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Sample records for oriented variant identification

  1. Identification, mRNA Expression, and Functional Analysis of Chitin Synthase 1 Gene and Its Two Alternative Splicing Variants in Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5′- and 3′-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  2. [Transferrin variants: significance and identification in paternity cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mauff, G; Doppelfeld, E; Weber, W

    1975-08-01

    Transferrin phenotypes were determined in 3380 sera of unrelated persons of the western region of Germany with 97.60 percent for TfC and 2.40 percent for Tf variants. Identification was achieved by immunochemical means or through autoradiography. Relative mobilities in some variants were measured using Tf B2C (0.7) as reference. Application of Tf variants is demonstrated in paternity cases.

  3. The orientation selectivity of face identification

    PubMed Central

    Goffaux, Valerie; Greenwood, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work demonstrates that human face identification is most efficient when based on horizontal, rather than vertical, image structure. Because it is unclear how this specialization for upright (compared to inverted) face processing emerges in the visual system, the present study aimed to systematically characterize the orientation sensitivity profile for face identification. With upright faces, identification performance in a delayed match-to-sample task was highest for horizontally filtered images and declined sharply with oblique and vertically filtered images. Performance was well described by a Gaussian function with a bandwidth around 25°. Face inversion reshaped this sensitivity profile dramatically, with a downward shift of the entire tuning curve as well as a reduction in the amplitude of the horizontal peak and a doubling in bandwidth. The use of naturalistic outer contours (vs. a common outline mask) was also found to reshape this sensitivity profile by increasing sensitivity to oblique information in the near-horizontal range. Altogether, although face identification is sharply tuned to horizontal angles, both inversion and outline masking can profoundly reshape this orientation sensitivity profile. This combination of image- and observer-driven effects provides an insight into the functional relationship between orientation-selective processes within primary and high-level stages of the human brain. PMID:27677359

  4. DNA-based identification of novel bovine casein gene variants.

    PubMed

    Gallinat, J L; Qanbari, S; Drögemüller, C; Pimentel, E C G; Thaller, G; Tetens, J

    2013-01-01

    In cattle, at least 39 variants of the 4 casein proteins (α(S1)-, β-, α(S2)- and κ-casein) have been described to date. Many of these variants are known to affect milk-production traits, cheese-processing properties, and the nutritive value of milk. They also provide valuable information for phylogenetic studies. So far, the majority of studies exploring the genetic variability of bovine caseins considered European taurine cattle breeds and were carried out at the protein level by electrophoretic techniques. This only allows the identification of variants that, due to amino acid exchanges, differ in their electric charge, molecular weight, or isoelectric point. In this study, the open reading frames of the casein genes CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, and CSN3 of 356 animals belonging to 14 taurine and 3 indicine cattle breeds were sequenced. With this approach, we identified 23 alleles, including 5 new DNA sequence variants, with a predicted effect on the protein sequence. The new variants were only found in indicine breeds and in one local Iranian breed, which has been phenotypically classified as a taurine breed. A multidimensional scaling approach based on available SNP chip data, however, revealed an admixture of taurine and indicine populations in this breed as well as in the local Iranian breed Golpayegani. Specific indicine casein alleles were also identified in a few European taurine breeds, indicating the introgression of indicine breeds into these populations. This study shows the existence of substantial undiscovered genetic variability of bovine casein loci, especially in indicine cattle breeds. The identification of new variants is a valuable tool for phylogenetic studies and investigations into the evolution of the milk protein genes.

  5. Identification of rare variants in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Jenny; Lu, Alexander J.; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in recent years in identifying genes involved in the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Yet despite the identification of over 20 disease associated loci, mainly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), a large proportion of the genetic component of the disorder remains unexplained. Recent evidence from the AD field, as with other complex diseases, suggests a large proportion of this “missing heritability” may be due to rare variants of moderate to large effect size, but the methodologies to detect such variants are still in their infancy. The latest studies in the field have been focused on the identification of coding variation associated with AD risk, through whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing. Such variants are expected to have larger effect sizes than GWAS loci, and are easier to functionally characterize, and develop cellular and animal models for. This review explores the issues involved in detecting rare variant associations in the context of AD, highlighting some successful approaches utilized to date. PMID:25389433

  6. Characterization of preferential orientation of martensitic variants in a single crystal of NiMnGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guodong; Chen, Jinglan; Cui, Yuting; Liu, Zhuhong; Zhang, Ming; Wu, Guangheng; Brück, E.; de Boer, F. R.; Meng, Fanbin; Li, Yangxian; Qu, Jingping

    2004-06-01

    We report the detailed observation of martensitic variants in NiMnGa single crystals. The variants that are twinned with each other in different ways can be clearly identified in our single crystals by optical observation. We also investigated the preferential orientation of the martensitic variants in NiMnGa single crystals. We observed the motion of the variant boundary in response to application of a magnetic field. This observation can be used to explain phenomenologically the magnetic-field-induced strain. In the single crystal with composition Ni 52Mn 24Ga 24, martensite with seven modulated layers (7M) shows preferentially oriented variants. A completely recoverable two-way shape-memory behavior was also observed by measuring the free sample in three different directions during a complete temperature cycle. It was found that the largest strains in the [001] and [010] directions occur in different temperature ranges.

  7. Imaging the three orientation variants of the DO22 phase by 3D atom probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Marteau, L; Pareige, C; Blavette, D

    2001-12-01

    Three-phase NiAlV alloys were investigated using a three-dimensional atom probe. Ageing at 800 degrees C gives rise to the precipitation of two ordered phases within the supersaturated FCC solid solution, namely Ni3Al (L1(2) structure) and Ni3V (DO22 structure). The DO22 phase has three orientation variants which need to be identified in 3DAP images. It is shown that an appropriate choice of analysis site enables us to image the chemical order within both L1(2) and DO22 ordered phases and to distinguish the three orientation variants of the DO22 phase in reconstructed images. The lateral resolution of 3DAP in these experimental conditions was estimated through simple considerations to be less than 0.3 nm.

  8. Identification of a new splice variant of BDNF in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be involved in the central regulation of energy homeostasis. BDNF splicing variants were discovered in vertebrates. Results from human, mouse and rat suggest that alternative BDNF splicing variants potentially play a role in fat deposition. Using t...

  9. Orientation to Machine Shop. Safety, Machine Identification, Metal Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Nancy; And Others

    These instructional materials provide an orientation to the machine shop for use at the postsecondary level. The first of three sections discusses four important areas of safety: (1) personal safety; (2) safety procedures; (3) safe work practices; and (4) fire prevention. The second section identifies and describes the general purposes of 12…

  10. Identification and characterization of variant alleles at CODIS STR loci.

    PubMed

    Allor, Catherine; Einum, David D; Scarpetta, Marco

    2005-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from 32,671 individuals generated by the ABI Profiler Plus and Cofiler systems were screened for variant alleles not represented within manufacturer-provided allelic ladders. A total of 85 distinct variants were identified at 12 of the 13 CODIS loci, most of which involve a truncated tetranucleotide repeat unit. Twelve novel alleles, identified at D3S1358, FGA, D18S51, D5S818, D7S820 and TPOX, were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis and include both insertions and deletions involving the repeat units themselves as well as DNA flanking the repeat regions. Population genetic data were collected for all variants and frequencies range from 0.0003 (many single observations) to 0.0042 (D7S820 '10.3' in North American Hispanics). In total, the variant alleles identified in this study are carried by 1.6% of the estimated 1 million individuals tested annually in the U.S. for the purposes of parentage resolution. A paternity case involving a recombination event of paternal origin is presented and demonstrates how variant alleles can significantly strengthen the genetic evidence in troublesome cases. In such instances, increased costs and turnaround time associated with additional testing may be eliminated.

  11. vipR: variant identification in pooled DNA using R

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Andre; Weber, Peter; Quast, Carina; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput-sequencing (HTS) technologies are the method of choice for screening the human genome for rare sequence variants causing susceptibility to complex diseases. Unfortunately, preparation of samples for a large number of individuals is still very cost- and labor intensive. Thus, recently, screens for rare sequence variants were carried out in samples of pooled DNA, in which equimolar amounts of DNA from multiple individuals are mixed prior to sequencing with HTS. The resulting sequence data, however, poses a bioinformatics challenge: the discrimination of sequencing errors from real sequence variants present at a low frequency in the DNA pool. Results: Our method vipR uses data from multiple DNA pools in order to compensate for differences in sequencing error rates along the sequenced region. More precisely, instead of aiming at discriminating sequence variants from sequencing errors, vipR identifies sequence positions that exhibit significantly different minor allele frequencies in at least two DNA pools using the Skellam distribution. The performance of vipR was compared with three other models on data from a targeted resequencing study of the TMEM132D locus in 600 individuals distributed over four DNA pools. Performance of the methods was computed on SNPs that were also genotyped individually using a MALDI-TOF technique. On a set of 82 sequence variants, vipR achieved an average sensitivity of 0.80 at an average specificity of 0.92, thus outperforming the reference methods by at least 0.17 in specificity at comparable sensitivity. Availability: The code of vipR is freely available via: http://sourceforge.net/projects/htsvipr/ Contact: altmann@mpipsykl.mpg.de PMID:21685105

  12. Application of the antibiotic batumin for accurate and rapid identification of staphylococcal small colony variants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality. The S. aureus colonies in osteomyelitis, in patients with cystic fibrosis and patients with endoprosthesis rejection frequently have an atypical morphology, i.e. staphylococcal small-colony variants, which form a naturally occurring subpopulation of clinically important staphylococci. Identification of these small colony variants is difficult, because of the loss of typical phenotypic characteristics of these variants. We wanted to improve and simplify the diagnosis of staphylococcal infection using a diagnostic preparation, consisting of 5 μg batumin paper disks. Batumin possesses a unique selective activity against all studied Staphylococcus spp., whereas all other species tested thus far are batumin resistant. We assessed the efficacy of the batumin diagnostic preparation to identify staphylococcal small colony variants, isolated from osteomyelitis patients. Findings With the batumin diagnostic preparation, all 30 tested staphylococcal small-colony variants had a growth inhibition zone around the disk of minimum 25 mm, accordant with the inhibition zones of the parent strains, isolated from the same patients. Conclusions The batumin diagnostic preparation correctly identified the small-colony variants of S. aureus, S. haemolyticus and S. epidermidis as belonging to the genus Staphylococcus, which differ profoundly from parental strains and are difficult to identify with standard methods. Identification of staphylococcal small-colony variants with the batumin diagnostic preparation is technically simple and can facilitate practical laboratory work. PMID:22828414

  13. Spatially variant tomographic imaging: Estimation, identification, and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.R.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis is an investigation of methods for processing multidimensional signals acquired using modern tomography systems that have an anisotropic or spatially variant response function. The main result of this research is the discovery of a new method to obtain better estimators of an unknown spatial intensity distribution by incorporating detailed knowledge about the tomograph system response function and statistical properties of the acquired signal into a mathematical model.

  14. Identification of a variant associated with adult-type hypolactasia.

    PubMed

    Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Sahi, Timo; Savilahti, Erkki; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Peltonen, Leena; Järvelä, Irma

    2002-02-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia, also known as lactase non-persistence (lactose intolerance), is a common autosomal recessive condition resulting from the physiological decline in activity of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) in intestinal cells after weaning. LPH hydrolyzes lactose into glucose and galactose. Sequence analyses of the coding and promoter regions of LCT, the gene encoding LPH, has revealed no DNA variations correlating with lactase non-persistence. An associated haplotype spanning LCT, as well as a distinct difference in the transcript levels of 'non-persistence' and 'persistence' alleles in heterozygotes, suggest that a cis-acting element contributes to the lactase non-persistence phenotype. Using linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype analysis of nine extended Finnish families, we restricted the locus to a 47-kb interval on 2q21. Sequence analysis of the complete region and subsequent association analyses revealed that a DNA variant, C/T-13910, roughly 14 kb upstream from the LCT locus, completely associates with biochemically verified lactase non-persistence in Finnish families and a sample set of 236 individuals from four different populations. A second variant, G/A-22018, 8 kb telomeric to C/T-13910, is also associated with the trait in 229 of 236 cases. Prevalence of the C/T-13910 variant in 1,047 DNA samples is consistent with the reported prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia in four different populations. That the variant (C/T-13910) occurs in distantly related populations indicates that it is very old. PMID:11788828

  15. A comparison of variant theories of intact biochemical systems. II. Flux-oriented and metabolic control theories.

    PubMed

    Sorribas, A; Savageau, M A

    1989-06-01

    In the past two decades, several theories, all ultimately based upon the same power-law formalism, have been proposed to relate the behavior of intact biochemical systems to the properties of their underlying determinants. Confusion concerning the relatedness of these alternatives has become acute because the implications of these theories have never been compared. In the preceding paper we characterized a specific system involving enzyme-enzyme interactions for reference in comparing alternative theories. We also analyzed the reference system by using an explicit variant that involves the S-system representation within biochemical systems theory (BST). We now analyze the same reference system according to two other variants within BST. First, we carry out the analysis by using an explicit variant that involves the generalized mass action representation, which includes the flux-oriented theory of Crabtree and Newsholme as a special case. Second, we carry out the analysis by using an implicit variant that involves the generalized mass action representation, which includes the metabolic control theory of Kacser and his colleagues as a special case. The explicit variants are found to provide a more complete characterization of the reference system than the implicit variants. Within each of these variant classes, the S-system representation is shown to be more mathematically tractable and accurate than the generalized mass action representation. The results allow one to make clear distinctions among the variant theories.

  16. Genome-wide identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  17. Identification of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in the Pten Deficient Murine Prostate Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mengmeng; Adisetiyo, Helty; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Gill, Parkash; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Jones, Jeremy O; Mulholland, David J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) variants are associated with resistance to anti androgen therapy both in human prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples. These observations support the hypothesis that AR isoform accumulation is a consequence of selective therapeutic pressure on the full length AR. The Pten deficient prostate cancer model proceeds with well-defined kinetics including progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While surgical castration and enzalutamide treatments yield an initial therapeutic response, Pten-/-epithelia continue to proliferate yielding locally invasive primary tumor pathology. That most epithelium remains AR positive, but ligand independent, suggests the presence of oncogenic AR variants. To address this hypothesis, we have used a panel of recently described Pten-/- tumor cell lines derived from both from hormone intact (E4, E8) and castrated Pten mutants (cE1, cE2) followed by RACE PCR to identify and characterize three novel truncated, amino terminus containing AR variants (mAR-Va, b, c). Variants appear not only conserved throughout progression but are correlated with nearly complete loss of full length AR (AR-FL) at castrate androgen levels. The overexpression of variants leads to enhanced transcriptional activity of AR while knock down studies show reduced transcriptional output. Collectively, the identification of truncated AR variants in the conditional PTEN deletion model supports a role for maintaining the CRPC phenotype and provides further therapeutic applications of this preclinical model. PMID:26196517

  18. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary, and Expression Analyses of Histone H3 Variants in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  19. Identification of Potentially Pathogenic Variants in the Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy 1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Le, Derek J.; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Kim, Michelle J.; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) is a genetic disorder that affects corneal endothelial cell function and leads to loss of visual acuity. PPCD1 has been linked to a locus on chromosome 20 in multiple families; however, Sanger sequencing of protein-coding genes in the consensus region failed to identify any causative missense mutations. In this study, custom capture probes were utilized for targeted next-generation sequencing of the linked region in a previously reported family with PPCD1. Variants were detected through two bioinformatics pipelines and filtered according to multiple criteria. Additionally, a high-resolution microarray was used to detect copy number variations. No non-synonymous variants in the protein-coding region of annotated genes were identified. However, 12 single nucleotide variants in 10 genes, and 9 indels in 7 genes met the filtering criteria and were considered candidate variants for PPCD1. Eleven single nucleotide variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including 2 synonymous variants and 9 non-coding variants, in 9 genes. One microdeletion was detected in an intron of OVOL2 by microarray but was subsequently not identified by PCR. Using a comprehensive next-generation sequencing approach, a total of 16 genes containing single nucleotide variants or indels that segregated with the affected phenotype in an affected family previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus were identified. Screening of these candidate genes in other families previously mapped to the PPCD1 locus will likely result in the identification of the genetic basis of PPCD1. PMID:27355326

  20. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    PubMed

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  1. Capillary zone electrophoresis: an additional technique for the identification of hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Cotton, F; Fontaine, B; Gulbis, B; Janssens, J; Vertongen, F

    1999-05-01

    Two capillary zone electrophoresis kits (Hb A2 and Hb A1c) were tested for confirmation and identification of hemoglobin variants. The capillary zone electrophoresis experiments were performed at pH 4.7 (Hb A1c kit) and 8.7 (Hb A2 kit) in a 24 cm uncoated fused silica capillary tube (25 microm I.D.). Normal hemoglobins and common hemoglobin variants, including Hbs S, D-Punjab, C, E, O-Arab, and G-Philadelphia, were successfully separated by both methods within a few minutes. Both systems provided completely different elution profiles of normal and abnormal hemoglobin fractions tested and were complementary. The inter-assay coefficient of variations of the migration times of hemoglobin variants were less than 1.0 and 1.3% by the Hb A2 and Hb A1c, respectively. This permits a higher resolution of some hemoglobin variants in low concentrations, like Hb S in newborns, compared with conventional electrophoresis methods. The present capillary zone electrophoresis methods are sensitive, rapid, not labor intensive, and highly selective for the separation of hemoglobin variants. Combination of both methods with some conventional methods, such as isoelectrofocusing, allows identification of Hbs C, E, O-Arab, S, and D-Punjab, as well as their quantification. We have demonstrated that the conventional electrophoresis methods (electrophoresis at pH 6.5 in citrate agar gel and electrophoresis at pH 8.6 on cellulose acetate) can be advantageously replaced by the present capillary zone electrophoresis methods in a clinical laboratory practice for the detection and quantification of hemoglobin variants. PMID:10335978

  2. Global ridge orientation modeling for partial fingerprint identification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Alice; Hu, Jiankun

    2011-01-01

    Identifying incomplete or partial fingerprints from a large fingerprint database remains a difficult challenge today. Existing studies on partial fingerprints focus on one-to-one matching using local ridge details. In this paper, we investigate the problem of retrieving candidate lists for matching partial fingerprints by exploiting global topological features. Specifically, we propose an analytical approach for reconstructing the global topology representation from a partial fingerprint. First, we present an inverse orientation model for describing the reconstruction problem. Then, we provide a general expression for all valid solutions to the inverse model. This allows us to preserve data fidelity in the existing segments while exploring missing structures in the unknown parts. We have further developed algorithms for estimating the missing orientation structures based on some a priori knowledge of ridge topology features. Our statistical experiments show that our proposed model-based approach can effectively reduce the number of candidates for pair-wised fingerprint matching, and thus significantly improve the system retrieval performance for partial fingerprint identification.

  3. Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM) for prospective detection and identification of emergent pathogen strains and variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, Clark; Lichanska, Agnieszka M.; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Weslowski, Brian; Morris, Leah M.; Lorence, Matthew C.; Schafer, Klaus O.; Campos, Joseph; Sene, Mohamadou; Myers, Christopher A.; Faix, Dennis; Blair, Patrick J.; Brown, Jason; Metzgar, David

    2010-04-01

    High-density resequencing microarrays support simultaneous detection and identification of multiple viral and bacterial pathogens. Because detection and identification using RPM is based upon multiple specimen-specific target pathogen gene sequences generated in the individual test, the test results enable both a differential diagnostic analysis and epidemiological tracking of detected pathogen strains and variants from one specimen to the next. The RPM assay enables detection and identification of pathogen sequences that share as little as 80% sequence similarity to prototype target gene sequences represented as detector tiles on the array. This capability enables the RPM to detect and identify previously unknown strains and variants of a detected pathogen, as in sentinel cases associated with an infectious disease outbreak. We illustrate this capability using assay results from testing influenza A virus vaccines configured with strains that were first defined years after the design of the RPM microarray. Results are also presented from RPM-Flu testing of three specimens independently confirmed to the positive for the 2009 Novel H1N1 outbreak strain of influenza virus.

  4. Hermetic Narratives and False Analysis: A Unique Variant of the Mechanism of Identification With the Aggressor.

    PubMed

    Amir, Dana

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on a unique variant of the mechanism of identification with the aggressor. The term "hermetic narrative" refers to a condition in which the trauma victim creates a hermetically sealed narrative of witnessing, which becomes an addictive and subjugating object in itself, while obstructing natural processes of thinking. This paper examines the ways in which the hermetic narrative reconstructs victim-aggressor relations both within the individual and in the analytic relationship. It further discusses the risk of creating a "false analysis" that is based on a malignant cooperation of the analyst and patient with the internalized traumatic object. PMID:27500704

  5. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Price, Erin P; Inman-Bamber, John; Thiruvenkataswamy, Venugopal; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH) data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data. PMID:17672919

  6. Identification of lung cancer histology-specific variants applying Bayesian framework variant prioritization approaches within the TRICL and ILCCO consortia.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Darren R; Amos, Christopher I; Brhane, Yonathan; Timofeeva, Maria N; Caporaso, Neil; Wang, Yufei; Christiani, David C; Bickeböller, Heike; Yang, Ping; Albanes, Demetrius; Stevens, Victoria L; Gapstur, Susan; McKay, James; Boffetta, Paolo; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Krokan, Hans E; Skorpen, Frank; Gabrielsen, Maiken E; Vatten, Lars; Njølstad, Inger; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary; Lathrop, Mark; Vooder, Tõnu; Välk, Kristjan; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Andres; Broderick, Peter; Eisen, Timothy; Wu, Xifeng; Zhang, Di; Chen, Wei; Spitz, Margaret R; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Xie, Dong; She, Jun; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Ito, Hidemi; Risch, Angela; Heinrich, Joachim; Rosenberger, Albert; Muley, Thomas; Dienemann, Hendrik; Field, John K; Raji, Olaide; Chen, Ying; Gosney, John; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael; McLaughlin, John; Orlow, Irene; Han, Younghun; Li, Yafang; Zong, Xuchen; Johansson, Mattias; Liu, Geoffrey; Tworoger, Shelley S; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne R; Dai, Juncheng; Shen, Hongbing; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria T; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have likely uncovered all common variants at the GWAS significance level. Additional variants within the suggestive range (0.0001> P > 5×10(-8)) are, however, still of interest for identifying causal associations. This analysis aimed to apply novel variant prioritization approaches to identify additional lung cancer variants that may not reach the GWAS level. Effects were combined across studies with a total of 33456 controls and 6756 adenocarcinoma (AC; 13 studies), 5061 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 12 studies) and 2216 small cell lung cancer cases (9 studies). Based on prior information such as variant physical properties and functional significance, we applied stratified false discovery rates, hierarchical modeling and Bayesian false discovery probabilities for variant prioritization. We conducted a fine mapping analysis as validation of our methods by examining top-ranking novel variants in six independent populations with a total of 3128 cases and 2966 controls. Three novel loci in the suggestive range were identified based on our Bayesian framework analyses: KCNIP4 at 4p15.2 (rs6448050, P = 4.6×10(-7)) and MTMR2 at 11q21 (rs10501831, P = 3.1×10(-6)) with SCC, as well as GAREM at 18q12.1 (rs11662168, P = 3.4×10(-7)) with AC. Use of our prioritization methods validated two of the top three loci associated with SCC (P = 1.05×10(-4) for KCNIP4, represented by rs9799795) and AC (P = 2.16×10(-4) for GAREM, represented by rs3786309) in the independent fine mapping populations. This study highlights the utility of using prior functional data for sequence variants in prioritization analyses to search for robust signals in the suggestive range. PMID:26363033

  7. Identification of alternative splice variants in Aspergillus flavus through comparison of multiple tandem MS search algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Database searching is the most frequently used approach for automated peptide assignment and protein inference of tandem mass spectra. The results, however, depend on the sequences in target databases and on search algorithms. Recently by using an alternative splicing database, we identified more proteins than with the annotated proteins in Aspergillus flavus. In this study, we aimed at finding a greater number of eligible splice variants based on newly available transcript sequences and the latest genome annotation. The improved database was then used to compare four search algorithms: Mascot, OMSSA, X! Tandem, and InsPecT. Results The updated alternative splicing database predicted 15833 putative protein variants, 61% more than the previous results. There was transcript evidence for 50% of the updated genes compared to the previous 35% coverage. Database searches were conducted using the same set of spectral data, search parameters, and protein database but with different algorithms. The false discovery rates of the peptide-spectrum matches were estimated < 2%. The numbers of the total identified proteins varied from 765 to 867 between algorithms. Whereas 42% (1651/3891) of peptide assignments were unanimous, the comparison showed that 51% (568/1114) of the RefSeq proteins and 15% (11/72) of the putative splice variants were inferred by all algorithms. 12 plausible isoforms were discovered by focusing on the consensus peptides which were detected by at least three different algorithms. The analysis found different conserved domains in two putative isoforms of UDP-galactose 4-epimerase. Conclusions We were able to detect dozens of new peptides using the improved alternative splicing database with the recently updated annotation of the A. flavus genome. Unlike the identifications of the peptides and the RefSeq proteins, large variations existed between the putative splice variants identified by different algorithms. 12 candidates of putative isoforms

  8. Identification of a novel variant hepatocyte growth factor secreted by spleen-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Miau, L H; Jan, Y W; Shen, B J; Tsai, W H; Lee, H S; Lee, S C

    1996-06-25

    Stromal cells can interact with parenchymal cells by secreting various cytokines to affect the growth, differentiation or movement of the latter. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel variant hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) from the conditioned medium of stromal cells derived from mouse spleen. Compared to human HGF, it has much lower heparin-binding activity and lacks the beta-chain. Its molecular weight, 70 kDa, is very close to that of the alpha-chain of HGF. Human HGF homologue was not found in the conditioned medium. The conditioned medium of stromal cells, like recombinant HGF, could inhibit the growth of rat hepatoma cells. The inhibitory activity was presumably attributed to this novel HGF because the inhibitory activity, as the existence of this novel HGF, was confined to the identical fractions after heparin-column chromatography. Furthermore, this activity could be specifically abrogated by neutralizing anti-HGF antibodies.

  9. Identification of genetic variants associated with alternative splicing using sQTLseekeR

    PubMed Central

    Monlong, Jean; Calvo, Miquel; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Guigó, Roderic

    2014-01-01

    Identification of genetic variants affecting splicing in RNA sequencing population studies is still in its infancy. Splicing phenotype is more complex than gene expression and ought to be treated as a multivariate phenotype to be recapitulated completely. Here we represent the splicing pattern of a gene as the distribution of the relative abundances of a gene’s alternative transcript isoforms. We develop a statistical framework that uses a distance-based approach to compute the variability of splicing ratios across observations, and a non-parametric analogue to multivariate analysis of variance. We implement this approach in the R package sQTLseekeR and use it to analyze RNA-Seq data from the Geuvadis project in 465 individuals. We identify hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as splicing QTLs (sQTLs), including some falling in genome-wide association study SNPs. By developing the appropriate metrics, we show that sQTLseekeR compares favorably with existing methods that rely on univariate approaches, predicting variants that behave as expected from mutations affecting splicing. PMID:25140736

  10. Orientation dependence of variant selection and intersection reactions of ɛ martensite in a high-manganese austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Sawaguchi, T.; Ogawa, K.; Yin, F.; Zhao, X.

    2011-09-01

    The orientation dependence of ɛ martensite during loading of a polycrystalline austenitic Fe-30Mn-4Si-2Al steel has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, emphasising the variant selection rule and plate-plate intersection reactions. Two types of plate-plate intersection reactions, which are characterised by incident shear direction of either 30° or 90° with respect to the intersection axis, were found in the grains along the [001]-[111] directions and [001]-[101] directions, respectively. In the intersecting volume of the latter type reaction, a γ phase rotated 90° from the austenite matrix along the ⟨011⟩ zone axis of the intersecting ɛ plates, which was theoretically predicted by Sleeswyk [A.W. Sleeswyk, Philos. Mag. 7 (1962) p.1597], has been experimentally observed for the first time.

  11. Skeletal idiopathic osteosclerosis helps to perform personal identification of unknown decedents: A novel contribution from anatomical variants through CT scan.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, D; Gibelli, D; Palazzo, E; Sconfienza, L; Obertova, Z; Cattaneo, C

    2016-07-01

    Personal identification consists of the comparison of ante-mortem information from a missing person with post-mortem data obtained from an unidentified corpse. Such procedure is based on the assessment of individualizing features which may help in providing a conclusive identification between ante-mortem and post-mortem material. Anatomical variants may provide important clues to correctly identify human remains. Areas of idiopathic osteosclerosis (IO), or dense bone islands (DBIs) characterized by radiopaque areas of dense, trabeculated, non-inflamed vital bone represent one of these, potentially individualizing, anatomical features. This study presents a case where the finding of DBI was crucial for a positive identification through CT-scan. A decomposed body was found in an apartment in June 2014 in advanced decomposition and no dental records were available to perform a comparison for positive identification. Genetic tests were not applicable because of the lack of relatives in a direct line. The analysis of the only ante-mortem documentation, a CT-scan to the deceased dating back to August 2009, showed the presence of three DBIs within the trabecular bone of the proximal portion of the right femur. The same bony district was removed from the corpse during the autopsy and analysed by CT-scan, which verified the presence of the same features. Forensic practitioners should therefore be aware of the great importance of anatomical bone variants, such as dense bone islands for identification purposes, and the importance of advanced radiological technique for addressing the individualizing potential of such variants. We propose that anatomical variants of the human skeleton should be considered as being "primary identification characteristics" similar to dental status, fingerprints and DNA. PMID:27320398

  12. Skeletal idiopathic osteosclerosis helps to perform personal identification of unknown decedents: A novel contribution from anatomical variants through CT scan.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, D; Gibelli, D; Palazzo, E; Sconfienza, L; Obertova, Z; Cattaneo, C

    2016-07-01

    Personal identification consists of the comparison of ante-mortem information from a missing person with post-mortem data obtained from an unidentified corpse. Such procedure is based on the assessment of individualizing features which may help in providing a conclusive identification between ante-mortem and post-mortem material. Anatomical variants may provide important clues to correctly identify human remains. Areas of idiopathic osteosclerosis (IO), or dense bone islands (DBIs) characterized by radiopaque areas of dense, trabeculated, non-inflamed vital bone represent one of these, potentially individualizing, anatomical features. This study presents a case where the finding of DBI was crucial for a positive identification through CT-scan. A decomposed body was found in an apartment in June 2014 in advanced decomposition and no dental records were available to perform a comparison for positive identification. Genetic tests were not applicable because of the lack of relatives in a direct line. The analysis of the only ante-mortem documentation, a CT-scan to the deceased dating back to August 2009, showed the presence of three DBIs within the trabecular bone of the proximal portion of the right femur. The same bony district was removed from the corpse during the autopsy and analysed by CT-scan, which verified the presence of the same features. Forensic practitioners should therefore be aware of the great importance of anatomical bone variants, such as dense bone islands for identification purposes, and the importance of advanced radiological technique for addressing the individualizing potential of such variants. We propose that anatomical variants of the human skeleton should be considered as being "primary identification characteristics" similar to dental status, fingerprints and DNA.

  13. Identification of variants in primary and recurrent glioblastoma using a cancer-specific gene panel and whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Virk, Selene M; Gibson, Richard M; Quinones-Mateu, Miguel E; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive, malignant brain tumor typically resulting in death of the patient within one year following diagnosis; and those who survive beyond this point usually present with tumor recurrence within two years (5-year survival is 5%). The genetic heterogeneity of GBM has made the molecular characterization of these tumors an area of great interest and has led to identification of molecular subtypes in GBM. The availability of sequencing platforms that are both fast and economical can further the adoption of tumor sequencing in the clinical environment, potentially leading to identification of clinically actionable genetic targets. In this pilot study, comprised of triplet samples of normal blood, primary tumor, and recurrent tumor samples from three patients; we compared the ability of Illumina whole exome sequencing (ExomeSeq) and the Ion AmpliSeq Comprehensive Cancer Panel (CCP) to identify somatic variants in patient-paired primary and recurrent tumor samples. Thirteen genes were found to harbor variants, the majority of which were exclusive to the ExomeSeq data. Surprisingly, only two variants were identified by both platforms and they were located within the PTCH1 and NF1 genes. Although preliminary in nature, this work highlights major differences in variant identification in data generated from the two platforms. Additional studies with larger samples sizes are needed to further explore the differences between these technologies and to enhance our understanding of the clinical utility of panel based platforms in genomic profiling of brain tumors. PMID:25950952

  14. Identification of copy number variants in whole-genome data using Reference Coverage Profiles.

    PubMed

    Glusman, Gustavo; Severson, Alissa; Dhankani, Varsha; Robinson, Max; Farrah, Terry; Mauldin, Denise E; Stittrich, Anna B; Ament, Seth A; Roach, Jared C; Brunkow, Mary E; Bodian, Dale L; Vockley, Joseph G; Shmulevich, Ilya; Niederhuber, John E; Hood, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    The identification of DNA copy numbers from short-read sequencing data remains a challenge for both technical and algorithmic reasons. The raw data for these analyses are measured in tens to hundreds of gigabytes per genome; transmitting, storing, and analyzing such large files is cumbersome, particularly for methods that analyze several samples simultaneously. We developed a very efficient representation of depth of coverage (150-1000× compression) that enables such analyses. Current methods for analyzing variants in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data frequently miss copy number variants (CNVs), particularly hemizygous deletions in the 1-100 kb range. To fill this gap, we developed a method to identify CNVs in individual genomes, based on comparison to joint profiles pre-computed from a large set of genomes. We analyzed depth of coverage in over 6000 high quality (>40×) genomes. The depth of coverage has strong sequence-specific fluctuations only partially explained by global parameters like %GC. To account for these fluctuations, we constructed multi-genome profiles representing the observed or inferred diploid depth of coverage at each position along the genome. These Reference Coverage Profiles (RCPs) take into account the diverse technologies and pipeline versions used. Normalization of the scaled coverage to the RCP followed by hidden Markov model (HMM) segmentation enables efficient detection of CNVs and large deletions in individual genomes. Use of pre-computed multi-genome coverage profiles improves our ability to analyze each individual genome. We make available RCPs and tools for performing these analyses on personal genomes. We expect the increased sensitivity and specificity for individual genome analysis to be critical for achieving clinical-grade genome interpretation. PMID:25741365

  15. Identification of MHCII variants associated with chlamydial disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Quintin; Griffith, Joanna E.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiosis, the most common infectious disease in koalas, can cause chronic urogenital tract fibrosis and infertility. High titres of serum immunoglobulin G against 10 kDa and 60 kDa chlamydial heat-shock proteins (c-hsp10 and c-hsp60) are associated with fibrous occlusion of the koala uterus and uterine tube. Murine and human studies have identified associations between specific major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) alleles or genotypes, and higher c-hsp 60 antibody levels or chlamydia-associated disease and infertility. In this study, we characterised partial MHCII DAB and DBB genes in female koalas (n = 94) from a single geographic population, and investigated associations among antibody responses to c-hsp60 quantified by ELISA, susceptibility to chlamydial infection, or age. The identification of three candidate MHCII variants provides additional support for the functional role of MHCII in the koala, and will inform more focused future studies. This is the first study to investigate an association between MHC genes with chlamydial pathogenesis in a non-model, free-ranging species. PMID:25024912

  16. Identification of MHCII variants associated with chlamydial disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Lau, Quintin; Griffith, Joanna E; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiosis, the most common infectious disease in koalas, can cause chronic urogenital tract fibrosis and infertility. High titres of serum immunoglobulin G against 10 kDa and 60 kDa chlamydial heat-shock proteins (c-hsp10 and c-hsp60) are associated with fibrous occlusion of the koala uterus and uterine tube. Murine and human studies have identified associations between specific major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) alleles or genotypes, and higher c-hsp 60 antibody levels or chlamydia-associated disease and infertility. In this study, we characterised partial MHCII DAB and DBB genes in female koalas (n = 94) from a single geographic population, and investigated associations among antibody responses to c-hsp60 quantified by ELISA, susceptibility to chlamydial infection, or age. The identification of three candidate MHCII variants provides additional support for the functional role of MHCII in the koala, and will inform more focused future studies. This is the first study to investigate an association between MHC genes with chlamydial pathogenesis in a non-model, free-ranging species. PMID:25024912

  17. HapFABIA: identification of very short segments of identity by descent characterized by rare variants in large sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    2013-12-01

    Identity by descent (IBD) can be reliably detected for long shared DNA segments, which are found in related individuals. However, many studies contain cohorts of unrelated individuals that share only short IBD segments. New sequencing technologies facilitate identification of short IBD segments through rare variants, which convey more information on IBD than common variants. Current IBD detection methods, however, are not designed to use rare variants for the detection of short IBD segments. Short IBD segments reveal genetic structures at high resolution. Therefore, they can help to improve imputation and phasing, to increase genotyping accuracy for low-coverage sequencing and to increase the power of association studies. Since short IBD segments are further assumed to be old, they can shed light on the evolutionary history of humans. We propose HapFABIA, a computational method that applies biclustering to identify very short IBD segments characterized by rare variants. HapFABIA is designed to detect short IBD segments in genotype data that were obtained from next-generation sequencing, but can also be applied to DNA microarray data. Especially in next-generation sequencing data, HapFABIA exploits rare variants for IBD detection. HapFABIA significantly outperformed competing algorithms at detecting short IBD segments on artificial and simulated data with rare variants. HapFABIA identified 160 588 different short IBD segments characterized by rare variants with a median length of 23 kb (mean 24 kb) in data for chromosome 1 of the 1000 Genomes Project. These short IBD segments contain 752 000 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), which account for 39% of the rare variants and 23.5% of all variants. The vast majority-152 000 IBD segments-are shared by Africans, while only 19 000 and 11 000 are shared by Europeans and Asians, respectively. IBD segments that match the Denisova or the Neandertal genome are found significantly more often in Asians and Europeans but also, in

  18. A Whole-Genome Analysis Framework for Effective Identification of Pathogenic Regulatory Variants in Mendelian Disease.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Damian; Schubach, Max; Jacobsen, Julius O B; Köhler, Sebastian; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Spielmann, Malte; Jäger, Marten; Hochheiser, Harry; Washington, Nicole L; McMurry, Julie A; Haendel, Melissa A; Mungall, Christopher J; Lewis, Suzanna E; Groza, Tudor; Valentini, Giorgio; Robinson, Peter N

    2016-09-01

    The interpretation of non-coding variants still constitutes a major challenge in the application of whole-genome sequencing in Mendelian disease, especially for single-nucleotide and other small non-coding variants. Here we present Genomiser, an analysis framework that is able not only to score the relevance of variation in the non-coding genome, but also to associate regulatory variants to specific Mendelian diseases. Genomiser scores variants through either existing methods such as CADD or a bespoke machine learning method and combines these with allele frequency, regulatory sequences, chromosomal topological domains, and phenotypic relevance to discover variants associated to specific Mendelian disorders. Overall, Genomiser is able to identify causal regulatory variants as the top candidate in 77% of simulated whole genomes, allowing effective detection and discovery of regulatory variants in Mendelian disease. PMID:27569544

  19. The Socializing Function of New Employee Orientation Programs: A Study of Organizational Identification and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Lisa R.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    This study examined one form of organizational socialization, the new employee orientation program, to determine whether such organizational efforts would increase levels of organizational identification and employee perceptions of job satisfaction when employees underwent such a program. An alternative model was tested to ascertain whether or not…

  20. On the identification of potential regulatory variants within genome wide association candidate SNP sets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) are a population-scale approach to the identification of segments of the genome in which genetic variations may contribute to disease risk. Current methods focus on the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with disease traits. As there are many SNPs within identified risk loci, and the majority of these are situated within non-coding regions, a key challenge is to identify and prioritize variants affecting regulatory sequences that are likely to contribute to the phenotype assessed. Methods We focused investigation on SNPs within lung and breast cancer GWAS loci that reached genome-wide significance for potential roles in gene regulation with a specific focus on SNPs likely to disrupt transcription factor binding sites. Within risk loci, the regulatory potential of sub-regions was classified using relevant open chromatin and epigenetic high throughput sequencing data sets from the ENCODE project in available cancer and normal cell lines. Furthermore, transcription factor affinity altering variants were predicted by comparison of position weight matrix scores between disease and reference alleles. Lastly, ChIP-seq data of transcription associated factors and topological domains were included as binding evidence and potential gene target inference. Results The sets of SNPs, including both the disease-associated markers and those in high linkage disequilibrium with them, were significantly over-represented in regulatory sequences of cancer and/or normal cells; however, over-representation was generally not restricted to disease-relevant tissue specific regions. The calculated regulatory potential, allelic binding affinity scores and ChIP-seq binding evidence were the three criteria used to prioritize candidates. Fitting all three criteria, we highlighted breast cancer susceptibility SNPs and a borderline lung cancer relevant SNP located in cancer-specific enhancers overlapping multiple

  1. Identification of de novo copy number variants associated with human disorders of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Corbett, Sean T; Louet, Jean-Francois; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Meyers, Lindsay; Shaw, Chad A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lamb, Dolores J

    2010-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD), ranging in severity from genital abnormalities to complete sex reversal, are among the most common human birth defects with incidence rates reaching almost 3%. Although causative alterations in key genes controlling gonad development have been identified, the majority of DSD cases remain unexplained. To improve the diagnosis, we screened 116 children born with idiopathic DSD using a clinically validated array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform. 8951 controls without urogenital defects were used to compare with our cohort of affected patients. Clinically relevant imbalances were found in 21.5% of the analyzed patients. Most anomalies (74.2%) evaded detection by the routinely ordered karyotype and were scattered across the genome in gene-enriched subtelomeric loci. Among these defects, confirmed de novo duplication and deletion events were noted on 1p36.33, 9p24.3 and 19q12-q13.11 for ambiguous genitalia, 10p14 and Xq28 for cryptorchidism and 12p13 and 16p11.2 for hypospadias. These variants were significantly associated with genitourinary defects (P = 6.08×10(-12)). The causality of defects observed in 5p15.3, 9p24.3, 22q12.1 and Xq28 was supported by the presence of overlapping chromosomal rearrangements in several unrelated patients. In addition to known gonad determining genes including SRY and DMRT1, novel candidate genes such as FGFR2, KANK1, ADCY2 and ZEB2 were encompassed. The identification of risk germline rearrangements for urogenital birth defects may impact diagnosis and genetic counseling and contribute to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of human sexual development. PMID:21048976

  2. Team-oriented leadership: the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification.

    PubMed

    Giessner, Steffen R; van Knippenberg, Daan; van Ginkel, Wendy; Sleebos, Ed

    2013-07-01

    We examined the interactive effects of leader group prototypicality, accountability, and team identification on team-oriented behavior of leaders, thus extending the social identity perspective on leadership to the study of leader behavior. An experimental study (N = 152) supported our hypothesis that leader accountability relates more strongly to team-oriented behavior for group nonprototypical leaders than for group prototypical leaders. A multisource field study with leaders (N = 64) and their followers (N = 209) indicated that this interactive effect is more pronounced for leaders who identify more strongly with their team. We discuss how these findings further develop the social identity analysis of leadership.

  3. Single Nucleotide Variants of the TGACTCA Motif Modulate Energetics and Orientation of Binding of the Jun-Fos Heterodimeric Transcription Factor†

    PubMed Central

    Seldeen, Kenneth L.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Deegan, Brian J.; Farooq, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    The Jun-Fos heterodimeric transcription factor is the terminal link between the transfer of extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to the site of DNA transcription within the nucleus in a wide variety of cellular processes central to health and disease. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry, we report detailed thermodynamics of the binding of bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer to synthetic dsDNA oligos containing the TGACTCA cis-element and all possible single nucleotide variants thereof encountered widely within the promoters of a diverse array of genes. Our data show that Jun-Fos heterodimer tolerates single nucleotide substitutions and binds to TGACTCA variants with affinities in the physiologically relevant micromolar-submicromolar range. The energetics of binding are richly favored by enthalpic forces and opposed by entropic changes across the entire spectrum of TGACTCA variants in agreement with the notion that protein-DNA interactions are largely driven by electrostatic interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Of particular interest is the observation that the Jun-Fos heterodimer binds to specific TGACTCA variants in a preferred orientation. Our 3D atomic models reveal that such orientational preference results from asymmetric binding and may in part be attributable to chemically distinct but structurally equivalent residues R263 and K148 located within the basic regions of Jun and Fos, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest that the single nucleotide variants of the TGACTCA motif modulate energetics and orientation of binding of the Jun-Fos heterodimer and that such behavior may be a critical determinant of differential regulation of specific genes under the control of this transcription factor. Our study also bears important consequences for the occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms within the TGACTCA cis-element at specific gene promoters between different individuals. PMID:19215067

  4. An Optimal Weighted Aggregated Association Test for Identification of Rare Variants Involved in Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Jae Hoon; Han, Buhm; He, Dan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2011-01-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies allows one to discover nearly all rare variants in a genomic region of interest. This technological development increases the need for an effective statistical method for testing the aggregated effect of rare variants in a gene on disease susceptibility. The idea behind this approach is that if a certain gene is involved in a disease, many rare variants within the gene will disrupt the function of the gene and are associated with the disease. In this article, we present the rare variant weighted aggregate statistic (RWAS), a method that groups rare variants and computes a weighted sum of differences between case and control mutation counts. We show that our method outperforms the groupwise association test of Madsen and Browning in the disease-risk model that assumes that each variant makes an equally small contribution to disease risk. In addition, we can incorporate prior information into our method of which variants are likely causal. By using simulated data and real mutation screening data of the susceptibility gene for ataxia telangiectasia, we demonstrate that prior information has a substantial influence on the statistical power of association studies. Our method is publicly available at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/rarevariants. PMID:21368279

  5. Overcoming asymmetric goals in teams: the interactive roles of team learning orientation and team identification.

    PubMed

    Pearsall, Matthew J; Venkataramani, Vijaya

    2015-05-01

    Although members of teams share a common, ultimate objective, they often have asymmetric or conflicting individual goals that shape the way they contribute to, and pursue, the shared goal of the team. Compounding this problem, they are frequently unaware of the nature of these goal asymmetries or even the fact that such differences exist. Drawing on, and integrating, social interdependence and representational gaps theories, we identify 2 emergent states that combine interactively to enable teams to overcome asymmetric goals: team identification and team learning orientation. Using data from long-term, real-life teams that engaged in a computer simulation designed to create both asymmetric goals and representational gaps about those goals, we found that teams were most effective when they had a high learning orientation coupled with high team identification and that this effect was mediated by teams' ability to form more accurate team goal mental models and engage in effective planning processes. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  6. The Identification and Classification of Sandy Lands by Application of the Object Oriented Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changlong; Gao, Zhihai; Wang, Bengyu; Bai, Lina; Wu, Junjun; Sun, Bin; Ding, Xiangyuan

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, BJ-1 small satellite images as the data source, the optimal segmentation scales of various categories were determined by the Jefries-Matusita (J-M) method and the identification and classification of the Otindag sandy land was carried out based on the object-oriented method combined with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. The research shows that the overall accuracy of sandy land classification, in this paper, is 81.52%, and Kappa coefficient is 0.7845, which indicate that the identification and classification of sandy lands by application of the object-oriented method is great. Finally, based on the research results of the classification methods and processes in sandy land, the sandy land of the Beijing-Tianjin dust and sandstorm source region (BTDSSR) was identified and classified. By doing this, it was determined basically that the distribution of the sandy lands in BTDSSR.

  7. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-28

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility "tag". Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS.

  8. Rare variants in complex traits: novel identification strategies and the role of de novo mutations.

    PubMed

    Jouan, Loubna; Gauthier, Julie; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2012-01-01

    Following the limited success of linkage and association studies aimed at identifying the genetic causes of common neurodevelopmental syndromes like autism and schizophrenia, complex traits such as these have recently been considered under the 'common disease-rare variant' hypothesis. Prior to this hypothesis, the study of candidate genes has enabled the discovery of rare variants in complex disorders, and in turn some of these variants have highlighted the genetic contribution of de novo variants. De novo variants belong to a subcategory of spontaneous rare variants that are largely associated with sporadic diseases, which include some complex psychiatric disorders where the affected individuals do not transmit the genetic defects they carry because of their reduced reproductive fitness. Interestingly, recent studies have demonstrated the rate of germline de novo mutations to be higher in individuals with complex psychiatric disorders by comparison to what is seen in unaffected control individuals; moreover, de novo mutations carried by affected individuals have generally been more deleterious than those observed in control individuals. Advanced sequencing technologies have recently enabled the undertaking of massive parallel sequencing projects that can cover the entire coding sequences (exome) or genome of several individuals at once. Such advances have thus fostered the emergence of novel genetic hypotheses and ideas to investigate disease-causative genetic variations. The genetic underpinnings of a number of sporadic complex diseases is now becoming partly explained and more major breakthroughs for complex traits genomics should be expected in the near future. PMID:23594499

  9. Identification of polymorphisms and sequence variants in the human homologue of the mouse natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Fujiwara, T.M.; Buu, N.T.; Sanchez, F.O.; Cellier, M.; Paradis, A.J.; Frappier, D.; Skamene, E.; Gros, P.; Morgan, K.

    1995-04-01

    The most common mycobacterial disease in humans is tuberculosis, and there is evidence for genetic factors in susceptibility to tuberculosis. In the mouse, the Bcg gene controls macrophage priming for activation and is a major gene for susceptibility to infection with mycobacteria. A candidate gene for Bcg was identified by positional cloning and was designated {open_quotes}natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene{close_quotes} (Nramp1), and the human homologue (NRAMP1) has recently been cloned. Here we report (1) the physical mapping NRAMP1 close to VIL in chromosome region 2q35 by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC cloning and (2) the identification of nine sequence variants in NRAMP1. Of the four variants in the coding region, there were two missense mutations and two silent substitutions. The missense mutations were a conservative alanine-to-valine substitution at codon 318 in exon9 and an aspartic acid-to-asparagine substitution at codon 543 in the predicted cytoplasmic tail of the NRAMP1 protein. A microsatellite was located in the immediate 5{prime} region of the gene, three variants were in introns, and one variant was located in the 3{prime} UTR. The allele frequencies of each of the nine variants were determined in DNA samples of 60 Caucasians and 20 Asians. In addition, we have physically linked two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, D2S104 and D2S173, to NRAMP1 on a 1.5-Mb YAC contig. These molecular markers will be useful to assess the role of NRAMP1 in susceptibility to tuberculosis and other macrophage-mediated diseases. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Identification of a novel 16S rRNA gene variant of Actinomyces funkei from six patients with purulent infections.

    PubMed

    Hinić, V; Straub, C; Schultheiss, E; Kaempfer, P; Frei, R; Goldenberger, D

    2013-07-01

    Little is known about the clinical significance and laboratory diagnosis of Actinomyces funkei. In this report we describe six clinical cases where A. funkei was isolated from purulent, polymicrobial infections. Conventional identification procedures were compared with molecular methods including matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique. Analysis of the full 16S rRNA gene sequence of the six investigated strains revealed differences from the A. funkei type strain. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that the clinical strains represent a novel 16S rRNA gene variant within the species of A. funkei.

  11. Identification of Gender-Specific Genetic Variants in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Dargis, Natasha; Lamontagne, Maxime; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Sbarra, Laura; Henry, Cyndi; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart defect and has a male predominance of 3 to 1. A large proportion of patients develop valvular and aortic complications. Despite the high prevalence of BAV, its cause and genetic origins remain elusive. The goal of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with BAV. Nine genes previously associated with BAV (NOTCH1, AXIN1, EGFR, ENG, GATA5, NKX2-5, NOS3, PDIA2, and TGFBR2) were sequenced in 48 patients with BAV using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Pathogenicity of genetic variants was evaluated with the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion framework. A selection of 89 variants identified by sequencing or in previous BAV genetic studies was genotyped, and allele frequencies were compared in 323 patients with BAV confirmed at surgery and 584 controls. Analyses were also performed by gender. Nine novel and 19 potentially pathogenic variants were identified by next-generation sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing, but they were not associated with BAV in the case-control population. A significant association was observed between an in silico-predicted benign EGFR intronic variant (rs17290301) and BAV. Analyses performed by gender revealed different variants associated with BAV in men (EGFR rs533525993 and TEX26 rs12857479) and women (NOTCH1 rs61751489, TGFBR2 rs1155705, and NKX2-5 rs2277923). In conclusion, these results constitute the first association between EGFR genetic variants and BAV in humans and support a possible role of gender-specific polymorphisms in the development of BAV. PMID:26708639

  12. Identification of Claudin 1 Transcript Variants in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelinski, Teresa; Xie, Jiuyong; Cooper, Steven; Penner, Carla; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The claudin 1 tight junction protein, solely responsible for the barrier function of epithelial cells, is frequently down regulated in invasive human breast cancer. The underlying mechanism is largely unknown, and no obvious mutations in the claudin 1 gene (CLDN1) have been identified to date in breast cancer. Since many genes have been shown to undergo deregulation through splicing and mis-splicing events in cancer, the current study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of transcript variants for CLDN1 in human invasive breast cancer. Methods RT-PCR analysis of CLDN1 transcripts was conducted on RNA isolated from 12 human invasive breast tumors. The PCR products from each tumor were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis, cloned and sequenced. Genomic DNA was also isolated from each of the 12 tumors and amplified using PCR CLDN1 specific primers. Sanger sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses were conducted. Results A number of CLDN1 transcript variants were identified in these breast tumors. All variants were shorter than the classical CLDN1 transcript. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed several splice variants, primarily in exon 1 of CLDN1; resulting in truncated proteins. One variant, V1, resulted in a premature stop codon and thus likely led to nonsense mediated decay. Interestingly, another transcript variant, V2, was not detected in normal breast tissue samples. Further, sequence analysis of the tumor genomic DNA revealed SNPs in 3 of the 4 coding exons, including a rare missense SNP (rs140846629) in exon 2 which represents an Ala124Thr substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report of CLDN1 transcript variants in human invasive breast cancer. These studies suggest that alternate splicing may also be a mechanism by which claudin 1 is down regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in invasive breast cancer and may provide novel insights into how CLDN1 is reduced or silenced in human breast

  13. Evaluation of BBL CHROMagar orientation medium for detection and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hengstler, K A; Hammann, R; Fahr, A M

    1997-01-01

    The microbiological performance of BBL CHROMagar Orientation medium and CPS ID2 agar was compared to that of Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood and MacConkey agar without crystal violet for the enumeration and presumptive identification of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Of a total of 658 clinical urine specimens, 118 specimens yielded no growth, 402 specimens yielded growth with cell counts of > or = 10(5) CFU/ml, and 138 specimens yielded growth with cell counts of < 10(5) CFU/ml. Of the specimens with cell counts of > or = 10(5) CFU/ml, 163 were pure cultures and 239 were mixed cultures. A total of 266 Escherichia coli organisms were isolated on both chromogenic media, 260 were isolated on blood agar, and 248 were isolated on MacConkey agar. One strain (0.4%) failed to develop the expected pink color on CHROMagar Orientation medium, and 23 strains (8.7%) failed to develop the expected pink color on CPS ID2 agar. Enterococci (CHROMagar Orientation medium, n = 266; CPS ID2 agar, n = 265) produced small blue-green colonies on both chromogenic media. Fifty of the mixed cultures contained enterococci that were detected only on the chromogenic media. The Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia (KES) and the Proteus-Morganella-Providencia (PMP) groups could be identified on both chromogenic media. Of 66 isolates of the KES group, 63 grew with the expected color on CHROMagar Orientation medium and 58 of 64 isolates grew with the expected color on CPS ID2 agar. Other microorganisms required further identification. The use of chromogenic medium formulations offers a time-saving method for the reliable detection, enumeration, and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens. One of the greatest advantages of these media is the easy recognition of mixed cultures. PMID:9350731

  14. Cloning and identification of splice variants of the porcine PILRA gene.

    PubMed

    Lizu, Li; Lixin, Han; Jinkui, Wang; Liang, Wang; Di, Liu; Xiuqin, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptors (PILRs) are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and composed of two subtypes, α and β. PILRα plays an important role in the immune response against invading pathogens, but so far there is no report on porcine PILRα. In order to analyze the potential role of PILRα in porcine disease-resistant breeding, we first cloned the PILRA gene (V1-V3, GenBank accession Nos. KJ143679-81) into pigs, and identified its three splice variants. Each variant conceptually translates into proteins of 271 amino acids (aa), 254aa and 283aa, respectively. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to construct expression profiles of each variant in tissues and that induced by Poly(I:C). All three variants had the highest expression levels in the spleen, followed by liver and lung tissues. While levels were low or undetectable in the heart, kidney, stomach, muscle, lymph, large intestine, small intestine and bladder. Poly(I:C) significantly induced the expression of splice variant 1 (V1) of porcine PILRA, but hardly affected the expression of V2 and V3. The results lay a foundation for further study on the role of PILRA in porcine breeding and disease resistance. PMID:26399532

  15. Identification of Blastocystis subtype 1 variants in the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thathaisong, Umaporn; Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Mungthin, Mathirut; Pipatsatitpong, Duangnate; Tan-ariya, Peerapan; Naaglor, Tawee; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2013-02-01

    A cross-sectional study of Blastocystis infection was conducted to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors, and subtypes of Blastocystis at the Home for Girls, Bangkok, Thailand in November 2008. Of 370 stool samples, 118 (31.9%) were infected with Blastocystis. Genotypic characterization of Blastocystis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the partial small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Subtype 1 was the most predominant (94.8%), followed by subtype 6 (3.5%) and subtype 2 (1.7%). Sequence analyses revealed nucleotide polymorphisms for Blastocystis subtype 1, which were described as subtype 1/variant 1, subtype 1/variant 2. Blastocystis subtype 1/variant 1 was the most predominant infection occurring in almost every house. The results showed that subtype analysis of Blastocystis was useful for molecular epidemiological study. PMID:23166199

  16. Identification of a chicken anemia virus variant-related gyrovirus in stray cats in china, 2012.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinheng; Liu, Yuanjia; Ji, Jun; Chen, Feng; Sun, Baoli; Xue, Chunyi; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2014-01-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV), is a known member of the genus Gyrovirus and was first isolated from chickens in Japan in 1979. Some reports have also demonstrated that CAV can be identified in human stool specimens. In this study, a variant of CAV was detected using PCR with CAV-based primers in fecal samples of stray cats. The genome of CAV variant was sequenced and the results suggest that it could be a recombinant viral strain from parental CAV strains JQ690762 and AF311900. Recombination is an important evolutionary mechanism that contributes to genetic diversification. These findings indicate that CAV variant might have originated from CAV-infected chickens. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of this novel virus remains to be elucidated. This study underscores the importance of CAV surveillance and it presents the first evidence suggesting the possibility of CAV homologous recombination in cat. PMID:24689034

  17. Identification of six novel P450 oxidoreductase missense variants in Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jewish populations

    PubMed Central

    Tomková, Mária; Marohnic, Christopher C; Gurwitz, David; Šeda, Ondřej; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Martásek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme NADPH–P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the main electron donor to all microsomal CYPs. The possible contribution of common POR variants to inter- and intra-individual variability in drug metabolism is of great pharmacogenetic interest. Aim To search for POR polymorphic alleles and estimate their frequencies in a Jewish population. Materials & methods We analyzed the POR gene in 301 Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jews. Results A total of 30 POR SNPs were identified, nine in the noncoding regions and 21 in the protein-coding regions (ten synonymous, 11 missense). Six of these missense variants are previously undescribed (S102P, V164M, V191M, D344N, E398A and D648N). Conclusion The data collected in this study on missense POR SNPs, interpreted in light of the crystallographic structure of human POR, indicate that some POR missense variants may be potential biomarkers for future POR pharmacogenetic screening. PMID:22462747

  18. Identification of Evolutionarily Conserved Md1 Splice Variants That Regulate Innate Immunity through Differential Induction of NF-кB.

    PubMed

    Candel, Sergio; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; García-Moreno, Diana; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-08-15

    Although in mammals the TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD)2/CD14 complex is responsible for the recognition of bacterial LPS, and it is known that the RP105/MD1 complex negatively regulates TLR4 signaling, the evolutionary history of LPS recognition remains enigmatic. Thus, zebrafish has orthologs of mammalian TLR4 (Tlr4a and Tlr4b), RP105, and MD1, but MD2 and CD14 seem to be absent from all fish genomes available to date. In addition, and to make the story more intriguing, zebrafish Tlr4a and Tlr4b do not recognize LPS, whereas the zebrafish Rp105/Md1 complex unexpectedly participates in the regulation of innate immunity and viral resistance. In this work, we report the identification of two novel splice variants of Md1, which are expressed at similar levels as full-length Md1 in the main immune-related organs of zebrafish and are highly induced upon viral infection. One of these splice variants, which is also expressed by mouse macrophages, lacks three conserved cysteine residues that have been shown to form disulfide bonds that are crucial for the three-dimensional structure of the MD-2-related lipid recognition domain of Md1. Functional studies in zebrafish demonstrate that this evolutionarily conserved splice variant shows higher antiviral activity than full-length Md1, but reduced proinflammatory activity, due to an impaired ability to activate the master regulator of inflammation, NF-κB. These results uncover a previously unappreciated evolutionarily conserved Md1 splice variant with important functions in the regulation of innate immunity and the antiviral response in zebrafish, and point to the need for additional functional studies in mammals on this little explored molecule.

  19. Identification and functional characterization of four TRPA1 variants in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As signal integrators that respond to various physical and chemical stimuli, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels fulfil critical functional roles in the sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Here, four variants of TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) were identified and cloned from...

  20. Identification of rare variants for hypertension with incorporation of linkage information

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We conducted linkage analysis using the genome-wide association study data on chromosome 3, and then assessed association between hypertension and rare variants of genes located in the regions showing evidence of linkage. The rare variants were collapsed if their minor allele frequencies were less than or equal to the thresholds: 0.01, 0.03, or 0.05. In the collapsing process, they were either unweighted or weighted by the nonparametric linkage log of odds scores in 2 different schemes: exponential weighting and cumulative weighting. Logistic regression models using the generalized estimating equations approach were used to assess association between the collapsed rare variants and hypertension adjusting for age and gender. Evidence of association from the weighted and unweighted collapsing schemes with minor allele frequencies ≤0.01, after accounting for multiple testing, was found for genes DOCK3 (p = 0.0090), ARMC8 (p = 1.29E-5), KCNAB1 (p = 5.8E-4), and MYRIP (p = 5.79E-6). DOCK3 and MYRIP are newly discovered. Incorporating linkage scores as weights was found to help identify rare causal variants with a large effect size. PMID:25519312

  1. Identification of genetic variants associated with susceptibility to West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Deng, X; Singh, P; Loeb, M; Lauring, A S; Seielstad, M

    2016-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection results in a diverse spectrum of outcomes, and host genetics are likely to influence susceptibility to neuroinvasive disease (West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND)). We performed whole-exome sequencing of 44 individuals with WNND and identified alleles associated with severe disease by variant filtration in cases, kernel association testing in cases and controls and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) imputation into a larger cohort of WNND cases and seropositive controls followed by genome-wide association analysis. Variant filtration prioritized genes based on the enrichment of otherwise rare variants, but did not unambiguously implicate variants shared by a majority of cases. Kernel association demonstrated enrichment for risk and protective alleles in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-DQB1 loci that have well understood roles in antiviral immunity. Two loci, HERC5 and an intergenic region between CD83 and JARID2, were implicated by multiple imputed SNPs and exceeded genome-wide significance in a discovery cohort (n=862). SNPs at two additional loci, TFCP2L1 and CACNA1H, achieved genome-wide significance after association testing of directly genotyped and imputed SNPs in a discovery cohort (n=862) and a separate replication cohort (n=1387). The context of these loci suggests that immunoregulatory, ion channel and endothelial barrier functions may be important elements of the host response to WNV.

  2. Identification of CD3ε, CD4, CD8β splice variants of Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Montero, Ruth; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2011-12-01

    In vertebrates, CD3 complex and CD4 and CD8 co-receptors are essential for signal transduction during T cell activation. In the present study, we report the mRNA spliced variants of the Atlantic salmon CD3ε, CD4 and CD8β and the effect of pathogen encounter on the expression of these variants. CD3ε is alternatively spliced in thymus, head kidney, spleen and gills to give rise to the complete mRNA sequence and to an alternative product that lacks the transmembrane exon. CD4 is also alternatively spliced in the thymus, head kidney, spleen and gills to form two variants, although the alternative product is barely detectable. The alternative product lacks the exon 1B encoding the D1 domain, which is essential for binding to MHC class II proteins. Two amplicons were also found for the CD8β gene; sequencing analysis revealed that the main PCR product corresponds to the previously reported CD8β sequence, whereas the variant sequence encodes a potential protein that lacks the Ig-like domain. The expression of CD3, CD4, CD8β genes also analyzed in head kidney of LPS-treated and IPNV infected salmon and different patterns of expression were observed. The presence and balance of the different variants of T cell co-receptors could be related to the ability of fish to induce a particular type of immune response, as well as, the ability of the pathogen to modify the fish immune response. PMID:21821134

  3. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations.

    PubMed

    Dogruluk, Turgut; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Espitia, Maribel; Chen, Fengju; Chen, Tenghui; Chong, Zechen; Appadurai, Vivek; Dogruluk, Armel; Eterovic, Agna Karina; Bonnen, Penelope E; Creighton, Chad J; Chen, Ken; Mills, Gordon B; Scott, Kenneth L

    2015-12-15

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers. Here we describe a mutation assessment pipeline enabled by high-throughput engineering of molecularly barcoded gene variant expression clones identified by tumor sequencing. We first used this platform to functionally assess tail mutations observed in PIK3CA, which encodes the catalytic subunit alpha of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) frequently mutated in cancer. Orthogonal screening for PIK3CA variant activity using in vitro and in vivo cell growth and transformation assays differentiated driver from passenger mutations, revealing that PIK3CA variant activity correlates imperfectly with its mutation frequency across breast cancer populations. Although PIK3CA mutations with frequencies above 5% were significantly more oncogenic than wild-type in all assays, mutations occurring at 0.07% to 5.0% included those with and without oncogenic activities that ranged from weak to strong in at least one assay. Proteomic profiling coupled with therapeutic sensitivity assays on PIK3CA variant-expressing cell models revealed variant-specific activation of PI3K signaling as well as other pathways that include the MEK1/2 module of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our data indicate that cancer treatments will need to increasingly consider the functional relevance of specific mutations in driver genes rather than considering all mutations in drivers as equivalent. PMID:26627007

  4. Approach/Avoidance Orientations Affect Self-Construal and Identification with In-group

    PubMed Central

    Nussinson, Ravit; Häfner, Michael; Seibt, Beate; Strack, Fritz; Trope, Yaacov

    2011-01-01

    Approach and avoidance are two basic motivational orientations. Their activation influences cognitive and perceptive processes: Previous work suggests that an approach orientation instigates a focus on larger units as compared to avoidance. Study 1 confirms this assumption using a paradigm that more directly taps a person’s tendency to represent objects as belonging to small or large units than prior studies. It was further predicted that the self should also be represented as belonging to larger units, and hence be more interdependent under approach than under avoidance. Study 2 supports this prediction. As a consequence of this focus on belonging to larger units, it was finally predicted that approach results in a stronger identification with one’s in-group than avoidance. Studies 3 and 4 support that prediction. PMID:22844229

  5. Hybrid Approach for Language Identification Oriented to Multilingual Speech Recognition in the Basque Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, N.; de Ipiña, K. López; Ezeiza, A.; Barroso, O.; Susperregi, U.

    The development of Multilingual Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition systems involves issues as: Language Identification, Acoustic-Phonetic Decoding, Language Modelling or the development of appropriated Language Resources. The interest on Multilingual Systems arouses because there are three official languages in the Basque Country (Basque, Spanish, and French), and there is much linguistic interaction among them, even if Basque has very different roots than the other two languages. This paper describes the development of a Language Identification (LID) system oriented to robust Multilingual Speech Recognition for the Basque context. The work presents hybrid strategies for LID, based on the selection of system elements by Support Vector Machines and Multilayer Perceptron classifiers and stochastic methods for speech recognition tasks (Hidden Markov Models and n-grams).

  6. Rapid identification of human SNAP-25 transcript variants by a miniaturized capillary electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Németh, Nóra; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Guttman, András

    2014-02-01

    The 25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25) is a crucial component of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and plays an important role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system. SNAP-25 has two different splice variants, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing in nine amino acids that results in a slight functional alteration of the generated soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex. Two independent techniques, a PCR-miniaturized CE method and a real-time PCR based approach were elaborated for the specific and quantitative detection of the two SNAP-25 transcription variants. DNA-constructs coding for the two isoforms were used for optimization. Excellent specificity was observed with the use of our previously described highly sensitive miniaturized CE system in combination with quantitative PCR. The ratio of the two isoforms were reliably detected in a range of at least four orders of magnitude with a linear regression of R(2) = 0.987. Expression of the two isoforms was determined in human samples, where SNAP-25 was detected even in non-neural tissues, although at approximately a 100-fold lower level compared to the central nervous system. The relative amount of the SNAP-25b isoform was higher in the brain, whereas expression of SNAP-25a variant proved to be slightly higher in extra-neural cell types. The genomics approach in conjunction with the miniaturized CE system introduced in this paper is readily applicable for rapid alternative splice variant analysis.

  7. Identification of high risk DISC1 structural variants with a 2% attributable risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Li, Wenyan; Feng, Jinong; Heston, Leonard L; Scaringe, William A; Sommer, Steve S

    2008-03-14

    The causes of schizophrenia remain elusive. In a large Scottish pedigree, a balanced translocation t(1;11) (q42.1;q14.3) disrupting the DISC1 and DISC2 genes segregates with major mental illness, including schizophrenia and unipolar depression. A frame-shift carboxyl-terminal deletion was reported in DISC1 in an American family, but subsequently found in two controls. A few common structural variants have been associated with less than a 2-fold increased risk for schizophrenia, but replication has not been uniform. No large scale case-control mutation study has been performed. We have analyzed the regions of likely functional significance in the DISC1 gene in 288 patients with schizophrenia and 288 controls (5 megabases of genomic sequence analyzed). Six patients with schizophrenia were heterozygous for ultra-rare missense variants not found in the 288 controls (p=0.015) and shown to be ultra-rare by their absence in a pool of 10,000 control alleles. We conclude that ultra-rare structural variants in DISC1 are associated with an attributable risk of about 2% for schizophrenia. In addition, we confirm that two common structural variants (Q264R and S704C) elevate the risk for schizophrenia slightly (odds ratio 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0-1.7). DISC1 illustrates how common/moderate risk alleles suggested by the HapMap project might be followed up by resequencing to identify genes with high risk, low frequency alleles of clinical relevance. PMID:18164685

  8. Identification of high risk DISC1 protein structural variants in patients with bipolar spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Li, Wenyan; Noltner, Katie; Yan, Jin; Green, Elaine; Grozeva, Detelina; Jones, Ian R; Craddock, Nick; Longmate, Jeff; Feng, Jinong; Sommer, Steve S

    2010-12-17

    In a large Scottish pedigree, a balanced translocation t (1;11)(q42.1;q14.3) disrupting the DISC1 and DISC2 genes segregates with major mental illness, including schizophrenia and depression. A frame-shift carboxyl-terminal deletion was reported in DISC1 in an American family with schizophrenia, but subsequently found in two controls. Herein, we test one hypothesis utilizing a large scale case-control mutation analysis: uncommon DISC1 variants are associated with high risk for bipolar spectrum disorder. We have analyzed the regions of likely functional significance in the DISC1 gene in 504 patients with bipolar spectrum disorder and 576 ethnically similar controls. Five patients were heterozygous for ultra-rare protein structural variants not found in the 576 controls (p=0.02, one-sided Fisher's exact test) and shown to be ultra-rare by their absence in a pool of 10,000 control alleles. In our sample, ultra-rare (private) protein structural variants in DISC1 are associated with an estimated attributable risk of about 0.5% in bipolar spectrum disorder. These data are consistent with: (i) the high frequency of depression in the large Scottish family with a translocation disrupting DISC1; (ii) linkage disequilibrium analysis demonstrating haplotypes associated with relatively small increases in risk for bipolar disorder (<3-fold odds ratio). The data illustrate how low/moderate risk haplotypes that might be found by the HapMap project can be followed up by resequencing to identify protein structural variants with high risk, low frequency and of potential clinical utility. PMID:20850505

  9. Identification and pharmacological characterization of the prostaglandin FP receptor and FP receptor variant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Woodward, D F; Guzman, V M; Li, C; Scott, D F; Wang, J W; Wheeler, L A; Garst, M E; Landsverk, K; Sachs, G; Krauss, A H-P; Cornell, C; Martos, J; Pettit, S; Fliri, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A prostamide analogue, bimatoprost, has been shown to be effective in reducing intraocular pressure, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Hence, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of this effect of bimatoprost, we focused on pharmacologically characterizing prostaglandin FP receptor (FP) and FP receptor variant (altFP) complexes. Experimental approach: FP receptor mRNA variants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The FP-altFP4 heterodimers were established in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptor variants. A fluorometric imaging plate reader was used to study Ca2+ mobilization. Upregulation of cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61 (Cyr61) mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by western analysis. Key results: Six splicing variants of FP receptor mRNA were identified in human ocular tissues. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that the FP receptor is dimerized with altFP4 receptors in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptors. In the studies of the kinetic profile for Ca2+ mobilization, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) elicited a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a steady state phase. In contrast, bimatoprost elicited an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a second phase. The prostamide antagonist, AGN211335, selectively and dose-dependently inhibited the bimatoprost-initiated second phase of Ca2+ mobilization, Cyr61 mRNA upregulation and MLC phosphorylation, but did not block the action of PGF2α. Conclusion and implications: Bimatoprost lacks effects on the FP receptor but may interact with the FP-altFP receptor heterodimer to induce alterations in second messenger signalling. Hence, FP-altFP complexes may represent the underlying basis of bimatoprost pharmacology. PMID:18587449

  10. PON-P2: Prediction Method for Fast and Reliable Identification of Harmful Variants

    PubMed Central

    Niroula, Abhishek; Urolagin, Siddhaling; Vihinen, Mauno

    2015-01-01

    More reliable and faster prediction methods are needed to interpret enormous amounts of data generated by sequencing and genome projects. We have developed a new computational tool, PON-P2, for classification of amino acid substitutions in human proteins. The method is a machine learning-based classifier and groups the variants into pathogenic, neutral and unknown classes, on the basis of random forest probability score. PON-P2 is trained using pathogenic and neutral variants obtained from VariBench, a database for benchmark variation datasets. PON-P2 utilizes information about evolutionary conservation of sequences, physical and biochemical properties of amino acids, GO annotations and if available, functional annotations of variation sites. Extensive feature selection was performed to identify 8 informative features among altogether 622 features. PON-P2 consistently showed superior performance in comparison to existing state-of-the-art tools. In 10-fold cross-validation test, its accuracy and MCC are 0.90 and 0.80, respectively, and in the independent test, they are 0.86 and 0.71, respectively. The coverage of PON-P2 is 61.7% in the 10-fold cross-validation and 62.1% in the test dataset. PON-P2 is a powerful tool for screening harmful variants and for ranking and prioritizing experimental characterization. It is very fast making it capable of analyzing large variant datasets. PON-P2 is freely available at http://structure.bmc.lu.se/PON-P2/. PMID:25647319

  11. Identification of a Functional Risk Variant for Pemphigus Vulgaris in the ST18 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Vodo, Dan; Sarig, Ofer; Ben-Asher, Edna; Olender, Tsviya; Bochner, Ron; Goldberg, Ilan; Nosgorodsky, Judith; Alkelai, Anna; Tatarskyy, Pavel; Peled, Alon; Baum, Sharon; Barzilai, Aviv; Ibrahim, Saleh M.; Zillikens, Detlef; Lancet, Doron; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a life-threatening autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering disease caused by disruption of intercellular adhesion due to auto-antibodies directed against epithelial components. Treatment is limited to immunosuppressive agents, which are associated with serious adverse effects. The propensity to develop the disease is in part genetically determined. We therefore reasoned that the delineation of PV genetic basis may point to novel therapeutic strategies. Using a genome-wide association approach, we recently found that genetic variants in the vicinity of the ST18 gene confer a significant risk for the disease. Here, using targeted deep sequencing, we identified a PV-associated variant residing within the ST18 promoter region (p<0.0002; odds ratio = 2.03). This variant was found to drive increased gene transcription in a p53/p63-dependent manner, which may explain the fact that ST18 is up-regulated in the skin of PV patients. We then discovered that when overexpressed, ST18 stimulates PV serum-induced secretion of key inflammatory molecules and contributes to PV serum-induced disruption of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion, two processes previously implicated in the pathogenesis of PV. Thus, the present findings indicate that ST18 may play a direct role in PV and consequently represents a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27148741

  12. Identification of five novel STAR variants in ten Chinese patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuo; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Yu, Yongguo; Liang, Lili; Gong, Zhuwen; Gu, Xuefan

    2016-04-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective synthesis of all steroids. This disorder is characterized by 46,XY sex reversal, skin hyperpigmentation, early-onset adrenal crisis and enlarged adrenal with fatty accumulation. CLAH is caused by mutations in the STAR gene. The clinical features and STAR gene mutation spectrum of a large cohort of Chinese patients with CLAH were not reported previously. We performed clinical retrospective review and genetic analysis of the STAR gene in ten unrelated Chinese phenotypic female patients who were clinically diagnosed with CLAH and followed up in our hospital from 2006 to 2015. All ten patients, including two 46,XY females and eight 46,XX females, presented skin hyperpigmentation and early salt-wasting episode, and showed normal growth and development after steroid replacement treatment. Totally 20 mutant alleles containing 11 different STAR gene mutations were identified in these ten patients, including five novel variants (two missense and three null variants), all predicted to be pathogenic in bioinformatics analysis, and six mutations described in previous literature. Among these 11 mutations, a reported mutation c.772C>T and a novel variant c.707_708delinsCTT were most frequent, accounting for 35% and 15% of the total mutant alleles, respectively. This is the first report of a large Chinese cohort with CLAH, presenting the mutation spectrum of the STAR gene and two possible founder mutations in the Chinese population, which may contribute to better genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  13. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  14. Identification of Rare Causal Variants in Sequence-Based Studies: Methods and Applications to VPS13B, a Gene Involved in Cohen Syndrome and Autism

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Silvia; McCallum, Kenneth; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Pinpointing the small number of causal variants among the abundant naturally occurring genetic variation is a difficult challenge, but a crucial one for understanding precise molecular mechanisms of disease and follow-up functional studies. We propose and investigate two complementary statistical approaches for identification of rare causal variants in sequencing studies: a backward elimination procedure based on groupwise association tests, and a hierarchical approach that can integrate sequencing data with diverse functional and evolutionary conservation annotations for individual variants. Using simulations, we show that incorporation of multiple bioinformatic predictors of deleteriousness, such as PolyPhen-2, SIFT and GERP++ scores, can improve the power to discover truly causal variants. As proof of principle, we apply the proposed methods to VPS13B, a gene mutated in the rare neurodevelopmental disorder called Cohen syndrome, and recently reported with recessive variants in autism. We identify a small set of promising candidates for causal variants, including two loss-of-function variants and a rare, homozygous probably-damaging variant that could contribute to autism risk. PMID:25502226

  15. Identification of a capsular variant and characterization of capsular acetylation in Klebsiella pneumoniae PLA-associated type K57

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chun-Ru; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Yang, Han-Ru; Yang, Feng-Ling; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can cause community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is important for its virulence. Among 79 capsular (K) types discovered thus far, K57 is often associated with PLA. Here, we report the identification of a K57 variant. Cps gene locus sequencing revealed differences between the K57 reference strain 4425/51 (Ref-K57) and a variant, the PLA isolate A1142. While Ref-K57 cps contained orf13 encoding a putative acetyltransferase, the insertion of a putative transposase-encoding gene at this position was detected in A1142. This variation was detected in other K57 clinical strains. Biochemical analyses indicated that A1142 was deficient in CPS acetylation. Genetic replacement and complementation verified that orf13 was responsible for CPS acetylation. Acetylation increased CPS immunoreactivity to antiserum and enhanced K. pneumoniae induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines through JNK and MAPK signaling. While acetylation diminished the serum resistance of bacteria, it promoted adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells possibly via increasing production of type I fimbriae. In conclusion, acetylation-mediated capsular variation in K57 was observed. Capsular acetylation contributed to the variety and antigenic diversity of CPS, influenced its biological activities, and was involved in K. pneumoniae-host interactions. These findings have implications for vaccine design and pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae. PMID:27550826

  16. Antagonistic lactic acid bacteria isolated from goat milk and identification of a novel nisin variant Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The raw goat milk microbiota is considered a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that can be exploited as an alternative for use as biopreservatives in foods. The constant demand for such alternative tools justifies studies that investigate the antimicrobial potential of such strains. Results The obtained data identified a predominance of Lactococcus and Enterococcus strains in raw goat milk microbiota with antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644. Enzymatic assays confirmed the bacteriocinogenic nature of the antimicrobial substances produced by the isolated strains, and PCR reactions detected a variety of bacteriocin-related genes in their genomes. Rep-PCR identified broad genetic variability among the Enterococcus isolates, and close relations between the Lactococcus strains. The sequencing of PCR products from nis-positive Lactococcus allowed the identification of a predicted nisin variant not previously described and possessing a wide inhibitory spectrum. Conclusions Raw goat milk was confirmed as a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic LAB strains, having identified Lactococcus isolates possessing variations in their genomes that suggest the production of a nisin variant not yet described and with potential for use as biopreservatives in food due to its broad spectrum of action. PMID:24521354

  17. PeSV-Fisher: Identification of Somatic and Non-Somatic Structural Variants Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Rabionet, Raquel; Tubio, Jose M. C.; Martínez-Fundichely, Alexander; Cáceres, Mario; Gut, Marta; Ossowski, Stephan; Estivill, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies expedited research to develop efficient computational tools for the identification of structural variants (SVs) and their use to study human diseases. As deeper data is obtained, the existence of higher complexity SVs in some genomes becomes more evident, but the detection and definition of most of these complex rearrangements is still in its infancy. The full characterization of SVs is a key aspect for discovering their biological implications. Here we present a pipeline (PeSV-Fisher) for the detection of deletions, gains, intra- and inter-chromosomal translocations, and inversions, at very reasonable computational costs. We further provide comprehensive information on co-localization of SVs in the genome, a crucial aspect for studying their biological consequences. The algorithm uses a combination of methods based on paired-reads and read-depth strategies. PeSV-Fisher has been designed with the aim to facilitate identification of somatic variation, and, as such, it is capable of analysing two or more samples simultaneously, producing a list of non-shared variants between samples. We tested PeSV-Fisher on available sequencing data, and compared its behaviour to that of frequently deployed tools (BreakDancer and VariationHunter). We have also tested this algorithm on our own sequencing data, obtained from a tumour and a normal blood sample of a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, on which we have also validated the results by targeted re-sequencing of different kinds of predictions. This allowed us to determine confidence parameters that influence the reliability of breakpoint predictions. Availability PeSV-Fisher is available at http://gd.crg.eu/tools. PMID:23704902

  18. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Shan M; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged H4 variant (hH4v) not described in other species. The hH4-1 and hH4-2 genes, which are 96% identical in their coding regions and encode identical proteins, were inactivated independently. Strains with inactivating mutations in either gene were phenotypically wild type, in terms of growth rates and fertility, but the double mutants were inviable. As expected, we were unable to isolate null alleles of hH2A, hH2B, or hH3. The genomic arrangement of the histone and histone variant genes was determined. hH2Az and the hH3-hH4-1 gene pair are on LG IIR, with hH2Az centromere-proximal to hH3-hH4-1 and hH3 centromere-proximal to hH4-1. hH3v and hH4-2 are on LG IIIR with hH3v centromere-proximal to hH4-2. hH4v is on LG IVR and the hH2A-hH2B pair is located immediately right of the LG VII centromere, with hH2A centromere-proximal to hH2B. Except for the centromere-distal gene in the pairs, all of the histone genes are transcribed toward the centromere. Phylogenetic analysis of the N. crassa histone genes places them in the Euascomycota lineage. In contrast to the general case in eukaryotes, histone genes in euascomycetes are few in number and contain introns. This may be a reflection of the evolution of the RIP (repeat-induced point mutation) and MIP (methylation induced premeiotically) processes that detect sizable duplications and silence associated genes. PMID:11901114

  19. Citrus viroid V: occurrence, host range, diagnosis, and identification of new variants.

    PubMed

    Serra, P; Eiras, M; Bani-Hashemian, S M; Murcia, N; Kitajima, E W; Daròs, J A; Flores, R; Duran-Vila, N

    2008-11-01

    The recently described Citrus viroid V (CVd-V) has been proposed as a new species of the genus Apscaviroid within the family Pospiviroidae. Analysis of 64 samples from different citrus-growing areas has shown that CVd-V is present in the United States, Spain, Nepal, and the Sultanate of Oman. CVd-V found in six sweet orange sources from the Sultanate of Oman was identical to the reference CVd-V variant, whereas three new variants with sequence identities of 98.6% (CVd-VCA), 97.3% (CVd-VST), and 94.9% (CVd-VNE) were identified in sources from California, Spain, and Nepal, respectively. These results suggest that this viroid has not emerged recently and that it is relatively widespread. Transmission assays to sweet orange, mandarin, and mandarin hybrids, clementine, satsuma, lemon, sour orange, Tahiti lime, Palestine sweet lime, calamondin, bergamot, and kumquat have shown that all these citrus species and citrus relatives are hosts for CVd-V. Several indexing approaches, including slot blot, northern blot hybridization, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, have been evaluated for detecting CVd-V, either using Etrog citron as an amplification host or directly from commercial species and cultivars.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Porcine Kobuvirus Variant Isolated from Suckling Piglet in Gansu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengtao; Sun, Heting; Ying, Ying; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Zheng; Yu, Yicong; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Yu, Zhijun; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Qin, Chuan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2013-01-01

    Kobuviruses comprise three species, the Aichivirus A, Aichivirus B, and Aichivirus C (porcine kobuvirus). Porcine kobuvirus is endemic to pig farms and is not restricted geographically but, rather, is distributed worldwide. The complete genomic sequences of four porcine kobuvirus strains isolated during a diarrhea outbreak in piglets in the Gansu province of China were determined. Two of these strains exhibited variations relative to the traditional strains. The potential 3C/3D cleavage sites of the variant strains were Q/C, which differed from the Q/S in the traditional porcine kobuvirus genome. A 90-nucleotide deletion in the 2B protein and a single nucleotide insertion in the 3′UTR were found in the variant strains. The VP1 regions of all four porcine kobuviruses in our study were highly variable (81%–86%). Ten common amino acid mutations were found specifically at certain positions within the VP1 region. Significant recombination sites were identified using SimPlot scans of whole genome sequences. Porcine kobuviruses were also detected in pig serum, indicating that the virus can escape the gastrointestinal tract and travel to the circulatory system. These findings suggest that mutations and recombination events may have contributed to the high level of genetic diversity of porcine kobuviruses and serve as a driving force in its evolution. PMID:24145960

  1. Identification of two new D variants, DHMi and DHMii using monoclonal anti-D.

    PubMed

    Jones, J

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen examples of red cells are described which showed discrepant reactivity on routine grouping with two monoclonal anti-D typing reagents, HAM-A being negative and MAD-2 strongly positive. The reaction profile of these cells with a number of monoclonal anti-D characterised the samples into two new variant groups, DHMi and DHMii. DHMi was characterised by a negative reaction with BRAD-8 and DHMii by a negative reaction with BRAD-5. DHMi cells were found to have a papain-sensitive site, identified by Mab 21 G6, which was not detectable in DHMii. The presence of allo-anti-D in one case of DHMi suggests a partial D in these individuals. The positive reaction of HAM-A with sialidase- and endo-F-treated DHMii cells suggests that sialic acid and/or N-glycans could possibly be involved in blocking the reaction with untreated cells. All samples typed as C-E+. One was e negative while the rest had variable depression of the e and f antigens. Marginal depression of E was seen with those DHMi cells tested, but not with DHMii cells. Data from family studies suggest that the variant D in both DHMi and DHMii is inherited as a cDE gene complex and is controlled by the RH locus.

  2. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O’Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer’s disease1,2 and is reduced in schizophrenia3, major depression4 and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy5. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable6,7, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10−16) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10−12). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10−7). PMID:22504417

  3. Identification and characterization of porcine kobuvirus variant isolated from suckling piglet in Gansu province, China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengtao; Sun, Heting; Ying, Ying; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Zheng; Yu, Yicong; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Yu, Zhijun; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Qin, Chuan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2013-10-18

    Kobuviruses comprise three species, the Aichivirus A, Aichivirus B, and Aichivirus C (porcine kobuvirus). Porcine kobuvirus is endemic to pig farms and is not restricted geographically but, rather, is distributed worldwide. The complete genomic sequences of four porcine kobuvirus strains isolated during a diarrhea outbreak in piglets in the Gansu province of China were determined. Two of these strains exhibited variations relative to the traditional strains. The potential 3C/3D cleavage sites of the variant strains were Q/C, which differed from the Q/S in the traditional porcine kobuvirus genome. A 90-nucleotide deletion in the 2B protein and a single nucleotide insertion in the 3'UTR were found in the variant strains. The VP1 regions of all four porcine kobuviruses in our study were highly variable (81%-86%). Ten common amino acid mutations were found specifically at certain positions within the VP1 region. Significant recombination sites were identified using SimPlot scans of whole genome sequences. Porcine kobuviruses were also detected in pig serum, indicating that the virus can escape the gastrointestinal tract and travel to the circulatory system. These findings suggest that mutations and recombination events may have contributed to the high level of genetic diversity of porcine kobuviruses and serve as a driving force in its evolution.

  4. RefCNV: Identification of Gene-Based Copy Number Variants Using Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lun-Ching; Das, Biswajit; Lih, Chih-Jian; Si, Han; Camalier, Corinne E.; McGregor, Paul M.; Polley, Eric

    2016-01-01

    With rapid advances in DNA sequencing technologies, whole exome sequencing (WES) has become a popular approach for detecting somatic mutations in oncology studies. The initial intent of WES was to characterize single nucleotide variants, but it was observed that the number of sequencing reads that mapped to a genomic region correlated with the DNA copy number variants (CNVs). We propose a method RefCNV that uses a reference set to estimate the distribution of the coverage for each exon. The construction of the reference set includes an evaluation of the sources of variability in the coverage distribution. We observed that the processing steps had an impact on the coverage distribution. For each exon, we compared the observed coverage with the expected normal coverage. Thresholds for determining CNVs were selected to control the false-positive error rate. RefCNV prediction correlated significantly (r = 0.96–0.86) with CNV measured by digital polymerase chain reaction for MET (7q31), EGFR (7p12), or ERBB2 (17q12) in 13 tumor cell lines. The genome-wide CNV analysis showed a good overall correlation (Spearman’s coefficient = 0.82) between RefCNV estimation and publicly available CNV data in Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. RefCNV also showed better performance than three other CNV estimation methods in genome-wide CNV analysis. PMID:27147817

  5. Enterovirus meningitis in Tunisia (Monastir, Mahdia, 2011-2013): identification of virus variants cocirculating in France.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ines; Volle, Romain; Elargoubi, Aida; Guediche, Mohamed Neji; Chakroun, Mohamed; Sfar, Mohamed Tahar; Pereira, Bruno; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Aouni, Mahjoub; Archimbaud, Christine; Bailly, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-01

    Acute enterovirus (EV) meningitis is a frequent cause of hospitalisation, and over 100 EV serotypes may be involved. A total of 215 patients of all ages with meningitis signs were investigated in 2 Tunisian hospitals. Their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was analysed retrospectively for EVs with a TaqMan real-time RT-qPCR. The virus strains were typed, and their evolutionary relationships were determined by Bayesian phylogenetic methods. An EV genome was detected in 21/215 patients (9.8%). The CSF viral loads ranged from 3.27 to 5.63 log10 genome copies/mL. The strains were identified in 13/21 patients and assigned to EV-B types. Viruses identified in Tunisian patients were genetically related to variants detected in France. The viral loads were similar in Tunisian and French patients for most EV types. The phylogenetic data and viral loads determined in Tunisian and French patients suggest that close EV variants were involved in aseptic meningitis in the 2 countries over a same period.

  6. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O'Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-04-15

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease and is reduced in schizophrenia, major depression and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10(-16)) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10(-12)). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10(-7)).

  7. Identification of a novel mouse Dbl proto-oncogene splice variant: evidence that SEC14 domain is involved in GEF activity regulation.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Marzia; Vanni, Cristina; Blengio, Fabiola; Segalerba, Daniela; Mancini, Patrizia; De Marco, Patrizia; Torrisi, Maria R; Bosco, Maria C; Varesio, Luigi; Eva, Alessandra

    2014-03-10

    The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor protoDbl is involved in different biochemical pathways affecting cell proliferation and migration. The N-terminal sequence of protoDbl contains negative regulatory elements that restrict the catalytic activity of the DH-PH module. Here, we report the identification of a new mouse protoDbl splice variant lacking exon 3. We found that the splice variant mRNA is expressed in the spleen and bone marrow lymphocytes, adrenal gland, gonads and brain. The protoDbl variant protein was detectable in the brain. The newly identified variant displays the disruption of the SEC14 domain, positioned on exons 2 and 3 in the protoDbl N-terminal region. We show here that an altered SEC14 sequence leads to enhanced Dbl translocation to the plasma membrane and to augmented transforming and exchange activity.

  8. Identification of a functional splice variant of 14-3-3E1 in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of regulatory proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. The presence of 14-3-3 isoforms and the diversity of cellular processes regulated by 14-3-3 isoforms suggest functional specificity of the isoforms. In this study, we report the identification and charact...

  9. Identification and characterization of human xylosyltransferase II promoter single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Faust, Isabel; Böker, Kai Oliver; Eirich, Christina; Akkermann, Dagmar; Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2015-03-20

    The human isoenzymes xylosyltransferase-I and -II (XT-I, XT-II) catalyze the rate-limiting step in proteoglycan biosynthesis. Therefore, serum XT activity, mainly representing XT-II activity, displays a powerful biomarker to quantify the actual proteoglycan synthesis rate. Serum XT activity is increased up to 44% in disorders which are characterized by an altered proteoglycan metabolism, whereby underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate new regulatory pathways by identifying and characterizing naturally occurring XYLT2 promoter sequence variants as well as their potential influence on promoter activity and serum XT activity. XYLT2 promoter single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified and genotyped in the genomic DNA of 100 healthy blood donors by promoter amplification and sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The SNVs were characterized by an in silico analysis considering genetic linkage and transcription factor binding sites (TBSs). The influence of SNVs on promoter activity and serum XT activity was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay and HPLC-ESI mass spectrometry. Allele frequencies of seven XYLT2 promoter sequence variants identified were investigated. In silico analyses revealed a strong genetic linkage of SNVs c.-80delG and c.-188G > A, c.-80delG and c.-1443G > A, as well as c.-188G > A and c.-1443G > A. However, despite the generation of several SNV-associated changes in TBSs in silico, XYLT2 promoter SNVs did not significantly affect promoter activity. Serum XT activities of SNV carriers deviated up to 8% from the wild-type, whereby the differences were also not statistically significant. This is the first study which identifies, genotypes and characterizes XYLT2 promoter SNVs. Our results reveal a weak genetic heterogeneity and a strong conservation of the human XYLT2 promoter region. Since the SNVs detected could be excluded as causatives for strong

  10. Identification and characterization of human xylosyltransferase II promoter single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Faust, Isabel; Böker, Kai Oliver; Eirich, Christina; Akkermann, Dagmar; Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2015-03-20

    The human isoenzymes xylosyltransferase-I and -II (XT-I, XT-II) catalyze the rate-limiting step in proteoglycan biosynthesis. Therefore, serum XT activity, mainly representing XT-II activity, displays a powerful biomarker to quantify the actual proteoglycan synthesis rate. Serum XT activity is increased up to 44% in disorders which are characterized by an altered proteoglycan metabolism, whereby underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate new regulatory pathways by identifying and characterizing naturally occurring XYLT2 promoter sequence variants as well as their potential influence on promoter activity and serum XT activity. XYLT2 promoter single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified and genotyped in the genomic DNA of 100 healthy blood donors by promoter amplification and sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The SNVs were characterized by an in silico analysis considering genetic linkage and transcription factor binding sites (TBSs). The influence of SNVs on promoter activity and serum XT activity was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay and HPLC-ESI mass spectrometry. Allele frequencies of seven XYLT2 promoter sequence variants identified were investigated. In silico analyses revealed a strong genetic linkage of SNVs c.-80delG and c.-188G > A, c.-80delG and c.-1443G > A, as well as c.-188G > A and c.-1443G > A. However, despite the generation of several SNV-associated changes in TBSs in silico, XYLT2 promoter SNVs did not significantly affect promoter activity. Serum XT activities of SNV carriers deviated up to 8% from the wild-type, whereby the differences were also not statistically significant. This is the first study which identifies, genotypes and characterizes XYLT2 promoter SNVs. Our results reveal a weak genetic heterogeneity and a strong conservation of the human XYLT2 promoter region. Since the SNVs detected could be excluded as causatives for strong

  11. Identification and validation of copy number variants using SNP genotyping arrays from a large clinical cohort

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genotypes obtained with commercial SNP arrays have been extensively used in many large case-control or population-based cohorts for SNP-based genome-wide association studies for a multitude of traits. Yet, these genotypes capture only a small fraction of the variance of the studied traits. Genomic structural variants (GSV) such as Copy Number Variation (CNV) may account for part of the missing heritability, but their comprehensive detection requires either next-generation arrays or sequencing. Sophisticated algorithms that infer CNVs by combining the intensities from SNP-probes for the two alleles can already be used to extract a partial view of such GSV from existing data sets. Results Here we present several advances to facilitate the latter approach. First, we introduce a novel CNV detection method based on a Gaussian Mixture Model. Second, we propose a new algorithm, PCA merge, for combining copy-number profiles from many individuals into consensus regions. We applied both our new methods as well as existing ones to data from 5612 individuals from the CoLaus study who were genotyped on Affymetrix 500K arrays. We developed a number of procedures in order to evaluate the performance of the different methods. This includes comparison with previously published CNVs as well as using a replication sample of 239 individuals, genotyped with Illumina 550K arrays. We also established a new evaluation procedure that employs the fact that related individuals are expected to share their CNVs more frequently than randomly selected individuals. The ability to detect both rare and common CNVs provides a valuable resource that will facilitate association studies exploring potential phenotypic associations with CNVs. Conclusion Our new methodologies for CNV detection and their evaluation will help in extracting additional information from the large amount of SNP-genotyping data on various cohorts and use this to explore structural variants and their impact on complex

  12. Identification of agents effective against multiple toxins and viruses by host-oriented cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Zilbermintz, Leeor; Leonardi, William; Jeong, Sun-Young; Sjodt, Megan; McComb, Ryan; Ho, Chi-Lee C; Retterer, Cary; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Bavari, Sina; Levitin, Anastasia; West, Joel; Bradley, Kenneth A; Clubb, Robert T; Cohen, Stanley N; Gupta, Vivek; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-08-27

    A longstanding and still-increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases is resistance to antimicrobial countermeasures. Potentially, the targeting of host proteins and pathways essential for the detrimental effects of pathogens offers an approach that may discover broad-spectrum anti-pathogen countermeasures and circumvent the effects of pathogen mutations leading to resistance. Here we report implementation of a strategy for discovering broad-spectrum host-oriented therapies against multiple pathogenic agents by multiplex screening of drugs for protection against the detrimental effects of multiple pathogens, identification of host cell pathways inhibited by the drug, and screening for effects of the agent on other pathogens exploiting the same pathway. We show that a clinically used antimalarial drug, Amodiaquine, discovered by this strategy, protects host cells against infection by multiple toxins and viruses by inhibiting host cathepsin B. Our results reveal the practicality of discovering broadly acting anti-pathogen countermeasures that target host proteins exploited by pathogens.

  13. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-06-20

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea.

  14. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Günter U.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Wang, Li-San; Klei, Lambertus; Rademakers, Rosa; de Silva, Rohan; Litvan, Irene; Riley, David E.; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Maetzler, Walter; Goldwurm, Stefano; Tolosa, Eduardo; Borroni, Barbara; Pastor, Pau; Cantwell, Laura B.; Han, Mi Ryung; Dillman, Allissa; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Yu, Chang-En; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John; Lees, Andrew J.; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Müller, Ulrich; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 PSP cases and 3,247 controls (Stage 1) followed up by a second stage where 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls were genotyped for Stage 1 SNPs that yielded P ≤ 10−3. We found significant novel signals (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with PSP risk at STX6, EIF2AK3, and MOBP. We confirmed two independent variants in MAPT affecting risk for PSP, one of which influences MAPT brain expression. The genes implicated encode proteins for vesicle-membrane fusion at the Golgi-endosomal interface, for the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, and for a myelin structural component. PMID:21685912

  15. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea. PMID:27319304

  16. A new class of purple membrane variants for the construction of highly oriented membrane assemblies on the basis of noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Roelf-Peter; Busch, Annegret P; Heidel, Björn; Hampp, Norbert

    2012-04-12

    Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum have been discussed for several technical applications. These ideas started just several years after its discovery. The biological function of bacteriorhodopsin (BR), the only protein in PM, is the light-driven proton translocation across the membrane thereby converting light energy into chemical energy. The astonishing physicochemical robustness of this molecular assembly and the ease of its isolation triggered ideas for technical uses. All basic molecular functions of BR, that is, photochromism, photoelectrism, and proton pumping, are key elements for technical applications like optical data processing and data storage, ultrafast light detection and processing, and direct utilization of sunlight in adenosine 5'-triphospate (ATP) generation or seawater desalination. In spite of the efforts of several research groups worldwide, which confirmed the proof-of-principle for all these potential applications, only the photochromism-based applications have reached a technical level. The physical reason for this is that no fixation or orientation of the PMs is required. The situation is quite different for photoelectrism and proton pumping where the macroscopic orientation of PMs is a prerequisite. For proton pumping, in addition, the formation of artificial membranes which prevent passive proton leakage is necessary. In this manuscript, we describe a new class of PM variants with oppositely charged membrane sides which enable an almost 100% orientation on a surface, which is the key element for photoelectric applications of BR. As an example, the mutated BR, BR-E234R7, was prepared and analyzed. A nearly 100% self-orientation on mica was obtained.

  17. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5–21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9–20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea. PMID:27319304

  18. Identification of Oncogenic Mutations and Gene Fusions in the Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Santagata, Dora; Sadow, Peter M.; Lynch, Kerry D.; Lubitz, Carrie; Donovan, Samuel E.; Zheng, Zongli; Le, Long; Iafrate, A. J.; Daniels, Gilbert H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC) is increasingly common. Recent studies have suggested that FVPTC is heterogeneous and comprises multiple tumor types with distinct biological behaviors and underlying genetics. Objectives: The purpose of this work was to identify the prevalence of mutations and gene fusions in known oncogenes in a panel representative of the common spectrum of FVPTC diagnosed at an academic medical center and correlate the clinical and pathological features obtained at the initial diagnosis with the tumor genotype. Materials and Methods: We performed SNaPshot genotyping on a panel of 129 FVPTCs of ≥1 cm for 90 point mutations or small deletions in known oncogenes and tumor suppressors and identified gene fusions using an anchored multiplex PCR assay targeting a panel of rearranged oncogenes. Results: We identified a mutation or gene fusion in 70% (89 of 127) of cases. Mutations targeting the RAS family of oncogenes were the most frequently observed class of alterations, present in 36% (46 of 127) of cases, followed by BRAF mutation, present in 30% (38 of 127). We also detected oncogenic rearrangements not previously associated with FVPTC, including TFG-ALK and CREB3L2-PPARγ. BRAF mutation was significantly associated with unencapsulated tumor status. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that FVPTC is composed of distinct biological entities, with one class being identified by BRAF mutation and support the use of clinical genotyping assays that detect a diverse array of rearrangements involving ALK and PPARγ. Additional studies are necessary to identify genetic drivers in the 30% of FVPTCs with no known oncogenic alteration and to better predict behavior in tumors with known genotypes. PMID:25148236

  19. Identification of IRF6 gene variants in three families with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Lim, Eileen Chew-Ping; Yap, Shiao-Hui; Lee, Seng-Teik; Cheng, Joanne; Por, Yong-Chen; Yeow, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    Van der Woude syndrome is the most common cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. It is characterised by the presence of lip pits, cleft lip and/or cleft palate. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Several mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene have been found in VWS families, suggesting that this gene is the primary locus. We screened for mutations in this gene in three families in our population. There was a recurrent nonsense mutation within exon 9 of the gene for a Malay family consisting of five affected members with different presentations. We also found a co-segregating rare polymorphism which would result in a non-synonymous change 23 bases downstream of the nonsense mutation. This polymorphism was present in <1% of the Malay subjects screened, but was not found among the Chinese and Indians in our population. For another family, a 396C-->T mutation (R45W in the DNA-binding domain) was found in the proband, although the possibility of a genetic defect elsewhere could not be excluded because his mother and twin sister (both unaffected) also had this variant. In the third case with complete absence of family history, a de novo deletion spanning the whole IRF6 gene was detected in the child with VWS. This case of haploinsufficiency caused disruption of orofacial development but not other organ systems as the child has no other medical or developmental abnormalities despite the deletion of at least five other genes. PMID:18506368

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND HORMONE INDUCTION OF PUTATIVE CHITIN SYNTHASE GENES AND SPLICE VARIANTS IN Leptinotarsa decemlineata (SAY).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Chitin synthase (ChS) plays a critical role in chitin synthesis and excretion. In this study, two ChS genes (LdChSA and LdChSB) were identified in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. LdChSA contains two splicing variants, LdChSAa and LdChSAb. Within the first, second, and third larval instars, the mRNA levels of LdChSAa, LdChSAb, and LdChSB coincide with the peaks of circulating 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). In vitro culture of midguts and an in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide stimulated the expression of the three LdChSs. Conversely, a reduction of 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD repressed the expression of these LdChSs, and ingestion of halofenozide by LdSHD RNAi larvae rescued the repression. Moreover, disruption of 20E signaling by RNAi of LdEcR, LdE75, LdHR3, and LdFTZ-F1 reduced the expression levels of these genes. Similarly, in vitro culture and an in vivo bioassay showed that exogenous JH and a JH analog methoprene activated the expression of the three LdChSs, whereas a decrease in JH by RNAi of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT downregulated these LdChSs. It seems that JH upregulates LdChSs at the early stage of each instar, whereas a 20E pulse triggers the transcription of LdChSs during molting in L. decemlineata. PMID:27030662

  1. Identification and validation of genetic variants that influence transcription factor and cell signaling protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ronald J; Stark, Amy L; Antao, Nirav N; Gorsic, Lidija K; Chung, Sophie H; Brown, Christopher D; Wong, Shan S; Gill, Daniel F; Myers, Jamie L; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P; Dolan, M Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-08-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression.

  2. Identification of Common Genetic Variants Influencing Spontaneous Dizygotic Twinning and Female Fertility.

    PubMed

    Mbarek, Hamdi; Steinberg, Stacy; Nyholt, Dale R; Gordon, Scott D; Miller, Michael B; McRae, Allan F; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Day, Felix R; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Davies, Gareth E; Martin, Hilary C; Penninx, Brenda W; Jansen, Rick; McAloney, Kerrie; Vink, Jacqueline M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Plomin, Robert; Spector, Tim D; Magnusson, Patrik K; Reversade, Bruno; Harris, R Alan; Aagaard, Kjersti; Kristjansson, Ragnar P; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Iacono, William G; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Montgomery, Grant W; McGue, Matt; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Martin, Nicholas G; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kari; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning occurs in 1%-4% of women, with familial clustering and unknown physiological pathways and genetic origin. DZ twinning might index increased fertility and has distinct health implications for mother and child. We performed a GWAS in 1,980 mothers of spontaneous DZ twins and 12,953 control subjects. Findings were replicated in a large Icelandic cohort and tested for association across a broad range of fertility traits in women. Two SNPs were identified (rs11031006 near FSHB, p = 1.54 × 10(-9), and rs17293443 in SMAD3, p = 1.57 × 10(-8)) and replicated (p = 3 × 10(-3) and p = 1.44 × 10(-4), respectively). Based on ∼90,000 births in Iceland, the risk of a mother delivering twins increased by 18% for each copy of allele rs11031006-G and 9% for rs17293443-C. A higher polygenic risk score (PRS) for DZ twinning, calculated based on the results of the DZ twinning GWAS, was significantly associated with DZ twinning in Iceland (p = 0.001). A higher PRS was also associated with having children (p = 0.01), greater lifetime parity (p = 0.03), and earlier age at first child (p = 0.02). Allele rs11031006-G was associated with higher serum FSH levels, earlier age at menarche, earlier age at first child, higher lifetime parity, lower PCOS risk, and earlier age at menopause. Conversely, rs17293443-C was associated with later age at last child. We identified robust genetic risk variants for DZ twinning: one near FSHB and a second within SMAD3, the product of which plays an important role in gonadal responsiveness to FSH. These loci contribute to crucial aspects of reproductive capacity and health. PMID:27132594

  3. Identification of genetic variants of lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase in individuals with high HDL‑C levels.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohsen; Hedayati, Mehdi; Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Bandarian, Fatemeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-07-01

    Among the most common lipid abnormalities, a low level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL‑C) is one of the first risk factors identified for coronary heart disease. Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has a pivotal role in the formation and maturation of HDL-C and in reverse cholesterol transport. To identify genetic loci associated with low HDL-C in a population-based cohort in Tehran, the promoter, coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of LCAT were amplified and sequenced in consecutive individuals (n=150) who had extremely low or high HDL-C levels but no other major lipid abnormalities. A total of 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, of which 10 were found to be novel; the L393L, S232T and 16:67977696 C>A polymorphisms have been previously reported in the SNP Database (as rs5923, rs4986970 and rs11860115, respectively) and the non-synonymous R47M mutation has been reported in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSM972635). Three of the SNPs identified in the present study (position 6,531 in exon 5, position 6,696 in exon 5 and position 5,151 in exon 1) led to an amino acid substitution. The most common variants were L393L (4886C/T) in exon 6 and Q177E, a novel mutation, in exon 5, and the prevalence of the heterozygous genotype of these two SNPs was significantly higher in the low HDL-C groups. Univariate conditional logistic regression odds ratios (ORs) were nominally significant for Q177E (OR, 5.64; P=0.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.2‑26.2). However, this finding was attenuated following adjustment for confounders. Further studies using a larger sample size may enhance the determination of the role of these SNPs. PMID:24789697

  4. Identification and tissue-specific expression of PDE7 phosphodiesterase splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Timothy J.; Beavo, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    Type 7 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE7s) are a newly described family of enzymes having high affinity and specificity for cAMP. However, little is known about their structure, function, or regulation. We have isolated a mouse skeletal muscle cDNA representing a new alternative splice variant (PDE7A2) of the PDE7 gene. The ORF encodes a 456-amino acid protein having a predicted molecular weight of 52.4 kDa. The 5′ end of the mouse PDE7A2 is divergent from the 5′ end of the human PDE7A1 sequence and is more hydrophobic. A comparison of the 5′ ends of the two cDNA clones with human genomic sequence indicates that they represent alternate splice products rather than species variation. RNase protection analysis of several mouse tissues indicates that PDE7 is expressed widely with highest levels in skeletal muscle. HPLC fractionation and Western blot analysis of two human lymphocyte T-cell lines shows that an unknown PDE activity described by Ichimura and Kase [Ichimura, M. & Kase, H. (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 193, 985–990] is most likely to be PDE7A1. A single immunoreactive band of ≈55 kDa, which comigrates with PDE7A1, is seen in fractions of the HPLC profile containing this activity suggesting that the original human PDE7A1 clone contains a full-length ORF, and is not truncated at the 5′ end as was originally postulated. In a human lymphocyte B-cell line and also in mouse skeletal muscle, a large amount of PDE7 mRNA but little PDE7 protein or activity is expressed suggesting that the translation or stability of PDE7 protein may be highly regulated in these tissues. PMID:8943082

  5. Variant colony surface antigenic phenotypes within mycoplasma strain populations: implications for species identification and strain standardization.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Yogev, D

    1996-01-01

    Immunobinding assays with mycoplasma colonies on agar plates (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques) or with imprints of colonies transferred to solid supports (colony immunoblotting) are widely used as standard diagnostic tests for serological species identification of mycoplasma isolates. However, in light of the high rate of variability of surface antigens in many mycoplasmas, diagnostic data obtained with these techniques require a more critical evaluation. In this report, we demonstrate with some examples that mycoplasma surface variability based on alterations in expression, in size, and in surface presentation of integral and peripheral membrane proteins may lead to misinterpretation of colony immunostaining reactions obtained by using specific monoclonal antibodies as well as conventional diagnostic hyperimmune sera. To more easily identify phenotypically mixed isolates or samples which contain more than one species, we have introduced some minor modifications of the colony immunoblot technique which provide sharp signals of positive as well as negative reactions and enable identification of cryptic epitopes. It is further demonstrated that because of the variability in colony surface antigenic phenotype, mycoplasma strains, including well-established reference and other prototype strains which are used under the same designation in many laboratories, can differ markedly in their antigen profiles and their potentially virulence-related surface properties, since they are usually purified by filter cloning and often propagated by subcultivation of randomly selected agar-grown subpopulations. We conclude from this study that because of this surface variability, the establishment of criteria for standardization of mycoplasma strains and diagnostic antisera is urgently required in order to obtain reproducible results in different laboratories. PMID:8748292

  6. Functional characterization of common protein variants in the efflux transporter ABCC11 and identification of T546M as functionally damaging variant.

    PubMed

    Arlanov, R; Lang, T; Jedlitschky, G; Schaeffeler, E; Ishikawa, T; Schwab, M; Nies, A T

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 8 (ABCC11) is an efflux transporter for anionic lipophilic compounds, conferring resistance to antiviral and anticancer agents like 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). ABCC11 missense variants may contribute to variability in drug response but functional consequences, except for the 'earwax variant' c.538G>A, are unknown. Using the 'Screen and Insert' technology, we generated human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing ABCC11 missense variants frequently occurring in different ethnic populations: c.57G>A, c.538G>A, c.950C>A, c.1637C>T, c.1942G>A, c.4032A>G. A series of in silico prediction analyses and in vitro plasma membrane vesicle uptake, immunoblotting and immunolocalization experiments were undertaken to investigate functional consequences. We identified c.1637C>T (T546M), previously associated with 5-FU-related toxicity, as a novel functionally damaging ABCC11 variant exhibiting markedly reduced transport function of 5-FdUMP, the active cytotoxic metabolite of 5-FU. Detailed analysis of 14 subpopulations revealed highest allele frequencies of c.1637C>T in Europeans and Americans (up to 11%) compared with Africans and Asians (up to 3%).

  7. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    SciTech Connect

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Kagedal, Katarina; Brorsson, Ann-Christin

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  8. Identification and functional characterization in vivo of a novel splice variant of LDLR in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Sadik H; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Hovhannisyan, Ruben; Wilson, James M; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-08-16

    In the course of developing a low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy treatment for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), we planned to examine the efficacy in a nonhuman primate model, the rhesus macaque heterozygous for an LDL receptor mutation fed a high-fat diet. Unexpectedly, our initial cDNA sequencing studies led to the identification of a heretofore unidentified splicing isoform of the rhesus LDLR gene. Compared with the publicly available GenBank reference sequence of rhesus LDLR, the novel isoform contains a 21 bp in frame insertion. This sequence coincides with part of exon 5 and creates a site for the restriction enzyme MscI. Using this site as a marker for the 21 bp in-frame insertion, we conducted a restriction enzyme screen to examine for the prevalence of the novel isoform in rhesus liver tissue cDNA and its homolog in human liver tissue cDNA. We found that the novel isoform is the predominant LDLR cDNA found in rhesus liver and the sole LDLR cDNA found in human liver. Finally, we compared the in vivo functionality of the novel and previously identified rhesus LDLR splicing isoforms in a mouse model of HoFH. PMID:21628398

  9. Identification and functional characterization in vivo of a novel splice variant of LDLR in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Hovhannisyan, Ruben; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    In the course of developing a low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene therapy treatment for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), we planned to examine the efficacy in a nonhuman primate model, the rhesus macaque heterozygous for an LDL receptor mutation fed a high-fat diet. Unexpectedly, our initial cDNA sequencing studies led to the identification of a heretofore unidentified splicing isoform of the rhesus LDLR gene. Compared with the publicly available GenBank reference sequence of rhesus LDLR, the novel isoform contains a 21 bp in frame insertion. This sequence coincides with part of exon 5 and creates a site for the restriction enzyme MscI. Using this site as a marker for the 21 bp in-frame insertion, we conducted a restriction enzyme screen to examine for the prevalence of the novel isoform in rhesus liver tissue cDNA and its homolog in human liver tissue cDNA. We found that the novel isoform is the predominant LDLR cDNA found in rhesus liver and the sole LDLR cDNA found in human liver. Finally, we compared the in vivo functionality of the novel and previously identified rhesus LDLR splicing isoforms in a mouse model of HoFH. PMID:21628398

  10. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar "Flower Nabana". In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  11. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar "Flower Nabana". In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  12. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C.; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D.; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar “Flower Nabana”. In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  13. Identification of agents effective against multiple toxins and viruses by host-oriented cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermintz, Leeor; Leonardi, William; Jeong, Sun-Young; Sjodt, Megan; McComb, Ryan; Ho, Chi-Lee C.; Retterer, Cary; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Bavari, Sina; Levitin, Anastasia; West, Joel; Bradley, Kenneth A.; Clubb, Robert T.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Gupta, Vivek; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding and still-increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases is resistance to antimicrobial countermeasures. Potentially, the targeting of host proteins and pathways essential for the detrimental effects of pathogens offers an approach that may discover broad-spectrum anti-pathogen countermeasures and circumvent the effects of pathogen mutations leading to resistance. Here we report implementation of a strategy for discovering broad-spectrum host-oriented therapies against multiple pathogenic agents by multiplex screening of drugs for protection against the detrimental effects of multiple pathogens, identification of host cell pathways inhibited by the drug, and screening for effects of the agent on other pathogens exploiting the same pathway. We show that a clinically used antimalarial drug, Amodiaquine, discovered by this strategy, protects host cells against infection by multiple toxins and viruses by inhibiting host cathepsin B. Our results reveal the practicality of discovering broadly acting anti-pathogen countermeasures that target host proteins exploited by pathogens. PMID:26310922

  14. Identification of the topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation in CaB4O7 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasylkiv, Yu; Skab, I.; Vlokh, R.

    2016-08-01

    We develop an experimental method for the identification of the topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation, which appear in glass samples with residual mechanical stresses. The criteria needed to determine the sign of the strength of topological defects are formulated. The method is verified on the example of a non-annealed CaB4O7 glass sample that manifests spatially inhomogeneous residual stresses. We have found that at least seven topological defects of optical indicatrix orientation exist under the condition when a light beam propagates through a parallelepiped-shaped glass sample. The strengths of all the defects detected by us are equal to +1/2.

  15. Development of a Targeted Multi-Disorder High-Throughput Sequencing Assay for the Effective Identification of Disease-Causing Variants

    PubMed Central

    Delio, Maria; Patel, Kunjan; Maslov, Alex; Marion, Robert W.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Cadoff, Evan M.; Golden, Aaron; Greally, John M.; Vijg, Jan; Morrow, Bernice; Montagna, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background While next generation sequencing (NGS) is a useful tool for the identification of genetic variants to aid diagnosis and support therapy decision, high sequencing costs have limited its application within routine clinical care, especially in economically depressed areas. To investigate the utility of a multi-disease NGS based genetic test, we designed a custom sequencing assay targeting over thirty disease-associated areas including cardiac disorders, intellectual disabilities, hearing loss, collagenopathies, muscular dystrophy, Ashkenazi Jewish genetic disorders, and complex Mendelian disorders. We focused on these specific areas based on the interest of our collaborative clinical team, suggesting these diseases being the ones in need for the development of a sequencing-screening assay. Results We targeted all coding, untranslated regions (UTR) and flanking intronic regions of 650 known disease-associated genes using the Roche-NimbleGen EZ SeqCapV3 capture system and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 Rapid Run platform. Eight controls with known variants and one HapMap sample were first sequenced to assess the performance of the panel. Subsequently, as a proof of principle and to explore the possible utility of our test, we analyzed test disease subjects (n = 16). Eight had known Mendelian disorders and eight had complex pediatric diseases. In addition to assess whether copy number variation may be of utility as a companion assay relative to these specific disease areas, we used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide SNP Array 6.0 to analyze the same samples. Conclusion We identified potentially disease-associated variants: 22 missense, 4 nonsense, 1 frameshift, and 1 splice variants (16 previously identified, 12 novel among dbSNP and 15 novel among NHLBI Exome Variant Server). We found multi-disease targeted high-throughput sequencing to be a cost efficient approach in detecting disease-associated variants to aid diagnosis. PMID:26214305

  16. Object-oriented identification of forested landslides with derivatives of single pulse LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Eeckhaut, Miet; Kerle, Norman; Poesen, Jean; Hervás, Javier

    2012-11-01

    In contrast to the many studies that use expert-based analysis of LiDAR derivatives for landslide mapping in forested terrain, only few studies have attempted to develop (semi-)automatic methods for extracting landslides from LiDAR derivatives. While all these studies are pixel-based, it has not yet been tested whether object-oriented analysis (OOA) could be an alternative. This study investigates the potential of OOA using only single-pulse LiDAR derivatives, such as slope gradient, roughness and curvature to map landslides. More specifically, the focus is on both LiDAR data segmentation and classification of slow-moving landslides in densely vegetated areas, where spectral data do not allow accurate landslide identification. A multistage procedure has been developed and tested in the Flemish Ardennes (Belgium). The procedure consists of (1) image binarization and multiresolution segmentation, (2) classification of landslide parts (main scarps and landslide body segments) and non-landslide features (i.e. earth banks and cropland fields) with supervised support vector machines at the appropriate scale, (3) delineation of landslide flanks, (4) growing of a landslide body starting from its main scarp, and (5) final cleaning of the inventory map. The results obtained show that OOA using LiDAR derivatives allows recognition and characterization of profound morphologic properties of forested deep-seated landslides on soil-covered hillslopes, because more than 90% of the main scarps and 70% of the landslide bodies of an expert-based inventory were accurately identified with OOA. For mountainous areas with bedrock, on the other hand, creation of a transferable model is expected to be more difficult.

  17. Identification of the Presence of Variant Hemoglobin Using a Measurement of the Labile HbA1c (#C) Fraction.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Miyazaki, Ayako

    2016-07-01

    Labile HbA1c migrates in the #C fraction together with modified hemoglobin (such as carbamylated hemoglobin, acetaldehyde hemoglobin, and acetylated hemoglobin) when HbA1c is measured by Arkray's high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is assumed that most of the labile glycation products of variant hemoglobin do not migrate in #C fraction; in addition, a part of the stable glycation products of variant hemoglobin migrates in #C fraction. We hypothesized that subjects with variant hemoglobin are likely to show abnormally low or high values of #C fraction. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. Twenty-one non-diabetic subjects with nine types of variant hemoglobin, and 103 non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were used. HbA1c and #C fraction were measured by Arkray's HPLC (HA-8180) using standard mode. The values of #C fraction in the control group were 1.75 ± 0.15% (range: 1.5-2.1%). The variant hemoglobin group reported #C fraction values of ≤1.3% in twelve subjects, ≥2.3% in five subjects, and within the reference range (1.4-2.2%) in three subjects. When the cutoff values of #C fraction were set at ≤1.3% and ≥2.3%, sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Most non-diabetic subjects with variant hemoglobin showed abnormal values of #C fraction. Measurement of #C fraction is a useful screening test for variant hemoglobin in non-diabetic subjects. PMID:27466298

  18. Population genetic studies of the Philippine Negritos. III. Identification of the carbonic anhydrase-1 variant with CA1 Guam.

    PubMed Central

    Omoto, K; Ueda, S; Goriki, K; Takahashi, N; Misawa, S; Pagaran, I G

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of blood samples from 277 Mamanwas of northeastern Mindanao, Philippines, confirmed the concentration of the variant carbonic anhydrase-1 (CA1 3N) in this group. The frequency for the variant allele was estimated at .217 +/- .017. It occurs also in the Manobos, the Mongoloid indigenous inhabitants of the same district, although the frequency is low (.019 +/- .008). Survey of samples from other Philippine populations, including the Aeta and the Ifugao of Luzon, failed to find variants. This findings suggests different origins of the Aeta and the Mamanwa, although both are usually referred to as Negritos. The Ca1 3N protein was purified by affinity chromatography using azosulfonamide and rechromatography on a DEAE-Sephadex column. The tryptic peptide pattern of CA1 3N was similar to that of CA1 Guam already reported. Furthermore, amino acid analyses of the tryptic peptides indicated that CA1 3N is characterized by the substitution 253 Gly leads to Arg, confirming the identity of this variant with CA1 Guam. The widespread occurrence of CA1 3 variants in the Western Pacific suggests that this variant was once common in an aboriginal population of this region, from which it was scattered by gene flow. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6781336

  19. Sex, Sexual Orientation, and Identification of Positive and Negative Facial Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Qazi; Wilson, Glenn D.; Abrahams, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Sex and sexual orientation related differences in processing of happy and sad facial emotions were examined using an experimental facial emotion recognition paradigm with a large sample (N=240). Analysis of covariance (controlling for age and IQ) revealed that women (irrespective of sexual orientation) had faster reaction times than men for…

  20. Identification of a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope in hypervariable region 1 of avian leukosis virus subgroup J.

    PubMed

    Hou, Minbo; Zhou, Defang; Li, Gen; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Jianzhu; Wang, Guihua; Zheng, Qiankun; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2016-03-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is a hypervariable oncogenic retrovirus that causes great economic loss in poultry. Antigenic variations in the variable regions make the development of an effective vaccine a challenging task. In the present study, we identified a variant antigenic neutralizing epitope using reverse vaccinology methods. First, we predicted the B-cell epitopes in gp85 gene of ALV-J strains by DNAman and bioinformatics. Fourteen candidate epitopes were selected and linked in tandem with glycines or serines as a multi-epitope gene. The expressed protein of multi-epitope gene can induce high-titer antibody that can recognize nature ALV-J and neutralize the infectivity of ALV-J strains. Next, we identified a high effective epitope using eight overlapping fragments of gp85 gene reacting with mAb 2D5 and anti-multi-epitope sera. The identified epitope contained one of the predicted epitopes and localized in hyervariable region 1 (hr1), indicating a variant epitope. To better understand if the variants of the epitope have a good antigenicity, we synthesized four variants to react with mAb 2D5 and anti-ALV-J sera. The result showed that all variants could react with the two kinds of antibodies though they showed different antigenicity, while could not react with ALV-J negative sera. Thus, the variant antigenic neutralizing epitope was determined as 137-LRDFIA/E/TKWKS/GDDL/HLIRPYVNQS-158. The result shows a potential use of this variant epitopes as a novel multi-epitope vaccine against ALV-J in poultry.

  1. Identification of cancer predisposition variants in apparently healthy individuals using a next-generation sequencing-based family genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Mizzi, Clint; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Peters, Brock A; Zagoriti, Zoi; Stenson, Peter D; Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Borg, Joseph; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Drmanac, Radoje; Stubbs, Andrew; van der Spek, Peter; Cooper, David N; Katsila, Theodora; Patrinos, George P

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, like many common disorders, has a complex etiology, often with a strong genetic component and with multiple environmental factors contributing to susceptibility. A considerable number of genomic variants have been previously reported to be causative of, or associated with, an increased risk for various types of cancer. Here, we adopted a next-generation sequencing approach in 11 members of two families of Greek descent to identify all genomic variants with the potential to predispose family members to cancer. Cross-comparison with data from the Human Gene Mutation Database identified a total of 571 variants, from which 47 % were disease-associated polymorphisms, 26 % disease-associated polymorphisms with additional supporting functional evidence, 19 % functional polymorphisms with in vitro/laboratory or in vivo supporting evidence but no known disease association, 4 % putative disease-causing mutations but with some residual doubt as to their pathological significance, and 3 % disease-causing mutations. Subsequent analysis, focused on the latter variant class most likely to be involved in cancer predisposition, revealed two variants of prime interest, namely MSH2 c.2732T>A (p.L911R) and BRCA1 c.2955delC, the first of which is novel. KMT2D c.13895delC and c.1940C>A variants are additionally reported as incidental findings. The next-generation sequencing-based family genomics approach described herein has the potential to be applied to other types of complex genetic disorder in order to identify variants of potential pathological significance. PMID:26092435

  2. Processus de réorientation des variantes de martensite dans un monocristal de Cu Al NiReorientation process of martensite variants in a Cu Al Ni monocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Pascal; Lexcellent, Christian

    2003-04-01

    On the one hand, Chu (Thesis, Minnesota, 1993), Abeyaratne et al. (Philos. Mag. A 73 (2) (1996) 457-497) performed biaxial tensile tests on a single crystal Cu-Al-Ni plate, in order to analyze the reorientation process of martensite variants. On the other hand, use is made of a constitutive model with n+1 internal variables (the volume fractions of austenite and of the n martensite variants) specific to the thermomechanical behavior of SMA single crystals in order to simulate the martensite variant reorientation. The comparison between experimental results and model prediction is fairly good. To cite this article: P. Blanc, C. Lexcellent, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  3. Expanding the mutation spectrum in 182 Spanish probands with craniosynostosis: identification and characterization of novel TCF12 variants.

    PubMed

    Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Berges-Soria, Julia; Barroso, Eva; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Pérez-Carrizosa, Virginia; Benito-Sanz, Sara; López-Messa, Eva; Santos, Fernando; García-Recuero, Ignacio I; Romance, Ana; Ballesta-Martínez, Juliana María; López-González, Vanesa; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Cruz, Jaime; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Sánchez Del Pozo, Jaime; Lapunzina, Pablo; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2015-07-01

    Craniosynostosis, caused by the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures, can be classified into non-syndromic or syndromic and by which sutures are affected. Clinical assignment is a difficult challenge due to the high phenotypic variability observed between syndromes. During routine diagnostics, we screened 182 Spanish craniosynostosis probands, implementing a four-tiered cascade screening of FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1. A total of 43 variants, eight novel, were identified in 113 (62%) patients: 104 (92%) detected in level 1; eight (7%) in level 2 and one (1%) in level 3. We subsequently screened additional genes in the probands with no detected mutation: one duplication of the IHH regulatory region was identified in a patient with craniosynostosis Philadelphia type and five variants, four novel, were identified in the recently described TCF12, in probands with coronal or multisuture affectation. In the 19 Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) individuals in whom a variant was detected, 15 (79%) carried a TWIST1 variant, whereas four (21%) had a TCF12 variant. Thus, we propose that TCF12 screening should be included for TWIST1 negative SCS patients and in patients where the coronal suture is affected. In summary, a molecular diagnosis was obtained in a total of 119/182 patients (65%), allowing the correct craniosynostosis syndrome classification, aiding genetic counselling and in some cases provided a better planning on how and when surgical intervention should take place and, subsequently the appropriate clinical follow up.

  4. Study designs for identification of rare disease variants in complex diseases: the utility of family-based designs.

    PubMed

    Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    The recent progress in sequencing technologies makes possible large-scale medical sequencing efforts to assess the importance of rare variants in complex diseases. The results of such efforts depend heavily on the use of efficient study designs and analytical methods. We introduce here a unified framework for association testing of rare variants in family-based designs or designs based on unselected affected individuals. This framework allows us to quantify the enrichment in rare disease variants in families containing multiple affected individuals and to investigate the optimal design of studies aiming to identify rare disease variants in complex traits. We show that for many complex diseases with small values for the overall sibling recurrence risk ratio, such as Alzheimer's disease and most cancers, sequencing affected individuals with a positive family history of the disease can be extremely advantageous for identifying rare disease variants. In contrast, for complex diseases with large values of the sibling recurrence risk ratio, sequencing unselected affected individuals may be preferable.

  5. Identification of variants in the 4q35 gene FAT1 in patients with a facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Francesca; Dionnet, Eugenie; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Castro, Christel; Vovan, Catherine; Bertaux, Karine; Bernard, Rafaelle; Attarian, Shahram; Goto, Kanako; Nishino, Ichizo; Hayashi, Yukiko; Magdinier, Frédérique; Krahn, Martin; Helmbacher, Françoise; Bartoli, Marc; Lévy, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeralmuscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to copy-number reduction (N < 10) of the 4q D4Z4 subtelomeric array, in association with DUX4-permissive haplotypes. This main form is indicated as FSHD1. FSHD-like phenotypes may also appear in the absence of D4Z4 copy-number reduction. Variants of the SMCHD1 gene have been reported to associate with D4Z4 hypomethylation in DUX4-compatible haplotypes, thus defining FSHD2. Recently, mice carrying a muscle-specific knock-out of the protocadherin gene Fat1 or its constitutive hypomorphic allele were shown to develop muscular and nonmuscular defects mimicking human FSHD. Here, we report FAT1 variants in a group of patients presenting with neuromuscular symptoms reminiscent of FSHD. The patients do not carry D4Z4 copy-number reduction, 4q hypomethylation, or SMCHD1 variants. However, abnormal splicing of the FAT1 transcript is predicted for all identified variants. To determine their pathogenicity, we elaborated a minigene approach coupled to an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) assay. In vitro, four out of five selected variants induced partial or complete alteration of splicing by creating new splice sites or modifying splicing regulators. AONs confirmed these effects. Altered transcripts may affect FAT1 protein interactions or stability. Altogether, our data suggest that defective FAT1 is associated with an FSHD-like phenotype. PMID:25615407

  6. Expanding the mutation spectrum in 182 Spanish probands with craniosynostosis: identification and characterization of novel TCF12 variants.

    PubMed

    Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Berges-Soria, Julia; Barroso, Eva; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Pérez-Carrizosa, Virginia; Benito-Sanz, Sara; López-Messa, Eva; Santos, Fernando; García-Recuero, Ignacio I; Romance, Ana; Ballesta-Martínez, Juliana María; López-González, Vanesa; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Cruz, Jaime; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Sánchez Del Pozo, Jaime; Lapunzina, Pablo; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2015-07-01

    Craniosynostosis, caused by the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures, can be classified into non-syndromic or syndromic and by which sutures are affected. Clinical assignment is a difficult challenge due to the high phenotypic variability observed between syndromes. During routine diagnostics, we screened 182 Spanish craniosynostosis probands, implementing a four-tiered cascade screening of FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1. A total of 43 variants, eight novel, were identified in 113 (62%) patients: 104 (92%) detected in level 1; eight (7%) in level 2 and one (1%) in level 3. We subsequently screened additional genes in the probands with no detected mutation: one duplication of the IHH regulatory region was identified in a patient with craniosynostosis Philadelphia type and five variants, four novel, were identified in the recently described TCF12, in probands with coronal or multisuture affectation. In the 19 Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) individuals in whom a variant was detected, 15 (79%) carried a TWIST1 variant, whereas four (21%) had a TCF12 variant. Thus, we propose that TCF12 screening should be included for TWIST1 negative SCS patients and in patients where the coronal suture is affected. In summary, a molecular diagnosis was obtained in a total of 119/182 patients (65%), allowing the correct craniosynostosis syndrome classification, aiding genetic counselling and in some cases provided a better planning on how and when surgical intervention should take place and, subsequently the appropriate clinical follow up. PMID:25271085

  7. Expanding the mutation spectrum in 182 Spanish probands with craniosynostosis: identification and characterization of novel TCF12 variants

    PubMed Central

    Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Berges-Soria, Julia; Barroso, Eva; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Pérez-Carrizosa, Virginia; Benito-Sanz, Sara; López-Messa, Eva; Santos, Fernando; García-Recuero, Ignacio I; Romance, Ana; Ballesta-Martínez, Juliana María; López-González, Vanesa; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Cruz, Jaime; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Sánchez del Pozo, Jaime; Lapunzina, Pablo; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Craniosynostosis, caused by the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures, can be classified into non-syndromic or syndromic and by which sutures are affected. Clinical assignment is a difficult challenge due to the high phenotypic variability observed between syndromes. During routine diagnostics, we screened 182 Spanish craniosynostosis probands, implementing a four-tiered cascade screening of FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1. A total of 43 variants, eight novel, were identified in 113 (62%) patients: 104 (92%) detected in level 1; eight (7%) in level 2 and one (1%) in level 3. We subsequently screened additional genes in the probands with no detected mutation: one duplication of the IHH regulatory region was identified in a patient with craniosynostosis Philadelphia type and five variants, four novel, were identified in the recently described TCF12, in probands with coronal or multisuture affectation. In the 19 Saethre–Chotzen syndrome (SCS) individuals in whom a variant was detected, 15 (79%) carried a TWIST1 variant, whereas four (21%) had a TCF12 variant. Thus, we propose that TCF12 screening should be included for TWIST1 negative SCS patients and in patients where the coronal suture is affected. In summary, a molecular diagnosis was obtained in a total of 119/182 patients (65%), allowing the correct craniosynostosis syndrome classification, aiding genetic counselling and in some cases provided a better planning on how and when surgical intervention should take place and, subsequently the appropriate clinical follow up. PMID:25271085

  8. Silencing of two alternative splicing-derived mRNA variants of chitin synthase 1 gene by RNAi is lethal to the oriental migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhen; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Sun, Yi; Guo, Yaping; Ma, Enbo; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2010-11-01

    Chitin synthases are crucial enzymes responsible for chitin biosynthesis in fungi, nematodes and arthropods. We characterized two alternative splicing-derived variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (LmCHS1) from the oriental migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). Each cDNA of the two variants (LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B) consists of 5116 nucleotides that include a 4728-nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) encoding 1576 amino acid residues, and 67- and 321-bp non-coding regions at the 5'- and 3'-ends of the cDNA, respectively. The two variants differ only in one exon consisting of 177 nucleotides that encode 59 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences within this alternative splicing region are 75% identical between the two variants. Both variants were expressed in all the developmental stages. However, LmCHS1A was predominately expressed in the integument whereas LmCHS1B was mainly expressed in the trachea. Our RNAi-based gene silencing study resulted in a dramatic reduction in the levels of the corresponding mRNA in the locust nymphs injected with dsRNA of LmCHS1, or either of its two variants, LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B. Consequentially, 95, 88 and 51% of mortalities were observed in the locusts injected with the LmCHS1, LmCHS1A and LmCHS1B dsRNA, respectively. The phenotypes resulted from the injection of LmCHS1A dsRNA were similar to those from the injection of LmCHS1 dsRNA, whereas the locusts injected with LmCHS1B dsRNA exhibited crimpled cuticle phenotype. Our results suggest that both variants of chitin synthase 1 are essential for insect growth and development. PMID:20713155

  9. Genome-wide identification of microRNA-related variants associated with risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Mohsen; Ikram, M. Arfan; de Looper, Hans W. J.; Hofman, Albert; Erkeland, Stefan J.; Franco, Oscar H.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) serve as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Genetic variation in miRNAs and miRNA-binding sites may affect miRNA function and contribute to disease risk. Here, we investigated the extent to which variants within miRNA-related sequences could constitute a part of the functional variants involved in developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), using the largest available genome-wide association study of AD. First, among 237 variants in miRNAs, we found rs2291418 in the miR-1229 precursor to be significantly associated with AD (p-value = 6.8 × 10−5, OR = 1.2). Our in-silico analysis and in-vitro miRNA expression experiments demonstrated that the variant’s mutant allele enhances the production of miR-1229-3p. Next, we found miR-1229-3p target genes that are associated with AD and might mediate the miRNA function. We demonstrated that miR-1229-3p directly controls the expression of its top AD-associated target gene (SORL1) using luciferase reporter assays. Additionally, we showed that miR-1229-3p and SORL1 are both expressed in the human brain. Second, among 42,855 variants in miRNA-binding sites, we identified 10 variants (in the 3′ UTR of 9 genes) that are significantly associated with AD, including rs6857 that increases the miR-320e-mediated regulation of PVRL2. Collectively, this study shows that miRNA-related variants are associated with AD and suggests miRNA-dependent regulation of several AD genes. PMID:27328823

  10. Identification of a functional variant in the KIF5A-CYP27B1-METTL1-FAM119B locus associated with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Fernández, Óscar; Saiz, Albert; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lucas, Miguel; Leyva, Laura; García-León, Juan-Antonio; Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Garcia-Barcina, María J; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Varadé, Jezabel; de la Hera, Belén; Arroyo, Rafael; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Petit-Marty, Natalia; Navarro, Arcadi; Otaegui, David; Olascoaga, Javier; Blanco, Yolanda; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim Several studies have highlighted the association of the 12q13.3–12q14.1 region with coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the causal variants underlying diseases are still unclear. The authors sought to identify the functional variant of this region associated with MS. Methods Tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the associated region encoding 15 genes was performed in 2876 MS patients and 2910 healthy Caucasian controls together with expression regulation analyses. Results rs6581155, which tagged 18 variants within a region where 9 genes map, was sufficient to model the association. This SNP was in total linkage disequilibrium (LD) with other polymorphisms that associated with the expression levels of FAM119B, AVIL, TSFM, TSPAN31 and CYP27B1 genes in different expression quantitative trait loci studies. Functional annotations from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) showed that six out of these rs6581155-tagged-SNPs were located in regions with regulatory potential and only one of them, rs10877013, exhibited allele-dependent (ratio A/G=9.5-fold) and orientation-dependent (forward/reverse=2.7-fold) enhancer activity as determined by luciferase reporter assays. This enhancer is located in a region where a long-range chromatin interaction among the promoters and promoter-enhancer of several genes has been described, possibly affecting their expression simultaneously. Conclusions This study determines a functional variant which alters the enhancer activity of a regulatory element in the locus affecting the expression of several genes and explains the association of the 12q13.3–12q14.1 region with MS. PMID:23160276

  11. Whole-genome re-sequencing for the identification of high contribution susceptibility gene variants in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Sui, Weiguo; Wang, Xiaobing; Hou, Xianliang; Ou, Minglin; Dai, Yong; Xiang, Yueying

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that several genes are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D); genome-wide association investigations and whole-genome re‑sequencing investigations offer a useful approach for the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. To further investigate which polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T2D, the present study screened for high‑contribution susceptibility gene variants Chinese patients with T2D using whole‑genome re‑sequencing with DNA pooling. In total, 100 Chinese individuals with T2D and 100 healthy Chinese individuals were analyzed using whole‑genome re‑sequencing using DNA pooling. To minimize the likelihood of systematic bias in sampling, paired‑end libraries with an insert size of 500 bp were prepared for in T2D in all samples, which were then subjected to whole‑genome sequencing. Each library contained four lanes. The average sequencing depth was 35.70. In the present study, 1.36 GB of clean sequence data were generated, and the resulting calculated T2D genome consensus sequence covered 99.88% of the hg19 sequence. A total of 3,974,307 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, of which 99.88% were in the dbSNP database. The present study also found 642,189 insertions and deletions, 5,590 structure variants (SVs), 4,713 copy number variants (CNVs) and 13,049 single nucleotide variants. A total of 1,884 somatic CNVs and 74 somatic SVs were significantly different between the cases and controls. Therefore, the present study provided validation of whole‑genome re‑sequencing using the DNA pooling approach. It also generated a whole-genome re-sequencing genotype database for future investigations of T2D. PMID:27035118

  12. Whole-genome re-sequencing for the identification of high contribution susceptibility gene variants in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XIAOJUAN; SUI, WEIGUO; WANG, XIAOBING; HOU, XIANLIANG; OU, MINGLIN; DAI, YONG; XIANG, YUEYING

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that several genes are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D); genome-wide association investigations and whole-genome re-sequencing investigations offer a useful approach for the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. To further investigate which polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T2D, the present study screened for high-contribution susceptibility gene variants Chinese patients with T2D using whole-genome re-sequencing with DNA pooling. In total, 100 Chinese individuals with T2D and 100 healthy Chinese individuals were analyzed using whole-genome re-sequencing using DNA pooling. To minimize the likelihood of systematic bias in sampling, paired-end libraries with an insert size of 500 bp were prepared for in T2D in all samples, which were then subjected to whole-genome sequencing. Each library contained four lanes. The average sequencing depth was 35.70. In the present study, 1.36 GB of clean sequence data were generated, and the resulting calculated T2D genome consensus sequence covered 99.88% of the hg19 sequence. A total of 3,974,307 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified, of which 99.88% were in the dbSNP database. The present study also found 642,189 insertions and deletions, 5,590 structure variants (SVs), 4,713 copy number variants (CNVs) and 13,049 single nucleotide variants. A total of 1,884 somatic CNVs and 74 somatic SVs were significantly different between the cases and controls. Therefore, the present study provided validation of whole-genome re-sequencing using the DNA pooling approach. It also generated a whole-genome re-sequencing genotype database for future investigations of T2D. PMID:27035118

  13. Identification and functional characterization of four transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 variants in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür).

    PubMed

    Fu, T; Hull, J J; Yang, T; Wang, G

    2016-08-01

    As signal integrators that respond to various physical and chemical stimuli, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels fulfil critical functional roles in the sensory systems of both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Here, four variants of TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) were identified and cloned from the green plant bug, Apolygus lucorum. Spatiotemporal expression profiling across development and in different adult tissues revealed that the highest relative-transcript levels occurred in first-instar nymphs and antennae, respectively. In Xenopus laevis-based functional assays, Apo. lucorum TRPA1-A (AlucTRPA1-A), AlucTRPA1-B and AlucTRPA1-C were activated by increasing the temperature from 20 to 40 °C with no significant desensitization observed after repeated temperature stimuli. The activation temperature of AlucTRPA1-A and AlucTRPA1-B was < 25 °C, whereas the activation temperature of AlucTRPA1-C was between 25 and 30 °C. Amongst the variants, only AlucTRPA1-A and AlucTRPA1-C were directly activated by high concentrations of allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and citronellal. Taken together, these results suggest that AlucTRPA1 variants may function in vivo as both thermal and chemical sensors, with the four variants potentially mediating different physiological functions. This study not only enriches our understanding of TRPA1 function in Hemiptera (Miridae), but also offers a foundation for developing new pest control strategies. PMID:27038267

  14. Identification of a novel pathogenic OTOF variant causative of nonsyndromic hearing loss with high frequency in the Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    Fedick, Anastasia M; Jalas, Chaim; Swaroop, Ananya; Smouha, Eric E; Webb, Bryn D

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the OTOF gene have previously been shown to cause nonsyndromic prelingual deafness (DFNB9, OMIM 601071) as well as auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony. In this study, the OTOF NM_194248.2 c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant was identified in a large Ashkenazi Jewish family as the causative variant in four siblings with hearing loss. Our analysis reveals a carrier frequency of the OTOF c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant of 1.27% in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, suggesting that this variant may be a significant contributor to nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and should be considered for inclusion in targeted hearing loss panels for this population. Of note, the degree of hearing loss associated with this phenotype ranged from mild to moderately severe, with two of the four siblings not known to have hearing loss until they were genotyped and underwent pure tone audiometry and auditory brainstem response testing. The phenotypic variability along with the auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which allows for the production of otoacoustic emissions, supports that nonsyndromic hearing loss caused by OTOF mutations may be much more common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population than currently appreciated due to a lack of diagnosis.

  15. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 l...

  16. Identification of a novel pathogenic OTOF variant causative of nonsyndromic hearing loss with high frequency in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Fedick, Anastasia M; Jalas, Chaim; Swaroop, Ananya; Smouha, Eric E; Webb, Bryn D

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the OTOF gene have previously been shown to cause nonsyndromic prelingual deafness (DFNB9, OMIM 601071) as well as auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony. In this study, the OTOF NM_194248.2 c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant was identified in a large Ashkenazi Jewish family as the causative variant in four siblings with hearing loss. Our analysis reveals a carrier frequency of the OTOF c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant of 1.27% in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, suggesting that this variant may be a significant contributor to nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and should be considered for inclusion in targeted hearing loss panels for this population. Of note, the degree of hearing loss associated with this phenotype ranged from mild to moderately severe, with two of the four siblings not known to have hearing loss until they were genotyped and underwent pure tone audiometry and auditory brainstem response testing. The phenotypic variability along with the auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which allows for the production of otoacoustic emissions, supports that nonsyndromic hearing loss caused by OTOF mutations may be much more common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population than currently appreciated due to a lack of diagnosis. PMID:27621663

  17. Identification of a novel pathogenic OTOF variant causative of nonsyndromic hearing loss with high frequency in the Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    Fedick, Anastasia M; Jalas, Chaim; Swaroop, Ananya; Smouha, Eric E; Webb, Bryn D

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the OTOF gene have previously been shown to cause nonsyndromic prelingual deafness (DFNB9, OMIM 601071) as well as auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony. In this study, the OTOF NM_194248.2 c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant was identified in a large Ashkenazi Jewish family as the causative variant in four siblings with hearing loss. Our analysis reveals a carrier frequency of the OTOF c.5332G>T, p.Val1778Phe variant of 1.27% in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, suggesting that this variant may be a significant contributor to nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and should be considered for inclusion in targeted hearing loss panels for this population. Of note, the degree of hearing loss associated with this phenotype ranged from mild to moderately severe, with two of the four siblings not known to have hearing loss until they were genotyped and underwent pure tone audiometry and auditory brainstem response testing. The phenotypic variability along with the auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which allows for the production of otoacoustic emissions, supports that nonsyndromic hearing loss caused by OTOF mutations may be much more common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population than currently appreciated due to a lack of diagnosis. PMID:27621663

  18. Identification of rare variants of DSP gene in Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in the southern Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianhao; Chen, Yili; Peng, Longlun; Gao, Rui; Liu, Nian; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Chao; Tang, Shuangbo

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) is a perplexing disorder to both forensic pathologists and clinic physicians. Desmoplakin (DSP) gene was the first desmosomal gene linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) which was associated with sudden death. To identify the genetic variants of the DSP gene in SUNDS in the southern Chinese Han population, we genetically screened the DSP gene in 40 sporadic SUNDS victims, 16 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients and 2 Early Repolarization syndrome (ERS) patients using Next Generation Sequencing (NSG) and direct Sanger sequencing. A total of 10 genetic variants of the DSP gene were detected in 11 cases, comprised of two novel missense mutations (p.I125F and p.D521A) and eight previously reported rare variants. Of eight reported variants, two were previously considered pathogenic (p.Q90R and p.R2639Q), three were predicted in silico to bepathogenic (p.R315C, p.E1357D and p.D2579H), and the rest three were predicted to be benign (p.N1234S, p.R1308Q and p.T2267S). This is the first report of DSP genetic screening in Chinese SUNDS and Brugada syndrome. Our results implies that DSP mutations contribute to the genetic cause of some SUNDS victims and maybe a new susceptible gene for Brugada syndrome. PMID:26585738

  19. Postmortem genetic screening for the identification, verification, and reporting of genetic variants contributing to the sudden death of the young.

    PubMed

    Methner, D Nicole R; Scherer, Steven E; Welch, Katherine; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Eng, Christine M; Belmont, John W; Powell, Mark C; Korchina, Viktoriya; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Wolf, Dwayne A; Sanchez, Luis A; Kahn, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Each year in the United States, thousands of cases of sudden and unexpected deaths of infants, children, and young adults are assigned an undetermined cause of death after postmortem investigation and autopsy. Heritable genetic variants have been suggested as the cause of up to a third of sudden death (SD) cases. Elucidation of the genetic variants involved in SD cases is important to not only help establish cause and manner of death of these individuals, but to also aid in determining whether familial genetic testing should be considered. Previously, these types of postmortem screenings have not been a feasible option for most county medical examiners' and coroners' offices. We sequenced full exons of 64 genes associated with SD in the largest known cohort (351) of infant and young SD decedents using massively parallel sequencing at <$600 per sample. Genetic variants were assessed through literature review and clinical evaluation by a multidisciplinary consortium of experts. Thirteen individuals (3.7%), eight infants (2.8% of those <1 yr of age) and five children/young adults (7.0% of those >1 yr of age), were found to have a reportable genetic variant contributing to SD. These percentages represent an estimate lower than those previously reported. Overall yields and results likely vary between studies due to differences in evaluation techniques and reporting. Additionally, we recommend ongoing assessment of data, including nonreported novel variants, as technology and literature continually advance. This study demonstrates a strategy to implement molecular autopsies in medicolegal investigations of young SD decedents. PMID:27435932

  20. Identification of Putative Olfactory Genes from the Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta via an Antennal Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiping; Wu, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is an extremely important oligophagous pest species of stone and pome fruits throughout the world. As a host-switching species, adult moths, especially females, depend on olfactory cues to a large extent in locating host plants, finding mates, and selecting oviposition sites. The identification of olfactory genes can facilitate investigation on mechanisms for chemical communications. Methodology/Principal Finding We generated transcriptome of female antennae of G.molesta using the next-generation sequencing technique, and assembled transcripts from RNA-seq reads using Trinity, SOAPdenovo-trans and Abyss-trans assemblers. We identified 124 putative olfactory genes. Among the identified olfactory genes, 118 were novel to this species, including 28 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins, 17 chemosensory proteins, 48 odorant receptors, four gustatory receptors, 24 ionotropic receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, and one odor degrading enzyme. The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs. OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues. Conclusion Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species. This study provides a foundation for future research on the molecules involved in olfactory recognition of this insect pest, and in particular, the feasibility of using semiochemicals to control this pest. PMID:26540284

  1. Apolipoprotein C-III(Lys58----Glu). Identification of an apolipoprotein C-III variant in a family with hyperalphalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed Central

    von Eckardstein, A; Holz, H; Sandkamp, M; Weng, W; Funke, H; Assmann, G

    1991-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III is a major protein constituent of triglyceride rich lipoproteins and HDL. It occurs in plasma in three isoforms differing by their sialic acid content. Apo C-III putatively inhibits lipolysis and the apo E mediated hepatic uptake of remnants from triglyceride rich particles. We identified a heterozygous carrier of an apolipoprotein C-III variant by the presence of additional bands after isoelectric focusing (IEF) of VLDL. Structural analysis of the variant protein by HPLC, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and automated gas phase sequencing revealed a lysine to glutamic acid replacement in position 58. The underlying A to G exchange was verified by direct sequencing subsequent to amplification by polymerase chain reaction of exon 4 of the apo C-III gene. Family studies revealed vertical transmission of this defect. The two variant carriers exhibited plasma concentrations of HDL cholesterol and apo A-I above the 95th percentiles of sex matched controls whereas the unaffected father and sister showed normal values. The plasma concentrations of apo C-III in the two variant carriers were decreased by 30-40% compared with those of the two unaffected family members and to random controls. Using two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis as well as IEF and subsequent scanning densitometry, we found that the low serum concentration of apo C-III was a consequence of diminished concentrations of the variant apo C-III isoproteins in both VLDL (15% of normal) and HDL (25% of normal). Apo C-III(Lys58----Glu) heterozygotes possessed unusual HDL as demonstrated by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. They consisted mainly of HDL2b and contained a proportion of atypically large particles, enriched in apo E, with a Stokes diameter of 13-18 nm and resembling HDLc. In conclusion, heterozygosity for a structural apo C-III variant--apo C-III(Lys58----Glu)--was identified in two hyperalphalipoproteinemic subjects characterized by the presence of low

  2. Reduced Nuclease Activity of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE1) Variants on Nucleosomes: IDENTIFICATION OF ACCESS RESIDUES.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Mao, Peng; McNeill, Daniel R; Wilson, David M

    2015-08-21

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are generated at high frequency in genomic DNA via spontaneous hydrolytic, damage-induced or enzyme-mediated base release. AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the predominant mammalian enzyme responsible for initiating removal of mutagenic and cytotoxic abasic lesions as part of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We have examined here the ability of wild-type (WT) and a collection of variant/mutant APE1 proteins to cleave at an AP site within a nucleosome core particle. Our studies indicate that, in comparison to the WT protein and other variant/mutant enzymes, the incision activity of the tumor-associated variant R237C and the rare population variant G241R are uniquely hypersensitive to nucleosome complexes in the vicinity of the AP site. This defect appears to stem from an abnormal interaction of R237C and G241R with abasic DNA substrates, but is not simply due to a DNA binding defect, as the site-specific APE1 mutant Y128A, which displays markedly reduced AP-DNA complex stability, did not exhibit a similar hypersensitivity to nucleosome structures. Notably, this incision defect of R237C and G241R was observed on a pre-assembled DNA glycosylase·AP-DNA complex as well. Our results suggest that the BER enzyme, APE1, has acquired distinct surface residues that permit efficient processing of AP sites within the context of protein-DNA complexes independent of classic chromatin remodeling mechanisms.

  3. Identification of a common variant in the TFR2 gene implicated in the physiological regulation of serum iron levels

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Irene; Minelli, Cosetta; Sanna, Serena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Schwienbacher, Christine; Naitza, Silvia; Porcu, Eleonora; Pattaro, Cristian; Busonero, Fabio; Zanon, Alessandra; Maschio, Andrea; Melville, Scott A.; Grazia Piras, Maria; Longo, Dan L.; Guralnik, Jack; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; Aigner, Elmar; Murphy, Anthony T.; Wroblewski, Victor; Marroni, Fabio; Theurl, Igor; Gnewuch, Carsten; Schadt, Eric; Mitterer, Manfred; Schlessinger, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Witcher, Derrick R.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Weiss, Günter; Uda, Manuela; Pramstaller, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic determinants of variation in iron status are actively sought, but remain incompletely understood. Meta-analysis of two genome-wide association (GWA) studies and replication in three independent cohorts was performed to identify genetic loci associated in the general population with serum levels of iron and markers of iron status, including transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR–ferritin index. We identified and replicated a novel association of a common variant in the type-2 transferrin receptor (TFR2) gene with iron levels, with effect sizes highly consistent across samples. In addition, we identified and replicated an association between the HFE locus and ferritin and confirmed previously reported associations with the TF, TMPRSS6 and HFE genes. The five replicated variants were tested for association with expression levels of the corresponding genes in a publicly available data set of human liver samples, and nominally statistically significant expression differences by genotype were observed for all genes, although only rs3811647 in the TF gene survived the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In addition, we measured for the first time the effects of the common variant in TMPRSS6, rs4820268, on hepcidin mRNA in peripheral blood (n = 83 individuals) and on hepcidin levels in urine (n = 529) and observed an association in the same direction, though only borderline significant. These functional findings require confirmation in further studies with larger sample sizes, but they suggest that common variants in TMPRSS6 could modify the hepcidin-iron feedback loop in clinically unaffected individuals, thus making them more susceptible to imbalances of iron homeostasis. PMID:21208937

  4. Single assay for simultaneous detection and differential identification of human and avian influenza virus types, subtypes, and emergent variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and accurate detection, identification and genetic characterization are essential for effective surveillance and epidemiological tracking of influenza viruses. This report describes applications of a resequencing pathogen microarray (RPM) assay that is capable of simultaneous sequencing of su...

  5. A HSV-1 variant (1720) generates four equimolar isomers despite a 9200-bp deletion from TRL and sequences between 9200 np and 97,000 np in inverted orientation being covalently bound to sequences 94,000-126,372 np.

    PubMed

    Harland, J; Brown, S M

    1992-08-01

    The genome structure of a spontaneously generated HSV-1 strain 17 variant, 1720, has been determined by restriction endonuclease and Southern blot analysis. The short segment of 1720 is unaltered compared to the parental strain 17 genome, whereas the long segment is extensively rearranged. Almost all of TRL (approximately 9.2 kb) has been deleted and consequently IRL is converted into unique sequence. Sequences from approximately 9200 nucleotide position (np) to 97,000 np are present in inverted orientation, covalently bound to sequences in the prototype orientation from approximately 94,000 np to the L/S junction at 126,372 np. Thus, sequences from 94,000 np to 97,000 np are now diploid, with one copy in the normal orientation and location, and the other at the long terminus as an inverted repeat; no inversion of the intervening unique sequences occurs about this novel inverted repeat. In contrast, normal inversions of the long and short segments occur to give four equimolar genomic isomers, indicating that the novel long terminus has gained an "a" sequence. The duplication of sequences between 94,000 np and 97,000 np results in a genome containing two copies of UL43 and one complete and one partial copy each of genes UL42 and UL44 encoding the 65 kD DNA-binding protein and glycoprotein C, respectively. The variant has been shown to grow normally in vitro following high multiplicity infection.

  6. [A variant of DDRT-PCR using anchored mini-exon primers for identification of differentially expressed sequences in Leishmania infantum].

    PubMed

    Turki-Mannoubi, L; Kbaier-Hachemi, H; Barhoumi, M; Chakroun, A S; Guizani, I

    2008-01-01

    Leishmania infantum (L.i) is responsible for visceral (VL) or cutaneous (CL) leishmaniasis. Previous studies done in Honduras by differential display reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) failed to demonstrate differences in expression profiles among L. infantum VL and CL parasites. For purpose of comparing expression among L. infantum isolates in Tunisia, a variant of this technique adapted from a commercial kit was developed involving pairs of random and anchored mini-exon primers for isolation and identification of differentially displayed cDNAs. To assess the efficiency of this variant, 34 pairs were applied to 2 consecutive dilutions of cDNAs from promastigotes at end of in vitro exponential growth of 2 visceral (LV50) and cutaneous (DREP14) isolates from Tunisia, thus increasing chance for observing differences among the cDNAs. Profiles were compared and analyzed as regards number and phenotype of bands displayed in 4 types of highly similar amplification profiles among the 2 cDNAs; 26 primer pair combinations generated in total 6.8% differentially displayed bands that had variable intensities or were present/absent, in comparable proportions in the 2 isolates. Analysis further demonstrated differences in amplification efficiency of some primers, emphasizing on qualitative and quantitative impact of relative proximity of the priming sites. Nine present/absent bands were cloned, sequenced and analyzed in silico. Mismatches at priming sites seem to underlie amplification of such bands. Only five products could be referred to annotated gene. Among the genes identified, we list histone H4, largely known to be differentially expressed among L.i stages, and "NTF2-like" for which overexpression in one cDNA was here confirmed. To conclude, the variant developed could be used further in Leishmania expression analysis with appropriate cautions about false positives.

  7. Large-scale identification and characterization of alternative splicing variants of human gene transcripts using 56 419 completely sequenced and manually annotated full-length cDNAs

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Barrero, Roberto A.; Koyanagi, Kanako O.; Jin, Lihua; Motono, Chie; Hata, Hiroko; Isogai, Takao; Nagai, Keiichi; Otsuki, Tetsuji; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Shionyu, Masafumi; Yura, Kei; Go, Mitiko; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Wiemann, Stefan; Nomura, Nobuo; Sugano, Sumio; Gojobori, Takashi; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    We report the first genome-wide identification and characterization of alternative splicing in human gene transcripts based on analysis of the full-length cDNAs. Applying both manual and computational analyses for 56 419 completely sequenced and precisely annotated full-length cDNAs selected for the H-Invitational human transcriptome annotation meetings, we identified 6877 alternative splicing genes with 18 297 different alternative splicing variants. A total of 37 670 exons were involved in these alternative splicing events. The encoded protein sequences were affected in 6005 of the 6877 genes. Notably, alternative splicing affected protein motifs in 3015 genes, subcellular localizations in 2982 genes and transmembrane domains in 1348 genes. We also identified interesting patterns of alternative splicing, in which two distinct genes seemed to be bridged, nested or having overlapping protein coding sequences (CDSs) of different reading frames (multiple CDS). In these cases, completely unrelated proteins are encoded by a single locus. Genome-wide annotations of alternative splicing, relying on full-length cDNAs, should lay firm groundwork for exploring in detail the diversification of protein function, which is mediated by the fast expanding universe of alternative splicing variants. PMID:16914452

  8. Molecular characterization of antithrombin III (ATIII) variants using polymerase chain reaction. Identification of the ATIII Charleville as an Ala 384 Pro mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Molho-Sabatier, P; Aiach, M; Gaillard, I; Fiessinger, J N; Fischer, A M; Chadeuf, G; Clauser, E

    1989-01-01

    The genes of seven structural mutants of antithrombin III (ATIII), presenting either defective serine protease reactivity or abnormal heparin binding, were analyzed. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the corresponding gene exon and the mutation was identified by either dot blot analysis using a battery of allele-specific oligonucleotide probes or sequencing. Variants Paris and Paris 2 were identified as Arg 47 Cys mutations, and Clichy, Clichy 2, and Franconville were found to be Pro 41 Leu mutations. All five are heparin binding-site variants. ATIII Avranches is an Arg 393 His mutation and ATIII Charleville is an Ala 384 Pro mutation. These two mutations impair the reactive site of the molecule. ATIII Charleville is a new mutation of the reactive center, as predicted by previous biochemical data. The position of this new mutation, together with the other previously described mutations of the reactive center, sheds light on the molecular function of this site in inhibiting thrombin. Finally, genomic amplification by PCR is a powerful technique for the fast identification of antithrombin III mutations and their homozygous/heterozygous status, and should be useful for predicting thrombotic risk. Images PMID:2794060

  9. SVSI: fast and powerful set-valued system identification approach to identifying rare variants in sequencing studies for ordered categorical traits.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenjian; Kang, Guolian; Zhao, Yanlong; Cui, Yuehua; Yan, Song; Li, Yun; Cheng, Cheng; Pounds, Stanley B; Borowitz, Michael J; Relling, Mary V; Yang, Jun J; Liu, Zhifa; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hunger, Stephen P; Hartford, Christine M; Leung, Wing; Zhang, Ji-Feng

    2015-07-01

    In genetic association studies of an ordered categorical phenotype, it is usual to either regroup multiple categories of the phenotype into two categories and then apply the logistic regression (LG), or apply ordered logistic (oLG), or ordered probit (oPRB) regression, which accounts for the ordinal nature of the phenotype. However, they may lose statistical power or may not control type I error due to their model assumption and/or instable parameter estimation algorithm when the genetic variant is rare or sample size is limited. To solve this problem, we propose a set-valued (SV) system model to identify genetic variants associated with an ordinal categorical phenotype. We couple this model with a SV system identification algorithm to identify all the key system parameters. Simulations and two real data analyses show that SV and LG accurately controlled the Type I error rate even at a significance level of 10(-6) but not oLG and oPRB in some cases. LG had significantly less power than the other three methods due to disregarding of the ordinal nature of the phenotype, and SV had similar or greater power than oLG and oPRB. We argue that SV should be employed in genetic association studies for ordered categorical phenotype. PMID:25959545

  10. Anterior chamber angle classification using multiscale histograms of oriented gradients for glaucoma subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanwu; Liu, Jiang; Tan, Ngan Meng; Lee, Beng Hai; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Baskaran, Mani; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma subtype can be identified according to the configuration of the anterior chamber angle(ACA). In this paper, we present an ACA classification approach based on histograms of oriented gradients at multiple scales. In digital optical coherence tomography (OCT) photographs, our method automatically localizes the ACA, and extracts histograms of oriented gradients (HOG) features from this region to classify the angle as an open angle (OA) or an angle-closure(AC). This proposed method has three major features that differs from existing methods. First, the ACA localization from OCT images is fully automated and efficient for different ACA configurations. Second, the ACA is directly classified as OA/AC by using multiscale HOG visual features only, which is different from previous ACA assessment approaches that on clinical features. Third, it demonstrates that visual features with higher dimensions outperform low dimensional clinical features in terms of angle closure classification accuracy. Testing was performed on a large clinical dataset, comprising of 2048 images. The proposed method achieves a 0.835±0.068 AUC value and 75.8% ± 6.4% balanced accuracy at a 85% specificity, which outperforms existing ACA classification approaches based on clinical features.

  11. Genomic structure of the human plasma prekallikrein gene, identification of allelic variants, and analysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Anderson, P J; Freedman, B I; Rich, S S; Bowden, D W

    2000-10-15

    Kallikreins are serine proteases that catalyze the release of kinins and other vasoactive peptides. Previously, we have studied one tissue-specific (H. Yu et al., 1996, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 7: 2559-2564) and one plasma-specific (H. Yu et al., 1998, Hypertension 31: 906-911) human kallikrein gene in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Short sequence repeat polymorphisms for the human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1; previously known as KLK3) on chromosome 4 were associated with ESRD in an African American study population. This study of KLKB1 in ESRD has been extended by determining the genomic structure of KLKB1 and searching for allelic variants that may be associated with ESRD. Exon-spanning PCR primer sets were identified by serial testing of primer pairs designed from KLKB1 cDNA sequence and DNA sequencing of PCR products. Like the rat plasma kallikrein gene and the closely related human factor XI gene, the human KLKB1 gene contains 15 exons and 14 introns. The longest intron, F, is almost 12 kb long. The total length of the gene is approximately 30 kb. Sequence of the 5'-proximal promoter region of KLKB1 was obtained by shotgun cloning of genomic fragments from a bacterial artificial clone containing the KLKB1 gene, followed by screening of the clones using exon 1-specific probes. Primers flanking the exons and 5'-proximal promoter region were used to screen for allelic variants in the genomic DNA from ESRD patients and controls using the single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We identified 12 allelic variants in the 5'-proximal promoter and 7 exons. Of note were a common polymorphism (30% of the population) at position 521 of KLKB1 cDNA, which leads to the replacement of asparagine with a serine at position 124 in the heavy chain of the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, an A716C polymorphism in exon 7 resulting in the amino acid change H189P in the A3 domain of the heavy chain was observed in 5 patients belonging to 3 ESRD families. A third

  12. Genomic structure of the human plasma prekallikrein gene, identification of allelic variants, and analysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Anderson, P J; Freedman, B I; Rich, S S; Bowden, D W

    2000-10-15

    Kallikreins are serine proteases that catalyze the release of kinins and other vasoactive peptides. Previously, we have studied one tissue-specific (H. Yu et al., 1996, J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 7: 2559-2564) and one plasma-specific (H. Yu et al., 1998, Hypertension 31: 906-911) human kallikrein gene in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Short sequence repeat polymorphisms for the human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1; previously known as KLK3) on chromosome 4 were associated with ESRD in an African American study population. This study of KLKB1 in ESRD has been extended by determining the genomic structure of KLKB1 and searching for allelic variants that may be associated with ESRD. Exon-spanning PCR primer sets were identified by serial testing of primer pairs designed from KLKB1 cDNA sequence and DNA sequencing of PCR products. Like the rat plasma kallikrein gene and the closely related human factor XI gene, the human KLKB1 gene contains 15 exons and 14 introns. The longest intron, F, is almost 12 kb long. The total length of the gene is approximately 30 kb. Sequence of the 5'-proximal promoter region of KLKB1 was obtained by shotgun cloning of genomic fragments from a bacterial artificial clone containing the KLKB1 gene, followed by screening of the clones using exon 1-specific probes. Primers flanking the exons and 5'-proximal promoter region were used to screen for allelic variants in the genomic DNA from ESRD patients and controls using the single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We identified 12 allelic variants in the 5'-proximal promoter and 7 exons. Of note were a common polymorphism (30% of the population) at position 521 of KLKB1 cDNA, which leads to the replacement of asparagine with a serine at position 124 in the heavy chain of the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, an A716C polymorphism in exon 7 resulting in the amino acid change H189P in the A3 domain of the heavy chain was observed in 5 patients belonging to 3 ESRD families. A third

  13. Versatile O-GlcNAc transferase assay for high-throughput identification of enzyme variants, substrates, and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun J; Abramowitz, Lara K; Bond, Michelle R; Love, Dona C; Kang, Dong W; Leucke, Hans F; Kang, Dae W; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hanover, John A

    2014-06-18

    The dynamic glycosylation of serine/threonine residues on nucleocytoplasmic proteins with a single N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation) is critical for many important cellular processes. Cellular O-GlcNAc levels are highly regulated by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is responsible for GlcNAc addition and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is responsible for removal of the sugar. The lack of a rapid and simple method for monitoring OGT activity has impeded the efficient discovery of potent OGT inhibitors. In this study we describe a novel, single-well OGT enzyme assay that utilizes 6 × His-tagged substrates, a chemoselective chemical reaction, and unpurified OGT. The high-throughput Ni-NTA Plate OGT Assay will facilitate discovery of potent OGT-specific inhibitors on versatile substrates and the characterization of new enzyme variants.

  14. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  15. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  16. Identification of Novel Variants in LTBP2 and PXDN Using Whole-Exome Sequencing in Developmental and Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Micheal, Shazia; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Zafar, Saemah Nuzhat; Iqbal, Aftab; Khan, Muhammad Imran; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is the most common form of glaucoma in children. PCG occurs due to the developmental defects in the trabecular meshwork and anterior chamber of the eye. The purpose of this study is to identify the causative genetic variants in three families with developmental and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) with a recessive inheritance pattern. Methods DNA samples were obtained from consanguineous families of Pakistani ancestry. The CYP1B1 gene was sequenced in the affected probands by conventional Sanger DNA sequencing. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed in DNA samples of four individuals belonging to three different CYP1B1-negative families. Variants identified by WES were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results WES identified potentially causative novel mutations in the latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 2 (LTBP2) gene in two PCG families. In the first family a novel missense mutation (c.4934G>A; p.Arg1645Glu) co-segregates with the disease phenotype, and in the second family a novel frameshift mutation (c.4031_4032insA; p.Asp1345Glyfs*6) was identified. In a third family with developmental glaucoma a novel mutation (c.3496G>A; p.Gly1166Arg) was identified in the PXDN gene, which segregates with the disease. Conclusions We identified three novel mutations in glaucoma families using WES; two in the LTBP2 gene and one in the PXDN gene. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of glaucoma, but may also contribute to a better understanding of the diverse phenotypic consequences caused by mutations in these genes. PMID:27409795

  17. User oriented ERTS-1 images. [vegetation identification in Canada through image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlien, S.; Goodenough, D.

    1974-01-01

    Photographic reproduction of ERTS-1 images are capable of displaying only a portion of the total information available from the multispectral scanner. Methods are being developed to generate ERTS-1 images oriented towards special users such as agriculturists, foresters, and hydrologists by applying image enhancement techniques and interactive statistical classification schemes. Spatial boundaries and linear features can be emphasized and delineated using simple filters. Linear and nonlinear transformations can be applied to the spectral data to emphasize certain ground information. An automatic classification scheme was developed to identify particular ground cover classes such as fallow, grain, rape seed or various vegetation covers. The scheme applies the maximum likelihood decision rule to the spectral information and classifies the ERTS-1 image on a pixel by pixel basis. Preliminary results indicate that the classifier has limited success in distinguishing crops, but is well adapted for identifying different types of vegetation.

  18. EcoTILLING for the identification of allelic variants of melon eIF4E, a factor that controls virus susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Cristina; Piron, Florence; Dalmais, Marion; Marco, Cristina F; Moriones, Enrique; Gómez-Guillamón, Ma Luisa; Truniger, Verónica; Gómez, Pedro; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Aranda, Miguel A; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2007-01-01

    Background Translation initiation factors of the 4E and 4G protein families mediate resistance to several RNA plant viruses in the natural diversity of crops. Particularly, a single point mutation in melon eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) controls resistance to Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) in melon. Identification of allelic variants within natural populations by EcoTILLING has become a rapid genotype discovery method. Results A collection of Cucumis spp. was characterised for susceptibility to MNSV and Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) and used for the implementation of EcoTILLING to identify new allelic variants of eIF4E. A high conservation of eIF4E exonic regions was found, with six polymorphic sites identified out of EcoTILLING 113 accessions. Sequencing of regions surrounding polymorphisms revealed that all of them corresponded to silent nucleotide changes and just one to a non-silent change correlating with MNSV resistance. Except for the MNSV case, no correlation was found between variation of eIF4E and virus resistance, suggesting the implication of different and/or additional genes in previously identified resistance phenotypes. We have also characterized a new allele of eIF4E from Cucumis zeyheri, a wild relative of melon. Functional analyses suggested that this new eIF4E allele might be responsible for resistance to MNSV. Conclusion This study shows the applicability of EcoTILLING in Cucumis spp., but given the conservation of eIF4E, new candidate genes should probably be considered to identify new sources of resistance to plant viruses. Part of the methodology described here could alternatively be used in TILLING experiments that serve to generate new eIF4E alleles. PMID:17584936

  19. Identification of a functional variant for colorectal cancer risk mapping to chromosome 5q31.1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Jiaoyuan; Liu, Cheng; Gong, Yajie; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Tian, Jianbo; Chang, Jiang; Zhong, Rong; Gong, Jing; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have established chromosome 5q31.1 as a risk locus for colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously identified a potentially regulatory single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17716310 within 5q31.1. Now, we extended our study with another independent Chinese population, functional assays and analyses of TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data. Significant associations between rs17716310 and CRC risk were found in Present Study including 1075 CRC cases and 1999 controls (additive model: OR = 1.149, 95% CI = 1.027–1.286, P = 0.016), and in Combined Study including 1766 cases and 2708 controls (additive model: OR = 1.145, 95% CI = 1.045–1.254, P = 0.004). Dual luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that the variant C allele obviously increased transcriptional activity. Using TCGA datasets, we indicated rs17716310 as a cis expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for the gene SMAD5, whose expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. These findings suggested that the functional polymorphism rs17716310 A > C might be a genetic modifier for CRC, promoting the expression of SMAD5 that belonged to the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. PMID:27177089

  20. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Li, Chunhui; Bradbury, Peter J; Liu, Xiaolei; Lu, Fei; Romay, Cinta M; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Wu, Xun; Peng, Bo; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Zhang, Dengfeng; Buckler, Edward S; Zhang, Zhiwu; Li, Yu; Wang, Tianyu

    2016-06-01

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 lines under multiple Sino-United States environments. The population included two nested association mapping (NAM) panels and a natural association panel. Nearly 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used in the analyses. Through the parallel linkage analysis of the two NAM panels, both common and unique flowering time regions were detected. Genome wide, a total of 90 flowering time regions were identified. One-third of these regions were connected to traits associated with the environmental sensitivity of maize flowering time. The genome-wide association study of the three panels identified nearly 1000 flowering time-associated SNPs, mainly distributed around 220 candidate genes (within a distance of 1 Mb). Interestingly, two types of regions were significantly enriched for these associated SNPs - one was the candidate gene regions and the other was the approximately 5 kb regions away from the candidate genes. Moreover, the associated SNPs exhibited high accuracy for predicting flowering time. PMID:27012534

  1. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene.

    PubMed

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z Q

    2016-09-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  2. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene.

    PubMed

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z Q

    2016-09-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  3. Observation of 'hidden' planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Cao, Baobao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Youfei; Li, Deyu; Xu, Terry T

    2014-01-15

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure-property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures.

  4. Observation of ‘hidden’ planar defects in boron carbide nanowires and identification of their orientations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The physical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their structures, and planar defects in particular could significantly affect the behavior of the nanowires. In this work, planar defects (twins or stacking faults) in boron carbide nanowires are extensively studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that these defects can easily be invisible, i.e., no presence of characteristic defect features like modulated contrast in high-resolution TEM images and streaks in diffraction patterns. The simplified reason of this invisibility is that the viewing direction during TEM examination is not parallel to the (001)-type planar defects. Due to the unique rhombohedral structure of boron carbide, planar defects are only distinctive when the viewing direction is along the axial or short diagonal directions ([100], [010], or 1¯10) within the (001) plane (in-zone condition). However, in most cases, these three characteristic directions are not parallel to the viewing direction when boron carbide nanowires are randomly dispersed on TEM grids. To identify fault orientations (transverse faults or axial faults) of those nanowires whose planar defects are not revealed by TEM, a new approach is developed based on the geometrical analysis between the projected preferred growth direction of a nanowire and specific diffraction spots from diffraction patterns recorded along the axial or short diagonal directions out of the (001) plane (off-zone condition). The approach greatly alleviates tedious TEM examination of the nanowire and helps to establish the reliable structure–property relations. Our study calls attention to researchers to be extremely careful when studying nanowires with potential planar defects by TEM. Understanding the true nature of planar defects is essential in tuning the properties of these nanostructures through manipulating their structures. PMID:24423258

  5. Identification and Expression Profile Analysis of Odorant Binding Proteins in the Oriental Fruit Fly Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwei; Peng, Wei; Zhu, Chipan; Zhang, Qun; Saccone, Giuseppe; Zhang, Hongyu

    2013-01-01

    Olfaction is crucial in many insects for critical behaviors, including those regulating survival and reproduction. Insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) function in the first step of the olfactory system and play an essential role in the perception of odorants, such as pheromones and host chemicals. The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is a destructive fruit-eating pest, due to its wide host range of up to 250 different types of fruits and vegetables, and this fly causes severe economic damage to the fruit and vegetable industry. However, OBP genes have not been largely identified in B. dorsalis. Based on our previously constructed B. dorsalis cDNA library, ten OBP genes were identified in B. dorsalis for the first time. A phylogenetic tree was generated to show the relationships among the 10 OBPs of B. dorsalis to OBP sequences of two other Dipteran species, including Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The expression profiles of the ten OBPs in different tissues (heads, thoraxes, abdomens, legs, wings, male antennae and female antenna) of the mated adults were analyzed by real-time PCR. The results showed that nine of them are highly expressed in the antenna of both sexes, except BdorOBP7. Four OBPs (BdorOBP1, BdorOBP4, BdorOBP8, and BdorOBP10) are also enriched in the abdomen, and BdorOBP7 is specifically expressed in leg, indicating that it may function in other biological processes. This work will provide insight into the roles of OBPs in chemoreception and help develop new pest-control strategies. PMID:23867609

  6. Identification of a Potential Regulatory Variant for Colorectal Cancer Risk Mapping to 3p21.31 in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Juntao; Lou, Jiao; Zhong, Rong; Chen, Xueqin; Li, Jiaoyuan; Liu, Cheng; Gong, Yajie; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Jiang; Gong, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have established chromosome 3p21.31 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer (CRC) that lacks replication and exploration in the Chinese population. We searched potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the linkage disequilibrium (LD) block of 3p21.31 with chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data of histone modification, and tested their association with CRC via a case-control study involving 767 cases and 1397 controls in stage 1 and 528 cases and 678 controls in stage 2. In addition to the tag SNP rs8180040 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.875, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.793−0.966, P = 0.008, P-FDR (false discovery rate) = 0.040), rs1076394 presented consistently significant associations with CRC risk at both stages with OR = 0.850 (95% CI = 0.771−0.938, P = 0.001, P-FDR = 0.005) under the additive model in combined analyses. Supported by the analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), it was suggested that rs1076394 served as an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) for gene CCDC12 and NME6, while NME6’s expression was obviously higher in CRC tissues. Using biofeature information such as ChIP-seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data might help researchers to interpret GWAS results and locate functional variants for diseases in the post-GWAS era. PMID:27120998

  7. First molecular survey and novel genetic variants' identification of Anaplasma marginale, A. centrale and A. bovis in cattle from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Belkahia, Hanène; Ben Said, Mourad; Alberti, Alberto; Abdi, Khaoula; Issaoui, Zakia; Hattab, Dorra; Gharbi, Mohamed; Messadi, Lilia

    2015-08-01

    Few data are available about the presence and distribution of Anaplasma species in cattle in North African countries. In this study prevalence, co-infections, risk factors and genetic diversity of Anaplasma species were evaluated in bovines from Northern Tunisia. A total of 232 cattle from 36 randomly selected farms in three Tunisian localities were investigated for the presence of Anaplasma species in blood by Real-time PCR and/or nested PCR. Overall infection rates of Anaplasma spp., Anaplasma marginale, Anaplasma centrale and Anaplasma bovis were 34.9%, 25.4%, 15.1%, and 3.9%, respectively. Anaplasma phagocytophilum was not detected in cattle. The most common co-infection pattern was an association of A. marginale and A. centrale (11.2%). Five cattle (2.1%) all reared in the sub-humid bioclimatic area, were co-infected by the three Anaplasma species. Molecular prevalence of Anaplasma infection varied significantly according to locality, bioclimatic area, tick infestation and type of breeding. Animals of the Holstein breed were less infected by A. marginale and A. centrale than other breeds. Genetic analysis of A. marginale msp4 gene indicated a high sequence diversity of Tunisian strains, suggesting a multiple introduction of infected cattle from different origins. Phylogenetic studies based on the 16S rRNA gene showed that the most prevalent A. centrale strains were closely related to the A. centrale vaccine strain. Moreover, all A. bovis variants clustered with other A. bovis sequences obtained from domestic and wild ruminant strains. This is the first molecular investigation on Anaplasma species in Tunisian cattle providing pivotal background for designing epidemiological studies and to develop control strategies in the country.

  8. Identification of Bari Transposons in 23 Sequenced Drosophila Genomes Reveals Novel Structural Variants, MITEs and Horizontal Transfer.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Antonio; Lovero, Domenica; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Caizzi, Ruggiero; Marsano, René Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Bari elements are members of the Tc1-mariner superfamily of DNA transposons, originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster, and subsequently identified in silico in 11 sequenced Drosophila genomes and as experimentally isolated in four non-sequenced Drosophila species. Bari-like elements have been also studied for their mobility both in vivo and in vitro. We analyzed 23 Drosophila genomes and carried out a detailed characterization of the Bari elements identified, including those from the heterochromatic Bari1 cluster in D. melanogaster. We have annotated 401 copies of Bari elements classified either as putatively autonomous or inactive according to the structure of the terminal sequences and the presence of a complete transposase-coding region. Analyses of the integration sites revealed that Bari transposase prefers AT-rich sequences in which the TA target is cleaved and duplicated. Furthermore evaluation of transposon's co-occurrence near the integration sites of Bari elements showed a non-random distribution of other transposable elements. We also unveil the existence of a putatively autonomous Bari1 variant characterized by two identical long Terminal Inverted Repeats, in D. rhopaloa. In addition, we detected MITEs related to Bari transposons in 9 species. Phylogenetic analyses based on transposase gene and the terminal sequences confirmed that Bari-like elements are distributed into three subfamilies. A few inconsistencies in Bari phylogenetic tree with respect to the Drosophila species tree could be explained by the occurrence of horizontal transfer events as also suggested by the results of dS analyses. This study further clarifies the Bari transposon's evolutionary dynamics and increases our understanding on the Tc1-mariner elements' biology. PMID:27213270

  9. Identification of genes expressed by immune cells of the colon that are regulated by colorectal cancer-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Peltekova, Vanya D; Lemire, Mathieu; Qazi, Aamer M; Zaidi, Syed H E; Trinh, Quang M; Bielecki, Ryszard; Rogers, Marianne; Hodgson, Lyndsey; Wang, Mike; D'Souza, David J A; Zandi, Sasan; Chong, Taryne; Kwan, Jennifer Y Y; Kozak, Krystian; De Borja, Richard; Timms, Lee; Rangrej, Jagadish; Volar, Milica; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Beck, Timothy; Ash, Colleen; Lee, Shawna; Wang, Jianxin; Boutros, Paul C; Stein, Lincoln D; Dick, John E; Gryfe, Robert; McPherson, John D; Zanke, Brent W; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Hudson, Thomas J

    2014-05-15

    A locus on human chromosome 11q23 tagged by marker rs3802842 was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in a genome-wide association study; this finding has been replicated in case-control studies worldwide. In order to identify biologic factors at this locus that are related to the etiopathology of CRC, we used microarray-based target selection methods, coupled to next-generation sequencing, to study 103 kb at the 11q23 locus. We genotyped 369 putative variants from 1,030 patients with CRC (cases) and 1,061 individuals without CRC (controls) from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. Two previously uncharacterized genes, COLCA1 and COLCA2, were found to be co-regulated genes that are transcribed from opposite strands. Expression levels of COLCA1 and COLCA2 transcripts correlate with rs3802842 genotypes. In colon tissues, COLCA1 co-localizes with crystalloid granules of eosinophils and granular organelles of mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells and differentiated myeloid-derived cell lines. COLCA2 is present in the cytoplasm of normal epithelial, immune and other cell lineages, as well as tumor cells. Tissue microarray analysis demonstrates the association of rs3802842 with lymphocyte density in the lamina propria (p = 0.014) and levels of COLCA1 in the lamina propria (p = 0.00016) and COLCA2 (tumor cells, p = 0.0041 and lamina propria, p = 6 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, genetic, expression and immunohistochemical data implicate COLCA1 and COLCA2 in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Histologic analyses indicate the involvement of immune pathways.

  10. Identification of Bari Transposons in 23 Sequenced Drosophila Genomes Reveals Novel Structural Variants, MITEs and Horizontal Transfer

    PubMed Central

    D’Addabbo, Pietro; Caizzi, Ruggiero

    2016-01-01

    Bari elements are members of the Tc1-mariner superfamily of DNA transposons, originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster, and subsequently identified in silico in 11 sequenced Drosophila genomes and as experimentally isolated in four non-sequenced Drosophila species. Bari-like elements have been also studied for their mobility both in vivo and in vitro. We analyzed 23 Drosophila genomes and carried out a detailed characterization of the Bari elements identified, including those from the heterochromatic Bari1 cluster in D. melanogaster. We have annotated 401 copies of Bari elements classified either as putatively autonomous or inactive according to the structure of the terminal sequences and the presence of a complete transposase-coding region. Analyses of the integration sites revealed that Bari transposase prefers AT-rich sequences in which the TA target is cleaved and duplicated. Furthermore evaluation of transposon’s co-occurrence near the integration sites of Bari elements showed a non-random distribution of other transposable elements. We also unveil the existence of a putatively autonomous Bari1 variant characterized by two identical long Terminal Inverted Repeats, in D. rhopaloa. In addition, we detected MITEs related to Bari transposons in 9 species. Phylogenetic analyses based on transposase gene and the terminal sequences confirmed that Bari-like elements are distributed into three subfamilies. A few inconsistencies in Bari phylogenetic tree with respect to the Drosophila species tree could be explained by the occurrence of horizontal transfer events as also suggested by the results of dS analyses. This study further clarifies the Bari transposon’s evolutionary dynamics and increases our understanding on the Tc1-mariner elements’ biology. PMID:27213270

  11. Identification of a Potential Regulatory Variant for Colorectal Cancer Risk Mapping to 3p21.31 in Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Ke, Juntao; Lou, Jiao; Zhong, Rong; Chen, Xueqin; Li, Jiaoyuan; Liu, Cheng; Gong, Yajie; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Jiang; Gong, Jing

    2016-04-28

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have established chromosome 3p21.31 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer (CRC) that lacks replication and exploration in the Chinese population. We searched potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the linkage disequilibrium (LD) block of 3p21.31 with chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data of histone modification, and tested their association with CRC via a case-control study involving 767 cases and 1397 controls in stage 1 and 528 cases and 678 controls in stage 2. In addition to the tag SNP rs8180040 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.875, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.793-0.966, P = 0.008, P-FDR (false discovery rate) = 0.040), rs1076394 presented consistently significant associations with CRC risk at both stages with OR = 0.850 (95% CI = 0.771-0.938, P = 0.001, P-FDR = 0.005) under the additive model in combined analyses. Supported by the analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), it was suggested that rs1076394 served as an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) for gene CCDC12 and NME6, while NME6's expression was obviously higher in CRC tissues. Using biofeature information such as ChIP-seq and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data might help researchers to interpret GWAS results and locate functional variants for diseases in the post-GWAS era.

  12. Identification of genes expressed by immune cells of the colon that are regulated by colorectal cancer-associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Peltekova, Vanya D; Lemire, Mathieu; Qazi, Aamer M; Zaidi, Syed H E; Trinh, Quang M; Bielecki, Ryszard; Rogers, Marianne; Hodgson, Lyndsey; Wang, Mike; D’Souza, David J A; Zandi, Sasan; Chong, Taryne; Kwan, Jennifer Y Y; Kozak, Krystian; De Borja, Richard; Timms, Lee; Rangrej, Jagadish; Volar, Milica; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Beck, Timothy; Ash, Colleen; Lee, Shawna; Wang, Jianxin; Boutros, Paul C; Stein, Lincoln D; Dick, John E; Gryfe, Robert; McPherson, John D; Zanke, Brent W; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Hudson, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    A locus on human chromosome 11q23 tagged by marker rs3802842 was associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in a genome-wide association study; this finding has been replicated in case–control studies worldwide. In order to identify biologic factors at this locus that are related to the etiopathology of CRC, we used microarray-based target selection methods, coupled to next-generation sequencing, to study 103 kb at the 11q23 locus. We genotyped 369 putative variants from 1,030 patients with CRC (cases) and 1,061 individuals without CRC (controls) from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. Two previously uncharacterized genes, COLCA1 and COLCA2, were found to be co-regulated genes that are transcribed from opposite strands. Expression levels of COLCA1 and COLCA2 transcripts correlate with rs3802842 genotypes. In colon tissues, COLCA1 co-localizes with crystalloid granules of eosinophils and granular organelles of mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells and differentiated myeloid-derived cell lines. COLCA2 is present in the cytoplasm of normal epithelial, immune and other cell lineages, as well as tumor cells. Tissue microarray analysis demonstrates the association of rs3802842 with lymphocyte density in the lamina propria (p = 0.014) and levels of COLCA1 in the lamina propria (p = 0.00016) and COLCA2 (tumor cells, p = 0.0041 and lamina propria, p = 6 × 10–5). In conclusion, genetic, expression and immunohistochemical data implicate COLCA1 and COLCA2 in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Histologic analyses indicate the involvement of immune pathways. PMID:24154973

  13. Cellulase variants

    DOEpatents

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  14. Functional identification of a novel 14-3-3 epsilon splicing variant suggests dimerization is not necessary for 14-3-3 epsilon to inhibit UV-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dingding; Ye, Guangming; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Cong; Yang, Xianmei; Wan, Bo; Pan, Yuanwang; Yu, Long

    2010-05-28

    14-3-3 proteins function as a dimer and have been identified to involve in diverse signaling pathways. Here we reported the identification of a novel splicing variant of human 14-3-3 epsilon (14-3-3 epsilon sv), which is derived from a novel exon 1' insertion. The insertion contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated splicing variant of 14-3-3 epsilon. The splicing variant is translated from the exon 2 and results in the deletion of an N-terminal {alpha}-helix which is crucial for the dimerization. Therefore, the 14-3-3 epsilon sv could not form a dimer with 14-3-3 zeta. However, after UV irradiation 14-3-3 epsilon sv could also support cell survival, suggesting monomer of 14-3-3 epsilon is sufficient to protect cell from apoptosis.

  15. Identification of rare DNA sequence variants in high-risk autism families and their prevalence in a large case/control population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics clearly plays a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but studies to date are only beginning to characterize the causal genetic variants responsible. Until recently, studies using multiple extended multi-generation families to identify ASD risk genes had not been undertaken. Methods We identified haplotypes shared among individuals with ASDs in large multiplex families, followed by targeted DNA capture and sequencing to identify potential causal variants. We also assayed the prevalence of the identified variants in a large ASD case/control population. Results We identified 584 non-conservative missense, nonsense, frameshift and splice site variants that might predispose to autism in our high-risk families. Eleven of these variants were observed to have odds ratios greater than 1.5 in a set of 1,541 unrelated children with autism and 5,785 controls. Three variants, in the RAB11FIP5, ABP1, and JMJD7-PLA2G4B genes, each were observed in a single case and not in any controls. These variants also were not seen in public sequence databases, suggesting that they may be rare causal ASD variants. Twenty-eight additional rare variants were observed only in high-risk ASD families. Collectively, these 39 variants identify 36 genes as ASD risk genes. Segregation of sequence variants and of copy number variants previously detected in these families reveals a complex pattern, with only a RAB11FIP5 variant segregating to all affected individuals in one two-generation pedigree. Some affected individuals were found to have multiple potential risk alleles, including sequence variants and copy number variants (CNVs), suggesting that the high incidence of autism in these families could be best explained by variants at multiple loci. Conclusions Our study is the first to use haplotype sharing to identify familial ASD risk loci. In total, we identified 39 variants in 36 genes that may confer a genetic risk of developing autism. The

  16. Evaluation of CHROMagar Orientation for differentiation and presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli and Enterococcus species.

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, J; Siarakas, S; Robertson, G J; Funnell, G R; Gottlieb, T; Bradbury, R

    1996-01-01

    A new chromogenic plate medium, CHROMagar Orientation, was evaluated for use in the differentiation and presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli and Enterococcus species by a multipoint inoculation (replicator) technique. In this study, 1,404 gram-negative bacilli and 74 enterococcal isolates were tested on CHROMagar Orientation. Six control American Type Culture Collection strains were also included with the testing to ensure quality control of the media. Of the Escherichia coli isolates (n = 588) tested, 99.3% produced a pink-to-red color. Only in four isolates that were O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) negative did this result differ. Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris were well differentiated on this medium. P. mirabilis (n = 184) produced a clear colony with diffusible brown pigment around the periphery. By contrast, 15 of 16 P. vulgaris isolates produced bluish-green colonies with a slight brown background. All Aeromonas hydrophila isolates (n = 26) tested produced clear to pink colonies at 35 to 37 degrees C. This colony color changed to blue after 2 to 3 h of incubation at room temperature. A. hydrophila exhibited stronger color and better growth at 30 degrees C. Serratia marcescens (n = 29) demonstrated an aqua blue color that deepened to a darker blue when exposed to room temperature. All enterococcal isolates (n = 74) resulted in a blue color and gave pinpoint colonies on purity subcultures at 35 to 37 degrees C after 18 h of incubation. Similarity in color resulted in failure to discriminate accurately between Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter species. However, these species could be readily differentiated from other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 151) was easily differentiated from members of the Enterobacteriaceae but was less easily distinguishable from other gram-negative nonmembers of the Enterobacteriaceae. The medium was found to facilitate easy visual detection of mixed

  17. Evaluation of CHROMagar Orientation for differentiation and presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli and Enterococcus species.

    PubMed

    Merlino, J; Siarakas, S; Robertson, G J; Funnell, G R; Gottlieb, T; Bradbury, R

    1996-07-01

    A new chromogenic plate medium, CHROMagar Orientation, was evaluated for use in the differentiation and presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli and Enterococcus species by a multipoint inoculation (replicator) technique. In this study, 1,404 gram-negative bacilli and 74 enterococcal isolates were tested on CHROMagar Orientation. Six control American Type Culture Collection strains were also included with the testing to ensure quality control of the media. Of the Escherichia coli isolates (n = 588) tested, 99.3% produced a pink-to-red color. Only in four isolates that were O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) negative did this result differ. Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris were well differentiated on this medium. P. mirabilis (n = 184) produced a clear colony with diffusible brown pigment around the periphery. By contrast, 15 of 16 P. vulgaris isolates produced bluish-green colonies with a slight brown background. All Aeromonas hydrophila isolates (n = 26) tested produced clear to pink colonies at 35 to 37 degrees C. This colony color changed to blue after 2 to 3 h of incubation at room temperature. A. hydrophila exhibited stronger color and better growth at 30 degrees C. Serratia marcescens (n = 29) demonstrated an aqua blue color that deepened to a darker blue when exposed to room temperature. All enterococcal isolates (n = 74) resulted in a blue color and gave pinpoint colonies on purity subcultures at 35 to 37 degrees C after 18 h of incubation. Similarity in color resulted in failure to discriminate accurately between Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter species. However, these species could be readily differentiated from other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 151) was easily differentiated from members of the Enterobacteriaceae but was less easily distinguishable from other gram-negative nonmembers of the Enterobacteriaceae. The medium was found to facilitate easy visual detection of mixed

  18. Control-Oriented Modeling and System Identification for Nonlinear Trajectory Tracking Control of a Small-Scale Unmanned Helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourrezaei Khaligh, Sepehr

    Model-based control design of small-scale helicopters involves considerable challenges due to their nonlinear and underactuated dynamics with strong couplings between the different degrees-of-freedom (DOFs). Most nonlinear model-based multi-input multi-output (MIMO) control approaches require the dynamic model of the system to be affine-in-control and fully actuated. Since the existing formulations for helicopter nonlinear dynamic model do not meet these requirements, these MIMO approaches cannot be applied for control of helicopters and control designs in the literature mostly use the linearized model of the helicopter dynamics around different trim conditions instead of directly using the nonlinear model. The purpose of this thesis is to derive the 6-DOF nonlinear model of the helicopter in an affine-in-control, non-iterative and square input-output formulation to enable many nonlinear control approaches, that require a control-affine and square model such as the sliding mode control (SMC), to be used for control design of small-scale helicopters. A combination of the first-principles approach and system identification is used to derive this model. To complete the nonlinear model of the helicopter required for the control design, the inverse kinematics of the actuating mechanisms of the main and tail rotors are also derived using an approach suitable for the real-time control applications. The parameters of the new control-oriented formulation are identified using a time-domain system identification strategy and the model is validated using flight test data. A robust sliding mode control (SMC) is then designed using the new formulation of the helicopter dynamics and its robustness to parameter uncertainties and wind disturbances is tested in simulations. Next, a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testbed is designed to allow for the control implementation and gain tuning as well as testing the robustness of the controller to external disturbances in a controlled

  19. Differential expression of P-type ATPases in intestinal epithelial cells: Identification of putative new atp1a1 splice-variant

    SciTech Connect

    Rocafull, Miguel A.; Thomas, Luz E.; Barrera, Girolamo J.; Castillo, Jesus R. del

    2010-01-01

    P-type ATPases are membrane proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis with cation transport across the membrane. Ten different subtypes have been described. In mammalia, 15 genes of P-type ATPases from subtypes II-A, II-B and II-C, that transport low-atomic-weight cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and H{sup +}), have been reported. They include reticulum and plasma-membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase and H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPases. Enterocytes and colonocytes show functional differences, which seem to be partially due to the differential expression of P-type ATPases. These enzymes have 9 structural motifs, being the phosphorylation (E) and the Mg{sup 2+}ATP-binding (H) motifs the most preserved. These structural characteristics permitted developing a Multiplex-Nested-PCR (MN-PCR) for the simultaneous identification of different P-type ATPases. Thus, using MN-PCR, seven different cDNAs were cloned from enterocytes and colonocytes, including SERCA3, SERCA2, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase {alpha}1-isoform, H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase {alpha}2-isoform, PMCA1, PMCA4 and a cDNA-fragment that seems to be a new cassette-type splice-variant of the atp1a1 gen. PMCA4 in enterocytes and H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase {alpha}2-isoform in colonocytes were differentially expressed. This cell-specific expression pattern is related with the distinctive enterocyte and colonocyte functions.

  20. Identification of a rare variant haemoglobin (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) causing spuriously low haemoglobin A(1c) values on ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoff; Murray, Heather; Brennan, Stephen O

    2013-01-01

    Commonly used methods for assay of haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) are susceptible to interference from the presence of haemoglobin variants. In many systems, the common variants can be identified but scientists and pathologists must remain vigilant for more subtle variants that may result in spuriously high or low HbA(1c) values. It is clearly important to recognize these events whether HbA(1c) is being used as a monitoring tool or, as is increasingly the case, for diagnostic purposes. We report a patient with a rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) that resulted in spuriously low values of HbA(1c) when assayed using ion exchange chromatography, and the steps taken to elucidate the nature of the variant.

  1. Identification and functional characterization of G6PC2 coding variants influencing glycemic traits define an effector transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 locus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A; Highland, Heather M; Locke, Adam E; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J; Teslovich, Tanya M; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Beer, Nicola L; Rundle, Jana K; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Doney, Alex S F; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Bergman, Richard N; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; Morris, Andrew P; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  2. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  3. Identification of functional variants for cleft lip with or without cleft palate in or near PAX7, FGFR2, and NOG by targeted sequencing of GWAS loci.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Taub, Margaret A; Liu, Huan; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Koboldt, Daniel C; Zhang, Qunyuan; Carlson, Jenna C; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Wang, Hang; Larson, David E; Fulton, Robert S; Kousa, Youssef A; Fakhouri, Walid D; Naji, Ali; Ruczinski, Ingo; Begum, Ferdouse; Parker, Margaret M; Busch, Tamara; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Scott, Alan F; Wehby, George L; Christensen, Kaare; Czeizel, Andrew E; Deleyiannis, Frederic W-B; Schutte, Brian C; Wilson, Richard K; Cornell, Robert A; Lidral, Andrew C; Weinstock, George M; Beaty, Terri H; Marazita, Mary L; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2015-03-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts have identified multiple strongly associated regions, the causal variants are unknown. To address this, we selected 13 regions from GWASs and other studies, performed targeted sequencing in 1,409 Asian and European trios, and carried out a series of statistical and functional analyses. Within a cluster of strongly associated common variants near NOG, we found that one, rs227727, disrupts enhancer activity. We furthermore identified significant clusters of non-coding rare variants near NTN1 and NOG and found several rare coding variants likely to affect protein function, including four nonsense variants in ARHGAP29. We confirmed 48 de novo mutations and, based on best biological evidence available, chose two of these for functional assays. One mutation in PAX7 disrupted the DNA binding of the encoded transcription factor in an in vitro assay. The second, a non-coding mutation, disrupted the activity of a neural crest enhancer downstream of FGFR2 both in vitro and in vivo. This targeted sequencing study provides strong functional evidence implicating several specific variants as primary contributory risk alleles for nonsyndromic clefting in humans.

  4. Identification of Functional Variants for Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate in or near PAX7, FGFR2, and NOG by Targeted Sequencing of GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Taub, Margaret A.; Liu, Huan; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Carlson, Jenna C.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Wang, Hang; Larson, David E.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Fakhouri, Walid D.; Naji, Ali; Ruczinski, Ingo; Begum, Ferdouse; Parker, Margaret M.; Busch, Tamara; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Scott, Alan F.; Wehby, George L.; Christensen, Kaare; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Deleyiannis, Frederic W.-B.; Schutte, Brian C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Cornell, Robert A.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Weinstock, George M.; Beaty, Terri H.; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts have identified multiple strongly associated regions, the causal variants are unknown. To address this, we selected 13 regions from GWASs and other studies, performed targeted sequencing in 1,409 Asian and European trios, and carried out a series of statistical and functional analyses. Within a cluster of strongly associated common variants near NOG, we found that one, rs227727, disrupts enhancer activity. We furthermore identified significant clusters of non-coding rare variants near NTN1 and NOG and found several rare coding variants likely to affect protein function, including four nonsense variants in ARHGAP29. We confirmed 48 de novo mutations and, based on best biological evidence available, chose two of these for functional assays. One mutation in PAX7 disrupted the DNA binding of the encoded transcription factor in an in vitro assay. The second, a non-coding mutation, disrupted the activity of a neural crest enhancer downstream of FGFR2 both in vitro and in vivo. This targeted sequencing study provides strong functional evidence implicating several specific variants as primary contributory risk alleles for nonsyndromic clefting in humans. PMID:25704602

  5. The primary structure of water buffalo alpha(s1)- and beta-casein identification of phosphorylation sites and characterization of a novel beta-casein variant.

    PubMed

    Ferranti, P; Scaloni, A; Caira, S; Chianese, L; Malorni, A; Addeo, F

    1998-11-01

    The primary structure of water buffalo alpha(s1)-casein and of beta-casein A and B variants has been determined using a combination of mass spectrometry and Edman degradation procedures. The phosphorylated residues were localized on the tryptic phosphopeptides after performing a beta-elimination/thiol derivatization. Water buffalo alpha(s1)-casein, resolved in three discrete bands by isoelectric focusing, was found to consist of a single protein containing eight, seven, or six phosphate groups. Compared to bovine alpha(s1)-casein C variant, the water buffalo alpha(s1)-casein presented ten amino acid substitutions, seven of which involved charged amino acid residues. With respect to bovine betaA2-casein variant, the two water buffalo beta-casein variants A and B presented four and five amino acid substitutions, respectively. In addition to the phosphoserines, a phosphothreonine residue was identified in variant A. From the phylogenetic point of view, both water buffalo beta-casein variants seem to be homologous to bovine betaA2-casein.

  6. Identification of a novel CHEK2 variant and assessment of its contribution to the risk of breast cancer in French Canadian women

    PubMed Central

    Novak, David J; Chen, Long Qi; Ghadirian, Parviz; Hamel, Nancy; Zhang, Phil; Rossiny, Vanessa; Cardinal, Guy; Robidoux, André; Tonin, Patricia N; Rousseau, Francois; Narod, Steven A; Foulkes, William D

    2008-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of the known familial breast cancer risk, however, the impact of other cancer susceptibility genes largely remains to be elucidated. Checkpoint Kinase 2 (CHEK2) is an important signal transducer of cellular responses to DNA damage, whose defects have been associated with an increase in breast cancer risk. Previous studies have identified low penetrance CHEK2 alleles such as 1100delC and I157T, as well as variants such as S428F in the Ashkenazi Jewish population and IVS2 + 1G>A in the Polish population. No founder allele has been specifically identified in the French Canadian population. Methods The 14 coding exons of CHEK2 were fully sequenced for variant alleles in a panel of 25 affected French Canadian women and 25 healthy controls. Two variants were identified of which one novel variant was further screened for in an additional panel of 667 breast cancer patients and 6548 healthy controls. Additional genotyping was conducted using allele specific PCR and a restriction digest assay. Significance of amino acid substitutions were deduced by employing comparative analysis techniques. Results Two variants were identified: the previously reported silent substitution 252A>G (E84E) and the novel missense variant, 1217G>A (R406H). No significant difference in allele distribution between French Canadian women with breast cancer and healthy controls was observed (3/692, 0.43% vs. 22/6573, 0.33%, respectively, P = 0.73). Conclusion The novel CHEK2 missense variant identified in this study, R406H, is unlikely to contribute to breast cancer risk in French Canadian women. PMID:18706089

  7. Influence of crystal-orientation effects on pulse-shape-based identification of heavy-ions stopped in silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardelli, L.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Barlini, S.; Becla, A.; Berjillos, R.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Bruno, M.; Cinausero, M.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Dueñas, J. A.; Edelbruck, P.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lavergne, L.; Marini, P.; Nannini, A.; Negoita, F.; Olmi, A.; Ordine, A.; Piantelli, S.; Rauly, E.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Scian, C.; Stefanini, A. A.; Vannini, G.; Velica, S.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2009-07-01

    Current and charge signals have been collected for Se ions at 408 MeV, S at 160 MeV and Ni at 703 MeV, all stopped in silicon detectors. Some detectors were cut 0∘ off the <1 1 1> axis and some off the <1 0 0> axis. Important effects on the shape of the silicon current and charge signals have been observed, depending on the orientation of the impinging ion relative to the crystal axes and planes. A degradation of the energy and risetime resolution of about a factor ˜3 with respect to the measured optimal values (for example 7∘ off-axis orientation) is observed for ion impinging directions close to crystal axes and/or planes, i.e. the common scenario for normal incidence on 0∘ cut detectors. For Pulse Shape Analysis applications, the necessity of using such "random" oriented silicon detectors is demonstrated.

  8. Identification of new SOX2OT transcript variants highly expressed in human cancer cell lines and down regulated in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saghaeian Jazi, Marie; Samaei, Nader Mansour; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-02-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are manifested as a new paradigm of molecular effectors in a wide range of human diseases. Human SOX2 overlapping transcript (SOX2OT) gene can generate six lncRNA transcript variants which are functionally assumed to be correlated with cellular differentiation and carcinogenesis. However, the circumstances determining expressional and functional differences between SOX2OT transcript variants remain to be explored. Here, we studied the expression of all SOX2OT transcript variants specifically in five human cancer cell lines by real-time RT-PCR. Changes of the new SOX2OT transcript variants expression were measured during the NT2 teratocarcinoma cell line neuronal-like differentiation and were compared to pluripotency regulators, SOX2 and OCT4A gene expressions. Surprisingly, we identified two new SOX2OT transcripts, named SOX2OT-7, SOX2OT-8 which lack exon 8. We discovered that beside active proximal and distal SOX2OT promoters, different cancer cell lines express high levels of some SOX2OT transcript variants differentially by alternative splicing. Significantly, both SOX2OT-7 and SOX2OT-8 are highly expressed in human cancer cell lines coinciding with SOX2, one of the pluripotency regulators. Our results revealed that SOX2OT-7 is almost the most abundant form of SOX2OT transcript variants in the examined cancer cell lines particularly in NT2 teratocarcinoma cell line where its expression falls upon neuronal-like differentiation similar to SOX2 and OCT4A. We suggest that at least some of SOX2OT transcripts are significantly associated with cancer and stem cell related pathways.

  9. Mutation screening of IRF6 among families with non-syndromic oral clefts and identification of two novel variants: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salahshourifar, Iman; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Azman; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Zilfalil, Bin Alwi

    2012-06-01

    Non-syndromic oral clefts share the main clinical features of Van der Woude Syndrome (VWS), with the exception of the lower lip pit. Thus, about 15% of VWS cases are indistinguishable from cases with non-syndromic oral clefts. IRF6 mutations are the major cause of VWS; however, variants in this gene show strong association with non-syndromic oral clefts, with a higher increased risk among cases with cleft lip only (CLO). A total of 39 individuals, including 16 patients with CLO and 23 patients with a family history of cleft, were examined for IRF6 mutations in the present study. Seven variants, including five known (c.-75-4 A>; G, c.-73T>; C, c.459G>; T 5, c.820G>; A, and c.1060 + 37C>; T) and two novel (c.-75-23G>; C and c.1380G>; T), were found. Both novel variants were inherited from non-affected parents and we did not find also in the 120 control chromosomes. In silico analysis revealed that both c.1380G>; T and c.-75-23G>; C variants may disrupts a putative exonic splicing enhancer and intronic splicing binding site for SC35, respectively. Taken together, the presence of deleterious IRF6 variants in patients with non-syndromic oral clefts could be most likely an evidence for VWS. While, IRF6 variants could, at best, contribute to clefting as part of a complex inheritance pattern, with both additional genes and environmental factors having a role. PMID:22440537

  10. Identification of a non-canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) in BRCA1 that could mediate nuclear localization of splice variants lacking the classical NLS.

    PubMed

    Korlimarla, Aruna; Bhandary, Lekhana; Prabhu, Jyothi S; Shankar, Hema; Sankaranarayanan, Hari; Kumar, Pravin; Remacle, Jose; Natarajan, Dipa; Sridhar, T S

    2013-06-01

    The breast cancer type 1 susceptibility gene (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor gene, mutations or loss of which lead to genomic instability and breast cancer. BRCA1 protein is part of a large multi-protein complex involved in a variety of DNA repair and transcription regulatory functions. At least four splice variants have been described and these differ in their function and tissue and spatio-temporal expression patterns. Structural analysis has revealed the presence of two nuclear localization signals (NLS) located in exon 11 of BRCA1. Interestingly, a splice variant of the protein that lacks both of the known NLS still manages to gain entry to the nucleus. While there is experimental proof for the translocation of these proteins by binding to other established nuclear proteins, we examined the possibility of a hitherto unidentified NLS in this particular variant. In this paper, we present evidence for the existence of a previously unreported non-canonical NLS contained within the first 39 amino acids of exon 11. A fusion protein with this 39mer and a reporter green fluorescent protein translocated into the nucleus when it was expressed in breast epithelial cells. We demonstrate the presence of a hitherto unreported noncanonical NLS in exon 11a of BRCA1. This NLS might aid proteins that were encoded by splice variants and lack the canonical NLS to localize to the nucleus. PMID:23666596

  11. Identification of Variants of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Entry Factors in Patients Highly Exposed to HCV but Remaining Uninfected: An ANRS Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Ghosn, Jade; Quertainmont, Yann; Salmon, Dominique; Rioux, Christophe; Duvivier, Claudine; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Misrahi, Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes persistent infection in 75% of cases and is a major public health problem worldwide. More than 92% of intravenous drug users (IDU) infected by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are seropositive for HCV, and it is conceivable that some HIV-1-infected IDU who remain uninfected by HCV may be genetically resistant.Here we conducted a case-control study to identify mutations in HCV entry coreceptors in HIV-infected IDU who remained uninfected by HCV. We recruited 138 patients, comprising 22 HIV+ HCV- case IDU and 116 HIV+ HCV+ control IDU. We focused on coreceptors in which point mutations are known to abolish HCV infectivity in vitro. Our previous study of the Claudin-1 gene revealed no specific variants in the same case population. Here we performed direct genomic sequencing of the Claudin-6, Claudin-9, Occludin and Scavenger receptor-B1 (SCARB1) gene coding regions. Most HIV+ HCV- IDU had no mutations in HCV coreceptors. However, two HIV+ HCV- patients harbored a total of four specific mutations/variants of HCV entry factors that were not found in the HIV+ HCV+ controls. One case patient harbored heterozygous variants of both Claudin-6 and Occludin, and the other case patient harbored two heterozygous variants of SCARB1. This suggests that HCV resistance might involve complex genetic events and factors other than coreceptors, a situation similar to that reported for HIV-1 resistance. PMID:26571379

  12. Stern-Gerlach Experiments on Mn@Sn12: Identification of a Paramagnetic Superatom and Vibrationally Induced Spin Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrmann, Urban; Schäfer, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Beam deflection experiments in inhomogeneous magnetic fields reveal a new limiting case of the magnetization distribution of isolated clusters. Endohedrally doped clusters are produced in a temperature controlled, cryogenically cooled laser ablation source. Temperature dependent experiments indicate a crucial contribution of molecular vibrations to the spin dynamics of Mn@Sn12. In its vibrational ground state the cluster behaves magnetically like a paramagnetic atom, with quantized spin states. However, excited molecular vibrations induce spin orientation in the magnetic field.

  13. In vitro Isolation and Identification of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Variants with Reduced Sensitivity to C-2 Symmetrical Inhibitors of HIV Type 1 Protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, M. J.; Garber, S.; Winslow, D. L.; Reid, C. D.; Aldrich, P.; Jadhav, P. K.; Patterson, C. E.; Hodge, C. N.; Cheng, Y.-S. E.

    1993-08-01

    Protease inhibitors are another class of compounds for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused disease. The emergence of resistance to the current anti-HIV drugs makes the determination of potential resistance to protease inhibitors imperative. Here we describe the isolation of an HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistant to an HIV-protease inhibitor. Serial passage of HIV-1 (strain RF) in the presence of the inhibitor, [2-pyridylacetylisoleucylphenylalanyl-psi(CHOH)]_2 (P9941), failed to yield a stock of virus with a resistance phenotype. However, variants of the virus with 6- to 8-fold reduced sensitivity to P9941 were selected by using a combination of plaque assay and endpoint titration. Genetic analysis and computer modeling of the variant proteases revealed a single change in the codon for amino acid 82 (Val -> Ala), which resulted in a protease with lower affinity and reduced sensitivity to this inhibitor and certain, but not all, related inhibitors.

  14. In vitro isolation and identification of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) variants with reduced sensitivity to C-2 symmetrical inhibitors of HIV type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Otto, M J; Garber, S; Winslow, D L; Reid, C D; Aldrich, P; Jadhav, P K; Patterson, C E; Hodge, C N; Cheng, Y S

    1993-08-15

    Protease inhibitors are another class of compounds for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused disease. The emergence of resistance to the current anti-HIV drugs makes the determination of potential resistance to protease inhibitors imperative. Here we describe the isolation of an HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistant to an HIV-protease inhibitor. Serial passage of HIV-1 (strain RF) in the presence of the inhibitor, [2-pyridylacetylisoleucylphenylalanyl-psi (CHOH)]2 (P9941), failed to yield a stock of virus with a resistance phenotype. However, variants of the virus with 6- to 8-fold reduced sensitivity to P9941 were selected by using a combination of plaque assay and endpoint titration. Genetic analysis and computer modeling of the variant proteases revealed a single change in the codon for amino acid 82 (Val-->Ala), which resulted in a protease with lower affinity and reduced sensitivity to this inhibitor and certain, but not all, related inhibitors.

  15. NADPH oxidase complex and IBD candidate gene studies: identification of a rare variant in NCF2 that results in reduced binding to RAC2

    PubMed Central

    Muise, Aleixo M; Xu, Wei; Guo, Cong-Hui; Walters, Thomas D; Wolters, Victorien M; Fattouh, Ramzi; Lam, Grace Y; Hu, Pingzhao; Murchie, Ryan; Sherlock, Mary; Gana, Juan Cristóbal; Russell, Richard K; Glogauer, Michael; Duerr, Richard H; Cho, Judy H; Lees, Charlie W; Satsangi, Jack; Wilson, David C; Paterson, Andrew D; Griffiths, Anne M; Silverberg, Mark S; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    Objective The NOX2 NADPH oxidase complex produces reactive oxygen species and plays a critical role in the killing of microbes by phagocytes. Genetic mutations in genes encoding components of the complex result in both X-linked and autosomal recessive forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Patients with CGD often develop intestinal inflammation that is histologically similar to Crohn's colitis, suggesting a common aetiology for both diseases. The aim of this study is to determine if polymorphisms in NOX2 NADPH oxidase complex genes that do not cause CGD are associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods Direct sequencing and candidate gene approaches were used to identify susceptibility loci in NADPH oxidase complex genes. Functional studies were carried out on identified variants. Novel findings were replicated in independent cohorts. Results Sequence analysis identified a novel missense variant in the neutrophil cytosolic factor 2 (NCF2) gene that is associated with very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD) and subsequently found in 4% of patients with VEO-IBD compared with 0.2% of controls (p=1.3×10−5, OR 23.8 (95% CI 3.9 to 142.5); Fisher exact test). This variant reduced binding of the NCF2 gene product p67phox to RAC2. This study found a novel genetic association of RAC2 with Crohn's disease (CD) and replicated the previously reported association of NCF4 with ileal CD. Conclusion These studies suggest that the rare novel p67phox variant results in partial inhibition of oxidase function and are associated with CD in a subgroup of patients with VEO-IBD; and suggest that components of the NADPH oxidase complex are associated with CD. PMID:21900546

  16. Identification, characterization, and distribution of a Shiga toxin 1 gene variant (stx(1c)) in Escherichia coli strains isolated from humans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlan; Bielaszewska, Martina; Kuczius, Thorsten; Karch, Helge

    2002-04-01

    By using sequence analysis of Shiga toxin 1 (Stx 1) genes from human and ovine Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, we identified an Stx1 variant in STEC of human origin that was identical to the Stx1 variant from ovine STEC, but demonstrated only 97.1 and 96.6% amino acid sequence identity in its A and B subunits, respectively, to the Stx1 encoded by bacteriophage 933J. We designated this variant "Stx1c" and developed stxB(1) restriction fragment length polymorphism and stx(1c)-specific PCR strategies to determine the frequency and distribution of stx(1c) among 212 STEC strains isolated from humans. stx(1c) was identified in 36 (17.0%) of 212 STEC strains, 19 of which originated from asymptomatic subjects and 16 of which were from patients with uncomplicated diarrhea. stx(1c) was most frequently (in 23 STEC strains [63.9%]) associated with stx(2d), but 12 (33.3%) of the 36 STEC strains possessed stx(1c) only. A single STEC strain possessed stx(1c) together with stx(2) and was isolated from a patient with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. All 36 stx(1c)-positive STEC strains were eae negative and belonged to 10 different serogroups, none of which was O157, O26, O103, O111, or O145. Stx1c was produced by all stx(1c)-containing STEC strains, but reacted weakly with a commercial immunoassay. We conclude that STEC strains harboring the stx(1c) variant account for a significant proportion of human STEC isolates. The procedures developed in this study now allow the determination of the frequency of STEC strains harboring stx(1c) among clinical STEC isolates and their association with human disease in prospective studies.

  17. Identification of a Potential Regulatory Variant for Colorectal Cancer Risk Mapping to Chromosome 5q31.1: A Post-GWAS Study

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Juntao; Lou, Jiao; Chen, Xueqin; Li, Jiaoyuan; Liu, Cheng; Gong, Yajie; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Gong, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have established chromosome 5q31.1 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer (CRC), which was still lack of causal genetic variants. We searched potentially regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the overlap region between linkage disequilibrium (LD) block of 5q31.1 and regulatory elements predicted by histone modifications, then tested their association with CRC via a case-control study. Among three candidate common variants, we found rs17716310 conferred significantly (heterozygous model: OR = 1.273, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.016–1.595, P = 0.036) and marginally (dominant model: OR = 1.238, 95%CI = 1.000–1.532, P = 0.050) increase risk for CRC in a Chinese population including 695 cases and 709 controls. This variation was suggested to be regulatory altering the activity of enhancer that control PITX1 expression. Using epigenetic information such as chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data might help researchers to interpret the results of GWAS and locate causal variants for diseases in post-GWAS era. PMID:26381143

  18. Identification of 11 Novel Homogentisate 1,2 Dioxygenase Variants in Alkaptonuria Patients and Establishment of a Novel LOVD-Based HGD Mutation Database.

    PubMed

    Zatkova, Andrea; Sedlackova, Tatiana; Radvansky, Jan; Polakova, Helena; Nemethova, Martina; Aquaron, Robert; Dursun, Ismail; Usher, Jeannette L; Kadasi, Ludevit

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic loss in alkaptonuria (AKU), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by mutations in the homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGD) gene, which decrease or completely inactivate the function of the HGD protein to metabolize homogentisic acid (HGA). AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000-250,000) in most ethnic groups, but there are countries with much higher incidence, such as Slovakia and the Dominican Republic. In this work, we report 11 novel HGD mutations identified during analysis of 36 AKU patients and 41 family members from 27 families originating from 9 different countries, mainly from Slovakia and France. In Slovak patients, we identified two additional mutations, thus a total number of HGD mutations identified in this small country is 12. In order to record AKU-causing mutations and variants of the HGD gene, we have created a HGD mutation database that is open for future submissions and is available online ( http://hgddatabase.cvtisr.sk/ ). It is founded on the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) system and includes data from the original AKU database ( http://www.alkaptonuria.cib.csic.es ) and also all so far reported variants and AKU patients. Where available, HGD-haplotypes associated with the mutations are also presented. Currently, this database contains 148 unique variants, of which 115 are reported pathogenic mutations. It provides a valuable tool for information exchange in AKU research and care fields and certainly presents a useful data source for genotype-phenotype correlations and also for future clinical trials.

  19. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Ovarian Brenner Tumors and Associated Mucinous Epithelial Neoplasms: High Variant Concordance and Identification of Mutually Exclusive RAS Driver Mutations and MYC Amplification.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Muller, Kristen E; Ananda, Guruprasad; Mitchell, Talia; Spotlow, Vanessa; Patterson, Sara E; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-03-01

    Benign ovarian Brenner tumors often are associated with mucinous cystic neoplasms, which are hypothesized to share a histogenic origin and progression, however, supporting molecular characterization is limited. Our goal was to identify molecular mechanisms linking these tumors. DNA from six Brenner tumors with paired mucinous tumors, two Brenner tumors not associated with a mucinous neoplasm, and two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples and sequenced using a 358-gene next-generation sequencing assay. Variant calls were compared within tumor groups to assess somatic mutation profiles. There was high concordance of the variants between paired samples (40% to 75%; P < 0.0001). Four of the six tumor pairs showed KRAS hotspot driver mutations specifically in the mucinous tumor. In the two paired samples that lacked KRAS mutations, MYC amplification was detected in both of the mucinous and the Brenner components; MYC amplification also was detected in a third Brenner tumor. Five of the Brenner tumors had no reportable potential driver alterations. The two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors both had RAS mutations. The high degree of coordinate variants between paired Brenner and mucinous tumors supports a shared origin or progression. Differences observed in affected genes and pathways, particularly involving RAS and MYC, may point to molecular drivers of a divergent phenotype and progression of these tumors.

  20. Identification and validation of immunogenic potential of India specific HPV-16 variant constructs: In-silico & in-vivo insight to vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anoop; Hussain, Showket; Sharma, Gagan; Mehrotra, Ravi; Gissmann, Lutz; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological cancers in the world but in India, it is the top most cancer among women. Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) is the most important risk factor. The sequence variation(s) in the most common HR-HPV i.e. HPV type 16 leads to altered biological functions with possible clinical significance in the different geographical locations. Sixteen major variants (V1-V16) in full length L1 gene of HPV-16 were identified following analysis of 250 prospectively collected cervical cancer tissue biopsies and their effect on immunogenicity was studied. The effect of these major variations on the epitopes were predicted by in silico methods and the immunogenicity of variants and respective reference DNA vaccine constructs were evaluated by administration of prepared DNA vaccine constructs in female BALB/c mice to evaluate antibody titer. In the present study, L500F (V16) variation showed a significant ~2.7 fold (p < 0.002) increase in antibody titer, whereas T379P (V8) showed ~0.4 fold (p < 0.328) decrease after final injection. These results showed a promising roadmap for the development of DNA based vaccine and for the generation of effective response, though there is a need to study more prevalent variants of HPV in the Indian population. PMID:26507515

  1. Identification of the thiamin pyrophosphokinase gene in rainbow trout: characteristic structure and expression of seven splice variants in tissues and cell lines and during embryo development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuge, Shinya; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Nicks, Diane; Saloka, Stephanie K.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Li, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPK) converts thiamin to its active form, thiamin diphosphate. In humans, TPK expression is down-regulated in some thiamin deficiency related syndrome, and enhanced during pregnancy. Rainbow trout are also vulnerable to thiamin deficiency in wild life and are useful models for thiamin metabolism research. We identified the tpk gene transcript including seven splice variants in the rainbow trout. Almost all cell lines and tissues examined showed co-expression of several tpk splice variants including a potentially major one at both mRNA and protein levels. However, relative to other tissues, the longest variant mRNA expression was predominant in the ovary and abundant in embryos. During embryogenesis, total tpk transcripts increased abruptly in early development, and decreased to about half of the peak shortly after hatching. In rainbow trout, the tpk transcript complex is ubiquitously expressed for all tissues and cells examined, and its increase in expression could be important in the early-middle embryonic stages. Moreover, decimated tpk expression in a hepatoma cell line relative to hepatic and gonadal cell lines appears to be consistent with previously reported down-regulation of thiamin metabolism in cancer.

  2. Reliably Detecting Clinically Important Variants Requires Both Combined Variant Calls and Optimized Filtering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Field, Matthew A.; Cho, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of tools is available for identification of variants from genome sequence data. Given the current complexity of incorporating external software into a genome analysis infrastructure, a tendency exists to rely on the results from a single tool alone. The quality of the output variant calls is highly variable however, depending on factors such as sequence library quality as well as the choice of short-read aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy. Here we present a two-part study first using the high quality ‘genome in a bottle’ reference set to demonstrate the significant impact the choice of aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy has on overall variant call quality and further how certain variant callers outperform others with increased sample contamination, an important consideration when analyzing sequenced cancer samples. This analysis confirms previous work showing that combining variant calls of multiple tools results in the best quality resultant variant set, for either specificity or sensitivity, depending on whether the intersection or union, of all variant calls is used respectively. Second, we analyze a melanoma cell line derived from a control lymphocyte sample to determine whether software choices affect the detection of clinically important melanoma risk-factor variants finding that only one of the three such variants is unanimously detected under all conditions. Finally, we describe a cogent strategy for implementing a clinical variant detection pipeline; a strategy that requires careful software selection, variant caller filtering optimizing, and combined variant calls in order to effectively minimize false negative variants. While implementing such features represents an increase in complexity and computation the results offer indisputable improvements in data quality. PMID:26600436

  3. Identification of Male- and Female-Specific Olfaction Genes in Antennae of the Oriental Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao; Smagghe, Guy; Lei, Zhongren; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) is a species of tephritid fruit fly, endemic to Southeast Asia but also introduced to many regions of the US, and it is one of the major pest species with a broad host range of cultivated and wild fruits. Although males of B. dorsalis respond strongly to methyl eugenol and this is used for monitoring and estimating populations, the molecular mechanism of the oriental fruit fly olfaction has not been elucidated yet. Therefore, in this project, using next generation sequencing technologies, we sequenced the transcriptome of the antennae of male and female adults of B. dorsalis. We identified a total of 20 candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 5 candidate chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 35 candidate odorant receptors (ORs), 12 candidate ionotropic receptors (IRs) and 4 candidate sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs). The sex-specific expression of these genes was determined and a subset of 9 OR genes was further characterized by qPCR with male and female antenna, head, thorax, abdomen, leg and wing samples. In the male antennae, 595 genes showed a higher expression, while 128 genes demonstrated a higher expression in the female antennae. Interestingly, 2 ORs (BdorOR13 and BdorOR14) were highly and specifically expressed in the antennae of males, and 4 ORs (BdorOR13, BdorOR16, BdorOR18 and BdorOR35) clustered with DmOR677, suggesting pheromone reception. We believe this study with these antennae-enriched OBPs, CSPs, ORs, IRs and SNMPs can play an important role in the detection of pheromones and general odorants, and so in turn our data improve our current understanding of insect olfaction at the molecular level and provide important information for disrupting the behavior of the oriental fruit fly using chemical communication methods. PMID:26845547

  4. Plant Gene and Alternatively Spliced Variant Annotator. A plant genome annotation pipeline for rice gene and alternatively spliced variant identification with cross-species expressed sequence tag conservation from seven plant species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Wang, Sheng-Shun; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2007-03-01

    The completion of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome draft has brought unprecedented opportunities for genomic studies of the world's most important food crop. Previous rice gene annotations have relied mainly on ab initio methods, which usually yield a high rate of false-positive predictions and give only limited information regarding alternative splicing in rice genes. Comparative approaches based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) can compensate for the drawbacks of ab initio methods because they can simultaneously identify experimental data-supported genes and alternatively spliced transcripts. Furthermore, cross-species EST information can be used to not only offset the insufficiency of same-species ESTs but also derive evolutionary implications. In this study, we used ESTs from seven plant species, rice, wheat (Triticum aestivum), maize (Zea mays), barley (Hordeum vulgare), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), soybean (Glycine max), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), to annotate the rice genome. We developed a plant genome annotation pipeline, Plant Gene and Alternatively Spliced Variant Annotator (PGAA). Using this approach, we identified 852 genes (931 isoforms) not annotated in other widely used databases (i.e. the Institute for Genomic Research, National Center for Biotechnology Information, and Rice Annotation Project) and found 87% of them supported by both rice and nonrice EST evidence. PGAA also identified more than 44,000 alternatively spliced events, of which approximately 20% are not observed in the other three annotations. These novel annotations represent rich opportunities for rice genome research, because the functions of most of our annotated genes are currently unknown. Also, in the PGAA annotation, the isoforms with non-rice-EST-supported exons are significantly enriched in transporter activity but significantly underrepresented in transcription regulator activity. We have also identified potential lineage-specific and conserved isoforms, which are

  5. Perceptual learning of Gabor orientation identification in visual periphery: complete inter-ocular transfer of learning mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chu, Wilson; Dosher, Barbara Anne; Lee, Sophia

    2005-09-01

    We combined the external noise paradigm, the Perceptual Template Model approach, and transfer tests to investigate the mechanisms and eye-specificity of perceptual learning of Gabor orientation in visual periphery. Coupled with a fixation task, discriminating a 5 from an S in a rapid small character string at fixation, contrast thresholds were estimated for each of eight external noise levels at two performance criteria using 3/1 and 2/1 staircases. Perceptual learning in one eye was measured over 10 practice sessions, followed by five sessions of practice in the new eye to assess transfer. We found that monocular learning improved performance (reduced contrast thresholds) with virtually equal magnitude across a wide range of external noise levels with no significant change in central task performance. Based on measurements of learning effects at two performance criterion levels, we identified a mixture of stimulus enhancement and external noise exclusion as the mechanism of perceptual learning underlying the observed improvements. Perceptual learning in the trained eye generalized completely to the untrained eye. We related the transfer patterns to known physiology and psychophysics on orientation direction coding.

  6. Automatic identification of agricultural terraces through object-oriented analysis of very high resolution DSMs and multispectral imagery obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Varela, R A; Zarco-Tejada, P J; Angileri, V; Loudjani, P

    2014-02-15

    Agricultural terraces are features that provide a number of ecosystem services. As a result, their maintenance is supported by measures established by the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). In the framework of CAP implementation and monitoring, there is a current and future need for the development of robust, repeatable and cost-effective methodologies for the automatic identification and monitoring of these features at farm scale. This is a complex task, particularly when terraces are associated to complex vegetation cover patterns, as happens with permanent crops (e.g. olive trees). In this study we present a novel methodology for automatic and cost-efficient identification of terraces using only imagery from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) cameras on board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Using state-of-the-art computer vision techniques, we generated orthoimagery and digital surface models (DSMs) at 11 cm spatial resolution with low user intervention. In a second stage, these data were used to identify terraces using a multi-scale object-oriented classification method. Results show the potential of this method even in highly complex agricultural areas, both regarding DSM reconstruction and image classification. The UAV-derived DSM had a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.5 m when the height of the terraces was assessed against field GPS data. The subsequent automated terrace classification yielded an overall accuracy of 90% based exclusively on spectral and elevation data derived from the UAV imagery.

  7. Automatic identification of agricultural terraces through object-oriented analysis of very high resolution DSMs and multispectral imagery obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Varela, R A; Zarco-Tejada, P J; Angileri, V; Loudjani, P

    2014-02-15

    Agricultural terraces are features that provide a number of ecosystem services. As a result, their maintenance is supported by measures established by the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). In the framework of CAP implementation and monitoring, there is a current and future need for the development of robust, repeatable and cost-effective methodologies for the automatic identification and monitoring of these features at farm scale. This is a complex task, particularly when terraces are associated to complex vegetation cover patterns, as happens with permanent crops (e.g. olive trees). In this study we present a novel methodology for automatic and cost-efficient identification of terraces using only imagery from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) cameras on board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Using state-of-the-art computer vision techniques, we generated orthoimagery and digital surface models (DSMs) at 11 cm spatial resolution with low user intervention. In a second stage, these data were used to identify terraces using a multi-scale object-oriented classification method. Results show the potential of this method even in highly complex agricultural areas, both regarding DSM reconstruction and image classification. The UAV-derived DSM had a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.5 m when the height of the terraces was assessed against field GPS data. The subsequent automated terrace classification yielded an overall accuracy of 90% based exclusively on spectral and elevation data derived from the UAV imagery. PMID:24473345

  8. Anatomy of a Red Copper Center: Spectroscopic Identification and Reactivity of the Copper Centers of Bacillus Subtilis Sco and its Cys to Ala Variants

    PubMed Central

    Siluvai, Gnana S; Mayfield, Mary; Nilges, Mark J; George, Serena DeBeer; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2010-01-01

    Sco is a mononuclear red copper protein involved in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. It is spectroscopically similar to red copper nitrosocyanin, but unlike the latter, which has one copper cysteine thiolate, the former has two. In addition to the two cysteine ligands (C45 and C49), the WT protein from Bacillus subtilis (hereafter named BSco) has a histidine (H135) and an unknown endogenous protein oxygen ligand in a distorted tetragonal array. We have compared the properties of the WT protein to variants in which each of the two coordinating Cys residues has been individually mutated to Ala, using UV/vis, Cu and S K edge XAS, EPR, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Unlike the Cu(II) form of native Sco, the Cu(II) complexes of the Cys variants are unstable. The copper center of C49A undergoes autoreduction to the Cu(I) form which is shown by EXAFS to be composed of a novel 2-coordinate center with one Cys and one His ligand. C45A rearranges to a new stable Cu(II) species coordinated by C49 H135 and a second His ligand recruited from a previously uncoordinated protein side chain. The different chemistry exhibited by the Cys variants can be rationalized by whether a stable Cu(I) species can be formed by autoredox chemistry. For C49A, the remaining Cys and His residues are trans which facilitate the formation of the highly stable 2-coordinate Cu(I) species, while for C45A such a configuration cannot be attained. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of the WT protein indicates a net weak Cu–S bond strength at ~ 2.24 Å corresponding to the two thiolate copper bonds, whereas the single variant C45A shows a moderately strong Cu–S bond at ~ 2.16 Å. S K-edge data gives a total covalency of 28% for both Cu-S bonds in the WT protein. These data suggest an average covalency per Cu-S bond lower than nitrosocyanin and close to that expected for type-2 Cu(II)-thiolate systems. The data are discussed relative to the unique Cu-S characteristics of cupredoxins, whence it is

  9. Molecular and biochemical identification of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase encoding mRNA variants in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeju; Saiardi, Adolfo; Greenwood, John S; Bewley, J Derek

    2014-05-01

    During seed development, phytic acid (PA) associated with mineral cations is stored as phytin and mobilized following germination in support of seedling growth. Two parallel biosynthetic pathways for PA have been proposed; yet the pathway is still poorly understood in terms of its regulation and the enzymes involved. Here, the castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) gene for inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (RcIPK1) has been identified. This encodes the enzyme implicated in catalyzing the final reaction in PA biosynthesis, and its expression is enhanced in isolated germinated embryos by application of phosphate and myo-inositol (Ins). Even though only one copy of the RcIPK1 gene is present in the genome, numerous RNA variants are present, most likely due to alternative splicing. These are translated into six closely related protein isoforms according to in silico analysis. Functional analyses using yeast ipk1Δ revealed that only three of the mRNA variants can rescue a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of this strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the synthesized inositol phosphates demonstrated that the ability to complement the missing yeast IPK1 enzyme is associated with the production of enzyme activity. The three active isoforms possess unique conserved motifs important for IPK1 catalytic activity.

  10. Identification of two inherited copy number variants in a male with autism supports two-hit and compound heterozygosity models of autism.

    PubMed

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Hong, Chao-Chun; Chien, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-09-01

    Autism is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder with complex genetic mechanism underlying its etiology. Recent studies revealed that a few single de novo copy number variants of genomic DNA (copy number variants [CNVs]) are pathogenic and causal in some sporadic cases, adding support to the hypothesis that some sporadic autism might be caused by single rare mutation with large clinical effect. In this study, we report the detection of two novel private CNVs simultaneously in a male patient with autism. These two CNVs include a microduplication of ~4.5 Mb at chromosome 4q12-13.1 that was transmitted from his mother and a microdeletion of ~1.8 Mb at 5q32 that was transmitted from his father. Several genes such as LPHN3, POU4F3, SH3RF2, and TCERG1 mapped to these two regions have psychiatric implications. However, the parents had only mild degree of attention deficit symptoms but did not demonstrate any obvious autistic symptoms or psychopathology. Our findings indicate that each of these two CNVs alone may not be pathogenic enough to cause clinical symptoms in their respective carriers, and hence they can be transmitted within each individual family. However, concomitant presence of these two CNVs might result in the clinical phenotypes of the affected patient reported here. Thus, our report of this family may represent an example to show that two hits of CNV and the presence of compound heterozygosity might be important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of autism.

  11. Molecular and biochemical identification of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase encoding mRNA variants in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaeju; Saiardi, Adolfo; Greenwood, John S; Bewley, J Derek

    2014-05-01

    During seed development, phytic acid (PA) associated with mineral cations is stored as phytin and mobilized following germination in support of seedling growth. Two parallel biosynthetic pathways for PA have been proposed; yet the pathway is still poorly understood in terms of its regulation and the enzymes involved. Here, the castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) gene for inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (RcIPK1) has been identified. This encodes the enzyme implicated in catalyzing the final reaction in PA biosynthesis, and its expression is enhanced in isolated germinated embryos by application of phosphate and myo-inositol (Ins). Even though only one copy of the RcIPK1 gene is present in the genome, numerous RNA variants are present, most likely due to alternative splicing. These are translated into six closely related protein isoforms according to in silico analysis. Functional analyses using yeast ipk1Δ revealed that only three of the mRNA variants can rescue a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of this strain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the synthesized inositol phosphates demonstrated that the ability to complement the missing yeast IPK1 enzyme is associated with the production of enzyme activity. The three active isoforms possess unique conserved motifs important for IPK1 catalytic activity. PMID:24463774

  12. Identification of differentially expressed genes in hepatopancreas of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense exposed to environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Ge, Xianping; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Shiyong

    2014-01-25

    Hypoxia represents a major physiological challenge for prawn culture, and the hepatopancreas plays an important role in these processes. Here, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect the gene expression profile of the hepatopancreas in Macrobrachium nipponense in response to hypoxia for 3 h and hypoxia for 24 h. Gene expression profiling identified 1925 genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated by dissolved oxygen availability. Functional categorization of the differentially expressed genes revealed that oxygen transport, electron transport chain, reactive oxygen species generation/scavenging, and immune response were the differentially regulated processes occurring during environmental hypoxia. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using six genes independently verified the tag-mapped results. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed, for the first time, hemocyanin protein expression as significant hypoxia-specific signature in prawns,which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of hypoxia exposure. The analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in oriental river prawn provides a preliminary basis for a better understanding of the molecular response to hypoxia exposures. PMID:24498647

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes in hepatopancreas of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense exposed to environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Ge, Xianping; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Zhang, Shiyong

    2013-10-25

    Hypoxia represents a major physiological challenge for prawn culture, and the hepatopancreas plays an important role in these processes. Here, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect the gene expression profile of the hepatopancreas in M. nipponense in response to hypoxia for 3h and hypoxia for 24h. Gene expression profiling identified 1925 genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated by dissolved oxygen availability. Functional categorization of the differentially expressed genes revealed that oxygen transport, electron transport chain, reactive oxygen species generation/scavenging, and immune response were the differentially regulated processes occurring during environmental hypoxia. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using six genes independently verified the tag-mapped results. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed, for the first time, hemocyanin protein expression as significant hypoxia-specific signatures in prawns, which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of hypoxia exposure. The analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in oriental river prawn provides a preliminary basis for a better understanding of the molecular response to hypoxia exposures. PMID:24513331

  14. Rapid identification of Bordetella pertussis pertactin gene variants using LightCycler real-time polymerase chain reaction combined with melting curve analysis and gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, J.; Viljanen, M. K.; Mertsola, J.; Arvilommi, H.; He, Q.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, eight allelic variants of the pertactin gene (prn1-8) have been characterized in Bordetella pertussis strains isolated in Europe and the United States. It has been suggested that the divergence of the pertactin types of clinical isolates from those of the B. pertussis vaccine strains is a result of vaccine-driven evolution. Sequencing of the prn, which is relatively time-consuming, has so far been the only method for the differentiation of prn types. We have developed a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction assay suitable for large-scale screening of the prn type of the circulating strains. This method correctly identified the prn type of all tested 41 clinical isolates and two Finnish vaccine strains. The method is simple and reliable and provides an alternative for sequencing in pertussis research. PMID:11747721

  15. Identification of a truncated splice variant of IL-18 receptor alpha in the human and rat, with evidence of wider evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which stimulates activation of the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB) pathway via interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The receptor itself is formed from a dimer of two subunits, with the ligand-binding IL-18Rα subunit being encoded by the IL18R1 gene. A splice variant of murine IL18r1, which has been previously described, is formed by transcription of an unspliced intron (forming a ‘type II’ IL18r1 transcript) and is predicted to encode a receptor with a truncated intracellular domain lacking the capacity to generate downstream signalling. In order to examine the relevance of this finding to human IL-18 function, we assessed the presence of a homologous transcript by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human and rat as another common laboratory animal. We present evidence for type II IL18R1 transcripts in both species. While the mouse and rat transcripts are predicted to encode a truncated receptor with a novel 5 amino acid C-terminal domain, the human sequence is predicted to encode a truncated protein with a novel 22 amino acid sequence bearing resemblance to the ‘Box 1’ motif of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain, in a similar fashion to the inhibitory interleukin-1 receptor 2. Given that transcripts from these three species are all formed by inclusion of homologous unspliced intronic regions, an analysis of homologous introns across a wider array of 33 species with available IL18R1 gene records was performed, which suggests similar transcripts may encode truncated type II IL-18Rα subunits in other species. This splice variant may represent a conserved evolutionary mechanism for regulating IL-18 activity. PMID:25250214

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level.

  17. Prevalence and genetic diversity of arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) in clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci: identification of ACME type I variants in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Mayumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-12-01

    Arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), a genomic island consisting of the arc and/or opp3 gene clusters found in staphylococcal species, is related to increased bacterial adaptability to hosts. Staphylococcus epidermidis is considered a major ACME reservoir; however, prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) have not yet been well characterized for clinical isolates in Japan. A total of 271 clinical isolates of CNS in a Japanese hospital were investigated for the presence and genotype of ACME and SCCmec. The prevalence of ACME-arcA was significantly higher (p<0.001) in S. epidermidis (45.8%) than in other CNS species (3.7%). ACME in S. epidermidis isolates (n=87) were differentiated into type I (n=33), variant forms of type I (ΔI, n=26) newly identified in this study, type II (n=6), and type ΔII (n=19). ACME-type ΔI, which were further classified into three subtypes, lacked some genetic components between the arc and opp3 clusters in archetypal type I, whereas the arc and opp3 clusters were intact. The arc cluster exhibited high sequence identity (95.8-100%) to that of type I ACME; in contrast, the opp3 cluster was highly diverse, and showed relatively lower identities (94.8-98.7%) to the identical regions in type I ACME. Twenty-one isolates of ΔI ACME-carrying S. epidermidis possessed SCCmec IVa and belonged to ST5 (clonal complex 2). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates harboring ACME ΔI in this study clustered with previously reported S. epidermidis strains with other lineges, suggesting that S. epidermidis originally had some genetic variations in the opp3 cluster. In summary, ACME type ΔI, a truncated variant of ACME-I, was first identified in S. epidermidis, and revealed to be prevalent in ST5 MRSE clinical isolates with SCCmec IVa.

  18. Isolation and identification of host cues from mango, Mangifera indica, that attract gravid female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, Pagadala D Kamala; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A

    2012-04-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an economically damaging, polyphagous pest of fruit crops in South-East Asia and Hawaii, and a quarantine pest in other parts of the world. The objective of our study was to identify new attractants for B. dorsalis from overripe mango fruits. Headspace samples of volatiles were collected from two cultivars of mango, 'Alphonso' and 'Chausa', and a strong positive behavioral response was observed when female B. dorsalis were exposed to these volatiles in olfactometer bioassays. Coupled GC-EAG with female B. dorsalis revealed 7 compounds from 'Alphonso' headspace and 15 compounds from 'Chausa' headspace that elicited an EAG response. The EAG-active compounds, from 'Alphonso', were identified, using GC-MS, as heptane, myrcene, (Z)-ocimene, (E)-ocimene, allo-ocimene, (Z)-myroxide, and γ-octalactone, with the two ocimene isomers being the dominant compounds. The EAG-active compounds from 'Chausa' were 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl butanoate, ethyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate, ethyl tiglate, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-carene, p-cymene, ethyl sorbate, α-terpinolene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and benzothiazole. Individual compounds were significantly attractive when a standard dose (1 μg on filter paper) was tested in the olfactometer. Furthermore, synthetic blends with the same concentration and ratio of compounds as in the natural headspace samples were highly attractive (P < 0.001), and in a choice test, fruit flies did not show any preference for the natural samples over the synthetic blends. Results are discussed in relation to developing a lure for female B. dorsalis to bait traps with.

  19. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    distinction between Theileria sp. (buffalo) and T. parva and indicate the existence of a single group of T. parva and two Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene variants in the African buffalo. Despite the observed variation in the full-length parasite 18S rRNA gene sequences, the area in the V4 hypervariable region where the RLB and real-time PCR hybridization probes were developed was relatively conserved. The T. parva specific real-time PCR assay was able to successfully detect all T. parva variants and, although amplicons were obtained from Theileria sp. (buffalo) DNA, none of the Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA sequence variants were detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes.

  20. Identification, characterization and regional distribution in brain of RPDE-6 (RNPDE4A5), a novel splice variant of the PDE4A cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase family.

    PubMed

    McPhee, I; Pooley, L; Lobban, M; Bolger, G; Houslay, M D

    1995-09-15

    COS-7 cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding a putative splice variant of PDE4A cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase, RPDE-6 (RNPDE4A5). This led to the expression of a novel, cyclic AMP-specific, rolipram-inhibited phosphodiesterase activity. In such transfected cells a novel approximately 109 kDa species was recognized by anti-peptide sera raised against a dodecapeptide whose sequence is found at the extreme C-terminus of both RPDE-6 and another PDE4A splice variant. RD1 (RNPDE4A1A). RPDE-6 activity and immunoreactivity was found distributed between both pellet (approximately 25%) and cytosol (approximately 75%) fractions of transfected COS-7 cells. Soluble and pellet RPDE-6 activities exhibited similar low Km values for cyclic AMP (approximately 2.4 microM) and were both inhibited by low concentrations of rolipram, with IC50 values for the soluble activity being lower (approximately 0.16 microM) than for the pellet activity (approximately 1.2 microM). Pellet RPDE-6 was resistant to release by either high NaCl concentrations or the detergent Triton X-100. Probing brain homogenates with the anti-(C-terminal peptide) sera identified two immunoreactive species, namely an approximately 79 kDa species reflecting RD1 and an approximately 109 kDa species that co-migrated with the immunoreactive species seen in COS cells transfected to express RPDE-6. The approximately 109 kDa species was found distributed between both the low-speed (P1) and high-speed (P2) pellet fractions as well as the cytosol fractions derived from both brain and RPDE-6-transfected COS cells. In contrast, RD1 was found exclusively in the P2 fraction. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity immuno-precipitated by these antisera from brain cytosol had the characteristics of COS cell-expressed RPDE-6 with KmcyclicAMP approximately 3.7 microM and IC50rolipram approximately 0.12 microM. The distribution of PDE activity immunoprecipitated from the cytosol of various brain regions paralleled that seen for

  1. Three-dimensional cephalometry: a method for the identification and for the orientation of the skull after cone-bean computed tomographic scan.

    PubMed

    Frongia, Gianluigi; Bracco, Pietro; Piancino, Maria Grazia

    2013-05-01

    The aims of this work were (1) to describe a method to identify new skeletal landmarks useful to define the reference system to orient the skull in a new position after cone-bean computed tomographic scan and (2) to demonstrate the reliability of this new method.Ten orthognathic patients (5 male, 5 female; mean [SD] age, 18.9 [1.2] years) underwent the cone-bean computed tomographic scan before surgery. Seven 3-dimensional skeletal measurements derived from 4 skeletal point of construction (C) (right, left, and median orbital C, and sella C) have been used for this study. Reliability has been calculated using Pearson correlation coefficient tests.Intraobserver reliability was 0.9999 for operator A (T1-T2) and 0.9999 for operator B (T1-T2); interobserver reliability was 0.9999 between the first (T1-T1) measurement and 0.9999 between the second (T2-T2).The original method is able to reduce the variability of landmark identification due to the variability of the human anatomy and the influence of the human error in cephalometric analysis. The innovation of this new method is the real possibility to use the anatomical structures in a 3-dimensional way, enhancing the reliability of the reference points.

  2. Insights Into the Pathogenicity of Rare Missense GCK Variants From the Identification and Functional Characterization of Compound Heterozygous and Double Mutations Inherited in Cis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Nicola L.; Osbak, Kara K.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Tribble, Nicholas D.; Steele, Anna M.; Wensley, Kirsty J.; Edghill, Emma L.; Colcough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; Valentínová, Lucia; Rundle, Jana K.; Raimondo, Anne; Grimsby, Joseph; Ellard, Sian; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the importance of using a combined genetic and functional approach to correctly interpret a genetic test for monogenic diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified three probands with a phenotype consistent with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) subtype GCK-MODY, in whom two potential pathogenic mutations were identified: [R43H/G68D], [E248 K/I225M], or [G261R/D217N]. Allele-specific PCR and cosegregation were used to determine phase. Single and double mutations were kinetically characterized. RESULTS The mutations occurred in cis (double mutants) in two probands and in trans in one proband. Functional studies of all double mutants revealed inactivating kinetics. The previously reported GCK-MODY mutations R43H and G68D were inherited from an affected father and unaffected mother, respectively. Both our functional and genetic studies support R43H as the cause of GCK-MODY and G68D as a neutral rare variant. CONCLUSIONS These data highlight the need for family/functional studies, even for previously reported pathogenic mutations. PMID:22611063

  3. Identification of proliferation-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Characterization of a new member of the highly evolutionarily conserved histone H2A.F/Z variant subfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Callard, D; Mazzolini, L

    1997-01-01

    The changes in gene expression associated with the reinitiation of cell division and subsequent progression through the cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana cell-suspension cultures were investigated. Partial synchronization of cells was achieved by a technique combining phosphate starvation and a transient treatment with the DNA replication inhibitor aphidicolin. Six cDNAs corresponding to genes highly induced in proliferating cells and showing cell-cycle-regulated expression were obtained by the mRNA differential display technique. Full-length cDNA clones (cH2BAt and cH2AvAt) corresponding to two of the display products were subsequently isolated. The cH2BAt clone codes for a novel histone H2B protein, whereas the cH2AvAt cDNA corresponds to a gene encoding a new member of the highly conserved histone H2A.F/Z subfamily of chromosomal proteins. Further studies indicated that H2AvAt mRNA expression is tightly correlated with cell proliferation in cell-suspension cultures, and that closely related analogs of the encoded protein exist in Arabidopsis. The implications of the conservation of histone H2A.F/Z variants in plants are discussed. PMID:9414552

  4. Identification of a functional genetic variant at 16q12.1 for breast cancer risk: results from the Asia Breast Cancer Consortium.

    PubMed

    Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Qu, Shimian; Li, Chun; Zheng, Ying; Gu, Kai; Wang, Wenjing; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cheng, Jiarong; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Lina; Zheng, Hong; Shen, Chen-Yang; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Furu; Deming, Sandra L; Kelley, Mark C; Shrubsole, Martha J; Khoo, Ui Soon; Chan, Kelvin Y K; Chan, Sum Yin; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Iwasaki, Motoki; Kasuga, Yoshio; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tajima, Kazuo; Iwata, Hiroji; Huang, Bo; Shi, Jiajun; Li, Guoliang; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Wei

    2010-06-24

    Genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of breast cancer. We carried out a multi-stage genome-wide association (GWA) study in over 28,000 cases and controls recruited from 12 studies conducted in Asian and European American women to identify genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. After analyzing 684,457 SNPs in 2,073 cases and 2,084 controls in Chinese women, we evaluated 53 SNPs for fast-track replication in an independent set of 4,425 cases and 1,915 controls of Chinese origin. Four replicated SNPs were further investigated in an independent set of 6,173 cases and 6,340 controls from seven other studies conducted in Asian women. SNP rs4784227 was consistently associated with breast cancer risk across all studies with adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.25 (1.20-1.31) per allele (P = 3.2 x 10(-25)) in the pooled analysis of samples from all Asian samples. This SNP was also associated with breast cancer risk among European Americans (per allele OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.09-1.31, P = 1.3 x 10(-4), 2,797 cases and 2,662 controls). SNP rs4784227 is located at 16q12.1, a region identified previously for breast cancer risk among Europeans. The association of this SNP with breast cancer risk remained highly statistically significant in Asians after adjusting for previously-reported SNPs in this region. In vitro experiments using both luciferase reporter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated functional significance of this SNP. These results provide strong evidence implicating rs4784227 as a functional causal variant for breast cancer in the locus 16q12.1 and demonstrate the utility of conducting genetic association studies in populations with different genetic architectures.

  5. Selection of monoclonal antibodies for the identification of D variants: ability to detect weak D and to split epD2, epD5 and epD6/7.

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Filbey, D

    1996-01-01

    Red cells from known D variant donors were tested with 41 monoclonal anti-D reagents, 26 IgG and 15 IgM, with the view to selecting a panel to aid the identification of unusual D types. These antibodies gave reaction patterns which allowed the identification of most of the known D category cells, recognizing epD2, epD5, epD6/7, epD8 and epD9, but were unable to distinguish category III from normal D-positive cells. Reactivity with HMi, HMii, DFR, DBT and RoHar cells split epD2, epD5 and epD6/7 into two, three and eight groups, respectively. A panel comprising 15 monoclonal anti-D, 11 IgG and four IgM, was selected as representative of the antibodies tested. Reactivity of monoclonal anti-D was dependent on antibody concentration and antibody avidity. An antibody concentration of at least 12 micrograms/ml was required for optimum reactivity of the two monoclonal antibodies tested. A simple calculation of division of the titre by the antibody concentration provided a relatively simple means of establishing the reactivity performance of the antibody and correlated well with ability to detect weak D (Du) cells. A characteristic variable reduction in reaction strength with all the IgG anti-D was observed with weak D cells. The IgM antibodies, except the high avidity RUM-1, T3D2T6, D9A4 and BS226, performed poorly in detecting weak D. The majority of the IgM antibodies tested reacted with RoHarr cells, while only one IgG antibody was positive. PMID:8740011

  6. Identification of a Functional Genetic Variant at 16q12.1 for Breast Cancer Risk: Results from the Asia Breast Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Qu, Shimian; Li, Chun; Zheng, Ying; Gu, Kai; Wang, Wenjing; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cheng, Jiarong; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Lina; Zheng, Hong; Shen, Chen-Yang; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Wang, Furu; Deming, Sandra L.; Kelley, Mark C.; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Khoo, Ui Soon; Chan, Kelvin Y. K.; Chan, Sum Yin; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Iwasaki, Motoki; Kasuga, Yoshio; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tajima, Kazuo; Iwata, Hiroji; Huang, Bo; Shi, Jiajun; Li, Guoliang; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Lu, Wei; Zheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of breast cancer. We carried out a multi-stage genome-wide association (GWA) study in over 28,000 cases and controls recruited from 12 studies conducted in Asian and European American women to identify genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. After analyzing 684,457 SNPs in 2,073 cases and 2,084 controls in Chinese women, we evaluated 53 SNPs for fast-track replication in an independent set of 4,425 cases and 1,915 controls of Chinese origin. Four replicated SNPs were further investigated in an independent set of 6,173 cases and 6,340 controls from seven other studies conducted in Asian women. SNP rs4784227 was consistently associated with breast cancer risk across all studies with adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.25 (1.20−1.31) per allele (P = 3.2×10−25) in the pooled analysis of samples from all Asian samples. This SNP was also associated with breast cancer risk among European Americans (per allele OR  = 1.19, 95% CI  = 1.09−1.31, P = 1.3×10−4, 2,797 cases and 2,662 controls). SNP rs4784227 is located at 16q12.1, a region identified previously for breast cancer risk among Europeans. The association of this SNP with breast cancer risk remained highly statistically significant in Asians after adjusting for previously-reported SNPs in this region. In vitro experiments using both luciferase reporter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated functional significance of this SNP. These results provide strong evidence implicating rs4784227 as a functional causal variant for breast cancer in the locus 16q12.1 and demonstrate the utility of conducting genetic association studies in populations with different genetic architectures. PMID:20585626

  7. Transcriptomics and Identification of the Chemoreceptor Superfamily of the Pupal Parasitoid of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuping; Zheng, Yuan; Li, Dunsong; Fan, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, causes serious losses to fruit production and is one of the most economically important pests in many countries, including China, Spalangia endius Walker is a pupal parasitoid of various dipteran hosts, and may be considered a potentially important ectoparasitic pupal parasitoid of B. dorsalis. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its interaction with this host. Analysis of the S. endius transcriptome is essential to extend the resources of genetic information on this species and, to support studies on S. endius on the host B. dorsalis. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed de novo assembly RNA-seq of S. endius. We obtained nearly 10 Gbp of data using a HiSeq platform, and 36319 high-quality transcripts using Trinity software. A total of 22443 (61.79%) unigenes were aligned to homologous sequences in the jewel wasp and honeybee (Apis florae) protein set from public databases. A total of 10037 protein domains were identified in 7892 S. endius transcripts using HMMER3 software. We identified expression of six gustatory receptor and 21 odorant receptor genes in the sample, with only one gene having a high expression level in each family. The other genes had a low expression level, including two genes regulated by splicing. This result may be due to the wasps being kept under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a total of 3727 SSR markers were predicted, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms and functional genes within wasp populations. Conclusion/Significance This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of S. endius and provides a large number of gene sequences for further study. PMID:24505315

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Variant Selection for Displacive Transformations Under Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Saurabh; Verma, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Vikram

    2012-07-01

    The existing variant selection models for displacive transformations are mostly qualitative in nature and attempt to predict the bulk texture using several fitting parameters. Many of these models use Kurdjumov-Sach (K-S) type orientation relationships (ORs) and ignore the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography. So far there has not been any attempt to assess variant selection in the level of individual variants within one austenite grain. In this work, new kinds of experiments and innovative mathematical models have been developed to critically assess the variant selection phenomenon during bainite transformation under externally applied stress. Volume fractions of individual variants in a austenite grain have been calculated for the first time. Patel and Cohen's theory on variant selection has been used in a new mathematical framework. Hitherto unknown aspects of variant selection have been found, which is exciting and provides new insight into the subject.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a mutant liver aldolase in adult hereditary fructose intolerance. Identification of the enzyme variant by radioassay in tissue biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M.; O'Donnell, Martin W.; Camilleri, Michael; Burghes, Arthur H.

    1983-01-01

    antialdolase B-Sepharose facilitated isolation and purification of enzyme from liver biopsy specimens. Active aldolase in normal liver, with substrate activity ratios and Michaelis constants identical to biochemically purified human enzyme, could be recovered from antibody columns. Chromatography on monospecific Fab' antialdolase B enabled pure enzyme protein to be retrieved quantitatively from normal control and HFI liver: direct chemical assay showed 1.88 and 1.15 mg aldolase protein/g of tissue, respectively. This confirmed that the catalytic properties of the HFI aldolase were profoundly impaired with specific activities of fructose-l-phosphate cleavage of 7.21 and 0.07 U/mg, respectively. Radioimmunoassay gave estimates of 7.66 and 1.18 U/mg, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis indicated that immunopurified aldolase from HFI liver possessed a single subunit size similar to material from control liver extracts: Mr 39,100 vs. 37,900±700 (SD) D, respectively. Electrofocusing under denaturing conditions of aldolase isolated in parallel from control and HFI liver revealed the same complement of subunits and, despite qualitative differences in distribution of bands during degradation, no additional charged species. Fructose phosphate aldolase deficiency in hereditary fructose intolerance is attended by the synthesis of an immunoreactive, but functionally and structurally modified enzyme variant that results from a restricted genetic mutation. ImagesFIGURE 2FIGURE 3FIGURE 3FIGURE 6FIGURE 7 PMID:6348085

  10. Cost-Effective and Rapid Presumptive Identification of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Routine Urine, Pus, and Stool Cultures: Evaluation of the Use of CHROMagar Orientation Medium in Conjunction with Simple Biochemical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2000-01-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND+), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND+, LDC+, and ODC negative (ODC−), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND+, LDC−, and ODC+, Citrobacter diversus; IND+ or IND−, LDC−, and ODC−, Citrobacter freundii; IND−, LDC+, and ODC+, Enterobacter aerogenes; IND−, LDC−, and ODC+, Enterobacter cloacae; IND−, LDC+, and ODC−, Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND+, Morganella morganii; IND−, Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND+, Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid identification system not only

  11. Cost-effective and rapid presumptive identification of gram-negative bacilli in routine urine, pus, and stool cultures: evaluation of the use of CHROMagar orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests.

    PubMed

    Ohkusu, K

    2000-12-01

    The algorithm for a new identification system was designed on the basis of colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation medium in conjunction with simple biochemical tests such as indole (IND), lysine decarboxylase (LDC), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) utilization tests with gram-negative bacilli isolated from urine samples as well as pus, stool, and other clinical specimens by the following colony characteristics, biochemical reactions, and serological results: pinkish to red, IND positive (IND(+)), Escherichia coli; metallic blue, IND(+), LDC(+), and ODC negative (ODC(-)), Klebsiella oxytoca; IND(+), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Citrobacter diversus; IND(+) or IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(-), Citrobacter freundii; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(+), Enterobacter aerogenes; IND(-), LDC(-), and ODC(+), Enterobacter cloacae; IND(-), LDC(+), and ODC(-), Klebsiella pneumoniae; diffuse brown and IND(+), Morganella morganii; IND(-), Proteus mirabilis; aqua blue, Serratia marcescens; bluish green and IND(+), Proteus vulgaris; transparent yellow-green, serology positive, Pseudomonas aeruginosa; clear and serology positive, Salmonella sp.; other colors and reactions, the organism was identified by the full identification methods. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this new system were prospectively evaluated. During an 8-month period, a total of 345 specimens yielded one or more gram-negative bacilli. A total of 472 gram-negative bacillus isolates were detected on CHROMagar Orientation medium. For 466 of the isolates (98.7%), no discrepancies in the results were obtained on the basis of the identification algorithm. The cost of identification of gram-negative bacilli during this period was reduced by about 70%. The results of this trial for the differentiation of the most commonly encountered gram-negative pathogens in clinical specimens with the new algorithm were favourable in that it permitted reliable detection and presumptive identification. In addition, this rapid

  12. Directed Evolution of Streptavidin Variants Using IVC

    PubMed Central

    Levy, M.; Ellington, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We have developed and implemented an in vitro compartmentalization (IVC) selection scheme for the identification of streptavidin (SA) variants with altered specificities for the biotin analog desthiobiotin. Wild-type SA and selected variants bind desthiobiotin with similar affinities (~10−13 M), but the variants have off-rates almost 50 times slower and a half-life for dissociation of 24 hours at 25°C. The utility of streptavidin variants with altered specificities and kinetic properties was demonstrated by constructing protein microarrays that could be used to differentially organize and immobilize DNAs bearing these ligands. The methods we have developed should prove to be generally useful for generating a variety of novel SA reagents, and for evolving other extremely high affinity protein:ligand couples. PMID:18804035

  13. A Curriculum Orientation Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babin, Patrick

    The Curriculum Orientation Profile was designed to assist in the identification of individual perspectives on curriculum and curricular decision-making. It contains 57 items, with which one agrees or disagrees. Each item is also given a code to be used in interpreting the score. Items with which one agrees are assigned to one of five codes,…

  14. Histone variants and melanoma: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Ulff-Møller, Constance J; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer with rising incidence and morbidity. Despite advances in treatment, the 10-yr survival for patients with metastatic disease is less than 10%. During the past few years, ongoing research on different epigenomic aberrations in melanoma has catalyzed better understanding of its pathogenesis and identification of new therapeutics. In our review, we will focus on the role of histone variants, key epigenetic players in melanoma initiation and progression. Specifically, incorporation of histone variants enables additional layers of chromatin structure, and here, we will describe how alterations in this epigenetic behavior impact melanoma.

  15. Hemoglobin variants in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Kyrri, Andreani R; Felekis, Xenia; Kalogerou, Eleni; Wild, Barbara J; Kythreotis, Loukas; Phylactides, Marios; Kleanthous, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Cyprus, located at the eastern end of the Mediterranean region, has been a place of eastern and western civilizations, and the presence of various hemoglobin (Hb) variants can be considered a testimony to past colonizations of the island. In this study, we report the structural Hb variants identified in the Cypriot population (Greek Cypriots, Maronites, Armenians, and Latinos) during the thalassemia screening of 248,000 subjects carried out at the Thalassaemia Centre, Nicosia, Cyprus, over a period of 26 years. A sample population of 65,668 people was used to determine the frequency and localization of several of the variants identified in Cyprus. The localization of some of the variants in regions where the presence of foreign people was most prevalent provides important clues to the origin of the variants. Twelve structural variants have been identified by DNA sequencing, nine concerning the beta-globin gene and three concerning the alpha-globin gene. The most common beta-globin variants identified were Hb S (0.2%), Hb D-Punjab (0.02%), and Hb Lepore-Washington-Boston (Hb Lepore-WB) (0.03%); the most common alpha-globin variant was Hb Setif (0.1%). The presence of some of these variants is likely to be directly linked to the history of Cyprus, as archeological monuments have been found throughout the island which signify the presence for many years of the Greeks, Syrians, Persians, Arabs, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians, and Turks. PMID:19373583

  16. Search-based model identification of smart-structure damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Macalou, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combined model and parameter identification approach, based on modal analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, for identifying damage or flaws in a rotating truss structure incorporating embedded piezoceramic sensors. This smart structure example is representative of a class of structures commonly found in aerospace systems and next generation space structures. Artificial intelligence techniques of classification, heuristic search, and an object-oriented knowledge base are used in an AI-based model identification approach. A finite model space is classified into a search tree, over which a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose stored response most closely matches that of the input. Newly-encountered models can be incorporated into the model space. This adaptativeness demonstrates the potential for learning control. Following this output-error model identification, numerical parameter identification is used to further refine the identified model. Given the rotating truss example in this paper, noisy data corresponding to various damage configurations are input to both this approach and a conventional parameter identification method. The combination of the AI-based model identification with parameter identification is shown to lead to smaller parameter corrections than required by the use of parameter identification alone.

  17. Mutation update: the spectra of nebulin variants and associated myopathies.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G; den Dunnen, Johan T; Beggs, Alan H; Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N; Laing, Nigel G; Romero, Norma B; Winder, Thomas L; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-12-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (∼7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype-phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  18. Mutation Update: The Spectra of Nebulin Variants and Associated Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A.; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Laing, Nigel G.; Romero, Norma B.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (~7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype–phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  19. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Zev N; Osborne, Edward J; Cone, Kelsey R; Kennedy, Brett J; Domyan, Eric T; Shapiro, Michael D; Elde, Nels C; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs) from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics) to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham), with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/). For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  20. Protein characterization by LC-MS/MS may be required for the DNA identification of a fusion hemoglobin: the example of Hb P-Nilotic.

    PubMed

    Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Delolme, Frédéric; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Vinatier, Isabelle; Francina, Alain; Joly, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    DNA analysis is currently the easiest way to identify a hemoglobin variant in most cases. Nevertheless, in case of complex gene rearrangements, mass spectrometry studies may be required to orientate the DNA diagnosis. The present report shows the use of mass spectrometry techniques prior to DNA analysis for the identification of the rare P-Nilotic fusion hemoglobin. Complete protein analysis is performed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on the abnormal globin chain isolated by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

  1. Evaluation of the Biomic V3 Microbiology System for Identification of Selected Species on BBL CHROMagar Orientation Agar and CHROMagar MRSA Medium ▿

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ellen Jo; D'Souza, Holly; Qi Wang, Andrew; Gibbs, David L.

    2008-01-01

    The Biomic V3 microbiology system identifies bacteria by reading the color of colonies selected by the user. For CHROMagar orientation, Biomic results agreed with conventional methods for 94% of the strains assayed. For CHROMagar MRSA, Biomic correctly identified 100% of the strains tested and did not misidentify two methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains growing on the plates. PMID:18701661

  2. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  3. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  4. Identification of Key Proteins and Networks Related to Grain Development in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Comparative Transcription and Proteomic Analysis of Allelic Variants in TaGW2-6A

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dengfeng; Gao, Xin; Geng, Juan; Li, Qingyan; Li, Liqun; Lv, Qian; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    In wheat, coding region allelic variants of TaGW2-6A are closely associated with grain width and weight, but the genetic mechanisms involved remain unclear. Thus, to obtain insights into the key functions regulated by TaGW2-6A during wheat grain development, we performed transcriptional and proteomic analyses of TaGW2-6A allelic variants. The transcription results showed that the TaGW2-6A allelic variants differed significantly by several orders of magnitude. Each allelic variant of TaGW2-6A reached its first transcription peak at 6 days after anthesis (DAA), but the insertion type TaGW2-6A allelic variant reached its second peak earlier than the normal type, i.e., at 12 DAA rather than 20 DAA. In total, we identified 228 differentially accumulated protein spots representing 138 unique proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS in these three stages. Based on the results, we found some key proteins that are closely related to wheat grain development. The results of this analysis improve our understanding of the genetic mechanisms related to TaGW2-6A during wheat grain development as well as providing insights into the biological processes involved in seed formation. PMID:27446152

  5. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  6. A cognitive map model based on spatial and goal-oriented mental exploration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Wang, Rubin; Wang, Ziyin

    2013-11-01

    The rodent hippocampus has been used to represent the spatial environment as a cognitive map. Classical theories suggest that the cognitive map is a consequence of assignment of different spatial regions to variant cell populations in the framework of rate coding. The current study constructs a novel computational neural model of the cognitive map based on firing rate coding, as widely appears in associative memory, thus providing an explanation for formation and function of the two types of cognitive maps: the spatial vector map, responsible for self localization and simultaneous updating of detailed information; and the goal-oriented vector map, important in route finding. A proposed intermediate between these two map types was constructed by combining the spatial vector and goal-orientation maps to form an effective and efficient path finding mechanism. Application of such novel cognitive map based path finding methods to a mental exploration model was explored. With adaptation as a driving force, the basic knowledge of the location relationships in the spatial cognitive map was reformed and sent to the goal-oriented cognitive map, thus solving a series of new path problems through mental exploration. This method allows for rapid identification of suitable paths under variant conditions, thus providing a simpler and safer resource for path finding. Additionally, this method also provides an improved basis for potential robotic path finding applications.

  7. Twin Research and the Arts: Interconnections / Twin Research: Twin Studies of Sexual Orientation; A Historical Biological Twin Gem; GWAS Approach to Who Has Twins / Newsworthy: Twins on College Campuses; 'Brainprint': Personal Identification by Brain Waves.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2016-08-01

    The interrelatedness between twin research and the arts is explored via a new play about a famous case. In the 1960s, identical twin David Bruce Reimer was accidentally castrated as an infant during circumcision to correct a urinary problem. The decision to raise him as a girl, and the consequences of that decision, are explored in the new theatrical production of Boy. Other examples of the arts mirroring science, and vice versa, are described. Next, brief reviews and summaries of twin research on sexual orientation, 1860s' knowledge of placental arrangements and twinning mechanisms, and genes underlying multiple birth conception and fertility related measures are provided. This article concludes with a look at twins on college campuses and the identification of individuals by their brain waves. A correction and clarification regarding my article on the Brazilian Twin Registry in the last issue of THG (Segal, 2016) is also provided. PMID:27436054

  8. New tools for Mendelian disease gene identification: PhenoDB variant analysis module; and GeneMatcher, a web-based tool for linking investigators with an interest in the same gene.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Nara; Schiettecatte, François; Boehm, Corinne; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the causative variant from among the thousands identified by whole-exome sequencing or whole-genome sequencing is a formidable challenge. To make this process as efficient and flexible as possible, we have developed a Variant Analysis Module coupled to our previously described Web-based phenotype intake tool, PhenoDB (http://researchphenodb.net and http://phenodb.org). When a small number of candidate-causative variants have been identified in a study of a particular patient or family, a second, more difficult challenge becomes proof of causality for any given variant. One approach to this problem is to find other cases with a similar phenotype and mutations in the same candidate gene. Alternatively, it may be possible to develop biological evidence for causality, an approach that is assisted by making connections to basic scientists studying the gene of interest, often in the setting of a model organism. Both of these strategies benefit from an open access, online site where individual clinicians and investigators could post genes of interest. To this end, we developed GeneMatcher (http://genematcher.org), a freely accessible Website that enables connections between clinicians and researchers across the world who share an interest in the same gene(s).

  9. New Tools for Mendelian Disease Gene Identification: PhenoDB Variant Analysis Module; and GeneMatcher, a Web-Based Tool for Linking Investigators with an Interest in the Same Gene

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Nara; Schiettecatte, François; Boehm, Corinne; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the causative variant from among the thousands identified by whole-exome sequencing or whole-genome sequencing is a formidable challenge. To make this process as efficient and flexible as possible, we have developed a Variant Analysis Module coupled to our previously described Web-based phenotype intake tool, PhenoDB (http://researchphenodb.net and http://phenodb.org). When a small number of candidate-causative variants have been identified in a study of a particular patient or family, a second, more difficult challenge becomes proof of causality for any given variant. One approach to this problem is to find other cases with a similar phenotype and mutations in the same candidate gene. Alternatively, it may be possible to develop biological evidence for causality, an approach that is assisted by making connections to basic scientists studying the gene of interest, often in the setting of a model organism. Both of these strategies benefit from an open access, online site where individual clinicians and investigators could post genes of interest. To this end, we developed GeneMatcher (http://genematcher.org), a freely accessible Website that enables connections between clinicians and researchers across the world who share an interest in the same gene(s). PMID:25684268

  10. Crystallographic and magnetic identification of secondary phase in orientated Bi5Fe0.5Co0.5Ti3O15 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palizdar, Meghdad; Comyn, Tim P.; Ward, Michael B.; Brown, Andrew P.; Harrington, John P.; Kulkarni, Santosh; Keeney, Lynette; Roy, Saibal; Pemble, Martyn; Whatmore, Roger; Quinn, Christopher; Kilcoyne, Susan H.; Bell, Andrew J.

    2012-10-01

    The fabrication of highly-oriented polycrystalline ceramics of Bi5Fe0.5Co0.5Ti3O15, prepared via molten salt synthesis and uniaxial pressing of high aspect ratio platelets is reported. Electron backscatter images show a secondary phase within the ceramic which is rich in cobalt and iron. The concentration of the secondary phase obtained from scanning electron microscopy is estimated at less than 2% by volume, below the detection limit of x-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, polarization-electric field measurements, superconducting quantum interference device as a function of sample orientation and vibrating sample magnetometry as a function of temperature. It is inferred from the data that the observed ferromagnetic response is dominated by the secondary phase. This work highlights the importance of rigorous materials characterisation in the study of multiferroics as small amounts of secondary phase, below the limit of XRD, can lead to false conclusions.

  11. Identification of a novel HIP1-ALK fusion variant in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and discovery of ALK I1171 (I1171N/S) mutations in two ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients with resistance to Alectinib.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Klempner, Samuel J; Greenbowe, Joel R; Azada, Michele; Schrock, Alexa B; Ali, Siraj M; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A

    2014-12-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) has recently been identified as a new fusion partner fused to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To date, two variants of HIP1-ALK (H21; A20) and (H28; A20) have been identified in NSCLC. However, the response of patients with NSCLC harboring HIP1-ALK to ALK inhibitors and potential resistance mechanisms to such remain unknown. Here, we report a patient with NSCLC harboring a novel HIP1-ALK fusion variant (H30; A20). This patient and another patient with EML4-ALK variant 3a/b initially responded sequentially to crizotinib and then alectinib, a next-generation ALK inhibitor, but developed acquired resistance to alectinib with the presence of a mutation in amino acid residue 1171 (I1171N and I1171S respectively) located in the hydrophobic regulatory spine (R-spine) of the ALK kinase in both the cases as identified by a comprehensive next-generation sequencing-based assay performed on biopsies of new liver metastases that developed during alectinib treatment.

  12. Identification of androgenic gland microRNA and their target genes to discover sex-related microRNA in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Jin, S B; Fu, H T; Jiang, S F; Xiong, Y W; Qiao, H; Zhang, W Y; Gong, Y S; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in the differentiation of crustaceans to the male sex. MicroRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptionally regulates many protein-coding genes, influencing important biological and metabolic processes. However, currently, there is no published data identifying miRNA in M. nipponense. In this study, we identified novel miRNA in the androgenic gland of M. nipponense. Using the high-throughput Illumina Solexa system, 1077 miRNA were identified from small RNA libraries by aligning with the de novo androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense (obtained from RNA-Seq) and the sequences in the miRBase21 database. A total of 8,248, 76,011, and 78,307 target genes were predicted in the EST and SRA sequences provided in the NCBI database, and the androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense, respectively. Some potential sex-related miRNA were identified based on the function of the predicted target genes. The results of our study provide new information regarding the miRNA expression in M. nipponense, which could be the basis for further genetic studies on decapod crustaceans. PMID:26782487

  13. Identification of the sex of Oriental white stork, Ciconia boyciana, by the polymerase chain reaction based on its sex chromosome-specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Ogawa, A; Murata, K; Hosoda, T; Mizuno, S

    1997-02-01

    Southern blotting of HindIII-digested genomic DNAs from the female and male Oriental white stork (Ciconia boyciana) with the EE0.6 probe cloned from the W chromosome of chicken (Gallus domesticus) produced a 3.0-kb W chromosome-derived band specific to the female and a 3.5-kb Z chromosome-derived band common to both sexes. These two genomic fragments were cloned and the counterpart sequences to that of EE0.6 in these fragments, XH0.6 and XH0.6RSM (XH0.6-related sequence in the male), respectively, were subcloned. Nucleotide sequences of XH0.6 and XH0.6RSM showed 92% identity. PCR using a set of primer sequences from XH0.6, which differed several nucleotides from those in XH0.6RSM, amplified an about 300-bp genomic sequence only from the female C. boyciana. This method was applied successfully to identify the sex of individual young birds of C. boyciana, an endangered special natural monument in Japan and whose sexes are unidentifiable from their external morphology.

  14. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  15. Impact of Pathogen Population Heterogeneity and Stress-Resistant Variants on Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Koomen, J; Metselaar, K I; Zwietering, M H; den Besten, H M W

    2016-01-01

    This review elucidates the state-of-the-art knowledge about pathogen population heterogeneity and describes the genotypic and phenotypic analyses of persister subpopulations and stress-resistant variants. The molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of persister phenotypes and genetic variants are identified. Zooming in on Listeria monocytogenes, a comparative whole-genome sequence analysis of wild types and variants that enabled the identification of mutations in variants obtained after a single exposure to lethal food-relevant stresses is described. Genotypic and phenotypic features are compared to those for persistent strains isolated from food processing environments. Inactivation kinetics, models used for fitting, and the concept of kinetic modeling-based schemes for detection of variants are presented. Furthermore, robustness and fitness parameters of L. monocytogenes wild type and variants are used to model their performance in food chains. Finally, the impact of stress-resistant variants and persistence in food processing environments on food safety is discussed.

  16. Impact of Pathogen Population Heterogeneity and Stress-Resistant Variants on Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; Koomen, J; Metselaar, K I; Zwietering, M H; den Besten, H M W

    2016-01-01

    This review elucidates the state-of-the-art knowledge about pathogen population heterogeneity and describes the genotypic and phenotypic analyses of persister subpopulations and stress-resistant variants. The molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of persister phenotypes and genetic variants are identified. Zooming in on Listeria monocytogenes, a comparative whole-genome sequence analysis of wild types and variants that enabled the identification of mutations in variants obtained after a single exposure to lethal food-relevant stresses is described. Genotypic and phenotypic features are compared to those for persistent strains isolated from food processing environments. Inactivation kinetics, models used for fitting, and the concept of kinetic modeling-based schemes for detection of variants are presented. Furthermore, robustness and fitness parameters of L. monocytogenes wild type and variants are used to model their performance in food chains. Finally, the impact of stress-resistant variants and persistence in food processing environments on food safety is discussed. PMID:26772414

  17. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  18. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  19. Novel RNA variants in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Nome, Torfinn; Løvf, Marthe; Bakken, Anne C.; Hektoen, Merete; Sveen, Anita; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    With an annual estimated incidence of 1.4 million, and a five-year survival rate of 60%, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major clinical burden. To identify novel RNA variants in CRC, we analyzed exon-level microarray expression data from a cohort of 202 CRCs. We nominated 25 genes with increased expression of their 3′ parts in at least one cancer sample each. To efficiently investigate underlying transcript structures, we developed an approach using rapid amplification of cDNA ends followed by high throughput sequencing (RACE-seq). RACE products from the targeted genes in 23 CRC samples were pooled together and sequenced. We identified VWA2-TCF7L2, DHX35-BPIFA2 and CASZ1-MASP2 as private fusion events, and novel transcript structures for 17 of the 23 other candidate genes. The high-throughput approach facilitated identification of CRC specific RNA variants. These include a recurrent read-through fusion transcript between KLK8 and KLK7, and a splice variant of S100A2. Both of these were overrepresented in CRC tissue and cell lines from external RNA-seq datasets. PMID:26474385

  20. Crystallographic variant selection in {alpha}-{beta} brass

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, N.; Bate, P.S. . E-mail: pete.bate@man.ac.uk

    2005-02-01

    The transformation texture of {alpha}/{beta} brass with a diffusional Widmanstaetten {alpha} growth morphology has been investigated. Electron micrographs and electron backscattered diffraction was used to determine that the orientation relationship between the {beta} phase and the {alpha} associated with nucleation at {beta} grain boundaries was 44.3 deg <1 1 6>. Crystallographic variant selection was observed across those prior {beta}/{beta} grain boundaries, but this has little effect on the transformation texture due to the crystal symmetry. The effect of the crystallographic variant selection on texture is further weakened by nucleation of diffusional transformed {alpha} in the grain interior.

  1. Identification of Unique, Heterozygous Germline Mutation, STK11 (p.F354L), in a Child with an Encapsulated Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma within Six Months of Completing Treatment for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Buryk, Melissa A; Picarsic, Jennifer L; Creary, Susan E; Shaw, Peter H; Simons, Jeffrey P; Deutsch, Melvin; Monaco, Sara E; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is rare in children, although it is a known secondary malignancy after treatment for neuroblastoma (NB). The interval between NB treatment completion and PTC is usually more than 5 years. A 4-year-old, female patient with a high risk adrenal NB was found to have a 2.9-cm, right thyroid nodule on surveillance chest computed tomography (CT) 6 months after completion of her NB treatment (induction chemotherapy, tumor resection, autologous stem cell transplantation, external beam radiation to the abdominal tumor site, immunotherapy, and retinoic acid). Posttreatment surveillance included iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine scans and CT scans. Fine-needle aspiration of the thyroid nodule diagnosed a follicular neoplasm, which was negative for BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, PAX8/PPARg, and RET/PTC mutations, without evidence of metastatic NB. Nodule histology demonstrated an encapsulated follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Next-generation sequence analysis for a 46 cancer-gene profile was performed on both tumors with subsequent peripheral blood DNA testing. A heterozygous missense mutation in STK11 (F354L) was identified in both the NB and FVPTC. This mutation was also detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Two additional heterozygous somatic missense mutations of uncertain significance were identified: KDR/VEGF receptor 2 (Q472H) on chromosome 4 and MET (N375S) on chromosome 7. To our knowledge, this is the shortest reported duration from completion of NB treatment to detection of thyroid cancer. The association of the STK11 gene with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, lung adenocarcinomas, and medullary thyroid cancer leads to a possible association between this genetic variant and our patient's tumors.

  2. Background-oriented schlieren (BOS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffel, Markus

    2015-03-01

    This article gives an overview of the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique, typical applications and literature in the field. BOS is an optical density visualization technique, belonging to the same family as schlieren photography, shadowgraphy or interferometry. In contrast to these older techniques, BOS uses correlation techniques on a background dot pattern to quantitatively characterize compressible and thermal flows with good spatial and temporal resolution. The main advantages of this technique, the experimental simplicity and the robustness of correlation-based digital analysis, mean that it is widely used, and variant versions are reviewed in the article. The advantages of each variant are reviewed, and further literature is provided for the reader.

  3. Generalization of Rare Variant Association Tests for Longitudinal Family Studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Given the functional relevance of many rare variants, their identification is frequently critical for dissecting disease etiology. Functional variants are likely to be aggregated in family studies enriched with affected members, and this aggregation increases the statistical power to detect rare variants associated with a trait of interest. Longitudinal family studies provide additional information for identifying genetic and environmental factors associated with disease over time. However, methods to analyze rare variants in longitudinal family data remain fairly limited. These methods should be capable of accounting for different sources of correlations and handling large amounts of sequencing data efficiently. To identify rare variants associated with a phenotype in longitudinal family studies, we extended pedigree-based burden (BT) and kernel (KS) association tests to genetic longitudinal studies. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) approaches were used to generalize the pedigree-based BT and KS to multiple correlated phenotypes under the generalized linear model framework, adjusting for fixed effects of confounding factors. These tests accounted for complex correlations between repeated measures of the same phenotype (serial correlations) and between individuals in the same family (familial correlations). We conducted comprehensive simulation studies to compare the proposed tests with mixed-effects models and marginal models, using GEEs under various configurations. When the proposed tests were applied to data from the Diabetes Heart Study, we found exome variants of POMGNT1 and JAK1 genes were associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26783077

  4. Five Rare β Globin Chain Hemoglobin Variants in India.

    PubMed

    Colah, Roshan B; Nadkarni, Anita; Gorakshakar, Ajit; Sawant, Pratibha; Gorivale, Manju; Mehta, Pallavi; Sawant, Madhavi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-06-01

    Thalassemias as well as structural hemoglobin (Hb) variants are common monogenic inherited disorders of Hb in India. In this paper we describe 5 rare β-chain Hb variants identified in the Indian population on the basis of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of these 3 were identified during antenatal screening of β-thalassemia while the other 2 cases were referred to us for a diagnostic work up. These 5 Hb variants were Hb British Columbia (β CD 101 GAG → AAG), Hb Saint Louis (β CD28 CTG → CAG), Hb G Coushatta (β CD 22 GAA → GCA), Hb Pyrgos (β CD 83 GGC → GAC) and Hb Agenogi (β CD 90 GAG → AAG). Hb Saint Louis and Hb G Coushatta eluted in the HbA2 window, Hb British Columbia and Hb Agenogi eluted in the Hb C window while Hb Pyrgos eluted in an unknown window on HPLC. They were all identified by DNA sequencing. The child having Hb St. Louis had hepatosplenomegaly and anemia while the individuals with the other 4 variants were asymptomatic. Rare Hb variants are diagnostic curiosities that may be encountered by laboratories. Correct identification requires the application of more than one technique to avoid misdiagnosing them as more common variants (e.g. St. Louis and G Coushatta as E or D Iran on HPLC. Some, like G Coushatta may interfere with HPLC-based HbA1c estimation). PMID:27408413

  5. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian reproduction: contribution from histone variants.

    PubMed

    Santenard, Angèle; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2009-02-16

    Development of the mammalian embryo is, by definition, epigenetic. At the level of the nucleosome, the building block of the chromatin, changes in chromatin structure can be regulated through histone content. Apart from the canonical histones whose synthesis is restricted to S-phase, different histone variants have been identified. Histone variants can help to establish specialised chromatin regions and to regulate developmental and cell differentiation processes. While the role of histone variants has been extensively explored in differentiated cells, less is known in germ cells and embryos. Increasing lines of evidence suggest that the functions and/or properties of histone variants in embryos might be different to those in somatic cells. During reprogramming, histone variants such as H3.3 or H2A.Z are candidates to play potential important roles. We suggest that H3.3 has an important role in setting up a 'transition' signature, and provides the possibility to infer changes in chromatin architecture independent of DNA replication. This should confer flexibility during important developmental processes. The specific pathways through which H3.3 could regulate different chromatin conformations at different loci and the identification of specific proteins responsible for this deposition are an important challenge for future investigation. Lastly, the set of variants incorporated within the nucleosome can have important consequences in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms during development. PMID:19242119

  6. Generalization of Rare Variant Association Tests for Longitudinal Family Studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2016-02-01

    Given the functional relevance of many rare variants, their identification is frequently critical for dissecting disease etiology. Functional variants are likely to be aggregated in family studies enriched with affected members, and this aggregation increases the statistical power to detect rare variants associated with a trait of interest. Longitudinal family studies provide additional information for identifying genetic and environmental factors associated with disease over time. However, methods to analyze rare variants in longitudinal family data remain fairly limited. These methods should be capable of accounting for different sources of correlations and handling large amounts of sequencing data efficiently. To identify rare variants associated with a phenotype in longitudinal family studies, we extended pedigree-based burden (BT) and kernel (KS) association tests to genetic longitudinal studies. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) approaches were used to generalize the pedigree-based BT and KS to multiple correlated phenotypes under the generalized linear model framework, adjusting for fixed effects of confounding factors. These tests accounted for complex correlations between repeated measures of the same phenotype (serial correlations) and between individuals in the same family (familial correlations). We conducted comprehensive simulation studies to compare the proposed tests with mixed-effects models and marginal models, using GEEs under various configurations. When the proposed tests were applied to data from the Diabetes Heart Study, we found exome variants of POMGNT1 and JAK1 genes were associated with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  8. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration.

  9. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration. PMID:27159990

  10. A proteogenomic approach for protein-level evidence of genomic variants in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jeonghun; Kabir, Mohammad Humayun; Lim, Byungho; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Cheolju

    2016-01-01

    Variations in protein coding sequence may sometimes play important roles in cancer development. However, since variants may not express into proteins due to various cellular quality control systems, it is important to get protein-level evidence of the genomic variations. We present a proteogenomic strategy getting protein-level evidence of genomic variants, which we call sequential targeted LC-MS/MS based on prediction of peptide pI and Retention time (STaLPIR). Our approach shows improved peptide identification, and has the potential for the unbiased analysis of variant sequence as well as corresponding reference sequence. Integrated analysis of DNA, mRNA and protein suggests that protein expression level of the nonsynonymous variant is regulated either before or after translation, according to influence of the variant on protein function. In conclusion, our data provides an excellent approach getting direct evidence for the expression of variant protein forms from genome sequence data. PMID:27734975

  11. Orienting hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  12. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of an Amerindian human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) isolate: identification of a variant HTLV-II subtype b from a Guaymi Indian.

    PubMed Central

    Pardi, D; Switzer, W M; Hadlock, K G; Kaplan, J E; Lal, R B; Folks, T M

    1993-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) isolate from a Panamanian Guaymi Indian was determined and analyzed. When this new viral isolate (HTLV-IIG12) was compared with prototypic HTLV-IIMoT, the overall nucleotide sequence similarity was 95.4%, while the predicted amino acid sequence similarity was 97.5%. Although the overall percentage of nucleotide and amino acid identity with prototypic HTLV-IIMoT (subtype a) was high, HTLV-IIG12 displayed several distinctive features that defined it as an HTLV-II subtype b. However, there were several characteristics unique to this isolate, which included a cluster of nucleotide substitutions in the pre-gag region and changes in restriction enzyme sites within the pre-gag region and the gag, pol, env, and pX genes. In addition, two nucleotide changes in the C terminus of the Tax protein coding sequence inserted an Arg residue for a stop codon and appeared to result in a larger tax gene product in HTLV-IIG12. Although the HTLV-IIG12 isolate appears to be a variant of the prototypic HTLV-IIb, this information represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of any HTLV-II subtype b. These data will allow further studies on the evolutionary relationships between the HTLV-II subtypes and between HTLV-I and HTLV-II. PMID:8331724

  14. Crystallographic variant selection of martensite during fatigue deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2015-03-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are prone to form deformation-induced martensite under the influence of externally applied stress. Crystallographic variant selection during martensitic transformation of metastable austenite has been investigated thoroughly with respect to the interaction between the applied uniaxial cyclic stress and the resulting accumulated plastic strain during cyclic plastic deformation. The orientation of all the Kurdjomov-Sachs (K-S) variants has been evaluated extensively and compared with the measured orientation of martensite with their corresponding interaction energies by applying the elegant transformation texture model recently developed by Kundu and Bhadeshia. Encouraging correlation between model prediction and experimental data generation for martensite pole figures at many deformed austenite grains has been observed. It has been found that both the applied uniaxial cyclic stress and the accumulated plastic strain are having strong influence on crystallographic variant selection during cyclic plastic deformation. Patel and Cohen's classical theory can be utilized to predict the crystallographic variant selection, if it is correctly used along with the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography.

  15. Scripps Genome ADVISER: Annotation and Distributed Variant Interpretation SERver

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phillip H.; Shipman, William J.; Erikson, Galina A.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Torkamani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of human genomes is a major challenge. We present the Scripps Genome ADVISER (SG-ADVISER) suite, which aims to fill the gap between data generation and genome interpretation by performing holistic, in-depth, annotations and functional predictions on all variant types and effects. The SG-ADVISER suite includes a de-identification tool, a variant annotation web-server, and a user interface for inheritance and annotation-based filtration. SG-ADVISER allows users with no bioinformatics expertise to manipulate large volumes of variant data with ease – without the need to download large reference databases, install software, or use a command line interface. SG-ADVISER is freely available at genomics.scripps.edu/ADVISER. PMID:25706643

  16. Sequencing Structural Variants in Cancer for Precision Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Geoff; Ylstra, Bauke; Brenton, James D

    2016-09-01

    The identification of mutations that guide therapy selection for patients with cancer is now routine in many clinical centres. The majority of assays used for solid tumour profiling use DNA sequencing to interrogate somatic point mutations because they are relatively easy to identify and interpret. Many cancers, however, including high-grade serous ovarian, oesophageal, and small-cell lung cancer, are driven by somatic structural variants that are not measured by these assays. Therefore, there is currently an unmet need for clinical assays that can cheaply and rapidly profile structural variants in solid tumours. In this review we survey the landscape of 'actionable' structural variants in cancer and identify promising detection strategies based on massively-parallel sequencing. PMID:27478068

  17. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  18. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  19. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  20. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  1. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  2. Multiple DNA variant association analysis: Application to the insulin gene region in type I diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, C.; Delepine, M.; Lathrop, G.M. |; Villedieu, P.; Froguel, P.; Levy-Marchal, C.; Boitard, C.; Bell, J.; Danze, P.M.; Bianchi, F.

    1994-12-01

    Association and linkage studies have shown that at least one of the genetic factors involved in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is contained within a 4.1-kb region of the insulin gene. Sequence analysis has led to the identification of 10 DNA variants in this region that are associated with increased risk for IDDM. These variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, and previous studies have failed to distinguish between the variant(s) that cause increased susceptibility to IDDM and others that are associated with the disease because of linkage disequilibrium. To address this problem, we have undertaken a large population study of French diabetics and controls and have analyzed genotype patterns for several of the variant sites simultaneously. This has led to the identification of a subset consisting of four variants (-2733AC, -23HphI, -365VNTR, and +1140AC), at least one of which appears to be directly implicated in disease susceptibility. The multiple-DNA-variant association-analysis approach that is applied here to the problem of identifying potential susceptibility variants in IDDM is likely to be important in studies of many other multifactorial diseases.

  3. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  4. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  5. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  6. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  7. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  8. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Clancy, Brian Gorre

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  10. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  11. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  12. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a decreased risk for addiction to heroin or cocaine. The other linked variants in two genes— OPRM1 , ...

  13. Identifying Mendelian disease genes with the Variant Effect Scoring Tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole exome sequencing studies identify hundreds to thousands of rare protein coding variants of ambiguous significance for human health. Computational tools are needed to accelerate the identification of specific variants and genes that contribute to human disease. Results We have developed the Variant Effect Scoring Tool (VEST), a supervised machine learning-based classifier, to prioritize rare missense variants with likely involvement in human disease. The VEST classifier training set comprised ~ 45,000 disease mutations from the latest Human Gene Mutation Database release and another ~45,000 high frequency (allele frequency >1%) putatively neutral missense variants from the Exome Sequencing Project. VEST outperforms some of the most popular methods for prioritizing missense variants in carefully designed holdout benchmarking experiments (VEST ROC AUC = 0.91, PolyPhen2 ROC AUC = 0.86, SIFT4.0 ROC AUC = 0.84). VEST estimates variant score p-values against a null distribution of VEST scores for neutral variants not included in the VEST training set. These p-values can be aggregated at the gene level across multiple disease exomes to rank genes for probable disease involvement. We tested the ability of an aggregate VEST gene score to identify candidate Mendelian disease genes, based on whole-exome sequencing of a small number of disease cases. We used whole-exome data for two Mendelian disorders for which the causal gene is known. Considering only genes that contained variants in all cases, the VEST gene score ranked dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) number 2 of 2253 genes in four cases of Miller syndrome, and myosin-3 (MYH3) number 2 of 2313 genes in three cases of Freeman Sheldon syndrome. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the potential power gain of aggregating bioinformatics variant scores into gene-level scores and the general utility of bioinformatics in assisting the search for disease genes in large-scale exome sequencing studies. VEST is

  14. Interpreting functional effects of coding variants: challenges in proteome-scale prediction, annotation and assessment.

    PubMed

    Shameer, Khader; Tripathi, Lokesh P; Kalari, Krishna R; Dudley, Joel T; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-09-01

    Accurate assessment of genetic variation in human DNA sequencing studies remains a nontrivial challenge in clinical genomics and genome informatics. Ascribing functional roles and/or clinical significances to single nucleotide variants identified from a next-generation sequencing study is an important step in genome interpretation. Experimental characterization of all the observed functional variants is yet impractical; thus, the prediction of functional and/or regulatory impacts of the various mutations using in silico approaches is an important step toward the identification of functionally significant or clinically actionable variants. The relationships between genotypes and the expressed phenotypes are multilayered and biologically complex; such relationships present numerous challenges and at the same time offer various opportunities for the design of in silico variant assessment strategies. Over the past decade, many bioinformatics algorithms have been developed to predict functional consequences of single nucleotide variants in the protein coding regions. In this review, we provide an overview of the bioinformatics resources for the prediction, annotation and visualization of coding single nucleotide variants. We discuss the currently available approaches and major challenges from the perspective of protein sequence, structure, function and interactions that require consideration when interpreting the impact of putatively functional variants. We also discuss the relevance of incorporating integrated workflows for predicting the biomedical impact of the functionally important variations encoded in a genome, exome or transcriptome. Finally, we propose a framework to classify variant assessment approaches and strategies for incorporation of variant assessment within electronic health records.

  15. Biometrics, identification and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lyon, David

    2008-11-01

    Governing by identity describes the emerging regime of a globalizing, mobile world. Governance depends on identification but identification increasingly depends on biometrics. This 'solution' to difficulties of verification is described and some technical weaknesses are discussed. The role of biometrics in classification systems is also considered and is shown to contain possible prejudice in relation to racialized criteria of identity. Lastly, the culture of biometric identification is shown to be limited to abstract data, artificially separated from the lived experience of the body including the orientation to others. It is proposed that creators of national ID systems in particular address these crucial deficiencies in their attempt to provide new modes of verification.

  16. A survey of tools for variant analysis of next-generation genome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Pabinger, Stephan; Dander, Andreas; Fischer, Maria; Snajder, Rene; Sperk, Michael; Efremova, Mirjana; Krabichler, Birgit; Speicher, Michael R.; Zschocke, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies provide unprecedented opportunities to characterize individual genomic landscapes and identify mutations relevant for diagnosis and therapy. Specifically, whole-exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies is gaining popularity in the human genetics community due to the moderate costs, manageable data amounts and straightforward interpretation of analysis results. While whole-exome and, in the near future, whole-genome sequencing are becoming commodities, data analysis still poses significant challenges and led to the development of a plethora of tools supporting specific parts of the analysis workflow or providing a complete solution. Here, we surveyed 205 tools for whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing data analysis supporting five distinct analytical steps: quality assessment, alignment, variant identification, variant annotation and visualization. We report an overview of the functionality, features and specific requirements of the individual tools. We then selected 32 programs for variant identification, variant annotation and visualization, which were subjected to hands-on evaluation using four data sets: one set of exome data from two patients with a rare disease for testing identification of germline mutations, two cancer data sets for testing variant callers for somatic mutations, copy number variations and structural variations, and one semi-synthetic data set for testing identification of copy number variations. Our comprehensive survey and evaluation of NGS tools provides a valuable guideline for human geneticists working on Mendelian disorders, complex diseases and cancers. PMID:23341494

  17. Crystallographic variant selection of martensite at high stress/strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2015-07-01

    The phenomenological theory of martensitic transformation is well understood that the displacive phase transformations are mainly influenced by the externally applied stress. Martensitic transformation occurs with 24 possible Kurdjomov-Sachs (K-S) variants, where each variant shows a distinct lattice orientation. The elegant transformation texture model of Kundu and Bhadeshia for crystallographic variant selection of martensite in metastable austenite at various stress/strain levels has been assessed in this present research. The corresponding interaction energies have also been evaluated. Encouraging correlation between model prediction and experimental data generation for martensite pole figures at many deformed austenite grains has been observed at different stress/strain levels. It has been investigated that the mechanical driving force alone is able to explain the observed martensite microtextures at all stress/strain levels under uniaxial tensile deformation of metastable austenite under low temperature at a slow strain rate. The present investigation also proves that the Patel and Cohen's classical theory can be utilized to predict the crystallographic variant selection, if it is correctly used along with the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography.

  18. Common Variants for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shutong; Tao, Lichan; Wang, Xiuzhi; Kong, Xiangqing; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with high morbidity and mortality; however, none of the drugs available are now entirely optimal for the treatment of HF. In addition to various clinical diseases and environment influences, genetic factors also contribute to the development and progression of HF. Identifying the common variants for HF by genome-wide association studies will facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HF. This review summarizes the recently identified common variants for HF risk and outcome and discusses their implications for the clinic therapy. PMID:26085806

  19. Occurrence of Fuligo gyrosa Causing Slime Mold of Oriental Melon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan Gyu; Choi, Hyo Won; Hong, Sung Kee; Lee, Young Kee; Lee, Su Heon

    2009-09-01

    Recently, a severe slime mold infestation affected oriental melon plants in fields in Chilgok county, Gyeongbuk province, Korea. Specimens were collected from the fields and examined for identification. A species of Myxomycetes, Fuligo gyrosa, was identified based on its morphological characteristics. This is the first report that F. gyrosa causes slime mold of oriental melon.

  20. The dermal-epidermal junction of human skin contains a novel laminin variant

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel laminin variant that appears to be unique to a subset of epithelial basement membranes. The variant contains two chains electrophoretically and immunologically identical to the B1 and B2 chains. Epitopes contained in the laminin A chain are absent from the molecule, and a 190-kD chain substitutes for the A chain. V8 protease analysis and Western blotting studies indicate that the variant 190-kD chain shows structural and immunological similarity to the 200-kD chain of kalinin. Rotary shadowing analysis indicates that the 190-kD chain contributes a large globular structure to the variant long arm, but lacks the short arm contributed to laminin by the A chain. The variant is produced by cultured skin explants, human keratinocytes and a squamous cell carcinoma line, and is present in human amniotic fluid. Polyclonal antibodies raised to kalinin, a recently characterized novel component of anchoring filaments, and mAb BM165 which recognizes a subunit of kalinin (Rousselle et al., 1991) cross react with the variant under nonreducing conditions. Immunohistological surveys of human tissues using the crossreacting antikalinin antiserum indicate that the distribution of this laminin variant is at least restricted to anchoring filament containing basement membranes. We propose the name K-laminin for this variant. PMID:1383241

  1. The Role of Constitutional Copy Number Variants in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Logan C.; Wiggins, George A.R.; Pearson, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional copy number variants (CNVs) include inherited and de novo deviations from a diploid state at a defined genomic region. These variants contribute significantly to genetic variation and disease in humans, including breast cancer susceptibility. Identification of genetic risk factors for breast cancer in recent years has been dominated by the use of genome-wide technologies, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays, with a significant focus on single nucleotide variants. To date, these large datasets have been underutilised for generating genome-wide CNV profiles despite offering a massive resource for assessing the contribution of these structural variants to breast cancer risk. Technical challenges remain in determining the location and distribution of CNVs across the human genome due to the accuracy of computational prediction algorithms and resolution of the array data. Moreover, better methods are required for interpreting the functional effect of newly discovered CNVs. In this review, we explore current and future application of SNP array technology to assess rare and common CNVs in association with breast cancer risk in humans.

  2. The Role of Constitutional Copy Number Variants in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan C; Wiggins, George A R; Pearson, John F

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional copy number variants (CNVs) include inherited and de novo deviations from a diploid state at a defined genomic region. These variants contribute significantly to genetic variation and disease in humans, including breast cancer susceptibility. Identification of genetic risk factors for breast cancer in recent years has been dominated by the use of genome-wide technologies, such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-arrays, with a significant focus on single nucleotide variants. To date, these large datasets have been underutilised for generating genome-wide CNV profiles despite offering a massive resource for assessing the contribution of these structural variants to breast cancer risk. Technical challenges remain in determining the location and distribution of CNVs across the human genome due to the accuracy of computational prediction algorithms and resolution of the array data. Moreover, better methods are required for interpreting the functional effect of newly discovered CNVs. In this review, we explore current and future application of SNP array technology to assess rare and common CNVs in association with breast cancer risk in humans. PMID:27600231

  3. Analysis of histones and histone variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Ila; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Verandra; Singh, Mala; Ranjan, Amol; Lodhi, Niraj; Sawant, Samir V

    2012-01-01

    Histone proteins are the major protein components of chromatin - the physiologically relevant form of the genome (or epigenome) in all eukaryotic cells. For many years, histones were considered passive structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that dynamic association of histones and their variants to the genome plays a very important role in gene regulation. Histones are extensively modified during posttranslation viz. acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, etc., and the identification of these covalent marks on canonical and variant histones is crucial for the understanding of their biological significance. Different biochemical techniques have been developed to purify and separate histone proteins; here, we describe techniques for analysis of histones from plant tissues.

  4. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-01

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells.

  5. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  6. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  7. Theories of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, Michael D.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicated homosexuals, heterosexuals, and bisexuals did not differ within each sex on measures of masculinity and femininity. Strong support was obtained for the hypothesis that sexual orientation relates primarily to erotic fantasy orientation. (Author/DB)

  8. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

  9. They Call it Orienteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Mark

    1977-01-01

    Through the use of personal anecdotes, the author details his initial experience with orienteering, a sport rapidly increasing in popularity that teaches people not to get lost in the woods. Sources of information about orienteering are provided. (BT)

  10. Cultural variant interaction in teaching and transmission.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Focus on the way in which cultural variants affect other variants' probabilities of transmission in modeling and empirical work can enrich Kline's conceptualization of teaching. For example, the problem of communicating complex cumulative culture is an adaptive problem; teaching methods that manage transmission so that acquisition of some cultural variants increases the probability of acquiring others, provide a partial solution. PMID:26786769

  11. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  12. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  13. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  14. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  15. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  16. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  17. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  18. Identification of New Rabies Virus Variant in Mexican Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Sharon L.; Orciari, Lillian A.; Niezgoda, Michael; Blanton, Jesse D.; Fukagawa, Chris; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel rabies virus was identified after death in a man who had immigrated from Oaxaca, Mexico, to California, USA. Despite the patient’s history of exposure to domestic and wild carnivores, molecular and phylogenetic characterizations suggested that the virus originated from insectivorous bats. Enhanced surveillance is needed to elucidate likely reservoirs. PMID:19046517

  19. RAPTR-SV: a hybrid method for the detection of structural variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motivation: Identification of Structural Variants (SV) in sequence data results in a large number of false positive calls using existing software, which overburdens subsequent validation. Results: Simulations using RAPTR-SV and another software package that uses a similar algorithm for SV detection...

  20. Clinically relevant variants identified in thoracic aortic aneurysm patients by research exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jeffrey A; Landis, Benjamin J; Shikany, Amy R; Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving subclinical and progressive dilation of the thoracic aorta, which can lead to life-threatening complications such as dissection or rupture. Genetic testing is important for risk stratification and identification of at risk family members, and clinically available genetic testing panels have been expanding rapidly. However, when past testing results are normal, there is little evidence to guide decision-making about the indications and timing to pursue additional clinical genetic testing. Results from research based genetic testing can help inform this process. Here we present 10 TAA patients who have a family history of disease and who enrolled in research-based exome testing. Nine of these ten patients had previous clinical genetic testing that did not identify the cause of disease. We sought to determine the number of rare variants in 23 known TAA associated genes identified by research-based exome testing. In total, we found 10 rare variants in six patients. Likely pathogenic variants included a TGFB2 variant in one patient and a SMAD3 variant in another. These variants have been reported previously in individuals with similar phenotypes. Variants of uncertain significance of particular interest included novel variants in MYLK and MFAP5, which were identified in a third patient. In total, clinically reportable rare variants were found in 6/10 (60%) patients, with at least 2/10 (20%) patients having likely pathogenic variants identified. These data indicate that consideration of re-testing is important in TAA patients with previous negative or inconclusive results. PMID:26854089

  1. Optimized filtering reduces the error rate in detecting genomic variants by short-read sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reumers, Joke; De Rijk, Peter; Zhao, Hui; Liekens, Anthony; Smeets, Dominiek; Cleary, John; Van Loo, Peter; Van Den Bossche, Maarten; Catthoor, Kirsten; Sabbe, Bernard; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Hilbush, Brian; Lambrechts, Diether; Del-Favero, Jurgen

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) from errors in whole-genome sequences remains challenging. Here we describe a set of filters, together with a freely accessible software tool, that selectively reduce error rates and thereby facilitate variant detection in data from two short-read sequencing technologies, Complete Genomics and Illumina. By sequencing the nearly identical genomes from monozygotic twins and considering shared SNVs as 'true variants' and discordant SNVs as 'errors', we optimized thresholds for 12 individual filters and assessed which of the 1,048 filter combinations were effective in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Cumulative application of all effective filters reduced the error rate by 290-fold, facilitating the identification of genetic differences between monozygotic twins. We also applied an adapted, less stringent set of filters to reliably identify somatic mutations in a highly rearranged tumor and to identify variants in the NA19240 HapMap genome relative to a reference set of SNVs. PMID:22178994

  2. A novel orientation code for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2011-06-01

    A novel orientation code is proposed for face recognition applications in this paper. Gabor wavelet transform is a common tool for orientation analysis in a 2D image; whereas Hamming distance is an efficient distance measurement for multiple classifications such as face identification. Specifically, at each frequency band, an index number representing the strongest orientational response is selected, and then encoded in binary format to favor the Hamming distance calculation. Multiple-band orientation codes are then organized into a face pattern byte (FPB) by using order statistics. With the FPB, Hamming distances are calculated and compared to achieve face identification. The FPB has the dimensionality of 8 bits per pixel and its performance will be compared to that of FPW (face pattern word, 32 bits per pixel). The dimensionality of FPB can be further reduced down to 4 bits per pixel, called face pattern nibble (FPN). Experimental results with visible and thermal face databases show that the proposed orientation code for face recognition is very promising in contrast with classical methods such as PCA.

  3. Oncotator: cancer variant annotation tool.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alex H; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gupta, Manaswi; Lawrence, Michael S; Pugh, Trevor J; Saksena, Gordon; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2015-04-01

    Oncotator is a tool for annotating genomic point mutations and short nucleotide insertions/deletions (indels) with variant- and gene-centric information relevant to cancer researchers. This information is drawn from 14 different publicly available resources that have been pooled and indexed, and we provide an extensible framework to add additional data sources. Annotations linked to variants range from basic information, such as gene names and functional classification (e.g. missense), to cancer-specific data from resources such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), the Cancer Gene Census, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For local use, Oncotator is freely available as a python module hosted on Github (https://github.com/broadinstitute/oncotator). Furthermore, Oncotator is also available as a web service and web application at http://www.broadinstitute.org/oncotator/.

  4. [Mirizzi syndrome and its variants].

    PubMed

    Meyer, G J; Runge, D; Gebhardt, J

    1990-04-01

    Between 1981 and 1987 5434 patients were studied by ERCP in Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hamburg-Barmbeck. 26 (i.e. 0.43%) suffered from Mirizze syndrome with the triad of cholelithiasis, cholecystitis and obstructive biliary disease. They were classified in four different types according to the variable localisation and origin of the biliary obstruction. 16 patients corresponded to the classical type (I and II) with compression, penetration, and obturation by the concrement, five patients matched borderline with infiltration (III) and five patients were classified as variants of this syndrome. A mild elevation of serum bilirubine and alkaline phosphatase indicated more likely the benign etiology of type I to III, however, a marked elevation of alkaline phosphatase in the variants suggested more likely a malignant underlying disease. The diagnosis was ascertained in all cases by ERC and sonography preoperatively and was verified by laparotomy (n = 18) and follow-up (n = 6).

  5. Escherichia coli variants in periprosthetic joint infection: diagnostic challenges with sessile bacteria and sonication.

    PubMed

    Sendi, Parham; Frei, Reno; Maurer, Thomas B; Trampuz, Andrej; Zimmerli, Werner; Graber, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The diagnostic yield of prosthetic joint-associated infection is hampered by the phenotypic change of bacteria into a sessile and resistant form, also called biofilm. With sonication, adherent bacteria can be dislodged from the prosthesis. Species identification may be difficult because of their variations in phenotypic appearance and biochemical reaction. We have studied the phenotypic, genotypic, and biochemical properties of Escherichia coli variants isolated from a periprosthetic joint infection. The strains were collected from synovial fluid, periprosthetic tissue, and fluid from the explanted and sonicated prosthesis. Isolates from synovial fluid revealed a normal phenotype, whereas a few variants from periprosthetic tissue and all isolates from sonication fluid showed different morphological features (including small-colony variants). All isolates from sonication fluid were beta-galactosidase negative and nonmotile; most were indole negative. Because of further variations in biochemical properties, species identification was false or not possible in 50% of the isolates included in this study. In contrast to normal phenotypes, variants were resistant to aminoglycosides. Typing of the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis yielded nonidentical banding patterns, but all strains were assigned to the same clonal origin when compared with 207 unrelated E. coli isolates. The bacteria were repeatedly passaged on culture media and reanalyzed. Thereafter, most variants reverted to normal phenotype and regained their motility and certain biochemical properties. In addition, some variants displayed aminoglycoside susceptibility after reversion. Sonication of an explanted prosthesis allows insight into the lifestyle of bacteria in biofilms. Since sonication fluid also reveals dislodged sessile forms, species identification of such variants may be misleading. PMID:20335421

  6. A new variant of blepharospasm.

    PubMed

    Elston, J S

    1992-05-01

    Ten patients who were unable to initiate or sustain eye opening in the absence of overt spasm of the orbicularis oculi, were investigated. In five, the problem was isolated. Three had Parkinson's disease and two progressive supra-nuclear palsy for between one to six years before the eye opening difficulty developed. The clinical features and electrophysiological investigation suggested that the disorder is a variant of blepharospasm due to abnormal contraction in the pre-tarsal orbicularis oculi. PMID:1602309

  7. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  8. Novel pathogenic variants and genes for myopathies identified by whole exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jesse M; Ahearn, Mary Ellen; Balak, Christopher D; Liang, Winnie S; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Corneveaux, Jason J; Russell, Megan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Carpten, John; Coons, Stephen W; DeMello, Daphne E; Hall, Judith G; Bernes, Saunder M; Baumbach-Reardon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD) account for a significant proportion of infant and childhood mortality and devastating chronic disease. Determining the specific diagnosis of NMD is challenging due to thousands of unique or rare genetic variants that result in overlapping phenotypes. We present four unique childhood myopathy cases characterized by relatively mild muscle weakness, slowly progressing course, mildly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and contractures. We also present two additional cases characterized by severe prenatal/neonatal myopathy. Prior extensive genetic testing and histology of these cases did not reveal the genetic etiology of disease. Here, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatics to identify likely causal pathogenic variants in each pedigree. In two cases, we identified novel pathogenic variants in COL6A3. In a third case, we identified novel likely pathogenic variants in COL6A6 and COL6A3. We identified a novel splice variant in EMD in a fourth case. Finally, we classify two cases as calcium channelopathies with identification of novel pathogenic variants in RYR1 and CACNA1S. These are the first cases of myopathies reported to be caused by variants in COL6A6 and CACNA1S. Our results demonstrate the utility and genetic diagnostic value of WES in the broad class of NMD phenotypes. PMID:26247046

  9. Identification of two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, DPD (rPDE-IVB1) and PDE-4 (rPDE-IVB2) in brain: selective localization in membrane and cytosolic compartments and differential expression in various brain regions.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M; Shakur, Y; Beattie, J; Houslay, M D

    1994-12-01

    In order to detect the two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, DPD (type-IVB1) and PDE-4 (type-IVB2), anti-peptide antisera were generated. One set ('DPD/PDE-4-common'), generated against a peptide sequence found at the common C-terminus of these two PDEs, detected both PDEs. A second set was PDE-4 specific, being directed against a peptide sequence found within the unique N-terminal region of PDE-4. In brain, DPD was found exclusively in the cytosol and PDE-4 exclusively associated with membranes. Both brain DPD and PDE-4 activities, isolated by immunoprecipitation, were cyclic AMP-specific (KmcyclicAMP: approximately 5 microM for DPD; approximately 4 microM for PDE-4) and were inhibited by low rolipram concentrations (K1rolipram approximately 1 microM for both). Transient expression of DPD in COS-1 cells allowed identification of an approx. 64 kDa species which co-migrated on SDS/PAGE with the immunoreactive species identified in both brain cytosol and membrane fractions using the DPD/PDE-4-common antisera. The subunit size observed for PDE-4 (approx. 64 kDa) in brain membranes was similar to that predicted from the cDNA sequence, but that observed for DPD was approx. 4 kDa greater. Type-IV, rolipram-inhibited PDE activity was found in all brain regions except the pituitary, where it formed between 30 and 70% of the PDE activity in membrane and cytosolic fractions when assayed with 1 microM cyclic AMP, PDE-4 formed 40-50% of the membrane type-IV activity in all brain regions save the midbrain (approx. 20%). DPD distribution was highly restricted to certain regions, providing approx. 35% of the type-IV cytosolic activity in hippocampus and 13-21% in cortex, hypothalamus and striatum with no presence in brain stem, cerebellum, midbrain and pituitary. The combined type-IVB PDE activities of DPD and PDE-4 contributed approx. 10% of the total PDE activity in most brain regions except for the pituitary (zero) and the mid

  10. Interactions of form and orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittelstaedt, Horst

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that the orientation of an optical pattern relative to egocentric or extraneous references affects its figural quality, that is, alters its perceived form and concomitantly delays or quickens its identification (Rock 1973). A square presented in the frontal plane to an upright person (S), for instance, changes from a box to a diamond when it is rotated with respect to the S's median plane by 45 deg. This angle, that is, the angle between the orientations of the pattern in which the two apparent figures (Gestalten) attain a summit of purity and distinctness, will be called the figural disparity of the pattern. If, as in this case, the S is upright, the retinal meridian and the subjective vertical (SV) are both in the viewer's median plane. The question arises with respect to which of these orientation references the two figures are identified. The answer may be found when the pattern and the S are oriented in such a way that the projections of the retinal meridian and the SV into the plane of the pattern diverge by the pattern's figural disparity or its periodic multiples: that is, in this case of a square by 45 or 135 deg, respectively. Similarly, which reference determines whether an equilateral triangle is seen as a pyramid or a traffic warning sign may be revealed at a divergence of SV and retinal meridian of 60 or 180 deg, respectively. It is generally found that for head roll tilts (Rho) and figural disparities of up to 90 deg, the figure whose axis coincides with the SV is seen. At head tilts of Rho=180 deg, however, the retinal reference dominates, as a rule independently of the figural disparity.

  11. Convex Image Orientation from Relative Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a novel workflow for the estimation of global image orientations given relative orientations between pairs of overlapping images. Our approach is convex and independent on initial values. First, global rotations are estimated in a relaxed semidefinite program (SDP) and refined in an iterative least squares adjustment in the tangent space of SO(3). A critical aspect is the handling of outliers in the relative orientations. We present a novel heuristic graph based approach for filtering the relative rotations that outperforms state-of-the-art robust rotation averaging algorithms. In a second part we make use of point-observations, tracked over a set of overlapping images and formulate a linear homogeneous system of equations to transfer the scale information between triplets of images, using estimated global rotations and relative translation directions. The final step consists of refining the orientation parameters in a robust bundle adjustment. The proposed approach handles outliers in the homologous points and relative orientations in every step of the processing chain. We demonstrate the robustness of the procedure on synthetic data. Moreover, the performance of our approach is illustrated on real world benchmark data.

  12. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite’s resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes. PMID:27494254

  13. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes.

  14. A Primate APOL1 Variant That Kills Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Anneli; Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; Veitch, Nicola; Weir, William; Thomson, Russell; Raper, Jayne; MacLeod, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Humans are protected against infection from most African trypanosomes by lipoprotein complexes present in serum that contain the trypanolytic pore-forming protein, Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). The human-infective trypanosomes, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in East Africa and T. b. gambiense in West Africa have separately evolved mechanisms that allow them to resist APOL1-mediated lysis and cause human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, in man. Recently, APOL1 variants were identified from a subset of Old World monkeys, that are able to lyse East African T. b. rhodesiense, by virtue of C-terminal polymorphisms in the APOL1 protein that hinder that parasite's resistance mechanism. Such variants have been proposed as candidates for developing therapeutic alternatives to the unsatisfactory anti-trypanosomal drugs currently in use. Here we demonstrate the in vitro lytic ability of serum and purified recombinant protein of an APOL1 ortholog from the West African Guinea baboon (Papio papio), which is able to lyse examples of all sub-species of T. brucei including T. b. gambiense group 1 parasites, the most common agent of human African trypanosomiasis. The identification of a variant of APOL1 with trypanolytic ability for both human-infective T. brucei sub-species could be a candidate for universal APOL1-based therapeutic strategies, targeted against all pathogenic African trypanosomes. PMID:27494254

  15. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease.

  16. Currarino syndrome: Rare clinical variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Currarino syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical condition. The classical presentation includes a triad of sacral anomaly, anorectal malformations, and presacral mass. This syndrome belongs to the group of persistent neuroenteric malformations. This article presents two cases of Currarino syndrome, where there was rare clinical variants such as rectal atresia in the first case and rectal stenosis in the second case. The clinical presentations were very deceptive as the first case presented as high anorectal malformation and the second case was simulating Hirschprung's disease. PMID:27695213

  17. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  18. NPAS3 variants in schizophrenia: a neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research is a one-site neuroimaging component of a two-site genetic study involving patients with schizophrenia at early and later stages of illness. Studies support a role for the neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim 3 (NPAS3) gene in processes that are essential for normal brain development. Specific NPAS3 variants have been observed at an increased frequency in schizophrenia. In humans, NPAS3 protein was detected in the hippocampus from the first trimester of gestation. In addition, NPAS3 protein levels were reduced in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of some patients with schizophrenia. Npas3 knockout mice display behavioural, neuroanatomical and structural changes with associated severe reductions in neural precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This study will evaluate the hypothesis that the severe reductions in neural precursor cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus will be present to some degree in patients carrying schizophrenia-associated NPAS3 variants and less so in other patients. Methods/Design Patients enrolled in the larger genetic study (n = 150) will be invited to participate in this neuroimaging arm. The genetic data will be used to ensure a sample size of 45 participants in each genetic subgroup of patients (with and without NPAS3 variants). In addition, we will recruit 60 healthy controls for acquisition of normative data. The following neuroimaging measures will be acquired from the medial temporal region: a) an index of the microcellular environment; b) a macro-structural volumetric measure of the hippocampus; and c) concentration levels of N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neuronal health. Discussion This study will help to establish the contribution of the NPAS3 gene and its variants to brain tissue abnormalities in schizophrenia. Given the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder and the large variation in outcomes, the identification of biological subgroups may in future support tailoring of treatment

  19. A new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, A; Lane, A B; Jenkins, T

    1988-01-01

    A South African Afrikaans speaking family is reported in which a new high activity plasma cholinesterase variant was found to occur in the mother and son. The variant has the same electrophoretic mobility as the "usual' enzyme, but greater heat stability. Its higher specific activity is associated with a normal number of enzyme molecules. The variant may be inherited as a dominant trait, though its locus is uncertain. Images PMID:3225823

  20. Apolipoprotein ɛ4 breaks the association between declarative long-term memory and memory-based orienting of spatial attention in middle-aged individuals.

    PubMed

    Salvato, Gerardo; Patai, Eva Z; McCloud, Tayla; Nobre, Anna C

    2016-09-01

    Apolipoprotein (APOE) ɛ4 genotype has been identified as a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). The memory system is mostly involved in AD, and memory deficits represent its key feature. A growing body of studies has focused on the earlier identification of cognitive dysfunctions in younger and older APOE ɛ4 carriers, but investigation on middle-aged individuals remains rare. Here we sought to investigate if the APOE ɛ4 genotype modulates declarative memory and its influences on perception in the middle of the life span. We tested 60 middle-aged individuals recruited according to their APOE allele variants (ɛ3/ɛ3, ɛ3/ɛ4, ɛ4/ɛ4) on a long-term memory-based orienting of attention task. Results showed that the APOE ɛ4 genotype impaired neither explicit memory nor memory-based orienting of spatial attention. Interestingly, however, we found that the possession of the ɛ4 allele broke the relationship between declarative long-term memory and memory-guided orienting of visuo-spatial attention, suggesting an earlier modulation exerted by pure genetic characteristics on cognition. These findings are discussed in light of possible accelerated brain ageing in middle-aged ɛ4-carriers, and earlier structural changes in the brain occurring at this stage of the lifespan. PMID:27395443

  1. Crystallographic and magnetic identification of secondary phase in orientated Bi{sub 5}Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 15} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Palizdar, Meghdad; Comyn, Tim P.; Ward, Michael B.; Brown, Andrew P.; Harrington, John P.; Bell, Andrew J.; Kulkarni, Santosh; Keeney, Lynette; Roy, Saibal; Pemble, Martyn; Whatmore, Roger; Quinn, Christopher; Kilcoyne, Susan H.

    2012-10-01

    The fabrication of highly-oriented polycrystalline ceramics of Bi{sub 5}Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 15}, prepared via molten salt synthesis and uniaxial pressing of high aspect ratio platelets is reported. Electron backscatter images show a secondary phase within the ceramic which is rich in cobalt and iron. The concentration of the secondary phase obtained from scanning electron microscopy is estimated at less than 2% by volume, below the detection limit of x-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, polarization-electric field measurements, superconducting quantum interference device as a function of sample orientation and vibrating sample magnetometry as a function of temperature. It is inferred from the data that the observed ferromagnetic response is dominated by the secondary phase. This work highlights the importance of rigorous materials characterisation in the study of multiferroics as small amounts of secondary phase, below the limit of XRD, can lead to false conclusions.

  2. Congenital anatomic variants of the kidney and ureter: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, M R; Adarsh, K M; Jeeson, Riya; Ashwini, C; Nagaraj, B R

    2016-03-01

    Congenital renal parenchymal and pelvicalyceal abnormalities have a wide spectrum. Most of them are asymptomatic, like that of ectopia, cross fused kidney, horseshoe kidney, etc., while a few of them become complicated, leading to renal failure and death. It is very important for the radiologist to identify these anatomic variants and guide the clinicians for surgical and therapeutic procedures. Cross-sectional imaging with a volume rendered technique/maximum intensity projection has overcome ultrasonography and IVU for identification and interpretation of some of these variants. PMID:26747433

  3. Teaching Orienteering. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Carol; Cory-Wright, Jean; Renfrew, Tom

    The educational value provided by orienteering's blend of navigational and physical skills has given it a permanent place in the primary and secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom. This book is a reference to orienteering for teachers, leaders, and coaches. It provides a "how to" approach to introducing and developing the skills and…

  4. Orientation in operator algebras

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Erik M.; Shultz, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of orientation is relevant for the passage from Jordan structure to associative structure in operator algebras. The research reported in this paper bridges the approach of Connes for von Neumann algebras and ourselves for C*-algebras in a general theory of orientation that is of geometric nature and is related to dynamics. PMID:9618457

  5. Fine-Scale Survey of X Chromosome Copy Number Variants and Indels Underlying Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Whibley, Annabel C.; Plagnol, Vincent; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Abidi, Fatima; Fullston, Tod; Choma, Maja K.; Boucher, Catherine A.; Shepherd, Lorraine; Willatt, Lionel; Parkin, Georgina; Smith, Raffaella; Futreal, P. Andrew; Shaw, Marie; Boyle, Jackie; Licata, Andrea; Skinner, Cindy; Stevenson, Roger E.; Turner, Gillian; Field, Michael; Hackett, Anna; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R.; Raymond, F. Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Copy number variants and indels in 251 families with evidence of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) were investigated by array comparative genomic hybridization on a high-density oligonucleotide X chromosome array platform. We identified pathogenic copy number variants in 10% of families, with mutations ranging from 2 kb to 11 Mb in size. The challenge of assessing causality was facilitated by prior knowledge of XLID-associated genes and the ability to test for cosegregation of variants with disease through extended pedigrees. Fine-scale analysis of rare variants in XLID families leads us to propose four additional genes, PTCHD1, WDR13, FAAH2, and GSPT2, as candidates for XLID causation and the identification of further deletions and duplications affecting X chromosome genes but without apparent disease consequences. Breakpoints of pathogenic variants were characterized to provide insight into the underlying mutational mechanisms and indicated a predominance of mitotic rather than meiotic events. By effectively bridging the gap between karyotype-level investigations and X chromosome exon resequencing, this study informs discussion of alternative mutational mechanisms, such as noncoding variants and non-X-linked disease, which might explain the shortfall of mutation yield in the well-characterized International Genetics of Learning Disability (IGOLD) cohort, where currently disease remains unexplained in two-thirds of families. PMID:20655035

  6. Behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia: a review of key symptoms.

    PubMed

    Laforce, Robert

    2013-12-01

    While recent advances in the development of neuroimaging and molecular biomarkers for studying neurodegenerative conditions have revolutionized the field, dementia remains a clinical diagnosis. No component of the diagnostic process is more crucial than obtaining a good history. Getting to know the first manifestations of the disease, tracking their evolution and functional impact, combined with a targeted neurological examination, further guides differential diagnosis. This paper summarizes the key symptoms of the behavioral and language variants of frontotemporal dementia. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is characterized by severe changes in behavior and personality such as disinhibition, apathy, loss of empathy, or stereotypic behavior, leading to a loss of social competence. Executive functions are impaired, while memory and visuospatial skills are relatively better preserved. By contrast, the language variants or primary progressive aphasias (PPAs) are marked by prominent language disturbances that can be subclassified into a non-fluent/agrammatic variant (naPPA), a semantic variant (svPPA), and a logopenic variant (lvPPA). Although combined characterization of clinical, imaging, biological and genetic biomarkers is essential to establish a detailed diagnosis of such heterogeneous conditions, the author emphasizes the importance of accurate recognition of key symptoms that can lead to better identification of underlying neuropathology and appropriate treatment approaches. PMID:24446563

  7. Object Oriented Risk Analysis Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, M. Güell I.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of the RISET Project (Interfaculty Network of Support to Education and Technology) an educational tool for introducing risk analysis has been developed. This workshop enables to carry a group of students (role-play game) through a step-by-step process of risk identification and quantification. The aim is to assess risk in a characteristic alpine village regarding natural hazards (rockfall, snow avalanche, flooding…) and is oriented to affected objects such as buildings, infrastructures... The workshop contains the following steps: 1.- Planning of the study and definition of stakeholders 2.- Hazard identification 3.- Risk analysis 4.- Risk assessment 5.- Proposition of mitigation measures 6- Risk management and cost-benefit analysis. During the process, information related to past events and useful concepts are provided in order to bring up discussion and decision making. The Risk Matrix and other graphical tools allow having a visual representation of the risk level and help to prioritize counter measures. At the end of the workshop, there is the possibility to compare the results between different groups and print out a summarizing report. This approach provides a rapid and comprehensible risk evaluation. The workshop is accessible from the internet and will be used for educational purposes at bachelor and master level as well as for external persons dealing with risk analysis.

  8. Grain-scale characterization of FCC/BCC correspondence relations and variant selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Youliang

    The misorientations between FCC and BCC crystals are characterized according to the common lattice correspondence relationships in terms of their parallelism conditions. Individual variants of the six models, namely the Bain, Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, Pitsch, Greninger-Troiano and inverse Greninger-Troiano relations, are identified and represented in both pole figure form and in Rodrigues-Frank space with respect to various coordinate frames. In this way, the relations between the variants of these models are clarified. The orientations of the kamacite (BCC) lamellae transformed from a single prior-taenite (FCC) grain in the Gibeon meteorite were measured by analyzing the electron backscatter diffraction patterns. The local misorientations between individual FCC and BCC crystals along their common interfaces were computed and are compared with the common lattice correspondence relationships. The orientation relations between the alpha and gamma phases in the plessite regions are also characterized. The Neumann bands (mechanical twins) and their orientation variations within individual kamacite lamellae were studied and analyzed. A Nb-bearing TRIP steel was control rolled and a certain amount of austenite was retained through appropriate heat treatment. EBSD measurements were conducted on specimens deformed to various reductions and the textures (ODF's) of both the gamma and alpha phases were obtained from the measured data points. The orientations of the bainite formed within individual prior-austenite grains are compared to those expected from the common correspondence relationships and the average orientation of the prior-austenite grain. The crystallography of the bainite laths within a single packet is also characterized. The orientations of the bainite formed from individual prior-austenite grains are analyzed with respect to their parent orientations. The occurrence of variant selection at the grain scale was examined using a dislocation

  9. Competition between endogenous and exogenous orienting of visual attention.

    PubMed

    Berger, Andrea; Henik, Avishai; Rafal, Robert

    2005-05-01

    The relation between reflexive and voluntary orienting of visual attention was investigated with 4 experiments: a simple detection task, a localization task, a saccade toward the target task, and a target identification task in which discrimination difficulty was manipulated. Endogenous and exogenous orienting cues were presented in each trial and their validity was manipulated orthogonally to examine whether attention mechanisms are mediated by separate systems and whether they have additive and independent effects on visual detection and discrimination. The results showed that each orienting mechanism developed its typical and independent effect in every case except for the difficult identification task. A theoretical framework for understanding the relationship between endogenous and exogenous orienting of attention is proposed, tested, and confirmed.

  10. Improved detection of artifactual viral minority variants in high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Welkers, Matthijs R A; Jonges, Marcel; Jeeninga, Rienk E; Koopmans, Marion P G; de Jong, Menno D

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of viral samples provides important information on the presence of viral minority variants. However, detection and accurate quantification is limited by the capacity to distinguish biological from artificial variation. In this study, errors related to the Illumina HiSeq2000 library generation and HTS process were investigated by determining minority variant frequencies in an influenza A/WSN/1933(H1N1) virus reverse-genetics plasmid pool. Errors related to amplification and sequencing were determined using the same plasmid pool, by generation of infectious virus using reverse genetics followed by in duplo reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) amplification and HTS in the same sequence run. Results showed that after "best practice" quality control (QC), within the plasmid pool, one minority variant with a frequency >0.5% was identified, while 84 and 139 were identified in the RT-PCR amplified samples, indicating RT-PCR amplification artificially increased variation. Detailed analysis showed that artifactual minority variants could be identified by two major technical characteristics: their predominant presence in a single read orientation and uneven distribution of mismatches over the length of the reads. We demonstrate that by addition of two QC steps 95% of the artifactual minority variants could be identified. When our analysis approach was applied to three clinical samples 68% of the initially identified minority variants were identified as artifacts. Our study clearly demonstrated that, without additional QC steps, overestimation of viral minority variants is very likely to occur, mainly as a consequence of the required RT-PCR amplification step. The improved ability to detect and correct for artifactual minority variants, increases data resolution and could aid both past and future studies incorporating HTS. The source code has been made available through Sourceforge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/mva-ngs). PMID:25657642

  11. Improved background oriented schlieren imaging using laser speckle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Alexander H.; Roesgen, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    A new variant of the background oriented schlieren technique is presented. Using a laser to generate a speckle reference pattern, several shortcomings of the conventional technique can be overcome. The arrangement decouples the achievable sensitivity from the placement constraint on the reference screen, facilitating the design of compact, high-sensitivity configurations. A new dual-pass imaging mode is introduced which further improves system performance and permits focusing on the target scene. Examples are presented that confirm the theoretical predictions.

  12. ClinLabGeneticist: a tool for clinical management of genetic variants from whole exome sequencing in clinical genetic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlian; Liao, Jun; Zhang, Jinglan; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Webb, Bryn D; Ramasamudram-Chakravarthi, Rajasekar; Karger, Lisa; Mehta, Lakshmi; Kornreich, Ruth; Diaz, George A; Li, Shuyu; Edelmann, Lisa; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Routine clinical application of whole exome sequencing remains challenging due to difficulties in variant interpretation, large dataset management, and workflow integration. We describe a tool named ClinLabGeneticist to implement a workflow in clinical laboratories for management of variant assessment in genetic testing and disease diagnosis. We established an extensive variant annotation data source for the identification of pathogenic variants. A dashboard was deployed to aid a multi-step, hierarchical review process leading to final clinical decisions on genetic variant assessment. In addition, a central database was built to archive all of the genetic testing data, notes, and comments throughout the review process, variant validation data by Sanger sequencing as well as the final clinical reports for future reference. The entire workflow including data entry, distribution of work assignments, variant evaluation and review, selection of variants for validation, report generation, and communications between various personnel is integrated into a single data management platform. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the utility of ClinLabGeneticist. ClinLabGeneticist is freely available to academia at http://rongchenlab.org/software/clinlabgeneticist . PMID:26338694

  13. A sensitive phage-based capture ELISA for sub-femtomolar detection of protein variants directly from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of proteins, and in particular protein variants, in human health, it may often be necessary to quantitatively determine the concentration of a specific protein variant present in complex biological samples such as blood, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), or tissue. Many protein variants are present only at trace levels and therefore a simple assay with very high sensitivity and reliability would greatly facilitate correlation of the presence of particular protein variants with the progression of specific diseases. We have developed a simple phage based capture ELISA system that enables femtomolar or better detection of individual protein variants directly from complex biological samples. The protocol utilizes a capture reagent that selectively recognizes a unique epitope of the protein variant and a phage based detection reagent that binds to a second epitope present in all forms of the target protein. The phage based detection reagent is essentially a self-assembling nanoparticle consisting of several thousand coat proteins that can each be labeled to amplify the detection signal by several orders of magnitude. Here we demonstrate that we can achieve subfemtomolar detection of individual protein variants that have been implicated in neurodegenerative disease directly from complex tissue homogenates and sera. The ELISA system should facilitate identification of disease specific protein variants or other compounds even when present at trace amounts in samples including blood, CSF, saliva and urine. PMID:25203940

  14. Functional testing strategy for coding genetic variants of unclear significance in MLH1 in Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Schäfer, Dieter; Langer, Deborah; Köger, Nicole; Wittmann, Margarethe; Aretz, Stefan; Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Trojan, Jörg; König, Rainer; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations in the MLH1 gene, but genetic variants of unclear significance frequently preclude diagnosis. Functional testing can reveal variant-conferred defects in gene or protein function. Based on functional defect frequencies and clinical applicability of test systems, we developed a functional testing strategy aimed at efficiently detecting pathogenic defects in coding MLH1 variants. In this strategy, tests of repair activity and expression are prioritized over analyses of subcellular protein localization and messenger RNA (mRNA) formation. This strategy was used for four unclear coding MLH1 variants (p.Asp41His, p.Leu507Phe, p.Gln689Arg, p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met). Expression was analyzed using a transfection system, mismatch repair (MMR) activity by complementation in vitro, mRNA formation by reverse transcriptase-PCR in carrier lymphocyte mRNA, and subcellular localization with dye-labeled fusion constructs. All tests included clinically meaningful controls. The strategy enabled efficient identification of defects in two unclear variants: the p.Asp41His variant showed loss of MMR activity, whereas the compound variant p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met had a defect of expression. This expression defect was significantly stronger than the pathogenic expression reference variant analyzed in parallel, therefore the defect of the compound variant is also pathogenic. Interestingly, the expression defect was caused additively by both of the compound variants, at least one of which is non-pathogenic when occurring by itself. Tests were neutral for p.Leu507Phe and p.Gln689Arg, and the results were consistent with available clinical data. We finally discuss the improved sensitivity and efficiency of the applied strategy and its limitations in analyzing unclear coding MLH1 variants.

  15. Hemoglobin analyses in the Netherlands reveal more than 80 different variants including six novel ones.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, Rob; Veldthuis, Martijn; Delzenne, Barend; Berghuis, Jeffrey; Groen, Joke; Ait Ichou, Fatima; Clifford, Els; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Stroobants, An K

    2014-01-01

    More than 20,000 blood samples of individuals living in The Netherlands and suspected of hemolytic anemia or diabetes were analyzed by high resolution cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Besides common disease-related hemoglobins (Hbs), rare variants were also detected. The variant Hbs were retrospectively analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and by isoelectric focusing (IEF). For unambiguous identification, the globin genes were sequenced. Most of the 80 Hb variants detected by initial screening on HPLC were also separated by capillary electrophoresis (CE), but a few variants were only detectable with one of these methods. Some variants were unstable, had thalassemic properties or increased oxygen affinity, and some interfered with Hb A2 measurement, detection of sickle cell Hb or Hb A1c quantification. Two of the six novel variants, Hb Enschede (HBA2: c.308G  > A, p.Ser103Asn) and Hb Weesp (HBA1: c.301C > T, p.Leu101Phe), had no clinical consequences. In contrast, two others appeared clinically significant: Hb Ede (HBB: c.53A > T, p.Lys18Met) caused thalassemia and Hb Waterland (HBB: c.428C > T, pAla143Val) was related to mild polycytemia. Hb A2-Venlo (HBD: c.193G > A, p.Gly65Ser) and Hb A2-Rotterdam (HBD: c.38A > C, p.Asn13Thr) interfered with Hb A2 quantification. This survey shows that HPLC analysis followed by globin gene sequencing of rare variants is an effective method to reveal Hb variants.

  16. Rare hemoglobin variants in Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Zorai, A; Moumni, I; Mosbahi, I; Douzi, K; Chaouachi, D; Guemira, F; Abbes, S

    2015-04-01

    During the last 30 years, many studies concerning hemoglobinopathies were realized among Tunisians. More than twenty different thalassemic alleles were detected on the β-globin gene, and less are affecting the α-globin genes. Unusual hemoglobin (Hb) variants other than Hb S, Hb C, and Hb O-arab, which are the most frequent variants in Tunisia, were also detected. Eight Tunisian subjects were studied at phenotypic and molecular levels. Hematological indices and hemoglobin (Hb) pattern were performed by alkaline electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing (IEF),and the Hb fractions were quantitated by cation exchange HPLC. On genomic level, coding regions were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by a sequencing of the purified PCR products using the dye terminator method. Seven uncommon Hb variants were detected and described for the first time among Tunisians. HbA2-Tunis [δ46(CD5), Gly → Glu, GGG → GAG] is the newly described δ-chain variant in our laboratory, and some other variants (Hb Constant Spring, G San Jose, and Hb J-Bangkok) are very uncommon in the Mediterranean region. We present here an updated review of the Hb variants detected among Tunisians. Twenty-one rare Hb variants were detected affecting the α1-, α2-, δ-, γ-, and β-globin genes, leading in some cases to a severe phenotype especially when the stability is completely altered. The ethnical history of Tunisia could explain this important variability of the observed rare Hb variants. PMID:24905386

  17. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  18. Beta-glucosidase I variants with improved properties

    DOEpatents

    Bott, Richard R.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kralj, Slavko; Kruithof, Paulien; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Der Kley, Wilhelmus Antonious Hendricus; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2016-09-20

    The present disclosure is generally directed to enzymes and in particular beta-glucosidase variants. Also described are nucleic acids encoding beta-glucosidase variants, compositions comprising beta-glucosidase variants, methods of using beta-glucosidase variants, and methods of identifying additional useful beta-glucosidase variants.

  19. Post-mortem testing; germline BRCA1/2 variant detection using archival FFPE non-tumor tissue. A new paradigm in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Annabeth Høgh; Aagaard, Mads Malik; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimation of cancer risk in HBOC families often requires BRCA1/2 testing, but this may be impossible in deceased family members. Previous, testing archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue for germline BRCA1/2 variants was unsuccessful, except for the Jewish founder mutations. A high-throughput method to systematically test for variants in all coding regions of BRCA1/2 in archival FFPE samples of non-tumor tissue is described, using HaloPlex target enrichment and next-generation sequencing. In a validation study, correct identification of variants or wild-type was possible in 25 out of 30 (83%) FFPE samples (age range 1-14 years), with a known variant status in BRCA1/2. No false positive was found. Unsuccessful identification was due to highly degraded DNA or presence of large intragenic deletions. In clinical use, a total of 201 FFPE samples (aged 0-43 years) were processed. Thirty-six samples were rejected because of highly degraded DNA or failed library preparation. Fifteen samples were investigated to search for a known variant. In the remaining 150 samples (aged 0-38 years), three variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA1, six variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA2, as well as four variants of unknown significance (VUS) in BRCA1 and three VUS in BRCA2 were discovered. It is now possible to test for germline BRCA1/2 variants in deceased persons, using archival FFPE samples from non-tumor tissue. Accurate genetic counseling is achievable in families where variant testing would otherwise be impossible.

  20. Post-mortem testing; germline BRCA1/2 variant detection using archival FFPE non-tumor tissue. A new paradigm in genetic counseling

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Annabeth Høgh; Aagaard, Mads Malik; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of cancer risk in HBOC families often requires BRCA1/2 testing, but this may be impossible in deceased family members. Previous, testing archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue for germline BRCA1/2 variants was unsuccessful, except for the Jewish founder mutations. A high-throughput method to systematically test for variants in all coding regions of BRCA1/2 in archival FFPE samples of non-tumor tissue is described, using HaloPlex target enrichment and next-generation sequencing. In a validation study, correct identification of variants or wild-type was possible in 25 out of 30 (83%) FFPE samples (age range 1–14 years), with a known variant status in BRCA1/2. No false positive was found. Unsuccessful identification was due to highly degraded DNA or presence of large intragenic deletions. In clinical use, a total of 201 FFPE samples (aged 0–43 years) were processed. Thirty-six samples were rejected because of highly degraded DNA or failed library preparation. Fifteen samples were investigated to search for a known variant. In the remaining 150 samples (aged 0–38 years), three variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA1, six variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA2, as well as four variants of unknown significance (VUS) in BRCA1 and three VUS in BRCA2 were discovered. It is now possible to test for germline BRCA1/2 variants in deceased persons, using archival FFPE samples from non-tumor tissue. Accurate genetic counseling is achievable in families where variant testing would otherwise be impossible. PMID:26733283

  1. Implementing Strategic Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Arthur K.; Brownback, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    An HRM case dealing with problems and issues of setting up orientation programs which align with corporate strategy. Discussion concerns how such a case can be used to exhibit the alignment between HRM and business strategy.

  2. Passive orientation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus that can return a payload to a known orientation after unknown motion, without requiring external power or complex mechanical systems. The apparatus comprises a faceted cage that causes the system to rest in a stable position and orientation after arbitrary motion. A gimbal is mounted with the faceted cage and holds the payload, allowing the payload to move relative to the stable faceted cage. The payload is thereby placed in a known orientation by the interaction of gravity with the geometry of the faceted cage, the mass of the system, and the motion of the payload and gimbal. No additional energy, control, or mechanical actuation is required. The apparatus is suitable for use in applications requiring positioning of a payload to a known orientation after arbitrary or uncontrolled motion, including remote sensing and mobile robot applications.

  3. Orientations to Reflective Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Bud; Austin, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Delineates five orientations to reflective practice: immediate, technical, deliberative, dialectic, and transpersonal, each reflecting different social science bases and beliefs and values about education. Views them as interactive, interdependent, noncompeting, aspects of reflective practice. (SK)

  4. Orientability and Diffusion Maps

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Amit; Wu, Hau-tieng

    2010-01-01

    One of the main objectives in the analysis of a high dimensional large data set is to learn its geometric and topological structure. Even though the data itself is parameterized as a point cloud in a high dimensional ambient space ℝp, the correlation between parameters often suggests the “manifold assumption” that the data points are distributed on (or near) a low dimensional Riemannian manifold ℳd embedded in ℝp, with d ≪ p. We introduce an algorithm that determines the orientability of the intrinsic manifold given a sufficiently large number of sampled data points. If the manifold is orientable, then our algorithm also provides an alternative procedure for computing the eigenfunctions of the Laplacian that are important in the diffusion map framework for reducing the dimensionality of the data. If the manifold is non-orientable, then we provide a modified diffusion mapping of its orientable double covering. PMID:21765628

  5. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Transgender People Teaching Your Child Tolerance STDs Understanding Early ... and Romance Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Transgender People Sexual Attraction and Orientation Contact Us Print ...

  6. Assigning Main Orientation to an EOH Descriptor on Multispectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Shi, Xiang; Wei, Lijun; Zou, Junwei; Chen, Fang

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach to compute an EOH (edge-oriented histogram) descriptor with main orientation. EOH has a better matching ability than SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform) on multispectral images, but does not assign a main orientation to keypoints. Alternatively, it tends to assign the same main orientation to every keypoint, e.g., zero degrees. This limits EOH to matching keypoints between images of translation misalignment only. Observing this limitation, we propose assigning to keypoints the main orientation that is computed with PIIFD (partial intensity invariant feature descriptor). In the proposed method, SIFT keypoints are detected from images as the extrema of difference of Gaussians, and every keypoint is assigned to the main orientation computed with PIIFD. Then, EOH is computed for every keypoint with respect to its main orientation. In addition, an implementation variant is proposed for fast computation of the EOH descriptor. Experimental results show that the proposed approach performs more robustly than the original EOH on image pairs that have a rotation misalignment. PMID:26140348

  7. Assigning Main Orientation to an EOH Descriptor on Multispectral Images.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Shi, Xiang; Wei, Lijun; Zou, Junwei; Chen, Fang

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes an approach to compute an EOH (edge-oriented histogram) descriptor with main orientation. EOH has a better matching ability than SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform) on multispectral images, but does not assign a main orientation to keypoints. Alternatively, it tends to assign the same main orientation to every keypoint, e.g., zero degrees. This limits EOH to matching keypoints between images of translation misalignment only. Observing this limitation, we propose assigning to keypoints the main orientation that is computed with PIIFD (partial intensity invariant feature descriptor). In the proposed method, SIFT keypoints are detected from images as the extrema of difference of Gaussians, and every keypoint is assigned to the main orientation computed with PIIFD. Then, EOH is computed for every keypoint with respect to its main orientation. In addition, an implementation variant is proposed for fast computation of the EOH descriptor. Experimental results show that the proposed approach performs more robustly than the original EOH on image pairs that have a rotation misalignment.

  8. [Spatial orientation of pilot using a cockpit exterior surveillance system].

    PubMed

    Chuntul, A V; Lapa, V V; Davydov, V V

    2013-01-01

    Spatial orientation of pilots using a cockpit exterior surveillance system was tested in real nighttime helicopter flights. Major factors complicating adequate spatial orientation and provoking visual illusions in pilots are lack of information for spatial depth (relation) perception in two-dimensional TV images altering their position along the horizontal and vertical lines of trajectory and simultaneous piloting and target search-identification operations. Reliability of pilot's spatial orientation could be improved by displaying on the exterior imaging screen also relevant flight navigation parameters.

  9. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.; Xi, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices.

  10. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C; Xi, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices. PMID:27484859

  11. Disease variants in genomes of 44 centenarians.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg-Hua, Yun; Freudenberg, Jan; Vacic, Vladimir; Abhyankar, Avinash; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Barzilai, Nir; Oschwald, Dayna; Christen, Erika; Koppel, Jeremy; Greenwald, Blaine; Darnell, Robert B; Germer, Soren; Atzmon, Gil; Davies, Peter

    2014-09-01

    To identify previously reported disease mutations that are compatible with extraordinary longevity, we screened the coding regions of the genomes of 44 Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians. Individual genome sequences were generated with 30× coverage on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 and single-nucleotide variants were called with the genome analysis toolkit (GATK). We identified 130 coding variants that were annotated as "pathogenic" or "likely pathogenic" based on the ClinVar database and that are infrequent in the general population. These variants were previously reported to cause a wide range of degenerative, neoplastic, and cardiac diseases with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance. Several of these variants are located in genes that harbor actionable incidental findings, according to the recommendations of the American College of Medical Genetics. In addition, we found risk variants for late-onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as the APOE ε4 allele that was even present in a homozygous state in one centenarian who did not develop Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate that the incidental finding of certain reported disease variants in an individual genome may not preclude an extraordinarily long life. When the observed variants are encountered in the context of clinical sequencing, it is thus important to exercise caution in justifying clinical decisions.

  12. A RESISTANT VARIANT OF MUMPS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Harold S.; Horsfall, Frank L.

    1949-01-01

    Serial passage of mumps virus in the presence of inhibitory quantities of the capsular polysaccharide of Friediänder bacillus type B results in the appearance of a variant strain of the virus. Multiplication of the variant virus is not inhibited by the polysaccharide. A similar resistant variant is obtained with polysaccharide in a single cycle of multiplication when very large inocula of mumps virus are employed. The resistant variant is indistinguishable from the parent strain as to infectivity, reactivity with erythrocytes, and immunological properties, but appears to have a somewhat slower rate of multiplication. Serial passage of the resistant variant in the absence of polysaccharide results in the reappearance of a sensitive strain. It is suggested that mumps virus populations are inhomogeneous; that naturally occurring variants are present in such populations and possess distinctive properties; that the use of a chemical inhibitor of mumps virus multiplication makes possible the selection of a variant possessing a predictable property. The findings are discussed in relation to the mechanism of inhibition of mumps virus multiplication by polysaccharide. PMID:18143585

  13. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Zubáčová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka

    2012-01-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin contain the histone H3 variant CenH3. The principal aim of this work was to identify a CenH3 homolog in T. vaginalis. We performed a screen of the T. vaginalis genome to retrieve sequences of canonical and variant H3 histones. Three variant histone H3 proteins were identified, and the subcellular localization of their epitope-tagged variants was determined. The localization of the variant TVAG_185390 could not be distinguished from that of the canonical H3 histone. The sequence of the variant TVAG_087830 closely resembled that of histone H3. The tagged protein colocalized with sites of active transcription, indicating that the variant TVAG_087830 represented H3.3 in T. vaginalis. The third H3 variant (TVAG_224460) was localized to 6 or 12 distinct spots at the periphery of the nucleus, corresponding to the number of chromosomes in G1 phase and G2 phase, respectively. We propose that this variant represents the centromeric marker CenH3 and thus can be employed as a tool to study mitosis in T. vaginalis. Furthermore, we suggest that the peripheral distribution of CenH3 within the nucleus results from the association of centromeres with the nuclear envelope throughout the cell cycle. PMID:22408228

  14. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Zubácová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka; Tachezy, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin contain the histone H3 variant CenH3. The principal aim of this work was to identify a CenH3 homolog in T. vaginalis. We performed a screen of the T. vaginalis genome to retrieve sequences of canonical and variant H3 histones. Three variant histone H3 proteins were identified, and the subcellular localization of their epitope-tagged variants was determined. The localization of the variant TVAG_185390 could not be distinguished from that of the canonical H3 histone. The sequence of the variant TVAG_087830 closely resembled that of histone H3. The tagged protein colocalized with sites of active transcription, indicating that the variant TVAG_087830 represented H3.3 in T. vaginalis. The third H3 variant (TVAG_224460) was localized to 6 or 12 distinct spots at the periphery of the nucleus, corresponding to the number of chromosomes in G(1) phase and G(2) phase, respectively. We propose that this variant represents the centromeric marker CenH3 and thus can be employed as a tool to study mitosis in T. vaginalis. Furthermore, we suggest that the peripheral distribution of CenH3 within the nucleus results from the association of centromeres with the nuclear envelope throughout the cell cycle. PMID:22408228

  15. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  16. Genome-Wide Study of Structural Variants in Bovine Holstein, Montbéliarde and Normande Dairy Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Barbieri, Johanna; Djari, Anis; Pinton, Alain; Letaief, Rabia; Salin, Gérald; Escudié, Frédéric; Roulet, Alain; Fritz, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Grohs, Cécile; Bernard, Maria; Klopp, Christophe; Boichard, Didier; Rocha, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have offered in recent years new opportunities to study genome variations. These studies have mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions or deletions and on copy number variants. Other structural variants, such as large insertions or deletions, tandem duplications, translocations, and inversions are less well-studied, despite that some have an important impact on phenotypes. In the present study, we performed a large-scale survey of structural variants in cattle. We report the identification of 6,426 putative structural variants in cattle extracted from whole-genome sequence data of 62 bulls representing the three major French dairy breeds. These genomic variants affect DNA segments greater than 50 base pairs and correspond to deletions, inversions and tandem duplications. Out of these, we identified a total of 547 deletions and 410 tandem duplications which could potentially code for CNVs. Experimental validation was carried out on 331 structural variants using a novel high-throughput genotyping method. Out of these, 255 structural variants (77%) generated good quality genotypes and 191 (75%) of them were validated. Gene content analyses in structural variant regions revealed 941 large deletions removing completely one or several genes, including 10 single-copy genes. In addition, some of the structural variants are located within quantitative trait loci for dairy traits. This study is a pan-genome assessment of genomic variations in cattle and may provide a new glimpse into the bovine genome architecture. Our results may also help to study the effects of structural variants on gene expression and consequently their effect on certain phenotypes of interest. PMID:26317361

  17. Developing an orientation program.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K

    1999-01-01

    When the local area experienced tremendous growth and change, the radiology department at Maury Hospital in Columbia, Tennessee looked seriously at its orientation process in preparation for hiring additional personnel. It was an appropriate time for the department to review its orientation process and to develop a manual to serve as both a tool for supervisors and an ongoing reference for new employees. To gather information for the manual, supervisors were asked to identify information they considered vital for new employees to know concerning the daily operations of the department, its policies and procedures, the organizational structure of the hospital, and hospital and departmental computer systems. That information became the basis of the orientation manual, and provided an introduction to the hospital and radiology department; the structure of the organization; an overview of the radiology department; personnel information; operating procedures and computer systems; and various policies and procedures. With the manual complete, the radiology department concentrated on an orientation process that would meet the needs of supervisors who said they had trouble remembering the many details necessary to teach new employees. A pre-orientation checklist was developed, which contained the many details supervisors must handle between the time an employee is hired and arrives for work. The next step was the creation of a checklist for use by the supervisor during a new employee's first week on the job. A final step in the hospital's orientation program is to have each new employee evaluate the entire orientation process. That information is then used to update and revise the manual. PMID:10346648

  18. Diversity in a honey bee pathogen: first report of a third master variant of the Deformed Wing Virus quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Mordecai, Gideon J; Wilfert, Lena; Martin, Stephen J; Jones, Ian M; Schroeder, Declan C

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of emerging RNA viruses is hampered by the high mutation and replication rates that enable these viruses to operate as a quasispecies. Declining honey bee populations have been attributed to the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor and its affiliation with Deformed Wing Virus (DWV). In the current study we use next-generation sequencing to investigate the DWV quasispecies in an apiary known to suffer from overwintering colony losses. We show that the DWV species complex is made up of three master variants. Our results indicate that a new DWV Type C variant is distinct from the previously described types A and B, but together they form a distinct clade compared with other members of the Iflaviridae. The molecular clock estimation predicts that Type C diverged from the other variants ∼319 years ago. The discovery of a new master variant of DWV has important implications for the positive identification of the true pathogen within global honey bee populations. PMID:26574686

  19. Shock Condition Forensics and Cryptic Phase Transformations from Crystallographic Orientation Relationships in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, N. E.; Erickson, T. M.; Cavosie, A. J.; Pearce, M. A.; Reddy, S. M.; Zanetti, M.; Tohver, E.; Schmieder, M.; Nemchin, A. A.; Wittmann, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present an approach to constrain pressure and temperature conditions during impact events involving identification of cryptic histories of phase transformations from orientation relationships in shocked zircon, linked to new P-T phase diagrams.

  20. Dopamine system genes are associated with orienting bias among healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Zozulinsky, Polina; Greenbaum, Lior; Brande-Eilat, Noa; Braun, Yair; Shalev, Idan; Tomer, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Healthy individuals display subtle orienting bias, manifested as a tendency to direct greater attention toward one hemispace, and evidence suggests that this bias reflects an individual trait, which may be modulated by asymmetric dopamine signaling in striatal and frontal regions. The current study examined the hypothesis that functional genetic variants within dopaminergic genes (DAT1 3' VNTR, dopamine D2 receptor Taq1A (rs1800497) and COMT Val158Met (rs4680)) contribute to individual differences in orienting bias, as measured by the greyscales paradigm, in a sample of 197 young healthy Israeli Jewish participants. For the Taq1A variant, homozygous carriers of the A2 allele displayed significantly increased leftward orienting bias compared to the carriers of the A1 allele. Additionally, and as previously reported by others, we found that bias towards leftward orienting of attention was significantly greater among carriers of the 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 3' VNTR as compared to the individuals who were homozygous for the 10-repeat allele. No significant effect of the COMT Val158Met on orienting bias was found. Taken together, our findings support the potential influence of genetic variants on inter-individual differences in orienting bias, a phenotype relevant to both normal and impaired cognitive processes.

  1. Design of non-aggregating variants of Aβ peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Joanne M.; Churches, Quentin; Waddington, Lynne; Nigro, Julie; Breheney, Kerry; Masters, Colin L.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Streltsov, Victor A.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Non-aggregating, non-toxic variants of Aβ peptide were designed using Aβ structure. • Mutations reduce aggregation by stabilising Aβ into small non-toxic oligomers. • Identification of these residues will assist the design of future therapeutic peptides. - Abstract: Self association of the amyloid-β (Aβ{sub 42}) peptide into oligomers, high molecular weight forms, fibrils and ultimately neuritic plaques, has been correlated with progressive cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, insights into the drivers of the aggregation pathway have the capacity to significantly contribute to our understanding of disease mechanism. Functional assays and a three-dimensional crystal structure of the P3 amyloidogenic region 18–41 of Aβ were used to identify residues important in self-association and to design novel non-aggregating variants of the peptide. Biophysical studies (gel filtration, SDS–PAGE, dynamic light scattering, thioflavin T assay, and electron microscopy) demonstrate that in contrast to wild type Aβ these targeted mutations lose the ability to self-associate. Loss of aggregation also correlates with reduced neuronal toxicity. Our results highlight residues and regions of the Aβ peptide important for future targeting agents aimed at the amelioration of Alzheimer’s disease.

  2. Intrahaplotypic Variants Differentiate Complex Linkage Disequilibrium within Human MHC Haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tze Hau; Tay, Matthew Zirui; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Ziwei; Ren, Ee Chee

    2015-11-23

    Distinct regions of long-range genetic fixation in the human MHC region, known as conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), possess unique genomic characteristics and are strongly associated with numerous diseases. While CEHs appear to be homogeneous by SNP analysis, the nature of fine variations within their genomic structure is unknown. Using multiple, MHC-homozygous cell lines, we demonstrate extensive sequence conservation in two common Asian MHC haplotypes: A33-B58-DR3 and A2-B46-DR9. However, characterization of phase-resolved MHC haplotypes revealed unique intra-CEH patterns of variation and uncovered 127 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which are missing from public databases. We further show that the strong linkage disequilibrium structure within the human MHC that typically confounds precise identification of genetic features can be resolved using intra-CEH variants, as evidenced by rs3129063 and rs448489, which affect expression of ZFP57, a gene important in methylation and epigenetic regulation. This study demonstrates an improved strategy that can be used towards genetic dissection of diseases.

  3. Robust diagnostic genetic testing using solution capture enrichment and a novel variant-filtering interface.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Morgan, Joanne E; Harrison, Sally M; Diggle, Christine P; Adlard, Julian; Lindsay, Helen A; Camm, Nick; Charlton, Ruth; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M

    2014-04-01

    Targeted hybridization enrichment prior to next-generation sequencing is a widespread method for characterizing sequence variation in a research setting, and is being adopted by diagnostic laboratories. However, the number of variants identified can overwhelm clinical laboratories with strict time constraints, the final interpretation of likely pathogenicity being a particular bottleneck. To address this, we have developed an approach in which, after automatic variant calling on a standard unix pipeline, subsequent variant filtering is performed interactively, using AgileExomeFilter and AgilePindelFilter (http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/agile), tools designed for clinical scientists with standard desktop computers. To demonstrate the method's diagnostic efficacy, we tested 128 patients using (1) a targeted capture of 36 cancer-predisposing genes or (2) whole-exome capture for diagnosis of the genetically heterogeneous disorder primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In the cancer cohort, complete concordance with previous diagnostic data was achieved across 793 variant genotypes. A high yield (42%) was also achieved for exome-based PCD diagnosis, underscoring the scalability of our method. Simple adjustments to the variant filtering parameters further allowed the identification of a homozygous truncating mutation in a presumptive new PCD gene, DNAH8. These tools should allow diagnostic laboratories to expand their testing portfolios flexibly, using a standard set of reagents and techniques.

  4. Prospective diagnostic analysis of copy number variants using SNP microarrays in individuals with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Faudet, Anne; Fonteneau, Eric; Amiet, Claire; Laurent, Claudine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Whalen, Sandra; Afenjar, Alexandra; Périsse, Didier; Doummar, Diane; Dorison, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, David; Brice, Alexis; Héron, Delphine; Depienne, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have repeatedly been found to cause or predispose to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). For diagnostic purposes, we screened 194 individuals with ASDs for CNVs using Illumina SNP arrays. In several probands, we also analyzed candidate genes located in inherited deletions to unmask autosomal recessive variants. Three CNVs, a de novo triplication of chromosome 15q11–q12 of paternal origin, a deletion on chromosome 9p24 and a de novo 3q29 deletion, were identified as the cause of the disorder in one individual each. An autosomal recessive cause was considered possible in two patients: a homozygous 1p31.1 deletion encompassing PTGER3 and a deletion of the entire DOCK10 gene associated with a rare hemizygous missense variant. We also identified multiple private or recurrent CNVs, the majority of which were inherited from asymptomatic parents. Although highly penetrant CNVs or variants inherited in an autosomal recessive manner were detected in rare cases, our results mainly support the hypothesis that most CNVs contribute to ASDs in association with other CNVs or point variants located elsewhere in the genome. Identification of these genetic interactions in individuals with ASDs constitutes a formidable challenge. PMID:23632794

  5. Prospective diagnostic analysis of copy number variants using SNP microarrays in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nava, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Mignot, Cyril; Rastetter, Agnès; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Faudet, Anne; Fonteneau, Eric; Amiet, Claire; Laurent, Claudine; Jacquette, Aurélia; Whalen, Sandra; Afenjar, Alexandra; Périsse, Didier; Doummar, Diane; Dorison, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, David; Brice, Alexis; Héron, Delphine; Depienne, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have repeatedly been found to cause or predispose to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). For diagnostic purposes, we screened 194 individuals with ASDs for CNVs using Illumina SNP arrays. In several probands, we also analyzed candidate genes located in inherited deletions to unmask autosomal recessive variants. Three CNVs, a de novo triplication of chromosome 15q11-q12 of paternal origin, a deletion on chromosome 9p24 and a de novo 3q29 deletion, were identified as the cause of the disorder in one individual each. An autosomal recessive cause was considered possible in two patients: a homozygous 1p31.1 deletion encompassing PTGER3 and a deletion of the entire DOCK10 gene associated with a rare hemizygous missense variant. We also identified multiple private or recurrent CNVs, the majority of which were inherited from asymptomatic parents. Although highly penetrant CNVs or variants inherited in an autosomal recessive manner were detected in rare cases, our results mainly support the hypothesis that most CNVs contribute to ASDs in association with other CNVs or point variants located elsewhere in the genome. Identification of these genetic interactions in individuals with ASDs constitutes a formidable challenge. PMID:23632794

  6. Multivariate Methods for Genetic Variants Selection and Risk Prediction in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Malovini, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Napolitano, Carlo; Guffanti, Guia

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies have contributed to major advancements in genetics research, as these technologies now facilitate affordable mapping of the entire genome for large sets of individuals. Given this, genome-wide association studies are proving to be powerful tools in identifying genetic variants that have the capacity to modify the probability of developing a disease or trait of interest. However, when the study's goal is to evaluate the effect of the presence of genetic variants mapping to specific chromosomes regions on a specific phenotype, the candidate loci approach is still preferred. Regardless of which approach is taken, such a large data set calls for the establishment and development of appropriate analytical methods in order to translate such knowledge into biological or clinical findings. Standard univariate tests often fail to identify informative genetic variants, especially when dealing with complex traits, which are more likely to result from a combination of rare and common variants and non-genetic determinants. These limitations can partially be overcome by multivariate methods, which allow for the identification of informative combinations of genetic variants and non-genetic features. Furthermore, such methods can help to generate additive genetic scores and risk stratification algorithms that, once extensively validated in independent cohorts, could serve as useful tools to assist clinicians in decision-making. This review aims to provide readers with an overview of the main multivariate methods for genetic data analysis that could be applied to the analysis of cardiovascular traits. PMID:27376073

  7. Targeted Re-Sequencing Approach of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Potentially Functional Variants in Tourette Syndrome Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John; Potamianou, Hera; Xing, Jinchuan; Deng, Li; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Tsetsos, Fotis; Drineas, Petros; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Farkas, Luca; Nagy, Peter; Szymanska, Urszula; Androutsos, Christos; Tsironi, Vaia; Koumoula, Anastasia; Barta, Csaba; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L.; Tischfield, Jay; Paschou, Peristera; Heiman, Gary A.; Georgitsi, Marianthi

    2016-01-01

    Although the genetic basis of Tourette Syndrome (TS) remains unclear, several candidate genes have been implicated. Using a set of 382 TS individuals of European ancestry we investigated four candidate genes for TS (HDC, SLITRK1, BTBD9, and SLC6A4) in an effort to identify possibly causal variants using a targeted re-sequencing approach by next generation sequencing technology. Identification of possible disease causing variants under different modes of inheritance was performed using the algorithms implemented in VAAST. We prioritized variants using Variant ranker and validated five rare variants via Sanger sequencing in HDC and SLITRK1, all of which are predicted to be deleterious. Intriguingly, one of the identified variants is in linkage disequilibrium with a variant that is included among the top hits of a genome-wide association study for response to citalopram treatment, an antidepressant drug with off-label use also in obsessive compulsive disorder. Our findings provide additional evidence for the implication of these two genes in TS susceptibility and the possible role of these proteins in the pathobiology of TS should be revisited. PMID:27708560

  8. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Iksoo; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data) to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket) for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively. PMID:26406920

  9. Introduction to Deep Sequencing and Its Application to Drug Addiction Research with a Focus on Rare Variants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaolin; Yang, Zhongli; Ma, Jennie Z.; Payne, Thomas J.; Li, Ming D

    2013-01-01

    Through linkage analysis, candidate gene approach, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), many genetic susceptibility factors for substance dependence have been discovered, such as the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ALDH2) for alcohol dependence (AD) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit variants on chromosomes 8 and 15 for nicotine dependence (ND). However, these confirmed genetic factors contribute only a small portion of the heritability responsible for each addiction. Among many potential factors, rare variants in those identified and unidentified susceptibility genes are supposed to contribute greatly to the missing heritability. Several studies focusing on rare variants have been conducted by taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technologies, which revealed that some rare variants of nAChR subunits are associated with ND in both genetic and functional studies. However, these studies investigated variants for only a small number of genes and need to be expanded to broad regions/genes in a larger population. This review presents an update on recently developed methods for rare-variant identification and association analysis and on studies focused on rare-variant discovery and function related to addictions. PMID:23990377

  10. Exome sequencing identifies a rare HSPG2 variant associated with familial idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Baschal, Erin E; Wethey, Cambria I; Swindle, Kandice; Baschal, Robin M; Gowan, Katherine; Tang, Nelson L S; Alvarado, David M; Haller, Gabe E; Dobbs, Matthew B; Taylor, Matthew R G; Gurnett, Christina A; Jones, Kenneth L; Miller, Nancy H

    2014-12-12

    Idiopathic scoliosis occurs in 3% of individuals and has an unknown etiology. The objective of this study was to identify rare variants that contribute to the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis by using exome sequencing in a multigenerational family with idiopathic scoliosis. Exome sequencing was completed for three members of this multigenerational family with idiopathic scoliosis, resulting in the identification of a variant in the HSPG2 gene as a potential contributor to the phenotype. The HSPG2 gene was sequenced in a separate cohort of 100 unrelated individuals affected with idiopathic scoliosis and also was examined in an independent idiopathic scoliosis population. The exome sequencing and subsequent bioinformatics filtering resulted in 16 potentially damaging and rare coding variants. One of these variants, p.Asn786Ser, is located in the HSPG2 gene. The variant p.Asn786Ser also is overrepresented in a larger cohort of idiopathic scoliosis cases compared with a control population (P = 0.024). Furthermore, we identified additional rare HSPG2 variants that are predicted to be damaging in two independent cohorts of individuals with idiopathic scoliosis. The HSPG2 gene encodes for a ubiquitous multifunctional protein within the extracellular matrix in which loss of function mutation are known to result in a musculoskeletal phenotype in both mouse and humans. Based on these results, we conclude that rare variants in the HSPG2 gene potentially contribute to the idiopathic scoliosis phenotype in a subset of patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Further studies must be completed to confirm the effect of the HSPG2 gene on the idiopathic scoliosis phenotype.

  11. B.O.L.D.: Bicultural Orientation and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Maria Gutierrez

    Described, in detail, in this speech is the implementation of the Silver City, New Mexico elementary school program to stress bicultural orientation and linguistic development. After brief introductory remarks concerning the identification of the bilingual problem and language teacher responsibility for initiating new bilingual educational…

  12. Problem-Oriented Approaches to Feeding the Handicapped Child. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa H.

    The monograph is intended to help parents or professionals teach severely handicapped children eating and drinking skills through the problem-oriented approach. The approach focuses on identification of the problem which restricts development of the skill, and selection of an alternative strategy for sequential teaching. The first section, on…

  13. Crystallography of decahedral and icosahedral particles. II - High symmetry orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the exact crystal structure of decahedral and icosahedral particles, high energy electron diffraction patterns and image profiles have been derived for various high symmetry orientations of the particles with respect to the incident beam. These results form a basis for the identification of small metal particle structures with advanced methods of transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Kuru and "new variant" CJD.

    PubMed

    Verdrager, J

    1997-09-01

    Acquired transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in humans include Kuru (a disease which was associated with ritualistic cannibalism in Papua New Guinea), iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and a newly recognized variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD). Clinical and neuropathological features of nvCJD are reminiscent of Kuru: early and progressive cerebellar ataxia and numerous characteristic Kuru-type amyloid plaques surrounded by spongiform change. In contrast to typical cases of sporadic CJD, Kuru and nvCJD affect young patients. The newly recognized form of CJD has been identified in ten young people in the UK in 1996, approximately 10 years after the beginning of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in the UK. Molecular analysis has shown that nvCJD has strain characteristics that are distinct from other types of CJD but similar to those of BSE. In the UK an estimated half a million BSE-infected cows entered the human food chain before the bovine offal ban of 1989. To be effective the oral route probably requires high-infectivity titers which are encountered only in the brain, spinal cord and eyes of naturally infected cows. In patients with Kuru, titers of more than 10(8) infectious doses per gram were reported in the brain tissues. As a result of the estimated very long incubation period of nvCJD (10 to 30 years or more) the predicted nvCJD epidemic will have the shape of a normal distribution curve with a peak expected in 2009. The epidemic may extend until 2030. There is already an example to illustrate such a curve in its descending line: the decline of Kuru deaths following the interruption of ritual cannibalism. PMID:9561604

  15. Diversity-oriented approach for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Lee, Jae Wook; Kang, Namyoung; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic molecules that modulate and probe biological events are critical tools in chemical biology. Utilizing combinatorial and diversity-oriented synthetic strategies, access to large numbers of small molecules is becoming more and more feasible, and research groups in this field can take advantage of the power of chemical diversity. Since the majority of early studies were focused on the discovery of compounds that perturb protein functions, diversity-based approaches are often considered as therapeutic lead discovery tactics. However, the diversity-oriented approach can also be applied to advance distinct aims, such as target protein identification, or the development of imaging probes and sensors. This review provides a personal perspective of the chemical-diversity-based approach and how this principle can be adapted to various chemical biology studies.

  16. Environmental responses mediated by histone variants.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Paul B; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient environment can trigger chromatin disruptions, involving replacement of nucleosomes or exchange of their histone subunits. Unlike canonical histones, which are available only during S-phase, replication-independent histone variants are present throughout the cell cycle and are adapted for chromatin repair. The H2A.Z variant mediates responses to environmental perturbations including fluctuations in temperature and seasonal variation. Phosphorylation of histone H2A.X rapidly marks double-strand DNA breaks for chromatin repair, which is mediated by both H2A and H3 histone variants. Other histones are used as weapons in conflicts between parasites and their hosts, which suggests broad involvement of histone variants in environmental responses beyond chromatin repair. PMID:25150594

  17. Dynamics of cell orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2007-09-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to mechanical forces generated by the contractile activity of the cell or by external stresses. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitivity of cells and the elasticity of the matrix, we predict the dynamics and orientation of cells in both the absence and presence of applied stresses. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the cellular forces in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency.

  18. Service-oriented science.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ian

    2005-05-01

    New information architectures enable new approaches to publishing and accessing valuable data and programs. So-called service-oriented architectures define standard interfaces and protocols that allow developers to encapsulate information tools as services that clients can access without knowledge of, or control over, their internal workings. Thus, tools formerly accessible only to the specialist can be made available to all; previously manual data-processing and analysis tasks can be automated by having services access services. Such service-oriented approaches to science are already being applied successfully, in some cases at substantial scales, but much more effort is required before these approaches are applied routinely across many disciplines. Grid technologies can accelerate the development and adoption of service-oriented science by enabling a separation of concerns between discipline-specific content and domain-independent software and hardware infrastructure.

  19. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  20. Topography and pigeon orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, G.

    1972-01-01

    Two types of homing experiments with pigeons to determine the influence of topographical features on the orientation behavior of the birds are discussed. The releases and following were conducted by ground experiments in which the birds are tracked by visual observation at points of topographical interest and the helicopter method by which the birds are tracked throughout the entire flight. The ground experiments showed a strong influence of topographical features on initial orientation. The helicopter experiments showed that the ground experiments do not provide adequate information on the manner in which homing occurs.

  1. Risk-Based Object Oriented Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda H.; Stapko, Ruth; Gallo, Albert

    2000-01-01

    Software testing is a well-defined phase of the software development life cycle. Functional ("black box") testing and structural ("white box") testing are two methods of test case design commonly used by software developers. A lesser known testing method is risk-based testing, which takes into account the probability of failure of a portion of code as determined by its complexity. For object oriented programs, a methodology is proposed for identification of risk-prone classes. Risk-based testing is a highly effective testing technique that can be used to find and fix the most important problems as quickly as possible.

  2. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits. PMID:27221085

  3. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  4. Characterizing Genetic Variants for Clinical Action

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Erin M.; Din-Lovinescu, Corina; Berg, Jonathan S.; Brooks, Lisa D.; Duncanson, Audrey; Dunn, Michael; Good, Peter; Hubbard, Tim; Jarvik, Gail P.; O'Donnell, Christopher; Sherry, Stephen T.; Aronson, Naomi; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Blumberg, Bruce; Calonge, Ned; Colhoun, Helen M.; Epstein, Robert S.; Flicek, Paul; Gordon, Erynn S.; Green, Eric D.; Green, Robert C.; Hurles, Matthew; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Knaus, William; Ledbetter, David H.; Levy, Howard P.; Lyon, Elaine; Maglott, Donna; McLeod, Howard L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Wicklund, Catherine; Manolio, Teri A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Williams, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing studies, and other genomic studies are finding an increasing number of genetic variants associated with clinical phenotypes that may be useful in developing diagnostic, preventive, and treatment strategies for individual patients. However, few common variants have been integrated into routine clinical practice. The reasons for this are several, but two of the most significant are limited evidence about the clinical implications of the variants and a lack of a comprehensive knowledge base that captures genetic variants, their phenotypic associations, and other pertinent phenotypic information that is openly accessible to clinical groups attempting to interpret sequencing data. As the field of medicine begins to incorporate genome-scale analysis into clinical care, approaches need to be developed for collecting and characterizing data on the clinical implications of variants, developing consensus on their actionability, and making this information available for clinical use. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Wellcome Trust thus convened a workshop to consider the processes and resources needed to: 1) identify clinically valid genetic variants; 2) decide whether they are actionable and what the action should be; and 3) provide this information for clinical use. This commentary outlines the key discussion points and recommendations from the workshop. PMID:24634402

  5. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  6. Identifying the multiplicity of crystallographically equivalent variants generated by iterative phase transformations in Ti.

    PubMed

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Pond, Robert Charles

    2016-02-01

    This work describes phase transformations in Ti from a purely crystallographic perspective. Iterative heating and cooling above and below 1155 K induce phase transitions between a low-temperature h.c.p. (hexagonal close packed) (6/m mm) and a high-temperature b.c.c. (body centred cubic) (m3m) structure. The crystallography of the two phases has been found to be related by the Burgers Orientation Relationship (Burgers OR). The transitions are accompanied by changes in texture, as an ever-increasing number of crystallographically equivalent variants occur with every cycle. Identifying their multiplicity is important to relate the textures before and after the transformation, in order to predict the resultant one and refine its microstructure. The four-dimensional Frank space was utilized to describe both h.c.p. and b.c.c. structures within the same orthogonal framework, and thus allow for their easy numerical manipulation through matrix algebra. Crystallographic group decomposition showed that the common symmetry maintained in both groups was that of group 2/m; therefore, the symmetry operations that generated the variants were of groups 3m and 23 for cubic and hexagonal generations, respectively. The number of all potential variants was determined for the first three variant generations, and degeneracy was indeed detected, reducing the number of variants from 72 to 57 and from 432 to 180 for the second and third generations, respectively. Degeneracy was attributed on some special alignments of symmetry operators, as a result of the Burgers OR connecting the relative orientation of the two structures. PMID:26830797

  7. Object Oriented Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We apply the object oriented software engineering (OOSE) design methodology for software objects (SOs) to learning objects (LOs). OOSE extends and refines design principles for authoring dynamic reusable LOs. Our learning object class (LOC) is a template from which individualised LOs can be dynamically created for, or by, students. The properties…

  8. New Faculty Orientation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    This report provides an overview of Triton College's (Illinois) New Faculty Orientation Plan, which was developed in light of the large number of retirements and new hires expected by the year 2000. The purpose of the plan is to assist newly hired instructors to move productively into their professional roles and to become actively involved in the…

  9. Good Orientation Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses the importance of having orientation for new librarians. During their crucial first few weeks on the job, the author claims, new librarians need as much hands-on, real-world training as they can get. If they are ushered to the information desk without an introduction to the staff interface of the catalog or to…

  10. Computer Based Library Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents computer-based lessons used to teach basic library skills to college students at York College of the City University of New York. The information for library orientation has been entered on a disk which must be used in conjunction with a word processing program, the Applewriter IIe, and an Apple IIe microcomputer. The…

  11. Orientation of Phoenician Temples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escacena Carrasco, José Luis

    The orientation of Phoenician temples has revealed some of the astronomical knowledge of their builders. What we now know on this topic is complemented by other archaeological documents from Syrio-Palestinian cities and their colonies. The astral aspects of Phoenician religion are a direct legacy from the Canaanite traditions 1,000 years earlier and display connections with Mesopotamia and Egypt.

  12. Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This view of the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico (26.5N, 102.0W) west of Monclova, shows a mining region of northern Mexico. Mine tailings can be seen on the mountain slopes and in the valley floor. In addition to mining activity, several irrigated agricultural areas supporting the local communities can be seen in the area.

  13. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  14. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants

    DOE PAGES

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Meydan, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; et al

    2014-12-15

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidatemore » genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest.« less

  15. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants

    SciTech Connect

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Meydan, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E.; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Huang, Qingyang

    2014-12-15

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest.

  16. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants.

    PubMed

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Cem, Meydan; Meyden, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E; Ross, M Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T Conrad

    2014-01-01

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest. PMID:25506935

  17. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants.

    PubMed

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Cem, Meydan; Meyden, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E; Ross, M Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T Conrad

    2014-01-01

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest.

  18. Vietnamese Refugee Orientation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interagency Task Force for Indochina Refugees, Washington, DC.

    This handbook addresses itself to Vietnamese refugees and is intended to help them cope with everyday situations in the United States. The entire text is given in both Vietnamese and English. The three main sections are: (1) Refugee Status--information about the legal status of refugees, identification procedures, obligations, some Immigration and…

  19. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  20. Personality and Medical Specialty Choice: Technique Orientation versus People Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Osmon, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire completed by 161 physicians indicated that role consciousness, abstractedness, and tough mindedness differentiated medical specialties (surgeons, anesthesiologists, family practitioners). Results correlated with the use of differences between person orientation and technique orientation to…

  1. Sequence Variant Descriptions: HGVS Nomenclature and Mutalyzer.

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Johan T

    2016-01-01

    Consistent and unambiguous description of sequence variants is essential to report and exchange information on the analysis of a genome, in particular in DNA diagnostics. The HGVS nomenclature-recommendations for the description of sequence variants as originally proposed by the Human Genome Variation Society-has gradually been accepted as the international standard for variant description. In this unit, we describe the current recommendations (HGVS version 15.11) regarding how to describe variants at the DNA, RNA, and protein level. We explain the rationale and give example descriptions for all variant types: substitution, deletion, duplication, insertion, inversion, conversion, and complex, as well as special types occurring only on the RNA (splicing) or protein level (nonsense, frame shift, extension). Finally, we point users to available support tools and give examples for the use of the freely available Mutalyzer suite. An extensive version of the HGVS recommendations is available online at http://varnomen.hgvs.org/. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367167

  2. Pooled-DNA Sequencing for Elucidating New Genomic Risk Factors, Rare Variants Underlying Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng Chih; Benitez, Bruno A; Deming, Yuetiva; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    20:1711, 2010), for accurate identification of rare variants in large DNA pools. Given an average sequencing coverage of 30× per haploid genome, SPLINTER can detect rare variants and short indels up to 4 base pairs (bp) with high sensitivity and specificity (up to 1 haploid allele in a pool as large as 500 individuals). Step-by-step instructions on how to conduct pooled-DNA sequencing experiments and data analyses are described in this chapter. PMID:26235075

  3. History of Oriental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S. M. Razaullah

    2002-12-01

    This volume deals specifically with recent original research in the history of Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Islamic, and Indian astronomy. It strikes a balance between landmarks of history of Ancient and Medieval Astronomy in the Orient on one hand, and on the other the transmission of the European Astronomy into the countries of the Orient. Most contributions are based on research by the experts in this field. The book also indicates the status of astronomy research in non-European cultural areas of the world. The book is especially of interest to historians of astronomy and science, and students of cultural heritage. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0657-8

  4. Perceptually oriented hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Fredrick J

    2003-04-01

    This theoretical article explores postulates representative of a perceptual frame of reference for a better understanding of hypnotic experiencing. This author contends that Perceptual Psychology, a theory first conceptualized by Snygg and Combs, as revised by Combs, Richards, and Richards in 1988, and Perceptually Oriented Hypnosis provide an effective way of understanding hypnosis, the therapist-client relationship, and has some implications as well for better comprehending psychopathology. Perceptually oriented hypnotic principles are shown to enhance the characeristics of the adequate personality, expand the phenomenal field, change personal meanings, and change aspects of the phenomenal self in the context of hypnosis. Implications for understanding differing views and conflicting perceptions of reality held by scientists and researchers are discussed. Implications for Dissociative Identity Disorder are also addressed. Research utilizing Giorgi's research methodology and Wasicsko's qualitative procedure for assessing educators' dispositions is suggested.

  5. Splice Variants of Perlucin from Haliotis laevigata Modulate the Crystallisation of CaCO3

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Sebastian; Grunwald, Ingo; Kelm, Sørge

    2014-01-01

    Perlucin is one of the proteins of the organic matrix of nacre (mother of pearl) playing an important role in biomineralisation. This nacreous layer can be predominately found in the mollusc lineages and is most intensively studied as a compound of the shell of the marine Australian abalone Haliotis laevigata. A more detailed analysis of Perlucin will elucidate some of the still unknown processes in the complex interplay of the organic/inorganic compounds involved in the formation of nacre as a very interesting composite material not only from a life science-based point of view. Within this study we discovered three unknown Perlucin splice variants of the Australian abalone H. laevigata. The amplified cDNAs vary from 562 to 815 base pairs and the resulting translation products differ predominantly in the absence or presence of a varying number of a 10 mer peptide C-terminal repeat. The splice variants could further be confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) analysis as endogenous Perlucin, purified from decalcified abalone shell. Interestingly, we observed that the different variants expressed as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins in E. coli showed strong differences in their influence on precipitating CaCO3 and that these differences might be due to a splice variant-specific formation of large protein aggregates influenced by the number of the 10 mer peptide repeats. Our results are evidence for a more complex situation with respect to Perlucin functional regulation by demonstrating that Perlucin splice variants modulate the crystallisation of calcium carbonate. The identification of differentially behaving Perlucin variants may open a completely new perspective for the field of nacre biomineralisation. PMID:24824517

  6. Aspect-Oriented Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrad, Tzilla (Editor); Filman, Robert E. (Editor); Bader, Atef (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    Computer science has experienced an evolution in programming languages and systems from the crude assembly and machine codes of the earliest computers through concepts such as formula translation, procedural programming, structured programming, functional programming, logic programming, and programming with abstract data types. Each of these steps in programming technology has advanced our ability to achieve clear separation of concerns at the source code level. Currently, the dominant programming paradigm is object-oriented programming - the idea that one builds a software system by decomposing a problem into objects and then writing the code of those objects. Such objects abstract together behavior and data into a single conceptual and physical entity. Object-orientation is reflected in the entire spectrum of current software development methodologies and tools - we have OO methodologies, analysis and design tools, and OO programming languages. Writing complex applications such as graphical user interfaces, operating systems, and distributed applications while maintaining comprehensible source code has been made possible with OOP. Success at developing simpler systems leads to aspirations for greater complexity. Object orientation is a clever idea, but has certain limitations. We are now seeing that many requirements do not decompose neatly into behavior centered on a single locus. Object technology has difficulty localizing concerns invoking global constraints and pandemic behaviors, appropriately segregating concerns, and applying domain-specific knowledge. Post-object programming (POP) mechanisms that look to increase the expressiveness of the OO paradigm are a fertile arena for current research. Examples of POP technologies include domain-specific languages, generative programming, generic programming, constraint languages, reflection and metaprogramming, feature-oriented development, views/viewpoints, and asynchronous message brokering. (Czarneclu and

  7. Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eanes, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the beginning of regular space geodetic measurements, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) has routinely provided polar motion and length of day solutions. At the present time, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) regularly produces daily polar motion solutions with 0.4 mas accuracy, equivalent to the routine 1-day VLBI experiments and SLR solutions using 3 days of Lageos-1 data. This rapid progress of the GPS technique forces a review of any resource allocations for VLBI and SLR measurements of Earth orientation.

  8. SubcloneSeeker: a computational framework for reconstructing tumor clone structure for cancer variant interpretation and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Quinlan, Aaron R; Jazaeri, Amir A; Verhaak, Roeland Gw; Wheeler, David A; Marth, Gabor T

    2014-01-01

    Many tumors are composed of genetically divergent cell subpopulations. We report SubcloneSeeker, a package capable of exhaustive identification of subclone structures and evolutionary histories with bulk somatic variant allele frequency measurements from tumor biopsies. We present a statistical framework to elucidate whether specific sets of mutations are present within the same subclones, and the order in which they occur. We demonstrate how subclone reconstruction provides crucial information about tumorigenesis and relapse mechanisms; guides functional study by variant prioritization, and has the potential as a rational basis for informed therapeutic strategies for the patient. SubcloneSeeker is available at: https://github.com/yiq/SubcloneSeeker.

  9. [Spatial orientation under microgravity].

    PubMed

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    On Earth, humans are constantly exposed to the gravity. During head and body tilts, the otolith organs sense changes in head orientation with respect to the gravitational vertical. These graviceptors also transduce transient linear acceleration generated by translational head motion and centripetal acceleration during rotation about a distant axis. When individuals are rotated at a constant velocity in a centrifuge, they sense the direction of the summed gravitational and centripetal acceleration as the vertical in the steady state. Consequently they experience a roll-tilt of the body when upright and oriented either left-ear-out or right-ear-out. This perception of tilt has been called the somatogravic illusion. Under the microgravity, the graviceptors no longer respond during static tilt of the head or head and body, but they are still activated by linear acceleration. Adaptation to weightlessness early in space flight has been proposed to entail a reinterpretation of the signals from the graviceptors (primarily the otolith organs), so that on return to Earth pitch or roll of the head with respect to the vertical is sensed as fore-aft or left-right translation. In this article, formulation of the spatial orientation on the earth and under microgravity was described.

  10. In silico comparative characterization of pharmacogenomic missense variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Missense pharmacogenomic (PGx) variants refer to amino acid substitutions that potentially affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic (PD) response to drug therapies. The PGx variants, as compared to disease-associated variants, have not been investigated as deeply. The ability to computationally predict future PGx variants is desirable; however, it is not clear what data sets should be used or what features are beneficial to this end. Hence we carried out a comparative characterization of PGx variants with annotated neutral and disease variants from UniProt, to test the predictive power of sequence conservation and structural information in discriminating these three groups. Results 126 PGx variants of high quality from PharmGKB were selected and two data sets were created: one set contained 416 variants with structural and sequence information, and, the other set contained 1,265 variants with sequence information only. In terms of sequence conservation, PGx variants are more conserved than neutral variants and much less conserved than disease variants. A weighted random forest was used to strike a more balanced classification for PGx variants. Generally structural features are helpful in discriminating PGx variant from the other two groups, but still classification of PGx from neutral polymorphisms is much less effective than between disease and neutral variants. Conclusions We found that PGx variants are much more similar to neutral variants than to disease variants in the feature space consisting of residue conservation, neighboring residue conservation, number of neighbors, and protein solvent accessibility. Such similarity poses great difficulty in the classification of PGx variants and polymorphisms. PMID:25057096

  11. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  12. Hemoglobin variants: biochemical properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Thom, Christopher S; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2013-03-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples.

  13. Human mitochondrial variants influence on oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Marcuello, Ana; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Dahmani, Yahya; Casajús, José A; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    This work investigates if human mitochondrial variants influence on maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)). With this purpose we recruited, as a uniform population in term of nutritional habits and life style, 114 healthy male Spanish subjects that practiced fitness exercises 3-4 times a week. Once mtDNA haplogroups were determined, we found that J presents with lower VO(2max) (P=0.02) than nonJ variants. J has been related with a lower efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC), diminished ATP and ROS production. Thus, the difficult to compensate the mitochondrial energetic deficiency could explain the accumulation of J haplogroup in LHON and multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, the lower ROS production associated to J could also account for the accrual of this variant in elderly people consequent to a decreased oxidative damage.

  14. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  15. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  16. Predominant fatty variant of myofibroblastoma of breast

    PubMed Central

    Baxendine-Jones, J; Theaker, J; Baldwin, L

    2001-01-01

    Myofibroblastoma of the breast is an uncommon but well defined benign stromal tumour. This report describes a case in which the predominant histological component was mature adipose tissue and two further cases with a major adipocytic component. Although small foci of adipose tissue are a recognised feature of this tumour, the dominance of the histological pattern by fat has not been described previously, and the recognition of this variant is important to allow confident diagnosis and avoid confusion with other primary adipocytic or stromal lesions, especially in the setting of potential needle core biopsy of such a lesion. Key Words: myofibroblastoma • variant • fatty PMID:11429434

  17. Crowding follows the binding of relative position and orientation.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John A; Bex, Peter J; Dakin, Steven C

    2012-03-21

    Crowding--the deleterious influence of clutter on object recognition--disrupts the identification of visual features as diverse as orientation, motion, and color. It is unclear whether this occurs via independent feature-specific crowding processes (preceding the feature binding process) or via a singular (late) mechanism tuned for combined features. To examine the relationship between feature binding and crowding, we measured interactions between the crowding of relative position and orientation. Stimuli were a target cross and two flanker crosses (each composed of two near-orthogonal lines), 15 degrees in the periphery. Observers judged either the orientation (clockwise/counterclockwise) of the near-horizontal target line, its position (up/down relative to the stimulus center), or both. For single-feature judgments, crowding affected position and orientation similarly: thresholds were elevated and responses biased in a manner suggesting that the target appeared more like the flankers. These effects were tuned for orientation, with near-orthogonal elements producing little crowding. This tuning allowed us to separate the predictions of independent (feature specific) and combined (singular) models: for an independent model, reduced crowding for one feature has no effect on crowding for other features, whereas a combined process affects either all features or none. When observers made conjoint judgments, a reduction of orientation crowding (by increasing target-flanker orientation differences) increased the rate of correct responses for both position and orientation, as predicted by our combined model. In contrast, our independent model incorrectly predicted a high rate of position errors, since the probability of positional crowding would be unaffected by changes in orientation. Thus, at least for these features, crowding is a singular process that affects bound position and orientation values in an all-or-none fashion.

  18. Single-variant and multi-variant trend tests for genetic association with next-generation sequencing that are robust to sequencing error.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonkuk; Londono, Douglas; Zhou, Lisheng; Xing, Jinchuan; Nato, Alejandro Q; Musolf, Anthony; Matise, Tara C; Finch, Stephen J; Gordon, Derek

    2012-01-01

    As with any new technology, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has potential advantages and potential challenges. One advantage is the identification of multiple causal variants for disease that might otherwise be missed by SNP-chip technology. One potential challenge is misclassification error (as with any emerging technology) and the issue of power loss due to multiple testing. Here, we develop an extension of the linear trend test for association that incorporates differential misclassification error and may be applied to any number of SNPs. We call the statistic the linear trend test allowing for error, applied to NGS, or LTTae,NGS. This statistic allows for differential misclassification. The observed data are phenotypes for unrelated cases and controls, coverage, and the number of putative causal variants for every individual at all SNPs. We simulate data considering multiple factors (disease mode of inheritance, genotype relative risk, causal variant frequency, sequence error rate in cases, sequence error rate in controls, number of loci, and others) and evaluate type I error rate and power for each vector of factor settings. We compare our results with two recently published NGS statistics. Also, we create a fictitious disease model based on downloaded 1000 Genomes data for 5 SNPs and 388 individuals, and apply our statistic to those data. We find that the LTTae,NGS maintains the correct type I error rate in all simulations (differential and non-differential error), while the other statistics show large inflation in type I error for lower coverage. Power for all three methods is approximately the same for all three statistics in the presence of non-differential error. Application of our statistic to the 1000 Genomes data suggests that, for the data downloaded, there is a 1.5% sequence misclassification rate over all SNPs. Finally, application of the multi-variant form of LTTae,NGS shows high power for a number of simulation settings, although it can have

  19. Curriculum Orientations of Virtual Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Nicole Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the curriculum orientation preferences of K-12 public school teachers who provided instruction in virtual settings (n = 47) in a midwestern state. Curriculum orientations were explored using a mixed-methods design. Quantitative assessments data revealed a pattern of curriculum orientations similar to teachers working in…

  20. Training for DD Council Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, James, Ed.; And Others

    Provided for Developmental Disabilities Councils is a resource handbook on planning orientation training for council members. The material, including three major presentations on orientation planning, advocacy, and orientation principles, is explained to be drawn from three 1975 regional conferences. Among training techniques analyzed are use of a…

  1. Orienteering for Sport and Pleasure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Hans; Atkinson, George

    This text presents the principles of the sport of orienteering (navigating through an unknown area using a map and compass as guide) and is useful to beginners, experienced orienteers, and "armchair" orienteers. Included in the text are: (1) a glossary of key words; (2) a basic introduction to, and history of, the sport; (3) description of the…

  2. Wide mutation spectrum and frequent variant Ala27Thr of FBN1 identified in a large cohort of Chinese patients with sporadic TAAD

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Cai, Lun; Jia, Lixin; Li, Xiaoyan; Xi, Xin; Zheng, Shuai; Liu, Xuxia; Piao, Chunmei; Liu, Tingting; Sun, Zhongsheng; Cai, Tao; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Genetic etiology in majority of patients with sporadic thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissections (STAAD) remains unknown. Recent GWAS study suggested common variant(s) in FBN1 is associated with STAAD. The present study aims to test this hypothesis and to identify mutation spectrum by targeted exome sequencing of the FBN1 gene in 146 unrelated patients with STAAD. Totally, 15.75% of FBN1 variants in STAAD were identified, including 5 disruptive and 18 missense mutations. Most of the variants were novel. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggested that the maximum aortic diameter in the disruptive mutation group was significantly larger than that in the non-Cys missense mutation group. Interestingly, the variant Ala27Thr at −1 position, which is predicted to change the cleavage site of the signal peptidase of fibrillin-1, was detected in two unrelated patients. Furthermore, genotyping analysis of this variant detected 10 heterozygous Ala27Thr from additional 666 unrelated patients (1.50%), versus 7 from 1500 controls (0.47%), indicating a significant association of this variant with STAAD. Collectively, the identification of the variant Ala27Thr may represent a relatively common genetic predisposition and a novel pathogenetic mechanism for STAAD. Also, expansion of the mutation spectrum in FBN1 will be helpful in genetic counselling for Chinese patients with STAAD. PMID:26272055

  3. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M; Tohme, Joe

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species. PMID:24413664

  4. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Thevelein, Johan M.; Tohme, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species. PMID:24413664

  5. An integrated framework for discovery and genotyping of genomic variants from high-throughput sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Duitama, Jorge; Quintero, Juan Camilo; Cruz, Daniel Felipe; Quintero, Constanza; Hubmann, Georg; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M; Tohme, Joe

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies and computing capacity have produced unprecedented amounts of genomic data that have unraveled the genetics of phenotypic variability in several species. However, operating and integrating current software tools for data analysis still require important investments in highly skilled personnel. Developing accurate, efficient and user-friendly software packages for HTS data analysis will lead to a more rapid discovery of genomic elements relevant to medical, agricultural and industrial applications. We therefore developed Next-Generation Sequencing Eclipse Plug-in (NGSEP), a new software tool for integrated, efficient and user-friendly detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels and copy number variants (CNVs). NGSEP includes modules for read alignment, sorting, merging, functional annotation of variants, filtering and quality statistics. Analysis of sequencing experiments in yeast, rice and human samples shows that NGSEP has superior accuracy and efficiency, compared with currently available packages for variants detection. We also show that only a comprehensive and accurate identification of repeat regions and CNVs allows researchers to properly separate SNVs from differences between copies of repeat elements. We expect that NGSEP will become a strong support tool to empower the analysis of sequencing data in a wide range of research projects on different species.

  6. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/.

  7. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  8. Evaluation of Intra-Host Variants of the Entire Hepatitis B Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sumathi; Zhai, Xiangjun; Thai, Hong; Campo, Davis S.; Xia, Guoliang; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia M.; Drobeniuc, Jan; Khudyakov, Yury E.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) frequently involves study of intra-host variants, identification of which is commonly achieved using short regions of the HBV genome. However, the use of short sequences significantly limits evaluation of genetic relatedness among HBV strains. Although analysis of HBV complete genomes using genetic cloning has been developed, its application is highly labor intensive and practiced only infrequently. We describe here a novel approach to whole genome (WG) HBV quasispecies analysis based on end-point, limiting-dilution real-time PCR (EPLD-PCR) for amplification of single HBV genome variants, and their subsequent sequencing. EPLD-PCR was used to analyze WG quasispecies from serum samples of patients (n = 38) infected with HBV genotypes A, B, C, D, E and G. Phylogenetic analysis of the EPLD-isolated HBV-WG quasispecies showed the presence of mixed genotypes, recombinant variants and sub-populations of the virus. A critical observation was that HBV-WG consensus sequences obtained by direct sequencing of PCR fragments without EPLD are genetically close, but not always identical to the major HBV variants in the intra-host population, thus indicating that consensus sequences should be judiciously used in genetic analysis. Sequence-based studies of HBV WG quasispecies should afford a more accurate assessment of HBV evolution in various clinical and epidemiological settings. PMID:21949887

  9. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  10. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data. PMID:27066855

  11. A systematic variant screening in familial cases of congenital heart defects demonstrates the usefulness of molecular genetics in this field.

    PubMed

    El Malti, Rajae; Liu, Hui; Doray, Bérénice; Thauvin, Christel; Maltret, Alice; Dauphin, Claire; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Teboul, Michel; Blanchet, Patricia; Roume, Joëlle; Gronier, Céline; Ducreux, Corinne; Veyrier, Magali; Marçon, François; Acar, Philippe; Lusson, Jean-René; Levy, Marilyne; Beyler, Constance; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Cordier-Alex, Marie-Pierre; Heitz, François; Sanlaville, Damien; Bonnet, Damien; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of congenital heart defect (CHD) combines environmental and genetic factors. So far, there were studies reporting on the screening of a single gene on unselected CHD or on familial cases selected for specific CHD types. Our goal was to systematically screen a proband of familial cases of CHD on a set of genetic tests to evaluate the prevalence of disease-causing variant identification. A systematic screening of GATA4, NKX2-5, ZIC3 and Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) P311 Kit was setup on the proband of 154 families with at least two cases of non-syndromic CHD. Additionally, ELN screening was performed on families with supravalvular arterial stenosis. Twenty-two variants were found, but segregation analysis confirmed unambiguously the causality of 16 variants: GATA4 (1 ×), NKX2-5 (6 ×), ZIC3 (3 ×), MLPA (2 ×) and ELN (4 ×). Therefore, this approach was able to identify the causal variant in 10.4% of familial CHD cases. This study demonstrated the existence of a de novo variant even in familial CHD cases and the impact of CHD variants on adult cardiac condition even in the absence of CHD. This study showed that the systematic screening of genetic factors is useful in familial CHD cases with up to 10.4% elucidated cases. When successful, it drastically improved genetic counseling by discovering unaffected variant carriers who are at risk of transmitting their variant and are also exposed to develop cardiac complications during adulthood thus prompting long-term cardiac follow-up. This study provides an important baseline at dawning of the next-generation sequencing era.

  12. Gene variants associated with antisocial behaviour: A latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Mary Jane; Lin, Haiqun; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Katsovich, Liliya; Olds, David L.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if a latent variable approach might be useful in identifying shared variance across genetic risk alleles that is associated with antisocial behaviour at age 15 years. Methods Using a conventional latent variable approach, we derived an antisocial phenotype in 328 adolescents utilizing data from a 15-year follow-up of a randomized trial of a prenatal and infancy nurse-home visitation program in Elmira, New York. We then investigated, via a novel latent variable approach, 450 informative genetic polymorphisms in 71 genes previously associated with antisocial behaviour, drug use, affiliative behaviours, and stress response in 241 consenting individuals for whom DNA was available. Haplotype and Pathway analyses were also performed. Results Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 8 genes contributed to the latent genetic variable that in turn accounted for 16.0% of the variance within the latent antisocial phenotype. The number of risk alleles was linearly related to the latent antisocial variable scores. Haplotypes that included the putative risk alleles for all 8 genes were also associated with higher latent antisocial variable scores. In addition, 33 SNPs from 63 of the remaining genes were also significant when added to the final model. Many of these genes interact on a molecular level, forming molecular networks. The results support a role for genes related to dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, glutamate, opioid, and cholinergic signaling as well as stress response pathways in mediating susceptibility to antisocial behaviour. Conclusions This preliminary study supports use of relevant behavioural indicators and latent variable approaches to study the potential “co-action” of gene variants associated with antisocial behaviour. It also underscores the cumulative relevance of common genetic variants for understanding the etiology of complex behaviour. If replicated in future studies, this approach may

  13. Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, D G; Manolio, T A; Dimmock, D P; Rehm, H L; Shendure, J; Abecasis, G R; Adams, D R; Altman, R B; Antonarakis, S E; Ashley, E A; Barrett, J C; Biesecker, L G; Conrad, D F; Cooper, G M; Cox, N J; Daly, M J; Gerstein, M B; Goldstein, D B; Hirschhorn, J N; Leal, S M; Pennacchio, L A; Stamatoyannopoulos, J A; Sunyaev, S R; Valle, D; Voight, B F; Winckler, W; Gunter, C

    2014-04-24

    The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of cell orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; de, Rumi

    2009-12-01

    The nonlinear dependence of cellular orientation on an external, time-varying stress field determines the distribution of orientations in the presence of noise and the characteristic time, τc , for the cell to reach its steady-state orientation. The short, local cytoskeletal relaxation time distinguishes between high-frequency (nearly perpendicular) and low-frequency (random or parallel) orientations. However, τc is determined by the much longer, orientational relaxation time. This behavior is related to experiments for which we predict the angle and characteristic time as a function of frequency.

  15. Representation of orientation distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenk, H.R.; Kocks, U.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper illustrates the principles presented with a particular experimental texture: from the surface layer of a copper polycrystal cold-rolled to 60% reduction in thickness. Four incomplete pole figures (200, 220, 222, and 113) were determined by x-ray diffraction in reflection geometry. The measured pole figures nearly exhibited orthorhombic symmetry (as expected), which was then strictly enforced by averaging the four quadrants of the pole figure. The orientation distribution function was obtained using the expansion in spherical harmonics (with only even-order coefficients up to l = 18).

  16. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  17. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  18. New variant for whole pancreas grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kootstra, G.; van Hooff, J.P.; Joerning, P.J.L.; Leunissen, K.M.; van der Linden, C.J.; Beukers, E.; Buurman, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    A new variant for whole pancreas grafting is described in which a segment of the duodenum and the spleen is included in the graft. The graft is placed extraperitoneally as in kidney transplantation. The exocrine drainage is with side-to-side anastomosis between duodenum and bladder. The spleen is irradiated to prevent the occurrence of GVHD, as is reported in splenic transplantation.

  19. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  20. Normal variants of the accessory hemiazygos vein

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, J M; Franco, A

    2011-01-01

    This short communication describes two normal variants of the accessory hemiazygous vein in a 15-year-old female. The article demonstrates that knowledge of the aberrant venous anatomy and the collateral pathway is important for the practising radiologist. PMID:21697414

  1. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, D R; Knott, T J; Pease, R J; Powell, L M; Wallis, S C; Robertson, S; Pullinger, C R; Milne, R W; Marcel, Y L; Humphries, S E

    1988-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here we describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant, apo-B(His1795----Met-Trp-Leu-Val-Thr-Term) is predicted to be 1799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant, apo-B(Arg1306----Term), is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1305 residues. The product of this allele could not be detected in the circulation. The differences in size and behaviour of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins. Images PMID:2843815

  2. New lymphogranuloma venereum Chlamydia trachomatis variant, Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Spaargaren, Joke; Fennema, Han S A; Morré, Servaas A; de Vries, Henry J C; Coutinho, Roel A

    2005-07-01

    We retrospectively conducted a study of men who have sex with men who visited the Amsterdam, the Netherlands, sexually transmitted diseases clinic from January 2002 to December 2003 and had rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infections. We found that symptomatic (73%) as well as asymptomatic (43%) patients were infected with a new C. trachomatis LGV variant.

  3. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  4. Monomorphic adenoma, canalicular variant: report of case.

    PubMed

    Wiener, A P; Meadows, F

    1977-05-01

    A case of monomorphic adenoma, canalicular variant, has been presented. This lesion is a rare benign neoplasm most often found in the minor salivary glands of the upper lip. This appears to be the first reported case of the lesion in a non-Caucasian.

  5. Molecular identification of Entamoeba spp. in captive nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Levecke, B; Dreesen, Leentje; Dorny, Pierre; Verweij, Jaco J; Vercammen, Francis; Casaert, Stijn; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter

    2010-08-01

    This study describes the molecular identification of 520 Entamoeba-positive fecal samples from a large and diverse population of captive nonhuman primates (NHP). The results revealed the presence of Entamoeba histolytica (NHP variant only), E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, E. hartmanni, E. coli, and E. polecki-like organisms. PMID:20573870

  6. A new trick of an old molecule: androgen receptor splice variants taking the stage?!

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Qiu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Although most prostate cancers are initially androgen-dependent and respond to androgen ablation therapy, majority of them eventually relapse and progress into incurable castration-resistant (or hormone refractory) prostate cancer. The underlying mechanisms are the focus of intensive investigation for development of more effective treatment. Mounting evidence from both clinical and basic research has demonstrated that the activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is still required for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Multiple mechanisms by which AR is re-activated under androgen-depleted conditions may be involved in the development of castration resistance. The recent identification of AR splicing variants may add another layer of complexity in AR biology. The present review summarizes recent progress in study of AR splicing variants in prostate cancer.

  7. Molecular analysis of rugosity in a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor phase variant.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Fitnat H; Liu, Xiaole S; Heydorn, Arne; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2004-07-01

    Reversible phase variation between the rugose and smooth colony variants is predicted to be important for the survival of Vibrio cholerae in natural aquatic habitats. Microarray expression profiling studies of the rugose and smooth variants of the same strain led to the identification of 124 differentially regulated genes. Further expression profiling experiments showed how these genes are regulated by the VpsR and HapR transcription factors, which, respectively, positively and negatively regulate production of VPS(El Tor), a rugose-associated extracellular polysaccharide. The study of mutants of rpoN and rpoS demonstrated the effects of these alternative sigma factors on phase variation-specific gene expression. Bioinformatics analysis of these expression data shows that 'rugosity' and 'smoothness' are determined by a complex hierarchy of positive and negative regulators, which also affect the biofilm, surface hydrophobicity and motility phenotypes of the organism. PMID:15228530

  8. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  9. A genome-wide approach for detecting novel insertion-deletion variants of mid-range size

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li C.; Sakshuwong, Sukolsak; Hopmans, Erik S.; Bell, John M.; Grimes, Susan M.; Siegmund, David O.; Ji, Hanlee P.; Zhang, Nancy R.

    2016-01-01

    We present SWAN, a statistical framework for robust detection of genomic structural variants in next-generation sequencing data and an analysis of mid-range size insertion and deletions (<10 Kb) for whole genome analysis and DNA mixtures. To identify these mid-range size events, SWAN collectively uses information from read-pair, read-depth and one end mapped reads through statistical likelihoods based on Poisson field models. SWAN also uses soft-clip/split read remapping to supplement the likelihood analysis and determine variant boundaries. The accuracy of SWAN is demonstrated by in silico spike-ins and by identification of known variants in the NA12878 genome. We used SWAN to identify a series of novel set of mid-range insertion/deletion detection that were confirmed by targeted deep re-sequencing. An R package implementation of SWAN is open source and freely available. PMID:27325742

  10. A genome-wide approach for detecting novel insertion-deletion variants of mid-range size.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li C; Sakshuwong, Sukolsak; Hopmans, Erik S; Bell, John M; Grimes, Susan M; Siegmund, David O; Ji, Hanlee P; Zhang, Nancy R

    2016-09-01

    We present SWAN, a statistical framework for robust detection of genomic structural variants in next-generation sequencing data and an analysis of mid-range size insertion and deletions (<10 Kb) for whole genome analysis and DNA mixtures. To identify these mid-range size events, SWAN collectively uses information from read-pair, read-depth and one end mapped reads through statistical likelihoods based on Poisson field models. SWAN also uses soft-clip/split read remapping to supplement the likelihood analysis and determine variant boundaries. The accuracy of SWAN is demonstrated by in silico spike-ins and by identification of known variants in the NA12878 genome. We used SWAN to identify a series of novel set of mid-range insertion/deletion detection that were confirmed by targeted deep re-sequencing. An R package implementation of SWAN is open source and freely available. PMID:27325742

  11. EBSD characterization of crystallographic orientations and twin interfaces of modulated martensite in epitaxial NiMnGa thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yudong; Li, Zongbin; Qin, Gaowu; Esling, Claude; Zhao, Xiang; Zuo, Liang

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure and the global texture of 7M modulated martensite in epitaxial Ni50Mn30Ga20 thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the local crystallographic orientations correlated with microstructural features were revealed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure of 7M martensite can be classified into two distinct constituents. One refers to long straight strips with relatively homogeneous contrast, running parallel to one edge direction of the substrate. The other refers to shorter and bent plates with relatively high relative contrast, being oriented with the plate length direction roughly in 45° with respect to the substrate edges. Each 7M martensite plate is designated as a single orientation variant, and four orientation variants that are twin-related one another constitute one variant group. With the local crystallographic orientations of martensite plates and the orientations of inter-plate interface traces, the Type I, Type II and compound twin interfaces in the low and high relative contrast zones were determined.

  12. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske–Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  13. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske-Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  14. Functional annotation of non-coding sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Dunham, Ian; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functionally relevant variants against the background of ubiquitous genetic variation is a major challenge in human genetics. For variants that fall in protein-coding regions our understanding of the genetic code and splicing allow us to identify likely candidates, but interpreting variants that fall outside of genic regions is more difficult. Here we present a new tool, GWAVA, which supports prioritisation of non-coding variants by integrating a range of annotations. PMID:24487584

  15. Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shafranske, Edward P

    2009-02-01

    Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy pays particular attention to the roles that religious and spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences play in the psychological life of the client. Contemporary psychoanalytic theorists offer multiple approaches to understand the functions of religious experience. Spirituality provides a means to address existential issues and provide a context to form personal meaning. Religious narratives present schemas of relationship and models of experiences salient to mental health, such as hope. God images or other symbolic representations of the transcendent have the power to evoke emotions, which in turn, influence motivation and behavior. While employing theories and techniques derived from psychodynamic psychotherapy, this therapeutic approach encourages the analysis of the functions religion and spirituality serve, while respecting the client's act of believing in faith. Psychotherapists address a client's spirituality by exploring the psychological meaning of such personal commitments and experiences and refrain from entering into discussion of faith claims.

  16. [Market oriented occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

    2012-09-01

    The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

  17. Oriental mystery: ginseng

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, T.K.; Cho, H.O.; Yun, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    As a mysterious cure-all medicine Korea ginseng has been, since four or five thousand years ago, used as a tonic in the orient. Ginseng has been known to have a tonic effect and it is the general opinion of many investigators that ginseng has the effect of normalization of physical conditions, that is; maintaining individual homeostasis. On the other hand, the authors have found that ginseng extract inhibits the incidence and also the proliferation of tumors induced by carcinogens such as urethane, DMBA and aflatoxin B. The anticarcinogenic effect of ginseng was due to its ability to enhance the natural killer activity of the host. Korea ginseng is highly effective in preventing or curing various disease such as diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure, etc.

  18. Stabilization of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Truncated Single Transmembrane Splice Variants through a Chaperone-like Action*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Ming; Brown, Taylor; Rossi, Grace C.; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Inturrisi, Charles E.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    The μ-opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, undergoes extensive alternative pre-mRNA splicing, as illustrated by the identification of an array of splice variants generated by both 5′ and 3′ alternative splicing. The current study reports the identification of another set of splice variants conserved across species that are generated through exon skipping or insertion that encodes proteins containing only a single transmembrane (TM) domain. Using a Tet-Off system, we demonstrated that the truncated single TM variants can dimerize with the full-length 7-TM μ-opioid receptor (MOR-1) in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to increased expression of MOR-1 at the protein level by a chaperone-like function that minimizes endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. In vivo antisense studies suggested that the single TM variants play an important role in morphine analgesia, presumably through modulation of receptor expression levels. Our studies suggest the functional roles of truncated receptors in other G protein-coupled receptor families. PMID:23760268

  19. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Mona K; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2014-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5'UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer.

  20. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  1. A Non-Synonymous HMGA2 Variant Decreases Height in Shetland Ponies and Other Small Horses

    PubMed Central

    Frischknecht, Mirjam; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Plattet, Philippe; Neuditschko, Markus; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Bachmann, Iris; Pacholewska, Alicja; Drögemüller, Cord; Dietschi, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) such as height and their underlying causative variants is still challenging and often requires large sample sizes. In humans hundreds of loci with small effects control the heritable portion of height variability. In domestic animals, typically only a few loci with comparatively large effects explain a major fraction of the heritability. We investigated height at withers in Shetland ponies and mapped a QTL to ECA 6 by genome-wide association (GWAS) using a small cohort of only 48 animals and the Illumina equine SNP70 BeadChip. Fine-mapping revealed a shared haplotype block of 793 kb in small Shetland ponies. The HMGA2 gene, known to be associated with height in horses and many other species, was located in the associated haplotype. After closing a gap in the equine reference genome we identified a non-synonymous variant in the first exon of HMGA2 in small Shetland ponies. The variant was predicted to affect the functionally important first AT-hook DNA binding domain of the HMGA2 protein (c.83G>A; p.G28E). We assessed the functional impact and found impaired DNA binding of a peptide with the mutant sequence in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This suggests that the HMGA2 variant also affects DNA binding in vivo and thus leads to reduced growth and a smaller stature in Shetland ponies. The identified HMGA2 variant also segregates in several other pony breeds but was not found in regular-sized horse breeds. We therefore conclude that we identified a quantitative trait nucleotide for height in horses. PMID:26474182

  2. A Non-Synonymous HMGA2 Variant Decreases Height in Shetland Ponies and Other Small Horses.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, Mirjam; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Plattet, Philippe; Neuditschko, Markus; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Bachmann, Iris; Pacholewska, Alicja; Drögemüller, Cord; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Flury, Christine; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) such as height and their underlying causative variants is still challenging and often requires large sample sizes. In humans hundreds of loci with small effects control the heritable portion of height variability. In domestic animals, typically only a few loci with comparatively large effects explain a major fraction of the heritability. We investigated height at withers in Shetland ponies and mapped a QTL to ECA 6 by genome-wide association (GWAS) using a small cohort of only 48 animals and the Illumina equine SNP70 BeadChip. Fine-mapping revealed a shared haplotype block of 793 kb in small Shetland ponies. The HMGA2 gene, known to be associated with height in horses and many other species, was located in the associated haplotype. After closing a gap in the equine reference genome we identified a non-synonymous variant in the first exon of HMGA2 in small Shetland ponies. The variant was predicted to affect the functionally important first AT-hook DNA binding domain of the HMGA2 protein (c.83G>A; p.G28E). We assessed the functional impact and found impaired DNA binding of a peptide with the mutant sequence in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This suggests that the HMGA2 variant also affects DNA binding in vivo and thus leads to reduced growth and a smaller stature in Shetland ponies. The identified HMGA2 variant also segregates in several other pony breeds but was not found in regular-sized horse breeds. We therefore conclude that we identified a quantitative trait nucleotide for height in horses. PMID:26474182

  3. Multivariate Methods for Genetic Variants Selection and Risk Prediction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Malovini, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Napolitano, Carlo; Guffanti, Guia

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies have contributed to major advancements in genetics research, as these technologies now facilitate affordable mapping of the entire genome for large sets of individuals. Given this, genome-wide association studies are proving to be powerful tools in identifying genetic variants that have the capacity to modify the probability of developing a disease or trait of interest. However, when the study’s goal is to evaluate the effect of the presence of genetic variants mapping to specific chromosomes regions on a specific phenotype, the candidate loci approach is still preferred. Regardless of which approach is taken, such a large data set calls for the establishment and development of appropriate analytical methods in order to translate such knowledge into biological or clinical findings. Standard univariate tests often fail to identify informative genetic variants, especially when dealing with complex traits, which are more likely to result from a combination of rare and common variants and non-genetic determinants. These limitations can partially be overcome by multivariate methods, which allow for the identification of informative combinations of genetic variants and non-genetic features. Furthermore, such methods can help to generate additive genetic scores and risk stratification algorithms that, once extensively validated in independent cohorts, could serve as useful tools to assist clinicians in decision-making. This review aims to provide readers with an overview of the main multivariate methods for genetic data analysis that could be applied to the analysis of cardiovascular traits. PMID:27376073

  4. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated