practice: organizational possibilities for decision latitude, created skill, social support and identity derived from role.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Eamon; Duffield, Christine; Baldwin, Richard; Fry, Margaret

    2012-03-01

    This article is a report of a study to describe the factors that support organizational opportunities for practice nurse decision-making and skill development for nurses employed in general practice in New South Wales, Australia. Corresponding to the availability of subsidies from the Australian universal health insurer (Medicare), there has been an increase in the number of nurses employed in general practice. Currently, there is no Australian evidence as to the organizational possibilities for these practice nurses to make decisions, develop their own skills and abilities, derive identity from their role or how their role is influenced by social support. Over a 8-month period in 2008 practice, nurses employed in general practice in the State of New South Wales were invited to complete a 26-item self-administered online questionnaire utilizing constructs from Karaseks (1998) Job Content Questionnaire (valid n = 160). Confirmatory Factor Analysis indicated that all scales demonstrated acceptable levels of internal consistency. Sequential regression models revealed that social support exerts a weak influence on decision latitude (R(2) = 0·07); the addition of self-identity through work significantly improved the predictive ability of the model (R(2) = 0·16). Social support and self-identity through work exerted a negative influence on created skill (R(2) = 0·347), whereas social support was effective in predicting self-identity through work (R(2) = 0·148).   Collegial and supervisory support in the work environment predicts organizational possibilities for practice nurse decision-making. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of Organizational Readiness in Clinical Settings for Social Supporting Evidence-Based Information Seeking Behavior after Introducing IT in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Alaei, Safollah; Panahi, Sohaila Sadat Ghazavi Shariat; Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    The health sector of Iran has endeavored to encourage physicians and medical students to use research findings in their practice. Remarkable changes have occurred, including: holding computer skills courses, digital library workshops for physicians and students, and establishing websites in hospitals. The findings showed that a small number of the participants completely agreed that they were supported by supervisors and colleagues to use evidence-based information resources in their clinical decisions. Health care organizations in Iran need other organizational facilitators such as social influences, organizational support, leadership, strong organizational culture, and climate in order to implement evidence-based practice.

  9. Promoting an equitable and supportive school climate in high schools: the role of school organizational health and staff burnout.

    PubMed

    Bottiani, Jessika H; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Mendelson, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    In response to persistent racial disparities in academic and behavioral outcomes between Black and White students, equitable school climate has drawn attention as a potential target for school reform. This study examined differences in Black and White students' experiences of school climate and explored whether indicators of school organizational health and staff burnout moderated differences in students' school experiences by race. Utilizing hierarchical linear modeling with a sample of 18,397 Black students (n=6228) and White students (n=12,169) and 2391 school staff in 53 schools, we found a consistent pattern of racial inequalities, such that Black students reported less positive experiences than White students across three indicators of school climate (caring γ=-0.08, p<.001; equity γ=-0.05, p=.007; and engagement γ=-0.05, p<.001). In addition, we found significant, positive associations between aggregated staff-report of school organizational health and student-reported school climate (e.g., staff affiliation and student-perceived equity, γ=0.07, p<.001). Surprisingly, a number of school organizational health indicators were more strongly associated with positive perceptions of school climate among White students than Black students, translating into greater racial disparities in perceived school climate at schools with greater organizational health (e.g., supportive leadership by race on student-perceived engagement, γ=-0.03, p=.042). We also found negative associations between staff-reported burnout and students' experience of equity, such that the racial gap was smaller in schools with high ratings of burnout (γ=0.04, p=.002). These findings have implications for educators and education researchers interested in promoting school social contexts that equitably support student engagement and success.

  10. Peer support for parents of disabled children part 2: how organizational and process factors influenced shared experience in a one-to-one service, a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shilling, V; Bailey, S; Logan, S; Morris, C

    2015-07-01

    Parents of disabled children often seek support from their peers. The shared experience between parents appears to be a crucial mediating factor. Understanding how a sense of shared experience is fostered can help to design and evaluate services that seek to provide peer support. We carried out a qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Participants were 12 parents and 23 befrienders who had contact with the Face2Face one-to-one befriending service in Devon and Cornwall during a 12-month period, and 10 professionals from health, social care and education. Formal structures and processes in place such as training and ongoing supervision and support were highly valued as was the highly personalized, confidential, flexible, one-to-one at-home nature of the service. Crucial to establishing rapport was putting the right people together and ensuring a good match between befrienders and parents. Clearly, the befriending parent has to be emotionally prepared to provide help. However, if the parent being offered support was not ready to accept help at the time it was offered or the type of support was not right for them, they are less likely to engage with the service. Organizational and process factors as well as characteristics of the parents offering and receiving support contribute to the sense of shared experience in one-to-one peer support. These factors interact to influence whether peer support is effective and should be explicitly considered when designing and evaluating services. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provider to the farthest point on the jurisdictional boundary of the city in that state with the largest... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Support for services beyond the maximum... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance...

  12. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provider to the farthest point on the jurisdictional boundary of the city in that state with the largest... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support for services beyond the maximum... Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625 Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance...

  13. Applying Case-Based Reasoning in Knowledge Management to Support Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Feng-Kwei

    2006-01-01

    Research and practice in human performance technology (HPT) has recently accelerated the search for innovative approaches to supplement or replace traditional training interventions for improving organizational performance. This article examines a knowledge management framework built upon the theories and techniques of case-based reasoning (CBR)…

  14. Urban Teacher Commitment: Exploring Associations with Organizational Conflict, Support for Innovation, and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Alan B.; Holliman, Stephanie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores relationships between teachers' organizational commitment and interpersonal conflict, participation activities beyond the classroom, and innovation in schools. Potential relationships among study variables are suggested in research that views affective commitment as a proxy measure for decisions to leave the school. Increments…

  15. Urban Teacher Commitment: Exploring Associations with Organizational Conflict, Support for Innovation, and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkin, Alan B.; Holliman, Stephanie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores relationships between teachers' organizational commitment and interpersonal conflict, participation activities beyond the classroom, and innovation in schools. Potential relationships among study variables are suggested in research that views affective commitment as a proxy measure for decisions to leave the school. Increments…

  16. Applying Case-Based Reasoning in Knowledge Management to Support Organizational Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Feng-Kwei

    2006-01-01

    Research and practice in human performance technology (HPT) has recently accelerated the search for innovative approaches to supplement or replace traditional training interventions for improving organizational performance. This article examines a knowledge management framework built upon the theories and techniques of case-based reasoning (CBR)…

  17. Management commitment to safety as organizational support: relationships with non-safety outcomes in wood manufacturing employees.

    PubMed

    Michael, Judd H; Evans, Demetrice D; Jansen, Karen J; Haight, Joel M

    2005-01-01

    Employee perceptions of management commitment to safety are known to influence important safety-related outcomes. However, little work has been conducted to explore non-safety-related outcomes resulting from a commitment to safety. Employee-level outcomes critical to the effective functioning of an organization, including attitudes such as job satisfaction and commitment to the organization, were included on surveys given to 641 hourly production employees at three wood products manufacturing facilities. Participants' were asked about perceptions of management commitment to safety and job-related variables such as perceived dangerousness of their position, organizational commitment, and withdrawal behaviors. Supervisors also rated the performance of each of their hourly subordinates. Results suggest that employee outcomes differ based on perceptions of management's commitment to safety. Specifically, management commitment to safety was positively related to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job-related performance. We also found a negative relationship between commitment to safety and employee withdrawal behaviors. Our results suggest that increasing employee perceptions of management's personal concern for employee well-being through a dedication to safety will result in positive outcomes beyond improved safety performance. These results also imply that there is a type of social exchange between employees and management that may affect employees similarly to perceived organizational support. Results further reinforce the value of a commitment to safety by a firm's management. Organizations with a strong commitment to safety may enjoy not only a reduction in safety-related events but also increases in desirable employee attitudes and behaviors.

  18. The impact of workplace empowerment, organizational trust on staff nurses' work satisfaction and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Laschinger, H K; Finegan, J; Shamian, J

    2001-01-01

    A predictive, nonexperimental design was used to test Kanter's work empowerment theory in a random sample of 412 staff nurses selected from the professional registry list of a central Canadian province. Kanter argues that work environments that provide access to information, support, resources, and opportunity to learn and develop are empowering and influence employee work attitudes, productivity, and organizational effectiveness. Test results suggest that fostering environments that enhance perceptions of empowerment will have positive effects on organizational members and increase organizational effectiveness.

  19. An Investigation of the Knowledge Claims Supporting Goal Based Planning and Organizational Culture as Keys to Excellence in Educational Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don; And Others

    Two independent bodies of organizational theory and research are developing around separate concepts associated with organizational effectiveness: goal-based behavior (intention) and organizational climate (distinction). Although both variables have been found to influence organizational effectiveness, findings have been inconsistent. The term…

  20. Quantity, quality, and support for research in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: An organizational assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratz, Joan M.; Ponds, Phadrea D.; Neilson, Jennifer R.; Liverca, Joyce; Lamb, Berton Lee

    2005-01-01

    To develop a clearer picture of the nature, extent and quality of management support available for conducting research within the FWS, we completed investigations to identify organizational units within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) that conduct research as a significant portion of their mission; identify positions in the FWS that include, in whole or in part, a component of scientific research; and assess the attitudes of employees and managers about the obstacles and opportunities for scientific research existing within the FWS.

  1. Decision Support Services provided by the NWS Alaska Regional Operations Center in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Breukelen, C. M.; Osiensky, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The NWS Alaska Region's Regional Operations Center (AR ROC) provides a variety of decision support services to partners and customers across the state. The AR ROC is virtual most times but can flex to stand up support for partners as needed. Support can vary from briefings over the phone or in person to dedicated virtual support to providing on-site meteorologist at an Emergency Operations Center or Incident Command Post to provide tailored support services. During 2015 there have been a number of situations where the AR ROC provided unique support services. This presentation will outline a few examples of how these unique support services benefitted partner agency decisions.

  2. Political and organizational barriers to satisfying low-income U. S. seniors' need for affordable rental housing with supportive services.

    PubMed

    Golant, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    A substantial share of the low-income older tenants who occupy U. S. government-subsidized rental housing has physical and cognitive limitations. These older tenants are often women living alone in their 70s and 80s, who need help obtaining community-based services, demand-responsive transportation, help with apartment housekeeping and maintenance, self-care assistance, and design modifications made to their dwellings. Other low-income and frail older persons who have large housing expense burdens or occupy physically deficient dwellings also need affordable rental housing with these supportive services. The unmet supportive service needs of these groups persist even as this country's major political and professional stakeholders are aware of their problems and have solutions. This paper examines five major political and organizational barriers that have restricted the availability of supportive services in affordable rental developments. It offers 12 policy recommendations.

  3. Using organizational change strategies to guide peer support technician implementation in the Veterans Administration.

    PubMed

    Chinman, Matthew; Shoai, Rebecca; Cohen, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) mental health system is in the process of hiring "Peer Support Technicians" or PSTs-individuals in recovery from serious mental illnesses hired as clinical team members. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate an implementation process that has potential to improve the deployment of the Peer Support Technicians to existing clinical teams within the VA. As part of a larger randomized trial called PEers Enhancing Recovery (PEER), research staff collaboratively planned the deployment of PSTs with three case management teams serving those with serious mental illnesses. Clinical staff received significant opportunity to participate in defining the PST role. PEER staff took extensive notes during planning meetings about the discussions held and decisions made about the PST role. PEER and clinical staff discussed and came to a consensus on several elements that comprise the PST job including goals for employing PSTs, desired characteristics of PSTs, job duties, training to be provided to PSTs, PST access to medical records, supervision, boundaries, confidentiality, how PSTs are to discuss their mental illness with veterans, and a sick leave policy. It is critical to solicit and use input from team providers and leaders when establishing PST services. This approach using input and solicitation can be a model to implement a wide range of clinical interventions in which existing providers and teams will be asked to do something new.

  4. Emerging Organizational Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carchidi, Daniel M.; Peterson, Marvin W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of emerging higher educational organizational structures focuses on the increasing importance of distance education. Considers the emerging organizational landscape, three types of network organizations, six organization archetypes, organizational forms that support distance education, and implications for higher education planners. (DB)

  5. U.S. Military Support for Rwandan Refugee Relief: Organizational Perspectives Determine the End-Game

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    counter to an orgamzahon’s tradtional goals tend to meet res&&ce The Pentagon viewed nulitary support for the humanitanan rehef operahon as somethmg...17 Tlus sudden and masswe outflow of ref&ees overwhelmed the abrltty of rehef agencies to provide water, food , me&Cal care, shelter and other...msufIicrent water and food , almost 50,000 refugees (between 6 and 10%) dred durmg the first month after the mflux By the second month’ however, “a well

  6. Effects of an Organizational Linkage Intervention on Inter-Organizational Service Coordination Between Probation/Parole Agencies and Community Treatment Providers.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Wayne N; Knudsen, Hannah K; Knight, Kevin; Ducharme, Lori; Pankow, Jennifer; Urbine, Terry; Lindsey, Adrienne; Abdel-Salam, Sami; Wood, Jennifer; Monico, Laura; Link, Nathan; Albizu-Garcia, Carmen; Friedmann, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Weak coordination between community correctional agencies and community-based treatment providers is a major barrier to diffusion of medication-assisted treatment (MAT)--the inclusion of medications (e.g., methadone and buprenorphine) in combination with traditional counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. In a multisite cluster randomized trial, experimental sites (j = 10) received a 3-h MAT training plus a 12-month linkage intervention; control sites (j = 10) received the 3-h training alone. Hierarchical linear models showed that the intervention resulted in significant improvements in perceptions of interagency coordination among treatment providers, but not probation/parole agents. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

  7. [The organizational technologies of quality support of emergency and acute medical care in megalopolis: Moscow case].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of emergency medical care in conditions of megalopolis on the example of the Moscow A.S. Putchkov emergency and acute medical care station. The analysis is applied to such new organizational technologies as the automatic navigational dispatcher system of field brigades 'management, the zoning of transport mains according accessibility of emergency medical are stations, the organization of emergency medical posts on the most conducive to accident areas of megalopolis, the integrated municipal inter-warning system in case of road accidents.

  8. Associations of Occupational Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Psychological Capital with Work Engagement among Chinese Female Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxi; Zou, Futing; Hao, Junhui

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations of occupational stressors (extrinsic effort, reward, and overcommitment), perceived organizational support (POS), and psychological capital (PsyCap) and its components (self-efficacy, hope, resilience, and optimism) with work engagement and the mediating roles of PsyCap and its components among Chinese female nurses within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. A cross-sectional sample (1,330) completed the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale, Survey of POS, and PsyCap Questionnaire, and effective respondents were 1,016 (76.4%). Hierarchical regression analysis and Preacher and Hayes' asymptotic and resampling strategies were used. Extrinsic effort was negatively associated with vigor, dedication, and absorption, while POS, PsyCap, and hope were positively associated with them. Reward and overcommitment were positively associated with dedication and absorption. Optimism was positively associated with vigor and dedication. Optimism mediated the associations of extrinsic effort, reward, and POS with vigor and dedication. PsyCap and hope mediated the associations of POS with vigor, dedication, and absorption. There is a low level of work engagement among Chinese female nurses. Extrinsic effort could reduce work engagement, while reward, overcommitment, POS, PsyCap, hope, and optimism could enhance work engagement. Hospital managers should develop the PsyCap of female nurses through controlling occupational stressors and establishing supportive organizational climate to enhance their work engagement. PMID:28168198

  9. Associations of Occupational Stressors, Perceived Organizational Support, and Psychological Capital with Work Engagement among Chinese Female Nurses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxi; Liu, Li; Zou, Futing; Hao, Junhui; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations of occupational stressors (extrinsic effort, reward, and overcommitment), perceived organizational support (POS), and psychological capital (PsyCap) and its components (self-efficacy, hope, resilience, and optimism) with work engagement and the mediating roles of PsyCap and its components among Chinese female nurses within the framework of the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. A cross-sectional sample (1,330) completed the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale, Survey of POS, and PsyCap Questionnaire, and effective respondents were 1,016 (76.4%). Hierarchical regression analysis and Preacher and Hayes' asymptotic and resampling strategies were used. Extrinsic effort was negatively associated with vigor, dedication, and absorption, while POS, PsyCap, and hope were positively associated with them. Reward and overcommitment were positively associated with dedication and absorption. Optimism was positively associated with vigor and dedication. Optimism mediated the associations of extrinsic effort, reward, and POS with vigor and dedication. PsyCap and hope mediated the associations of POS with vigor, dedication, and absorption. There is a low level of work engagement among Chinese female nurses. Extrinsic effort could reduce work engagement, while reward, overcommitment, POS, PsyCap, hope, and optimism could enhance work engagement. Hospital managers should develop the PsyCap of female nurses through controlling occupational stressors and establishing supportive organizational climate to enhance their work engagement.

  10. Effects of an Organizational Linkage Intervention on Inter-Organizational Service Coordination Between Probation/Parole Agencies and Community Treatment Providers

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Knight, Kevin; Ducharme, Lori; Pankow, Jennifer; Urbine, Terry; Lindsey, Adrienne; Abdel-Salam, Sami; Wood, Jennifer; Monico, Laura; Link, Nathan; Albizu-Garcia, Carmen; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Weak coordination between community correctional agencies and community-based treatment providers is a major barrier to diffusion of medication-assisted treatment (MAT)—the inclusion of medications (e.g., methadone and buprenorphine) in combination with traditional counseling and behavioral therapies to treat substance use disorders. In a multisite cluster randomized trial, experimental sites (j = 10) received a 3-h MAT training plus a 12-month linkage intervention; control sites (j = 10) received the 3-h training alone. Hierarchical linear models showed that the intervention resulted in significant improvements in perceptions of interagency coordination among treatment providers, but not probation/parole agents. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. PMID:25559124

  11. Training Addiction Counselors to Implement an Evidence-Based Intervention: Strategies for Increasing Organizational and Provider Acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Stephanie M.; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Elizabeth A.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Hunter, Sarah B.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Watkins, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    One barrier to widespread public access to empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is the limited availability and high cost of professionals trained to deliver them. Our earlier work from two clinical trials demonstrated that front-line addiction counselors could be trained to deliver a manualized, group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) for depression, a prototypic example of an EST, with a high level of adherence and competence. This follow-up article provides specific recommendations for the selection and initial training of counselors, and for the structure and process of their ongoing clinical supervision. Unique challenges in working with counselors unaccustomed to traditional clinical supervision are highlighted. The recommendations are based on comprehensive feedback derived from clinician notes taken throughout the clinical trials, a focus group with counselors conducted one year following implementation, and interviews with key organization executives and administrators. PMID:23734072

  12. Organizational work factors among workers and supervisors in export processing zones which support global markets.

    PubMed

    Del Prado-Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2008-10-01

    This is an investigation of the interaction between organizational and management factors at work for both workers and supervisors in the manufacturing sector. Survey was done in a sample consisted of 23 establishments, 630 workers, and 47 supervisors, meanwhile 10 focus group discussions (FGDs) for workers, and 5 FGDs for supervisors. Workers and supervisors alike reported illnesses and job dissatisfaction. Survey showed that the most prevalent issues among workers were: the need to upgrade skills (76.3%), pressured in doing work (60.5%), fast paced work (60.5%), repetitive work (63%), and that work is both physically and mentally tiring (59.7%). On the other hand, supervisors described their work as challenging and stimulating (66%), needed regular upgrading of skills (46.8%), and needed literacy on information technology (31.9%). Focus group discussions showed that workers and supervisors were confronted with stress, fast-paced work, the need to upgrade skills due to accommodation of information technology into the work production, fatigue, re-engineering and downsizing by management, low job control and difficult worker-supervisor relationship. This study was able to show that health of workers and supervisors were affected by both organizational and management factors at work.

  13. Support for Learning with Computer Simulations: Giving Hints, Supporting Learning Processes, and Providing Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njoo, Melanie; de Jong, Ton

    This paper contains the results of a study on the importance of discovery learning using computer simulations. The purpose of the study was to identify what constitutes discovery learning and to assess the effects of instructional support measures. College students were observed working with an assignment and a computer simulation in the domain of…

  14. Health organizations providing and seeking social support: a Twitter-based content analysis.

    PubMed

    Rui, Jian Raymond; Chen, Yixin; Damiano, Amanda

    2013-09-01

    Providing and seeking social support are important aspects of social exchange. New communication technologies, especially social network sites (SNSs), facilitate the process of support exchange. An increasing number of health organizations are using SNSs. However, how they provide and seek social support via SNSs has yet to garner academic attention. This study examined the types of social support provided and sought by health organizations on Twitter. A content analysis was conducted on 1,500 tweets sent by a random sample of 58 health organizations within 2 months. Findings indicate that providing informational and emotional support, as well as seeking instrumental support, were the main types of social support exchanged by health organizations through Twitter. This study provides a typology for studying social support exchanges by health organizations, and recommends strategies for health organizations regarding the effective use of Twitter.

  15. A mixed methods analysis of support for self-management behaviors: perspectives of people with epilepsy and their support providers.

    PubMed

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Engelhard, George; Barmon, Christina; McGee, Robin E; Sterk, Claire E; Diiorio, Colleen; Thompson, Nancy J

    2014-02-01

    Social support is associated with improved self-management for people with chronic conditions, such as epilepsy; however, little is known about the perceived ease or difficulty of receiving and providing support for epilepsy self-management. We examined patterns of epilepsy self-management support from the perspectives of both people with epilepsy and their support persons. Fifty-three people with epilepsy and 48 support persons completed a survey on epilepsy self-management support. Of these individuals, 22 people with epilepsy and 16 support persons completed an in-depth interview. Rasch measurement models were used to evaluate the degree of difficulty of receiving or providing support often for nine self-management tasks. We analyzed model-data fit, person and item location along the support latent variable and differential person and item functioning. Qualitative methods were used to provide context and insight into the quantitative results. The results demonstrated good model-data fit. Help with seizures was the easiest type of support to receive or provide more often, followed by rides to a doctor's appointments and help avoiding seizure triggers. The most difficult types of support to receive or provide more often were reminders, particularly for taking and refilling medications. While most participants' responses fit the model, responses of several individuals misfit the model. Person misfit generally occurred because the scale items did not adequately capture some individuals' behaviors. These results could be useful in designing interventions that use support as a means of improving self-management. Additionally, the results provide information to improve or expand current measures of support for epilepsy self-management to better assess the experiences of people with epilepsy and their support persons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 24 CFR 960.705 - Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Animals that assist, support, or... HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.705 Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart G does not apply to animals that assist, support or provide...

  17. 24 CFR 960.705 - Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animals that assist, support, or... HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.705 Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart G does not apply to animals that assist, support or provide...

  18. 24 CFR 960.705 - Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Animals that assist, support, or... HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.705 Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart G does not apply to animals that assist, support or provide...

  19. 24 CFR 960.705 - Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Animals that assist, support, or... HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.705 Animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart G does not apply to animals that assist, support or provide...

  20. Rationales for Support That African American Grandmothers Provide to Their Children Who Are Parenting Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumo, Jen'nea; Dancy, Barbara; Julion, Wrenetha; Wilbur, JoEllen

    2015-01-01

    African American grandmothers are known to be a major source of support for their children who are parenting adolescents, but little is known about why they provide support. The purpose of this study was to describe the kinds of support provided by African American maternal and paternal grandmothers to their parenting adolescents and the reasons…

  1. Rationales for Support That African American Grandmothers Provide to Their Children Who Are Parenting Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumo, Jen'nea; Dancy, Barbara; Julion, Wrenetha; Wilbur, JoEllen

    2015-01-01

    African American grandmothers are known to be a major source of support for their children who are parenting adolescents, but little is known about why they provide support. The purpose of this study was to describe the kinds of support provided by African American maternal and paternal grandmothers to their parenting adolescents and the reasons…

  2. Provider and Nonprovider Sources of Mental Health Help in the Military and the Effects of Stigma, Negative Attitudes, and Organizational Barriers to Care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul Y; Toblin, Robin L; Riviere, Lyndon A; Kok, Brian C; Grossman, Sasha H; Wilk, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    This study examined sources of help (providers or nonproviders) used by soldiers for mental health problems. Differences in perceived barriers to care by type of help used were also assessed. Active-duty soldiers from four brigade combat teams (N=3,380) were surveyed in 2008-2009. Items assessed posttraumatic stress disorder; depression; anxiety; help needed because of a stress, emotional, alcohol, or family problem; stigma; negative attitudes toward care; and organizational barriers. Participants reported receipt of help in the past three months from providers (mental health or medical professionals or an Army resource hotline) or nonproviders (fellow soldier, medic, chaplain, or chain of command). Nearly a third (31%) were identified as being in need of mental health care. Of those, 5% reported using nonprovider help exclusively, 14% used provider help exclusively, and 7% used both types. Stigma was rated significantly lower as a barrier among those who used help exclusively from providers than among those who did not use help from any source; however, no significant differences in stigma scores were found between those who used help from nonproviders and those who did not use help from any source. Soldiers who used help from nonproviders were more likely than those who used help from providers to perceive organizational barriers. Results show that soldiers may view nonproviders as alternative sources of mental health help, suggesting that the Army should ensure that such resources are adequately trained and integrated into the mental health community so that soldiers can receive the help they need.

  3. Effective resources for improving mental health among Chinese underground coal miners: perceived organizational support and psychological capital.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Wen, Fengting; Xu, Xin; Wang, Lie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the potential effects of perceived organizational support (POS) and psychological capital (PsyCap) on combating depressive and anxious symptoms among Chinese underground coal miners. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a coal-mining population in northeast China. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale, the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Survey of Perceived Organizational Support (SPOS) scale and the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ), which measure depressive and anxious symptoms, POS and PsyCap were distributed to 2,500 underground coal miners (1,925 effective respondents). Hierarchical linear regression was performed to examine the associations of POS and PsyCap (self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism) with depressive and anxious symptoms and the moderating roles of PsyCap and its components. The mediating roles of PsyCap and its components were examined using asymptotic and resampling strategies. The mean levels of depressive and anxious symptoms were 19.91 and 49.69, respectively. POS, PsyCap, hope, resilience, optimism and POS × PsyCap were negatively associated with depressive symptoms. POS, PsyCap, resilience, POS × PsyCap and POS × resilience were negatively associated with anxious symptoms. PsyCap, hope, resilience and optimism partially mediated the association between POS and depressive symptoms. PsyCap and resilience partially mediated the association between POS and anxious symptoms. POS, PsyCap, hope, resilience and optimism could be effective resources for reducing depressive and anxious symptoms. PsyCap, hope, resilience and optimism act as moderators and mediators in the associations of POS with depressive and anxious symptoms. Managers should promote supportive settings and investment in PsyCap to improve workers' mental health.

  4. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Supporting analyses of human-system interfaces, procedures and practices, training and organizational practices and policies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L.

    1995-07-01

    A human factors project on the use of nuclear by-product material to treat cancer using remotely operated afterloaders was undertaken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the project was to identify factors that contribute to human error in the system for remote afterloading brachytherapy (RAB). This report documents the findings from the second, third, fourth, and fifth phases of the project, which involved detailed analyses of four major aspects of the RAB system linked to human error: human-system interfaces; procedures and practices; training practices and policies; and organizational practices and policies, respectively. Findings based on these analyses provided factual and conceptual support for the final phase of this project, which identified factors leading to human error in RAB. The impact of those factors on RAB performance was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance, and alternative approaches for resolving safety significant problems were identified and evaluated.

  5. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. (a) Upon submitting a...

  6. Motivations for providing a secure base: links with attachment orientation and secure base support behavior.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Brooke C; Collins, Nancy L; Van Vleet, Meredith; Tomlinson, Jennifer M

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the importance of underlying motivations in predicting secure base support behavior, as well as the extent to which support motivations are predicted by individual differences in attachment orientation. Participants were 189 married couples who participated in two laboratory sessions. During a questionnaire session, couples completed assessments of their underlying motivations for providing, and for not providing, support for their partner's exploration (i.e., goal-strivings), as well as assessments of their typical secure base support behavior. In an observational session, couples engaged in a discussion of one member's personal goals, during which the partner's secure base support was assessed. Results revealed a variety of distinct motivations for providing, and for not providing, secure base support to one's partner, as well as theoretically expected links between these motivations and both secure base behavior and attachment orientation. This work establishes motivations as important mechanisms that underlie the effective or ineffective provision of relational support.

  7. Identifying Effective Strategies to Providing Technical Support to One-to-One Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of this study was that while one-to-one initiatives in the K-12 environment are growing, the technical support personnel that work in these environments are experiencing problems supporting these initiatives. The purposes of this study were to: (a) identify common problems of providing technical support in a one-to-one laptop program,…

  8. Social support provided by adolescents following a disaster and perceived social support, sense of community at school, and proactive coping.

    PubMed

    Bokszczanin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Heightened levels of support provision are systematically observed in adults immediately following natural disasters, yet knowledge about adolescents' social support provision is less extensive. This longitudinal study of 262 adolescents assessed their help-providing behaviors during and after a flood. It was hypothesized that social support provided by adolescents would relate to subsequent perceptions of their relationships with others and perceptions of the self. Descriptive analyses demonstrated that the majority of respondents reported that they provided tangible, emotional, and informational support to others in need. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that higher levels of support provided following the flood were subsequently associated with higher levels of perceived social support, a stronger sense of community at school, and greater propensity to engage in proactive coping. These associations were statistically significant, controlling for the impact of exposure to disaster stressors, age, gender, and received social support. Theoretical considerations and practical implications related to processes of social support provisions in times of stress are discussed.

  9. Continuing Professional Education, Organizational Support, and Professional Competence: Dilemmas of Rural Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 199 rural Pennsylvania nurses showed that 86% had participated in recent continuing education. Deterrents included lack of support from supervisors/spouses, inflexible schedules, money, time, and travel. Administrators believed nurses were supported for professional development. Little money was available for continuing education.…

  10. GTAs as Organizational Newcomers: The Association between Supportive Communication Relationships and Information Seeking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the components of the assimilation stage of Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) socialization, with a specific focus on the relationship between GTA involvement in supportive communication relationships and GTA use of information-seeking strategies. Finds that a correlation exists between GTA involvement in supportive communication…

  11. Social Support and Youth Physical Activity: The Role of Provider and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Vogel, Randy; Forlaw, Loretta; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine provider and type variation in social support (SS) for activity. Methods: Three hundred sixty-three fifth to eighth-grade students completed a questionnaire assessing self-reported activity and social support (SS) from 3 providers: mom, dad, and peers. Important covariates of activity were included in the analysis: age, BMI,…

  12. Social Support and Youth Physical Activity: The Role of Provider and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Vogel, Randy; Forlaw, Loretta; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine provider and type variation in social support (SS) for activity. Methods: Three hundred sixty-three fifth to eighth-grade students completed a questionnaire assessing self-reported activity and social support (SS) from 3 providers: mom, dad, and peers. Important covariates of activity were included in the analysis: age, BMI,…

  13. Using Variables in School Mathematics: Do School Mathematics Curricula Provide Support for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogbey, James

    2016-01-01

    This study employed content analysis to examine 3 popular middle-grades mathematics curricula in the USA on the support they provide for teachers to implement concepts associated with variables in school mathematics. The results indicate that each of the 3 curricula provides some type of support for teachers, but in a varied amount and quality.…

  14. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care...

  15. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Telecommunications Program § 54.613 Limitations on supported services for rural health care...

  16. Using Variables in School Mathematics: Do School Mathematics Curricula Provide Support for Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogbey, James

    2016-01-01

    This study employed content analysis to examine 3 popular middle-grades mathematics curricula in the USA on the support they provide for teachers to implement concepts associated with variables in school mathematics. The results indicate that each of the 3 curricula provides some type of support for teachers, but in a varied amount and quality.…

  17. (Too) Anxious to help? Social support provider anxiety and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Kent de Grey, Robert G; Uchino, Bert N; Smith, Timothy W; Baucom, Brian R W

    2017-09-27

    Provider factors, such as anxiety, may be important in understanding effects of received social support (SS), which are less consistently positive than those of perceived SS. Due to the dyadic nature of support, anxiety on the part of the provider was predicted to influence the effectiveness of received SS. This laboratory study examined effects of SS provider anxiety within unacquainted dyads on cardiovascular reactivity during acute stress. 148 participants were assigned to support roles, and each dyad was randomized to low or high provider anxiety. Results include that SS provider anxiety resulted in greater blood pressure reactivity and less recovery toward baseline diastolic blood pressure within the dyad. Overall, it appears provider anxiety contributes to less effective SS for recipients and that health costs may accompany providing and receiving support under nonoptimal conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Work-Family Support Roles of Child Care Providers across Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromer, Juliet; Henly, Julia R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of the work-family support roles of a sample of 29 child care providers serving low-income families in the Chicago area (16 family, friend, and neighbor providers (FFN), 7 licensed family child care providers (FCC), and 6 center-based teachers). Providers report offering low-income parents…

  19. Training Addiction Counselors to Implement an Evidence-Based Intervention: Strategies for Increasing Organizational and Provider Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Stephanie M.; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Elizabeth A.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Hunter, Sarah B.; Munoz, Ricardo F.; Watkins, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    One barrier to widespread public access to empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is the limited availability and high cost of professionals trained to deliver them. Our earlier work from 2 clinical trials demonstrated that front-line addiction counselors could be trained to deliver a manualized, group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT)…

  20. Training Addiction Counselors to Implement an Evidence-Based Intervention: Strategies for Increasing Organizational and Provider Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Stephanie M.; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Elizabeth A.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Hunter, Sarah B.; Munoz, Ricardo F.; Watkins, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    One barrier to widespread public access to empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is the limited availability and high cost of professionals trained to deliver them. Our earlier work from 2 clinical trials demonstrated that front-line addiction counselors could be trained to deliver a manualized, group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT)…

  1. The Relationship of Perceived Organizational Support, Job Satisfaction, and Years of Online Teaching Experience to Work Engagement among Online Undergraduate Adjunct Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zone, Emma J.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of online higher education has necessitated increased employment of adjunct faculty. Correlational analyses were implemented to determine whether a relationship exists between adjunct undergraduate faculty's perceptions of organizational support, overall job satisfaction, and online teaching experience, and their work engagement.…

  2. A Reliability Generalization Study on the Survey of Perceived Organizational Support: The Effects of Mean Age and Number of Items on Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Chan M.; Fuqua, Dale R.; Worley, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The Survey of Perceived Organizational Support (SPOS) is a unidimensional measure of the general belief held by an employee that the organization is committed to him or her, values his or her continued membership, and is generally concerned about the employee's well-being. In the interest of efficiency, researchers are often compelled to use a…

  3. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  4. Organizational Learning: Improving Learning, Teaching, and Leading in School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collinson, Vivienne; Cook, Tanya Fedoruk

    2006-01-01

    This innovative book about organizational learning in K-12 settings reshapes the way teachers and administrators think about people, practices, and policies while providing a compelling roadmap for transformation from within today's school systems. The authors argue that six interrelated conditions support organizational learning: prioritizing…

  5. Collaborative learning: A next step in the training of peer support providers.

    PubMed

    Cronise, Rita

    2016-09-01

    This column explores how peer support provider training is enhanced through collaborative learning. Collaborative learning is an approach that draws upon the "real life" experiences of individual learners and encompasses opportunities to explore varying perspectives and collectively construct solutions that enrich the practice of all participants. This description draws upon published articles and examples of collaborative learning in training and communities of practice of peer support providers. Similar to person-centered practices that enhance the recovery experience of individuals receiving services, collaborative learning enhances the experience of peer support providers as they explore relevant "real world" issues, offer unique contributions, and work together toward improving practice. Three examples of collaborative learning approaches are provided that have resulted in successful collaborative learning opportunities for peer support providers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Organizational Social Support and Parenting Challenges among Mothers of Color: The Case of Mocha Moms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Jocelyn E.; Curenton, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrates the parenting experiences of a random sample of members of "Mocha Moms, Inc.", a national organization dedicated to supporting women of color who predominantly have elected not to work full-time outside of the home "(www.mochamoms.org)". Using modified grounded theory methods on 25 telephone interviews, we summarized the…

  7. ICT and Intellectual Disability: A Survey of Organizational Support at the Municipal Level in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsten, Camilla; Marmstål Hammar, Lena; Martin, Lene; Göransson, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Young adults today have grown up in a society where information and communication technology (ICT) support empowerment and social participation. Young adults with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability are at risk for marginalization by the digital divide. The aim was to map and describe how municipal organizations in Sweden organize…

  8. The Role of Perceived Autonomy Support in Principals' Affective Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yujin; Leach, Nicole; Anderman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relations between principals' perceived autonomy support from superintendents, affective commitment to their school districts, and job satisfaction. We also explore possible moderation effects of principals' career experiences on these relations. Data were collected from K-12 public school principals in…

  9. A Planning Process Addresses an Organizational and Support Crisis in Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Keith R.; Davenport, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    An institutionwide strategic planning effort at Central Michigan University, in response to a need for rapid and significant changes in its information technology infrastructure, is outlined. The effort resulted in a matrix governance structure for information technology that acknowledges the value of both distributed support and a strong central…

  10. Organizational Social Support and Parenting Challenges among Mothers of Color: The Case of Mocha Moms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Jocelyn E.; Curenton, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrates the parenting experiences of a random sample of members of "Mocha Moms, Inc.", a national organization dedicated to supporting women of color who predominantly have elected not to work full-time outside of the home "(www.mochamoms.org)". Using modified grounded theory methods on 25 telephone interviews, we summarized the…

  11. Assessment of International Work on Organizational Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Ian

    2002-06-01

    This report describes the concept of organizational factors and includes a consensus definition. It summarizes existing methods for assessing organizations from a safety culture perspective, for analyzing past incidents at plants to assess the role of safety culture, and for using such incident analysis to provide a database supporting organizational factors models. It describes existing methods that potentially could be extended to quantify organizational factors in a Probabilistic Safety Analysis. It concludes that no method is clearly superior for this purpose and recommends the organization of a workshop to clarify important issues prior to selecting a method.

  12. Refinement of an Organizational Skills Intervention for Adolescents with ADHD for Implementation by School Mental Health Providers

    PubMed Central

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Vaughn, Aaron J.; Williamson, Pamela; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Girio-Herrera, Erin; Becker, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to modify, test, and refine the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention for adolescents with ADHD for use by school mental health (SMH) providers. Ten SMH providers from three school districts implemented the HOPS intervention with 11 middle school students with ADHD. Parent and teacher ratings of materials organization and homework management were collected pre- and post-intervention and treatment fidelity was assessed. SMH providers and teachers participated in focus groups and provided feedback on ways to improve the feasibility and usability of the HOPS intervention. Students made large improvements in organization skills (d = 1.8) and homework problems (d = 1.6) according to parent ratings however, no improvements were observed on teacher ratings. Qualitative data generated from coding the focus groups and audio-recorded HOPS sessions were combined with the quantitative results to systematically refine the HOPS intervention for further evaluation of intervention effectiveness and disseminability. PMID:23599833

  13. Partner-provided social support influences choice of risk reduction strategies in gay male couples.

    PubMed

    Darbes, Lynae A; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Beougher, Sean C; Neilands, Torsten B; Hoff, Colleen C

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of partner-provided HIV-specific and general social support on the sexual risk behavior of gay male couples with concordant, discordant, or serostatus-unknown outside partners. Participants were 566 gay male couples from the San Francisco Bay Area. HIV-specific social support was a consistent predictor for reduced unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with both concordant outside partners (all couple types) and outside partners of discordant or unknown serostatus (concordant negative and discordant couples). General social support was associated with increased UAI with concordant outside partners for concordant negative and concordant positive couples (i.e., serosorting). Our findings suggest that prevention efforts should target couples and identify the level of HIV-specific support that partners provide. Partner-provided support for HIV-related behaviors could be an additional construct to consider in gay male relationships, akin to relationship satisfaction and commitment, as well as an important component of future HIV prevention interventions.

  14. Developing a web 2.0 diabetes care support system with evaluation from care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiu; Chen, Rong-Rong; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming; Chang, Hui-Yu; Chang, Her-Kun

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes is a life-long illness condition that many diabetic patients end up with related complications resulted largely from lacking of proper supports. The success of diabetes care relies mainly on patient's daily self-care activities and care providers' continuous support. However, the self-care activities are socially bounded with patient's everyday schedules that can easily be forgotten or neglected and the care support from providers has yet been fully implemented. This study develops a Web 2.0 diabetes care support system for patients to integrate required self-care activities with different context in order to enhance patient's care knowledge and behavior adherence. The system also supports care managers in a health service center to conduct patient management through collecting patient's daily physiological information, sharing care information, and maintaining patient-provider relationships. After the development, we evaluate the acceptance of the system through a group of nursing staffs.

  15. Way-Finding Support in Public Transport Environments provided by the NAMO Mobile Travel Assistance System.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Christian; Heck, Helmut; Nietzio, Annika; Reins, Frank; Berker, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The NAMO travel assistance system is a mobile application providing support for elder travellers in public transport and on foot. The system combines technical and human support during the journey, especially in situations where many seniors experience orientation difficulties. Several approaches to way-finding and orientation support have been developed. This paper introduces the different approaches and presents the results of the extensive user evaluations, leading to recommendations for future development of mobile travel assistance applications for seniors.

  16. Effects of Stress on the Social Support Provided by Men and Women in Intimate Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, Guy; Meuwly, Nathalie; Germann, Janine; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Heinrichs, Markus; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-10-01

    Although evolutionary and social-structural models predict that women will be more supportive than men in relationships, behavioral studies fail to confirm this difference. We predicted instead that gender differences in support will be moderated by stress, and that men will provide lower-quality support primarily when their stress is high. We predicted further that the detrimental effects of stress on men's support will be more evident when men are responding to women's emotionally toned expressions of stress than when men are responding to women's affectively neutral expressions of stress. Stressed and unstressed men and women were observed providing support to a stressed relationship partner. While unstressed, men and women generally provided similar support to the stressed partner. While stressed, men provided lower-quality support than did comparably stressed women, but only in response to emotionally toned expressions of stress. Thus, gender differences in support may arise because women are better able than men to regulate other people's emotional distress while managing stresses of their own.

  17. "They Know where to Find Us...." Service Providers' Views on Early Support and Minority Ethnic Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Bogusia; Young, Alys; Bolton, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine the views of multi-professional service providers on the provision of Early Support for disabled children 0-3 years old from minority ethnic communities. We begin with a description of national policies relevant to this field and of Early Support before describing a national evaluation of its impact. We discuss findings…

  18. Online learning communities can provide support for nurses preparing for certification examinations.

    PubMed

    Pethtel, Pam

    2005-01-01

    Achieving certification is a benefit to the nurses, to their patients, and to the organizations that support them. Developing an online learning community is a simple way for the institution to offer support to the nursing staff. Providing the resources for creation of online learning communities demonstrates the facility's commitment to communication, education, and professional development.

  19. Children's Support Services: Providing a System of Care for Urban Preschoolers with Significant Behavioral Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tewhey, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author features the Children's Support Services (CSS) project in Lowell, Massachusetts, which is an interagency, multidisciplinary program that provides young children and their families a range of child development, mental health, and family support services. The CSS project, which was begun in September 2000, addresses the…

  20. Maintaining Long-Distance Friendships: Communication Practices for Seeking and Providing Social Support across Geographic Divides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobburi, Patipan

    2012-01-01

    People seek and provide support through their personal social network, especially when they must cope with stress, deal with an emergency, or need help. Coping with a new culture or new environment is a stressful situation that sojourner students must face. Support through friendship plays an important role in facing such new situations. Focusing…

  1. 76 FR 16349 - Notice of Policy Regarding Civil Aircraft Operators Providing Contract Support to Government...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Chapter 1 Notice of Policy Regarding Civil Aircraft Operators Providing Contract Support to Government Entities (Public Aircraft Operations) AGENCY: Federal Aviation... states the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) policy pertaining to civil aircraft operators that...

  2. [The organizational bases for the building of a modern medical support system for the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Chizh, I M

    1996-01-01

    In the article the problems concerning characteristic features of the local wars and armed conflicts, organization bases of construction of The Army and Fleet medical support modern system are discussed. The organization of personnel medical security is considered depending on the duration, intensity and spatial scope of military conflict, peculiarities of group (forces) application and ways of military actions conduction. The distribution of federal troops sanitary losses during the war in Chechenskaya Republic is shown depending on the type, localization and degree of injuries gravity as well as volume of the wounded and invalids evacuation by air transport and work of military medical institutions. The following principles of construction of the Armed Forces medical support system are formulated: The system must be in compliance with troops goals, structure, strategy and tactics, its specificity; development of medical security forms and methods, their historicism; interdependency, completeness and integrity of the system's elements; territorial aspects of its construction and management optimization. Considering character of the goals being laid on the Mobile Forces the paramount importance is attached to the level of readiness of medical service and its formations and units to act in crisis situations.

  3. Support Needs for Canadian Health Providers Responding to Disaster: New Insights from a Grounded Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Christine; O'Sullivan, Tracey L.; Lane, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: An earlier descriptive study exploring the various supports available to Canadian health and social service providers who deployed to the 2010 earthquake disaster in Haiti, indicated that when systems are compromised, professionals are at physical, emotional and mental risk during overseas deployment. While these risks are generally well-identified, there is little literature that explores the effectiveness of the supports in place to mitigate this risk. This study provides evidence to inform policy development regarding future disaster relief, and the effectiveness of supports available to responders assisting with international disaster response. Methods: This study follows Strauss and Corbin’s 1990 structured approach to grounded theory to develop a framework for effective disaster support systems. N=21 interviews with Canadian health and social service providers, who deployed to Haiti in response to the 2010 earthquake, were conducted and analyzed. Resulting data were transcribed, coded and analysed for emergent themes. Results and Discussion: Three themes were identified in the data and were used to develop the evolving theory. The interview data indicate that the experiences of responders are determined based on an interaction between the individual’s ‘lens’ or personal expectations, as well as the supports that an organization is able to provide. Therefore, organizations should consider the following factors: experience, expectations, and supports, to tailor a successful support initiative that caters to the needs of the volunteer workforce. PMID:26203399

  4. Campus Portals: Supportive Mechanisms for University Communication, Collaboration, and Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisler, David L.

    2001-01-01

    University portals provide a new computerized interface between colleges and constituent groups. This article discusses: campus portals and possible features they may contain, nine strategies for portal projects, collaborative mechanisms to develop and implement portal projects, criteria for determination of campus portal readiness, potential…

  5. Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education, Professional Development, and Organizational Support in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younies, Hassan; Berham, Belal; Smith, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates the views of health care providers on continuous medical education (CME). To our knowledge, this is one of the first surveys to examine perspectives of CME in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: A 6-part questionnaire focused on the following areas of CME: the workshop leaders/trainers, the training…

  6. Impact of health care adversity on providers: Lessons learned from a staff support program.

    PubMed

    Trent, Maxine; Waldo, Kimberly; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Williams, Daniel; Hegefeld, Wendy; Havens, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Health care providers often experience traumatic events and adversity that can have negative emotional impacts on the profession and on patients. These impacts are typically multifaceted and can result from many different events, such as unanticipated outcomes, licensing board complaints, claims, and litigation. Because health care providers are exposed to diverse situations, they require adequate and timely support, imperative for provider resilience and patient safety. This study evaluated the success of an institution's second victim health care support program and best practices in responding to these traumatic experiences effectively. Twenty faculty and medical residents who utilized the support program at a large hospital system located in Central Texas from 2001 to 2012 participated in 1 of 6 focus groups. Qualitative data were collected from these groups to describe program requirements for the adequate delivery of health care adversity support and necessary program improvements. Responses were first transcribed verbatim. Each research team member analyzed data using a thematic framework approach. This approach helped to characterize traumatic experiences and to design a support system. The results revealed that (1) provider experiences are traumatic, (2) it is necessary to communicate an adverse event in a confidential and timely manner, preferably with a peer, (3) preemptive education regarding risk management and the legal process is helpful, and (4) there is a need for further support of the specific experience of a board complaint. Focus group data indicated the complexity of the emotional impact of traumatic experiences. Specific program components are needed to create best practices for providers affected by health care adversity, including support when providers face board complaints. The program's unique combination of support and education allowed us to expand upon leading national health care adversity programs. © 2016 American Society for

  7. Swarm Intelligence: New Techniques for Adaptive Systems to Provide Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2012-01-01

    The notion of a system adapting itself to provide support for learning has always been an important issue of research for technology-enabled learning. One approach to provide adaptivity is to use social navigation approaches and techniques which involve analysing data of what was previously selected by a cluster of users or what worked for…

  8. A Guide to Providing Social Support for Apprentices. Good Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this guide is to provide some ideas for employers of apprentices to provide an environment in which strong informal bases of support can succeed. Formal mentoring is an important aspect of apprenticeships; however, it is also informal mentoring--practices that are difficult to formally nurture--that plays a significant and…

  9. External Support for Collaborative Problem Solving in a Simulated Provider/Patient Medication Scheduling Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Daniel; Raquel, Liza; Schriver, Angela; Redenbo, Seth; Rozovski, David; Weiss, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Taking medication requires developing plans to accomplish the activity. This planning challenges older adults because of age-related cognitive limits and inadequate collaboration with health providers. The authors investigated whether an external aid ("medtable") supports collaborative planning in the context of a simulated patient/provider task…

  10. Swarm Intelligence: New Techniques for Adaptive Systems to Provide Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2012-01-01

    The notion of a system adapting itself to provide support for learning has always been an important issue of research for technology-enabled learning. One approach to provide adaptivity is to use social navigation approaches and techniques which involve analysing data of what was previously selected by a cluster of users or what worked for…

  11. Providing learning support to nursing students: a study of two universities.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Ann; Fergy, Sue; Marks-Maran, Di; Burke, Linda; Sheehy, Karen

    2013-03-01

    In universities where significant numbers of nursing students come from non-traditional backgrounds, and where an equally significant proportion of students have English as a second language, provision of learning support is essential to ensure success and progression, and to prevent attrition. This paper presents an evaluative study of the support services provided to undergraduate nursing students in two universities in the United Kingdom (UK). Both universities have significant numbers of students from non-traditional backgrounds and who have English as a second language, and both institutions have in place a large array of student support mechanisms. The aims of the study were to identify all existing student support mechanisms across the two universities, to illuminate the profile of students who enter pre-registration programmes at the two universities (age, gender, educational background) and to measure the perceptions of students of the use and usefulness of the support mechanisms provided by their university. Survey method evaluative research was the chosen research approach. Findings showed that the support services that appear to have the greatest impact on student success in their nursing programme are the programme leaders/module teachers, small study skills groups (known as APPL and L2L) and, for the 50% of students who required it, academic literacy and numeracy support sessions. For students who have English as a second language and with non-traditional entry qualifications, numeracy and academic literacy support is particularly valued.

  12. Medication-related Clinical Decision Support in Computerized Provider Order Entry Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Gilad J.; Bobb, Anne; Payne, Thomas H.; Avery, Anthony J.; Gandhi, Tejal K.; Burns, Gerard; Classen, David C.; Bates, David W.

    2007-01-01

    While medications can improve patients’ health, the process of prescribing them is complex and error prone, and medication errors cause many preventable injuries. Computer provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS), can improve patient safety and lower medication-related costs. To realize the medication-related benefits of CDS within CPOE, one must overcome significant challenges. Healthcare organizations implementing CPOE must understand what classes of CDS their CPOE systems can support, assure that clinical knowledge underlying their CDS systems is reasonable, and appropriately represent electronic patient data. These issues often influence to what extent an institution will succeed with its CPOE implementation and achieve its desired goals. Medication-related decision support is probably best introduced into healthcare organizations in two stages, basic and advanced. Basic decision support includes drug-allergy checking, basic dosing guidance, formulary decision support, duplicate therapy checking, and drug–drug interaction checking. Advanced decision support includes dosing support for renal insufficiency and geriatric patients, guidance for medication-related laboratory testing, drug-pregnancy checking, and drug–disease contraindication checking. In this paper, the authors outline some of the challenges associated with both basic and advanced decision support and discuss how those challenges might be addressed. The authors conclude with summary recommendations for delivering effective medication-related clinical decision support addressed to healthcare organizations, application and knowledge base vendors, policy makers, and researchers. PMID:17068355

  13. Health Care Providers' Perceptions of Nutrition Support in Pediatric Oncology and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathleen; Belongia, Meghan; Schulta, Christina; Mulberry, Mollie Haddigan; Nugent, Melodee L; Simpson, Pippa M

    2016-07-01

    One of the most common side effects of medical treatment for patients with an oncologic diagnosis is malnutrition. There is limited research that broadly assesses the perceptions of health care providers (HCPs) regarding nutrition support in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of nutrition support among pediatric oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant HCPs. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design using a 31-item survey. Results of the survey indicated that nurses were more likely to initiate conversations about nutrition support during the first month of diagnosis, while midlevel providers and physicians initiated discussions in response to a change in nutritional status evidenced by decreased oral intake or weight loss. Participants reported resistance by patients and families more often for enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition. Findings suggest a need to develop a more unified service line-based approach for initiating discussions related to nutrition support that incorporate patient and family perceptions.

  14. U.S. Manufacturing: Federal Programs Reported Providing Support and Addressing Trends

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-28

    D. Twenty of the 30 programs fostered innovation by supporting applied R&D—that is, research designed to solve practical problems or develop and... create new business opportunities, attract businesses to the region, and provide manufacturing training to workers. The IMCP community we visited in... comprehensive representation of tax incentives that support the manufacturing sector because other tax incentives that benefit businesses in general may

  15. Nurses as providers of emotional support to patients with MDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Chalco, K; Wu, D Y; Mestanza, L; Muñoz, M; Llaro, K; Guerra, D; Palacios, E; Furin, J; Shin, S; Sapag, R

    2006-12-01

    To identify the forms and means of emotional support that nurses provide to patients living with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MTR-TB) in Lima, Peru. A fundamental role of nurses is to provide emotional support, defined as all the strategies that a health team employs to assure the psychosocial well-being of the patient. However, neither the forms of emotional support nor the means used by nurses in resource-poor settings have been much written about. This paper describes a qualitative study of a team of seven nurses working in a programme that provides individualized MDR-TB treatment to patients in Lima, Peru. It describes the various forms of support that facilitated the ability of patients to adhere to treatment despite socio-economic difficulties, social stigma, drug side effects, problems related to different stages of treatment and concurrent illnesses/special situations. Qualitative study methods were employed over the course of 8 years to observe nurses and patients in an MDR-TB treatment programme. These included participant observation, structured observation sessions of nurses with their patients and focus groups with seven nurses. Through theme and content analyses of qualitative data, ten situations related to MDR-TB treatment were found. These ten issues served as an analytical framework used to identify and discuss the various types of emotional support provided by both formal and informal means. This type of support focused on problems related to different stages of treatment, social stigma of the illness, treatment adherence, side effects, socio-economic difficulties, death and concurrent illnesses/special situations. The essential role of the nurse as a provider of emotional support in the development or implementation of similar programmes with MDR-TB should, in future, be taken into account.

  16. How Cancer Survivors Provide Support on Cancer-Related Internet Mailing Lists

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Frydman, Gilles; Forlenza, Michael; Rimer, Barbara K

    2007-01-01

    Background Internet mailing lists are an important and increasingly common way for cancer survivors to find information and support. Most studies of these mailing lists have investigated lists dedicated to one type of cancer, most often breast cancer. Little is known about whether the lessons learned from experiences with breast cancer lists apply to other cancers. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the structural characteristics of 10 Internet cancer-related mailing lists and identify the processes by which cancer survivors provide support. Methods We studied a systematic 9% sample of email messages sent over five months to 10 cancer mailing lists hosted by the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR). Content analyses were used to compare the structural characteristics of the lists, including participation rates and members’ identities as survivors or caregivers. We used thematic analyses to examine the types of support that list members provided through their message texts. Results Content analyses showed that characteristics of list members and subscriber participation rates varied across the lists. Thematic analyses revealed very little “off topic” discussion. Feedback from listowners indicated that they actively modeled appropriate communication on their lists and worked to keep discussions civil and focused. In all lists, members offered support much more frequently than they requested it; survivors were somewhat more likely than caregivers to offer rather than to ask for support. The most common topics in survivors’ messages were about treatment information and how to communicate with health care providers. Although expressions of emotional support were less common than informational support, they appeared in all lists. Many messages that contained narratives of illness or treatment did not specifically ask for help but provided emotional support by reassuring listmates that they were not alone in their struggles with cancer

  17. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Mirjam P; Beune, Erik J A J; Baim-Lance, Abigail M; Bruessing, Raynold C; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study serves as a problem analysis for systematic intervention development to improve diabetes self-management among patients with LHL. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews with general practitioners (n = 4), nurse practitioners (n = 5), and patients with LHL (n = 31). The results of the interviews with health care providers guided the patient interviews. In addition, we observed 10 general practice consultations. Providers described patients with LHL as uninvolved and less motivated patients who do not understand self-management. Their main strategy to improve self-management was to provide standard information on a repeated basis. Patients with LHL seemed to have a different view of diabetes self-management than their providers. Most demonstrated a low awareness of what self-management involves, but did not express needing more information. They reported several practical barriers to self-management, although they seemed reluctant to use the information provided to overcome them. Providing and repeating information does not fit the needs of patients with LHL regarding diabetes self-management support. Health care providers do not seem to have the insight or the tools to systematically support diabetes self-management in this group. Systematic intervention development with a focus on skills-based approaches rather than cognition development may improve diabetes self-management support of patients with LHL. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Oncology nurses' obstacles and supportive behaviors in end-of-life care: providing vital family care.

    PubMed

    Beckstrand, Renea L; Collette, Joan; Callister, Lynn; Luthy, Karlen E

    2012-09-01

    To determine the impact of obstacles and supportive behaviors in end-of-life (EOL) care as perceived by hospital-based oncology nurses. A 69-item mailed survey. National random sample. 1,005 nurse members of the Oncology Nursing Society who had provided EOL care for patients with cancer. Three mailings yielded 380 usable responses from 912 eligible respondents, resulting in a 42% return rate. Size and frequency of EOL care obstacles and supportive behaviors for patients with cancer in a hospital setting. Results of this research demonstrate the need for more EOL education and help in forming teams of nurses, social and palliative care workers, and physicians to support high-quality care. Another finding was the need for other nurses at a facility to give the nurse caring for the dying patient more time to support the patient and family. Dealing with the family is vital in providing optimal EOL care to patients dying from cancer. By carefully listening to the experience, concerns, and recommendations of hospital-based oncology nurses, compassionate EOL care can be provided to these patients and their families. Oncology nurses are dedicated to providing the best EOL care to their patients and patients' families. This study helped to identify research-based obstacles and supportive behaviors regarding the provision of high-quality EOL care.

  19. Refugees’ views of the effectiveness of support provided by their host countries

    PubMed Central

    Zepinic, Vito; Bogic, Maria; Priebe, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Background The war in former Yugoslavia, which commenced in 1990, caused the biggest refugee crisis in Europe since World War II. There are numerous research investigations into the trauma and associated problems. However, there is no available publication concerning refugees’ own perception of the provided support in host countries. Aims To investigate how refugees evaluated support received (helpful or detrimental) and what kinds of support they wish to receive in the future. Method The study participants were 854 refugees from former Yugoslavia settled in the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy. Alongside demographic data, they were assessed using International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), Life Stressor Checklist–Revised (LSC–R), Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), Matrix for Recording Health Care, Social Interventions (MACSI), and an open questions interview. Results Data revealed that 99.3% of refugees received some kind of support. The most frequent support (98.7%) was primary health care and the least frequent (34.7%) was support in employment and further training. The most helpful (27.5%) was primary health care, and the most detrimental (11.6%) was legal support. The most desired types of support were help in employment (31.8%) and further education/training (20.5%). The educational level of refugees affected their perceptions of support as detrimental or desired. Conclusions There are different levels of received and desired support among host countries. There are also differences in the perception of received and desired support with regard to the refugees’ educational levels. PMID:23105960

  20. Supports for Health and Social Service Providers from Canada Responding to the Disaster in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Christine; O'Sullivan, Tracey; Lane, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In January 12, 2010, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake shook Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The massive disaster made it difficult for local Haitian community officials to respond immediately, leaving the country reliant on foreign aid and international and non-governmental relief organizations. This study explores the effectiveness of various supports that were made available to health and social service providers in Haiti, by focusing on their lived experiences pre-deployment, on-site and post-deployment. The paper provides a qualitative exploration of participant perceptions with respect to the success of their performance in response, and relevant literature describing the various supports provided to health and social service providers responding to disasters. Methods: A single, semi-structured interview was conducted with Canadian health professionals (n=21) who deployed to Haiti during the time of, or after, the 2010 earthquake. The study uses Strauss and Corbin’s structured approach to grounded theory to identify main themes and relationships in the interviews. Results: The interviews indicate that training, and psychological and emotional supports for health and social service providers require improvement to enhance the experience and effectiveness of their work. Conclusions: Findings indicate that supports are most effective when they are tailored to the volunteers. The paper highlights future research stemming from the grounded theory findings. PMID:24475364

  1. Design and initial results from a supported education initiative: the Kansas Consumer as Provider program.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, Diane; Rapp, Charles; Ratzlaff, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    Despite increased attention to consumer-providers, there remains a lack of models that prepare, support, and sustain consumers in provider roles. This article describes the Consumer as Provider (CAP) Training program at the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare, which creates opportunities for individuals with severe psychiatric disabilities to develop knowledge and skills to be effective as human service providers. CAP fosters a partnership between colleges and community mental health centers where students experience classroom and internship activities. Outcome from a 2-year longitudinal study on CAP graduates indicates increased employability, especially in social services field, and higher post-secondary educational involvement.

  2. Framework of the outreach after a school shooting and the students perceptions of the provided support.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Tuija; Haravuori, Henna; Pihlajamäki, Jaakko J; Marttunen, Mauri; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    A large number of bereaved family members, surviving students, and their relatives as well as school staff and the wider community were in need of psychosocial support as a result of a school shooting in Kauhajoki, Finland, 2008. A multilevel outreach project provided psychosocial care to the trauma-affected families, students, schools staff, and wider community for 2 years and 4 months. This article is twofold. First, it presents the theoretical rationale behind the psychosocial support and describes the multimodal elements of the services. Second, it analyzes the trauma-exposed students' help-seeking behavior and perceptions of the usefulness of the support they were offered in different phases of recovery. Information of students' help-seeking and perceptions of support is based on a follow-up data from 4 months (T1, N=236), 16 months (T2, N=180), and 28 months (T3, N=137) after the shootings. Mean age of students was 24.9 (SD=10.2; 95% women). Their perceptions of the offered psychosocial support were collected with structured and open questions constructed for the study. The results confirmed the importance of enhancing the natural networks after a major trauma and offering additional professional support for those in greatest need. The students' perceptions of the provided care confirmed that the model of the acute and long-term outreach can be used after major tragedies in diverse situations and in other countries as well.

  3. Framework of the outreach after a school shooting and the students perceptions of the provided support

    PubMed Central

    Turunen, Tuija; Haravuori, Henna; Pihlajamäki, Jaakko J.; Marttunen, Mauri; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of bereaved family members, surviving students, and their relatives as well as school staff and the wider community were in need of psychosocial support as a result of a school shooting in Kauhajoki, Finland, 2008. A multilevel outreach project provided psychosocial care to the trauma-affected families, students, schools staff, and wider community for 2 years and 4 months. Objective This article is twofold. First, it presents the theoretical rationale behind the psychosocial support and describes the multimodal elements of the services. Second, it analyzes the trauma-exposed students’ help-seeking behavior and perceptions of the usefulness of the support they were offered in different phases of recovery. Method Information of students’ help-seeking and perceptions of support is based on a follow-up data from 4 months (T1, N=236), 16 months (T2, N=180), and 28 months (T3, N=137) after the shootings. Mean age of students was 24.9 (SD=10.2; 95% women). Their perceptions of the offered psychosocial support were collected with structured and open questions constructed for the study. Results The results confirmed the importance of enhancing the natural networks after a major trauma and offering additional professional support for those in greatest need. The students’ perceptions of the provided care confirmed that the model of the acute and long-term outreach can be used after major tragedies in diverse situations and in other countries as well. PMID:25018862

  4. Comparing the Effects of Volunteering and Providing Informal Support in Church on Health in Late Life

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationships among volunteer work at church, providing informal support to fellow church members, religious commitment, and change in self-rated health over time. Method Data were obtained from a nationwide longitudinal sample of 681 older adults. Results The findings suggest that providing informal tangible support to fellow church members is associated with better health over time. In contrast, the data reveal that performing volunteer work does not have a statistically significant effect on health. The results further indicate that the health-related benefits of providing tangible help to fellow church members are especially evident among older adults who are more deeply committed to their faith. Discussion Although older people may assist others in different ways within the church, the informal assistance they provide to coreligionists appears to be more strongly associated with health. PMID:19144969

  5. Hospice providers' key approaches to support informal caregivers in managing medications for patients in private residences.

    PubMed

    Lau, Denys T; Joyce, Brian; Clayman, Marla L; Dy, Sydney; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Emanuel, Linda; Hauser, Joshua; Paice, Judith; Shega, Joseph W

    2012-06-01

    Managing and administering medications to relieve pain and symptoms are common, important responsibilities for informal caregivers of patients receiving end-of-life care at home. However, little is known about how hospice providers prepare and support caregivers with medication-related tasks. This qualitative study explores the key approaches that hospice providers use to facilitate medication management for caregivers. Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 22 providers (14 nurses, four physicians, and four social workers) from four hospice organizations around an urban setting in the midwestern U.S. Based on the interviews, the following five key approaches emerged, constituting how the hospice team collectively helped caregivers manage medications: 1) establishing trust; 2) providing information; 3) promoting self-confidence; 4) offering relief (e.g., provided in-home medication assistance, mobilized supportive resources, and simplified prescriptions); and 5) assessing understanding and performance. Each hospice discipline used multiple approaches. Nurses emphasized tailoring information to individual caregivers and patients, providing in-home assistance to help relieve caregivers, and assessing caregivers' understanding and performance of medication management during home visits. Physicians simplified medication prescriptions to alleviate burden and reassured caregivers using their perceived medical authority. Social workers facilitated medication management by providing emotional support to promote self-confidence and mobilizing resources in caregivers' support networks and the community at large. Hospice nurses, physicians, and social workers identified distinct, yet overlapping, approaches in aiding caregivers with medication management. These findings emphasize the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork among hospice providers. Future research should investigate how common, standardized, effective, and efficient these approaches are in

  6. Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs): mapping a research agenda that incorporates an organizational perspective.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Carrie A; Lindhorst, Taryn; Tajima, Emiko A

    2015-04-01

    Multidisciplinary coordinated Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) are a growing model of providing health, legal, and emotional support services to victims of sexual assault. This article conceptualizes SARTs from an organizational perspective and explores three approaches to researching SARTs that have the potential of increasing our understanding of the benefits and challenges of multidisciplinary service delivery. These approaches attend to several levels of organizational behavior, including the organizational response to external legitimacy pressures, the inter-organizational networks of victim services, and the negotiation of power and disciplinary boundaries. Possible applications to organizational research on SARTs are explored.

  7. The Implementation of a Behavioural Support Programme: Teachers' Perceptions of the Programme and Themselves as Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingemarson, Maria; Bodin, Maria; Rubenson, Birgitta; Guldbrandsson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how teachers received and perceived the school programme Prevention in School (PS), a positive behavioural support programme; how did the teachers perceive the programme characteristics and themselves as providers; and how did this affect programme implementation? Design/methodology/approach:…

  8. An Action Research in Science: Providing Metacognitive Support to Year 9 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagaba, Francis; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Won, Mihye

    2016-01-01

    An action research study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of providing metacognitive support to enhance Year 9 students' metacognitive capabilities in order to better understand science concepts related to light, environmental health, ecosystems, genetics, ecology, atoms and the Periodic Table. The study was conducted over three years…

  9. Providing Extra Supports for Language and Literacy Development to Struggling Learners in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sheila; Murphy, Doug; Dennis, Sarah; Davidson, Sherry; Light, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Preschool teachers face increasing pressure to ensure that "all" children acquire the competencies they need to start on the path to becoming successful readers in the early grades, including children who may enter preschool with exceptionally weak skills. This article describes efforts to provide individually tailored supports to relatively…

  10. The Implementation of a Behavioural Support Programme: Teachers' Perceptions of the Programme and Themselves as Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingemarson, Maria; Bodin, Maria; Rubenson, Birgitta; Guldbrandsson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how teachers received and perceived the school programme Prevention in School (PS), a positive behavioural support programme; how did the teachers perceive the programme characteristics and themselves as providers; and how did this affect programme implementation? Design/methodology/approach:…

  11. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  12. Addressing Needs of Military Families during Deployment: Military Service Providers' Perceptions of Integrating Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Seth Christian Walter

    2011-01-01

    Service providers are increasingly recognizing the need to develop effective methods for delivering supporting services to military families during deployment. Research suggests that military families experience increased levels of stress during the cycle of deployment. Bronfenbrenner (1979) conceptualized the family operating within the context…

  13. Perceived Support Provided by Teachers and Classmates and Students' Self-Reported Academic Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielsen, Anne G.; Wiium, Nora; Wilhelmsen, Britt U.; Wold, Bente

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how perceived support provided by teachers and classmates in the school class environment related to students' academic initiative. Data were from a stratified sample of 13-year-old students (n = 1591) from the Norwegian part of the World Health Organization's survey of Health Behaviour in School-aged Children…

  14. The Capacity of Instructional Technologists to Provide Systemic Support for Science Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which pre-service instructional technologists were prepared to assume roles in providing the systemic support needed by science teachers. The participants in the study engaged in a one-semester graduate course focused on integrating technology into science instruction. Through qualitative methods, this study…

  15. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  16. Providing a Full Circle of Support to Teachers in an Inclusive Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Nancy L.; Redd, Lacy

    2011-01-01

    Providing a full circle of support to teachers in an inclusive elementary school, the Newberry Elementary School (NES) principal and staff have worked for 5 years to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. The authors would like to share their perceptions of how this full circle (the multiple systems) of…

  17. Interorganizational and Political Obstacles to Providing Low Cost Supportive Services to the Elderly Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Dan I.; And Others

    An experimental program is described involving the development of supportive service teams composed of nonprofessionals, volunteers and large numbers of elderly consumers in all of the federally funded nutrition sites in an urban region. The team model is advanced as a particular approach to meeting the federal mandate to provide a range of…

  18. [Home support for a child receiving palliative care provided by a self-employed nurse].

    PubMed

    Diamantidis-Zinchiri, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Complex and demanding, paediatric palliative care at home is beginning to develop. How can a self-employed nurse, by definition isolated, care for a child approaching the end of life and his/her family at home? What resources and tools does the nurse have to provide this support?

  19. Interorganizational and Political Obstacles to Providing Low Cost Supportive Services to the Elderly Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Dan I.; And Others

    An experimental program is described involving the development of supportive service teams composed of nonprofessionals, volunteers and large numbers of elderly consumers in all of the federally funded nutrition sites in an urban region. The team model is advanced as a particular approach to meeting the federal mandate to provide a range of…

  20. Mentors Providing Challenge and Support: Integrating Concepts from Teacher Mentoring in Education and Organizational Mentoring in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews and critiques the literature on mentoring functions and roles in education and business to inform the use of mentoring as a developmental tool in both fields. Specifically, in an effort to expand the current notions of the different mentor roles, this review synthesizes studies exploring teacher mentoring in schools and…

  1. Services and supports for young children with Down syndrome: parent and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J; Tanner, J P; Kozyr, Y A; Kirby, R S

    2015-05-01

    As individuals with Down syndrome are living longer and more socially connected lives, early access to supports and services for their parents will ensure an optimal start and improved outcomes. The family's journey begins at the child's diagnosis, and cumulative experiences throughout infancy and childhood set the tone for a lifetime of decisions made by the family regarding services, supports and activities. This study utilized focus groups and interviews with seven nurses, five therapists, 25 service co-ordinators, and 10 English- and three Spanish-speaking parents to better understand family experiences and perceptions on accessing Down syndrome-related perinatal, infant and childhood services and supports. Parents and providers reflected on key early life issues for children with Down syndrome and their families in five areas: prenatal diagnosis; perinatal care; medical and developmental services; care co-ordination and services; and social and community support. Systems of care are not consistently prepared to provide appropriate family-centred services to individuals with Down syndrome and their families. Individuals with disabilities require formal and informal supports from birth to achieve and maintain a high quality of life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Family carers providing support to a person dying in the home setting: A narrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Sara M; King, Claire; Turner, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study is based on people dying at home relying on the care of unpaid family carers. There is growing recognition of the central role that family carers play and the burdens that they bear, but knowledge gaps remain around how to best support them. Aim: The aim of this study is to review the literature relating to the perspectives of family carers providing support to a person dying at home. Design: A narrative literature review was chosen to provide an overview and synthesis of findings. The following search terms were used: caregiver, carer, ‘terminal care’, ‘supportive care’, ‘end of life care’, ‘palliative care’, ‘domiciliary care’ AND home AND death OR dying. Data sources: During April–May 2013, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Pubmed, Cochrane Reviews and Citation Indexes were searched. Inclusion criteria were as follows: English language, empirical studies and literature reviews, adult carers, perspectives of family carers, articles focusing on family carers providing end-of-life care in the home and those published between 2000 and 2013. Results: A total of 28 studies were included. The overarching themes were family carers’ views on the impact of the home as a setting for end-of-life care, support that made a home death possible, family carer’s views on deficits and gaps in support and transformations to the social and emotional space of the home. Conclusion: Many studies focus on the support needs of people caring for a dying family member at home, but few studies have considered how the home space is affected. Given the increasing tendency for home deaths, greater understanding of the interplay of factors affecting family carers may help improve community services. PMID:25634635

  3. Glenn's Telescience Support Center Provided Around-the-Clock Operations Support for Space Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, Diane C.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Telescience Support Center (TSC) allows researchers on Earth to operate experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the space shuttles. NASA s continuing investment in the required software, systems, and networks provides distributed ISS ground operations that enable payload developers and scientists to monitor and control their experiments from the Glenn TSC. The quality of scientific and engineering data is enhanced while the long-term operational costs of experiments are reduced because principal investigators and engineering teams can operate their payloads from their home institutions.

  4. Factors affecting radiographers' organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Akroyd, Duane; Jackowski, Melissa B; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    A variety of factors influence employees' attitudes toward their workplace and commitment to the organization that employs them. However, these factors have not been well documented among radiologic technologists. To determine the predictive ability of selected organizational, leadership, work-role and demographic variables on organizational commitment for a national sample of radiographers. Three thousand radiographers registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists working full time in clinical settings were surveyed by mail regarding their commitment to their employers, leadership within the organization that employs them, employer support and demographic information. Overall, radiographers were found to have only a moderate level of commitment to their employers. Among the factors that significantly affected commitment were the radiographer's educational level, perceived level of organizational support, role clarity and organizational leadership. The results of this study could provide managers and supervisors with insights on how to empower and challenge radiographers and offer opportunities that will enhance radiographers' commitment to the organization, thus reducing costly turnover and improving employee performance.

  5. Core Religious Beliefs and Providing Support to Others in Late Life

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Bastida, Elena

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies suggest that people who have strong social support systems at church tend to enjoy better mental and physical health. Yet little is known about the factors that promote strong church-based social support networks. The purpose of this study is to show that key religious beliefs may have something to do with it. A new construct – spiritual connectedness – is introduced for this purpose. Spiritual connectedness refers to an awareness of the bond that exists among all people and the sense of the interdependence among them. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people in the United States reveal that a strong sense of spiritual connectedness is associated with providing more emotional support and tangible assistance to fellow church members over time. The data further reveal that older people with a strong sense of spiritual connectedness are more likely to pray for others, as well. PMID:20890390

  6. Academic effects of providing peer support in general education classrooms on students without disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, L S; Kennedy, C H

    1997-01-01

    We studied the academic effects on peers without disabilities of serving as peer supports for students with disabilities in general education classrooms. Three peers were studied using a range of indicators, including academic engagement, coursework performance, and social validity assessments. Peers assisting a student with disabilities via curricular adaptation, assignment completion, and social facilitation constituted the multicomponent independent variable. We used withdrawal or multiple baseline designs to demonstrate positive benefits for peers for all measures used. In addition, follow-up data for 2 peers indicated that the positive changes associated with serving as a peer support were maintained for up to 2 months. Our results are discussed in relation to the possible academic and social effects of providing peer supports in general education classrooms for students with and without disabilities. PMID:9103989

  7. Integrating Supportive Care Principles Into Dialysis Decision Making: A Primer for Palliative Medicine Providers.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alvin H

    2017-03-01

    Despite advances in predialysis care and dialysis technology, patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease continue to experience multiple comorbidities, a high symptom burden, a shortened life expectancy, and substantial physical, emotional, and spiritual suffering. Patients with acute kidney injury and end-stage renal disease, especially if they are older, often undergo prolonged hospitalizations, greater use of intensive medical treatment, and limited survival. Unfortunately, most nephrologists are not trained to conduct shared decision-making conversations to elicit patients' values, preferences, and goals for treatment and address their patients' multifactorial suffering. These patients would benefit from the integration of supportive care principles into their care. This article addresses how supportive care specialists can collaborate with nephrology clinicians to provide patient-centered supportive care and identifies resources to assist them in this endeavor.

  8. Why does interactional justice promote organizational loyalty, job performance, and prevent mental impairment? The role of social support and social stressors.

    PubMed

    Otto, Kathleen; Mamatoglu, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Using social exchange theory as a conceptual framework, we investigated the relationship between interactional justice and the outcomes organizational loyalty (affective commitment, turnover intentions), perceived job performance (self-rated performance, personal accomplishment), and mental impairment (cognitive irritation, emotional exhaustion) in an online survey of 218 employees working in the field of computer technology. Specifically, we predicted that interactional justice would heighten the quality of social exchange relationships and therefore expected perceived social support (POS) and bullying to mediate the proposed relationships. We tested our hypotheses applying a latent structural equation model. Our findings revealed that POS mediated the relationship between interactional justice and organizational loyalty, whereas bullying mediated the relationship between interactional justice and mental impairment. Practical implications are discussed concerning how to foster interactional justice and POS and how to weaken bullying behavior.

  9. Patients' and nurses' views on providing psychological support within cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Turner, Katrina M; Winder, Rachel; Campbell, John L; Richards, David A; Gandhi, Manish; Dickens, Chris M; Richards, Suzanne

    2017-09-01

    To explore patients' and nurses' views on the feasibility and acceptability of providing psychological care within cardiac rehabilitation services. In-depth interviews analysed thematically. 18 patients and 7 cardiac nurses taking part in a pilot trial (CADENCE) of an enhanced psychological care intervention delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes by nurses to patients with symptoms of depression. Cardiac services based in the South West of England and the East Midlands, UK. Patients and nurses viewed psychological support as central to good cardiac rehabilitation. Patients' accounts highlighted the significant and immediate adverse effect a cardiac event can have on an individual's mental well-being. They also showed that patients valued nurses attending to both their mental and physical health, and felt this was essential to their overall recovery. Nurses were committed to providing psychological support, believed it benefited patients, and advocated for this support to be delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes rather than within a parallel healthcare service. However, nurses were time-constrained and found it challenging to provide psychological care within their existing workloads. Both patients and nurses highly value psychological support being delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes but resource constraints raise barriers to implementation. Consideration, therefore, should be given to alternative forms of delivery which do not rely solely on nurses to enable patients to receive psychological support during cardiac rehabilitation. ISCTRN34701576. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. 'They survive despite the organizational culture, not because of it': a longitudinal study of new staff perceptions of what constitutes support during the transition to an acute tertiary facility.

    PubMed

    Fox, Robyn; Henderson, Amanda; Malko-Nyhan, Kristina

    2005-10-01

    Increasing difficulties of recruitment and retention of nursing staff strongly indicate that organizations should identify factors that contribute to successful transition of new staff to the workplace. Although many studies have identified problems facing new staff, fewer studies have articulated best practices. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to ascertain what new staff perceived as supportive elements implemented by the organization to assist their integration. Sixteen staff in Phase I and 12 staff in Phase II attended focus groups. The focus groups at 2-3 months provided specific information, with particular emphasis on negative interactions with other staff members and inadequate learning assistance and support. Different themes emerged within the focus groups at 6-9 months. Staff discussed being 'self-reliant' and 'getting to know the system'. Participants indicated that these skills might be beneficial to new staff in the development of organizational 'know how' and resourcefulness, rather than relying on preceptor support that, unfortunately, cannot be always guaranteed.

  11. Providing mentorship support to general surgery residents: a model for structured group facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Caitlin; Bennett, Sean; Carver, David; El Tawil, Karim; Fabbro, Sarah; Howatt, Neil; Noei, Farahnaz; Rae, Rachel; Haggar, Fatima; Arnaout, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mentorship is foundational to surgical training, with recognized benefits for both mentees and mentors. The University of Ottawa General Surgery Mentorship Program was developed as a module-based group facilitation program to support inclusive personal and professional development of junior general surgery residents. The group format provided an opportunity for both vertical and horizontal mentorship relationships between staff mentors and resident mentees. Perceived benefits of program participants were evaluated at the conclusion of the first year of the program. The program was well-received by staff and resident participants and may provide a time-efficient and inclusive mentorship structure with the additional benefit of peer support. We review the development and implementation of the program to date and share our mentorship experience to encourage the growth of formal mentorship opportunities within general surgery training programs. PMID:26424687

  12. Relaxing moral reasoning to win: How organizational identification relates to unethical pro-organizational behavior.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Chen, Chao C; Sheldon, Oliver J

    2016-08-01

    Drawing on social identity theory and social-cognitive theory, we hypothesize that organizational identification predicts unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB) through the mediation of moral disengagement. We further propose that competitive interorganizational relations enhance the hypothesized relationships. Three studies conducted in China and the United States using both survey and vignette methodologies provided convergent support for our model. Study 1 revealed that higher organizational identifiers engaged in more UPB, and that this effect was mediated by moral disengagement. Study 2 found that organizational identification once again predicted UPB through the mediation of moral disengagement, and that the mediation relationship was stronger when employees perceived a higher level of industry competition. Finally, Study 3 replicated the above findings using a vignette experiment to provide stronger evidence of causality. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Stress and Coping with War: Support Providers and Casualties of Operations Desert Shield/Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    civilian world it would be belly -up in 6 months." "I was taken to a University hospital and the treatment was poor. Then I was moved to King Fahd and...and now we’re getting married as soon as we get back home." "I provided support for all of my soldiers." 0 "It was like a little clique that was formed

  14. Educating Amid Uncertainty: The Organizational Supports Teachers Need to Serve Students in High-Poverty, Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.; Papay, John P.; Johnson, Susan Moore; Charner-Laird, Megin; Ng, Monica; Reinhorn, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We examine how uncertainty, both about students and the context in which they are taught, remains a persistent condition of teachers' work in high-poverty, urban schools. We describe six schools' organizational responses to these uncertainties, analyze how these responses reflect open- versus closed-system approaches, and examine how this…

  15. National Results of the Organizational Change Survey: Cooperative Extension's Capacity To Support Programs for Children, Youth and Families at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Sherry C.; Marczak, Mary S.; Peterson, Donna J.; Sewell, Margaret; Lipinski, John

    As part of the Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Evaluation Collaboration, responses from extension professionals in 42 states and territories to the 74-item Organizational Change Survey were analyzed. Overall trends in the discrepancy between the current and ideal status of extension as indicated by all state discrepancy scores in all…

  16. The "specter" of cancer: exploring secondary trauma for health professionals providing cancer support and counseling.

    PubMed

    Breen, Lauren J; O'Connor, Moira; Hewitt, Lauren Y; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2014-02-01

    Health professionals are vulnerable to occupational stress and tend to report high levels of secondary trauma and burnout; this is especially so for those working in "high-death" contexts such as cancer support and palliative care. In this study, 38 health professionals (psychologists, social workers, pastoral carers/chaplains, nurses, group facilitators, and a medical practitioner) who provide grief support and counseling in cancer and palliative care each participated in a semistructured interview. Qualitatively, a grounded theory analysis revealed four themes: (a) the role of health professionals in supporting people who are experiencing grief and loss issues in the context of cancer, (b) ways of working with patients with cancer and their families, (c) the unique qualities of cancer-related loss and grief experiences, and (d) the emotional demands of the work and associated self-care. The provision of psychological services in the context of cancer is colored by the specter of cancer, an unseen yet real phenomenon that contributes to secondary trauma and burnout. The participants' reported secondary trauma has serious repercussions for their well-being and may compromise the care they provide. The findings have implications for the retention and well-being of personnel who provide psychosocial care in cancer and the quality and delivery of services for people with cancer and their families. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Reducing turnover is not enough: The need for proficient organizational cultures to support positive youth outcomes in child welfare.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles

    2013-11-01

    High caseworker turnover has been identified as a factor in the poor outcomes of child welfare services. However, almost no empirical research has examined the relationship between caseworker turnover and youth outcomes in child welfare systems and there is an important knowledge gap regarding whether, and how, caseworker turnover relates to outcomes for youth. We hypothesized that the effects of caseworker turnover are moderated by organizational culture such that reduced caseworker turnover is only associated with improved youth outcomes in organizations with proficient cultures. The study applied hierarchical linear models (HLM) analysis to the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW II) with a U.S. nationwide sample of 2,346 youth aged 1.5- to 18-years-old and 1,544 caseworkers in 73 child welfare agencies. Proficient organizational culture was measured by caseworkers' responses to the Organizational Social Context (OSC) measure; staff turnover was reported by the agencies' directors; and youth outcomes were measured as total problems in psychosocial functioning with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) completed by the youths' caregivers at intake and at 18 month follow-up. The association between caseworker turnover and youth outcomes was moderated by organizational culture. Youth outcomes were improved with lower staff turnover in proficient organizational cultures and the best outcomes occurred in organizations with low turnover and high proficiency. To be successful, efforts to improve child welfare services by lowering staff turnover must also create proficient cultures that expect caseworkers to be competent and responsive to the needs of the youth and families they serve.

  18. Reducing turnover is not enough: The need for proficient organizational cultures to support positive youth outcomes in child welfare

    PubMed Central

    Glisson, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objective High caseworker turnover has been identified as a factor in the poor outcomes of child welfare services. However, almost no empirical research has examined the relationship between caseworker turnover and youth outcomes in child welfare systems and there is an important knowledge gap regarding whether, and how, caseworker turnover relates to outcomes for youth. We hypothesized that the effects of caseworker turnover are moderated by organizational culture such that reduced caseworker turnover is only associated with improved youth outcomes in organizations with proficient cultures. Methods The study applied hierarchical linear models (HLM) analysis to the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW II) with a U.S. nationwide sample of 2,346 youth aged 1.5- to 18-years-old and 1,544 caseworkers in 73 child welfare agencies. Proficient organizational culture was measured by caseworkers’ responses to the Organizational Social Context (OSC) measure; staff turnover was reported by the agencies’ directors; and youth outcomes were measured as total problems in psychosocial functioning with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) completed by the youths’ caregivers at intake and at 18 month follow-up. Results The association between caseworker turnover and youth outcomes was moderated by organizational culture. Youth outcomes were improved with lower staff turnover in proficient organizational cultures and the best outcomes occurred in organizations with low turnover and high proficiency. Conclusions To be successful, efforts to improve child welfare services by lowering staff turnover must also create proficient cultures that expect caseworkers to be competent and responsive to the needs of the youth and families they serve. PMID:24273363

  19. Differences between pediatric registered nurses' perception of organizational support, intent to stay, workload, and overall satisfaction, and years employed as a nurse in magnet and non-magnet pediatric hospitals: implications for administrators.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Susan R; Teasley, Susan L; Cox, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    Much is understood about the issues that nurses believe impact their work environment and how Magnet hospitals have better organizational and patient outcomes. The majority of these large-scale studies have not included large numbers of nurses who care for children. In addition, we know little about how nurses perceive their work environment as their years in nursing increase. This study used a secondary analysis of survey responses from pediatric staff nurses to determine (1) whether there were differences in nurses' perceptions of organizational support, workload, intent to stay, and overall satisfaction within Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals, and (2) whether there were differences in these responses as the years in nursing increased. Findings indicate that Magnet nurses perceive a better work environment than do nurses from non-Magnet hospitals, and that for nurses in their first year as a nurse and for those nurses who have been a nurse for 15 years or longer believe their work environment is more supportive. The implications for nurse administrators include finding ways to keep new nurses engaged and satisfied after that initial "honeymoon" feeling about their new profession as well as providing further evidence of the value Magnet provides an institution.

  20. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today's competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application, as

  1. The association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ravangard, Ramin; Sajjadnia, Zahra; Jafari, Abdosaleh; Shahsavan, Najme; Bahmaie, Jamshid; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve success in today’s competitive world, organizations should adapt to environmental changes. On the other hand, managers should have a set of values and ethical guidelines for their administrative and organizational functions. This study aimed to investigate the association between work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes among the administrative, financial and support employees of general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytic study conducted in 2013. A sample of 124 employees was selected using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using 2 questionnaires measuring the dimensions of employees' work ethics (four dimensions) and attitudes towards organizational changes (three dimensions). The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and statistical tests, including ANOVA, independent samples t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The maximum and minimum score of work ethic dimensions were related to being cooperative (4.60 ± 0.38) and dependable (4.29 ± 0.39) respectively. On the other hand, the maximum and minimum score of attitudes towards the various dimensions of organizational changes were related to the behavioral (3.83 ± 0.70) and the affective (3.55 ± 0.88) dimensions respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between the work ethics and education levels of the employees in this study (P = 0.003). Also, among work s dimensions, only being considerate had a significant association with attitudes towards organizational changes (P = 0.014) and their cognitive dimension (P = 0.005). To improve employees' work ethics and attitudes towards organizational changes, the following suggestions can be offered: training hospitals managers in participative management style and its application

  2. Caregiver and health care provider preferences of nutritional support in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit.

    PubMed

    Williams-Hooker, Ruth; Adams, Marissa; Havrilla, David A; Leung, Wing; Roach, Robin R; Mosby, Terezie T

    2015-08-01

    Many pediatric oncology patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) require nutritional support (NS) because of their inability to consume adequate caloric intake enough calories orally. Although NS can be provided either enteraly (EN) or parenteraly (PN), EN is the preferred method of NS as long as if the gastrointestinal tract is functioning. In this qualitative study, we determined the type of NS preferences and the reservations of caregivers of pediatric HSCT patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as well as those of health care (HC) providers working on the HSCT unit. A survey was developed and completed anonymously by HC providers and caregivers. The hypothesis was that HC providers and caregivers would prefer PN because it is convenient to use in patients who already have a central line in place. Most caregivers preferred PN to EN, while most HC providers preferred EN to PN. The barrier between EN initiation and caregivers' approval was the caregivers' perception that EN was invasive and painful, most common obstacle for initiation of EN among caregivers was that it hurts/is invasive, while the barrier with HC providers was vomiting and/abdominal pain associated with EN. If caregivers were better educated about NS and the advantages/disadvantages of the different forms of NS, their preferences may change. There have been policy changes at St. Jude have been implemented since this study, and an outpatient dietitian now provides education to caregivers about NS during the pre-evaluation for HSCT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neonatal Nurses NICU Quality Improvement: Embracing EBP Recommendations to Provide Parent Psychosocial Support.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Isabell B; Melwak, Mary Alice; Smith, Joan R; Kenner, Carole; Chuffo-Siewert, Rebecca; Ryan, Donna J; Geller, Pamela A; Hall, Sue

    2017-02-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a stressful environment for infants, their families, and the healthcare team. There is an immediate need for neonatal nurses to embrace and translate the new National Perinatal Association recommendations for psychosocial support of NICU parents into clinical practice to demonstrate best practices for infants, their families, and the whole team. To summarize the current evidence-based practice recommendations and to provide suggestions for team members to develop strategies to adopt and implement them through quality improvement (QI) projects. Literature reviews were conducted by the original 6 National Perinatal Association workgroup teams and covered all levels of available evidence (eg, qualitative, quantitative, and clinical research, guidelines, and clinical and parental expertise). Evidence was synthesized to formulate this set of recommendations published in December 2015. We describe their applicability to the vital role of neonatal nurses, while elucidating QI projects that track measurements of change to translate these recommendations into practice. Neonatal nurses are in an ideal position to transform systems of support for NICU parents through the adoption of these recommendations at the bedside, and further to identify areas for QI to enhance implementation. Neonatal nurses are integral to problem solving and identifying QI strategies for translating these recommendations into NICU clinical practice to improve parent psychosocial support. This article disseminates evidence and encourages scientific investigation into various methods of supporting emotional health of NICU parents to create better health outcomes.

  4. Inter-generational family support provided by older people in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2004-07-01

    Most social research on ageing in Asia has focused on the support provided by adult children to their parents, and thereby suggests that as a matter of course older people are in need of support. This paper offers a different perspective. Drawing on ethnographic and quantitative data from a village in East Java, it examines the extent of older people's dependence on others and highlights the material and practical contributions that they make to their families. It is shown that only a minority of older people are reliant on children or grandchildren for their daily survival. In the majority of cases, the net flow of inter-generational support is either downwards - from old to young - or balanced. Far from merely assisting with childcare and domestic tasks, older people are often the economic pillars of multi-generational families. Pension and agricultural incomes serve to secure the livelihoods of whole family networks, and the accumulated wealth of older parents is crucial for launching children into economic independence and underwriting their risks. Parental generosity does not generally elicit commensurate reciprocal support when it is needed, leaving many people vulnerable towards the end of their lives.

  5. Inter-generational family support provided by older people in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    SCHRÖDER-BUTTERFILL, ELISABETH

    2007-01-01

    Most social research on ageing in Asia has focused on the support provided by adult children to their parents, and thereby suggests that as a matter of course older people are in need of support. This paper offers a different perspective. Drawing on ethnographic and quantitative data from a village in East Java, it examines the extent of older people’s dependence on others and highlights the material and practical contributions that they make to their families. It is shown that only a minority of older people are reliant on children or grandchildren for their daily survival. In the majority of cases, the net flow of inter-generational support is either downwards – from old to young – or balanced. Far from merely assisting with childcare and domestic tasks, older people are often the economic pillars of multi-generational families. Pension and agricultural incomes serve to secure the livelihoods of whole family networks, and the accumulated wealth of older parents is crucial for launching children into economic independence and underwriting their risks. Parental generosity does not generally elicit commensurate reciprocal support when it is needed, leaving many people vulnerable towards the end of their lives. PMID:23750060

  6. Doulas' Perspectives about Providing Support to Incarcerated Women: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hellerstedt, Wendy; Secor-Turner, Molly; Gerrity, Erica; Baker, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To document the logistical feasibility of a doula program for pregnant incarcerated women and to assess doulas' perceptions of their achievements. Design and Sample Six doulas provided written case notes (“birth stories”) about their experiences with 18 pregnant women in one Midwestern state prison. Measures The birth stories were analyzed by two coders to identify major themes related to doulas' perceptions about providing support to incarcerated women. Analyses involved coder consensus about major themes and doula affirmation of findings. Results All doulas reported that they met key objectives for a successful relationship with each of their clients. Key themes were their ability to empower clients, establish a trusting relationship, normalize the delivery, and support women as they were separated from their newborns. Conclusions The intervention was logistically feasible, suggesting that doulas can adapt their practice for incarcerated women. Doulas may need specific training to prepare themselves for institutional restrictions that may conflict with the traditional roles of doula care. It may be important for doulas to understand the level of personal and professional resources they may have to expend to support incarcerated women if they are separated from their infants soon after delivery. PMID:24980835

  7. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer counselor training program for volunteer veterans, the “Buddies” program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Results Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. Conclusions MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion. PMID:24199738

  8. Organizational Support for the 3rd Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, July 30 – August 8, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-07-01

    This grant provided partial funds for American graduate students to attend the 3rd Graduate Summer Institute on Complex Plasmas, which was held from July 30 to August 8, 2012 at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The Graduate Summer Institute is a topical series of instructional workshops held bi-annually on the emerging field of complex plasmas that is jointly organized through a collaboration between American and German-European Union plasmas researchers. This specialized program brings together many of the world's leading researchers in the specialized area of complex plasmas, who freely provide instructional lectures and tutorials on the most recent research and discoveries done in this branch of plasma science. The partial funds provided by this grant helped support the travel and accommodation expenses of the participating American students and tutorial instructors. Partial funds further supported the travel and accommodation of three renown American plasma researchers that provided educational tutorials to the thirty-eight participating students from the United States, Europe, and Asia. The organized program afforded a unique opportunity for the participating American graduate students to learn about and engage more deeply in an area of plasma science that is not studied in any of the graduate educational curriculums provided by universities in the United States of America. The educational experience offered by this program provided the necessary knowledge needed by future American plasma researchers to keep the national plasma research effort on the cutting-edge and keep the national plasma community as a global leader.

  9. Sowing the seeds of hope: providing regional behavioral health supports to the agricultural population.

    PubMed

    Rosmann, M R

    2005-11-01

    In 1999, project leaders from seven states (i.e., Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin) began to share ideas and resources for providing behavioral health assistance (i.e., mental health counseling and addictions services) to stressed farmers, ranchers, farm workers, and their families. The seven states are among those most impacted by the farm crisis of the 1980s and again by low commodity prices and disasters such as droughts and floods in the 1990s. Project leaders conferred in monthly telephone conference calls and by 2001 began meeting in semi-annual face-to-face meetings to formally agree on a mission, program components, and management structure. Administrative functions were transferred from the Wisconsin Office of Rural Health and Wisconsin Primary Healthcare Association, to AgriWellness, Inc., a regional nonprofit corporation founded to provide technical assistance, grant writing, training of service providers, and other administrative supports. The Sowing the Seeds of Hope program has become a model for the provision of behavioral health supports for the agricultural population, including development of farm stress telephone hotlines, provision of confidential and affordable outpatient mental health and substance abuse counseling, training of professional providers in agricultural behavioral health, training of indigenous farm and rural residents as outreach workers who can respond to disasters of all types, and weekend educational retreats for farm residents. The program has achieved economy of scale by sharing expertise across state boundaries and the formation of a regional administrative structure. Yet, many challenges exist, the greatest of which is obtaining ongoing permanent support for the increasing numbers of uninsured and underinsured people involved in agriculture.

  10. Retaining the next generation of nurses: the Wisconsin nurse residency program provides a continuum of support.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer

    2009-09-01

    Because of the high costs associated with new graduate nurse turnover, an academic-service partnership developed a nurse residency program that provides a comprehensive support system that spans 15 months. Now in its fourth year, involving more than 50 urban and rural hospitals of varying sizes and geographic locations, the program provides formalized preceptor training, monthly daylong educational sessions, and mentoring by clinical coaches. Key factors contributing to the success of this program are a dedicated, cohesive planning team of individuals who embrace a common agenda, stakeholder buy-in, appropriate allocation of resources, and clear articulation of measures of success, with associated data collection. Successful elements of the monthly educational sessions are the use of interactive teaching methods, inclusion of content tailored to the unique needs of the nurse residents, and storytelling to facilitate learning from practice. Finally, training to advance the skill development of preceptors, coaches, educators, and facilitators has provided organizations with enduring benefits.

  11. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  12. Method for Providing a Jewel Bearing for Supporting a Pump Rotor Shaft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Methods for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  13. 20 CFR 670.970 - What are the reporting requirements for center operators and operational support service providers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... center operators and operational support service providers? 670.970 Section 670.970 Employees' Benefits... requirements for center operators and operational support service providers? The Secretary establishes... maintain accountability. Center operators and operational support service providers are responsible for the...

  14. 20 CFR 670.970 - What are the reporting requirements for center operators and operational support service providers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... center operators and operational support service providers? 670.970 Section 670.970 Employees' Benefits... requirements for center operators and operational support service providers? The Secretary establishes... maintain accountability. Center operators and operational support service providers are responsible for the...

  15. Provider-identified barriers and facilitators to implementing a supported employment program in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cotner, Bridget A; Ottomanelli, Lisa; O'Connor, Danielle R; Trainor, John K

    2017-03-08

    In a 5-year study, individual placement and support (IPS) significantly increased employment rate of United States Veterans with spinal cord injury (SCI), a historically underemployed population. In a follow-up study, data on barriers and facilitators to IPS implementation were identified. Over 24 months of implementation, 82 key medical and vocational staff underwent semi-structured interviews (n = 130). Interviews were digitally recorded and qualitatively analyzed (ATLAS.ti v0.7) using a constant comparative method to generate themes. Some barriers to implementation occurred throughout the study, such as Veterans' lack of motivation and providers' difficulty integrating vocational and medical rehabilitation. Other barriers emerged at specific stages, for example, early barriers included a large geographic service area and a large patient caseload, and late barriers included need for staff education. Facilitators were mostly constant throughout implementation and included leadership support and successful integration of vocational staff into the medical care team. Implementation strategies need to be adjusted as implementation progresses and matures. The strategies that succeeded in this setting, which were situated in a real-world context of providing IPS as a part of SCI medical care, may inform implementation of IPS for other populations with physical disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Key facilitators to IPS in SCI implementation are integrating vocational staff with expertise in IPS and SCI on clinical rehabilitation teams and providing leadership support. Ongoing barriers to IPS in SCI include patient specific and program administration factors such as caseload size and staffing patterns. Varying implementation strategies are needed to address barriers as they arise and facilitate successful implementation.

  16. Decision Support Alerts for Medication Ordering in a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System

    PubMed Central

    Beccaro, M. A. Del; Villanueva, R.; Knudson, K. M.; Harvey, E. M.; Langle, J. M.; Paul, W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the frequency and type of decision support alerts by location and ordering provider role during Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) medication ordering. Using these data we adjusted the decision support tools to reduce the number of alerts. Design Retrospective analyses were performed of dose range checks (DRC), drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy alerts from our electronic medical record. During seven sampling periods (each two weeks long) between April 2006 and October 2008 all alerts in these categories were analyzed. Another audit was performed of all DRC alerts by ordering provider role from November 2008 through January 2009. Medication ordering error counts were obtained from a voluntary error reporting system. Measurement/Results Between April 2006 and October 2008 the percent of medication orders that triggered a dose range alert decreased from 23.9% to 7.4%. The relative risk (RR) for getting an alert was higher at the start of the interventions versus later (RR= 2.40, 95% CI 2.28-2.52; p< 0.0001). The percentage of medication orders that triggered alerts for drug-drug interactions also decreased from 13.5% to 4.8%. The RR for getting a drug interaction alert at the start was 1.63, 95% CI 1.60-1.66; p< 0.0001. Alerts decreased in all clinical areas without an increase in reported medication errors. Conclusion We reduced the quantity of decision support alerts in CPOE using a systematic approach without an increase in reported medication errors PMID:23616845

  17. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  18. Forward Surgical Teams provide comparable outcomes to combat support hospitals during support and stabilization operations on the battlefield.

    PubMed

    Eastridge, Brian J; Stansbury, Lynn G; Stinger, Harry; Blackbourne, Lorne; Holcomb, John B

    2009-04-01

    Forward Surgical Teams (FST) provide forward deployed surgical care within the battle space. The next level of care in theater, the Combat Support Hospitals (CSH), are distinguished from the FST by advanced resource capabilities including more complex diagnostic imaging, laboratory support with blood banking, and intensive care units. This study was intended to assess the effect of FST capability on the outcome of seriously injured casualties in comparison to the CSH. We reviewed all casualty records in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry database from April 2004 to April 2006. The study cohort included all US military battle casualties who were admitted to either a FST or a CSH and were not returned to duty within 72 hours. Data were tabulated and assessed for basic demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity score, ventilator and critical care days, and mortality. Statistical inferences were made using Chi square and Student's t tests. As of April 2006, the above information was available in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry on 2,617 US military battle casualties who survived to reach care at a FST and/or CSH. Of this population, 77 subsequently died of wounds and 2,540 survived. We found no significant difference in died of wounds rates between the sample populations or rates of ventilator or critical care days between the two groups, nor did controlling for injury severity score alter this picture. The most significant predictor of mortality in both these groups was head injury. The disparity between the availability of the highest level of injury care and the ability to care for injury as soon as possible is an issue of central importance to both the civilian and military trauma care communities. Our analysis demonstrates that despite the operational and logistic challenges that burden the FST, this level of surgical care confers equivalent battlefield injury outcome results compared with the CSH.

  19. HIV Care Providers' Attitudes regarding Mobile Phone Applications and Web-Based Dashboards to support Patient Self-Management and Care Coordination: Results from a Qualitative Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Swendeman, Dallas; Farmer, Shu; Mindry, Deborah; Lee, Sung-Jae; Medich, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with healthcare providers (HCPs) from five HIV medical care coordination teams in a large Los Angeles County HIV clinic, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial services providers. HCPs reported on the potential utility, acceptability, and barriers for patient self-monitoring and notifications via mobile phones, and web-based dashboards for HCPs. Potential benefits included: 1) enhancing patient engagement, motivation, adherence, and self-management; and 2) improving provider-patient relationships and HCP care coordination. Newly diagnosed and patients with co-morbidities were highest priorities for mobile application support. Facilitators included universal mobile phone ownership and use of smartphones or text messaging. Patient-level barriers included concerns about low motivation and financial instability for consistent use by some patients. Organizational barriers, cited primarily by physicians, included concerns about privacy protections, easy dashboard access, non-integrated electronic records, and competing burdens in limited appointment times. Psychosocial services providers were most supportive of the proposed mobile tools.

  20. Organizational climate, occupational stress, and employee mental health: mediating effects of organizational efficiency.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Lucas, Todd; Arnetz, Judith E

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the relationship between organizational climate and employee mental health is consistent (ie, invariant) or differs across four large hospitals, and whether organizational efficiency mediates this relationship. Participants (total N = 5316) completed validated measures of organizational climate variables (social climate, participatory management, goal clarity, and performance feedback), organizational efficiency, occupational stress, and mental health. Path analysis best supported a model in which organizational efficiency partially mediated relationships between organizational climate, occupational stress, and mental health. Focusing on improving both the psychosocial work environment and organizational efficiency might contribute to decreased employee stress, improved mental well-being, and organizational performance.

  1. Using Information Technology in the Navy Lessons Learned System to Improve Organizational Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    or procedures (TTP). The purpose of this thesis is to examine the various factors that influence organizational learning such as structure...environment, and culture and to examine how Information Technology can be used to support or enhance organizational learning in the Navy. The research...concludes that NLLS has improved organizational learning but has not attained as widespread use as is possible. Recommendations are provide to improve the

  2. Effects of Providing Peer Support on Diabetes Management in People With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junmei; Wong, Rebecca; Au, Shimen; Chung, Harriet; Lau, Maggie; Lin, Laihar; Tsang, Chiuchi; Lau, Kampiu; Ozaki, Risa; So, Wingyee; Ko, Gary; Luk, Andrea; Yeung, Roseanne; Chan, Juliana C. N.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We examined the effects of participating in a “train-the-trainer” program and being a peer supporter on metabolic and cognitive/psychological/behavioral parameters in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS In response to our invitation, 79 patients with fair glycemic control (HbA1c <8%) agreed to participate in a “train-the-trainer” program to become peer supporters. Of the 59 who completed the program successfully, 33 agreed to be peer supporters (“agreed trainees”) and were each assigned to support 10 patients for 1 year, with a voluntary extension period of 3 additional years, while 26 trainees declined to be supporters (“refused trainees”). A group of 60 patients with fair glycemic control who did not attend the training program and were under usual care were selected as a comparison group. The primary outcome was the change in average HbA1c levels for the 3 groups from baseline to 6 months. RESULTS At 6 months, HbA1c was unchanged in the trainees (at baseline, 7.1 ± 0.3%; at 6 months, 7.1 ± 1.1%) but increased in the comparison group (at baseline, 7.1 ± 0.5%; at 6 months, 7.3 ± 1.1%. P = .02 for between-group comparison). Self-reported self-care activities including diet adherence and foot care improved in the trainees but not the comparison group. After 4 years, HbA1c remained stable among the agreed trainees (at baseline, 7.0 ± 0.2%; at 4 years: 7.2 ± 0.6%), compared with increases in the refused trainees (at baseline, 7.1 ± 0.4%; at 4 years, 7.8 ± 0.8%) and comparison group (at baseline, 7.1 ± 0.5%; at 4 years, 8.1 ± 0.6%. P = .001 for between-group comparison). CONCLUSIONS Patients with diabetes who engaged in providing ongoing peer support to other patients with diabetes improved their self-care while maintaining glycemic control over 4 years. PMID:26304971

  3. Should Sabbath Prohibitions Be Overridden to Provide Emotional Support to a Sick Relative?

    PubMed Central

    Greenberger, Chaya; Mor, Pnina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a consensus among the halachic authorities that life-saving actions override Sabbath prohibitions. They are painstaking in securing that the sanctity of the Sabbath is maintained but that not a single life be lost. Objective This manuscript examines if and when a relative’s presence at the bedside of a seriously ill individual is potentially life-saving against the backdrop of the scientific literature. It specifically addresses the permissibility of traveling in a motorized vehicle, generally prohibited on the Sabbath, to be with one’s relative in hospital for the provision of emotional support. Methods Discourse of the halachic issues in the context of the scientific literature. Results Stress, mental or physical, has been determined as a potentially life-threatening condition in many disease entities. The literature attests to both the patient’s and the professionals’ perception of the curative potential of the presence of loved ones by advocating for the patient and relieving stress in the hospital experience. Emotional support from a loved one is perceived by some patients as vital to survival. There is halachic consensus that a patient’s perception of the emotional need for a relative’s presence is sufficient to permit overriding rabbinic prohibitions. Torah prohibitions, which may be overridden for medical needs, may be overridden for emotional support, providing a health professional or family member attests to the fulfilment of this specific need as diminishing the danger to the patient’s life. In certain cases, the latter contingency is unnecessary. Conclusions Emotional support has an impact on the patient’s health status; the degree to which its impact is strong enough to save life is still being studied. As more data from scientific studies emerge, they may be relevant to sharpening the halachic rulings with respect to the issue at hand. PMID:27487314

  4. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students.

  5. Teachers' perspectives on providing support to children after trauma: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Alisic, Eva

    2012-03-01

    A considerable number of children are exposed to extreme stressors such as the sudden loss of a loved one, serious traffic accidents, violence, and disaster. In order to facilitate school psychologists' assistance of teachers working with traumatized children, this study aimed to explore elementary school teachers' perspectives. Using a qualitative design, the study explored the perspectives of a purposively varied sample of 21 elementary school teachers (ages 22-55 years; with 0.5-30 years of teaching experience; 5 men). The teachers participated in semistructured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed in line with the method of "summative analysis" by F. Rapport. Even though some teachers expressed confidence in working with children after traumatic exposure and many referred to a supportive atmosphere within the school, the most prominent themes in the participants' narratives reflected uncertainty about, or a struggle with, providing optimal support to children. They searched for a clear role definition as well as a good balance in answering conflicting needs of the exposed children and classmates, wished for better knowledge and skills, and experienced difficulties related to the emotional burden of their work. The findings suggest a need for further research into this understudied topic. In addition, the identified themes can be used by school psychologists to systematically explore individual teachers' strengths and difficulties and to provide them with tailored advice and training.

  6. Clinical evidence supporting pharmacogenomic biomarker testing provided in US Food and Drug Administration drug labels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Canestaro, William J; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2014-12-01

    Genetic biomarkers that predict a drug's efficacy or likelihood of toxicity are assuming increasingly important roles in the personalization of pharmacotherapy, but concern exists that evidence that links use of some biomarkers to clinical benefit is insufficient. Nevertheless, information about the use of biomarkers appears in the labels of many prescription drugs, which may add confusion to the clinical decision-making process. To evaluate the evidence that supports pharmacogenomic biomarker testing in drug labels and how frequently testing is recommended. Publicly available US Food and Drug Administration databases. We identified drug labels that described the use of a biomarker and evaluated whether the label contained or referenced convincing evidence of its clinical validity (ie, the ability to predict phenotype) and clinical utility (ie, the ability to improve clinical outcomes) using guidelines published by the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Working Group. We graded the completeness of the citation of supporting studies and determined whether the label recommended incorporation of biomarker test results in therapeutic decision making. Of the 119 drug-biomarker combinations, only 43 (36.1%) had labels that provided convincing clinical validity evidence, whereas 18 (15.1%) provided convincing evidence of clinical utility. Sixty-one labels (51.3%) made recommendations about how clinical decisions should be based on the results of a biomarker test; 36 (30.3%) of these contained convincing clinical utility data. A full description of supporting studies was included in 13 labels (10.9%). Fewer than one-sixth of drug labels contained or referenced convincing evidence of clinical utility of biomarker testing, whereas more than half made recommendations based on biomarker test results. It may be premature to include biomarker testing recommendations in drug labels when convincing data that link testing to patient outcomes do not exist.

  7. Sleep spindles provide indirect support to the consolidation of emotional encoding contexts.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Jackson, Rebecca; Lewis, Penelope A

    2014-10-01

    Emotional memories tend to be strengthened ahead of neutral memories during sleep-dependent consolidation. In recent work, however, we found that this is not the case when emotion pertains to the contextual features of a memory instead of its central constructs, suggesting that emotional contexts are influenced by distinct properties of sleep. We therefore examined the sleep-specific mechanisms supporting representations of emotional context and asked whether these differ to those already implicated in central emotional memory processing, such as rapid eye movement sleep (REM). Participants encoded neutral foreground images that were each associated with an emotionally negative or neutral background (context) image. Immediate and delayed tests for the emotionality of the foreground/background image association were separated by a 4-h consolidation period, which consisted of either total wakefulness or included a 2-h polysomnographically monitored nap. Although memory for negative contexts was not associated with REM, or any other parameter of sleep, sleep spindles (12-15 Hz) predicted increased forgetting and slowed response times for neutral contexts. Together with prior work linking spindles to emotional memory processing, our data may suggest that spindles provide multi-layered support to emotionally salient memories in sleep, with the nature of such effects depending on whether the emotionality of these memories pertains to their central or contextual features. Therefore, whereas spindles may mediate a direct strengthening of central emotional information, as suggested in prior work, they may also provide concurrent indirect support to emotional contexts by working to suppress non-salient neutral contexts.

  8. Lipid-anchored Synaptobrevin Provides Little or No Support for Exocytosis or Liposome Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Wei; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Gaffaney, Jon D.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    SNARE proteins catalyze many forms of biological membrane fusion, including Ca2+-triggered exocytosis. Although fusion mediated by SNAREs generally involves proteins anchored to each fusing membrane by a transmembrane domain (TMD), the role of TMDs remains unclear, and previous studies diverge on whether SNAREs can drive fusion without a TMD. This issue is important because it relates to the question of the structure and composition of the initial fusion pore, as well as the question of whether SNAREs mediate fusion solely by creating close proximity between two membranes versus a more active role in transmitting force to the membrane to deform and reorganize lipid bilayer structure. To test the role of membrane attachment, we generated four variants of the synaptic v-SNARE synaptobrevin-2 (syb2) anchored to the membrane by lipid instead of protein. These constructs were tested for functional efficacy in three different systems as follows: Ca2+-triggered dense core vesicle exocytosis, spontaneous synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and Ca2+-synaptotagmin-enhanced SNARE-mediated liposome fusion. Lipid-anchoring motifs harboring one or two lipid acylation sites completely failed to support fusion in any of these assays. Only the lipid-anchoring motif from cysteine string protein-α, which harbors many lipid acylation sites, provided support for fusion but at levels well below that achieved with wild type syb2. Thus, lipid-anchored syb2 provides little or no support for exocytosis, and anchoring syb2 to a membrane by a TMD greatly improves its function. The low activity seen with syb2-cysteine string protein-α may reflect a slower alternative mode of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:26663078

  9. Bayesian data assimilation provides rapid decision support for vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Chris P; Brown, Richard G

    2015-07-06

    Predicting the spread of vector-borne diseases in response to incursions requires knowledge of both host and vector demographics in advance of an outbreak. Although host population data are typically available, for novel disease introductions there is a high chance of the pathogen using a vector for which data are unavailable. This presents a barrier to estimating the parameters of dynamical models representing host-vector-pathogen interaction, and hence limits their ability to provide quantitative risk forecasts. The Theileria orientalis (Ikeda) outbreak in New Zealand cattle demonstrates this problem: even though the vector has received extensive laboratory study, a high degree of uncertainty persists over its national demographic distribution. Addressing this, we develop a Bayesian data assimilation approach whereby indirect observations of vector activity inform a seasonal spatio-temporal risk surface within a stochastic epidemic model. We provide quantitative predictions for the future spread of the epidemic, quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters, case infection times and the disease status of undetected infections. Importantly, we demonstrate how our model learns sequentially as the epidemic unfolds and provide evidence for changing epidemic dynamics through time. Our approach therefore provides a significant advance in rapid decision support for novel vector-borne disease outbreaks.

  10. [Organizational climate and burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lubrańska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of organizational climate and burnout syndrome. It has been assumed that burnout syndrome is dependent on work climate (organizational climate), therefore, two concepts were analyzed: by D. Kolb (organizational climate) and by Ch. Maslach (burnout syndrome). The research involved 239 persons (122 woman, 117 men), aged 21-66. In the study Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Inventory of Organizational Climate were used. The results of statistical methods (correlation analysis, one-variable analysis of variance and regression analysis) evidenced a strong relationship between organizational climate and burnout dimension. As depicted by the results, there are important differences in the level of burnout between the study participants who work in different types of organizational climate. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the organizational climate determines burnout syndrome. Therefore, creating supportive conditions at the workplace might reduce the risk of burnout.

  11. Providing Real-time Sea Ice Modeling Support to the U.S. Coast Guard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Richard; Dykes, James; Hebert, David; Posey, Pamela; Rogers, Erick; Wallcraft, Alan; Phelps, Michael; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Wang, Shouping; Geiszler, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) supported the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center (RDC) through a demonstration project during the summer and autumn of 2015. Specifically, a modeling system composed of a mesoscale atmospheric model, regional sea ice model, and regional wave model were loosely coupled to provide real-time 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The system components included a 2-km regional Community Ice CodE (CICE) sea ice model, 15-km Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric model, and a 5-km regional WAVEWATCH III wave model. The wave model utilized modeled sea ice concentration fields to incorporate the effects of sea ice on waves. The other modeling components assimilated atmosphere, ocean, and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. The modeling system generated daily 72-hr forecasts of synoptic weather (including visibility), ice drift, ice thickness, ice concentration and ice strength for missions within the economic exclusion zone off the coast of Alaska and a transit to the North Pole in support of the National Science Foundation GEOTRACES cruise. Model forecasts graphics were shared on a common web page with selected graphical products made available via ftp for bandwidth limited users. Model ice thickness and ice drift show very good agreement compared with Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Mass Balance buoys. This demonstration served as a precursor to a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave-ice modeling system under development. National Ice Center (NIC) analysts used these model data products (CICE and COAMPS) along with other existing model and satellite data to produce the predicted 48-hr position of the ice edge. The NIC served as a liaison with the RDC and NRL to provide feedback on the model predictions. This evaluation provides a baseline analysis of the current models for future comparison studies

  12. The relationship between women's experiences of mistreatment at facilities during childbirth, types of support received and person providing the support in Lucknow, India.

    PubMed

    Diamond-Smith, Nadia; Sudhinaraset, May; Melo, Jason; Murthy, Nirmala

    2016-09-01

    a growing body of literature has highlighted the prevalence of mistreatment that women experience around the globe during childbirth, including verbal and physical abuse, neglect, lack of support, and disrespect. Much of this has been qualitative. Research around the world suggests that support during childbirth can improve health outcomes and behaviours, and improve experiences. Support can be instrumental, informational, or emotional, and can be provided by a variety of people including family (husbands, mothers) or health providers of various professional levels. This study explores women's reported experiences of mistreatment during childbirth quantitatively, and how these varied by specific types of support available and provided by specific individuals. participants were women age 16-30 who had delivered infants in a health facility in the previous five years and were living in slums of Lucknow India. Data were collected on their experiences of mistreatment, the types of support they received, and who provided that support. women who reported lack of support were more likely to report mistreatment. Lack of support in regards to discussions with providers and provider information were most strongly associated with a higher mistreatment score. Women who received any type of support from their husband or a health worker were significantly more likely to report lower mistreatment scores. Receiving informational support from a mother/mother-in-law or emotional support from a health worker was also associated with lower mistreatment scores. However, receiving emotional support from a friend/neighbour/other family member was associated with a higher mistreatment score. women rely on different people to provide different types of support during childbirth in this setting. Some of these individuals provide specific types of support that ultimately improve a woman's overall experience of her childbirth. Interventions aiming to reduce mistreatment to women during

  13. Providing Data Management Support to NASA Airborne Field Studies through Streamlined Usability Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, A. L., III; Northup, E. A.; Early, A. B.; Chen, G.

    2016-12-01

    Airborne field studies are an effective way to gain a detailed understanding of atmospheric processes for scientific research on climate change and air quality relevant issues. One major function of airborne project data management is to maintain seamless data access within the science team. This allows individual instrument principal investigators (PIs) to process and validate their own data, which requires analysis of data sets from other PIs (or instruments). The project's web platform streamlines data ingest, distribution processes, and data format validation. In May 2016, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) developed a new data management capability to help support the Korea U.S.-Air Quality (KORUS-AQ) science team. This effort is aimed at providing direct NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) support to an airborne field study. Working closely with the science team, the ASDC developed a scalable architecture that allows investigators to easily upload and distribute their data and documentation within a secure collaborative environment. The user interface leverages modern design elements to intuitively guide the PI through each step of the data management process. In addition, the new framework creates an abstraction layer between how the data files are stored and how the data itself is organized(i.e. grouping files by PI). This approach makes it easy for PIs to simply transfer their data to one directory, while the system itself can automatically group/sort data as needed. Moreover, the platform is "server agnostic" to a certain degree, making deployment and customization more straightforward as hardware needs change. This flexible design will improve development efficiency and can be leveraged for future field campaigns. This presentation will examine the KORUS-AQ data portal as a scalable solution that applies consistent and intuitive usability design practices to support ingest and management of airborne

  14. Exposure to aggressive behaviour and burnout in direct support providers: The role of positive work factors.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Jennifer M; Lunsky, Yona; Dewa, Carolyn S

    2014-11-11

    Many direct support providers (DSPs) are exposed to aggressive behaviour in their work supporting adults with developmental disabilities service recipients. This is a work environment factor that has been linked to job burnout. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of positive work factors on emotional exhaustion (EE) among DSPs who are exposed to aggressive behaviour. Survey responses from 671 DSPs who were working in community service settings for adults with developmental disabilities, and were exposed to aggressive behaviour at least monthly were examined. Hierarchical linear regression examined the direct contribution and moderating role of positive work factors (self-efficacy for dealing with aggression and work contributions) on EE measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, after controlling for demographics, occupational variables, exposure to aggression and negative emotional reactions to aggression. Results showed that younger age, more experience, more depression/anger emotions in response to aggression, lower self-efficacy and low positive work contributions were significantly associated with EE. Positive work motivation was a moderator of exposure to aggression and EE. When work motivations were low, DSPs were more negatively affected by higher exposure to aggression. These findings suggest that in addition to addressing the negative emotional reactions to the aggressive behaviour encountered at work, it is also important to foster positive work factors which may be protective against EE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Wearable human movement monitoring device aimed at providing personalized support in healthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Manuel; Roa, Laura M.; Reina-Tosina, Javier; Rovayo, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a wearable human movement monitor designed within the context of a telehealthcare system for the elderly. One major characteristic of this device is the capability for an on-line personalization to the user. This capability compels to a trade-off among processing capacity, portability, low cost and power consumption, which are necessary to assure its feasibility. We have performed a preliminary laboratory study to assess the influence of the customization capacity in the reliability of the device for capturing falling events. The study was based carried out over 8 voluntaries and demonstrated that the device is able to distinguish true falling events from normal activities like fast walking or going up/downstairs. Moreover, our outcomes indicate that the subject and the environment have a critical influence on the reliability of the falling detection. This result underlines the importance of providing personalized support in telehealthcare.

  16. A Model of Stress and Coping and Their Influence on Individual and Organizational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Nancy G.; Lewin, Jeffrey E.; Sager, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    A model of coping with stress is proposed in which coping mediates the relationship among organizational stressors and personal characteristics, and job-related strains and organizational outcomes. Study results, based on a sample of professional salespeople, provide overall support for most of the hypothesized relationships among work-related…

  17. Planned Organizational Change in Higher Education: Dashboard Indicators and Stakeholder Sensemaking--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulowitz, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examined the introduction and implementation of an organizational Dashboard as a planned organizational change within four educational support service departments and the senior leadership group within a large, Northeastern university. General systems theory provides a theoretical framework for conceptualizing planned…

  18. Planned Organizational Change in Higher Education: Dashboard Indicators and Stakeholder Sensemaking--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulowitz, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examined the introduction and implementation of an organizational Dashboard as a planned organizational change within four educational support service departments and the senior leadership group within a large, Northeastern university. General systems theory provides a theoretical framework for conceptualizing planned…

  19. The challenges of boundary spanners in supporting inter-organizational collaboration in primary care--a qualitative study of general practitioners in a new role.

    PubMed

    Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Joensen, Anne Sofie Kjær; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2015-02-13

    The visions of more integrated care have created new roles and accountabilities for organizations and professionals. Thus, professionals are increasingly expected to engage in boundary spanning activities in order to facilitate inter-organizational and inter-sectoral collaboration. However, this task can be difficult for individual actors and it is important to investigate the work and challenges of boundary spanners in various settings. This study explores the challenges related to a new boundary spanning role for general practitioners employed to facilitate collaboration between the municipalities and general practice. The study is based on semi-structured interviews with ten general practitioners acting as municipal practice consultants in the Capital Region of Denmark. The transcribed interviews were analyzed in several steps organizing the material into a set of coherent and distinct categories covering the different types of challenges experienced by the informants. The main challenges of the general practitioners acting as boundary spanners were: 1) defining and negotiating the role in terms of tasks and competencies; 2) representing and mobilizing colleagues in general practice; 3) navigating in an unfamiliar organizational context. The results support previous studies in emphasizing the difficult and multifaceted character of the boundary spanning role. While some of these challenges are not easily dealt with due to their structural causes, organizations employing boundary spanners should take note of these challenges and support their boundary spanners with matching resources and competencies.

  20. Supporting hospital staff to provide compassionate care: do Schwartz Center Rounds work in English hospitals?

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Joanna

    2012-03-01

    To assess (1) whether the Schwartz Center Rounds ("Rounds"), a multidisciplinary forum which brings together hospital staff to discuss the nonclinical, social and emotional aspects of caring for patients, could transfer from the US to a UK setting; and (2) whether UK Rounds would achieve a similar positive impact on individuals and teams, and hospital culture. The results reported are based on 41 qualitative interviews with context provided by additional quantitative research. We introduced Rounds at two pilot sites, both NHS hospitals providing acute care. Over the one-year, ten-Rounds pilot period, Rounds were attended by 1250 staff across the two sites. We conducted qualitative research into the experiences of staff involved in implementing Rounds at the outset and the end of the pilot. Interviewees' assessment of the effects of Rounds on participants, their relationships with colleagues, and the wider hospital. The findings show that in the two pilot trusts, Rounds are perceived by participants as a source of support and that their benefit may translate into benefits for patients and team working; and that Rounds have the potential to effect change in the hospital culture. Rounds appear to transfer successfully from the US to the UK, and there is some evidence that they are having a similarly positive impact, but more research is needed.

  1. Social Support for First-Time Chinese Mothers in Contexts of Provider-Recipient Relationships.

    PubMed

    An, Zheng; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of social support on perceived stress and online support activities in two relationship contexts. In 2013, we surveyed 366 first-time mothers between the ages of 26 and 30 years from mainland China about their social support experiences with their mothers and mothers-in-law in regard to child rearing. Women who received higher levels of support from their mothers reported lower levels of perceived stress and higher levels of online support activities. Receiving support from mothers-in-law was not associated with either perceived stress or online support activities. The findings demonstrate the importance of considering relationship contexts when examining social support outcomes. Implications for future research on social support and interpersonal relationships are discussed.

  2. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients’ homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Results Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Conclusions Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority

  3. Interactional Psychology and Organizational Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    7 A0-A113 1132 MI1CHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY F/6 5/10 INTERACTIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHA VIOR. (U) FEB 82 8...j INTERACTIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Benjamin Schneider Research Report No. 82.1 February 1982 The writing of this paper was...supported in part by the Organizational Effectiveness Research Programs, Psychological Sciences Division, Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N00014

  4. EDP Sciences and A&A: partnering to providing services to support the scientific community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Scholarly publishing is no longer about simply producing and packaging articles and sending out to subscribers. To be successful, as well as being global and digital, Publishers and their journals need to be fully engaged with their stakeholders (authors, readers, funders, libraries etc), and constantly developing new products and services to support their needs in the ever-changing environment that we work in.Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) is a high quality, major international Journal that belongs to the astronomical communities of a consortium of European and South American countries supported by ESO who sponsor the journal. EDP Sciences is a non-profit publisher belonging to several learned societies and is appointed by ESO to publish the journal.Over the last decade, as well as publishing the results of worldwide astronomical and astrophysical research, A&A and EDP Sciences have worked in partnership to develop a wide range of services for the authors and readers of A&A:- A specialist language editing service: to provide a clear and excellent level of English ensuring full understanding of the high-quality science.- A flexible and progressive Open Access Policy including Gold and Green options and strong links with arXiv.- Enriched articles: authors are able to enhance their articles using a wide range of rich media such as 3D models, videos and animations.Multiple publishing formats: allowing readers to browse articles on multiple devices including eReaders and Kindles.- “Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers”: In 2008 EDP Sciences and A&A set up the Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) School with the objective to teach early PhD Students how write correct and efficient scientific papers for different mediums (journals, proceedings, thesis manuscripts, etc.).

  5. Interleukin 1 genetic tests provide no support for reduction of preventive dental care.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Scott R; Kuo, Fengshen; Hart, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    It has been proposed that the PST and PerioPredict genetic tests that are based on polymorphisms in interleukin 1 (IL-1) genes identify a subset of patients who experience fewer tooth extractions if provided with 2 annual preventive visits. Economic analyses indicate rationing preventive care to only "high-risk" genotypes, smokers, patients with diabetes, or combinations of these risk factors would reduce the cost of dental care by $4.8 billion annually in the United States. Data presented in the study that claimed clinical utility for the PST and PerioPredict tests were obtained for reanalysis using logistic regression to assess whether the PST genetic test, smoking, diabetes, or number of preventive visits were risk factors for tooth extraction during a span of 16 years. Consistency of risk classification by the PST (version 1) and PerioPredict (version 2) genetic tests was evaluated in different ethnic groups from the 1000 Genomes database. Multivariate analyses revealed association of tooth extraction with diabetes (P < .0001), smoking (P < .0001), and number of preventive visits (P = .004), but no support for the PST genetic test (P = .96) nor indication that the benefit of 2 preventive visits was affected by this genetic test (P = .58). Classification of risk was highly inconsistent between the PST (version 1) and PerioPredict (version 2) genetic tests. Two annual preventive visits were supported as beneficial for all patients, and there was no evidence that the IL-1 PST genetic test has any effect on tooth extraction risk or influences the benefits of 2 annual preventive visits. Neither IL-1 PST nor PerioPredict genetic tests are useful for rationing preventive dental care. Further research is needed to identify genetic biomarkers with robust clinical validity and clinical utility to effectively personalize the practice of dentistry. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Organizational culture, intersectoral collaboration and mental health care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Penelope Fay; Pattison, Philippa Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether and how organizational culture moderates the influence of other organizational capacities on the uptake of new mental health care roles by non-medical primary health and social care services. Using a cross-sectional survey design, data were collected in 2004 from providers in 41 services in Victoria, Australia, recruited using purposeful sampling. Respondents within each service worked as a group to complete a structured interview that collected quantitative and qualitative data simultaneously. Five domains of organizational capacity were analyzed: leadership, moral support and participation; organizational culture; shared concepts, policies, processes and structures; access to resource support; and social model of health. A principal components analysis explored the structure of data about roles and capacities, and multiple regression analysis examined relationships between them. The unit of analysis was the service (n = 41). Organizational culture was directly associated with involvement in two types of mental health care roles and moderated the influence of factors in the inter-organizational environment on role involvement. Congruence between the values embodied in organizational culture, communicated in messages from the environment, and underlying particular mental health care activities may play a critical role in shaping the emergence of intersectoral working and the uptake of new roles. This study is the first to demonstrate the importance of organizational culture to intersectoral collaboration in health care, and one of very few to examine organizational culture as a predictor of performance, compared with other organizational-level factors, in a multivariate analysis. Theory is developed to explain the findings.

  7. Perceived Organizational Support Impacts on the Associations of Work-Family Conflict or Family-Work Conflict with Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Doctors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Junhui; Wang, Jiana; Liu, Li; Wu, Wei; Wu, Hui

    2016-03-16

    As a common mental disorder, depressive symptoms had been studied extensively all over the world. However, positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors were rarely studied. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) with depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors. Meanwhile, the role of perceived organizational support (POS) in this association was explored at an organizational level. The investigation was conducted between March and April 2014. Questionnaires that measured WFC, FWC, depressive symptoms and POS were distributed to 1200 doctors in Shenyang, China. The final study subjects were 931 doctors (effective response rate: 77.6%). In all analyses, male and female doctors were analyzed separately because of possible gender differences. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to examine the moderating role of POS. Baron and Kenny's technique and asymptotic and resampling strategies were used to explore the mediating role of POS on the associations of WFC or FWC with depressive symptoms. WFC and FWC had positive relations with depressive symptoms among doctors. POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of FWC with depressive symptoms among male doctors, and POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of WFC with depressive symptoms among female doctors. POS had a positive moderating effect on the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms among doctors. WFC and FWC could aggravate doctors' depressive symptoms, and POS, as an organizational resource, could fight against doctors' depressive symptoms. When POS functioned as a mediator, FWC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase male doctors' depressive symptoms, and WFC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase female doctors' depressive symptoms. In the meantime, POS, as a moderator, could enhance the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms.

  8. Perceived Organizational Support Impacts on the Associations of Work-Family Conflict or Family-Work Conflict with Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Junhui; Wang, Jiana; Liu, Li; Wu, Wei; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    As a common mental disorder, depressive symptoms had been studied extensively all over the world. However, positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors were rarely studied. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) with depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors. Meanwhile, the role of perceived organizational support (POS) in this association was explored at an organizational level. The investigation was conducted between March and April 2014. Questionnaires that measured WFC, FWC, depressive symptoms and POS were distributed to 1200 doctors in Shenyang, China. The final study subjects were 931 doctors (effective response rate: 77.6%). In all analyses, male and female doctors were analyzed separately because of possible gender differences. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to examine the moderating role of POS. Baron and Kenny’s technique and asymptotic and resampling strategies were used to explore the mediating role of POS on the associations of WFC or FWC with depressive symptoms. WFC and FWC had positive relations with depressive symptoms among doctors. POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of FWC with depressive symptoms among male doctors, and POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of WFC with depressive symptoms among female doctors. POS had a positive moderating effect on the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms among doctors. WFC and FWC could aggravate doctors’ depressive symptoms, and POS, as an organizational resource, could fight against doctors’ depressive symptoms. When POS functioned as a mediator, FWC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase male doctors’ depressive symptoms, and WFC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase female doctors’ depressive symptoms. In the meantime, POS, as a moderator, could enhance the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms. PMID

  9. Organizational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  10. Organizational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their interactions…

  11. Organizational Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beriwal, Madhu; Clegg, Stewart; Collopy, Fred; McDaniel, Reuben, Jr.; Morgan, Gareth; Sutcliffe, Kathleen; Kaufman, Roger; Marker, Anthony; Selwyn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of organizational science, broadly defined as including many fields--organizational behavior and development, management, workplace performance, and so on--were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might…

  12. Organizational Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Helping principals understand the importance of organizational justice is the first step in enhancing learning outcomes for all learners, regardless of their social class, race, abilities, sex, or gender. In schools, organizational justice may be defined as teachers' perceptions of fairness, respect, and equity that relate to their interactions…

  13. Development of the Environmental Assessment Tool (EAT) to Measure Organizational Physical and Social Support for Worksite Obesity Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    DeJoy, David M.; Wilson, Mark G.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; Wang, Shaohung; Baker, Kristin M.; Bowen, Heather M.; Tully, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the development, reliability, and validity of the Environmental Assessment Tool (EAT) for assessing worksite physical and social environmental support for obesity prevention. Methods The EAT was developed using a multi-step process. Inter-rater reliability was estimated via Kappa and other measures. Concurrent and predictive validity were estimated using site-level correlations and person-level multiple regression analyses comparing EAT scores and employee absenteeism and healthcare expenditures. Results Results show high inter-rater reliability and concurrent validity for many measures and predictive validity for absenteeism expenditures. Conclusions The primary use of the EAT is as a physical and social environment assessment tool for worksite obesity prevention efforts. It can be used as a reliable and valid means to estimate relationships between environmental interventions and absenteeism and medical expenditures, provided those expenditures are for the same year that the EAT is administered. PMID:18301169

  14. Walk-Throughs Provide Stepped-Up Support: Edmonton Builds a Framework of Support for Teaching and Learning to Increase High School Completion Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Corrie

    2006-01-01

    Edmonton Public Schools district implemented a framework of support for teaching and learning, and a key element supporting the framework is instructional walk-throughs, which provide staff opportunities to learn from one another. Instructional walk-throughs help move the staff from a culture of isolation to a culture of collaboration and support.…

  15. Engaging Learner Support: An Investigation of Faculty-Library Collaboration to Provide Live Course-Specific Learner Support in the Online Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration between faculty and learner support can create seamless services for e-learners. Providing access to learning materials and activities with co-located tailored learner support creates an environment in which e-learners can easily access everything they need for an enhanced, supported, and more focused learning experience. The…

  16. Primary Support Persons for Individuals Who Are Visually Impaired: Who They Are and the Support They Provide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva-Smith, Amy L.; Theune, Thomas W.; Spaid, Penny E.

    2007-01-01

    As the proportion of older adults in the U.S. population grows, the prevalence of visual impairment related to cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy will increase as well. Individuals who are visually impaired require various degrees of support and assistance in their daily activities. This assistance is frequently…

  17. Conserved gene clusters in bacterial genomes provide further support for the primacy of RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefert, J. L.; Martin, K. A.; Abdi, F.; Widger, W. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Five complete bacterial genome sequences have been released to the scientific community. These include four (eu)Bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, M. pneumoniae, and Synechocystis PCC 6803, as well as one Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii. Features of organization shared by these genomes are likely to have arisen very early in the history of the bacteria and thus can be expected to provide further insight into the nature of early ancestors. Results of a genome comparison of these five organisms confirm earlier observations that gene order is remarkably unpreserved. There are, nevertheless, at least 16 clusters of two or more genes whose order remains the same among the four (eu)Bacteria and these are presumed to reflect conserved elements of coordinated gene expression that require gene proximity. Eight of these gene orders are essentially conserved in the Archaea as well. Many of these clusters are known to be regulated by RNA-level mechanisms in Escherichia coli, which supports the earlier suggestion that this type of regulation of gene expression may have arisen very early. We conclude that although the last common ancestor may have had a DNA genome, it likely was preceded by progenotes with an RNA genome.

  18. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept.

    PubMed

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages.

  19. An intelligent virtual human system for providing healthcare information and support.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert A; Lange, Belinda; Buckwalter, John G; Forbell, Eric; Kim, Julia; Sagae, Kenji; Williams, Josh; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Reger, Greg; Parsons, Thomas; Kenny, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, a virtual revolution has taken place in the use of Virtual Reality simulation technology for clinical purposes. Shifts in the social and scientific landscape have now set the stage for the next major movement in Clinical Virtual Reality with the "birth" of intelligent virtual humans. Seminal research and development has appeared in the creation of highly interactive, artificially intelligent and natural language capable virtual human agents that can engage real human users in a credible fashion. No longer at the level of a prop to add context or minimal faux interaction in a virtual world, virtual humans can be designed to perceive and act in a 3D virtual world, engage in spoken dialogues with real users and can be capable of exhibiting human-like emotional reactions. This paper will present an overview of the SimCoach project that aims to develop virtual human support agents to serve as online guides for promoting access to psychological healthcare information and for assisting military personnel and family members in breaking down barriers to initiating care. The SimCoach experience is being designed to attract and engage military Service Members, Veterans and their significant others who might not otherwise seek help with a live healthcare provider. It is expected that this experience will motivate users to take the first step--to empower themselves to seek advice and information regarding their healthcare and general personal welfare and encourage them to take the next step towards seeking more formal resources if needed.

  20. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC, it...

  1. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC, it...

  2. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC, it...

  3. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC, it...

  4. 7 CFR 1.620 - What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What supporting information must the Forest Service... § 1.620 What supporting information must the Forest Service provide with its preliminary conditions? (a) Supporting information. (1) When the Forest Service files preliminary conditions with FERC, it...

  5. The Evidence in Support of Physicians and Health Care Providers as Physical Activity Role Models

    PubMed Central

    Lobelo, Felipe; de Quevedo, Isabel Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity constitutes the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Health care providers (HCPs) should play a key role in counseling and appropriately referring their patients to adopt physical activity (PA). Previous reports suggest that active HCPs are more likely to provide better, more credible, and motivating preventive counseling to their patients. This review summarizes the available evidence on the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their related PA counseling practices. Based on relevant studies, a snowball search strategy identified, out of 196 studies screened, a total of 47 pertinent articles published between 1979 and 2012. Of those, 23 described HCPs’ PA habits and/or their counseling practices and 24 analytic studies evaluated the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their PA counseling practices. The majority of studies came from the United States (n = 33), and 9 studies included nonphysicians (nurses, pharmacists, and other HCPs). PA levels were mostly self-reported, and counseling was typically assessed as self-reported frequency or perceived self-efficacy in clinical practice. Most (19 out of 24) analytic studies reported a significant positive association between HCPs’ PA habits and counseling frequency, with odds ratios ranging between 1.4 and 5.7 (P < .05), in 6 studies allowing direct comparison. This review found consistent evidence supporting the notion that physically active physicians and other HCPs are more likely to provide PA counseling to their patients and can indeed become powerful PA role models. This evidence appears sufficient to justify randomized trials to determine if adding interventions to promote PA among HCPs, also results in improvements in the frequency and quality of PA preventive counseling and referrals, delivered by HCPs, to patients in primary care settings. Future studies should also aim at objectively quantifying the effect of HCPs’ PA role-modeling and how it

  6. The Effect of Providing Life Support on Nurses' Decision Making Regarding Life Support for Themselves and Family Members in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shaku, Fumio; Tsutsumi, Madoka

    2016-12-01

    Decision making in terminal illness has recently received increased attention. In Japan, patients and their families typically make decisions without understanding either the severity of illness or the efficacy of life-supporting treatments at the end of life. Japanese culture traditionally directs the family to make decisions for the patient. This descriptive study examined the influence of the experiences of 391 Japanese nurses caring for dying patients and family members and how that experience changed their decision making for themselves and their family members. The results were mixed but generally supported the idea that the more experience nurses have in caring for the dying, the less likely they would choose to institute lifesupport measures for themselves and family members. The results have implications for discussions on end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Attrition of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) skills among ATLS instructors and providers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Luis Am; Gutierrez, Guillermo E O; Fernandez, Cesar J P; Natera, Octavio M; Ruiz-Speare, Octavio; Ali, Jameel

    2002-09-01

    Mexico has had the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program since 1986. We assessed the attrition of ATLS skills among ATLS providers and instructors in this country. Three groups (S, 16 students [new medical graduates enrolled for an ATLS course]; P, 33 providers; and I, 26 instructors [who had completed courses previously]) were evaluated. Group S read the manual before pretesting. Groups P and I were subdivided based on the length of time since the course had been completed: P1, less than 2 years (n = 22); P2, more than 2 years (n = 11); I1, less than 2 years (n = 16); and I2, more than 2 years (n = 10). Multiple-choice and psychomotor testing using ATLS scoring criteria were used. Affect was assessed post-ATLS for motivational factors, interactivity, and attitude toward trauma care. Multiple-choice test scores (means +/- SD) out of a maximum of 40 were as follows: S, 24.3 +/- 2.6; P1, 24.0 +/- 5.7; P2, 21.3 +/- 8.0; I1, 23.2 +/- 8.2; and I2, 24.0 +/- 7.2. Group S all passed the post-ATLS multiple-choice test (with correct answer percentages of 60.3% +/- 6.6% pre-ATLS versus 88.8% +/- 5.6% post-ATLS). An ATLS passing score of 80% correct answers was achieved in 2 of 33 for group P and 8 of 26 for group I (p < 0.05), with no statistically significant differences between groups P1 and P2 or between groups I1 and I2. For the psychomotor skills testing component, 5 of 16 in the S group passed, 15 of 22 in P1 passed, 9 of 11 in P2 passed, 14 of 16 in I1 passed, and 6 of 10 in I2 passed. The pass rate was significantly lower in the S pre-ATLS group than in the P and I groups (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). More than 60% preferred interactive components and enrolled for professional improvement, and more than 90% reported improved post-ATLS attitude to trauma care. Reading the manual alone yields similar cognitive but inferior psychomotor performance compared with subjects who completed the course previously. The majority of previous providers and instructors did

  8. Abused women and peer-provided social support: the nature and dynamics of reciprocity in a crisis setting.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A

    1995-01-01

    Research has demonstrated clearly the positive effect social support can have on health. Peer-provided social support, in the forms of both one-on-one peer counseling and peer support groups, is encouraged by health care providers as an effective and inexpensive way to enhance mental health in at-risk client populations. This article examines data from two studies that included information about the use of social support by abused women during their stay in a transition house. Analysis revealed a potential for problems when vulnerable clients offer support to other vulnerable clients. The ability to offer support was viewed by the "givers" to be evidence of their own recovery. Women needed to give this support, and, therefore, it was often difficult to know whose needs were being met. The complexities of these relationships are discussed. An understanding of the issues involved will ensure that maximum benefit with minimum risk can be derived by participants in supportive exchanges between peers.

  9. 24 CFR 5.303 - Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exclusion for animals that assist... Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons with...

  10. 24 CFR 5.303 - Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exclusion for animals that assist... Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons with...

  11. 24 CFR 5.303 - Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion for animals that assist... Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons with...

  12. 24 CFR 5.303 - Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exclusion for animals that assist... Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons with...

  13. A Qualitative Study Exploring Influences on the Types of Online Instructional Support Provided by High School Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Valerie S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of high school librarians related to use of online environments to provide instructional support. The study sought to discover influences on the types of online instructional support provided by high school librarians. Inquiry focused on the participant librarians' perceptions of…

  14. 34 CFR 380.1 - What is the program of special projects and demonstrations for providing supported employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demonstrations for providing supported employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities and... employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, including projects that demonstrate the... SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE...

  15. 34 CFR 380.1 - What is the program of special projects and demonstrations for providing supported employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demonstrations for providing supported employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities and... employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, including projects that demonstrate the... SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE...

  16. 34 CFR 380.1 - What is the program of special projects and demonstrations for providing supported employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demonstrations for providing supported employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities and... employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, including projects that demonstrate the... SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE...

  17. 34 CFR 380.1 - What is the program of special projects and demonstrations for providing supported employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... demonstrations for providing supported employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities and... employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, including projects that demonstrate the... SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE...

  18. 34 CFR 380.1 - What is the program of special projects and demonstrations for providing supported employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demonstrations for providing supported employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities and... employment services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, including projects that demonstrate the... SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR PROVIDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH THE...

  19. 20 CFR 670.970 - What are the reporting requirements for center operators and operational support service providers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... center operators and operational support service providers? 670.970 Section 670.970 Employees' Benefits... INVESTMENT ACT Administrative and Management Provisions § 670.970 What are the reporting requirements for center operators and operational support service providers? The Secretary establishes procedures...

  20. Positive Behavior Supports in Classrooms and Schools: Effective and Practical Strategies for Teachers and Other Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Keith; Post, Michal

    2012-01-01

    This unique book will provide teachers and other service providers the knowledge and skills for positive behavior supports in school settings, thereby improving the academic and social skills of their students. The text is generic across age levels K-12, and focuses on the positive behavior supports in school settings. Each chapter begins with Key…

  1. Positive Behavior Supports in Classrooms and Schools: Effective and Practical Strategies for Teachers and Other Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Keith; Post, Michal

    2012-01-01

    This unique book will provide teachers and other service providers the knowledge and skills for positive behavior supports in school settings, thereby improving the academic and social skills of their students. The text is generic across age levels K-12, and focuses on the positive behavior supports in school settings. Each chapter begins with Key…

  2. 24 CFR 5.303 - Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exclusion for animals that assist... Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. (a) This subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons...

  3. An evaluation of a science professional development model: Examining participants' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Georgi Anne

    The problem of this study was to determine in what ways science professional development would support kindergarten through sixth grade teachers in their implementation of a revised curriculum. The problem centered on evaluating the relationship between professional development involvement and teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills, organizational support and change, and student learning outcomes. Using data derived from survey responses and other sources (e.g., test scores, financial records, etc.), this study examined use of a science course of study, use of activities/experiments from workshops, use and adequacy of materials adoptions, administrative support, and achievement scores. This research was completed using an Ex Post Facto research design. Using the General Linear Model and causal-comparative analyses, thus study significantly concluded that teachers with a higher level of involvement in science professional development were more likely to use the revised course of study for lesson planning and to perceive materials adoptions as being adequate, and that districts that had participated in science professional development to revise curriculum showed more gains in student learning outcomes. Data on teachers' learning and use of new knowledge and skills implied that districts needed to continue to design teacher leadership situations that implement long-term professional development, build capacity for shared decision making, create a supportive environment for leaders, and incorporate assessments. Teacher leaders needed to actively engage in action research as a professional development strategy to promote reflection on their teaching and student learning. Data on organizational support and change implied that without logistical and financial support for teaching and learning in terms of hands-on materials, teachers would be unable to support future curriculum improvement efforts. Building principals needed to play a more active role in

  4. Radical Transformation of Organizational Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, J. Craig

    1977-01-01

    The recent emergence of a novel form of social-change activity, professionalized reform, is studied using the National Council of Churches as an example. A revised theory of organizational transformation is advanced, specifying the conditions under which oligarchy emerges and supports a transformation of organizational goals in a radical…

  5. Monolayer-crystal streptavidin support films provide an internal standard of cryo-EM image quality.

    PubMed

    Han, Bong-Gyoon; Watson, Zoe; Cate, Jamie H D; Glaeser, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of images of biotinylated Escherichia coli 70S ribosome particles, bound to streptavidin affinity grids, demonstrates that the image-quality of particles can be predicted by the image-quality of the monolayer crystalline support film. The quality of the Thon rings is also a good predictor of the image-quality of particles, but only when images of the streptavidin crystals extend to relatively high resolution. When the estimated resolution of streptavidin was 5Å or worse, for example, the ribosomal density map obtained from 22,697 particles went to only 9.5Å, while the resolution of the map reached 4.0Å for the same number of particles, when the estimated resolution of streptavidin crystal was 4Å or better. It thus is easy to tell which images in a data set ought to be retained for further work, based on the highest resolution seen for Bragg peaks in the computed Fourier transforms of the streptavidin component. The refined density map obtained from 57,826 particles obtained in this way extended to 3.6Å, a marked improvement over the value of 3.9Å obtained previously from a subset of 52,433 particles obtained from the same initial data set of 101,213 particles after 3-D classification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interaction with the air-water interface can damage particles when the sample becomes too thin. Streptavidin monolayer crystals appear to provide a good indication of when that is the case.

  6. The Role of Health Care Provider and Partner Decisional Support in Patients' Cancer Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Palmer-Wackerly, Angela L; Krieger, Janice L; Rhodes, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    Cancer patients rely on multiple sources of support when making treatment decisions; however, most research studies examine the influence of health care provider support while the influence of family member support is understudied. The current study fills this gap by examining the influence of health care providers and partners on decision-making satisfaction. In a cross-sectional study via an online Qualtrics panel, we surveyed cancer patients who reported that they had a spouse or romantic partner when making cancer treatment decisions (n = 479). Decisional support was measured using 5-point, single-item scales for emotional support, informational support, informational-advice support, and appraisal support. Decision-making satisfaction was measured using Holmes-Rovner and colleagues' (1996) Satisfaction With Decision Scale. We conducted a mediated regression analysis to examine treatment decision-making satisfaction for all participants and a moderated mediation analysis to examine treatment satisfaction among those patients offered a clinical trial. Results indicated that partner support significantly and partially mediated the relationship between health care provider support and patients' decision-making satisfaction but that results did not vary by enrollment in a clinical trial. This study shows how and why decisional support from partners affects communication between health care providers and cancer patients.

  7. Migrants and Mobile Technology Use: Gaps in the Support Provided by Current Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of how migrants use mobile tools to support their communication and language learning is inadequate. This study, therefore, explores the learner-initiated use of technologies to support their comprehension, production, and acquisition of English following migration to Canada. Information about migrant use of technologies…

  8. Providing Students with Interdisciplinary Support to Improve Their Organic Chemistry Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widanski, Bozena; Thompson, Jo Ann; Foran-Mulcahy, Katie; Abafo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A two-semester-long interdisciplinary support effort to improve student posters in organic chemistry lab is described. In the first semester, students' literature search report is supported by a workshop conducted by an Instruction Librarian. During the subsequent semester, a second workshop is presented by the Instruction Librarian, an English…

  9. Providing Feasible Implementation Support: Direct Training and Implementation Planning in Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Sanetti, Lisa M. H.; Boyle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    To deliver interventions completely and consistently (i.e., with adequate treatment integrity) and, thus, have a positive impact on student outcomes, implementers, such as teachers and paraprofessionals, often require support. To efficiently deliver implementation support, school psychologists could embed research-based strategies into their…

  10. Providing Students with Interdisciplinary Support to Improve Their Organic Chemistry Posters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widanski, Bozena; Thompson, Jo Ann; Foran-Mulcahy, Katie; Abafo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    A two-semester-long interdisciplinary support effort to improve student posters in organic chemistry lab is described. In the first semester, students' literature search report is supported by a workshop conducted by an Instruction Librarian. During the subsequent semester, a second workshop is presented by the Instruction Librarian, an English…

  11. Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment: Women's perceptions of support provided by their male partners during hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sena; Tazumi, Keiko; Arao, Harue

    2015-01-01

    Women with breast cancer receive support from their partners to deal with the side effects of therapies over the cancer trajectory. Hormonal therapy (HT) is usually given after completing other treatments, and women receiving HT reclaim their normal life. This may lead to changes in support from their partners. Therefore, we explored women's perceptions of the support provided by their male partners in managing the side effects of adjuvant HT. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 10 women who received HT and recognized their partners as a main source of support. An interview guide was used to explore their experiences of treatment side effects, the contents of support received from their partners, their need for support, and their overall relationship with their partners. Interviews were analysed by content analysis. A theme on how participants perceived support from their partners was formulated as “Support not corresponding to transition to a new treatment” with the following categories: “Shrinking support,” “Primacy of partner,” and “Solitary new treatment.” Participants felt lack of support from their partners because their partners did not understand their experience of the side effects induced by HT. Unlike the side effects of past treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy, side effects of HT cannot be observed and are highly subjective. Their partners often failed to notice these symptoms and provided little support. Nevertheless, participants aimed to accept the existing support without asking for more. They were left alone in the continuing trajectory of breast cancer. After starting HT, women entered a new treatment phase in which less understanding and support was provided by partners. Educational support for couples may enable sharing of subjective symptoms that are not obvious to partners and improve outcomes by facilitating partner engagement and support. PMID:26627115

  12. 20 CFR 670.525 - What residential support services must Job Corps center operators provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... issued by the Secretary: (a) A quality living and learning environment that supports the overall training..., vending machines, disciplinary fines, and donations, and is run by an elected student government, with...

  13. 20 CFR 670.525 - What residential support services must Job Corps center operators provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... issued by the Secretary: (a) A quality living and learning environment that supports the overall training..., vending machines, disciplinary fines, and donations, and is run by an elected student government, with...

  14. 20 CFR 670.525 - What residential support services must Job Corps center operators provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... issued by the Secretary: (a) A quality living and learning environment that supports the overall training..., vending machines, disciplinary fines, and donations, and is run by an elected student government, with...

  15. 20 CFR 670.525 - What residential support services must Job Corps center operators provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the Secretary: (a) A quality living and learning environment that supports the overall training..., vending machines, disciplinary fines, and donations, and is run by an elected student government, with...

  16. Language facilitates event memory in early childhood: Child comprehension, adult-provided linguistic support and delayed recall at 16 months.

    PubMed

    Lukowski, Angela F; Phung, Janice N; Milojevich, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    Adult-provided supportive language facilitates memory for the past in preverbal and verbal children. Work conducted with 18-month-olds indicates that children benefit from supportive adult language when tested after a 4-week delay but not when tested immediately after sequence demonstration; moreover, findings reveal that supportive language provided only at test may be more facilitative of recall after a delay relative to supportive language provided only at encoding. In the present study, we examined whether child language comprehension abilities moderated the extent to which preverbal children benefitted from supportive language provided at encoding and test. The findings indicated that child language comprehension and supportive language provided at encoding were unassociated with performance at baseline or immediate imitation; however, the moderating effect of child language comprehension on adult-provided supportive language at encoding and test was observed after a 1-week delay. Correlations revealed continuous associations between general comprehension scores and recall performance after the 1-week delay on sequences presented in the most supportive condition at encoding. Taken together, the presented findings reveal that the complex interplay between language and cognition is established in early childhood, with foundational relations emerging before children are capable of verbally reporting on the past.

  17. [Organizational learning].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Moreno, J

    2001-06-01

    This article presents the reader with conceptual close-up view about the attractive topic organizational apprenticeship and includes and extensive bibliographical file. Therefore, due to the author's effort, we chronologically trace those authors who have contributed to conceptualizing the aforementioned apprenticeship, with particular emphasis on the writings by Paul Senge, the so-called father of the "fifth discipline. This theoretical close-up helps apply organizational apprenticeship to nursing.

  18. Resuscitation from cardiac arrest: assessment of a system providing only basic life support outside of hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tweed, W.A.; Bristow, G.; Donen, N.

    1980-01-01

    Resuscitation outside of hospital of victims of cardiac arrest is a major challenge to our emergency care system. Most cities in Canada do not have a mobile advanced life support service; instead they rely on basic life support outside of hospital. The outcome in such cases and the factors affecting the outcome are largely unknown. Thus, it is difficult to estimate the lifesaving potential of adding advanced life support to the existing measures available for care outside of hospital. A prospective study of all resuscitation attempts begun outside of hospital was conducted during 18 consecutive months in 1977-78 in Winnipeg; at that time only basic life support was available outside of hospital. Resuscitation was attempted 849 times, and 33 patients (4%) survived to be discharged from hospital. Data analysis revealed that: (a) none of the 58% of patients in asystole at the time of arrival at a hospital survived to be discharged, but 11% of the patients with ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia (27% of the entire group) survived; (b) the survival rate was lower when the interval from the emergency telephone call to the patient's arrival at the hospital exceeded 10 minutes; and (c) basic life support was begun immediately in 29% of the patients with ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia, and increased the survival rate fivefold. The training of private citizens in basic life support is a vital component of total emergency cardiac care. A mobile advanced life support service will be effective in saving lives if it reduces the delay before definitive care is instituted, preferably to less than 10 minutes. PMID:7370825

  19. The emotional impact of errors or adverse events on healthcare providers in the NICU: The protective role of coworker support.

    PubMed

    Winning, Adrien M; Merandi, Jenna M; Lewe, Dorcas; Stepney, Lois M C; Liao, Nancy N; Fortney, Christine A; Gerhardt, Cynthia A

    2017-07-26

    To examine the impact of errors or adverse events on emotional distress and professional quality of life in healthcare providers in the neonatal intensive care unit, and the moderating role of coworker support. Errors or adverse events can result in negative outcomes for healthcare providers. However, the role of coworker support in improving emotional and professional outcomes has not been examined. A cross-sectional online survey from a quality improvement initiative to train peer supporters in a neonatal intensive care unit. During 2015, 463 healthcare providers in a neonatal intensive care unit completed a survey assessing their experiences with an error or adverse event, anxiety, depression, professional quality of life and coworker support. Compared with those who did not experience an error or adverse event (58%), healthcare providers who observed (23%) or were involved (19%) in an incident reported higher levels of anxiety and secondary traumatic stress. Those who were involved in an event reported higher levels of depression and burnout. Differences between the three groups (no event, observation and involvement) for compassion satisfaction were non-significant. Perceived coworker support moderated the association between experiencing an event and both anxiety and depression. Specifically, experiencing an event was associated with higher levels of anxiety and depression when coworkers were perceived as low in supportiveness, but not when they were viewed as highly supportive. Findings suggest that errors or adverse events can have a harmful impact on healthcare providers and that coworker support may reduce emotional distress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Organizational Learning: Leading Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collinson, Vivienne; Cook, Tanya Fedoruk

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the interplay among the environment, learning, leaders, and innovations in school systems. Six conditions that, together, have potential to shape an environment that supports organizational learning are illustrated with data from two leaders of innovation: one in an environment that resisted change; the other in a supportive…