Science.gov

Sample records for oriented wavefront sensor

  1. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jose; Wöger, Friedrich

    2014-02-01

    Solar multiconjugate adaptive optics systems rely on several wavefront sensors, which measure the incoming turbulent phase along several field directions to produce a tomographic reconstruction of the turbulent phase. In this paper, we explore an alternative wavefront sensing approach that attempts to directly measure the turbulent phase present at a particular height in the atmosphere: a layer-oriented cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). In an experiment at the Dunn Solar Telescope, we built a prototype layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS system conjugated to two separate atmospheric heights. We present the data obtained in the observations and complement these with ray-tracing computations to achieve a better understanding of the instrument's performance and limitations. The results obtained in this study strongly indicate that a layer-oriented cross-correlating SHWFS is not a practical design to measure the wavefront at a high layer in the atmosphere.

  2. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes: reply.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jose; Wöger, Friedrich

    2014-11-10

    We appreciate the thoughtful comments by Kellerer [Appl. Opt.53, 7643 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.007643] to our recent study [Appl. Opt.53, 685 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.000685] in which we evaluate the practicability of a layer-oriented wavefront sensing approach suggested for use in solar multiconjugate adaptive optics. After careful review of Kellerer's comment, we remain cautious about the feasibility of a solar-layer-oriented Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. However, we strongly encourage further analysis and proof-of-concept work that addresses the difficulties outlined in our original paper and that demonstrates the operating principles behind such an instrument.

  3. Feasibility study of a layer-oriented wavefront sensor for solar telescopes: comment.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2014-11-10

    The future generation of telescopes will be equipped with multi-conjugate adaptive-optics (MCAO) systems in order to obtain high angular resolution over large fields of view. MCAO comes in two flavors: star- and layer-oriented. Existing solar MCAO systems rely exclusively on the star-oriented approach. Earlier we suggested a method to implement the layer-oriented approach, and in view of recent concerns by Marino and Wöger [Appl. Opt.53, 685 (2014)10.1364/AO.53.000685APOPAI1559-128X], we now explain the proposed scheme in further detail. We note that in any layer-oriented system one sensor is conjugated to the pupil and the others are conjugated to higher altitudes. For the latter, not all the sensing surface is illuminated by the entire field of view. The successful implementation of nighttime layer-oriented systems shows that the field reduction is no crucial limitation. In the solar approach the field reduction is directly noticeable because it causes vignetting of the Shack-Hartmann subaperture images. It can be accounted for by a suitable adjustment of the algorithms to calculate the local wavefront slopes. We discuss a further concern related to the optical layout of a layer-oriented solar system.

  4. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  5. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  6. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Alford, W. J.; Gruetzner, James K.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed.

  7. Broadband, Common-path, Interferometric Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sensors comprising Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (S-HWFS) and Zernike Wavefront Sensor (Z-WFS) capabilities are presented. The hybrid sensor includes a Z-WFS optically arranged in-line with a S-HWFS such that the combined wavefront sensor operates across a wide dynamic range and noise conditions. The Z-WFS may include the ability to introduce a dynamic phase shift in both transmissive and reflective modes.

  8. Virtual pyramid wavefront sensor for phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Vohnsen, Brian; Marcos, Susana

    2016-10-10

    Noise affects wavefront reconstruction from wrapped phase data. A novel method of phase unwrapping is proposed with the help of a virtual pyramid wavefront sensor. The method was tested on noisy wrapped phase images obtained experimentally with a digital phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer. The virtuality of the pyramid wavefront sensor allows easy tuning of the pyramid apex angle and modulation amplitude. It is shown that an optimal modulation amplitude obtained by monitoring the Strehl ratio helps in achieving better accuracy. Through simulation studies and iterative estimation, it is shown that the virtual pyramid wavefront sensor is robust to random noise.

  9. X-ray wavefront characterization with two-dimensional wavefront sensors: shearing interferometers and Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin L.

    2012-10-01

    Phase reconstructions from a two-dimensional shearing interferometer, based on two orthogonal phase gratings in a single plane, and a Hartmann sensor are compared. Design alternatives for both wavefront sensors are given and simulated performance of both the two-dimensional x-ray shearing interferometer and Hartmann wavefront sensor are presented for two different phase profiles. The first comparison is an evaluation of metrology on DT ice layers in an inertial confinement fusion capsule and the second comparison is a high frequency "asterisk" phase profile. Both of these sensors can measure the two-dimensional wave-front gradient of an x-ray beam, as well as the x-ray absorption. These instruments measure the two-dimensional wave-front gradient in a single measurement and the wavefront sensor is located in a single plane making them much less sensitive to vibrations than most other wavefront sensing techniques.

  10. Scalable analog wavefront sensor with subpixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Michael

    2006-06-01

    Standard Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors use a CCD element to sample position and distortion of a target or guide star. Digital sampling of the element and transfer to a memory space for subsequent computation adds significant temporal delay, thus, limiting the spatial frequency and scalability of the system as a wavefront sensor. A new approach to sampling uses information processing principles in an insect compound eye. Analog circuitry eliminates digital sampling and extends the useful range of the system to control a deformable mirror and make a faster, more capable wavefront sensor.

  11. Digital pyramid wavefront sensor with tunable modulation.

    PubMed

    Akondi, Vyas; Castillo, Sara; Vohnsen, Brian

    2013-07-29

    The pyramid wavefront sensor is known for its high sensitivity and dynamic range that can be tuned by mechanically altering its modulation amplitude. Here, a novel modulating digital scheme employing a reflecting phase only spatial light modulator is demonstrated. The use of the modulator allows an easy reconfigurable pyramid with digital control of the apex angle and modulation geometry without the need of any mechanically moving parts. Aberrations introduced by a 140-actuator deformable mirror were simultaneously sensed with the help of a commercial Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor. The wavefronts reconstructed using the digital pyramid wavefront sensor matched very closely with those sensed by the Hartmann-Shack. It is noted that a tunable modulation is necessary to operate the wavefront sensor in the linear regime and to accurately sense aberrations. Through simulations, it is shown that the wavefront sensor can be extended to astronomical applications as well. This novel digital pyramid wavefront sensor has the potential to become an attractive option in both open and closed loop adaptive optics systems.

  12. An achromatic low-order wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brousseau, Denis; Allain, Guillaume; Thibault, Simon; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Many wavefront sensors have been developed over the years, but most are not well suited for the photon-limited regime of coronagraphs designed for 10-9 contrast ratios and small inner working angles (IWAs). To meet current coronagraphs low-order wavefront sensing requirements, it is essential to have a method that offers high sensitivity and preferably a linear response. We propose an innovative low-order wavefront sensor (LOWFS) design that is both achromatic and near free of non-common path aberrations (NCPAs).

  13. Reconfigurable wavefront sensor for ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Bock, Martin; Das, Susanta Kumar; Fischer, Carsten; Diehl, Michael; Börner, Peter; Grunwald, Ruediger

    2012-04-01

    A highly flexible Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for ultrashort pulse diagnostics is presented. The temporal system performance is studied in detail. Reflective operation is enabled by programming tilt-tolerant microaxicons into a liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulator. Nearly undistorted pulse transfer is obtained by generating nondiffracting needle beams as subbeams. Reproducible wavefront analysis and spatially resolved second-order autocorrelation are demonstrated at incident angles up to 50° and pulse durations down to 6 fs.

  14. X-ray wavefront characterization with two-dimensional wavefront sensors: shearing interferometers and Hartmann wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin L.

    2013-02-01

    Phase reconstructions from a two-dimensional shearing interferometer, based on two orthogonal phase gratings in a single plane, and a Hartmann sensor are compared. Design alternatives for both wavefront sensors are given, and simulated performance of both the two-dimensional x-ray shearing interferometer and Hartmann wavefront sensor are presented for two different phase profiles. The first comparison is an evaluation of metrology on deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers in an inertial confinement fusion capsule, and the second comparison is a high frequency "asterisk" phase profile, which tests the ability of these wavefront sensors to detect spikes of ablator material seen in DT fuel capsule implosions. Both of these sensors can measure the two-dimensional wavefront gradient of an x-ray beam, as well as the x-ray absorption. These instruments measure the two-dimensional wavefront gradient in a single measurement, and the wavefront sensor is located in a single plane, making them much less sensitive to vibrations than most other wavefront sensing techniques.

  15. Curvature sensor for ocular wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Doutón, Fernando; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat; Luque, Sergio O

    2006-08-01

    We describe a new wavefront sensor for ocular aberration determination, based on the curvature sensing principle, which adapts the classical system used in astronomy for the living eye's measurements. The actual experimental setup is presented and designed following a process guided by computer simulations to adjust the design parameters for optimal performance. We present results for artificial and real young eyes, compared with the Hartmann-Shack estimations. Both methods show a similar performance for these cases. This system will allow for the measurement of higher order aberrations than the currently used wavefront sensors in situations in which they are supposed to be significant, such as postsurgery eyes.

  16. Laboratory test of a pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Simone; Feeney, Orla; Riccardi, Armando

    2000-07-01

    A laboratory characterization of a new wavefront sensor for adaptive optics applications called a pyramid sensor is presented. This characterization is aimed at establishing the sensor accuracy and sensitivity. To investigate the operation of the sensor in low and high order correction adaptive optics systems, its behavior for different amplitudes of incoming wavefront aberrations is studied. The sensor characterization is carried out using a two arm optical set-up that allows the comparison of the PS measurements with those of a commercial Fizeau interferometer. This is done when a certain aberration is introduced into the optical path of both instruments via a deformable mirror. The experimental data are analyzed and discussed using both geometrical and diffractive optics theory. The closed loop sensor accuracy is investigated experimentally and demonstrates closed loop wavefront correction down to 30 nm root mean square for starting aberrations whose root mean square ranges from 170 nm to 300 nm. Modal noise propagation coefficients are determined and are compared with Shack-Hartmann sensor coefficients.

  17. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Mansell, J. D.; Gruetzner, James K.; Morgan, R.; Warren, Mial E.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using MLM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs are presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  18. A Wavefront Sensor to Detect Dim Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, M.; Guyon, O.; Hart, M.; Codona, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present the progress made towards building the non-linear Curvature wavefront sensor (nlCWFS) to be used in an adaptive optics system for the direct imaging of exoplanets without the use of a laser guide star (LGS). Commonly used wavefront sensors such as the Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) do a good job of reconstructing high order modes but due to design limitations are poor at reconstructing low order modes. The nlCWFS is able to use the full spatial coherence of the pupil allowing it to reconstruct all spatial frequencies equally well. The nlCWFS senses at the diffraction limit as opposed to the SHWFS which senses at the seeing limit. This awards the nlCWFS a gain in flux of (D/r0)2. In this paper we present results from putting the nlCWFS on the 6.5m MMT Observatory and detail the progress being made to build the nlCWFS for the 1.5 m Air Force Research Laboratory/RDS Optics Division telescope.

  19. Pyramidal Wavefront Sensor Demonstrator at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Olivier; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Anctil, Geneviève; Bourqui, Pascal; Châteauneuf, François; Gauvin, Jonny; Goyette, Philippe; Lagacé, François; Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min

    2014-08-01

    Wavefront sensing is one of the key elements of an Adaptive Optics System. Although Shack-Hartmann WFS are the most commonly used whether for astronomical or biomedical applications, the high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range of the Pyramid-WFS (P-WFS) technology is promising and needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT) applications. At INO, center for applied research in optics and technology transfer in Quebec City, Canada, we have recently set to develop a Pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS), an option for which no other research group in Canada had any experience. A first version had been built and tested in 2013 in collaboration with NRC-HIA Victoria. Here we present a second iteration of demonstrator with an extended spectral range, fast modulation capability and low-noise, fast-acquisition EMCCD sensor. The system has been designed with compactness and robustness in mind to allow on-sky testing at Mont Mégantic facility, in parallel with a Shack- Hartmann sensor so as to compare both options.

  20. Calibrating the interaction matrix for the LINC-NIRVANA high layer wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyu; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Conrad, Albert R; Herbst, Thomas M; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Bertram, Thomas; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Schreiber, Laura; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Kuerster, Martin; Bizenberger, Peter; Meschke, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rao, Changhui; Mohr, Lars; Briegel, Florian; Kittmann, Frank; Berwein, Juergen; Trowitzsch, Jan

    2012-03-26

    LINC-NIRVANA is a near-infrared Fizeau interferometric imager that will operate at the Large Binocular Telescope. In preparation for the commissioning of this instrument, we conducted experiments for calibrating the high-layer wavefront sensor of the layer-oriented multi-conjugate adaptive optics system. For calibrating the multi-pyramid wavefront sensor, four light sources were used to simulate guide stars. Using this setup, we developed the push-pull method for calibrating the interaction matrix. The benefits of this method over the traditional push-only method are quantified, and also the effects of varying the number of push-pull frames over which aberrations are averaged is reported. Finally, we discuss a method for measuring mis-conjugation between the deformable mirror and the wavefront sensor, and the proper positioning of the wavefront sensor detector with respect to the four pupil positions.

  1. Closed-loop performance of pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Feeney, Orla

    2000-07-01

    We consider the performance of the wavefront reconstruction process when a Pyramid wavefront Sensor is used in a closed loop Adaptive Optics System. The Pyramid Sensor sensitivity in closed loop operations has been the subject of a first heuristic analysis showing that the sensor sensitivity is higher than that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor, at least when low order modes are considered. In this paper we evaluate the sensor accuracy by determining the closed loop reconstruction matrix. This is done using a diffractive analysis of the sensor behavior. Furthermore, knowledge of this matrix enables us to quantify the effect of error sources like sensor non linearity and photon noise on the reconstructed wavefront accuracy. Finally, a comparison of the performance of the Shack-Hartmann and Pyramid wavefront sensors is given.

  2. Post-Coronagraph Wavefront Sensor for Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Shelton, Chris; Bartos, Randall; Fregoso, Felipe; Nemati, Bijan; Best, Paul; Angione, John

    2009-01-01

    The calibration wavefront system for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) will measure the complex wavefront at the apodized pupil and provide slow phase errors to the AO system to mitigate against image plane speckles that would cause a loss in contrast. This talk describes both the low-order and high-order sensors in the calibration wavefront sensor and how the information is combined to form the wavefront estimate before the coronagraph. We will show laboratory results from our calibration testbed that demonstrate the subsystem performance at levels commensurate with those required on the final instrument.

  3. Z-View diffractive wavefront sensor: principle and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueai; Warden, Laurence; Dillon, Keith; Mills, Gary; Dreher, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    A novel wavefront sensor (Z-View TM) using a two dimensional diffractive grating has been developed at Ophthonix, Inc. Based on the Talbot self-imaging theory, a CMOS camera is placed behind the grating to capture the first Talbot image of the aberrated wavefront. This captured Talbot image is analyzed to recover the wavefront aberration. The diffractive grating wavefront sensor has been used in Ophthonix's Z-View Aberrometer, an objective refractive vision assessment system which is now commercially used in optometrist's offices/clinics across the United States of America. Coupled with a deformable mirror and other auxiliary optics systems, Z-View wavefront sensor forms the A-View adaptive optic vision correction system at Ophthonix. This A-View system is used to study the effect of complete wavefront correction in human vision, and has potential application in prescribing Ophthonix's wavefront-guided iZon TM lenses. In this paper, the wavefront sensing principle of this novel diffractive wavefront sensor and its applications will be discussed.

  4. The NGS Pyramid wavefront sensor for ERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Antichi, J.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.; Carbonaro, L.; Agapito, G.; Biliotti, V.; Briguglio, R.; Di Rico, G.; Dolci, M.; Ferruzzi, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Marchetti, E.; Fedrigo, E.; Le Louarn, M.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Amico, P.; Hubin, N.

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is the new Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for VLT in construction at ESO with the collaboration of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, ETH-Institute for Astronomy and INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. The ERIS AO system relies on a 40×40 sub-aperture Pyramid Wavefront Sensor (PWFS) for two operating modes: a pure Natural Guide Star high-order sensing for high Strehl and contrast correction and a low-order visible sensing in support of the Laser Guide Star AO mode. In this paper we present in detail the preliminary design of the ERIS PWFS that is developed under the responsibility of INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in collaboration with ESO.

  5. High-speed SPGD wavefront controller for an adaptive optics system without wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caixia; Li, Xinyang; Li, Mei; Ye, Jongwei; Chen, Bo

    2010-10-01

    A non-conventional adaptive optics system based on direct system performance metric optimization is illustrated. The system does not require wave-front sensor which is difficult to work under the poor condition such as beam cleanup for the anomalous light beam. The system comprises a high speed wavefront controller based on Stochastic Parallel Gradient Descent (SPGD) Algorithm, a deformable mirror, a tip/tilt mirror and a far-field system performance metric sensor. The architecture of the wave-front controller is based on a combination of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and floating-point Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The Zernike coefficient information is applied to improve the iteration speed. The experimental results show that the beam cleanup system based on SPGD keep a high iteration speed. The controller can compensate the wavefront aberration and tilt excursion effectively.

  6. The Gemini Planet Imager Calibration Wavefront Sensor Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick S.; Bartos, Randall D.; Trinh, Thang Q.; Pueyo, Laurent A.; Fregoso, Santos F.; Angione, John R.; Shelton, J. Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager is an extreme adaptive optics system that will employ an apodized-pupil coronagraph to make direct detections of faint companions of nearby stars to a contrast level of the 10(exp -7) within a few lambda/D of the parent star. Such high contrasts from the ground require exquisite wavefront sensing and control both for the AO system as well as for the coronagraph. Un-sensed non-common path phase and amplitude errors after the wavefront sensor dichroic but before the coronagraph would lead to speckles which would ultimately limit the contrast. The calibration wavefront system for GPI will measure the complex wavefront at the system pupil before the apodizer and provide slow phase corrections to the AO system to mitigate errors that would cause a loss in contrast. The calibration wavefront sensor instrument for GPI has been built. We will describe the instrument and its performance.

  7. Zonal wavefront sensor with reduced number of rows in the detector array.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Bosanta R; Das, Abhijit

    2011-07-10

    In this paper, we describe a zonal wavefront sensor in which the photodetector array can have a smaller number of rows. The test wavefront is incident on a two-dimensional array of diffraction gratings followed by a single focusing lens. The periodicity and the orientation of the grating rulings of each grating can be chosen such that the +1 order beam from the gratings forms an array of focal spots in the detector plane. We show that by using a square array of zones, it is possible to generate an array of +1 order focal spots having a smaller number of rows, thus reducing the height of the required detector array. The phase profile of the test wavefront can be estimated by measuring the displacements of the +1 order focal spots for the test wavefront relative to the +1 order focal spots for a plane reference wavefront. The narrower width of the photodetector array can offer several advantages, such as a faster frame rate of the wavefront sensor, a reduced amount of cross talk between the nearby detector zones, and a decrease in the maximum thermal noise. We also present experimental results of a proof-of-concept experimental arrangement using the proposed wavefront sensing scheme.

  8. Optical differentiation wavefront sensor based on binary pixelated transmission filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J.; Travinsky, A.; Ding, G.; Dorrer, C.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution wavefront sensors are used in a wide range of applications. The Shack-Hartmann sensor is the industry standard and mostly used for this kind of analysis. However, with this sensor the analysis can only be performed for narrowband radiation, the recoverable curvature of the wavefront slopes is also restricted by the size of a single lens in the microlens array. The high-resolution Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (>128×128) is also significantly expensive. The optical differentiation wavefront sensor, on the other hand, consists of only simple and therefore inexpensive components, offers greater signal to noise ratio, allows for high-resolution analysis of wavefront curvature, and is potentially capable of performing broadband measurements. When a transmission mask with linear attenuation along a spatial direction modulates the far field of an optical wave, the spatial wavefront slope along that direction can be recovered from the fluence in the near field after modulation. With two orthogonal measurements one can recover the complete wavefront of the optical wave. In this study the characteristics of such a wavefront sensor are investigated when the linear transmission modulation is implemented with a pixelated binary filter. Such a filter can be produced as a gray-scale quasi-continuous transmission pattern constructed using arrays of small (e.g., 10-micron) transparent or opaque pixels and therefore it can simply be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques. Simulations demonstrate the potential ability of such a pixelated filter to match the performance of a filter with continuously varying transmission, while offering the advantage of better transmission control and reduction of fabrication costs.

  9. Fast modulation and dithering on a pyramid wavefront sensor bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kooten, Maaike; Bradley, Colin; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; Lardiere, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    A pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) bench has been setup at NRC-Herzberg (Victoria, Canada) to investigate, first, the feasibility of a double roof prism PWFS, and second, test the proposed pyramid wavefront sensing methodology to be used in NFIRAOS for the Thirty Meter Telescope. Traditional PWFS require shallow angles and strict apex tolerances, making them difficult to manufacture. Roof prisms, on the other hand, are common optical components and can easily be made to the desired specifications. Understanding the differences between a double roof prism PWFS and traditional PWFS will allow for the double roof prism PWFS to become more widely used as an alternative to the standard pyramid, especially in a laboratory setting. In this work, the response of the double roof prism PWFS as the amount of modulation is changed, is compared to an ideal PWFS modelled using the adaptive optics toolbox, OOMAO in MATLAB. The object oriented toolbox uses physical optics to model complete AO systems. Fast modulation and dithering using a PI mirror has been implemented using a micro-controller to drive the mirror and trigger the camera. The various trade offs of this scheme, in a controlled laboratory environment, are studied and reported.

  10. Preprocessed cumulative reconstructor with domain decomposition: a fast wavefront reconstruction method for pyramid wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Shatokhina, Iuliia; Obereder, Andreas; Rosensteiner, Matthias; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-04-20

    We present a fast method for the wavefront reconstruction from pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) measurements. The method is based on an analytical relation between pyramid and Shack-Hartmann sensor (SH-WFS) data. The algorithm consists of two steps--a transformation of the P-WFS data to SH data, followed by the application of cumulative reconstructor with domain decomposition, a wavefront reconstructor from SH-WFS measurements. The closed loop simulations confirm that our method provides the same quality as the standard matrix vector multiplication method. A complexity analysis as well as speed tests confirm that the method is very fast. Thus, the method can be used on extremely large telescopes, e.g., for eXtreme adaptive optics systems.

  11. Two-photon Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Sinefeld, David; Li, Bo; Xu, Chris

    2017-03-15

    We introduce a simple wavefront sensing scheme for aberration measurement of pulsed laser beams in near-infrared wavelengths (<2200  nm), where detectors are not always available or are very expensive. The method is based on two-photon absorption in a silicon detector array for longer wavelengths detection. We demonstrate the simplicity of such implementations with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and discuss the detection sensitivity of this method.

  12. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.; Michie, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems.

  13. One dimensional wavefront distortion sensor comprising a lens array system

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.; Michie, R.B.

    1996-02-20

    A 1-dimensional sensor for measuring wavefront distortion of a light beam as a function of time and spatial position includes a lens system which incorporates a linear array of lenses, and a detector system which incorporates a linear array of light detectors positioned from the lens system so that light passing through any of the lenses is focused on at least one of the light detectors. The 1-dimensional sensor determines the slope of the wavefront by location of the detectors illuminated by the light. The 1 dimensional sensor has much greater bandwidth that 2 dimensional systems. 8 figs.

  14. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem.

  15. Miniaturized Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for starbugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Michael; Richards, Samuel; Zheng, Jessica; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Argyros, Alexander; Alcalde, Belen

    2014-07-01

    The ability to position multiple miniaturized wavefront sensors precisely over large focal surfaces are advantageous to multi-object adaptive optics. The Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) has prototyped a compact and lightweight Shack-Hartmann wavefront-sensor that fits into a standard Starbug parallel fibre positioning robot. Each device makes use of a polymer coherent fibre imaging bundle to relay an image produced by a microlens array placed at the telescope focal plane to a re-imaging camera mounted elsewhere. The advantages of the polymer fibre bundle are its high-fill factor, high-throughput, low weight, and relatively low cost. Multiple devices can also be multiplexed to a single lownoise camera for cost efficiencies per wavefront sensor. The use of fibre bundles also opens the possibility of applications such as telescope field acquisition, guiding, and seeing monitors to be positioned by Starbugs. We present the design aspects, simulations and laboratory test results.

  16. AIS wavefront sensor: a robust optical test of exposure tools using localized wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan; Zhou, Xibin; Goldstein, Michael; Ashworth, Dominic; Cummings, Kevin; Fan, Yu-Jen; Shroff, Yashesh; Denbeaux, Greg; Kandel, Yudhi; Naulleau, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    We present an update of the AIS wavefront sensor, a diagnostic sensor set for insertion in the upgraded 0.5 NA SEMATECH Albany and Berkeley METs. AIS works by using offset monopole illumination to probe localized regions of the test optic pupil. Variations in curvature manifest as focus shifts, which are measured using a photodiode- based grating-on- grating contrast monitor, and the wavefront aberrations are reconstructed using a least-squares approach. We present results from an optical prototype of AIS demonstrating an accuracy of better than λ/30 rms for Zernike polynomials Z4 through Z10. We also discuss integration strategies and requirements as well as specifications on system alignment.

  17. Adaptive Full Aperture Wavefront Sensor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This grant and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and review of wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Program. A team developed the SSD concept. For completeness, some of the information included in this report has also been included in the final report of a follow-on contract (H-27657D) entitled "Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors". The original purpose of this GTRI study was to investigate how various wavefront sensing techniques might be most effectively employed with large (greater than 10 meter) aperture space based telescopes used for commercial and scientific purposes. However, due to changes in the scope of the work performed on this grant and in light of the initial studies completed for the NGST program, only a portion of this report addresses wavefront sensing techniques. The wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the NGST were summarized in proposals and briefing materials developed by three study teams including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, TRW, and Lockheed-Martin. In this report, GTRI reviews these approaches and makes recommendations concerning the approaches. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities: Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form a space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (greater than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or

  18. A linear phase retrieval wave-front sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Xin-Yang; Jiang, Wen-Han

    2008-12-01

    A method to retrieve small phase aberration from a single far-field image is proposed. It only needs to calibrate the inherent aberration of the imaging system once, and then the difference between a single measured image with aberration and the calibrated image with inherent aberration is got to retrieve the disturbed phase aberration by an approximate linear relationship. Computer simulations are employed to analyze the performance of this linear phase retrieval (LPR) wave-front sensor. The dynamic range of this method is discussed without noise to judge how small it is needed to satisfy the method. The results show that the proposed small phase retrieval method works well when the RMS phase error is less than 1.6 rad. The Linear Phase Retrieval wave-front sensor and the Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor are compared on the same stochastic wave-front aberration. The influence of different calculation condition on the retrieval results is compared and analyzed. After analyzing the target resolution, it is thought that a reasonable target size is advantageous to the retrieval precision. At the same time, the LPR sensor can realize the alike precision measurement by using less detect cell, such as 8 pixelx8 pixel in our experiment. From the retrieval results of different orders, the error rate are less than 0.25 and it is comparatively accurate to retrieve pre-35 order aberrations.

  19. Development of a Pyramid Wave-front Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, Kacem; Vignaux, Mael; Fusco, Thierry

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of the E-ELT studies, several laboratories are involved on some instruments: HARMONY with its ATLAS adaptive optics [AO] system, EAGLE or EPICS. Most of the AO systems will probably integrate one or several pyramidal wavefront sensors, PWFS (R. Ragazzoni [1]). The coupling in an AO loop and the control in laboratory (then on sky) of this type of sensor is fundamental for the continuation of the projects related to OA systems on the E-ELT. LAM (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) is involved in particular in the VLT-SPHERE, ATLAS, EPICS projects. For the last few years, our laboratory has been carrying out different R&D activities in AO instrumentation for ELTs. An experimental AO bench is designed and being developed to allow the validation of new wave-front sensing and control concepts [2]. One the objectives of this bench, is the experimental validation of a pyramid WFS. Theoretical investigations on its behavior have been already made. The world's fastest and most sensitive camera system (OCAM2) has been recently developed at LAM (J.L Gach [3], First Light Imaging). Conjugating this advantage with the pyramid concept, we plan to demonstrate a home made Pyramid sensor for Adaptive Optics whose the speed and the precision are the key points. As a joint collaboration with ONERA and Shaktiware, our work aims at the optimization (measurement process, calibration and operation) in laboratory then on the sky of a pyramid sensor dedicated to the first generation instruments for ELTs. The sensor will be implemented on the ONERA ODISSEE AO bench combining thus a pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. What would give the possibility to compare strictly these two WFS types and make this bench unique in France and even in Europe. Experimental work on laboratory demonstration is undergoing. The status of our development will presented at the conference.

  20. A Phase-Shifting Zernike Wavefront Sensor for the Palomar P3K Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Crawford, Sam; Loya, Frank; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    A phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor has distinct advantages over other types of wavefront sensors. Chief among them are: 1) improved sensitivity to low-order aberrations and 2) efficient use of photons (hence reduced sensitivity to photon noise). We are in the process of deploying a phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor to be used with the realtime adaptive optics system for Palomar. Here we present the current state of the Zernike wavefront sensor to be integrated into the high-order adaptive optics system at Mount Palomar's Hale Telescope.

  1. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clemb, Rebecca M.; Serabyn, Gene

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique1,2,3,4 transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/D) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output planes. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective. Second, the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and or arbitrary size. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument

  2. Phase-Shifting Zernike Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Rao, Shanti; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Zernike phase-contrast technique transforms a phase object in one plane into an intensity object in the conjugate plane. This is done by applying a static pi/2 phase shift to the central core (approx. lambda/diameter) of the PSF which is intermediate between the input and output plane. Here we present a new architecture for this sensor. First, the optical system is simple and all reflective, and second the phase shift in the central core of the PSF is dynamic and can be made arbitrarily large. This common-path, all-reflective design makes it minimally sensitive to vibration, polarization and wavelength. We review the theory of operation, describe the optical system, summarize numerical simulations and sensitivities and review results from a laboratory demonstration of this novel instrument.

  3. Herschel Space Observatory Telescope characterization with Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovillaire, Guillaume; Wang, Yong; Toth, Rémy; Porcar-Guézénec, Raphael

    2012-09-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory Telescope is the first of its kind to cover the 60-670 μm far infrared spectral band. Its optical characterization, performed in the visible range, was a true technological challenge requiring very large dynamic range coupled to very high accuracy. A specific Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (HWFS) was designed to meet the demanding specifications of the measurement. The metrological system used by the EADS Astrium team to characterize the silicon car-bide based telescope will be presented as well as the main features of the specifically developed HWFS. The large expected wavefront error was measured in a double path set-up using the HWFS positioned in an extra-focal plane and a point source in the focal plane. The auto-collimation was carried out thanks to several liquid mirrors covering the M1 pupil plane and located in the conjugation plane of the HWFS sub-apertures. The results on the wavefront error obtained at the Centre Spatial de Liege (CSL) in Belgium will be shown as well as the simulated Point Spread Function to be compared to the real PSF obtained during on flight measurements. The thermally induced focal length variations are also presented as the telescope is meant to operate at 70°K in space.

  4. Holographic imaging with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Soloviev, Oleg; Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Verhaegen, Michel; Vdovin, Gleb

    2016-06-27

    A high-resolution Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor has been used for coherent holographic imaging, by computer reconstruction and propagation of the complex field in a lensless imaging setup. The resolution of the images obtained with the experimental data is in a good agreement with the diffraction theory. Although a proper calibration with a reference beam improves the image quality, the method has a potential for reference-less holographic imaging with spatially coherent monochromatic and narrowband polychromatic sources in microscopy and imaging through turbulence.

  5. Laser guide star spot shrinkage for affordable wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Wilfried; Hugot, Emmanuel; Fusco, Thierry; Neichel, Benoit; Ferrari, Marc; Correia, Carlos; Pueyo, Laurent; Dohlen, Kjetil; Pascal, Sandrine; Vola, Pascal; Sauvage, Jean-François; El Hadi, Kacem; Gach, Jean Luc

    2016-07-01

    Innovative optical designs allow tackling the spot elongation issues in Shack-Hartman based laser guide star wavefront sensors. We propose two solutions using either a combination of two arrays of freeform microlenses, or a combination of freeform optics, to perform a shrinkage of the laser spots as well as a magnification of the SH focal plane. These approaches will drastically reduce the number of needed pixels, thus making possible the use of existing detectors. We present the recent advances on this activity as well as the estimation of performance, linearity and sensitivity of the compressed system in presence of aberrations.

  6. Telescope interferometers: an alternative to classical wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault, F.

    2008-07-01

    Several types of Wavefront Sensors (WFS) are nowadays available in the field of Adaptive Optics (AO). Generally speaking, their basic principle consists in measuring slopes or curvatures of Wavefront Errors (WFE) transmitted by a telescope, subsequently reconstructing WFEs digitally. Such process, however, does not seem to be well suited for evaluating co-phasing or piston errors of future large segmented telescopes in quasi real-time. This communication presents an original, recently proposed technique for direct WFE sensing. The principle of the device, which is named "Telescope-Interferometer" (TI), is based on the addition of a reference optical arm into the telescope pupil plane. Then incident WFEs are deduced from Point Spread Function (PSF) measurements at the telescope focal plane. Herein are described two different types of TIs, and their performance are discussed in terms of intrinsic measurement accuracy and spatial resolution. Various error sources are studied by means of numerical simulations, among which photon noise sounds the most critical. Those computations finally help to define the application range of the TI method in an AO regime, including main and auxiliary telescope diameters and magnitude of the guide star. Some practical examples of optical configurations are also described and commented.

  7. A laser guide star wavefront sensor bench demonstrator for TMT.

    PubMed

    Lardiere, Olivier; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Jackson, Kate; Herriot, Glen

    2008-04-14

    Sodium laser guide stars (LGSs) allow, in theory, Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to reach a full sky coverage, but they have their own limitations. The artificial star is elongated due to the sodium layer thickness, and the temporal and spatial variability of the sodium atom density induces changing errors on wavefront measurements, especially with Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) for which the LGS elongation is larger. In the framework of the Thirty-Meter-Telescope project (TMT), the AO-Lab of the University of Victoria (UVic) has built an LGS-simulator test bed in order to assess the performance of new centroiding algorithms for LGS Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SH-WFS). The design of the LGS-bench is presented, as well as laboratory SH-WFS images featuring 29x29 radially elongated spots, simulated for a 30-m pupil. The errors induced by the LGS variations, such as focus and spherical aberrations, are characterized and discussed. This bench is not limited to SH-WFS and can serve as an LGS-simulator test bed to any other LGS-AO projects for which sodium layer fluctuations are an issue.

  8. Wide dynamic range wavefront sensor using sub-wavelength grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new zonal wavefront sensor with a very wide dynamic range. The proposed sensor uses a sub-wavelength grating array to subdivide the input wavefront and produce transmitted light spots on CCD. The wavefront tilts are calculated from the transmissions of a sub-wavelength grating array. The dynamic range and resolution of the proposed sensor are respectively decided by the grating parameters and the sub-unit size of the array. So these two performances of the sensor are independent of one another, which enables the realization of wide dynamic range and high resolution simultaneously. We introduce the principle of the sensor by both Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis and Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods. A simulation is designed to validate our proposed method, and the measurement errors are analyzed. The sensor performs good sensitivity for wide incident angles, which is particularly suitable for spherical input wavefront.

  9. Calibration and performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor for the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Dainty, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the calibration and performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor designed for use in a retinal imaging camera. The effect of the image modulation and the sensor binning on the measurements are explained in detail and various tests to validate the performance are described. The wavefront sensor was incorporated into an adaptive optics system that used a magnetically actuated deformable mirror, and results on static test optics are shown.

  10. Expected gain in the pyramid wavefront sensor with limited Strehl ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Bergomi, M.; Magrin, D.; Farinato, J.

    2016-09-01

    Context. One of the main properties of the pyramid wavefront sensor is that, once the loop is closed, and as the reference star image shrinks on the pyramid pin, the wavefront estimation signal-to-noise ratio can considerably improve. This has been shown to translate into a gain in limiting magnitude when compared with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, in which the sampling on the wavefront is performed before the light is split into four quadrants, which does not allow the quality of the focused spot to increase. Since this property is strictly related to the size of the re-imaged spot on the pyramid pin, the better the wavefront correction, the higher the gain. Aims: The goal of this paper is to extend the descriptive and analytical computation of this gain that was given in a previous paper, to partial wavefront correction conditions, which are representative for most of the wide field correction adaptive optics systems. Methods: After focusing on the low Strehl ratio regime, we analyze the minimum spatial sampling required for the wavefront sensor correction to still experience a considerable gain in sensitivity between the pyramid and the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Results: We find that the gain can be described as a function of the sampling in terms of the Fried parameter.

  11. Laboratory characterization of the ARGOS laser wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaglia, Marco; Busoni, Lorenzo; Carbonaro, Luca; Quiròs Pacheco, Fernando; Xompero, Marco; Esposito, Simone; Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present the integration status of the ARGOS wavefront sensor and the results of the closed loop tests performed in laboratory. ARGOS is the laser guide star adaptive optics system of the Large Binocular Telescope. It is designed to implement a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction for LUCI, an infrared imaging camera and multi-object spectrograph, using 3 pulsed Rayleigh beacons focused at 12km altitude. The WFS is configured as a Shack-Hartman sensor having a 15 x 15 subaspertures over the telescope pupil. In the WFS each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and range-gated to reduce spot elongation. The 3 LGS are arranged on a single lenslet array and detector by the use of off-axis optics in the final part of the WFS. The units of WFS are in the integration and testing phase at Arcetri Observatory premises. We describe here the test aimed to demonstrate the functionality of the WFS in an adaptive optics closed loop performed using the internal light sources of the WFS and a MEMS deformable mirror.

  12. Interferometric Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with an array of four-hole apertures.

    PubMed

    López, David; Ríos, Susana

    2010-04-20

    A modified Hartmann test based on the interference produced by a four-hole mask can be used to measure an unknown wavefront. To scan the wavefront, the interference pattern is measured for different positions of the mask. The position of the central fringe of the diamond-shaped interference pattern gives a measure of the local wavefront slopes. Using a set of four-hole apertures located behind an array of lenslets in such a way that each four-hole window is inside one lenslet area, a set of four-hole interference patterns can be obtained in the back focal plane of the lenslets without having to scan the wavefront. The central fringe area of each interference pattern is narrower than the area of the central maximum of the diffraction pattern of the lenslet, increasing the accuracy in the estimate of the lobe position as compared with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

  13. A hierarchical wavefront reconstruction algorithm for gradient sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharmal, Nazim; Bitenc, Urban; Basden, Alastair; Myers, Richard

    2013-12-01

    ELT-scale extreme adaptive optics systems will require new approaches tocompute the wavefront suitably quickly, when the computational burden ofapplying a MVM is no longer practical. An approach is demonstrated here whichis hierarchical in transforming wavefront slopes from a WFS into a wavefront,and then to actuator values. First, simple integration in 1D is used to create1D-wavefront estimates with unknown starting points at the edges of independentspatial domains. Second, these starting points are estimated globally. By thesestarting points are a sub-set of the overall grid where wavefront values are tobe estimated, sparse representations are produced and numerical complexity canbe chosen by the spacing of the starting point grid relative to the overallgrid. Using a combination of algebraic expressions, sparse representation, anda conjugate gradient solver, the number of non-parallelized operations forreconstruction on a 100x100 sub-aperture sized problem is ~600,000 or O(N^3/2),which is approximately the same as for each thread of a MVM solutionparallelized over 100 threads. To reduce the effects of noise propagationwithin each domain, a noise reduction algorithm can be applied which ensuresthe continuity of the wavefront. To apply this additional step has a cost of~1,200,000 operations. We conclude by briefly discussing how the final step ofconverting from wavefront to actuator values can be achieved.

  14. A Broad-Band Phase-Contrast Wave-Front Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric; Wallace, J. Kent

    2005-01-01

    A broadband phase-contrast wave-front sensor has been proposed as a real-time wave-front sensor in an adaptive-optics system. The proposed sensor would offer an alternative to the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensors now used in high-order adaptive-optics systems of some astronomical telescopes. Broadband sensing gives higher sensitivity than does narrow-band sensing, and it appears that for a given bandwidth, the sensitivity of the proposed phase-contrast sensor could exceed that of a Shack-Hartmann sensor. Relative to a Shack-Hartmann sensor, the proposed sensor may be optically and mechanically simpler. As described below, an important element of the principle of operation of a phase-contrast wave-front sensor is the imposition of a 90deg phase shift between diffracted and undiffracted parts of the same light beam. In the proposed sensor, this phase shift would be obtained by utilizing the intrinsic 90 phase shift between the transmitted and reflected beams in an ideal (thin, symmetric) beam splitter. This phase shift can be characterized as achromatic or broadband because it is 90deg at every wavelength over a broad wavelength range.

  15. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  16. Wavefront Sensing with the Fine Guidance Sensor for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David; Dean, Bruce H.; Howard,Joe; Shiri, Ron

    2008-01-01

    An analysis is presented that utilizes the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) for focal-plane wavefront sensing (WFS) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WFS with FGS increases the number of wavefront measurements taken in field of the telescope, but has many challenges over the other JWST instruments that make it unique, such as; less sampling of the Point Spread Function (PSF), a smaller diversity-defocus range, a smaller image detector size, and a polychromatic object or source. Additionally, presented is an analysis of sampling for wavefront sensing. Results are shown based on simulations of flight and the cryogenic optical testing at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  17. Shack - Hartmann wavefront sensor for measuring the parameters of high-power pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A G; Zavalova, V E; Kudryashov, A V; Rukosuev, A L; Sheldakova, Yu V; Samarkin, V V; Romanov, P N

    2010-06-23

    The wavefront of the radiation of two types from high-power solid-state (Ti:sapphire and Nd:glass) lasers is experimentally studied. The measurements are performed using a Shack - Hartmann wavefront sensor. The technical and functional potential of this sensor in measuring laser-based schemes is demonstrated. The results of measuring both static and dynamic wavefront aberrations are discussed. The estimated dynamics of defocus aberration is in agreement with the experimental data. (measurement of laser radiation parameters)

  18. End-To-End performance test of the LINC-NIRVANA Wavefront-Sensor system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Juergen; Bertram, Thomas; Conrad, Al; Briegel, Florian; Kittmann, Frank; Zhang, Xiangyu; Mohr, Lars

    2011-09-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is an imaging Fizeau interferometer, for use in near infrared wavelengths, being built for the Large Binocular Telescope. Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) increases the sky coverage and the field of view over which diffraction limited images can be obtained. For its MCAO implementation, Linc-Nirvana utilizes four total wavefront sensors; each of the two beams is corrected by both a ground-layer wavefront sensor (GWS) and a high-layer wavefront sensor (HWS). The GWS controls the adaptive secondary deformable mirror (DM), which is based on an DSP slope computing unit. Whereas the HWS controls an internal DM via computations provided by an off-the-shelf multi-core Linux system. Using wavefront sensor data collected from a prior lab experiment, we have shown via simulation that the Linux based system is sufficient to operate at 1kHz, with jitter well below the needs of the final system. Based on that setup we tested the end-to-end performance and latency through all parts of the system which includes the camera, the wavefront controller, and the deformable mirror. We will present our loop control structure and the results of those performance tests.

  19. Simple broadband implementation of a phase contrast wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    The most critical element of an adaptive optics system is its wavefront sensor, which must measure the closed-loop difference between the corrected wavefront and an ideal template at high speed, in real time, over a dense sampling of the pupil. Most high-order systems have used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, but a novel approach based on Zernike's phase contrast principle appears promising. In this paper we discuss a simple way to achromatize such a phase contrast wavefront sensor, using the pi/2 phase difference between reflected and transmitted rays in a thin, symmetric beam splitter. We further model the response at a range of wavelengths to show that the required transverse dimension of the focal-plane phase-shifting spot, nominally lambda/D, may not be very sensitive to wavelength, and so in practice additional optics to introduce wavelength-dependent transverse magnification achromatizing this spot diameter may not be required. A very simple broadband implementation of the phase contrast wavefront sensor results.

  20. Wavefront sensor testing in hypersonic flows using a laser-spark guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Armstrong, Darrell J.; Hedlund, Eric; Lederer, Melissa; Collier, Arnold S.; Spring, Charles; Gruetzner, James K.; Hebner, Gregory A.; Mansell, Justin D.

    1997-11-01

    The flight environment of next-generation theater missile defense interceptors involves hypersonic speeds that place severe aero-thermodynamic loads on missile components including the windows used for optical seekers. These heating effects can lead to significant boresight error and aberration. Ground-based tests are required to characterize these effects. We have developed methods to measure aberrations in seeker windows using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Light from a laser or other source with a well known wavefront is passed through the window and falls on the sensor. The sensor uses an array of micro-lenses to generate a grid of focal spots on a CCD detector. The positions of the focal spots provide a measure of the wavefront slope over each micro-lens. The wavefront is reconstructed by integrating the slopes, and analyzed to characterize aberrations. During flight, optical seekers look upstream through a window at 'look angles' angles near 0 degrees relative to the free stream flow. A 0 degree angle corresponds to large angles approaching 90 degrees when measured relative to the normal of the window, and is difficult to simulate using conventional techniques to illuminate the wavefront sensor during wind tunnel tests. For this reason, we developed a technique using laser- induced optical breakdown that allows arbitrary look angles down to 0 degrees.

  1. Testing highly aberrated large optics with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Pulaski, Paul; Raymond, Thomas D.; Neal, David A.; Wang, Quandou; Griesmann, Ulf

    2003-12-01

    We have adapted a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) to the measurement of highly aberrated large optics. The experiment uses a concave mirror operating at the radius point with a small lens to re-collimate the light onto the wavefront sensor. It is used to test large (300 mm) fused silica wafers in double pass transmission. The optic under test is placed in the intermediate path near the large return mirror. The aberrations of the large mirror, beam splitter and other optics are subtracted by recording a reference set of focal spot on the SHWFS without the wafer. The wavefront error for some of these wafers is nearly 100 waves, yet we are able to make accurate measurements with the wavefront sensor by selecting a sensor with the appropriate combination of focal length and lenslet diameter. The special sensor that we developed uses a megapixel camera with an arrangement of 100 X 100 lenslets. This sensor could achieve several hundred waves of dynamic range with better than λ/20 accuracy. Additional wafer thickness measurements that were made at NIST with the XCALIBIR interferometer corroborate the SHWFS results.

  2. Time series analysis of Adaptive Optics wave-front sensor telemetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D

    2004-03-22

    Time series analysis techniques are applied to wave-front sensor telemetry data from the Lick Adaptive Optics System. For 28 fully-illuminated subapertures, telemetry data of 4096 consecutive slope estimates for each subaperture are available. The primary problem is performance comparison of alternative wave-front sensing algorithms. Using direct comparison of data in open loop and closed-loop trials, we analyze algorithm performance in terms of gain, noise and residual power. We also explore the benefits of multi-input Wiener filtering and analyze the open-loop and closed-loop spatial correlations of the sensor measurements.

  3. Modified Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor using an array of superresolution pupil filters.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Susana; López, David

    2009-06-08

    A conventional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor works with an array of lenslets which produces an array of focal spots in the back focal plane of the lenses. The displacements of the focal spots from a reference position give a measure of the mean local wavefront slopes. To determine the positions of the focal spots, centroiding algorithms have to be used. In this work, the use of superresolution pupil filters to reduce the size of the focal spots is analyzed, as well as its effect on the variance of the centroid estimate, seeking for an enhancing of the sensor accuracy.

  4. An ocular wavefront sensor based on binary phase element: design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Anurag

    2012-07-01

    A modal wavefront sensor for ocular aberrations exhibits two main advantages compared to a conventional Shack-Hartmann sensor. As the wavefront is detected in the Fourier plane, the method is robust against local loss of information (e.g. local opacity of ocular lens as in the case of cataract), and is not dependent on the spatial distribution of wavefront sampling. We have proposed a novel method of wavefront sensing for ocular aberrations that directly detects the strengths of Zernike aberrations. A multiplexed Fourier computer-generated hologram has been designed as the binary phase element (BPE) for the detection of second-order and higher-order ocular aberrations (HOAs). The BPE design has been validated by comparing the simulated far-field pattern with the experimental results obtained by displaying it on a spatial light modulator. Simulation results have demonstrated the simultaneous wavefront detection with an accuracy better that ∼λ/30 for a measurement range of ±2.1λ with reduced cross-talk. Sensor performance is validated by performing a numerical experiment using the City data set for test waves containing second-order and HOAs and measurement errors of 0.065 µm peak-to-valley (PV) and 0.08 µm (PV) have been obtained, respectively.

  5. High-speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor design with commercial off-the-shelf optics.

    PubMed

    Widiker, Jeffrey J; Harris, Scott R; Duncan, Bradley D

    2006-01-10

    Several trade-offs relevant to the design of a two-dimensional high-speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor are presented. Also outlined are some simple preliminary experiments that can be used to establish critical design specifications not already known. These specifications include angular uncertainty, maximum measurable wavefront tilt, and spatial resolution. A generic design procedure is then introduced to enable the adaptation of a limited selection of CCD cameras and lenslet arrays to the desired design specifications by use of commercial off-the-shelf optics. Although initially developed to aid in the design of high-speed (i.e., megahertz-frame-rate) Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors, our method also works when used for slower CCD cameras. A design example of our procedure is provided.

  6. EUV Hartmann sensor for wavefront measurements at the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flöter, Bernhard; Juranić, Pavle; Kapitzki, Svea; Keitel, Barbara; Mann, Klaus; Plönjes, Elke; Schäfer, Bernd; Tiedtke, Kai

    2010-08-01

    A compact, self-supporting Hartmann wavefront sensor was developed for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray range. The device is adapted to the characteristics of the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). It operates in a wavelength range from 6 to 30 nm with the capability to measure the wavefront quality of individual free-electron laser (FEL) pulses for beam characterization as well as for beamline alignment and monitoring behind user experiments. We report on online-Hartmann wavefront measurements at beamline BL2 with λ13.5 nm/90 accuracy for wavefront rms (wrms). The results were used to align the ellipsoidal focusing mirror at the beamline, decreasing the residual root mean square (rms) wavefront aberrations by more than a factor of 3 to 2.6 nm. The spot size of 31 μm (x) and 27 μm (y) full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) as well as other beam parameters evaluated from wavefront and intensity data are consistent with independent profile measurements in the focal region, employing both a high-resolution EUV camera and poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) imprints.

  7. Experimental study of an optimised Pyramid wave-front sensor for Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Charlotte Z.; El Hadi, Kacem; Sauvage, Jean-François; Correia, Carlos; Fauvarque, Olivier; Rabaud, Didier; Lamb, Masen; Neichel, Benoit; Fusco, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few years the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM) has been heavily involved in R&D for adaptive optics systems dedicated to future large telescopes, particularly in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Within this framework an investigation into a Pyramid wave-front sensor is underway. The Pyramid sensor is at the cutting edge of high order, high precision wave-front sensing for ground based telescopes. Investigations have demonstrated the ability to achieve a greater sensitivity than the standard Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor whilst the implementation of a Pyramid sensor on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) has provided compelling operational results.1, 2 The Pyramid now forms part of the baseline for several next generation Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). As such its behaviour under realistic operating conditions must be further understood in order to optimise performance. At LAM a detailed investigation into the performance of the Pyramid aims to fully characterise the behaviour of this wave-front sensor in terms of linearity, sensitivity and operation. We have implemented a Pyramid sensor using a high speed OCAM2 camera (with close to 0 readout noise and a frame rate of 1.5kHz) in order to study the performance of the Pyramid within a full closed loop adaptive optics system. This investigation involves tests on all fronts, from theoretical models and numerical simulations to experimental tests under controlled laboratory conditions, with an aim to fully understand the Pyramid sensor in both modulated and non-modulated configurations. We include results demonstrating the linearity of the Pyramid signals, compare measured interaction matrices with those derived in simulation and evaluate the performance in closed loop operation. The final goal is to provide an on sky comparison between the Pyramid and a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor, at Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (ONERA-ODISSEE bench). Here we

  8. Two-Sided Pyramid Wavefront Sensor in the Direct Phase Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D; Baker, K

    2006-04-12

    The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor has been extensively simulated in the direct phase mode using a wave optics code. The two-sided pyramid divides the focal plane so that each half of the core only interferes with the speckles in its half of the focal plane. A relayed image of the pupil plane is formed at the CCD camera for each half. Antipodal speckle pairs are separated so that a pure phase variation causes amplitude variations in the two images. The phase is reconstructed from the difference of the two amplitudes by transforming cosine waves into sine waves using the Hilbert transform. There are also other corrections which have to be applied in Fourier space. The two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor performs extremely well: After two or three iterations, the phase error varies purely in y. The two-sided pyramid pair enables the phase to be completely reconstructed. Its performance has been modeled closed loop with atmospheric turbulence and wind. Both photon noise and read noise were included. The three-sided and four-sided pyramid wavefront sensors have also been studied in direct phase mode. Neither performs nearly as well as does the two-sided pyramid wavefront sensor.

  9. Concepts, laboratory, and telescope test results of the plenoptic camera as a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, L. F.; Montilla, I.; Fernández-Valdivia, J. J.; Trujillo-Sevilla, J. L.; Rodríguez-Ramos, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    The plenoptic camera has been proposed as an alternative wavefront sensor adequate for extended objects within the context of the design of the European Solar Telescope (EST), but it can also be used with point sources. Originated in the field of the Electronic Photography, the plenoptic camera directly samples the Light Field function, which is the four - dimensional representation of all the light entering a camera. Image formation can then be seen as the result of the photography operator applied to this function, and many other features of the light field can be exploited to extract information of the scene, like depths computation to extract 3D imaging or, as it will be specifically addressed in this paper, wavefront sensing. The underlying concept of the plenoptic camera can be adapted to the case of a telescope by using a lenslet array of the same f-number placed at the focal plane, thus obtaining at the detector a set of pupil images corresponding to every sampled point of view. This approach will generate a generalization of Shack-Hartmann, Curvature and Pyramid wavefront sensors in the sense that all those could be considered particular cases of the plenoptic wavefront sensor, because the information needed as the starting point for those sensors can be derived from the plenoptic image. Laboratory results obtained with extended objects, phase plates and commercial interferometers, and even telescope observations using stars and the Moon as an extended object are presented in the paper, clearly showing the capability of the plenoptic camera to behave as a wavefront sensor.

  10. The low-order wavefront sensor for the PICTURE-C mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Christopher B.; Brown, Joshua; Martel, Jason; Howe, Glenn A.; Hewasawam, Kuravi; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Douglas, Ewan S.; Mawet, Dimitri; Guyon, Olivier; Singh, Garima; Lozi, Julien; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Marinan, Anne D.

    2015-09-01

    The PICTURE-C mission will fly a 60 cm off-axis unobscured telescope and two high-contrast coronagraphs in successive high-altitude balloon flights with the goal of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing visible scattered light from exozodiacal dust in the interior 1-10 AU of nearby exoplanetary systems. The first flight in 2017 will use a 10-4 visible nulling coronagraph (previously flown on the PICTURE sounding rocket) and the second flight in 2019 will use a 10-7 vector vortex coronagraph. A low-order wavefront corrector (LOWC) will be used in both flights to remove time-varying aberrations from the coronagraph wavefront. The LOWC actuator is a 76-channel high-stroke deformable mirror packaged on top of a tip-tilt stage. This paper will detail the selection of a complementary high-speed, low-order wavefront sensor (LOWFS) for the mission. The relative performance and feasibility of several LOWFS designs will be compared including the Shack-Hartmann, Lyot LOWFS, and the curvature sensor. To test the different sensors, a model of the time-varying wavefront is constructed using measured pointing data and inertial dynamics models to simulate optical alignment perturbations and surface deformation in the balloon environment.

  11. Improving the accuracy of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor on extended scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, M.; Morel, J.-M.; Thiebaut, C.; Delvit, J.-M.; Facciolo, G.

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve higher resolutions, current earth-observation satellites use larger lightweight main mirrors which are usually deformed over time, impacting on image quality. In the context of active optics, we studied the problem of correcting this main mirror by performing wavefront estimation in a closed loop environment. To this end, a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor (SHWFS) used on extended scenes could measure the incoming wavefront. The performance of the SHWFS on extended scenes depends entirely on the accuracy of the shift estimation algorithm employed, which should be fast enough to be executed on-board. In this paper we specifically deal with the problem of fast accurate shift estimation in this context. We propose a new algorithm, based on the global optical flow method, that estimates the shifts in linear time. In our experiments, our method proved to be more accurate and stable, as well as less sensitive to noise than all current state-of-the-art methods.

  12. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a hybrid focal-plane sensor for the high-contrast imaging of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Snik, F.; Korkiakoski, V.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The raw coronagraphic performance of current high-contrast imaging instruments is limited by the presence of a quasi-static speckle (QSS) background, resulting from instrumental Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs). Rapid development of efficient speckle subtraction techniques in data reduction has enabled final contrasts of up to 10-6 to be obtained, however it remains preferable to eliminate the underlying NCPEs at the source. In this work we introduce the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS), a new wavefront sensor suitable for real-time NCPE correction. This combines the Apodizing Phase Plate (APP) coronagraph with a holographic modal wavefront sensor to provide simultaneous coronagraphic imaging and focal-plane wavefront sensing with the science point-spread function. We first characterise the baseline performance of the cMWS via idealised closed-loop simulations, showing that the sensor is able to successfully recover diffraction-limited coronagraph performance over an effective dynamic range of ±2.5 radians root-mean-square (rms) wavefront error within 2-10 iterations, with performance independent of the specific choice of mode basis. We then present the results of initial on-sky testing at the William Herschel Telescope, which demonstrate that the sensor is capable of NCPE sensing under realistic seeing conditions via the recovery of known static aberrations to an accuracy of 10 nm (0.1 radians) rms error in the presence of a dominant atmospheric speckle foreground. We also find that the sensor is capable of real-time measurement of broadband atmospheric wavefront variance (50% bandwidth, 158 nm rms wavefront error) at a cadence of 50 Hz over an uncorrected telescope sub-aperture. When combined with a suitable closed-loop adaptive optics system, the cMWS holds the potential to deliver an improvement of up to two orders of magnitude over the uncorrected QSS floor. Such a sensor would be eminently suitable for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of

  13. Amplitude and phase beam characterization using a two-dimensional wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Warren, M.E.

    1996-09-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor that uses binary optic lenslet arrays to directly measure the wavefront slope (phase gradient) and amplitude of the laser beam. This sensor uses an array of lenslets that dissects the beam into a number of samples. The focal spot location of each of these lenslets (measured by a CCD camera) is related to the incoming wavefront slope over the lenslet. By integrating these measurements over the laser aperture, the wavefront or phase distribution can be determined. Since the power focused by each lenslet is also easily determined, this allows a complete measurement of the intensity and phase distribution of the laser beam. Furthermore, all the information is obtained in a single measurement. Knowing the complete scalar field of the beam allows the detailed prediction of the actual beam`s characteristics along its propagation path. In particular, the space- beamwidth product M{sup 2}, can be obtained in a single measurement. The intensity and phase information can be used in concert with information about other elements in the optical train to predict the beam size, shape, phase and other characteristics anywhere in the optical train. We present preliminary measurements of an Ar{sup +} laser beam and associated M{sup 2} calculations.

  14. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  15. A phase-knife wave-front sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A S; Larichev, A V

    2005-01-31

    The use of an optical system with a phase knife is proposed to record qualitatively the shape of the optical-radiation wave front. Theoretical and numerical studies of a sensor based on a phase knife are performed, the algorithms for reconstruction of the phase function and schemes for sensor realisation are developed, and the range in which the device can be used expediently is determined. The sensor component parameters required for its realisation are determined, and the sensor efficiency in various operational modes is tested experimentally. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Adaptive optics wavefront sensors based on photon-counting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aull, Brian F.; Schuette, Daniel R.; Reich, Robert K.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2010-07-01

    For adaptive optics systems, there is a growing demand for wavefront sensors that operate at higher frame rates and with more pixels while maintaining low readout noise. Lincoln Laboratory has been investigating Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays integrated with CMOS readout circuits as a potential solution. This type of sensor counts photons digitally within the pixel, enabling data to be read out at high rates without the penalty of readout noise. After a brief overview of adaptive optics sensor development at Lincoln Laboratory, we will present the status of silicon Geigermode- APD technology along with future plans to improve performance.

  17. Holographic wavefront sensor based on Karhunen-Loève decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzuola, Esdras; Zepp, Andreas; Gladysz, Szymon; Stein, Karin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce the use of Karhunen-Loève functions as a basis set to decompose atmospheric phase aberrations in a digital holographic wavefront sensor (HWS). We show that the intermodal crosstalk when using Karhunen-Loève functions is reduced in comparison to the Zernike decomposition. Additionally, the sensor's response showed an improved linearity and better robustness to scintillation. Intermodal crosstalk remains a significant problem for this sensor but operation of an adaptive optics system based on HWS is less challenging when using Karhunen-Loève functions instead of Zernike polynomials.

  18. Optical characterization of MEMS micro-mirror arrays using digital holographic Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor: a new technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Igor; Dooley, Sarah B.

    2011-05-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Micro-Mirror Arrays (MMAs) are widely used in advanced laser beam steering systems and as adaptive optical elements. The new generation of MEMS MMAs are fabricated by bulk micromachining of a single Silicon-On-Insulator wafer. Optical characterization of MEMS MMAs can be done by direct detection of the reflected beams or by using more advanced wavefront measuring techniques, such as a phase-shifting interferometer or Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. In the case of an interferometer, the geometry of the tested MMA can be calculated after performing the phase unwrapping procedure, which can be quite complex. In the latter case of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, careful selection of a highquality array of microlenses is required in order to match the capabilities of the wavefront sensor to the measured wavefront produced by the MMA. The presented digital Shack-Hartmann technique is a modified approach for wavefront characterization based on digital processing of the interferometer data. The optical wavefront from the tested MMA is mixed with the reference wavefront. Then the recorded interference intensity image is Fourier transformed producing digitally synthesized images of the optical beams in the far field. Therefore, the digital version of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor does not require the use of an array of microlenses and is primarily limited by the detector array geometry. One can digitally generate any configuration of subapertures corresponding to various geometries of microlenses. However, this new technique does require coherent optical mixing of the two wavefronts in order to produce the interference pattern.

  19. Sorting method to extend the dynamic range of the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junwon; Shack, Roland V.; Descour, Michael R

    2005-08-10

    We propose a simple and powerful algorithm to extend the dynamic range of a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor. In a conventional Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor the dynamic range is limited by the f-number of a lenslet, because the focal spot is required to remain in the area confined by the single lenslet. The sorting method proposed here eliminates such a limitation and extends the dynamic range by tagging each spot in a special sequence. Since the sorting method is a simple algorithm that does not change the measurement configuration, there is no requirement for extra hardware, multiple measurements, or complicated algorithms. We not only present the theory and a calculation example of the sorting method but also actually implement measurement of a highly aberrated wave front from nonrotational symmetric optics.

  20. Simulating the Effects of an Extended Source on the Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Through Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not...subject to copyright protection in the United States . AFIT/GE/ENG/11-08 SIMULATING THE EFFECTS OF AN EXTENDED SOURCE ON THE SHACK-HARTMANN WAVEFRONT SENSOR...19 USAF United States Air Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 OSC

  1. Phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator is introduced. A close-loop phase retrieval method based on Eigen functions of Laplacian is proposed, and its accuracy and efficiency are analyzed through numerical experiments of atmospheric phase retrieval. The results show that the close-loop phase retrieval method has a high accuracy. Moreover, it is stable regardless of modal cross coupling.

  2. Measurement of corneal topography through Hartmann-Shack wave-front sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinsheng; Rao, Xuejun; Rao, Changhui

    2008-12-01

    A corneal topography based on Hartmann-Shack Sensor is presented in this paper. In the system, the focus of an objective lens is precisely positioned on cornea's curve center. Wave-front of the reflecting beam can be measured by the Hartmann-Shack sensor which is conjugate to the cornea plane. If the corneal surface is a perfect sphere, wave-front detected by the Hartmann-Shack sensor is a plane. As a result, data measured by Hartmann-Shacks sensor is the deviation between the sphere and the real cornea surface. This paper describes a methodology for designing instrument based on Hartmann-Shack sensor. Then, applying this method, an instrument is developed for accurate measurement of corneal topography. In addition, measuring principle of Hartmann-Shack sensor which determined system parameters is also introduced. Repeatability is demonstrated by a series of data. The instrument was able to accurately measure simulative cornea's reflective aberrations, from which corneal topography and corneal refractive aberrations were derived.

  3. Wavefront sensor based diagnostic of FERMI FEL photon beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Lorenzo; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Svetina, Cristian; Cocco, Daniele; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Kiskinova, Maya; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-09-01

    FERMI is the first seeded EUV-SXR free electron laser (FEL) user facility, and it is operated at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste. Two of the four already operating beamlines, namely LDM (Low Density Matter) and DiProI (Diffraction and Projection Imaging), use a Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) active X-ray optics system for focusing the FEL pulses onto the target under investigation. A wafefront sensor is used as diagnostic for the characterization of the focused spot and for the optimization of the parameters of these active optical systems as well. The aim of this work is, first, to describe in detail the optimization procedure using the wavefront sensor through the minimization of the Zernike coefficients, and second, report on the final results obtained on the K-B optical system at the DiProI endstation. The wavefront sensor, mounted out of focus behind the DiProI chamber, allows to compute the intensity distribution of the FEL beam, typically a mix between several modes resulting in a "noisy hyper-Gaussian" intensity profile, and the wavefront residual from ideal propagation shape and after tilt correction. Combining these two measures we can obtain the electric field of the wave out of focus. Propagating back the electric field we reconstruct the focal spot in far field approximation. In this way the sensor works as a diagnostic reconstructing the focal spot. On the other hand, after modelling the electric field with a Zernike polynomial it is easy and fast to optimize the mirror bending and the optical system angles by minimizing the aberrations, quantified in terms of Zernike coefficients. Since each coefficient corresponds to a single parameter, they can be minimized one at the time. Online wavefront measurements have made possible the optimization of the bending acting on the mirror curvature, and of the (pitch and roll) angle positions of the K-B system. From the wavefront measurements we have inferred a focal spot for DiProI of 5.5 μm x 6.2 μm at 32 nm wavelength

  4. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Chen, Xinyang; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wave-front sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in close loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full close loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  5. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  6. More Zernike modes' open-loop measurement in the sub-aperture of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyi; Mu, Quanquan; Li, Dayu; Yang, Chengliang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Hu, Lifa; Xuan, Li

    2016-10-17

    The centroid-based Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) treats the sampled wavefronts in the sub-apertures as planes, and the slopes of the sub-wavefronts are used to reconstruct the whole pupil wavefront. The problem is that the centroid method may fail to sense the high-order modes for strong turbulences, decreasing the precision of the whole pupil wavefront reconstruction. To solve this problem, we propose a sub-wavefront estimation method for SHWFS based on the focal plane sensing technique, by which more Zernike modes than the two slopes can be sensed in each sub-aperture. In this paper, the effects on the sub-wavefront estimation method of the related parameters, such as the spot size, the phase offset with its set amplitude and the pixels number in each sub-aperture, are analyzed and these parameters are optimized to achieve high efficiency. After the optimization, open-loop measurement is realized. For the sub-wavefront sensing, we achieve a large linearity range of 3.0 rad RMS for Zernike modes Z2 and Z3, and 2.0 rad RMS for Zernike modes Z4 to Z6 when the pixel number does not exceed 8 × 8 in each sub-aperture. The whole pupil wavefront reconstruction with the modified SHWFS is realized to analyze the improvements brought by the optimized sub-wavefront estimation method. Sixty-five Zernike modes can be reconstructed with a modified SHWFS containing only 7 × 7 sub-apertures, which could reconstruct only 35 modes by the centroid method, and the mean RMS errors of the residual phases are less than 0.2 rad2, which is lower than the 0.35 rad2 by the centroid method.

  7. Pupil tracking with a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arines, Justo; Prado, Paula; Bará, Salvador

    2010-05-01

    We present the theoretical background and experimental validation of a pupil tracking method based on measurement of the irradiance centroid of Hartmann-Shack aberrometric images. The experimental setup consists of a Hartmann-Shack (HS) sensor forming over the same camera the images of the eye's pupil and the aberrometric image. The calibration is made by comparing the controlled displacements induced to an artificial eye with the displacements estimated from the centroid of the pupil and of the HS focal plane. The pupil image is also used for validation of the method when operating with human eyes. The experimental results after calibration show a root mean square error of 10.45 μm for the artificial eye and 27, 10, and 6 μm rms for human eyes tested using Hartmann-Shack images, with signal-to-noise ratios of 6, 8, and 11, respectively. The performance of the method is similar to conventional commercial eye trackers. It avoids the need for using separate tracking devices and their associated synchronization problems. This technique can also be used to reprocess present and stored sets of Hartmann-Shack aberrometric images to estimate the ocular movements that occurred during the measurement runs, and, if convenient, to correct the measured aberrations from their influence.

  8. Improved artificial bee colony algorithm for wavefront sensor-less system in free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chaojun; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technology is an effective way to alleviate the effect of turbulence on free space optical communication (FSO). A new adaptive compensation method can be used without a wave-front sensor. Artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC) is a population-based heuristic evolutionary algorithm inspired by the intelligent foraging behaviour of the honeybee swarm with the advantage of simple, good convergence rate, robust and less parameter setting. In this paper, we simulate the application of the improved ABC to correct the distorted wavefront and proved its effectiveness. Then we simulate the application of ABC algorithm, differential evolution (DE) algorithm and stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to the FSO system and analyze the wavefront correction capabilities by comparison of the coupling efficiency, the error rate and the intensity fluctuation in different turbulence before and after the correction. The results show that the ABC algorithm has much faster correction speed than DE algorithm and better correct ability for strong turbulence than SPGD algorithm. Intensity fluctuation can be effectively reduced in strong turbulence, but not so effective in week turbulence.

  9. Development of a pyramidal wavefront sensor test-bench at INO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Wang, Min; Gauvin, Jonny; Martin, Olivier; Savard, Maxime; Bourqui, Pascal; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Deschenes, William; Anctil, Genevieve; Chateauneuf, François

    2013-12-01

    The key technical element of the adaptive optics in astronomy is the wavefront sensing (WFS). One of the advantages of the pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) over the widely used Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor seems to be the increased sensitivity in closed-loop applications. A high-sensitivity and large dynamic-range WFS, such as P-WFS technology, still needs to be further investigated for proper justification in future Extremely Large Telescopes application. At INO, we have recently carried out the optical design, testing and performance evaluation of a P-WFS bench setup. The optical design of the bench setup mainly consists of the super-LED fiber source, source collimator, spatial light modulator (SLM), relay lenses, tip-tilt mirror, Fourier-transforming lens, and a four-faceted glass pyramid with a large vertex angle as well as pupil re-imaged optics. The phase-only SLM has been introduced in the bench setup to generate atmospheric turbulence with a maximum phase shift of more than 2π at each pixel (256 grey levels). Like a modified Foucault knife-edge test, the refractive pyramid element is used to produce four images of the entrance pupil on a CCD camera. The Fourier-transforming lens, which is used before the pyramid prism, is designed for telecentric output to allow dynamic modulation (rotation of the beam around the pyramid-prism center) from a tip-tilt mirror. Furthermore, a P-WFS diffraction-based model has been developed. This model includes most of the system limitations such as the SLM discrete voltage steps and the CCD pixel pitch. The pyramid effects (edges and tip) are considered as well. The modal wavefront reconstruction algorithm relies on the construction of an interaction matrix (one for each modulation's amplitude). Each column of the interaction matrix represents the combination of the four pupil images for a given wavefront aberration. The nice agreement between the data and the model suggest that the limitation of the system is not the P

  10. Sensing more modes with fewer sub-apertures: the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Meimon, Serge; Fusco, Thierry; Michau, Vincent; Plantet, Cédric

    2014-05-15

    We propose here a novel way to analyze Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor images in order to retrieve more modes than the two centroid coordinates per sub-aperture. To do so, we use the linearized focal-plane technique (LIFT) phase retrieval method for each sub-aperture. We demonstrate that we can increase the number of modes sensed with the same computational burden per mode. For instance, we show the ability to control a 21×21 actuator deformable mirror using a 10×10 lenslet array.

  11. Guaranteeing Failsafe Operation of Extended-Scene Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erikin

    2009-01-01

    A Shack-Hartmann sensor (SHS) is an optical instrument consisting of a lenslet array and a camera. It is widely used for wavefront sensing in optical testing and astronomical adaptive optics. The camera is placed at the focal point of the lenslet array and points at a star or any other point source. The image captured is an array of spot images. When the wavefront error at the lenslet array changes, the position of each spot measurably shifts from its original position. Determining the shifts of the spot images from their reference points shows the extent of the wavefront error. An adaptive cross-correlation (ACC) algorithm has been developed to use scenes as well as point sources for wavefront error detection. Qualifying an extended scene image is often not an easy task due to changing conditions in scene content, illumination level, background, Poisson noise, read-out noise, dark current, sampling format, and field of view. The proposed new technique based on ACC algorithm analyzes the effects of these conditions on the performance of the ACC algorithm and determines the viability of an extended scene image. If it is viable, then it can be used for error correction; if it is not, the image fails and will not be further processed. By potentially testing for a wide variety of conditions, the algorithm s accuracy can be virtually guaranteed. In a typical application, the ACC algorithm finds image shifts of more than 500 Shack-Hartmann camera sub-images relative to a reference sub -image or cell when performing one wavefront sensing iteration. In the proposed new technique, a pair of test and reference cells is selected from the same frame, preferably from two well-separated locations. The test cell is shifted by an integer number of pixels, say, for example, from m= -5 to 5 along the x-direction by choosing a different area on the same sub-image, and the shifts are estimated using the ACC algorithm. The same is done in the y-direction. If the resulting shift

  12. Tests and evaluation of a variable focus liquid lens for curvature wavefront sensors in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Fernández, Jorge; Cuevas, Salvador; Álvarez-Nuñez, Luis C; Watson, Alan

    2013-10-20

    Curvature wavefront sensors (WFSs), which obtain the wavefront aberrations from two defocused intensity images at each side of the pupil plane, have shown to be highly efficient for astronomical applications. We propose here an alternative defocusing mechanism for curvature sensors, based on an electrowetting-based variable focus liquid lens. Typically, the sampling rates of a WFS for active optics are of the order of 0.01 Hz, and the focus modulation can be done by simply moving the detector back and forth. On the other hand, adaptive optics may require speeds of up to several hundred hertz, and the modulation is then done by using a fast vibrating membrane mirror. We believe variable focus liquid lenses may be able to perform this focus modulation, reducing the overall size of the system and without the need of extra moving parts. We have done a full characterization of the Varioptic Arctic 416 liquid lens, and we have evaluated its potential performance in different curvature configurations.

  13. Accurate laser guide star wavefront sensor simulation for the E-ELT first light adaptive optics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patti, Mauro; Schreiber, Laura; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Ciliegi, Paolo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Esposito, Simone; Feautrier, Philippe; Lombini, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    MAORY will be the multi-conjugate adaptive optics module for the E-ELT first light. The baseline is to operate wavefront sensing using 6 Sodium Laser Guide Stars and 3 Natural Guide Stars to solve intrinsic limitations of artificial beacons and to mitigate the impact of the sodium layer structure and variability. In particular, some critical components of MAORY require to be designed and dimensioned in order to reduce the spurious effects arising from the Sodium Layer density distribution and variation. The MAORY end-to-end simulation code has been designed to accurately model the Laser Guide Star image in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor sub-apertures and to allow sodium profile temporal evolution. The fidelity with which the simulation code translates the sodium profiles in Laser Guide Star images at the wavefront sensor focal plane has been verified using a laboratory Prototype.

  14. Auto gain control of EMCCD in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaoyi; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Mu, QuanQuan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yukun; Wang, Shaoxin; Xuan, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) makes the wavefront sensing more efficient for adaptive optics (AO). However when the brightness of the observed target changes in large ranges in a few minutes, a fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain may not be optimum. Thus an auto-gain-control (AGC) method based on the spots image of the S-H WFS is proposed. The designed control value is the average value of the maximum signals of all the light spots in a frame. It has been demonstrated in the experiments that the control value is sensitive to the change of the target brightness, and is stable in the presence of detecting noises and turbulence influence. The goal value for control is predetermined based on the linear relation of the signal with the EM gain and the number of photons collected in sub-apertures. The conditions of the self-protection of the EMCCD are also considered for the goal value. Simulations and experiments indicate that the proposed control method is efficient, and keeps the sensing in a high SNR which reaches the upper SNR limit when sensing with EMCCD. The self-protection of the EMCCD is avoided during the whole sensing process.

  15. Iteratively Weighted Centroiding for Shack-Hartmann Wave-Front Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Moallem, M M

    2007-02-28

    Several techniques have been used with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to determine the local wave-front gradient across each lenslet. In this article we introduce an iterative weighted technique which is specifically targeted for open-loop applications such as aberrometers and metrology. In this article the iterative centroiding technique is compared to existing techniques such as center-of-mass with thresholding, weighted center-of-gravity, matched filter and cross-correlation. Under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio, the iterative weighted centroiding algorithm is demonstrated to produce a lower variance in the reconstructed phase than existing techniques. The iteratively weighted algorithm was also compared in closed-loop and demonstrated to have the lowest error variance along with the weighted center-of-gravity, however, the iteratively weighted algorithm removes the bulk of the aberration in roughly half the iterations than the weighted center-of-gravity algorithm. This iterative weighted algorithm is also well suited to applications such as guiding on telescopes.

  16. Focal plane wavefront sensor achromatization: The multireference self-coherent camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Rousset, G.; Mazoyer, J.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging and spectroscopy provide unique constraints for exoplanet formation models as well as for planetary atmosphere models. But this can be challenging because of the planet-to-star small angular separation (<1 arcsec) and high flux ratio (>105). Recently, optimized instruments like VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI were installed on 8m-class telescopes. These will probe young gazeous exoplanets at large separations (≳1 au) but, because of uncalibrated phase and amplitude aberrations that induce speckles in the coronagraphic images, they are not able to detect older and fainter planets. Aims: There are always aberrations that are slowly evolving in time. They create quasi-static speckles that cannot be calibrated a posteriori with sufficient accuracy. An active correction of these speckles is thus needed to reach very high contrast levels (>106-107). This requires a focal plane wavefront sensor. Our team proposed a self coherent camera, the performance of which was demonstrated in the laboratory. As for all focal plane wavefront sensors, these are sensitive to chromatism and we propose an upgrade that mitigates the chromatism effects. Methods: First, we recall the principle of the self-coherent camera and we explain its limitations in polychromatic light. Then, we present and numerically study two upgrades to mitigate chromatism effects: the optical path difference method and the multireference self-coherent camera. Finally, we present laboratory tests of the latter solution. Results: We demonstrate in the laboratory that the multireference self-coherent camera can be used as a focal plane wavefront sensor in polychromatic light using an 80 nm bandwidth at 640 nm (bandwidth of 12.5%). We reach a performance that is close to the chromatic limitations of our bench: 1σ contrast of 4.5 × 10-8 between 5 and 17 λ0/D. Conclusions: The performance of the MRSCC is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to actively minimize the

  17. Calibration strategy of the pyramid wavefront sensor module of ERIS with the VLT deformable secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Briguglio, R.; Pinna, E.; Agapito, G.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    ERIS is a new Adaptive Optics Instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility of the VLT that foresees, in its design phase, a Pyramid Wavefront Sensor Module (PWM) to be used with the VLT Deformable Secondary Mirror (VLT-DSM) as corrector. As opposite to the concave secondary mirrors currently in use (e.g. at LBT), VLT-DSM is convex and calibration of the interaction matrix (IM) between the PWM and the DSM is not foreseen on-telescope during day-time. In this paper different options of calibration are evaluated and compared with particular attention on the synthetic evaluation and on-sky calibration of the IM. A trade-off of the calibration options, the optimization techniques and the related validation with numerical simulations are also provided.

  18. Measurement of nonlinear refractive index and ionization rates in air using a wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Kimmel, Mark; Atherton, Briggs

    2012-04-09

    A wavefront sensor has been used to measure the Kerr nonlinear focal shift of a high intensity ultrashort pulse beam in a focusing beam geometry while accounting for the effects of plasma-defocusing. It is shown that plasma-defocusing plays a major role in the nonlinear focusing dynamics and that measurements of Kerr nonlinearity and ionization are coupled. Furthermore, this coupled effect leads to a novel way that measures the laser ionization rates in air under atmospheric conditions as well as Kerr nonlinearity. The measured nonlinear index n₂ compares well with values found in the literature and the measured ionization rates could be successfully benchmarked to the model developed by Perelomov, Popov, and Terentev (PPT model) [Sov. Phys. JETP 50, 1393 (1966)].

  19. Improving the performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor with modal sensitivity compensation.

    PubMed

    Korkiakoski, Visa; Vérinaud, Christophe; Le Louarn, Miska

    2008-01-01

    We describe a solution to increase the performance of a pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS) under bad seeing conditions. We show that most of the issues involve a reduced sensitivity that depends on the magnitude of the high frequency atmospheric distortions. We demonstrate in end-to-end closed loop adaptive optics simulations that with a modal sensitivity compensation method a high-order system with a nonmodulated P-WFS is robust in conditions with the Fried parameter r 0 at 0.5 microm in the range of 0.05-0.10 m. We also show that the method makes it possible to use a modal predictive control system to reach a total performance improvement of 0.06-0.45 in Strehl ratio at 1.6 microm. Especially at r 0=0.05 m the gain is dramatic.

  20. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  1. Status of an extreme adaptive optics testbench using a self-referenced Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupias, M.; Langlois, M.; Thiébaut, E.; Tallon, M.; Leger, J.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (XAO) systems have severe difficulties to meet the following high contrast requirements: high speed (>1kHz) and high accuracy ( 10 nm) at 5-10 cm spatial scale. An innovative high order adaptive optics system using a self-referenced Mach-Zehnder wavefront sensor has been proposed to counteract these limitations. This wavefront sensor estimates the phase by measuring directly intensity differences between two outputs, but has a limited dynamical range. In this paper, we report on our latest results with the XAO testbed in operation in our lab, and dedicated to high contrast imaging with 30m-class telescopes. A woofer-tweeter architecture is used in order to deliver the required high Strehl ratio (>95%). We present our latest laboratory results, including fine calibration and closed loop performance. This work is carried out in synergy with the validation of fast iterative wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and the optimal treatment of phase ambiguities in order to mitigate the dynamical range limitation of such a wavefront sensor.

  2. Pre-shipment test of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaglia, Marco; Busoni, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Puglisi, Alfio; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of the laboratory characterization of the ARGOS LGS wavefront sensor (LGSW) and dichroic units. ARGOS is the laser guide star adaptive optics system of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). It implements a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics (GLAO) correction for LUCI, an infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph (MOS), using 3 pulsed Rayleigh beacons focused at 12km altitude. The LGSW is a Shack-Hartman sensor having 15 × 15 subaspertures over the telescope pupil. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and gated to reduce spot elongation. The 3 LGS pupils are stabilized to compensate mechanical flexure and are arranged on a single detector. Two units of LGSW have been produced and tested at Arcetri Observatory. We report on the results obtained in the pre-shipment laboratory test: internal active flexure compensation loop performance, optomechanical stability under different gravity conditions, thermal cycling, Pockels cells performance. We also update on the upcoming installation and commissioning campaign at LBT.

  3. Integration and laboratory characterization of the ARGOS laser guide star wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busoni, Lorenzo; Bonaglia, Marco; Carbonaro, Luca; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Antichi, Jacopo; Esposito, Simone; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    The integration status of the ARGOS wavefront sensors is presented. ARGOS is the laser guide star AO program for the LBT. It will implement a Ground Layer AO correction for the instruments LUCI, an infrared imaging and spectrograph camera, using 3 pulsed low-altitudes Rayleigh beacons for each LBT's eye. It profits of the LBT's adaptive secondary mirrors and of FLAO's pyramid unit for NGS sensing. Each LGS is independently stabilized for on-sky jitter and range-gated using custom Pockels cells and then sensed by a 15x15 SH sensor. The 3 pupil images are reimaged on a single lenslet array and a single detector. In the WFS are also installed 3 patrol cameras for the acquisition of the laser beacons, a system for the stabilization of the pupil images on the lenslet array and an internal source for calibration purposes. The two units are now completing the integration phase in Arcetri premises. We describe the characterization of the units and the closed-loop test realized using a deformable MEMS mirror.

  4. Revisiting the comparison between the Shack-Hartmann and the pyramid wavefront sensors via the Fisher information matrix.

    PubMed

    Plantet, C; Meimon, S; Conan, J-M; Fusco, T

    2015-11-02

    Exoplanet direct imaging with large ground based telescopes requires eXtreme Adaptive Optics that couples high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy. A key element of such systems is the high-order wavefront sensor. We study here several high-order wavefront sensing approaches, and more precisely compare their sensitivity to noise. Three techniques are considered: the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the recently proposed LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor. They are compared in a unified framework based on precise diffractive models and on the Fisher information matrix, which conveys the information present in the data whatever the estimation method. The diagonal elements of the inverse of the Fisher information matrix, which we use as a figure of merit, are similar to noise propagation coefficients. With these diagonal elements, so called "Fisher coefficients", we show that the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and pyramid sensors outperform the classical Shack-Hartmann sensor. In photon noise regime, the LIFTed Shack-Hartmann and modulated pyramid sensors obtain a similar overall noise propagation. The LIFTed Shack-Hartmann sensor however provides attractive noise properties on high orders.

  5. Numerical research of measurements of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor according to the parameters of its optical parts and the intensity of turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleneva, N. V.; Lavrinov, V.; Lavrinova, L. N.

    2015-11-01

    The wavefront sensor of Hartmann type consists of two parts: the optical and algorithmic. The parameters of the optical part of the sensor may vary. Since the time of "frozen" turbulence due to the Fried's length and to the cross wind transport turbulent distortion speed, the measurement Shack-Hartmann sensor depend on the intensity of turbulent distortions. In this paper are presented the results of the analysis of the measurements of the sensor according to the size of lens array and to the intensity of turbulent distortions. The analysis is performed on basis of a numerical model of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and on Kolmogorov's turbulence model.

  6. CHOUGH: spatially filtered Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor for HOAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölck, Daniel; Bharmal, Nazim Ali; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M.; Myers, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    The CANARY-Hosted Upgrade for High-Order Adaptive Optics (CHOUGH), is a narrow-field of view High- Order Single Conjugate on-sky AO demonstrator to be placed on the 4.2m WHT telescope. It aims to produce a Strehl ratio greater than 0.5 in the visible region of the spectrum (> 640nm). A High-Order wave-front sensor (HOWFS) is a central piece of the experiment; it is a Shack-Hartmann with a sampling of 31x31 subapertures across the pupil. A variable aperture spatial filter designed to reduce aliasing for high-spatial frequencies, located at a focal plane preceding the lenslet array. The HOWFS has a quad-cell configuration on the detector with a one-pixel guard ring and 48μm subaperture. The detector is a NuVu EMCCD camera, 24μm pixel size, operating at >500Hz. The lenslet array, collimator and relay are commercial off-the-shelf. This was technically challenging due to the small size of the pupil, 2.3mm, and the small optics involved in the design.

  7. Measurement of M²-Curve for Asymmetric Beams by Self-Referencing Interferometer Wavefront Sensor.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao

    2016-11-29

    For asymmetric laser beams, the values of beam quality factor M x 2 and M y 2 are inconsistent if one selects a different coordinate system or measures beam quality with different experimental conditionals, even when analyzing the same beam. To overcome this non-uniqueness, a new beam quality characterization method named as M²-curve is developed. The M²-curve not only contains the beam quality factor M x 2 and M y 2 in the x-direction and y-direction, respectively; but also introduces a curve of M x α 2 versus rotation angle α of coordinate axis. Moreover, we also present a real-time measurement method to demonstrate beam propagation factor M²-curve with a modified self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer based-wavefront sensor (henceforth SRI-WFS). The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated with the theoretical analysis and experiment in multimode beams. The experimental results showed that the proposed measurement method is simple, fast, and a single-shot measurement procedure without movable parts.

  8. The ARGOS wavefront sensor pnCCD camera for an ELT: characteristics, limitations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Xivry, G. Orban; Ihle, S.; Ziegleder, J.; Barl, L.; Hartmann, R.; Rabien, S.; Soltau, H.; Strueder, L.

    2011-09-01

    From low-order to high-order AO, future wave front sensors on ELTs require large, fast, and low-noise detectors with high quantum efficiency and low dark current. While a detector for a high-order Shack-Hartmann WFS does not exist yet, the current CCD technology pushed to its limits already provides several solutions for the ELT AO detector requirements. One of these devices is the new WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS, the Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics system (GLAO) for LUCIFER at LBT. Indeed, with its 264x264 pixels, 48 mu m pixel size and 1kHz frame rate, this camera provides a technological solution to different needs of the AO systems for ELTs, such as low-order but as well possibly higher order correction using pyramid wavefront sensing. In this contribution, we present the newly developped WFS pnCCD camera of ARGOS and how it fulfills future detector needs of AO on ELTs.

  9. Measurement of M2-Curve for Asymmetric Beams by Self-Referencing Interferometer Wavefront Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yongzhao

    2016-01-01

    For asymmetric laser beams, the values of beam quality factor Mx2 and My2 are inconsistent if one selects a different coordinate system or measures beam quality with different experimental conditionals, even when analyzing the same beam. To overcome this non-uniqueness, a new beam quality characterization method named as M2-curve is developed. The M2-curve not only contains the beam quality factor Mx2 and My2 in the x-direction and y-direction, respectively; but also introduces a curve of Mxα2 versus rotation angle α of coordinate axis. Moreover, we also present a real-time measurement method to demonstrate beam propagation factor M2-curve with a modified self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer based-wavefront sensor (henceforth SRI-WFS). The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated with the theoretical analysis and experiment in multimode beams. The experimental results showed that the proposed measurement method is simple, fast, and a single-shot measurement procedure without movable parts. PMID:27916845

  10. Statistics of turbulence parameters at Maunakea using the multiple wavefront sensor data of RAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshito H.; Correia, Carlos M.; Andersen, Dave R.; Lardière, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Akiyama, Masayuki; Jackson, Kate; Bradley, Colin

    2017-03-01

    Prior statistical knowledge of atmospheric turbulence is essential for designing, optimizing and evaluating tomographic adaptive optics systems. We present the statistics of the vertical profiles of C_N^2 and the outer scale at Maunakea estimated using a SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR) method from on-sky telemetry taken by a multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) demonstrator, called RAVEN, on the Subaru telescope. In our SLODAR method, the profiles are estimated by fitting the theoretical autocorrelations and cross-correlations of measurements from multiple Shack-Haltmann wavefront sensors to the observed correlations via the non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LMA). The analytical derivatives of the spatial phase structure function with respect to its parameters for the LMA are also developed. From a total of 12 nights in the summer season, a large ground C_N^2 fraction of 54.3 per cent is found, with median estimated seeing of 0.460 arcsec. This median seeing value is below the results for Maunakea from the literature (0.6-0.7 arcsec). The average C_N^2 profile is in good agreement with results from the literature, except for the ground layer. The median value of the outer scale is 25.5 m and the outer scale is larger at higher altitudes; these trends of the outer scale are consistent with findings in the literature.

  11. Embedded sensor having an identifiable orientation

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is described wherein a sensor, such as a mechanical strain sensor, embedded in a fiber core, is "flagged" to identify a preferred orientation of the sensor. The identifying "flag" is a composite material, comprising a plurality of non-woven filaments distributed in a resin matrix, forming a small planar tab. The fiber is first subjected to a stimulus to identify the orientation providing the desired signal response, and then sandwiched between first and second layers of the composite material. The fiber, and therefore, the sensor orientation is thereby captured and fixed in place. The process for achieving the oriented fiber includes, after identifying the fiber orientation, carefully laying the oriented fiber onto the first layer of composite, moderately heating the assembled layer for a short period in order to bring the composite resin to a "tacky" state, heating the second composite layer as the first, and assembling the two layers together such that they merge to form a single consolidated block. The consolidated block achieving a roughly uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin is prevented from "pooling" around the periphery of the fiber.

  12. New algorithm for centroiding in elongated spots for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, A. T.; Kanaan, A.; Guzmán, D.

    2014-10-01

    To recover the resolution lost in a ground-based telescopes due to the atmospheric turbulence, it is necessary to use a technique known as Adaptive Optics (AO). The next generation of telescopes will have primary mirrors of more than 30 meter in diameter and will require AO systems from the ground up (Nelson et al. 2006). There are a number of challenges to implement an AO system at these scales. One of these challenges is the accurate measurement of the aberrated wavefronts using a laser guide star and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Due to the diameter of the telescope and the use of the sodium layer in the upper atmosphere as photon return for the laser guide stars, the image of the guide star will appear elongated in the wavefront sensor. Typical centroiding algorithms such as Center of Gravity do not perform well under these conditions (Thomas et al. 2008). We present a new technique based on artificial neural networks for measuring the spot position with better accuracy than existing methods. Simulation results confirms that the new algorithm incurs in smaller errors with respect to other centroiding techniques in use.

  13. Reduction in the amount of crosstalk with reduced number of focal spot rows in a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2015-06-01

    The Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), named after Johannes Franz Hartmann and Roland Shack, is one of the most well-known and popularly used optical wavefront sensor that finds numerous applications in various optical technologies. SHWS samples the incident wavefront by means of a lenslet array to produce an array of regular 2D array of focal spots on the detector plane of a digital camera, in the case of an unaberrated plane wavefront. If the incident wavefront is aberrated or deviates from a plane wavefront, the respective focal spots get shifted from its reference positions corresponding to the regular grid. If the incident wavefront aberration increases or has a very large curvature, the focal spot of one lenslet may enter the detector sub-aperture of the nearby lenslet. Thus, the SHWS has a limited dynamic range that is restricted to aberrations which do not allow the sub-images to be displaced out from their own detector sub-array. It makes the SHWS sensitive to cross-talk when higher order aberrations are present thereby unavoidably a ecting the wavefront estimation process. The array of tiny lenses of the SHWS can be replaced by an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens, generating an array of focal spots which is similar to that as in the case of a SHWS. In this paper, the spatial frequency of such a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor is configured to produce lesser number of rows of focal spots. The reduction in the number of focal spot rows reduces the amount of cross talk in the vertical direction. In this paper we present preliminary experimental results to demonstrate the above stated reduction in crosstalk.

  14. Designing and testing the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a fast non-common path error sensor for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Haffert, S.; Korkiakoski, V.; Snik, F.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2016-07-01

    Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs) are the dominant factor limiting the performance of current astronomical high-contrast imaging instruments. If uncorrected, the resulting quasi-static speckle noise floor limits coronagraph performance to a raw contrast of typically 10-4, a value which does not improve with increasing integration time. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS) is a hybrid phase optic which uses holographic PSF copies to supply focal-plane wavefront sensing information directly from the science camera, whilst maintaining a bias-free coronagraphic PSF. This concept has already been successfully implemented on-sky at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma, demonstrating both real-time wavefront sensing capability and successful extraction of slowly varying wavefront errors under a dominant and rapidly changing atmospheric speckle foreground. In this work we present an overview of the development of the cMWS and recent first light results obtained using the Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI), a high-contrast imager and high-dispersion spectrograph pathfinder instrument for the WHT.

  15. Modelization of a pyramid wavefront sensor for the E-ELT in the context of the COMPASS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis; Vérinaud, Christophe; Gratadour, Damien; Westphal, Mathieu; Beuzit, Jean-Luc

    2014-08-01

    The COMputing Platform for Adaptive optics SystemS (COMPASS) will be used to perform end-to-end simulations of the AO system of the E-ELT. COMPASS will perform massively parallel computations using GPUs as accelerators. The completed project will involve several different aspects. In this paper we present the modelization of a pyramid wavefront sensor (P-WFS). This sensor offers an increased sensitivity compared to the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and a time-varying phase modulation increases the dynamic range of the P-WFS. This makes it a particularly interesting choice for an extreme adaptive optics system, such as the one that will be used with the planetary camera and spectrograph (PCS) instrument dedicated to exoplanet characterization with the E-ELT. We review previous P-WFS models, and in addition to describing its current implementation in COMPASS, we give a first look at the P-WFS expected performance in the presence of realistic optical aberrations.

  16. Sensor Localization from Distance and Orientation Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Josep M.; Rull, Aleix; Thomas, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The sensor localization problem can be formalized using distance and orientation constraints, typically in 3D. Local methods can be used to refine an initial location estimation, but in many cases such estimation is not available and a method able to determine all the feasible solutions from scratch is necessary. Unfortunately, existing methods able to find all the solutions in distance space can not take into account orientations, or they can only deal with one- or two-dimensional problems and their extension to 3D is troublesome. This paper presents a method that addresses these issues. The proposed approach iteratively projects the problem to decrease its dimension, then reduces the ranges of the variable distances, and back-projects the result to the original dimension, to obtain a tighter approximation of the feasible sensor locations. This paper extends previous works introducing accurate range reduction procedures which effectively integrate the orientation constraints. The mutual localization of a fleet of robots carrying sensors and the position analysis of a sensor moved by a parallel manipulator are used to validate the approach. PMID:27428977

  17. Comparison of several stochastic parallel optimization algorithms for adaptive optics system without a wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huizhen; Li, Xinyang

    2011-04-01

    Optimizing the system performance metric directly is an important method for correcting wavefront aberrations in an adaptive optics (AO) system where wavefront sensing methods are unavailable or ineffective. An appropriate "Deformable Mirror" control algorithm is the key to successful wavefront correction. Based on several stochastic parallel optimization control algorithms, an adaptive optics system with a 61-element Deformable Mirror (DM) is simulated. Genetic Algorithm (GA), Stochastic Parallel Gradient Descent (SPGD), Simulated Annealing (SA) and Algorithm Of Pattern Extraction (Alopex) are compared in convergence speed and correction capability. The results show that all these algorithms have the ability to correct for atmospheric turbulence. Compared with least squares fitting, they almost obtain the best correction achievable for the 61-element DM. SA is the fastest and GA is the slowest in these algorithms. The number of perturbation by GA is almost 20 times larger than that of SA, 15 times larger than SPGD and 9 times larger than Alopex.

  18. Plasmonic nanorod absorbers as orientation sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Ha, Ji Won; Slaughter, Liane S.; Link, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are actively exploited as biological imaging probes. Of particular interest are gold nanoparticles because of their nonblinking and nonbleaching absorption and scattering properties that arise from the excitation of surface plasmons. Nanoparticles with anisotropic shapes furthermore provide information about the probe orientation and its environment. Here we show how the orientation of single gold nanorods (25 × 73 nm) can be determined from both the transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonance by using polarization-sensitive photothermal imaging. By measuring the orientation of the same nanorods separately using scanning electron microscopy, we verified the high accuracy of this plasmon-absorption-based technique. However, care had to be taken when exciting the transverse plasmon absorption using a large numerical aperture objective as out-of-plane plasmon oscillations were also excited then. For the size regime studied here, being able to establish the nanorod orientation from the transverse mode is unique to photothermal imaging and almost impossible with conventional dark-field scattering spectroscopy. This is important because the transverse surface plasmon resonance is mostly insensitive to the medium refractive index and nanorod aspect ratio allowing nanorods of any length to be used as orientation sensors without changing the laser frequency. PMID:20133646

  19. Approach for Improving the Integrated Sensor Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitishita, E.; Ercolin Filho, L.; Graça, N.; Centeno, J.

    2016-06-01

    The direct determination of exterior orientation parameters (EOP) of aerial images via integration of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS is often used in photogrammetric mapping nowadays. The accuracies of the EOP depend on the accurate parameters related to sensors mounting when the job is performed (offsets of the IMU relative to the projection centre and the angles of boresigth misalignment between the IMU and the photogrammetric coordinate system). In principle, when the EOP values do not achieve the required accuracies for the photogrammetric application, the approach, known as Integrated Sensor Orientation (ISO), is used to refine the direct EOP. ISO approach requires accurate Interior Orientation Parameters (IOP) and standard deviation of the EOP under flight condition. This paper investigates the feasibility of use the in situ camera calibration to obtain these requirements. The camera calibration uses a small sub block of images, extracted from the entire block. A digital Vexcel UltraCam XP camera connected to APPLANIX POS AVTM system was used to get two small blocks of images that were use in this study. The blocks have different flight heights and opposite flight directions. The proposed methodology improved significantly the vertical and horizontal accuracies of the 3D point intersection. Using a minimum set of control points, the horizontal and vertical accuracies achieved nearly one image pixel of resolution on the ground (GSD). The experimental results are shown and discussed.

  20. Curvature-Based Wavefront Sensor for Use on Extended, Arbitrary, Low-Contract Scenes Final Technical Report August 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBonte, Barry J.

    2004-01-01

    A small amount of work has been done on this project; the strategy to be adopted has been better defined, though no experimental work has been started. 1) Wavefront error signals: The best choice appears use a lenslet array at a pupil image to produce defocused image pairs for each subaperture. Then use the method proposed by Molodij et al. to produce subaperture curvature signals. Basically, this method samples a moderate number of locations in the image where the value of the image Laplacian is high, then taking the curvature signal from the difference of the Laplacians of the extrafocal images at those locations. The tip-tilt error is obtained from the temporal dependence of the first spatial derivatives of an in-focus image, at selected locations where these derivatives are significant. The wavefront tilt can be obtained from the full-aperture image. 2) Extrafocal image generation: The important aspect here is to generate symmetrically defocused images, with dynamically adjustable defocus. The adjustment is needed because larger defocus is required before the feedback loop is closed, and at times when the seeing is worse. It may be that the usual membrane mirror is the best choice, though other options should be explored. 3) Detector: Since the proposed sensor is to work on solar granulation, rather than a point source, an array detector for each subaperture is required. A fast CMOS camera such as that developed by the National Solar Observatory would be a satisfactory choice. 4) Processing: Processing requirements have not been defined in detail, though significantly fewer operations per cycle are required than for a correlation tracker.

  1. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: motion planning with collision avoidance for the on-instrument wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapin, Edward L.; Dunn, Jennifer; Weiss, Jason; Gillies, Kim; Hayano, Yutaka; Johnson, Chris; Larkin, James; Moore, Anna; Riddle, Reed L.; Sohn, Ji Man; Smith, Roger; Suzuki, Ryuji; Walth, Gregory; Wright, Shelley

    2016-08-01

    The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) will be a first-light client instrument for the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) on the Thirty Meter Telescope. IRIS includes three configurable tip/tilt (TT) or tip/tilt/focus (TTF) On-Instrument Wavefront Sensors (OIWFS). These sensors are positioned over natural guide star (NGS) asterisms using movable polar-coordinate pick-ofi arms (POA) that patrol an approximately 2-arcminute circular field-of-view (FOV). The POAs are capable of colliding with one another, so an algorithm for coordinated motion that avoids contact is required. We have adopted an approach in which arm motion is evaluated using the gradient descent of a scalar potential field that includes an attractive component towards the goal configuration (locations of target stars), and repulsive components to avoid obstacles (proximity to adjacent arms). The resulting vector field is further modified by adding a component transverse to the repulsive gradient to avoid problematic local minima in the potential. We present path planning simulations using this computationally inexpensive technique, which exhibit smooth and efficient trajectories.

  2. Effect of mobility devices on orientation sensors that contain magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Kendell, Cynthia; Lemaire, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Orientation sensors containing magnetometers use the earth's magnetic field as a reference. Ferromagnetic objects may distort this magnetic field, leading to inaccurate orientation output. We explored the viability of these orientation sensors for motion analysis in an assistive mobility device rehabilitative setting. We attached two MTx orientation sensors (XSens; Enschade, the Netherlands), connected to the XBus Master data collection unit (XSens), to a plastic frame such that the relative angle between sensors was constant. We then moved a series of mobility devices in proximity to the plastic frame: two knee-ankle-foot orthoses (aluminum, stainless steel), one ankle-foot orthosis, two transtibial prostheses (exoskeletal, endoskeletal), two walkers (standard, Challenger Low Wide [Evolution Technologies; Port Coquitlam, Canada]), and two wheelchairs (Tango [OrthoFab; Quebec City, Canada], GTi [Quickie; Phoenix, Arizona]). For each mobility device, we calculated the average difference in relative angle between the baseline and peak angles for each of five trials. Errors ranged from less than 0.10 to 35.29 degrees, depending on the mobility device and frame positioning near the device. This demonstrated the large errors that can occur when magnetometer-based orientation sensors with mobility devices are used. While strategic orientation sensor placement on some mobility devices can minimize these errors to an acceptable level, testing protocols should be implemented to verify orientation sensor accuracy for these applications.

  3. UTILIZATION OF THE WAVEFRONT SENSOR AND SHORT-EXPOSURE IMAGES FOR SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF QUASI-STATIC ABERRATION AND EXOPLANET INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-10

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength {lambda} of 1.1 {mu}, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of Almost-Equal-To 3{lambda}/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of Almost-Equal-To 1 photon ms{sup -1

  4. Flexible pulse-wave sensors from oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Tateyama, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    Flexible pulse-wave sensors were fabricated from density-packed oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns prepared on aluminum foils. The nanocolumns were prepared by the rf magnetron sputtering method and were perpendicularly oriented to the aluminum foil surfaces. The sensor structure is laminated, and the structure contributes to avoiding unexpected leakage of an electric charge. The resulting sensor thickness is 50 μm. The sensor is flexible like aluminum foil and can respond to frequencies from 0.1 to over 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the sensor to pressure is proportional to the surface area. The sensor sensitively causes reversible charge signals that correlate with the pulse wave form, which contains significant information on arteriosclerosis and cardiopathy of a man sitting on it.

  5. A force vector and surface orientation sensor for intelligent grasping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcglasson, W. D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Duffie, N. A.; Gale, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses a force vector and surface orientation sensor suitable for intelligent grasping. The use of a novel four degree-of-freedom force vector robotic fingertip sensor allows efficient, real time intelligent grasping operations. The basis of sensing for intelligent grasping operations is presented and experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and ease of implementation of this approach.

  6. Workflow-Oriented Cyberinfrastructure for Sensor Data Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, J. A.; Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R. W.; Vernon, F.

    2015-12-01

    Sensor streams comprise an increasingly large part of Earth Science data. Analytics based on sensor data require an easy way to perform operations such as acquisition, conversion to physical units, metadata linking, sensor fusion, analysis and visualization on distributed sensor streams. Furthermore, embedding real-time sensor data into scientific workflows is of growing interest. We have implemented a scalable networked architecture that can be used to dynamically access packets of data in a stream from multiple sensors, and perform synthesis and analysis across a distributed network. Our system is based on the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (irods.org), which accesses sensor data from the Antelope Real Time Data System (brtt.com), and provides virtualized access to collections of data streams. We integrate real-time data streaming from different sources, collected for different purposes, on different time and spatial scales, and sensed by different methods. iRODS, noted for its policy-oriented data management, brings to sensor processing features and facilities such as single sign-on, third party access control lists ( ACLs), location transparency, logical resource naming, and server-side modeling capabilities while reducing the burden on sensor network operators. Rich integrated metadata support also makes it straightforward to discover data streams of interest and maintain data provenance. The workflow support in iRODS readily integrates sensor processing into any analytical pipeline. The system is developed as part of the NSF-funded Datanet Federation Consortium (datafed.org). APIs for selecting, opening, reaping and closing sensor streams are provided, along with other helper functions to associate metadata and convert sensor packets into NetCDF and JSON formats. Near real-time sensor data including seismic sensors, environmental sensors, LIDAR and video streams are available through this interface. A system for archiving sensor data and metadata in Net

  7. Wavefront Compensation Segmented Mirror Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andrew; Bradford, Charles M.; Woody, David; Padin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The primary mirror of very large submillimeter-wave telescopes will necessarily be segmented into many separate mirror panels. These panels must be continuously co-phased to keep the telescope wavefront error less than a small fraction of a wavelength, to ten microns RMS (root mean square) or less. This performance must be maintained continuously across the full aperture of the telescope, in all pointing conditions, and in a variable thermal environment. A wavefront compensation segmented mirror sensing and control system, consisting of optical edge sensors, Wavefront Compensation Estimator/Controller Soft ware, and segment position actuators is proposed. Optical edge sensors are placed two per each segment-to-segment edge to continuously measure changes in segment state. Segment position actuators (three per segment) are used to move the panels. A computer control system uses the edge sensor measurements to estimate the state of all of the segments and to predict the wavefront error; segment actuator commands are computed that minimize the wavefront error. Translational or rotational motions of one segment relative to the other cause lateral displacement of the light beam, which is measured by the imaging sensor. For high accuracy, the collimator uses a shaped mask, such as one or more slits, so that the light beam forms a pattern on the sensor that permits sensing accuracy of better than 0.1 micron in two axes: in the z or local surface normal direction, and in the y direction parallel to the mirror surface and perpendicular to the beam direction. Using a co-aligned pair of sensors, with the location of the detector and collimated light source interchanged, four degrees of freedom can be sensed: transverse x and y displacements, as well as two bending angles (pitch and yaw). In this approach, each optical edge sensor head has a collimator and an imager, placing one sensor head on each side of a segment gap, with two parallel light beams crossing the gap. Two sets

  8. Characterization of optical turbulence in a jet engine exhaust with Shack-Hartmenn wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deron, R.; Mendez, F.

    2008-10-01

    Airborne laser countermeasure applications (DIRCM) are hampered by the turbulence of jet engine exhaust. The effects of this source of perturbation on optical propagation have still to be documented and analyzed in order to get a better insight into the different mechanisms of the plume perturbations and also to validate CFD/LES codes. For that purpose, wave front sensing has been used as a non-intrusive optical technique to provide unsteady and turbulent optical measurements through a plume of a jet engine installed at a fixed point on the ground. The experiment has been implemented in October 2007 along with other optical measuring techniques at Volvo Aero Corporation (Trollhättan, Sweden). This study is part of a European research programme dealing with DIRCM issues. The Shack- Hartmann (SH) wave front sensing technique was employed. It consisted of 64 x 64 lenslets coupled to a 1024x1024 pixel Dalsa CCD sensor working at a sampling rate of 40 Hz. A 15 ns pulsed laser synchronized with the SH sensor enabled "freezing" turbulence in each SH image. The ability of the technique to substract a reference permitted a simple calibration procedure to ensure accurate and reliable measurements despite vibration environment. Instantaneous phases are reconstructed using Fourier techniques so as to obtain a better spatial resolution against turbulent effects. Under any given plume condition, overall tilt aberration prevails. Phase power spectra derived from phase statistics are drawn according to the plume main axis and to normal axis. They compare favorably well to the decaying Kolmogorov power law on a useful high spatial frequency range. Averaged phases are also decomposed into Zernike polynomials to analyze optical mode behavior according to engine status and to plume abscissa. With overall tilt removed, turbulent DSP's amplitude drops by a factor of 30 to 40 and mean aberrations by a factor of 10 from an abscissa 1 meter to another 3.5 meters away from the engine

  9. Seismic Sensor orientation by complex linear least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Olcay, Manuel; Tassara, Carlos; Sobiesiak, Monika; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Poorly known orientation of the horizontal components of seismic sensors is a common problem that limits data analysis and interpretation for several acquisition setups, including linear arrays of geophones deployed in borehole installations, ocean bottom seismometers deployed at the sea-floor and surface seismic arrays. To solve this problem we propose an inversion method based on complex linear least squares method. Relative orientation angles, with respect to a reference sensor, are retrieved by minimizing the l2-norm between the complex traces (hodograms) of adjacent pairs of sensors in a least-squares sense. The absolute orientations are obtained in a second step by the polarization analysis of stacked seismograms of a seismic event with known location. This methodology can be applied without restrictions, if the plane wave approximation for wavefields recorded by each pair of sensors is valid. In most cases, it is possible to satisfy this condition by low-pass filtering the recorded waveform. The main advantage of our methodology is that, finding the estimation of the relative orientations of seismic sensors in complex domain is a linear inverse problem, which allows a direct solution corresponding to the global minimum of a misfit function. It is also possible to use simultaneously more than one independent dataset (e.g. using several seismic events simultaneously) to better constrain the solution of the inverse problem itself. Furthermore, by a computational point of view, our method results faster than the relative orientation methods based on waveform cross-correlation. Our methodology can be also applied for testing the correct orientation/alignment of multicomponent land stations in seismological arrays or temporary networks and for determining the absolute orientation of OBS stations and borehole arrays. We first apply our method to real data resembling two different acquisition setups: a borehole sensor array deployed in a gas field located in the

  10. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  11. Breadboard Testing of a Phase Conjugate Engine with an Interferometric Wave-Front Sensor and a MEMS-Based Spatial Light Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J; Olsen, J; Minden, M L; Gavel, D; Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Wilks, S C; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S; Young, P E; Kartz, M W; Flath, L M; Azucena, O

    2003-12-08

    Laboratory breadboard results of a high-speed adaptive optics system are presented. The wave-front sensor for the adaptive optics system is based on a quadrature interferometer, which directly measures the turbulence induced phase aberrations. The laboratory experiments were conducted using Kolmogorov phase screens to simulate atmospheric phase distortions with the characterization of these plates presented below. The spatial light modulator used in the phase conjugate engine was a MEMS-based piston-only correction device with 1024 actuators. The overall system achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 hz and Strehl ratios greater than 0.5 with the Kolmogorov phase screens.

  12. Service Oriented Architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks in Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, S. A.; Adinarayana, J.; Durbha, S. S.; Tripathy, A. K.; Sudharsan, D.

    2012-08-01

    Rapid advances in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for agricultural applications has provided a platform for better decision making for crop planning and management, particularly in precision agriculture aspects. Due to the ever-increasing spread of WSNs there is a need for standards, i.e. a set of specifications and encodings to bring multiple sensor networks on common platform. Distributed sensor systems when brought together can facilitate better decision making in agricultural domain. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) through Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) provides guidelines for semantic and syntactic standardization of sensor networks. In this work two distributed sensing systems (Agrisens and FieldServer) were selected to implement OGC SWE standards through a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach. Online interoperable data processing was developed through SWE components such as Sensor Model Language (SensorML) and Sensor Observation Service (SOS). An integrated web client was developed to visualize the sensor observations and measurements that enables the retrieval of crop water resources availability and requirements in a systematic manner for both the sensing devices. Further, the client has also the ability to operate in an interoperable manner with any other OGC standardized WSN systems. The study of WSN systems has shown that there is need to augment the operations / processing capabilities of SOS in order to understand about collected sensor data and implement the modelling services. Also, the very low cost availability of WSN systems in future, it is possible to implement the OGC standardized SWE framework for agricultural applications with open source software tools.

  13. Numerical analysis of wavefront measurement characteristics by using plenoptic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang; Ma, Haotong; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Ning, Yu; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    To take advantage of the large-diameter telescope for high-resolution imaging of extended targets, it is necessary to detect and compensate the wave-front aberrations induced by atmospheric turbulence. Data recorded by Plenoptic cameras can be used to extract the wave-front phases associated to the atmospheric turbulence in an astronomical observation. In order to recover the wave-front phase tomographically, a method of completing the large Field Of View (FOV), multi-perspective wave-front detection simultaneously is urgently demanded, and it is plenoptic camera that possesses this unique advantage. Our paper focuses more on the capability of plenoptic camera to extract the wave-front from different perspectives simultaneously. In this paper, we built up the corresponding theoretical model and simulation system to discuss wave-front measurement characteristics utilizing plenoptic camera as wave-front sensor. And we evaluated the performance of plenoptic camera with different types of wave-front aberration corresponding to the occasions of applications. In the last, we performed the multi-perspective wave-front sensing employing plenoptic camera as wave-front sensor in the simulation. Our research of wave-front measurement characteristics employing plenoptic camera is helpful to select and design the parameters of a plenoptic camera, when utilizing which as multi-perspective and large FOV wave-front sensor, which is expected to solve the problem of large FOV wave-front detection, and can be used for AO in giant telescopes.

  14. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-07-05

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units-IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors' signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients' mobility.

  15. Hartmann wavefront measurements at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, Barbara; Flöter, Bernhard; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Mann, Klaus; Mey, Tobias; Plönjes, Elke; Schäfer, Bernd; Tiedtke, Kai

    2013-05-01

    We report on online measurements of photon beam parameters during mirror alignment in the soft x-ray spectral region of FLASH, the free-electron laser in Hamburg. A compact Hartmann sensor operating in the wavelength range from 6 to 35nm was used to determine the wavefront quality of individual free-electron laser (FEL) pulses during the alignment procedure as well as aberrations. Beam characterization and alignment of beamline BL3 was performed with λ13.5??/ 116 accuracy for wavefront rms (W???). Second moment beam parameters are computed using a spherical reference wavefront generated by a 5μm pinhole. The Hartmann sensor was used for alignment of the ellipsoidal focusing mirror of beamline BL3, resulting in a reduction of (W???;) by 33%.

  16. ZELDA, a Zernike wavefront sensor for the fine measurement of quasi-static aberrations in coronagraphic systems: concept studies and results with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, M.; Vigan, A.; Dohlen, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Girard, J. H. V.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Fusco, T.; Blanchard, P.; Le Merrer, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Madec, F.; Moreaux, G.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Zins, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-contrast imaging instruments VLT/SPHERE and GPI have been routinely observing gas giant planets, brown dwarfs, and debris disks around nearby stars since 2013-2014. In these facilities, low-wind effects or differential aberrations between the extreme Adaptive Optics sensing path and the science path represent critical limitations for the observation of exoplanets orbiting their host star with a contrast ratio larger than 106 at small separations. To circumvent this problem, we proposed ZELDA, a Zernike wavefront sensor to measure these quasistatic aberrations at a nanometric level. A prototype was installed on VLT/SPHERE during its integration in Chile. We recently performed measurements on an internal source with ZELDA in the presence of Zernike or Fourier modes introduced with the deformable mirror of the instrument. In this communication, we present the results of our experiment and report on the contrast gain obtained with a first ZELDA-based wavefront correction. We finally discuss the suitability of such a solution for a possible upgrade of VLT/SPHERE and for its use with future E-ELT instruments or space missions with high-contrast capabilities (e.g. WFIRST-AFTA, HDST).

  17. ARGOS wavefront sensing: from detection to correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J.; Busoni, L.; Connot, C.; Esposito, S.; Gaessler, W.; Kulas, M.; Mazzoni, T.; Puglisi, A.; Rabien, S.; Storm, J.; Ziegleder, J.

    2014-08-01

    Argos is the ground-layer adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope. In order to perform its wide-field correction, Argos uses three laser guide stars which sample the atmospheric turbulence. To perform the correction, Argos has at disposal three different wavefront sensing measurements : its three laser guide stars, a NGS tip-tilt, and a third wavefront sensor. We present the wavefront sensing architecture and its individual components, in particular: the finalized Argos pnCCD camera detecting the 3 laser guide stars at 1kHz, high quantum efficiency and 4e- noise; the Argos tip-tilt sensor based on a quad-cell avalanche photo-diodes; and the Argos wavefront computer. Being in the middle of the commissioning, we present the first wavefront sensing configurations and operations performed at LBT, and discuss further improvements in the measurements of the 3 laser guide star slopes as detected by the pnCCD.

  18. Sensor Orientation Effects on UXO Geophysical Target Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    ACRONYMS AHRS Attitude-Heading Reference System BRAC Base Realignment and Closure DAS Data Acquisition System DGPS Differential Global Positioning...commercially available IMUs; this project utilized the Crossbow Solid State IMU known as an Attitude-Heading Reference System ( AHRS ). The AHRS uses...collection. As part of this project, the EM modeling process for sensor orientation information was developed that included full simulation of 3D

  19. Autonomous Quality Control of Joint Orientation Measured with Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Clinical mobility assessment is traditionally performed in laboratories using complex and expensive equipment. The low accessibility to such equipment, combined with the emerging trend to assess mobility in a free-living environment, creates a need for body-worn sensors (e.g., inertial measurement units—IMUs) that are capable of measuring the complexity in motor performance using meaningful measurements, such as joint orientation. However, accuracy of joint orientation estimates using IMUs may be affected by environment, the joint tracked, type of motion performed and velocity. This study investigates a quality control (QC) process to assess the quality of orientation data based on features extracted from the raw inertial sensors’ signals. Joint orientation (trunk, hip, knee, ankle) of twenty participants was acquired by an optical motion capture system and IMUs during a variety of tasks (sit, sit-to-stand transition, walking, turning) performed under varying conditions (speed, environment). An artificial neural network was used to classify good and bad sequences of joint orientation with a sensitivity and a specificity above 83%. This study confirms the possibility to perform QC on IMU joint orientation data based on raw signal features. This innovative QC approach may be of particular interest in a big data context, such as for remote-monitoring of patients’ mobility. PMID:27399701

  20. Wave-front analysis using Fresnel lens arrays.

    PubMed

    Spektor, B; Shamir, J

    1995-07-01

    A compact wave-front sensor is implemented by an array of two-beam common path inversion interferometers. Each element of the array consists of two Fresnel lenses in a confocal configuration. The wave-front data can be extracted from a superposition of the zero-order undiffracted wave and the twice-diffracted first-order wave. The result is a high-sensitivity, compact, and stable interferometric wave-front sensor.

  1. Real-Time Wavefront Control for the PALM-3000 High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Tuan N.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; Dekany, Richard G.; Guiwits, Stephen R.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Troy, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    We present a cost-effective scalable real-time wavefront control architecture based on off-the-shelf graphics processing units hosted in an ultra-low latency, high-bandwidth interconnect PC cluster environment composed of modules written in the component-oriented language of nesC. The architecture enables full-matrix reconstruction of the wavefront at up to 2 KHz with latency under 250 us for the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems, a state-of-the-art upgrade on the 5.1 meter Hale Telescope that consists of a 64 x 64 subaperture Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a 3368 active actuator high order deformable mirror in series with a 241 active actuator tweeter DM. The architecture can easily scale up to support much larger AO systems at higher rates and lower latency.

  2. Validating Knowledge-Based Framework through Mission-Oriented Sensors Array and Smart Sensor Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Douglas; Pires, Rayner M.; Branco, Kalinka R. L. J. C.

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of using Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) in critical embedded systems, mainly in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). We present the use of a SOA approach to provide the integration of the payload in the UAV. The integration is provided by a plug and play protocol named Smart Sensor Protocol (SSP) that validates the SOA approach.

  3. Individual eye model based on wavefront aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huanqing; Wang, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Qiuling; Quan, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2005-03-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore, the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There are four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high-order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software-ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  4. Wavefront Measurement in Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl

    Wavefront sensing or aberration measurement in the eye is a key problem in refractive surgery and vision correction with laser. The accuracy of these measurements is critical for the outcome of the surgery. Practically all clinical methods use laser as a source of light. To better understand the background, we analyze the pre-laser techniques developed over centuries. They allowed new discoveries of the nature of the optical system of the eye, and many served as prototypes for laser-based wavefront sensing technologies. Hartmann's test was strengthened by Platt's lenslet matrix and the CCD two-dimensional photodetector acquired a new life as a Hartmann-Shack sensor in Heidelberg. Tscherning's aberroscope, invented in France, was transformed into a laser device known as a Dresden aberrometer, having seen its reincarnation in Germany with Seiler's help. The clinical ray tracing technique was brought to life by Molebny in Ukraine, and skiascopy was created by Fujieda in Japan. With the maturation of these technologies, new demands now arise for their wider implementation in optometry and vision correction with customized contact and intraocular lenses.

  5. An alternative sensor fusion method for object orientation using low-cost MEMS inertial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Joshua L.

    This thesis develops an alternative sensor fusion approach for object orientation using low-cost MEMS inertial sensors. The alternative approach focuses on the unique challenges of small UAVs. Such challenges include the vibrational induced noise onto the accelerometer and bias offset errors of the rate gyroscope. To overcome these challenges, a sensor fusion algorithm combines the measured data from the accelerometer and rate gyroscope to achieve a single output free from vibrational noise and bias offset errors. One of the most prevalent sensor fusion algorithms used for orientation estimation is the Extended Kalman filter (EKF). The EKF filter performs the fusion process by first creating the process model using the nonlinear equations of motion and then establishing a measurement model. With the process and measurement models established, the filter operates by propagating the mean and covariance of the states through time. The success of EKF relies on the ability to establish a representative process and measurement model of the system. In most applications, the EKF measurement model utilizes the accelerometer and GPS-derived accelerations to determine an estimate of the orientation. However, if the GPS-derived accelerations are not available then the measurement model becomes less reliable when subjected to harsh vibrational environments. This situation led to the alternative approach, which focuses on the correlation between the rate gyroscope and accelerometer-derived angle. The correlation between the two sensors then determines how much the algorithm will use one sensor over the other. The result is a measurement that does not suffer from the vibrational noise or from bias offset errors.

  6. Wavefront sensing using a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Valente, Denise; Rativa, Diego; Vohnsen, Brian

    2015-05-18

    A novel wavefront sensor based on a microstructural array of waveguides is proposed. The method is based on the sensitivity in light-coupling efficiency to the wavefront gradient present at the entrance aperture of each waveguide in an array, and hence the amount of incident light that couples is influenced by wavefront aberrations. The concept is illustrated with wavefront measurements that have been performed using a liquid-filled photonic crystal fiber (LF-PCF) working as a coherent fiber bundle. The pros and cons of the LF-PCF based sensor are discussed.

  7. Erratum: "Utilization of the Wavefront Sensor and Short-exposure Images for Simultaneous Estimation of Quasi-static Aberration and Exoplanet Intensity" (ApJ, 767, 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper first demonstrates analytically that, at millisecond timescales, the adaptive optics system in a ground-based telescope will maintain the faint planetary emission nearly constant in time, while the speckle intensity at the planet’s location will undergo wild fluctuations. Then, it presents a method for the simultaneous determination of the image of an exo-planetary system and pupil-plane aberrations that are not corrected by the adaptive optics system (so-called “non-common path aberrations”), which cause a confounding speckle background. The central idea of the method is to take simultaneous millisecond exposures in both the wavefront sensor and science camera, and then perform statistical inference procedures to determine both the aberrations and planetary image. The statistical inference is based on a Taylor expansion of an exponential containing the aberration function. While the first order terms given in the paper are correct, it is missing some second-order terms, which are important when the aberrations are large enough so that a first order expansion is not adequate. Since the numerical experiments used small aberrations, this correction has little effect on the results.

  8. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S-H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. A First Order Wavefront Estimation Algorithm for P1640 Calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhaia, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hinkley, S.; Hillenbrand, L.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2012-01-01

    P1640 calibrator is a wavefront sensor working with the P1640 coronagraph and the Palomar 3000 actuator adaptive optics system (P3K) at the Palomar 200 inch Hale telescope. It measures the wavefront by interfering post-coronagraph light with a reference beam formed by low-pass filtering the blocked light from the coronagraph focal plane mask. The P1640 instrument has a similar architecture to the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and its performance is currently limited by the quasi-static speckles due to non-common path wavefront errors, which comes from the non-common path for the light to arrive at the AO wavefront sensor and the coronagraph mask. By measuring the wavefront after the coronagraph mask, the non-common path wavefront error can be estimated and corrected by feeding back the error signal to the deformable mirror (DM) of the P3K AO system. Here, we present a first order wavefront estimation algorithm and an instrument calibration scheme used in experiments done recently at Palomar observatory. We calibrate the P1640 calibrator by measuring its responses to poking DM actuators with a sparse checkerboard pattern at different amplitudes. The calibration yields a complex normalization factor for wavefront estimation and establishes the registration of the DM actuators at the pupil camera of the P1640 calibrator, necessary for wavefront correction. Improvement of imaging quality after feeding back the wavefront correction to the AO system demonstrated the efficacy of the algorithm.

  10. Model-Based Wavefront Control for CCAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David; Lou, John Z.; Kissil, Andy; Bradford, Matt; Padin, Steve; Woody, David

    2011-01-01

    The 25-m aperture CCAT submillimeter-wave telescope will have a primary mirror that is divided into 162 individual segments, each of which is provided with 3 positioning actuators. CCAT will be equipped with innovative Imaging Displacement Sensors (IDS) inexpensive optical edge sensors capable of accurately measuring all segment relative motions. These measurements are used in a Kalman-filter-based Optical State Estimator to estimate wavefront errors, permitting use of a minimum-wavefront controller without direct wavefront measurement. This controller corrects the optical impact of errors in 6 degrees of freedom per segment, including lateral translations of the segments, using only the 3 actuated degrees of freedom per segment. The global motions of the Primary and Secondary Mirrors are not measured by the edge sensors. These are controlled using a gravity-sag look-up table. Predicted performance is illustrated by simulated response to errors such as gravity sag.

  11. Wavefront control for extreme adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2003-12-01

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  12. Wavefront Control for Extreme Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A

    2003-07-16

    Current plans for Extreme Adaptive Optics systems place challenging requirements on wave-front control. This paper focuses on control system dynamics, wave-front sensing and wave-front correction device characteristics. It may be necessary to run an ExAO system after a slower, low-order AO system. Running two independent systems can result in very good temporal performance, provided specific design constraints are followed. The spatially-filtered wave-front sensor, which prevents aliasing and improves PSF sensitivity, is summarized. Different models of continuous and segmented deformable mirrors are studied. In a noise-free case, a piston-tip-tilt segmented MEMS device can achieve nearly equivalent performance to a continuous-sheet DM in compensating for a static phase aberration with use of spatial filtering.

  13. Real-time turbulence profiling with a pair of laser guide star Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors for wide-field adaptive optics systems on large to extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gilles, L; Ellerbroek, B L

    2010-11-01

    Real-time turbulence profiling is necessary to tune tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems on large to extremely large telescopes, and to perform a variety of image post-processing tasks involving point-spread function reconstruction. This paper describes a computationally efficient and accurate numerical technique inspired by the slope detection and ranging (SLODAR) method to perform this task in real time from properly selected Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements accumulated over a few hundred frames from a pair of laser guide stars, thus eliminating the need for an additional instrument. The algorithm is introduced, followed by a theoretical influence function analysis illustrating its impulse response to high-resolution turbulence profiles. Finally, its performance is assessed in the context of the Thirty Meter Telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics system via end-to-end wave optics Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Relaying an optical wavefront

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2007-03-06

    A wavefront rely devices samples an incoming optical wavefront at different locations, optically relays the samples while maintaining the relative position of the samples and the relative phase between the samples. The wavefront is reconstructed due to interference of the samples. Devices can be designed for many different wavelengths, including for example the ultraviolet, visible, infrared and even longer wavelengths such as millimeter waves. In one application, the device function as a telescope but with negligible length.

  15. Static optical designs for Wavefront Curvature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharmal, Nazim A.

    2006-06-01

    A bulk optic is presented, the Parallel Output Beamsplitter, which allows simultaneous imaging of two planes either side of the focus using static imaging optics. The POB is used to create novel optical configurations for Wavefront Curvature Sensing and two designs are presented. The first is suited to small-amplitude aberration measurements in situations where compactness, a large field of view, and high optical throughput are desirable. A laboratory experiment using a POB to make such a wavefront sensor was undertaken, and results are presented. The second design is a conceptual idea which offers image-scale invariant imaging of two planes whose conjugation satisfies the requirements of a conventional Wavefront Curvature Sensor concept.

  16. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, P. N.

    1974-01-01

    Focal plane sensors for determining the error in a telescope wavefront were investigated. The construction of three candidate test instruments and their evaluation in terms of small wavefront error aberration measurements are described. A laboratory wavefront simulator was designed and fabricated to evaluate the test instruments. The laboratory wavefront error simulator was used to evaluate three tests; a Hartmann test, a polarization shearing interferometer test, and an interferometric Zernike test.

  17. Study of an instrument for sensing errors in a telescope wavefront

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, L. J.; Shack, R. V.; Slater, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Partial results are presented of theoretical and experimental investigations of different focal plane sensor configurations for determining the error in a telescope wavefront. The coarse range sensor and fine range sensors are used in the experimentation. The design of a wavefront error simulator is presented along with the Hartmann test, the shearing polarization interferometer, the Zernike test, and the Zernike polarization test.

  18. Phase Contrast Wavefront Sensing for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Wallace, J. K.; Bloemhof, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    Most ground-based adaptive optics systems use one of a small number of wavefront sensor technologies, notably (for relatively high-order systems) the Shack-Hartmann sensor, which provides local measurements of the phase slope (first-derivative) at a number of regularly-spaced points across the telescope pupil. The curvature sensor, with response proportional to the second derivative of the phase, is also sometimes used, but has undesirable noise propagation properties during wavefront reconstruction as the number of actuators becomes large. It is interesting to consider the use for astronomical adaptive optics of the "phase contrast" technique, originally developed for microscopy by Zemike to allow convenient viewing of phase objects. In this technique, the wavefront sensor provides a direct measurement of the local value of phase in each sub-aperture of the pupil. This approach has some obvious disadvantages compared to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing, but has some less obvious but substantial advantages as well. Here we evaluate the relative merits in a practical ground-based adaptive optics system.

  19. [From scattering to wavefront. Healing optics].

    PubMed

    Semchishen, V; Mrokhen, M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report, made within research in progress, was to discuss the optical effect of irregular surface structures that might be associated with complicated refractive procedures related with the retinal image quality. We concentrated our discussion on the range of surface structures between the known scattering effects and wavefront aberrations of higher orders. The case study demonstrates that the surface irregularities of the cornea might induce, after refractive laser surgery, significant optical aberrations that are much too different from the classical wavevront or scattering errors. Such optical errors, however, cannot be correctly measured by current commercial wavefront sensors. Finally, the influence of the healing process on Strehl ratio is under discussion.

  20. Spirally oriented Au microelectrode array sensor for detection of Hg (II).

    PubMed

    Huan, Tran Ngoc; Hung, Le Quoc; Ha, Vu Thi Thu; Anh, Nguyen Hoang; Van Khai, Tran; Shim, Kwang Bo; Chung, Hoeil

    2012-05-30

    A simple and reproducible carbon microelectrode array (CMA), designed to eliminate diffusive interference among the microelectrodes, has been fabricated and used as a frame to build a gold (Au) microelectrode array (GMA) sensor. To prepare the CMA initially, rather than use an uncontrollable large number of carbon fibers, only 60 carbon fibers of regular size were used to ensure manageable and reproducible arrangement for array construction. In addition, for efficient spatial arrangement of the microelectrode and easy sensor preparation, carbon fibers were oriented in a spiral fashion by rolling around a Cu wire. The distance between carbon fibers was carefully determined to avoid overlap among individual diffusion layers, one of the important factors governing steady-state current response and sensor-to-sensor reproducibility. After the preparation of a spirally arranged CMA, Au was electrochemically deposited on the surface of individual carbon electrodes to build a final GMA sensor. Then, the GMA sensor was used to measure Hg(2+) in a low concentration range. Simultaneously, multiple GMA sensors were independently prepared to examine reproducibility in sensor fabrication as well as electrochemical measurement (sensor-to-sensor reproducibility). Overall, highly sensitive detection of Hg(2+) was possible using the proposed GMA sensor due to efficient arrangement of microelectrodes and the sensor-to-sensor reproducibility was superior owing to simplicity in sensor fabrication.

  1. Wavefront control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J; Dillon, D; Severson, S; Macintosh, B

    2006-04-14

    The wavefront control strategy for the proposed Gemini Planet Imager, an extreme adaptive optics coronagraph for planet detection, is presented. Two key parts of this strategy are experimentally verified in a testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics, which features a 32 x 32 MEMS device. Detailed analytic models and algorithms for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor alignment and calibration are presented. It is demonstrated that with these procedures, the spatially filtered WFS and the Fourier Transform reconstructor can be used to flatten to the MEMS to 1 nm RMS in the controllable band. Performance is further improved using the technique of modifying the reference slopes using a measurement of the static wavefront error in the science leg.

  2. Prototype pipeline for LSST wavefront sensing and reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claver, Charles F.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Liang, Ming; Xin, Bo; Alagoz, Enver; Arndt, Kirk; Shipsey, Ian P.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses an Active Optics System (AOS) to maintain system alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from 4 curvature based wavefront sensors located on the corners of the inscribed square within the 3.5 degree field of view. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1mm on either side of focus. In this paper we describe the development of the Active Optics Pipeline prototype that simulates processing the raw image data from the wavefront sensors through to wavefront estimation on to the active optics corrective actions. We also describe various wavefront estimation algorithms under development for the LSST active optics system. The algorithms proposed are comprised of the Zernike compensation routine which improve the accuracy of the wavefront estimate. Algorithm development has been aided by a bench top optical simulator which we also describe. The current software prototype combines MATLAB modules for image processing, tomographic reconstruction, atmospheric turbulence and Zemax for optical ray-tracing to simulate the closed loop behavior of the LSST AOS. We describe the overall simulation model and results for image processing using simulated images and initial results of the wavefront estimation algorithms.

  3. Non-GPS full position and angular orientation onboard sensors for moving and stationary platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Kwok, Philip; Pereira, Carlos M.

    2016-05-01

    Angular orientation of both mobile and stationary objects continues to be an ongoing topic of interest for guidance and control as well as for non-GPS based solutions for geolocations of assets in any environment. Currently available sensors, which include inertia devices such as accelerometers and gyros; magnetometers; surface mounted antennas; radars; GPS; and optical line of sight devices, do not provide an acceptable solution for many applications, particularly for gun-fired munitions and for all-weather and all environment scenarios. A robust onboard full angular orientation sensor solution, based on a scanning polarized reference source and a polarized geometrical cavity orientation sensor, is presented. The full position of the object, in the reference source coordinate system, is determined by combining range data obtained using established time-of-flight techniques, with the angular orientation information.

  4. High order dark wavefront sensing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragazzoni, Roberto; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Farinato, Jacopo; Viotto, Valentina; Bergomi, Maria; Dima, Marco; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Greggio, Davide; Carolo, Elena; Vassallo, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Dark wavefront sensing takes shape following quantum mechanics concepts in which one is able to "see" an object in one path of a two-arm interferometer using an as low as desired amount of light actually "hitting" the occulting object. A theoretical way to achieve such a goal, but in the realm of wavefront sensing, is represented by a combination of two unequal beams interferometer sharing the same incoming light, and whose difference in path length is continuously adjusted in order to show different signals for different signs of the incoming perturbation. Furthermore, in order to obtain this in white light, the path difference should be properly adjusted vs the wavelength used. While we incidentally describe how this could be achieved in a true optomechanical setup, we focus our attention to the simulation of a hypothetical "perfect" dark wavefront sensor of this kind in which white light compensation is accomplished in a perfect manner and the gain is selectable in a numerical fashion. Although this would represent a sort of idealized dark wavefront sensor that would probably be hard to match in the real glass and metal, it would also give a firm indication of the maximum achievable gain or, in other words, of the prize for achieving such device. Details of how the simulation code works and first numerical results are outlined along with the perspective for an in-depth analysis of the performances and its extension to more realistic situations, including various sources of additional noise.

  5. Tomographic wavefront correction for the LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D W; Olivier, S S; Baker, K; Seppala, L; Hvisc, S

    2006-05-03

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is a three mirror modified Paul-Baker design with an 8.4m primary, a 3.4m secondary, and a 5.0m tertiary followed by a 3-element refractive corrector producing a 3.5 degree field of view. This design produces image diameters of <0.3 arcsecond 80% encircled energy over its full field of view. The image quality of this design is sufficient to ensure that the final images produced by the telescope will be limited by the atmospheric seeing at an excellent astronomical site. In order to maintain this image quality, the deformations and rigid body motions of the three large mirrors must be actively controlled to minimize optical aberrations. By measuring the optical wavefront produced by the telescope at multiple points in the field, mirror deformations and rigid body motions that produce a good optical wavefront across the entire field may be determined. We will describe the details of the techniques for obtaining these solutions. We will show that, for the expected mirror deformations and rigid body misalignments, the solutions that are found using these techniques produce an image quality over the field that is close to optimal. We will discuss how many wavefront sensors are needed and the tradeoffs between the number of wavefront sensors, their layout and noise sensitivity.

  6. A novel method for assessing the 3-D orientation accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Rizun, Peter; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    A novel method for assessing the accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors is presented. The method, referred to as the "residual matrix" method, is advantageous because it decouples the sensor's error with respect to Earth's gravity vector (attitude residual error: pitch and roll) from the sensor's error with respect to magnetic north (heading residual error), while remaining insensitive to singularity problems when the second Euler rotation is close to ±90°. As a demonstration, the accuracy of an inertial/magnetic sensor mounted to a participant's forearm was evaluated during a reaching task in a laboratory. Sensor orientation was measured internally (by the inertial/magnetic sensor) and externally using an optoelectronic measurement system with a marker cluster rigidly attached to the sensor's enclosure. Roll, pitch and heading residuals were calculated using the proposed novel method, as well as using a common orientation assessment method where the residuals are defined as the difference between the Euler angles measured by the inertial sensor and those measured by the optoelectronic system. Using the proposed residual matrix method, the roll and pitch residuals remained less than 1° and, as expected, no statistically significant difference between these two measures of attitude accuracy was found; the heading residuals were significantly larger than the attitude residuals but remained below 2°. Using the direct Euler angle comparison method, the residuals were in general larger due to singularity issues, and the expected significant difference between inertial/magnetic sensor attitude and heading accuracy was not present.

  7. Comparison of LSST and DECam wavefront recovery algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Bo; Roodman, Aaron; Angeli, George; Claver, Chuck; Thomas, Sandrine

    2016-07-01

    We make a detailed quantitative comparison of the wavefront recovery algorithms between those developed for Dark Energy Camera (DECam) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Samples used in this study include images of out of focus stars collected by the DECam at the Blanco 4-meter telescope and artificial simulated donut images. The data from DECam include wavefront images collected by the wavefront sensors and out-of-focus images where the entire DECam sensor array is used. For simulated images, we have used both the forward Fraunhofer diffraction and a LSST-like ZEMAX optical model where the images are convolved with Kolmogorov atmosphere. All samples are analyzed with the forward wavefront retrieval algorithm developed for DECam and the transport of intensity algorithm for LSST. Good quantitative agreement between results by the two implemented algorithms is observed.

  8. Wireless orientation sensors: their suitability to measure head movement for neck pain assessment.

    PubMed

    Jasiewicz, Jan M; Treleaven, Julia; Condie, Peter; Jull, Gwendolen

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the performance and suitability of new generation 3D wireless orientations sensors to measure cervical range of movement against a criterion standard instrument, an electromagnetic motion analysis system (Fastrak-Polhemus). The wireless orientation sensor (InertiaCube 3) consists of 9 motion-sensing elements: 3 accelerometers, 3 angular velocity rate transducers and 3 magnetometers. Measurements of cervical range of motion in each primary plane, left-lateral flexion, flexion and left rotation were directly compared from both systems in 10 normal asymptomatic subjects. Results showed very high cross-correlations (.99-.97) and low average root mean square errors (0.7-2.5 degrees). We conclude that orientation sensors are a valid, accurate and suitable device for obtaining cervical joint ranges of motion in the primary plane of movement.

  9. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  10. Cumulative Reconstructor: fast wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Extremely Large Telescopes.

    PubMed

    Rosensteiner, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    The Cumulative Reconstructor (CuRe) is a new direct reconstructor for an optical wavefront from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements. In this paper, the algorithm is adapted to realistic telescope geometries and the transition from modified Hudgin to Fried geometry is discussed. After a discussion of the noise propagation, we analyze the complexity of the algorithm. Our numerical tests confirm that the algorithm is very fast and accurate and can therefore be used for adaptive optics systems of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  11. MOSAIC: a new wavefront metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-02-02

    MOSAIC is a new wavefront metrology that enables complete wavefront characterization from print or aerial image based measurements. Here we describe MOSAIC and verify its utility with a model-based proof of principle.

  12. Wavefront sensing based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huang; Qi, Bian; Chenlu, Zhou; Tenghao, Li; Mali, Gong

    2016-07-01

    A novel wavefront sensing method based on phase contrast theory and coherent optical processing is proposed. The wavefront gradient field in the object plane is modulated into intensity distribution in a gang of patterns, making high-density detection available. By applying the method, we have also designed a wavefront sensor. It consists of a classical coherent optical processing system, a CCD detector array, two pieces of orthogonal composite sinusoidal gratings, and a mechanical structure that can perform real-time linear positioning. The simulation results prove and demonstrate the validity of the method and the sensor in high-precision measurement of the wavefront gradient field.

  13. Wavefront error sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, Eldred F.

    1986-01-01

    A two-step approach to wavefront sensing for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) was examined as part of an effort to define wavefront-sensing requirements and to determine particular areas for more detailed study. A Hartmann test for coarse alignment, particularly segment tilt, seems feasible if LDR can operate at 5 microns or less. The direct measurement of the point spread function in the diffraction limited region may be a way to determine piston error, but this can only be answered by a detailed software model of the optical system. The question of suitable astronomical sources for either test must also be addressed.

  14. PIYAS-Proceeding to Intelligent Service Oriented Memory Allocation for Flash Based Data Centric Sensor Devices in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Sanam Shahla; Chung, Tae-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Flash memory has become a more widespread storage medium for modern wireless devices because of its effective characteristics like non-volatility, small size, light weight, fast access speed, shock resistance, high reliability and low power consumption. Sensor nodes are highly resource constrained in terms of limited processing speed, runtime memory, persistent storage, communication bandwidth and finite energy. Therefore, for wireless sensor networks supporting sense, store, merge and send schemes, an efficient and reliable file system is highly required with consideration of sensor node constraints. In this paper, we propose a novel log structured external NAND flash memory based file system, called Proceeding to Intelligent service oriented memorY Allocation for flash based data centric Sensor devices in wireless sensor networks (PIYAS). This is the extended version of our previously proposed PIYA [1]. The main goals of the PIYAS scheme are to achieve instant mounting and reduced SRAM space by keeping memory mapping information to a very low size of and to provide high query response throughput by allocation of memory to the sensor data by network business rules. The scheme intelligently samples and stores the raw data and provides high in-network data availability by keeping the aggregate data for a longer period of time than any other scheme has done before. We propose effective garbage collection and wear-leveling schemes as well. The experimental results show that PIYAS is an optimized memory management scheme allowing high performance for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22315541

  15. PIYAS-proceeding to intelligent service oriented memory allocation for flash based data centric sensor devices in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sanam Shahla; Chung, Tae-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Flash memory has become a more widespread storage medium for modern wireless devices because of its effective characteristics like non-volatility, small size, light weight, fast access speed, shock resistance, high reliability and low power consumption. Sensor nodes are highly resource constrained in terms of limited processing speed, runtime memory, persistent storage, communication bandwidth and finite energy. Therefore, for wireless sensor networks supporting sense, store, merge and send schemes, an efficient and reliable file system is highly required with consideration of sensor node constraints. In this paper, we propose a novel log structured external NAND flash memory based file system, called Proceeding to Intelligent service oriented memorY Allocation for flash based data centric Sensor devices in wireless sensor networks (PIYAS). This is the extended version of our previously proposed PIYA [1]. The main goals of the PIYAS scheme are to achieve instant mounting and reduced SRAM space by keeping memory mapping information to a very low size of and to provide high query response throughput by allocation of memory to the sensor data by network business rules. The scheme intelligently samples and stores the raw data and provides high in-network data availability by keeping the aggregate data for a longer period of time than any other scheme has done before. We propose effective garbage collection and wear-leveling schemes as well. The experimental results show that PIYAS is an optimized memory management scheme allowing high performance for wireless sensor networks.

  16. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  17. Estimating Orientation Using Magnetic and Inertial Sensors and Different Sensor Fusion Approaches: Accuracy Assessment in Manual and Locomotion Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bergamini, Elena; Ligorio, Gabriele; Summa, Aurora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units are an emerging technology to obtain 3D orientation of body segments in human movement analysis. In this respect, sensor fusion is used to limit the drift errors resulting from the gyroscope data integration by exploiting accelerometer and magnetic aiding sensors. The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of sensor fusion methods under different experimental conditions. Manual and locomotion tasks, differing in time duration, measurement volume, presence/absence of static phases, and out-of-plane movements, were performed by six subjects, and recorded by one unit located on the forearm or the lower trunk, respectively. Two sensor fusion methods, representative of the stochastic (Extended Kalman Filter) and complementary (Non-linear observer) filtering, were selected, and their accuracy was assessed in terms of attitude (pitch and roll angles) and heading (yaw angle) errors using stereophotogrammetric data as a reference. The sensor fusion approaches provided significantly more accurate results than gyroscope data integration. Accuracy improved mostly for heading and when the movement exhibited stationary phases, evenly distributed 3D rotations, it occurred in a small volume, and its duration was greater than approximately 20 s. These results were independent from the specific sensor fusion method used. Practice guidelines for improving the outcome accuracy are provided. PMID:25302810

  18. Job-Oriented Basic Skills (JOBS) Program for the Acoustic Sensor Operations Strand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    U'Ren, Paula Kabance; Baker, Meryl S.

    An effort was undertaken to develop a job-oriented basic skills curriculum appropriate for the acoustic sensor operations area, which includes members of four ratings: ocean systems technician, aviation antisubmarine warfare operator, sonar technician (surface), and sonar technician (submarine). Analysis of the job duties of the four ratings…

  19. WISDOM: wheelchair inertial sensors for displacement and orientation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansiot, J.; Zhang, Z.; Lo, B.; Yang, G. Z.

    2011-10-01

    Improved wheelchair design in recent years has significantly increased the mobility of people with disabilities, which has also enhanced the competitive advantage of wheelchair sports. For the latter, detailed assessment of biomechanical factors influencing individual performance and team tactics requires real-time wireless sensing and data modelling. In this paper, we propose the use of a miniaturized wireless wheel-mounted inertial sensor for wheelchair motion monitoring and tracking in an indoor sport environment. Based on a combined use of 3D microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes and 2D MEMS accelerometers, the proposed system provides real-time velocity, heading, ground distance covered and motion trajectory of the wheelchair across the sports court. The proposed system offers a number of advantages compared to existing platforms in terms of size, weight and ease of installation. Beyond sport applications, it also has important applications for training and rehabilitation for people with disabilities.

  20. Comparative study of infrared wavefront sensing solutions for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantet, C.; Fusco, T.; Guerineau, N.; Derelle, S.; Robert, C.

    2016-07-01

    The development of new low-noise infrared detectors, such as RAPID (CEA LETI/Sofradir) or SAPHIRA (Selex), has given the possibility to consider infrared wavefront sensing at low ux. We propose here a comparative study of near infrared (J and H bands) wavefront sensing concepts for mid and high orders estimation on a 8m- class telescope, relying on three existing wavefront sensors: the Shack-Hartmann sensor, the pyramid sensor and the quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer. We consider several conceptual designs using the RAPID camera, making a trade-off between background flux, optical thickness and compatibility with a compact cryostat integration. We then study their sensitivity to noise in order to compare them in different practical scenarios. The pyramid provides the best performance, with a gain up to 0.5 magnitude, and has an advantageous setup.

  1. Zonal wavefront estimation using an array of hexagonal grating patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in; Boruah, Bosanta R. E-mail: brboruah@iitg.ernet.in

    2014-10-15

    Accuracy of Shack-Hartmann type wavefront sensors depends on the shape and layout of the lenslet array that samples the incoming wavefront. It has been shown that an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens provide a substitution for the lensslet array. Taking advantage of the computer generated holography technique, any arbitrary diffraction grating aperture shape, size or pattern can be designed with little penalty for complexity. In the present work, such a holographic technique is implemented to design regular hexagonal grating array to have zero dead space between grating patterns, eliminating the possibility of leakage of wavefront during the estimation of the wavefront. Tessellation of regular hexagonal shape, unlike other commonly used shapes, also reduces the estimation error by incorporating more number of neighboring slope values at an equal separation.

  2. Sensor Webs with a Service-Oriented Architecture for On-demand Science Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Ungar, Stephen; Ames, Troy; Justice, Chris; Frye, Stuart; Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Cappelaere, Patrice; Derezinsfi, Linda; Paules, Granville; Di, Liping; Kolitz, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the work being managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Information System Division (ISD) under a NASA Earth Science Technology Ofice (ESTO) Advanced Information System Technology (AIST) grant to develop a modular sensor web architecture which enables discovery of sensors and workflows that can create customized science via a high-level service-oriented architecture based on Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) web service standards. These capabilities serve as a prototype to a user-centric architecture for Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). This work builds and extends previous sensor web efforts conducted at NASA/GSFC using the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite and other low-earth orbiting satellites.

  3. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  4. Highly sensitive integrated pressure sensor with horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network.

    PubMed

    Mohammad Haniff, Muhammad Aniq Shazni; Lee, Hing Wah; Bien, Daniel Chia Sheng; Teh, Aun Shih; Azid, Ishak Abdul

    2014-01-28

    This paper presents a functionalized, horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network as a sensing element to enhance the sensitivity of a pressure sensor. The synthesis of horizontally oriented nanotubes from the AuFe catalyst and their deposition onto a mechanically flexible substrate via transfer printing are studied. Nanotube formation on thermally oxidized Si (100) substrates via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition controls the nanotube coverage and orientation on the flexible substrate. These nanotubes can be simply transferred to the flexible substrate without changing their physical structure. When tested under a pressure range of 0 to 50 kPa, the performance of the fabricated pressure sensor reaches as high as approximately 1.68%/kPa, which indicates high sensitivity to a small change of pressure. Such sensitivity may be induced by the slight contact in isolated nanotubes. This nanotube formation, in turn, enhances the modification of the contact and tunneling distance of the nanotubes upon the deformation of the network. Therefore, the horizontally oriented carbon nanotube network has great potential as a sensing element for future transparent sensors.

  5. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  6. Application of Service Oriented Architecture for Sensors and Actuators in District Heating Substations

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Jonas; Kyusakov, Rumen; Mäkitaavola, Henrik; Delsing, Jerker

    2014-01-01

    Hardwired sensor installations using proprietary protocols found in today's district heating substations limit the potential usability of the sensors in and around the substations. If sensor resources can be shared and re-used in a variety of applications, the cost of sensors and installation can be reduced, and their functionality and operability can be increased. In this paper, we present a new concept of district heating substation control and monitoring, where a service oriented architecture (SOA) is deployed in a wireless sensor network (WSN), which is integrated with the substation. IP-networking is exclusively used from sensor to server; hence, no middleware is needed for Internet integration. Further, by enabling thousands of sensors with SOA capabilities, a System of Systems approach can be applied. The results of this paper show that it is possible to utilize SOA solutions with heavily resource-constrained embedded devices in contexts where the real-time constrains are limited, such as in a district heating substation. PMID:25196165

  7. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning.

  8. Application-oriented programming model for sensor networks embedded in the human body.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Talles M G de A; Sene, Iwens G; da Rocha, Adson F; Nascimento, Fransisco A de O; Carvalho, Hervaldo S; Camapum, Juliana F

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a new programming model for sensor networks embedded in the human body which is based on the concept of multi-programming application-oriented software. This model was conceived with a top-down approach of four layers and its main goal is to allow the healthcare professionals to program and to reconfigure the network locally or by the Internet. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, a benchmarking was executed in order to allow the assessment of the mean time spent in the programming of a multi-functional sensor node used for the measurement and transmission of the electrocardiogram.

  9. Orientation-Dependent Displacement Sensor Using an Inner Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2016-09-11

    An orientation-dependent displacement sensor based on grating inscription over a fiber core and inner cladding has been demonstrated. The device comprises a short piece of multi-cladding fiber sandwiched between two standard single-mode fibers (SMFs). The grating structure is fabricated by a femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Two well-defined resonances are achieved by the downstream both core and cladding fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The cladding resonance presents fiber bending dependence, together with a strong orientation dependence because of asymmetrical distribution of the "cladding" FBG along the fiber cross-section.

  10. Orientation-Dependent Displacement Sensor Using an Inner Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Bao, Weijia

    2016-01-01

    An orientation-dependent displacement sensor based on grating inscription over a fiber core and inner cladding has been demonstrated. The device comprises a short piece of multi-cladding fiber sandwiched between two standard single-mode fibers (SMFs). The grating structure is fabricated by a femtosecond laser side-illumination technique. Two well-defined resonances are achieved by the downstream both core and cladding fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The cladding resonance presents fiber bending dependence, together with a strong orientation dependence because of asymmetrical distribution of the “cladding” FBG along the fiber cross-section. PMID:27626427

  11. inertial orientation tracker having automatic drift compensation using an at rest sensor for tracking parts of a human body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxlin, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A self contained sensor apparatus generates a signal that corresponds to at least two of the three orientational aspects of yaw, pitch and roll of a human-scale body, relative to an external reference frame. A sensor generates first sensor signals that correspond to rotational accelerations or rates of the body about certain body axes. The sensor may be mounted to the body. Coupled to the sensor is a signal processor for generating orientation signals relative to the external reference frame that correspond to the angular rate or acceleration signals. The first sensor signals are impervious to interference from electromagnetic, acoustic, optical and mechanical sources. The sensors may be rate sensors. An integrator may integrate the rate signal over time. A drift compensator is coupled to the rate sensors and the integrator. The drift compensator may include a gravitational tilt sensor or a magnetic field sensor or both. A verifier periodically measures the orientation of the body by a means different from the drift sensitive sate sensors. The verifier may take into account characteristic features of human motion, such as stillness periods. The drift compensator may be, in part, a Kalman filter, which may utilize statistical data about human head motion.

  12. Framework to trade optimality for local processing in large-scale wavefront reconstruction problems.

    PubMed

    Haber, Aleksandar; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-11-15

    We show that the minimum variance wavefront estimation problems permit localized approximate solutions, in the sense that the wavefront value at a point (excluding unobservable modes, such as the piston mode) can be approximated by a linear combination of the wavefront slope measurements in the point's neighborhood. This enables us to efficiently compute a wavefront estimate by performing a single sparse matrix-vector multiplication. Moreover, our results open the possibility for the development of wavefront estimators that can be easily implemented in a decentralized/distributed manner, and in which the estimate optimality can be easily traded for computational efficiency. We numerically validate our approach on Hudgin wavefront sensor geometries, and the results can be easily generalized to Fried geometries.

  13. Radius and Orientation Measurement for Cylindrical Objects by a Light Section Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youdong; Liu, Chongxu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient method based on a light section sensor is presented for measuring cylindrical objects’ radii and orientations in a robotic application. By this method, the cylindrical objects can be measured under some special conditions, such as when the cylindrical objects are welded with others, or in the presence of interferences. Firstly, the measurement data are roughly identified and accurately screened to effectively recognize ellipses. Secondly, the data are smoothed and homogenized to eliminate the effect of laser line loss or jump and reduce the influence of the inhomogeneity of measurement data on the ellipse fitting to a minimum. Finally, the ellipse fitting is carried out to obtain the radii and orientations of the cylindrical objects. Measuring experiments and results demonstrate the effective of the proposed radius and orientation measurement method for cylindrical object. PMID:27886090

  14. A test bench for ARGOS: integration of sub-systems and validation of the wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    ARGOS, the wide eld Laser Guide Stars adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope, is now entering its installation phase. In the meanwhile, we have started a test bench in order to integrate various Argos sub-systems and demonstrate its wavefront measurements. To this objective, we rst validate three key components of the Argos wavefront sensor which we then integrate together. The test bench therefore comprises the Argos wavefront camera system - including a large frame, fast framerate, high quantum eciency and low readout noise pnCCD -, the slope computer, and a optical gating unit. While we present here the demonstration of those three key components, it is also a step to their system level integration that enables us to validate the wavefront measurements in term of noises, timing and computation. In the near future, those system will be integrated to the wavefront sensor system of ARGOS.

  15. Maximum-likelihood methods in wavefront sensing: stochastic models and likelihood functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Dainty, Christopher; Lara, David

    2007-02-01

    Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation in wavefront sensing requires careful attention to all noise sources and all factors that influence the sensor data. We present detailed probability density functions for the output of the image detector in a wavefront sensor, conditional not only on wavefront parameters but also on various nuisance parameters. Practical ways of dealing with nuisance parameters are described, and final expressions for likelihoods and Fisher information matrices are derived. The theory is illustrated by discussing Shack-Hartmann sensors, and computational requirements are discussed. Simulation results show that ML estimation can significantly increase the dynamic range of a Shack-Hartmann sensor with four detectors and that it can reduce the residual wavefront error when compared with traditional methods.

  16. Accurate estimation of human body orientation from RGB-D sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Zhang, Yongdong; Tang, Sheng; Tang, Jinhui; Hong, Richang; Li, Jintao

    2013-10-01

    Accurate estimation of human body orientation can significantly enhance the analysis of human behavior, which is a fundamental task in the field of computer vision. However, existing orientation estimation methods cannot handle the various body poses and appearances. In this paper, we propose an innovative RGB-D-based orientation estimation method to address these challenges. By utilizing the RGB-D information, which can be real time acquired by RGB-D sensors, our method is robust to cluttered environment, illumination change and partial occlusions. Specifically, efficient static and motion cue extraction methods are proposed based on the RGB-D superpixels to reduce the noise of depth data. Since it is hard to discriminate all the 360 (°) orientation using static cues or motion cues independently, we propose to utilize a dynamic Bayesian network system (DBNS) to effectively employ the complementary nature of both static and motion cues. In order to verify our proposed method, we build a RGB-D-based human body orientation dataset that covers a wide diversity of poses and appearances. Our intensive experimental evaluations on this dataset demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Wavefront phase retrieval with multi-aperture Zernike filter for atmospheric sensing and adaptive optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordbar, Behzad; Farwell, Nathan H.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.

    2016-09-01

    A novel scintillation resistant wavefront sensor based on a densely packed array of classical Zernike filters, referred to as the multi-aperture Zernike wavefront sensor (MAZ-WFS), is introduced and analyzed through numerical simulations. Wavefront phase reconstruction in the MAZ-WFS is performed using iterative algorithms that are optimized for phase aberration sensing in severe atmospheric turbulence conditions. The results demonstrate the potential of the MAZ-WFS for high-resolution retrieval of turbulence-induced phase aberrations in strong scintillation conditions for atmospheric sensing and adaptive optics applications.

  18. Wavefront sensing for deformable space-based optics exploiting natural and synthetic guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, Brian K.; Friedman, Edward J.

    2002-08-01

    Natural and synthetic guide stars can serve as beacons for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors in space-based applications. In this paper, the authors determine the key equations that govern the optimization of the wavefront sensor employed on a space- based imaging system. There are two major products of this analysis. First, the number of subapertures can be optimized. Second, the number of modes used in the wavefront recovery can be optimized. Finally, the process for optimizing these values is explained. For the examples shown, the optimal number of retrieved modes and the optimal number of subapertures are determined.

  19. Common-Path Interferometric Wavefront Sensing for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optical configuration for a common-path phase-shifting interferometric wavefront sensor.1 2 This sensor has a host of attractive features which make it well suited for space-based adaptive optics. First, it is strictly reflective and therefore operates broadband, second it is common mode and therefore does not suffer from systematic errors (like vibration) that are typical in other interferometers, third it is a phase-shifting interferometer and therefore benefits from both the sensitivity of interferometric sensors as well as the noise rejection afforded by synchronous detection. Unlike the Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor, it has nearly uniform sensitivity to all pupil modes. Optical configuration, theory and simulations for such a system will be discussed along with predicted performance.

  20. JWST Wavefront Control Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Shahram Ron; Aronstein, David L.

    2011-01-01

    A Matlab-based toolbox has been developed for the wavefront control and optimization of segmented optical surfaces to correct for possible misalignments of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) using influence functions. The toolbox employs both iterative and non-iterative methods to converge to an optimal solution by minimizing the cost function. The toolbox could be used in either of constrained and unconstrained optimizations. The control process involves 1 to 7 degrees-of-freedom perturbations per segment of primary mirror in addition to the 5 degrees of freedom of secondary mirror. The toolbox consists of a series of Matlab/Simulink functions and modules, developed based on a "wrapper" approach, that handles the interface and data flow between existing commercial optical modeling software packages such as Zemax and Code V. The limitations of the algorithm are dictated by the constraints of the moving parts in the mirrors.

  1. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Goy, M.; Beckert, E.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The speed of real-time adaptive optical systems is primarily restricted by the data processing hardware and computational aspects. Furthermore, the application of mirror layouts with increasing numbers of actuators reduces the bandwidth (speed) of the system and, thus, the number of applicable control algorithms. This burden turns out a key-impediment for deformable mirrors with continuous mirror surface and highly coupled actuator influence functions. In this regard, specialized hardware is necessary for high performance real-time control applications. Our approach to overcome this challenge is an adaptive optics system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) with a CameraLink interface. The data processing is based on a high performance Intel Core i7 Quadcore hard real-time Linux system. Employing a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA, an own developed PCie card is outlined in order to accelerate the analysis of a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor. A recently developed real-time capable spot detection algorithm evaluates the wavefront. The main features of the presented system are the reduction of latency and the acceleration of computation For example, matrix multiplications which in general are of complexity O(n3 are accelerated by using the DSP48 slices of the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) as well as a novel hardware implementation of the SHWFS algorithm. Further benefits are the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE) which intensively use the parallelization capability of the processor for further reducing the latency and increasing the bandwidth of the closed-loop. Due to this approach, up to 64 actuators of a deformable mirror can be handled and controlled without noticeable restriction from computational burdens.

  2. Secure Distributed Detection under Energy Constraint in IoT-Oriented Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Sun, Hao

    2016-12-16

    We study the secure distributed detection problems under energy constraint for IoT-oriented sensor networks. The conventional channel-aware encryption (CAE) is an efficient physical-layer secure distributed detection scheme in light of its energy efficiency, good scalability and robustness over diverse eavesdropping scenarios. However, in the CAE scheme, it remains an open problem of how to optimize the key thresholds for the estimated channel gain, which are used to determine the sensor's reporting action. Moreover, the CAE scheme does not jointly consider the accuracy of local detection results in determining whether to stay dormant for a sensor. To solve these problems, we first analyze the error probability and derive the optimal thresholds in the CAE scheme under a specified energy constraint. These results build a convenient mathematic framework for our further innovative design. Under this framework, we propose a hybrid secure distributed detection scheme. Our proposal can satisfy the energy constraint by keeping some sensors inactive according to the local detection confidence level, which is characterized by likelihood ratio. In the meanwhile, the security is guaranteed through randomly flipping the local decisions forwarded to the fusion center based on the channel amplitude. We further optimize the key parameters of our hybrid scheme, including two local decision thresholds and one channel comparison threshold. Performance evaluation results demonstrate that our hybrid scheme outperforms the CAE under stringent energy constraints, especially in the high signal-to-noise ratio scenario, while the security is still assured.

  3. Fast minimum variance wavefront reconstruction for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Thiébaut, Eric; Tallon, Michel

    2010-05-01

    We present what we believe to be a new algorithm, FRactal Iterative Method (FRiM), aiming at the reconstruction of the optical wavefront from measurements provided by a wavefront sensor. As our application is adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, our algorithm was designed with speed and best quality in mind. The latter is achieved thanks to a regularization that enforces prior statistics. To solve the regularized problem, we use the conjugate gradient method, which takes advantage of the sparsity of the wavefront sensor model matrix and avoids the storage and inversion of a huge matrix. The prior covariance matrix is, however, non-sparse, and we derive a fractal approximation to the Karhunen-Loève basis thanks to which the regularization by Kolmogorov statistics can be computed in O(N) operations, with N being the number of phase samples to estimate. Finally, we propose an effective preconditioning that also scales as O(N) and yields the solution in five to ten conjugate gradient iterations for any N. The resulting algorithm is therefore O(N). As an example, for a 128 x 128 Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, the FRiM appears to be more than 100 times faster than the classical vector-matrix multiplication method.

  4. Active Control of Laser Wavefronts in Atom Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimeche, A.; Langlois, M.; Merlet, S.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2017-03-01

    Wavefront aberrations are identified as a major limitation in quantum sensors. They are today the main contribution in the uncertainty budget of the best cold-atom interferometers based on two-photon laser beam splitters and constitute an important limit for their long-term stability, impeding these instruments from reaching their full potential. Moreover, they will also remain a major obstacle in future experiments based on large-momentum beam splitters. In this article, we tackle this issue by using a deformable mirror to control actively the laser wavefronts in atom interferometry. In particular, we demonstrate in an experimental proof of principle the efficient correction of wavefront aberrations in an atomic gravimeter.

  5. Wavefront measurement of plastic lenses for mobile-phone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ting; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Wang, Chung-Yen; Wang, Pei-Jen

    2016-08-01

    In camera lenses for mobile-phone applications, all lens elements have been designed with aspheric surfaces because of the requirements in minimal total track length of the lenses. Due to the diffraction-limited optics design with precision assembly procedures, element inspection and lens performance measurement have become cumbersome in the production of mobile-phone cameras. Recently, wavefront measurements based on Shack-Hartmann sensors have been successfully implemented on injection-molded plastic lens with aspheric surfaces. However, the applications of wavefront measurement on small-sized plastic lenses have yet to be studied both theoretically and experimentally. In this paper, both an in-house-built and a commercial wavefront measurement system configured on two optics structures have been investigated with measurement of wavefront aberrations on two lens elements from a mobile-phone camera. First, the wet-cell method has been employed for verifications of aberrations due to residual birefringence in an injection-molded lens. Then, two lens elements of a mobile-phone camera with large positive and negative power have been measured with aberrations expressed in Zernike polynomial to illustrate the effectiveness in wavefront measurement for troubleshooting defects in optical performance.

  6. Wavefront reconstruction with pupil fragmentation: study of a simple case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefond, Sylvain; Tallon, Michel; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The use of smaller subapertures on some recent adaptive optics (AO) systems seems to yield difficulties in wavefront reconstruction, known as spider effect or pupil fragmentation: the size of the subapertures is small enough so that some of them are masked by the telescope spider, dividing the pupil into disconnected domains. In particular, this problem will arise on the E-ELT.We have studied pure wavefront reconstruction on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, for a simplified AO system similar to VLT/SPHERE in size, with and without pupil fragmentation, and compared the performance of various wavefront reconstructors for different signal-to-noise ratios, using priors (minimum variance) or not (least-squares), and with different assumptions for the damaged wavefront measurements. The missing measurements have been either discarded (corresponding subapertures are not active), replaced by zeros, or interpolated by preserving the loop continuity property of the gradients (curl operator). Priors have been introduced using the FrIM (Fractal Iterative Method) algorithm. In our perfect conditions, we show that no method allows the full recovery from the pupil fragmentation, that minimum variance always gives the best performance, especially the one without any interpolation. On the opposite, the performance with least-squares somewhat improves when correcting for the missing measurements. In this latter case, preserving the curl property of the gradient is preferable only for very low measurement noise.

  7. Spatial asymmetry in tactile sensor skin deformation aids perception of edge orientation during haptic exploration.

    PubMed

    Ponce Wong, Ruben D; Hellman, Randall B; Santos, Veronica J

    2014-01-01

    Upper-limb amputees rely primarily on visual feedback when using their prostheses to interact with others or objects in their environment. A constant reliance upon visual feedback can be mentally exhausting and does not suffice for many activities when line-of-sight is unavailable. Upper-limb amputees could greatly benefit from the ability to perceive edges, one of the most salient features of 3D shape, through touch alone. We present an approach for estimating edge orientation with respect to an artificial fingertip through haptic exploration using a multimodal tactile sensor on a robot hand. Key parameters from the tactile signals for each of four exploratory procedures were used as inputs to a support vector regression model. Edge orientation angles ranging from -90 to 90 degrees were estimated with an 85-input model having an R (2) of 0.99 and RMS error of 5.08 degrees. Electrode impedance signals provided the most useful inputs by encoding spatially asymmetric skin deformation across the entire fingertip. Interestingly, sensor regions that were not in direct contact with the stimulus provided particularly useful information. Methods described here could pave the way for semi-autonomous capabilities in prosthetic or robotic hands during haptic exploration, especially when visual feedback is unavailable.

  8. Performance and Challenges of Service-Oriented Architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Alshinina, Remah; Elleithy, Khaled

    2017-03-08

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have become essential components for a variety of environmental, surveillance, military, traffic control, and healthcare applications. These applications face critical challenges such as communication, security, power consumption, data aggregation, heterogeneities of sensor hardware, and Quality of Service (QoS) issues. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a software architecture that can be integrated with WSN applications to address those challenges. The SOA middleware bridges the gap between the high-level requirements of different applications and the hardware constraints of WSNs. This survey explores state-of-the-art approaches based on SOA and Service-Oriented Middleware (SOM) architecture that provide solutions for WSN challenges. The categories of this paper are based on approaches of SOA with and without middleware for WSNs. Additionally, features of SOA and middleware architectures for WSNs are compared to achieve more robust and efficient network performance. Design issues of SOA middleware for WSNs and its characteristics are also highlighted. The paper concludes with future research directions in SOM architecture to meet all requirements of emerging application of WSNs.

  9. Performance and Challenges of Service-Oriented Architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Alshinina, Remah; Elleithy, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have become essential components for a variety of environmental, surveillance, military, traffic control, and healthcare applications. These applications face critical challenges such as communication, security, power consumption, data aggregation, heterogeneities of sensor hardware, and Quality of Service (QoS) issues. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is a software architecture that can be integrated with WSN applications to address those challenges. The SOA middleware bridges the gap between the high-level requirements of different applications and the hardware constraints of WSNs. This survey explores state-of-the-art approaches based on SOA and Service-Oriented Middleware (SOM) architecture that provide solutions for WSN challenges. The categories of this paper are based on approaches of SOA with and without middleware for WSNs. Additionally, features of SOA and middleware architectures for WSNs are compared to achieve more robust and efficient network performance. Design issues of SOA middleware for WSNs and its characteristics are also highlighted. The paper concludes with future research directions in SOM architecture to meet all requirements of emerging application of WSNs. PMID:28282896

  10. Service-Oriented Node Scheduling Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks Using Markov Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongju; Su, Zhihuang; Lloret, Jaime; Chen, Guolong

    2014-01-01

    Future wireless sensor networks are expected to provide various sensing services and energy efficiency is one of the most important criterions. The node scheduling strategy aims to increase network lifetime by selecting a set of sensor nodes to provide the required sensing services in a periodic manner. In this paper, we are concerned with the service-oriented node scheduling problem to provide multiple sensing services while maximizing the network lifetime. We firstly introduce how to model the data correlation for different services by using Markov Random Field (MRF) model. Secondly, we formulate the service-oriented node scheduling issue into three different problems, namely, the multi-service data denoising problem which aims at minimizing the noise level of sensed data, the representative node selection problem concerning with selecting a number of active nodes while determining the services they provide, and the multi-service node scheduling problem which aims at maximizing the network lifetime. Thirdly, we propose a Multi-service Data Denoising (MDD) algorithm, a novel multi-service Representative node Selection and service Determination (RSD) algorithm, and a novel MRF-based Multi-service Node Scheduling (MMNS) scheme to solve the above three problems respectively. Finally, extensive experiments demonstrate that the proposed scheme efficiently extends the network lifetime. PMID:25384005

  11. Direct observation of binding stress-induced crystalline orientation change in piezoelectric plate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the mechanism of the detection resonance frequency shift, Δf/f, of a 1370 μm long and 537 μm wide [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.65[PbTiO3]0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) made of a 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film. The Δf/f of the PEPS was monitored in a three-step binding model detections of (1) binding of maleimide-activated biotin to the sulfhydryl on the PEPS surface followed by (2) binding of streptavidin to the bound biotin and (3) subsequent binding of biotinylated probe deoxyribonucleic acid to the bound streptavidin. We used a PMN-PT surrogate made of the same 8-μm thick PMN-PT freestanding film that the PEPS was made of but was about 1 cm in length and width to carry out crystalline orientation study using X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan around the (002)/(200) peaks after each of the binding steps. The result of the XRD studies indicated that each binding step caused the crystalline orientation of the PMN-PT thin layer to switch from the vertical (002) orientation to the horizontal (200) orientation, and most of the PEPS detection Δf/f was due to the change in the lateral Young's modulus of the PMN-PT thin layer as a result of the crystalline orientation change.

  12. Influence of wave-front sampling in adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laslandes, Marie; Salas, Matthias; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Pircher, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of sampling densities of the wave-front has been used in retinal adaptive optics (AO) instruments, compared to the number of corrector elements. We developed a model in order to characterize the link between number of actuators, number of wave-front sampling points and AO correction performance. Based on available data from aberration measurements in the human eye, 1000 wave-fronts were generated for the simulations. The AO correction performance in the presence of these representative aberrations was simulated for different deformable mirror and Shack Hartmann wave-front sensor combinations. Predictions of the model were experimentally tested through in vivo measurements in 10 eyes including retinal imaging with an AO scanning laser ophthalmoscope. According to our study, a ratio between wavefront sampling points and actuator elements of 2 is sufficient to achieve high resolution in vivo images of photoreceptors. PMID:28271004

  13. Relative Orientation and Position Detections Based on an RGB-D Sensor and Dynamic Cooperation Strategies for Jumping Sensor Nodes Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Xi; Song, Guang-Ming; Chen, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents relative orientation and position detection methods for jumping sensor nodes (JSNs) recycling. The methods are based on motion captures of the JSNs by an RGB-D sensor mounted on a carrier robot and the dynamic cooperation between the carrier and the JSNs. A disc-like label with two different colored sides is mounted on the top of the JSNs. The RGB-D sensor can detect the motion of the label to calculate the orientations and positions of the JSNs and the carrier relative to each other. After the orientations and positions have been detected, the JSNs jump into a cabin mounted on the carrier in dynamic cooperation with the carrier for recycling. The performances of the proposed methods are tested with a prototype system. The results show that the carrier can detect a JSN from up to 2 m away and sense its relative orientation and position successfully. The errors of the JSN’s orientation and position detections relative to the carrier could be reduced to the values smaller than 1° and 1 cm, respectively, by using the dynamic cooperation strategies. The proposed methods in this paper could also be used for other kinds of mobile sensor nodes and multi-robot systems. PMID:26393589

  14. Secure Distributed Detection under Energy Constraint in IoT-Oriented Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guomei; Sun, Hao

    2016-01-01

    We study the secure distributed detection problems under energy constraint for IoT-oriented sensor networks. The conventional channel-aware encryption (CAE) is an efficient physical-layer secure distributed detection scheme in light of its energy efficiency, good scalability and robustness over diverse eavesdropping scenarios. However, in the CAE scheme, it remains an open problem of how to optimize the key thresholds for the estimated channel gain, which are used to determine the sensor’s reporting action. Moreover, the CAE scheme does not jointly consider the accuracy of local detection results in determining whether to stay dormant for a sensor. To solve these problems, we first analyze the error probability and derive the optimal thresholds in the CAE scheme under a specified energy constraint. These results build a convenient mathematic framework for our further innovative design. Under this framework, we propose a hybrid secure distributed detection scheme. Our proposal can satisfy the energy constraint by keeping some sensors inactive according to the local detection confidence level, which is characterized by likelihood ratio. In the meanwhile, the security is guaranteed through randomly flipping the local decisions forwarded to the fusion center based on the channel amplitude. We further optimize the key parameters of our hybrid scheme, including two local decision thresholds and one channel comparison threshold. Performance evaluation results demonstrate that our hybrid scheme outperforms the CAE under stringent energy constraints, especially in the high signal-to-noise ratio scenario, while the security is still assured. PMID:27999282

  15. Retrieval of Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated MEMS gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, A.; D'Anna, G.

    2014-12-01

    The absolute orientation of the horizontal components of ocean bottom or downhole seismic sensors are generally unknown. Almost all the methods proposed to overcome this issue are based on the post-processing of the acquired signals and so the results are strongly dependent on the nature, quantity and quality of the acquired data. We have carried out several test to evaluate the ability of retrieve sensor orientation using integrated low cost MEMS gyroscope. Our tests have shown that the tested MEMS gyroscope (the model 1044_0-3/3/3 Phidget Spatial Precision High Resolution) can be used to measure angular displacement and therefore to retrieve the absolute orientation of the horizontal components of a sensor that has been subjected to rotation in the horizontal plane. A correct processing of the acquired signals permit to retrieve, for rotation at angular rate between 0 and 180° s-1, angular displacement with error less 2°.

  16. Wavefront Derived Refraction and Full Eye Biometry in Pseudophakic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinjie; Banta, James T.; Ke, Bilian; Jiang, Hong; He, Jichang; Liu, Che; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess wavefront derived refraction and full eye biometry including ciliary muscle dimension and full eye axial geometry in pseudophakic eyes using spectral domain OCT equipped with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Methods Twenty-eight adult subjects (32 pseudophakic eyes) having recently undergone cataract surgery were enrolled in this study. A custom system combining two optical coherence tomography systems with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was constructed to image and monitor changes in whole eye biometry, the ciliary muscle and ocular aberration in the pseudophakic eye. A Badal optical channel and a visual target aligning with the wavefront sensor were incorporated into the system for measuring the wavefront-derived refraction. The imaging acquisition was performed twice. The coefficients of repeatability (CoR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated. Results Images were acquired and processed successfully in all patients. No significant difference was detected between repeated measurements of ciliary muscle dimension, full-eye biometry or defocus aberration. The CoR of full-eye biometry ranged from 0.36% to 3.04% and the ICC ranged from 0.981 to 0.999. The CoR for ciliary muscle dimensions ranged from 12.2% to 41.6% and the ICC ranged from 0.767 to 0.919. The defocus aberrations of the two measurements were 0.443 ± 0.534 D and 0.447 ± 0.586 D and the ICC was 0.951. Conclusions The combined system is capable of measuring full eye biometry and refraction with good repeatability. The system is suitable for future investigation of pseudoaccommodation in the pseudophakic eye. PMID:27010674

  17. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  18. The construction of individual eye model based on eye's wavefront aberration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao-Qi; Guo, Huan-Qing

    2005-08-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There were four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software -ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  19. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  20. Curvature wavefront sensing for the large synoptic survey telescope.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bo; Claver, Chuck; Liang, Ming; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Angeli, George; Shipsey, Ian

    2015-10-20

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will use an active optics system (AOS) to maintain alignment and surface figure on its three large mirrors. Corrective actions fed to the LSST AOS are determined from information derived from four curvature wavefront sensors located at the corners of the focal plane. Each wavefront sensor is a split detector such that the halves are 1 mm on either side of focus. In this paper, we describe the extensions to published curvature wavefront sensing algorithms needed to address challenges presented by the LSST, namely the large central obscuration, the fast f/1.23 beam, off-axis pupil distortions, and vignetting at the sensor locations. We also describe corrections needed for the split sensors and the effects from the angular separation of different stars providing the intrafocal and extrafocal images. Lastly, we present simulations that demonstrate convergence, linearity, and negligible noise when compared to atmospheric effects when the algorithm extensions are applied to the LSST optical system. The algorithm extensions reported here are generic and can easily be adapted to other wide-field optical systems including similar telescopes with large central obscuration and off-axis curvature sensing.

  1. Wavefront correction by target-phase-locking technology in a 500 TW laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. E.; Dai, W. J.; Zhou, K. N.; Su, J. Q.; Xue, Q.; Yuan, Q.; Zhang, X.; Deng, X. W.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Xie, N.; Sun, L.; Hu, D. X.; Zhu, Q. H.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach termed target-phase-locking that could improve the entire beam wavefront quality of a 500 TW Nd3+:phosphate glass laser facility. The thermal and static wavefront from front-end to target is corrected by using one deformable mirror that receives feedback from both the focal-spot sensor and wavefront sensor, and only the main laser of the laser system is employed in the correction process, with auxiliary calibration light no longer necessary. As a result, a static focal spot with full width at half maximum of 8.87  ×  5.74 µm is achieved, the thermal wavefront induced by flash-lamp-pumped Nd3+:phosphate glass is compensated with PV from 3.54-0.43 µm, and a dynamic focal spot with intensity exceeding 1020 W cm-2 is precisely predicted at the target with such an approach.

  2. Kalman-filter-based orientation determination using inertial/magnetic sensors: observability analysis and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a quaternion-based Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the three-dimensional orientation of a rigid body. The EKF exploits the measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that is integrated with a tri-axial magnetic sensor. Magnetic disturbances and gyro bias errors are modeled and compensated by including them in the filter state vector. We employ the observability rank criterion based on Lie derivatives to verify the conditions under which the nonlinear system that describes the process of motion tracking by the IMU is observable, namely it may provide sufficient information for performing the estimation task with bounded estimation errors. The observability conditions are that the magnetic field, perturbed by first-order Gauss-Markov magnetic variations, and the gravity vector are not collinear and that the IMU is subject to some angular motions. Computer simulations and experimental testing are presented to evaluate the algorithm performance, including when the observability conditions are critical.

  3. Real-time physiological monitoring with distributed networks of sensors and object-oriented programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, William P.; Pranger, L. Alex; Bogucki, Mary S.

    1998-05-01

    Remote monitoring of physiologic data from individual high- risk workers distributed over time and space is a considerable challenge. This is often due to an inadequate capability to accurately integrate large amounts of data into usable information in real time. In this report, we have used the vertical and horizontal organization of the 'fireground' as a framework to design a distributed network of sensors. In this system, sensor output is linked through a hierarchical object oriented programing process to accurately interpret physiological data, incorporate these data into a synchronous model and relay processed data, trends and predictions to members of the fire incident command structure. There are several unique aspects to this approach. The first includes a process to account for variability in vital parameter values for each individual's normal physiologic response by including an adaptive network in each data process. This information is used by the model in an iterative process to baseline a 'normal' physiologic response to a given stress for each individual and to detect deviations that indicate dysfunction or a significant insult. The second unique capability of the system orders the information for each user including the subject, local company officers, medical personnel and the incident commanders. Information can be retrieved and used for training exercises and after action analysis. Finally this system can easily be adapted to existing communication and processing links along with incorporating the best parts of current models through the use of object oriented programming techniques. These modern software techniques are well suited to handling multiple data processes independently over time in a distributed network.

  4. SOMM: A new service oriented middleware for generic wireless multimedia sensor networks based on code mobility.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Mohammad Mehdi; Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Although much research in the area of Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) has been done in recent years, the programming of sensor nodes is still time-consuming and tedious. It requires expertise in low-level programming, mainly because of the use of resource constrained hardware and also the low level API provided by current operating systems. The code of the resulting systems has typically no clear separation between application and system logic. This minimizes the possibility of reusing code and often leads to the necessity of major changes when the underlying platform is changed. In this paper, we present a service oriented middleware named SOMM to support application development for WMSNs. The main goal of SOMM is to enable the development of modifiable and scalable WMSN applications. A network which uses the SOMM is capable of providing multiple services to multiple clients at the same time with the specified Quality of Service (QoS). SOMM uses a virtual machine with the ability to support mobile agents. Services in SOMM are provided by mobile agents and SOMM also provides a t space on each node which agents can use to communicate with each other.

  5. A Dual-Linear Kalman Filter for Real-Time Orientation Determination System Using Low-Cost MEMS Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Yuan, Xuebing; Liu, Sheng

    2016-02-20

    To provide a long-time reliable orientation, sensor fusion technologies are widely used to integrate available inertial sensors for the low-cost orientation estimation. In this paper, a novel dual-linear Kalman filter was designed for a multi-sensor system integrating MEMS gyros, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer. The proposed filter precludes the impacts of magnetic disturbances on the pitch and roll which the heading is subjected to. The filter can achieve robust orientation estimation for different statistical models of the sensors. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the estimated attitude angles are reduced by 30.6% under magnetic disturbances. Owing to the reduction of system complexity achieved by smaller matrix operations, the mean total time consumption is reduced by 23.8%. Meanwhile, the separated filter offers greater flexibility for the system configuration, as it is possible to switch on or off the second stage filter to include or exclude the magnetometer compensation for the heading. Online experiments were performed on the homemade miniature orientation determination system (MODS) with the turntable. The average RMSE of estimated orientation are less than 0.4° and 1° during the static and low-dynamic tests, respectively. More realistic tests on two-wheel self-balancing vehicle driving and indoor pedestrian walking were carried out to evaluate the performance of the designed MODS when high accelerations and angular rates were introduced. Test results demonstrate that the MODS is applicable for the orientation estimation under various dynamic conditions. This paper provides a feasible alternative for low-cost orientation determination.

  6. A Dual-Linear Kalman Filter for Real-Time Orientation Determination System Using Low-Cost MEMS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengzhi; Yu, Shuai; Liu, Chaojun; Yuan, Xuebing; Liu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To provide a long-time reliable orientation, sensor fusion technologies are widely used to integrate available inertial sensors for the low-cost orientation estimation. In this paper, a novel dual-linear Kalman filter was designed for a multi-sensor system integrating MEMS gyros, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer. The proposed filter precludes the impacts of magnetic disturbances on the pitch and roll which the heading is subjected to. The filter can achieve robust orientation estimation for different statistical models of the sensors. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of the estimated attitude angles are reduced by 30.6% under magnetic disturbances. Owing to the reduction of system complexity achieved by smaller matrix operations, the mean total time consumption is reduced by 23.8%. Meanwhile, the separated filter offers greater flexibility for the system configuration, as it is possible to switch on or off the second stage filter to include or exclude the magnetometer compensation for the heading. Online experiments were performed on the homemade miniature orientation determination system (MODS) with the turntable. The average RMSE of estimated orientation are less than 0.4° and 1° during the static and low-dynamic tests, respectively. More realistic tests on two-wheel self-balancing vehicle driving and indoor pedestrian walking were carried out to evaluate the performance of the designed MODS when high accelerations and angular rates were introduced. Test results demonstrate that the MODS is applicable for the orientation estimation under various dynamic conditions. This paper provides a feasible alternative for low-cost orientation determination. PMID:26907294

  7. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.; Kumar, Suraj

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  8. Estimate Low and High Order Wavefront Using P1640 Calibrator Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhai, C.; Vasisht, G.; Shao, M.; Lockhart, T.; Cady, E.; Oppenheimer, B.; Burruss, R.; Roberts, J.; Beichman, C.; Brenner, D.; Crepp, J.; Dekany, R.; Hillenbrand, L.; Hinkley, S.; Parry, I.; Pueyo, L.; Rice, E.; Roberts, L. C. Jr.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.; Tang, H.; Vescelus, F.; Wallace, K.; Zimmerman, N.

    2013-01-01

    P1640 high contrast imaging system on the Palomar 200 inch Telescope consists of an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics (P3K-AO), and P1640 Calibrator (CAL). Science images are recorded by an integral field spectrograph covering J-H bands for detecting and characterizing stellar companions. With aberrations from atmosphere corrected by the P3K-AO, instrument performance is limited mainly by the quasi-static speckles due to noncommon path wavefront aberrations for the light to propagate to the P3K-AO wavefront sensor and to the coronagraph mask. The non-common path wavefront aberrations are sensed by CAL, which measures the post-coronagraph E-field using interferometry, and can be effectively corrected by offsetting the P3K-AO deformable mirror target position accordingly. Previously, we have demonstrated using CAL measurements to correct high order wavefront aberrations, which is directly connected to the static speckles in the image plane. Low order wavefront, on the other hand, usually of larger amplitudes, causes light to leak through the coronagraph making the whole image plane brighter. Knowledge error in low order wavefront aberrations can also affect the estimation of the high order wavefront. Even though, CAL is designed to sense efficiently high order wavefront aberrations, the low order wavefront front can be inferred with less sensitivity. Here, we describe our method for estimating both low and high order wavefront aberrations using CAL measurements by propagating the post-coronagraph E-field to a pupil before the coronagraph. We present the results from applying this method to both simulated and experiment data.

  9. Parallel Implementation of a Frozen Flow Based Wavefront Reconstructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, J.; Kelly, K.

    2013-09-01

    Obtaining high resolution images of space objects from ground based telescopes is challenging, often requiring the use of a multi-frame blind deconvolution (MFBD) algorithm to remove blur caused by atmospheric turbulence. In order for an MFBD algorithm to be effective, it is necessary to obtain a good initial estimate of the wavefront phase. Although wavefront sensors work well in low turbulence situations, they are less effective in high turbulence, such as when imaging in daylight, or when imaging objects that are close to the Earth's horizon. One promising approach, which has been shown to work very well in high turbulence settings, uses a frozen flow assumption on the atmosphere to capture the inherent temporal correlations present in consecutive frames of wavefront data. Exploiting these correlations can lead to more accurate estimation of the wavefront phase, and the associated PSF, which leads to more effective MFBD algorithms. However, with the current serial implementation, the approach can be prohibitively expensive in situations when it is necessary to use a large number of frames. In this poster we describe a parallel implementation that overcomes this constraint. The parallel implementation exploits sparse matrix computations, and uses the Trilinos package developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Trilinos provides a variety of core mathematical software for parallel architectures that have been designed using high quality software engineering practices, The package is open source, and portable to a variety of high-performance computing architectures.

  10. The simulation of turbulence effect based on the technology of optical wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongming; Fei, Jindong; Du, Huijie; Yu, Hong; Du, Jian; Hu, Xinqi; Dong, Bing

    2013-09-01

    In the process of high-resolution astronomical observation and space optical mapping, the wavefront aberrations caused by atmosphere turbulence effect lead to reduced resolution of optical imaging sensor. Firstly, on the base of influence of atmosphere turbulence effect for the optical observation system, this paper investigates and analyses the development and technical characteristics of deformable mirror, which is the key device of optical wavefront control technology. In this part, the paper describes the basic principles of wavefront control and measurement using the current production line of deformable mirror, including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror which is one of the most promising technology for wavefront modulation and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Secondly, a new method based on the technology of optical wavefront control and the data of optical path difference (OPD) for simulating the effect of optical transmission induced by turbulence is presented in this paper. The modeling and characteristics of atmosphere turbulence effect applied for optical imagery detector of astronomical observation and space optical mapping has been obtained. Finally, based on the theory model of atmosphere turbulence effects and digital simulation results, a preliminary experiment was done and the results verify the feasibility of the new method. The OPD data corresponding to optical propagation effect through turbulent atmosphere can be achieved by the calculation based on the method of ray-tracing and principle of physical optics. It is a common practice to decompose aberrated wavefronts in series over the Zernike polynomials. These data will be applied to the drive and control of the deformable mirror. This kind of simulation method can be applied to simulate the optical distortions effect, such as the dithering and excursion of light spot, in the space based earth observation with the influence of turbulent atmosphere. With the help of the

  11. Wavefront Sensing via High Speed DSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Future light-weighted and segmented primary mirror systems require active optical control to maintain mirror positioning and figure to within nanometer tolerances. Current image-based wavefront sensing approaches rely on post-processing techniques to return an estimate of the aberrated optical wavefront with accuracies to the nanometer level. But the lag times between wavefront sensing, and then control, contributes to a significant latency in the wavefront sensing implementation. In this analysis we demonstrate accelerated image-based wavefront sensing performance using multiple digital signal processors (DSP's). The computational architecture is discussed as well as the heritage leading to the approach.

  12. Retrieve Ocean Bottom and Downhole Seismic sensors orientation using integrated low cost gyroscope and direct rotation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    To reduce the background noise level, seismic sensors are often installed in downhole. During the installation, it is not possible to determine exactly what the sensors has rotated in the horizontal plane before reaching the bottom. To monitoring the seismic activity occurred in offshore areas, Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) are often deployed in the area to be studied. During the OBS descent phase along the seawater column the sensor can undergo to significant rotations in the horizontal plane. Therefore, both for seismic sensors installed in downhole or on ocean bottom, the absolute orientation of the horizontal components are unknown. Clearly, this serious problem can be limits data analysis and interpretation. The absolute orientation of horizontal components are critical for many modern seismic analysis techniques such as receiver functions, body- and surface-wave polarization analysis, studies of anisotropy, and surface wave dispersion curves estimations. The techniques proposed to retrieve the correct sensor horizontal components orientations use different approaches (polarization analysis, cross-correlation measurements, synthetic seismograms fitting), different data set (shots, earthquakes, seismic noise) and different portion of the seismic wave-field (P or S wave arrival times, Rayleigh waves, full waveforms), but are all based on the post-processing of the acquired data. All these methods are not error-free and not always applicable. Method based on active source are not applicable in passive OBS monitoring campaigns. The method based on synthetic waveforms are strong dependent on accuracy of the source parameters estimation and are generally computationally intensive. The method based on polarization analysis are clearly strong dependent on the quality of the data in term of number of seismic events recorded, azimuthal coverage and signal to noise ratio. The methods base on events or noise cross-correlation can be applicable only if an array of sensor

  13. Fast iterative optimal estimation of turbulence wavefronts with recursive block Toeplitz covariance matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Rodolphe

    2014-07-01

    The estimation of a corrugated wavefront after propagation through the atmosphere is usually solved optimally with a Minimum-Mean-Square-Error algorithm. The derivation of the optimal wavefront can be a very computing intensive task especially for large Adaptive Optics (AO) systems that operates in real-time. For the largest AO systems, efficient optimal wavefront reconstructor have been proposed either using sparse matrix techniques or relying on the fractal properties of the atmospheric wavefront. We propose a new method that exploits the Toeplitz structure in the covariance matrix of the wavefront gradient. The algorithm is particularly well-suited to Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based AO systems. Thanks to the Toeplitz structure of the covariance, the matrices are compressed up to a thousand-fold and the matrix-to-vector product is reduced to a simple one-dimension convolution product. The optimal wavefront is estimated iteratively with the MINRES algorithm which exhibits better convergence properties for ill-conditioned matrices than the commonly used Conjugate Gradient algorithm. The paper describes, in a first part, the Toeplitz structure of the covariance matrices and shows how to compute the matrix-to-vector product using only the compressed version of the matrices. In a second part, we introduced the MINRES iterative solver and shows how it performs compared to the Conjugate Gradient algorithm for different AO systems.

  14. Human Arm Motion Tracking by Orientation-Based Fusion of Inertial Sensors and Kinect Using Unscented Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Atrsaei, Arash; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2016-09-01

    Due to various applications of human motion capture techniques, developing low-cost methods that would be applicable in nonlaboratory environments is under consideration. MEMS inertial sensors and Kinect are two low-cost devices that can be utilized in home-based motion capture systems, e.g., home-based rehabilitation. In this work, an unscented Kalman filter approach was developed based on the complementary properties of Kinect and the inertial sensors to fuse the orientation data of these two devices for human arm motion tracking during both stationary shoulder joint position and human body movement. A new measurement model of the fusion algorithm was obtained that can compensate for the inertial sensors drift problem in high dynamic motions and also joints occlusion in Kinect. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by an optical motion tracker system. The errors were reduced by almost 50% compared to cases when either inertial sensor or Kinect measurements were utilized.

  15. Applicability of New Approaches of Sensor Orientation to Micro Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-06-01

    This study highlights the benefits of precise aerial position and attitude control in the context of mapping with Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs). Accurate mapping with MAVs is gaining importance in applications such as corridor mapping, road and pipeline inspections or mapping of large areas with homogeneous surface structure, e.g. forests or agricultural fields. There, accurate aerial control plays a major role in successful terrain reconstruction and artifact-free ortophoto generation. The presented experiments focus on new approaches of aerial control. We confirm practically that the relative aerial position and attitude control can improve accuracy in difficult mapping scenarios. Indeed, the relative orientation method represents an attractive alternative in the context of MAVs for two reasons. First, the procedure is somewhat simplified, e.g. the angular misalignment, so called boresight, between the camera and the inertial measurement unit (IMU) does not have to be determined and, second, the effect of possible systematic errors in satellite positioning (e.g. due to multipath and/or incorrect recovery of differential carrier-phase ambiguities) is mitigated. First, we present a typical mapping project over an agricultural field and second, we perform a corridor road mapping. We evaluate the proposed methods in scenarios with and without automated image observations. We investigate a recently proposed concept where adjustment is performed using image observations limited to ground control and check points, so called fast aerial triangulation (Fast AT). In this context we show that accurate aerial control (absolute or relative) together with a few image observations can deliver accurate results comparable to classical aerial triangulation with thousands of image measurements. This procedure in turns reduces the demands on processing time and the requirements on the existence of surface texture. Finally, we compare the above mentioned procedures with direct sensor

  16. Low order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Bartos, Randall; Hein, Randall; Kern, Brian; Krist, John; Lam, Raymond; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, Kent; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Dan

    2015-09-01

    To maintain the required WFIRST Coronagraph starlight suppression performance in a realistic space environment, a low order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as the low order wavefront errors due to changes in thermal loading on the telescope and the rest of the observatory. In this paper we will present an overview of the low order wavefront sensing and control subsystem for the WFIRST Coronagraph. We will describe LOWFS/C's Zernike wavefront sensor concept and control design, and present an overview of sensing performance analysis and modeling, predicted line-of-sight jitter suppression loop performance, as well as the low order wavefront error correction with the coronagraph's deformable mirror. We will also report the LOWFS/C testbed design and the preliminary in-air test results, which show promising performance of the Zernike wavefront sensor and FSM feedback loop.

  17. Wavefront Imaging in Fractured Transversely-Isotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures in the Earth's crust are a source of stress-dependent mechanical anisotropy that affect seismic wave attenuation and velocity. While many theoretical and experimental studies have investigated seismic wave propagation in single or multi- fractured isotropic rocks, few studies have examined the seismic response of a fractured anisotropic medium. Fractures and layering each contribute to the mechanical anisotropy of the crust. The coexistence of these two sources of anisotropy complicates the interpretation of the seismic properties of crustal rock. In this study, laboratory wavefront imaging was performed to capture the seismic response of layered media containing multiple parallel fractures. We determined that whether the observed anisotropy is dominated by the matrix anisotropy or by the fracture orientation depends on the applied stress and that late-arriving guided-modes provide information on the orientation of the fractures. Four cubic garolite samples (~102 mm on edge) each containing 5 parallel fractures were used in this study. The fractures were oriented normal, parallel or at acute angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees) to the layering. The fracture and layer spacing were approximately 10mm and 0.5mm, respectively. An intact sample containing no fractures was used as a standard orthorhombic medium for reference. Stress was applied to the samples with a servo-controlled loading machine. Two spherically-focused water-coupled transducers (central frequency 1MHz) were used; one as a fixed-source and the other as a translating receiver. Each sample was scanned over a 60mm×60mm region in 1 mm increments to map out the arriving wavefront (i.e. 3600 signals were recorded) as a function of time. The measured wavefront in the intact reference sample (which contained no fractures) was elliptical with the major axis parallel to the layers as expected and was stress-independent. When the fracture samples were subjected to low stress (<4 MPa), the observed seismic

  18. A reagentless DNA-based electrochemical silver(I) sensor for real time detection of Ag(I) - the effect of probe sequence and orientation on sensor response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2016-06-01

    Ag(I) is known to interact with cytosine (C) via the formation C-Ag(I)-C complexes. The authors have utilized this concept to design six electrochemical Ag(I) sensors using C-rich DNA probes. Alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry were used to analyze the sensors. The results show that the dual-probe sensors that require the use of both 5'- and 3'-thiolated DNA probes are not suitable for this application, the differences in probe orientation impedes formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes. Sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both thymine (T) and C, independent of the location of the alkanethiol linker, do not response to Ag(I) either; T-T mismatches destabilize the duplex even in the presence of Ag(I). However, sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both adenine (A) and C are ideal for this application, owing to the formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes, as well as other lesser known interactions between A and Ag(I). Both sensors are sensitive, specific and selective enough to be used in 50% human saliva. They can also be used to detect silver sulfadiazine, a commonly prescribed antimicrobial drug. With further optimization, this sensing strategy may offer a promising approach for detection of Ag(I) in environmental and clinical samples.

  19. Variable-State-Dimension Kalman-Based Filter for Orientation Determination Using Inertial and Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a quaternion-based Variable-State-Dimension Extended Kalman Filter (VSD-EKF) is developed for estimating the three-dimensional orientation of a rigid body using the measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) integrated with a triaxial magnetic sensor. Gyro bias and magnetic disturbances are modeled and compensated by including them in the filter state vector. The VSD-EKF switches between a quiescent EKF, where the magnetic disturbance is modeled as a first-order Gauss-Markov stochastic process (GM-1), and a higher-order EKF where extra state components are introduced to model the time-rate of change of the magnetic field as a GM-1 stochastic process, namely the magnetic disturbance is modeled as a second-order Gauss-Markov stochastic process (GM-2). Experimental validation tests show the effectiveness of the VSD-EKF, as compared to either the quiescent EKF or the higher-order EKF when they run separately. PMID:23012502

  20. Kalman-Filter-Based Orientation Determination Using Inertial/Magnetic Sensors: Observability Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a quaternion-based Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the three-dimensional orientation of a rigid body. The EKF exploits the measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that is integrated with a tri-axial magnetic sensor. Magnetic disturbances and gyro bias errors are modeled and compensated by including them in the filter state vector. We employ the observability rank criterion based on Lie derivatives to verify the conditions under which the nonlinear system that describes the process of motion tracking by the IMU is observable, namely it may provide sufficient information for performing the estimation task with bounded estimation errors. The observability conditions are that the magnetic field, perturbed by first-order Gauss-Markov magnetic variations, and the gravity vector are not collinear and that the IMU is subject to some angular motions. Computer simulations and experimental testing are presented to evaluate the algorithm performance, including when the observability conditions are critical. PMID:22163689

  1. Revisiting static modulation in pyramid wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Vassallo, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Pyramid Sensor (PS) is based on the Focault knife-edge test, yielding then, in geometrical approximation, only the sign of the wavefront slope. To provide linear measurements of the wavefront slopes the PS relies on a technique known as modulation, which also plays a central role to improve the linear range of the pyramid WFS, very small in the nonmodulated case. In the main PS using modulation so far, this task is achieved by moving optical components in the WFS, increasing the complexity of the system. An attractive idea to simplify the optical and mechanical design of a pyramid WFS is to work without any dynamic modulation. This concept was only merely described and functionally tested in the framework of MAD, and subsequently, with a holographic diffuser. The latter produce a sort of random distribution of the light coming out from the pupil plane, leading to sort of inefficient modulation, as most of the rays are focused in the central region of the light diffused by such device. The bi-dimensional original grating is, in contrast, producing a well defined deterministic distribution of the light onto a specifically shaped pattern. A crude option has been already discussed as a possibility, and it is here generalized to holographic plates leading to various distribution of lights, including a circle whose diameter would match the required modulation pattern, or more cost effective approaches like the one of a square pattern. These holographic diffusers would exhibit also zero-th and high order patterns and the actual size of the equivalent modulation would be linearly wavelength dependent, leading to colour effects that requires a careful handling in order to properly choose the right amount of equivalent modulation.

  2. Improving wavefront sensing with a Shack-Hartmann device.

    PubMed

    Rais, Martin; Morel, Jean-Michel; Thiebaut, Carole; Delvit, Jean-Marc; Facciolo, Gabriele

    2016-10-01

    To achieve higher resolutions, current earth observation satellites use larger, lightweight primary mirrors that can deform over time, affecting the image quality. To overcome this problem, we evaluated the possibility of combining a deformable mirror with a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor (SHWFS) directly in the satellite. The SHWFS's performance depends entirely on the accuracy of the shift estimation algorithm employed, which should be computationally cheap to execute onboard. We analyzed the problem of fast, accurate shift estimation in this context and have proposed a new algorithm, based on a global optical flow method that estimates the shifts in linear time. Based on our experiments, we believe our method has proven to be more accurate and stable, as well as less sensitive to noise, than all current state-of-the-art methods, permitting a more precise onboard wavefront estimation.

  3. Novel technology for reducing wavefront image processing latency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, David; Schwartz, Noah; Vick, Andy; Coughlan, John; Halsall, Rob; Basden, Alastair; Dipper, Nigel

    2016-07-01

    Adaptive optics is essential for the successful operation of the future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). At the heart of these AO system lies the real-time control which has become computationally challenging. A majority of the previous efforts has been aimed at reducing the wavefront reconstruction latency by using many-core hardware accelerators such as Xeon Phis and GPUs. These modern hardware solutions offer a large numbers of cores combined with high memory bandwidths but have restrictive input/output (I/O). The lack of efficient I/O capability makes the data handling very inefficient and adds both to the overall latency and jitter. For example a single wavefront sensor for an ELT scale adaptive optics system can produce hundreds of millions of pixels per second that need to be processed. Passing all this data through a CPU and into GPUs or Xeon Phis, even by reducing memory copies by using systems such as GPUDirect, is highly inefficient. The Mellanox TILE series is a novel technology offering a high number of cores and multiple 10 Gbps Ethernet ports. We present results of the TILE-Gx36 as a front-end wavefront sensor processing unit. In doing so we are able to greatly reduce the amount of data needed to be transferred to the wavefront reconstruction hardware. We show that the performance of the Mellanox TILE-GX36 is in-line with typical requirements, in terms of mean calculation time and acceptable jitter, for E-ELT first-light instruments and that the Mellanox TILE series is a serious contender for all E-ELT instruments.

  4. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  5. The Wave-Front Correction System for the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Soltau, D.; Bell, A.; Doerr, H. P.; Feger, B.; Friedlein, R.; Gerber, K.; Heidecke, F.; Kentischer, T.; v. D. Lühe, O.; Sigwarth, M.; Wälde, E.; Barthol, P.; Deutsch, W.; Gandorfer, A.; Germerott, D.; Grauf, B.; Meller, R.; Álvarez-Herrero, A.; Knölker, M.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; Title, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the wave-front correction system developed for the Sunrise balloon telescope, and it provides information about its in-flight performance. For the correction of low-order aberrations, a Correlating Wave-Front Sensor (CWS) was used. It consisted of a six-element Shack - Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS), a fast tip-tilt mirror for the compensation of image motion, and an active telescope secondary mirror for focus correction. The CWS delivered a stabilized image with a precision of 0.04 arcsec (rms), whenever the coarse pointing was better than ± 45 arcsec peak-to-peak. The automatic focus adjustment maintained a focus stability of 0.01 waves in the focal plane of the CWS. During the 5.5 day flight, good image quality and stability were achieved during 33 hours, containing 45 sequences, which lasted between 10 and 45 min.

  6. FOCAL PLANE WAVEFRONT SENSING USING RESIDUAL ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECKLES

    SciTech Connect

    Codona, Johanan L.; Kenworthy, Matthew

    2013-04-20

    Optical imperfections, misalignments, aberrations, and even dust can significantly limit sensitivity in high-contrast imaging systems such as coronagraphs. An upstream deformable mirror (DM) in the pupil can be used to correct or compensate for these flaws, either to enhance the Strehl ratio or suppress the residual coronagraphic halo. Measurement of the phase and amplitude of the starlight halo at the science camera is essential for determining the DM shape that compensates for any non-common-path (NCP) wavefront errors. Using DM displacement ripples to create a series of probe and anti-halo speckles in the focal plane has been proposed for space-based coronagraphs and successfully demonstrated in the lab. We present the theory and first on-sky demonstration of a technique to measure the complex halo using the rapidly changing residual atmospheric speckles at the 6.5 m MMT telescope using the Clio mid-IR camera. The AO system's wavefront sensor measurements are used to estimate the residual wavefront, allowing us to approximately compute the rapidly evolving phase and amplitude of speckle halo. When combined with relatively short, synchronized science camera images, the complex speckle estimates can be used to interferometrically analyze the images, leading to an estimate of the static diffraction halo with NCP effects included. In an operational system, this information could be collected continuously and used to iteratively correct quasi-static NCP errors or suppress imperfect coronagraphic halos.

  7. Common-Path Wavefront Sensing for Advanced Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of faint companions around nearby stars is not limited by either intrinsic resolution of a coronagraph/telescope system, nor is it strictly photon limited. Typically, it is both the magnitude and temporal variation of small phase and amplitude errors imparted to the electric field by elements in the optical system which will limit ultimate performance. Adaptive optics systems, particularly those with multiple deformable mirrors, can remove these errors, but they need to be sensed in the final image plane. If the sensing system is before the final image plane, which is typical for most systems, then the non-common path optics between the wavefront sensor and science image plane will lead to un-sensed errors. However, a new generation of high-performance coronagraphs naturally lend themselves to wavefront sensing in the final image plane. These coronagraphs and the wavefront sensing will be discussed, as well as plans for demonstrating this with a high-contrast system on the ground. Such a system will be a key system-level proof for a future space-based coronagraph mission, which will also be discussed.

  8. GITEWS, an extensible and open integration platform for manifold sensor systems and processing components based on Sensor Web Enablement and the principles of Service Oriented Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haener, Rainer; Waechter, Joachim; Fleischer, Jens; Herrnkind, Stefan; Schwarting, Herrmann

    2010-05-01

    The German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) is a multifaceted system consisting of various sensor types like seismometers, sea level sensors or GPS stations, and processing components, all with their own system behavior and proprietary data structure. To operate a warning chain, beginning from measurements scaling up to warning products, all components have to interact in a correct way, both syntactically and semantically. Designing the system great emphasis was laid on conformity to the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) specification by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The technical infrastructure, the so called Tsunami Service Bus (TSB) follows the blueprint of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA). The TSB is an integration concept (SWE) where functionality (observe, task, notify, alert, and process) is grouped around business processes (Monitoring, Decision Support, Sensor Management) and packaged as interoperable services (SAS, SOS, SPS, WNS). The benefits of using a flexible architecture together with SWE lead to an open integration platform: • accessing and controlling heterogeneous sensors in a uniform way (Functional Integration) • assigns functionality to distinct services (Separation of Concerns) • allows resilient relationship between systems (Loose Coupling) • integrates services so that they can be accessed from everywhere (Location Transparency) • enables infrastructures which integrate heterogeneous applications (Encapsulation) • allows combination of services (Orchestration) and data exchange within business processes Warning systems will evolve over time: New sensor types might be added, old sensors will be replaced and processing components will be improved. From a collection of few basic services it shall be possible to compose more complex functionality essential for specific warning systems. Given these requirements a flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite for sustainable systems and their architecture must be

  9. An Artificial Neural Network Embedded Position and Orientation Determination Algorithm for Low Cost MEMS INS/GPS Integrated Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Chang, Hsiu-Wen; Li, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Yun-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Digital mobile mapping, which integrates digital imaging with direct geo-referencing, has developed rapidly over the past fifteen years. Direct geo-referencing is the determination of the time-variable position and orientation parameters for a mobile digital imager. The most common technologies used for this purpose today are satellite positioning using Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). They are usually integrated in such a way that the GPS receiver is the main position sensor, while the IMU is the main orientation sensor. The Kalman Filter (KF) is considered as the optimal estimation tool for real-time INS/GPS integrated kinematic position and orientation determination. An intelligent hybrid scheme consisting of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and KF has been proposed to overcome the limitations of KF and to improve the performance of the INS/GPS integrated system in previous studies. However, the accuracy requirements of general mobile mapping applications can’t be achieved easily, even by the use of the ANN-KF scheme. Therefore, this study proposes an intelligent position and orientation determination scheme that embeds ANN with conventional Rauch-Tung-Striebel (RTS) smoother to improve the overall accuracy of a MEMS INS/GPS integrated system in post-mission mode. By combining the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) INS/GPS integrated system and the intelligent ANN-RTS smoother scheme proposed in this study, a cheaper but still reasonably accurate position and orientation determination scheme can be anticipated. PMID:22574034

  10. Huygens-Fresnel wavefront tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Létourneau, P.-D.; Zhao, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present initial results from a novel numerical method describing wave propagation in slowly non-uniform media. Following Huygens-Fresnel's principle, we model the wavefront as an array of point sources that emit wavelets, which interfere. We then identify a set of new points where the electric field has equal phase. In fact, without losing generality, we find zeros of the electric field, by means of the bisection method. This obviously corresponds to a specific phase-advance, but is easily generalized, e.g. by phase-shifting all sources. The points found form the new wavefront, then the process is reiterated. One of the advantages of the method is that it includes diffraction. Two examples provided are diffraction around an obstacle and the finite waist of a focused Gaussian beam. Refraction is also successfully modeled, both in slowly-varying media as well as in the presence of discontinuities. The calculations were performed in two dimensions, but can be easily extended to three dimensions. We also discuss the extension to anisotropic, birefringent, absorbing media.

  11. Sensing wavefronts on resolved sources with pyramids on ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, Markus; Hippler, Stefan; Obereder, Andreas; Stuik, Remko; Bertram, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS) have been agreed to provide a superior faint-end performance with respect to Shack-Hartmann systems (SHS) quite some time ago. However, much of the advantage relies on the fact that PWFSs exploit the full resolution limit of the telescope. ELTs will thus confront PWFSs with an unprecedented number of resolved targets. To analyze the behavior of PWFS on extended targets in detail observationally is difficult. We will present the result of simulations representing the Single-Conjugated Adaptive Optics (SCAO) system of METIS on the European ELT (E-ELT).

  12. Layer-oriented adaptive optics for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2012-08-10

    First multiconjugate adaptive-optical (MCAO) systems are currently being installed on solar telescopes. The aim of these systems is to increase the corrected field of view with respect to conventional adaptive optics. However, this first generation is based on a star-oriented approach, and it is then difficult to increase the size of the field of view beyond 60-80 arc sec in diameter. We propose to implement the layer-oriented approach in solar MCAO systems by use of wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors conjugated to the strongest turbulent layers. The wavefront distortions are averaged over a wide field: the signal from distant turbulence is attenuated and the tomographic reconstruction is thus done optically. The system consists of independent correction loops, which only need to account for local turbulence: the subapertures can be enlarged and the correction frequency reduced. Most importantly, a star-oriented MCAO system becomes more complex with increasing field size, while the layer-oriented approach benefits from larger fields and will therefore be an attractive solution for the future generation of solar MCAO systems.

  13. A chipless sensor tag-based RFID technology for cyber-oriented environmental sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sudhir; Agarwal, Mangilal; Phoha, Vir V.; Varahramyan, Kody

    2009-05-01

    A chipless sensor tag-based radio frequency identification (RFID) technology that allows wireless collection of information from the environment, and the monitoring and accessing of the given information through cyberspace is presented. The developed system consists of a cyber enabled RFID reader and passive chipless RFID sensor tags. The reader is comprised of an analog part that wirelessly communicates with the sensor tags, and a single board computer (SBC) part. Each passive chipless sensor tag consists of a microstrip antenna and a sensor. The sensor information is amplitude modulated in the backscattered signal of the tag. The analog reader part receives the backscattered signal and feeds it to the SBC, which computes the sensor information into a 96 bit serialized global trade item number (SGTIN-96) electronic product code (EPC). Moreover, the SBC makes the information available on a cyberspace-accessible secure user interface. The reported system has been applied for temperature sensing, where the change in temperature at the tag ranging from 27°C to 140°C resulted in a 28% amplitude change at the analog part of the reader. The temperature at the tag has been monitored by accessing the reader through cyberspace using a web-based user interfaces developed for the SBC.

  14. Wavefront Analysis of Nonlinear Self-Amplified Spontaneous-Emission Free-Electron Laser Harmonics in the Single-Shot Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelard, R.; Chubar, O.; Mercere, P.; Idir, M.; Couprie, M.E.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Kimura, H.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Nagasono, M.; Hara, T. and Ishikawa, T.

    2011-06-08

    The single-shot spatial characteristics of the vacuum ultraviolet self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free electron laser (FEL) is measured at different stages of amplification up to saturation with a Hartmann wavefront sensor. We show that the fundamental radiation at 61.5 nm tends towards a single-mode behavior as getting closer to saturation. The measurements are found in good agreement with simulations and theory. A near diffraction limited wavefront was measured. The analysis of Fresnel diffraction through the Hartmann wavefront sensor hole array also provides some further insight for the evaluation of the FEL transverse coherence, of high importance for various applications.

  15. Probing molecular pathways for DNA orientational trapping, unzipping and translocation in nanopores by using a tunable overhang sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Kai; Hunter, Lehr L.; Ritzo, Brandon; Gu, Li-Qun

    2014-09-01

    Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection.Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03195d

  16. Adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscopy with direct wavefront sensing for brain tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Chen, Diana C.; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi; Kubby, Joel

    2011-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in deep tissue imaging for the study of neurons. Unfortunately, because of the inhomogeneous refractive index of the tissue, the aberrations degrade the resolution and brightness of the final image. In this paper, we describe an adaptive optics confocal fluorescence microscope (AOCFM) which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a point source reference beacon and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor (SHWS). Mouse brain tissues with different thicknesses are tested. After correction, both the signal intensity and contrast of the image are improved.

  17. Static wavefront correction by Linnik interferometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artzner, G.

    1989-04-01

    The author considers optical systems with residual peak to valley wavefront errors below 150 nm. The interference figure for λ = 633 nm may then be adjusted and photographed as to hold out at every point of the image of the pupil a one to one relationship between the optical density of the interferogram and the magnitude of the wavefront error. An enduring interference figure is secured by means of a tiny reflecting aluminized spot on a bare substrate located on the image of a distant point source. The author investigates how subsequent photoreproduction of an interferogram upon a photoresist coating may act as a transmitting or reflecting wavefront corrector.

  18. Adaptive wavefront correction in two-photon microscopy using coherence-gated wavefront sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rueckel, Markus; Mack-Bucher, Julia A.; Denk, Winfried

    2006-01-01

    The image quality of a two-photon microscope is often degraded by wavefront aberrations induced by the specimen. We demonstrate here that resolution and signal size in two-photon microcopy can be substantially improved, even in living biological specimens, by adaptive wavefront correction based on sensing the wavefront of coherence-gated backscattered light (coherence-gated wavefront sensing, CGWS) and wavefront control by a deformable mirror. A nearly diffraction-limited focus can be restored even for strong aberrations. CGWS-based wavefront correction should be applicable to samples with a wide range of scattering properties and it should be possible to perform real-time pixel-by-pixel correction even at fast scan speeds. PMID:17088565

  19. Digital holography wavefront sensing in the pupil-plane recording geometry for distributed-volume atmospheric aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banet, Matthias T.; Spencer, Mark F.; Raynor, Robert A.; Marker, Dan K.

    2016-09-01

    Digital holography in the pupil-plane recording geometry shows promise as a wavefront sensor for use in adaptive-optics systems. Because current wavefront sensors suffer from decreased performance in the presence of turbulence and thermal blooming, there is a need for a more robust wavefront sensor in such distributed-volume atmospheric conditions. Digital holography fulfills this roll by accurately estimating the wrapped phase of the complex optical field after propagation through the atmosphere to the pupil plane of an optical system. This paper examines wave-optics simulations of spherical-wave propagation through both turbulence and thermal blooming; it also quantifies the performance of digital holography as a wavefront sensor by generating field-estimated Strehl ratios as a function of the number of pixels in the detector array, the Rytov number, and the Fried coherence diameter. Altogether the results indicate that digital holography wavefront sensing in the pupil-plane recording geometry is a valid and accurate method for estimating the wrapped phase of the complex optical field in the presence of distributed-volume atmospheric aberrations.

  20. Wavefront sensing and adaptive control in phased array of fiber collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.

    2011-03-01

    A new wavefront control approach for mitigation of atmospheric turbulence-induced wavefront phase aberrations in coherent fiber-array-based laser beam projection systems is introduced and analyzed. This approach is based on integration of wavefront sensing capabilities directly into the fiber-array transmitter aperture. In the coherent fiber array considered, we assume that each fiber collimator (subaperture) of the array is capable of precompensation of local (onsubaperture) wavefront phase tip and tilt aberrations using controllable rapid displacement of the tip of the delivery fiber at the collimating lens focal plane. In the technique proposed, this tip and tilt phase aberration control is based on maximization of the optical power received through the same fiber collimator using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) technique. The coordinates of the fiber tip after the local tip and tilt aberrations are mitigated correspond to the coordinates of the focal-spot centroid of the optical wave backscattered off the target. Similar to a conventional Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, phase function over the entire fiber-array aperture can then be retrieved using the coordinates obtained. The piston phases that are required for coherent combining (phase locking) of the outgoing beams at the target plane can be further calculated from the reconstructed wavefront phase. Results of analysis and numerical simulations are presented. Performance of adaptive precompensation of phase aberrations in this laser beam projection system type is compared for various system configurations characterized by the number of fiber collimators and atmospheric turbulence conditions. The wavefront control concept presented can be effectively applied for long-range laser beam projection scenarios for which the time delay related with the double-pass laser beam propagation to the target and back is compared or even exceeds the characteristic time of the atmospheric turbulence change

  1. Combining physiological, environmental and locational sensors for citizen-oriented health applications.

    PubMed

    Huck, J J; Whyatt, J D; Coulton, P; Davison, B; Gradinar, A

    2017-03-01

    This work investigates the potential of combining the outputs of multiple low-cost sensor technologies for the direct measurement of spatio-temporal variations in phenomena that exist at the interface between our bodies and the environment. The example used herein is the measurement of personal exposure to traffic pollution, which may be considered as a function of the concentration of pollutants in the air and the frequency and volume of that air which enters our lungs. The sensor-based approach described in this paper removes the 'traditional' requirements either to model or interpolate pollution levels or to make assumptions about the physiology of an individual. Rather, a wholly empirical analysis into pollution exposure is possible, based upon high-resolution spatio-temporal data drawn from sensors for NO2, nasal airflow and location (GPS). Data are collected via a custom smartphone application and mapped to give an unprecedented insight into exposure to traffic pollution at the individual level. Whilst the quality of data from low-cost miniaturised sensors is not suitable for all applications, there certainly are many applications for which these data would be well suited, particularly those in the field of citizen science. This paper demonstrates both the potential and limitations of sensor-based approaches and discusses the wider relevance of these technologies for the advancement of citizen science.

  2. On distributed wavefront reconstruction for large-scale adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Cornelis C; Brunner, Elisabeth; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The distributed-spline-based aberration reconstruction (D-SABRE) method is proposed for distributed wavefront reconstruction with applications to large-scale adaptive optics systems. D-SABRE decomposes the wavefront sensor domain into any number of partitions and solves a local wavefront reconstruction problem on each partition using multivariate splines. D-SABRE accuracy is within 1% of a global approach with a speedup that scales quadratically with the number of partitions. The D-SABRE is compared to the distributed cumulative reconstruction (CuRe-D) method in open-loop and closed-loop simulations using the YAO adaptive optics simulation tool. D-SABRE accuracy exceeds CuRe-D for low levels of decomposition, and D-SABRE proved to be more robust to variations in the loop gain.

  3. Generation of acoustic helical wavefronts using metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that acoustic waves with helical wavefronts can carry angular momentum, which can be transmitted towards a propagating medium. Such a wave field can be achieved by using a planar array of electroacoustic transducers, forming a given spatial distribution of phased sound sources which produce the desired helical wavefronts. Here, we introduce a technique to generate acoustic vortices, based on the passive acoustic metasurface concept. The proposed metasurface is composed of space-coiled cylindrical unit cells transmitting sound pressure with a controllable phase shift, which are arranged in a discretized circular configuration, and thus passively transforming an incident plane wavefront into the desired helical wavefront. This method presents the advantage of overcoming the restrictions on using many acoustic sources, and it is implemented with a transmitting metasurface which can be easily three-dimensionally printed. The proposed straightforward design principle can be adopted for easy production of acoustic angular momentum with minimum complexity and using a single source.

  4. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    SciTech Connect

    Scrymgeour, David; Boye, Robert; Adelsberger, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  5. X-ray wavefront characterization using a rotating shearing interferometer technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Berujon, Sébastien; Ziegler, Eric; Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian

    2011-08-15

    A fast and accurate method to characterize the X-ray wavefront by rotating one of the two gratings of an X-ray shearing interferometer is described and investigated step by step. Such a shearing interferometer consists of a phase grating mounted on a rotation stage, and an absorption grating used as a transmission mask. The mathematical relations for X-ray Moiré fringe analysis when using this device are derived and discussed in the context of the previous literature assumptions. X-ray beam wavefronts without and after X-ray reflective optical elements have been characterized at beamline B16 at Diamond Light Source (DLS) using the presented X-ray rotating shearing interferometer (RSI) technique. It has been demonstrated that this improved method allows accurate calculation of the wavefront radius of curvature and the wavefront distortion, even when one has no previous information on the grating projection pattern period, magnification ratio and the initial grating orientation. As the RSI technique does not require any a priori knowledge of the beam features, it is suitable for routine characterization of wavefronts of a wide range of radii of curvature.

  6. X-ray wavefront characterization using a rotating shearing interferometer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal; Berujon, Sébastien; Ziegler, Eric; Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian

    2011-08-01

    A fast and accurate method to characterize the X-ray wavefront by rotating one of the two gratings of an X-ray shearing interferometer is described and investigated step by step. Such a shearing interferometer consists of a phase grating mounted on a rotation stage, and an absorption grating used as a transmission mask. The mathematical relations for X-ray Moiré fringe analysis when using this device are derived and discussed in the context of the previous literature assumptions. X-ray beam wavefronts without and after X-ray reflective optical elements have been characterized at beamline B16 at Diamond Light Source (DLS) using the presented X-ray rotating shearing interferometer (RSI) technique. It has been demonstrated that this improved method allows accurate calculation of the wavefront radius of curvature and the wavefront distortion, even when one has no previous information on the grating projection pattern period, magnification ratio and the initial grating orientation. As the RSI technique does not require any a priori knowledge of the beam features, it is suitable for routine characterization of wavefronts of a wide range of radii of curvature.

  7. Wavefront control system for the Keck telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J. M., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The laser guide star adaptive optics system currently being developed for the Keck 2 telescope consists of several major subsystems: the optical bench, wavefront control, user interface and supervisory control, and the laser system. The paper describes the design and implementation of the wavefront control subsystem that controls a 349 actuator deformable mirror for high order correction and tip-tilt mirrors for stabilizing the image and laser positions.

  8. The design of wavefront coded imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shun; Cen, Zhaofeng; Li, Xiaotong

    2016-10-01

    Wavefront Coding is a new method to extend the depth of field, which combines optical design and signal processing together. By using optical design software ZEMAX ,we designed a practical wavefront coded imaging system based on a conventional Cooke triplet system .Unlike conventional optical system, the wavefront of this new system is modulated by a specially designed phase mask, which makes the point spread function (PSF)of optical system not sensitive to defocus. Therefore, a series of same blurred images obtained at the image plane. In addition, the optical transfer function (OTF) of the wavefront coded imaging system is independent of focus, which is nearly constant with misfocus and has no regions of zeros. All object information can be completely recovered through digital filtering at different defocus positions. The focus invariance of MTF is selected as merit function in this design. And the coefficients of phase mask are set as optimization goals. Compared to conventional optical system, wavefront coded imaging system obtains better quality images under different object distances. Some deficiencies appear in the restored images due to the influence of digital filtering algorithm, which are also analyzed in this paper. The depth of field of the designed wavefront coded imaging system is about 28 times larger than initial optical system, while keeping higher optical power and resolution at the image plane.

  9. Fast patterning of oriented organic microstripes for field-effect ammonia gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binghao; Ding, Jinqiang; Zhu, Tao; Huang, Wei; Cui, Zequn; Chen, Jianmei; Huang, Lizhen; Chi, Lifeng

    2016-02-21

    A series of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with patterned ultra-thin films for NH3 detection are achieved via fast dip-coating. The morphology and packing structure of the ultra-thin films are greatly dependent on the surface energy of the substrates, geometry features of the patterned electrodes and evaporation atmosphere during the dip-coating process, which in turn results in a significant difference in the NH3 sensing properties. Based on the newly proposed mechanism, low-trap dielectric-semiconductor interfaces, a stripe-like morphology and an ultrathin film (as low as 2 nm) enable the OFET-based sensors to exhibit unprecedented sensitivity (∼160) with a short response/recovery time. The efficient (2 mm s(-1)), reliable, and scalable patterning strategy opens a new route for solution-processed OFET-based gas sensors.

  10. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues.

  11. Experimental Verification of Sparse Aperture Mask for Low Order Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    To directly image exoplanets, future space-based missions are equipped with coronagraphs which manipulate the diffraction of starlight and create regions of high contrast called dark holes. Theoretically, coronagraphs can be designed to achieve the high level of contrast required to image exoplanets, which are billions of times dimmer than their host stars, however the aberrations caused by optical imperfections and thermal fluctuations cause the degradation of contrast in the dark holes. Focal plane wavefront control (FPWC) algorithms using deformable mirrors (DMs) are used to mitigate the quasi-static aberrations caused by optical imperfections. Although the FPWC methods correct the quasi-static aberrations, they are blind to dynamic errors caused by telescope jitter and thermal fluctuations. At Princeton's High Contrast Imaging Lab we have developed a new technique that integrates a sparse aperture mask with the coronagraph to estimate these low-order dynamic wavefront errors. This poster shows the effectiveness of a SAM Low-Order Wavefront Sensor in estimating and correcting these errors via simulation and experiment and compares the results to other methods, such as the Zernike Wavefront Sensor planned for WFIRST.

  12. FPGA-accelerated adaptive optics wavefront control part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, S.; Barth, A.; Reger, J.; Reinlein, C.; Appelfelder, M.; Beckert, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present progressive work that is based on our recently developed rapid control prototyping system (RCP), designed for the implementation of high-performance adaptive optical control algorithms using a continuous de-formable mirror (DM). The RCP system, presented in 2014, is resorting to a Xilinx Kintex-7 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), placed on a self-developed PCIe card, and installed on a high-performance computer that runs a hard real-time Linux operating system. For this purpose, algorithms for the efficient evaluation of data from a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) on an FPGA have been developed. The corresponding analog input and output cards are designed for exploiting the maximum possible performance while not being constrained to a specific DM and control algorithm due to the RCP approach. In this second part of our contribution, we focus on recent results that we achieved with this novel experimental setup. By presenting results which are far superior to the former ones, we further justify the deployment of the RCP system and its required time and resources. We conducted various experiments for revealing the effective performance, i.e. the maximum manageable complexity in the controller design that may be achieved in real-time without performance losses. A detailed analysis of the hidden latencies is carried out, showing that these latencies have been drastically reduced. In addition, a series of concepts relating the evaluation of the wavefront as well as designing and synthesizing a wavefront are thoroughly investigated with the goal to overcome some of the prevalent limitations. Furthermore, principal results regarding the closed-loop performance of the low-speed dynamics of the integrated heater in a DM concept are illustrated in detail; to be combined with the piezo-electric high-speed actuators in the next step

  13. Correlations between corneal and total wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrochen, Michael; Jankov, Mirko; Bueeler, Michael; Seiler, Theo

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: Corneal topography data expressed as corneal aberrations are frequently used to report corneal laser surgery results. However, the optical image quality at the retina depends on all optical elements of the eye such as the human lens. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations and to discuss the importance of corneal aberrations for representing corneal laser surgery results. Methods: Thirty three eyes of 22 myopic subjects were measured with a corneal topography system and a Tschernig-type wavefront analyzer after the pupils were dilated to at least 6 mm in diameter. All measurements were centered with respect to the line of sight. Corneal and total wavefront aberrations were calculated up to the 6th Zernike order in the same reference plane. Results: Statistically significant correlations (p < 0.05) between the corneal and total wavefront aberrations were found for the astigmatism (C3,C5) and all 3rd Zernike order coefficients such as coma (C7,C8). No statistically significant correlations were found for all 4th to 6th order Zernike coefficients except for the 5th order horizontal coma C18 (p equals 0.003). On average, all Zernike coefficients for the corneal aberrations were found to be larger compared to Zernike coefficients for the total wavefront aberrations. Conclusions: Corneal aberrations are only of limited use for representing the optical quality of the human eye after corneal laser surgery. This is due to the lack of correlation between corneal and total wavefront aberrations in most of the higher order aberrations. Besides this, the data present in this study yield towards an aberration balancing between corneal aberrations and the optical elements within the eye that reduces the aberration from the cornea by a certain degree. Consequently, ideal customized ablations have to take both, corneal and total wavefront aberrations, into consideration.

  14. Sensored Field Oriented Control of a Robust Induction Motor Drive Using a Novel Boundary Layer Fuzzy Controller

    PubMed Central

    Saghafinia, Ali; Ping, Hew Wooi; Uddin, Mohammad Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Physical sensors have a key role in implementation of real-time vector control for an induction motor (IM) drive. This paper presents a novel boundary layer fuzzy controller (NBLFC) based on the boundary layer approach for speed control of an indirect field-oriented control (IFOC) of an induction motor (IM) drive using physical sensors. The boundary layer approach leads to a trade-off between control performances and chattering elimination. For the NBLFC, a fuzzy system is used to adjust the boundary layer thickness to improve the tracking performance and eliminate the chattering problem under small uncertainties. Also, to eliminate the chattering under the possibility of large uncertainties, the integral filter is proposed inside the variable boundary layer. In addition, the stability of the system is analyzed through the Lyapunov stability theorem. The proposed NBLFC based IM drive is implemented in real-time using digital signal processor (DSP) board TI TMS320F28335. The experimental and simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed NBLFC based IM drive at different operating conditions.

  15. An optimized Kalman filter for the estimate of trunk orientation from inertial sensors data during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Mazzà, Claudia; Donati, Marco; McCamley, John; Picerno, Pietro; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the fine tuning of a Kalman filter with the intent to provide optimal estimates of lower trunk orientation in the frontal and sagittal planes during treadmill walking at different speeds using measured linear acceleration and angular velocity components represented in a local system of reference. Data were simultaneously collected using both an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a stereophotogrammetric system from three healthy subjects walking on a treadmill at natural, slow and fast speeds. These data were used to estimate the parameters of the Kalman filter that minimized the difference between the trunk orientations provided by the filter and those obtained through stereophotogrammetry. The optimized parameters were then used to process the data collected from a further 15 healthy subjects of both genders and different anthropometry performing the same walking tasks with the aim of determining the robustness of the filter set up. The filter proved to be very robust. The root mean square values of the differences between the angles estimated through the IMU and through stereophotogrammetry were lower than 1.0° and the correlation coefficients between the corresponding curves were greater than 0.91. The proposed filter design can be used to reliably estimate trunk lateral and frontal bending during walking from inertial sensor data. Further studies are needed to determine the filter parameters that are most suitable for other motor tasks.

  16. Developmental Cryogenic Active Telescope Testbed, a Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Claudia M.; Davila, Pamela S.; Redding, David C.; Morell, Armando; Lowman, Andrew E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Young, Eric W.; Pacini, Linda K.; Coulter, Dan R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the technology validation strategy of the next generation space telescope (NGST), a system testbed is being developed at GSFC, in partnership with JPL and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which will include all of the component functions envisioned in an NGST active optical system. The system will include an actively controlled, segmented primary mirror, actively controlled secondary, deformable, and fast steering mirrors, wavefront sensing optics, wavefront control algorithms, a telescope simulator module, and an interferometric wavefront sensor for use in comparing final obtained wavefronts from different tests. The developmental. cryogenic active telescope testbed (DCATT) will be implemented in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on operating the testbed at ambient temperature. During Phase 2, a cryocapable segmented telescope will be developed and cooled to cryogenic temperature to investigate the impact on the ability to correct the wavefront and stabilize the image. In Phase 3, it is planned to incorporate industry developed flight-like components, such as figure controlled mirror segments, cryogenic, low hold power actuators, or different wavefront sensing and control hardware or software. A very important element of the program is the development and subsequent validation of the integrated multidisciplinary models. The Phase 1 testbed objectives, plans, configuration, and design will be discussed.

  17. Wavefront autocorrelation of femtosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Ruediger; Neumann, Uwe J.; Griebner, Uwe; Reimann, Klaus; Steinmeyer, Guenter; Kebbel, Volker

    2004-06-01

    Spatially resolved wavefront sensing and time-resolved autocorrelation measurement of ultrashort pulses are usually separated procedures. For few-cycle pulses with significant spatial inhomogeneities and poor beam quality, a fully spatio-temporal beam characterization is necessary. Here we report on a new concept for a joint two-dimensional mapping of local temporal coherence and local wavefront tilt based on the combination of collinear autocorrelation and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing. Essentially for this "wavefront autocorrelation" is a splitting of the beam into a matrix of Bessel-like sub-beams by an array of thin-film microaxicons. The sub-beams are further processed by a two-dimensional collinear autocorrelation setup. The second harmonic distribution of sub-beams at a defined distance is imaged onto a CCD camera. The nondiffractive sub-beams ensure an extended depth of focus and a low sensitivity towards angular misalignment or axial displacement. With low-dispersion small-angle refractive-reflective shapers, wavefront-sensing of Ti:sapphire laser wavepackets was demonstrated experimentally for the first time.

  18. Surface-Parallel Sensor Orientation for Assessing Energy Balance Components on Mountain Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Sánchez-Cañete, E. P.; Olmo, F. J.; Metzger, S.; Pérez-Priego, O.; Carrara, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Kowalski, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    The consistency of eddy-covariance measurements is often evaluated in terms of the degree of energy balance closure. Even over sloping terrain, instrumentation for measuring energy balance components is commonly installed horizontally, i.e. perpendicular to the geo-potential gradient. Subsequently, turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat are rotated perpendicular to the mean streamlines using tilt-correction algorithms. However, net radiation (Rn) and soil heat fluxes ( G) are treated differently, and typically only Rn is corrected to account for slope. With an applied case study, we show and argue several advantages of installing sensors surface-parallel to measure surface-normal Rn and G. For a 17 % south-west-facing slope, our results show that horizontal installation results in hysteresis in the energy balance closure and errors of up to 25 %. Finally, we propose an approximation to estimate the surface-normal Rn, when only vertical Rn measurements are available.

  19. Feedback controlled optics with wavefront compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, William G. (Inventor); Redding, David C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The sensitivity model of a complex optical system obtained by linear ray tracing is used to compute a control gain matrix by imposing the mathematical condition for minimizing the total wavefront error at the optical system's exit pupil. The most recent deformations or error states of the controlled segments or optical surfaces of the system are then assembled as an error vector, and the error vector is transformed by the control gain matrix to produce the exact control variables which will minimize the total wavefront error at the exit pupil of the optical system. These exact control variables are then applied to the actuators controlling the various optical surfaces in the system causing the immediate reduction in total wavefront error observed at the exit pupil of the optical system.

  20. Recent developments of interferometric wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Chen, Xiaoyu; Ling, Tong; Zhang, Lei; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Recent trends of interferometric wavefront sensing tend to focus on high precision, anti-vibration, compact, along with much more involved of electric and computer technology. And the optical principles employed not only limit to interference but also include diffraction, scattering, polarization, etc. In this paper, some selected examples basing on the research works in our group will be given to illustrate the trends mentioned above. To achieve extra high accuracy, phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS-PDI) is believed to be a good candidate as it employs a nearly perfect point diffraction spherical wavefront as the reference and also takes advantage of the high precision of phase-shifting algorithms. Cyclic radial shearing interferometry (C-RSI) successively demonstrate the anti-vibration characteristic and can diagnose transient wavefront with only one single shot by employing a three-mirror common-path configuration and a synchronizing system. In contrast sharply with those early interferometers, interferometers with very compact configuration are more suitable to develop portable wavefront sensing instruments. Cross-grating lateral shearing interferometer (CG-LSI) is a very compact interferometer that adopts a cross-grating of millimeters to produce lateral shearing of the diffraction wave of the test wavefront. Be aware that, computer technique has been used a lot in all of the above interferometers but the non-null annual sub-aperture stitching interferometer (NASSI) for general aspheric surface testing mostly relies on the computer model of the physical interferometer setup and iterative ray-tracing optimization. The principles of the above mentioned interferometric wavefront sensing methods would be given in detail.

  1. Method and apparatus for wavefront sensing

    DOEpatents

    Bahk, Seung-Whan

    2016-08-23

    A method of measuring characteristics of a wavefront of an incident beam includes obtaining an interferogram associated with the incident beam passing through a transmission mask and Fourier transforming the interferogram to provide a frequency domain interferogram. The method also includes selecting a subset of harmonics from the frequency domain interferogram, individually inverse Fourier transforming each of the subset of harmonics to provide a set of spatial domain harmonics, and extracting a phase profile from each of the set of spatial domain harmonics. The method further includes removing phase discontinuities in the phase profile, rotating the phase profile, and reconstructing a phase front of the wavefront of the incident beam.

  2. Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Laura A.; Basinger, Scott A.; Campion, Scott D.; Faust, Jessica A.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Hayden, William L.; Lowman, Andrew E.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Petrone, Peter P., III

    2004-01-01

    The Wavefront Control Testbed (WCT) was created to develop and test wavefront sensing and control algorithms and software for the segmented James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Last year, we changed the system configuration from three sparse aperture segments to a filled aperture with three pie shaped segments. With this upgrade we have performed experiments on fine phasing with line-of-sight and segment-to-segment jitter, dispersed fringe visibility and grism angle;. high dynamic range tilt sensing; coarse phasing with large aberrations, and sampled sub-aperture testing. This paper reviews the results of these experiments.

  3. Wave-front correctors by diamond turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.; Stacy, J. E.; Saito, T. T.; Patterson, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The production of wave-front correctors by single-point diamond turning is reported. Interferograms are shown which demonstrate excellent agreement between the diamond-turned surface and the desired surface. It is concluded from this experiment that it is now feasible by means of single-point diamond turning to make generalized wave-front control surfaces or to produce any unusual surface desired by the optical designer. The maximum departure from the nearest regular surface is set by the dynamic range and maximum diamond point acceleration permitted by the machine.

  4. Wavefront sets and polarizations on supermanifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Gimperlein, Heiko; Murro, Simone; Schenkel, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop the foundation for microlocal analysis on supermanifolds. Making use of pseudodifferential operators on supermanifolds as introduced by Rempel and Schmitt, we define a suitable notion of super-wavefront set for superdistributions which generalizes Dencker's polarization sets for vector-valued distributions to supergeometry. In particular, our super-wavefront sets detect polarization information of the singularities of superdistributions. We prove a refined pullback theorem for superdistributions along supermanifold morphisms, which as a special case establishes criteria when two superdistributions may be multiplied. As an application of our framework, we study the singularities of distributional solutions of a supersymmetric field theory.

  5. QUEN - The APL wavefront array processor

    SciTech Connect

    Dolecek, Q.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Developments in computer networks are making parallel processing machines accessible to an increasing number of scientists and engineers. Several vector and array processors are already commercially available, as are costly systolic, wavefront, and massive parallel processors. This article discusses the Applied Physics Laboratory's entry: a low-cost, memory-linked wavefront array processor that can be used as a peripheral on existing computers. Available today as the family of QUEN processors, it is the first commercial parallel processor to bring Cray 1 computation speeds into the minicomputer price range. 5 refs.

  6. Wavefront sensing using a photonic lantern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Mark; Harris, Robert J.; Thomson, Robert R.; MacLachlan, David G.; Allington-Smith, Jeremy; Myers, Richard; Morris, Tim

    2016-07-01

    The need for high speed wavefront sensing within astronomical adaptive optics is growing, especially when scaling existing systems to ELTs. A photonic lantern (PL) could be advantageous with such systems because the output can be formatted onto a fast 1D CCD array separated from the telescope focal plane. We investigate the coupling of light from the focal plane into a simple four mode PL via simulations within RSoft. The output intensity distribution of the single mode cores when the input wavefront is affected by tip or tilt is analysed and compared with a quad cell of detector pixels typically used for a Shack-Hartmann.

  7. Fast and robust estimation of ophthalmic wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Keith

    2016-12-01

    Rapidly rising levels of myopia, particularly in the developing world, have led to an increased need for inexpensive and automated approaches to optometry. A simple and robust technique is provided for estimating major ophthalmic aberrations using a gradient-based wavefront sensor. The approach is based on the use of numerical calculations to produce diverse combinations of phase components, followed by Fourier transforms to calculate the coefficients. The approach does not utilize phase unwrapping nor iterative solution of inverse problems. This makes the method very fast and tolerant to image artifacts, which do not need to be detected and masked or interpolated as is needed in other techniques. These features make it a promising algorithm on which to base low-cost devices for applications that may have limited access to expert maintenance and operation.

  8. Objective lens simultaneously optimized for pupil ghosting, wavefront delivery and pupil imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Eugene G (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens includes multiple optical elements disposed between a first end and a second end, each optical element oriented along an optical axis. Each optical surface of the multiple optical elements provides an angle of incidence to a marginal ray that is above a minimum threshold angle. This threshold angle minimizes pupil ghosts that may enter an interferometer. The objective lens also optimizes wavefront delivery and pupil imaging onto an optical surface under test.

  9. Exact wavefront surface refracted by a smooth arbitrary surface considering a plane wavefront incident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino M.

    2015-08-01

    We study the formation of wavefronts produced by smooth arbitrary surfaces with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface. The wavefronts are obtained by using the Malus-Dupin theorem and they represent the monochromatic aberrations which can be called image errors, furthermore their shapes could be modified by changing the parameters of the lens in such a way that if a caustic surface is vanished the optical system produces a perfect image, on the other hand for a caustic possessing a large area it could be applied to design non-imaging optical systems. The shape of the wavefront depends only on the indices of refraction and geometrical properties of the refracting surface such as the first derivative and their parameters associated. This analytic formula has potential applications in the microscopy field, illumination or corrector plates.

  10. An experimental study on reflector wave-front error correction using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Wu, Zhigang; Du, Jianming

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive control system for correcting wave-front error of a CFRC reflector has been studied. Errors investigated in this paper were mainly introduced by fabrication and gravity. 72 Piezoelectric Ceramic Transducer (PZT) actuators were integrated to the CFRC reflector to conduct wave-front error control. The adaptive CFRC reflector was fixed on an optical platform without any external loads. The temperature and humidity were well controlled during the experimental study. The wave-front error correction algorithm is based on influence matrix approach coupled with least squares optimization method. The linear relationship between the PZT actuator's input voltage and the output displacement of the adaptive CFRC reflector surface is validated. A laser displacement sensor was used for measuring the displacements. The influence matrix was obtained experimentally by measuring the displacements of the associated points while each actuator was activated separately. The wave-front error and influence matrix were measured using a V-Stars photogrammetry system. Experimental investigation validated that this adaptive control system is capable to significantly reduce the reflector surface geometry error. Experimental results are correlated very well with simulation results which were obtained by using a multidisciplinary analytical approach. Conclusions of this study suggest that the adaptive CFRC reflector technology can provide a low cost method to significantly increase the precision of a CFRC reflector.

  11. Implementation of adaptive optics in fluorescent microscopy using wavefront sensing and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azucena, Oscar; Crest, Justin; Cao, Jian; Sullivan, William; Kner, Peter; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren; Olivier, Scot; Kubby, Joel

    2010-02-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) improves the quality of astronomical imaging systems by using real time measurement of the turbulent medium in the optical path using a guide star (natural or artificial) as a point source reference beacon [1]. AO has also been applied to vision science to improve the view of the human eye. This paper will address our current research focused on the improvement of fluorescent microscopy for biological imaging utilizing current AO technology. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) is used to measure the aberration introduced by a Drosophila Melanogaster embryo with an implanted 1 micron fluorescent bead that serves as a point source reference beacon. Previous measurements of the wavefront aberrations have found an average peak-to-valley and root-mean-square (RMS) wavefront error of 0.77 micrometers and 0.15 micrometers, respectively. Measurements of the Zernike coefficients indicated that the correction of the first 14 Zernike coefficients is sufficient to correct the aberrations we measured. Here we show that a MEMS deformable mirror with 3.5 microns of stroke and 140 actuators is sufficient to correct these aberrations. The design, assembly and initial results for the use of a MEMS deformable mirror, SHWS and implanted fluorescent reference beacon for wavefront correction are discussed.

  12. Image amplification based super-resolution reconstruction procedure designed for wavefront-coded imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Zong, Caihui; Wei, Jingxuan; Xie, Xiaopeng

    2016-10-01

    Wave-front coding, proposed by Dowski and Cathey in 1995, is widely known to be capable of extending the depth of focus (DOF) of incoherent imaging systems. However, benefiting from its very large point spread function (PSF) generated by a suitably designed phase mask that is added to the aperture plane, wave-front coding could also be used to achieve super-resolution without replacing the current sensor with one of smaller pitch size. An image amplification based super-resolution reconstruction procedure has been specifically designed for wave-front coded imaging systems and its effectiveness has been tested by experiment. For instance, for a focal length of 50 mm and f-number 4.5, objects within the range [5 m, ∞] are clearly imaged with the help of wave-front coding, which indicates a DOF extension ratio of approximately 20. The proposed super-resolution reconstruction procedure produces at least 3× resolution improvement, with the quality of the reconstructed super-resolution image approaching the diffraction limit.

  13. Wavefront sensing and control performance modeling of the Thirty Meter telescope for systematic trade analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissly, Carl; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Troy, Mitchell; Chanan, Gary; Roberts, Scott; Rogers, John

    2014-08-01

    We have developed an integrated optical model of the semi-static performance of the Thirty Meter Telescope. The model includes surface and rigid body errors of all telescope optics as well as a model of the Alignment and Phasing System Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors and control algorithms. This integrated model allows for simulation of the correction of the telescope wavefront, including optical errors on the secondary and tertiary mirrors, using the primary mirror segment active degrees of freedom. This model provides the estimate of the predicted telescope performance for system engineering and error budget development. In this paper we present updated performance values for the TMT static optical errors in terms of Normalized Point Source Sensitivity and RMS wavefront error after Adaptive Optics correction. As an example of a system level trade, we present the results from an analysis optimizing the number of Shack-Hartmann lenslets per segment. We trade the number of lenslet rings over each primary mirror segment against the telescope performance metrics of PSSN and RMS wavefront error.

  14. Inverse pupil wavefront optimization for immersion lithography.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunying; Li, Yanqiu; Dong, Lisong; Ma, Xu; Guo, Xuejia

    2014-10-10

    As the critical dimension of integrated circuits is continuously shrunk, thick mask induced aberration (TMIA) cannot be ignored in the lithography image process. Recently, a set of pupil wavefront optimization (PWO) approaches has been proposed to compensate for TMIA, based on a wavefront manipulator in modern scanners. However, these prior PWO methods have two intrinsic drawbacks. First, the traditional methods fell short in building up the analytical relationship between the pupil wavefront and the cost function, and used time-consuming algorithms to solve for the PWO problem. Second, in traditional methods, only the spherical aberrations were optimized to compensate for the focus exposure matrix tilt and best focus shift induced by TMIA. Thus, the degrees of freedom were limited during the optimization procedure. To overcome these restrictions, we build the analytical relationship between the pupil wavefront and the cost function based on Abbe vector imaging theory. With this analytical model and the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate-gradient algorithm, an inverse PWO method is innovated to balance the TMIA including 37 Zernike terms. Simulation results illustrate that our approach significantly improves image fidelity within a larger process window. This demonstrates that TMIA is effectively compensated by our inverse PWO approach.

  15. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1995-04-25

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image. 3 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for holographic wavefront diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1995-01-01

    A wavefront diagnostic apparatus has an optic and a measuring system. The optic forms a holographic image in response to a beam of light striking a hologram formed on a surface of the optic. The measuring system detects the position of the array of holographic images and compares the positions of the array of holographic images to a reference holographic image.

  17. Wavefront shaping for single fiber fluorescence endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M.; Piestun, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in wavefront control, spatial light modulators, and computational power enable the use of a single multimode fiber as a fluorescence scanning microscope. We explore multimode fibers with different characteristics (diameter, index profile, etc.) and compare their performance regarding robustness against external perturbations and quality of the scanning focus.

  18. Improved wavefront reconstruction algorithm from slope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuc, Phan Huy; Manh, Nguyen The; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Ghim, Young-Sik; Yang, Ho-Soon; Lee, Yun-Woo

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a wavefront reconstruction algorithm from slope measurements based on a zonal method. In this algorithm, the slope measurement sampling geometry used is the Southwell geometry, in which the phase values and the slope data are measured at the same nodes. The proposed algorithm estimates the phase value at a node point using the slope measurements of eight points around the node, as doing so is believed to result in better accuracy with regard to the wavefront. For optimization of the processing time, a successive over-relaxation method is applied to iteration loops. We use a trial-and-error method to determine the best relaxation factor for each type of wavefront in order to optimize the iteration time and, thus, the processing time of the algorithm. Specifically, for a circularly symmetric wavefront, the convergence rate of the algorithm can be improved by using the result of a Fourier Transform as an initial value for the iteration. Various simulations are presented to demonstrate the improvements realized when using the proposed algorithm. Several experimental measurements of deflectometry are also processed by using the proposed algorithm.

  19. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  20. Implementation of a Wavefront-Sensing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce; Aronstein, David

    2013-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a unique implementation of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm reported in "Iterative-Transform Phase Retrieval Using Adaptive Diversity" (GSC-14879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 4 (April 2007), page 32. This software was originally intended for application to the James Webb Space Telescope, but is also applicable to other segmented-mirror telescopes. The software is capable of determining optical-wavefront information using, as input, a variable number of irradiance measurements collected in defocus planes about the best focal position. The software also uses input of the geometrical definition of the telescope exit pupil (otherwise denoted the pupil mask) to identify the locations of the segments of the primary telescope mirror. From the irradiance data and mask information, the software calculates an estimate of the optical wavefront (a measure of performance) of the telescope generally and across each primary mirror segment specifically. The software is capable of generating irradiance data, wavefront estimates, and basis functions for the full telescope and for each primary-mirror segment. Optionally, each of these pieces of information can be measured or computed outside of the software and incorporated during execution of the software.

  1. Object-oriented Matlab adaptive optics toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, R.; Correia, C.

    2014-08-01

    Object-Oriented Matlab Adaptive Optics (OOMAO) is a Matlab toolbox dedicated to Adaptive Optics (AO) systems. OOMAO is based on a small set of classes representing the source, atmosphere, telescope, wavefront sensor, Deformable Mirror (DM) and an imager of an AO system. This simple set of classes allows simulating Natural Guide Star (NGS) and Laser Guide Star (LGS) Single Conjugate AO (SCAO) and tomography AO systems on telescopes up to the size of the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELT). The discrete phase screens that make the atmosphere model can be of infinite size, useful for modeling system performance on large time scales. OOMAO comes with its own parametric influence function model to emulate different types of DMs. The cone effect, altitude thickness and intensity profile of LGSs are also reproduced. Both modal and zonal modeling approach are implemented. OOMAO has also an extensive library of theoretical expressions to evaluate the statistical properties of turbulence wavefronts. The main design characteristics of the OOMAO toolbox are object-oriented modularity, vectorized code and transparent parallel computing. OOMAO has been used to simulate and to design the Multi-Object AO prototype Raven at the Subaru telescope and the Laser Tomography AO system of the Giant Magellan Telescope. In this paper, a Laser Tomography AO system on an ELT is simulated with OOMAO. In the first part, we set-up the class parameters and we link the instantiated objects to create the source optical path. Then we build the tomographic reconstructor and write the script for the pseudo-open-loop controller.

  2. Testbed Demonstration of Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for WFIRST Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, K.; Cady, E.; Kern, B.; Lam, R.; Mandic, M.; Patterson, K.; Poberezhskiy, I.; Shields, J.; Seo, J.; Tang, H.; Truong, T.; Wilson, D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s WFIRST-AFTA Coronagraph will be capable of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing giant exoplanets similar to Neptune and Jupiter, and possibly even super-Earths, around nearby stars. To maintain the required coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C will use the rejected stellar light to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront errors due to the changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. The LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor with the phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting mask, a key concept to minimize the non-common path error. Developed as a part of the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed (DHCIT), the LOWFS/C subsystem also consists of an Optical Telescope Assembly Simulator (OTA-S) to generate the realistic line-of-sight (LoS) drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront error from WFIRST-AFTA telescope’s vibration and thermal drift. The entire LOWFS/C subsystem have been integrated, calibrated, and tested in the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed. In this presentation we will show the results of LOWFS/C performance during the dynamic coronagraph tests in which we have demonstrated that LOWFS/C is able to maintain the coronagraph contrast with the presence of WFIRST like line-of-sight drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront drifts.

  3. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-08-24

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images.

  4. Design and implementation of a Cooke triplet based wave-front coded super-resolution imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wei, Jingxuan

    2015-09-01

    Wave-front coding is a powerful technique that could be used to extend the DOF (depth of focus) of incoherent imaging system. It is the suitably designed phase mask that makes the system defocus invariant and it is the de-convolution algorithm that generates the clear image with large DOF. Compared with the traditional imaging system, the point spread function (PSF) in wave-front coded imaging system has quite a large support size and this characteristic makes wave-front coding be capable of realizing super-resolution imaging without replacing the current sensor with one of smaller pitch size. An amplification based single image super-resolution reconstruction procedure has been specifically designed for wave-front coded imaging system and its effectiveness has been demonstrated experimentally. A Cooke Triplet based wave-front coded imaging system is established. For a focal length of 50 mm and f-number 4.5, objects within the range [5 m, ∞] could be clearly imaged, which indicates a DOF extension ratio of approximately 20. At the same time, the proposed processing procedure could produce at least 3× resolution improvement, with the quality of the reconstructed super-resolution image approaching the diffraction limit.

  5. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  6. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin S K; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-02-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation.

  7. An efficient pipeline wavefront phase recovery for the CAFADIS camera for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations.

  8. In vivo imaging of human photoreceptor mosaic with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kevin S. K.; Jian, Yifan; Cua, Michelle; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (WSAO-OCT) is a novel imaging technique for in vivo high-resolution depth-resolved imaging that mitigates some of the challenges encountered with the use of sensor-based adaptive optics designs. This technique replaces the Hartmann Shack wavefront sensor used to measure aberrations with a depth-resolved image-driven optimization algorithm, with the metric based on the OCT volumes acquired in real-time. The custom-built ultrahigh-speed GPU processing platform and fast modal optimization algorithm presented in this paper was essential in enabling real-time, in vivo imaging of human retinas with wavefront sensorless AO correction. WSAO-OCT is especially advantageous for developing a clinical high-resolution retinal imaging system as it enables the use of a compact, low-cost and robust lens-based adaptive optics design. In this report, we describe our WSAO-OCT system for imaging the human photoreceptor mosaic in vivo. We validated our system performance by imaging the retina at several eccentricities, and demonstrated the improvement in photoreceptor visibility with WSAO compensation. PMID:25780747

  9. Low-order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hein, Randall; Lam, Raymond; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the required Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a low-order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from the coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing errors as well as low-order wavefront errors (WFEs) due to changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. We will present a conceptual design of a LOWFS/C subsystem for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. This LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor (ZWFS) with a phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting masks, a key concept to minimize the noncommon path error. We will present our analysis of the sensor performance and evaluate the performance of the line-of-sight jitter suppression loop, as well as the low-order WFE correction loop with a deformable mirror on the coronagraph. We will also report the LOWFS/C testbed design and the preliminary in-air test results, which show a very promising performance of the ZWFS.

  10. An Efficient Pipeline Wavefront Phase Recovery for the CAFADIS Camera for Extremely Large Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations. PMID:22315523

  11. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  12. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  13. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics fluorescence biomicroscope for in vivo retinal imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Daniel J; Jian, Yifan; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-01-01

    Cellular-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging is a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of retinal function in vision research. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) is a developing technology that enables high-resolution imaging of the mouse retina. In place of the conventional method of using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to measure the aberrations directly, WSAO uses an image quality metric and a search algorithm to drive the shape of the adaptive element (i.e. deformable mirror). WSAO is a robust approach to AO and it is compatible with a compact, low-cost lens-based system. In this report, we demonstrated a hill-climbing algorithm for WSAO with a variable focus lens and deformable mirror for non-invasive in vivo imaging of EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) labelled ganglion cells and microglia cells in the mouse retina.

  14. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics fluorescence biomicroscope for in vivo retinal imaging in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Daniel J.; Jian, Yifan; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging is a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of retinal function in vision research. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) is a developing technology that enables high-resolution imaging of the mouse retina. In place of the conventional method of using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to measure the aberrations directly, WSAO uses an image quality metric and a search algorithm to drive the shape of the adaptive element (i.e. deformable mirror). WSAO is a robust approach to AO and it is compatible with a compact, low-cost lens-based system. In this report, we demonstrated a hill-climbing algorithm for WSAO with a variable focus lens and deformable mirror for non-invasive in vivo imaging of EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) labelled ganglion cells and microglia cells in the mouse retina. PMID:26819812

  15. Prediction of Visual Acuity from Wavefront Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for generating a visual acuity metric, based on wavefront aberrations (WFAs), associated with a test subject and representing classes of imperfections, such as defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberrations, of the subject's visual system. The metric allows choices of different image template, can predict acuity for different target probabilities, can incorporate different and possibly subject-specific neural transfer functions, can predict acuity for different subject templates, and incorporates a model of the optotype identification task.

  16. Wavefront reconstruction using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian; Flamm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver A.; Duparré, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam, based on modal decomposition using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). Thereby the beam under test illuminates the CGH with a specific, inscribed transmission function that enables the measurement of modal amplitudes and phases by evaluating the first diffraction order of the hologram. Since we use an angular multiplexing technique, our method is innately capable of real-time measurements of amplitude and phase, yielding the complete information about the optical field. A measurement of the Stokes parameters, respectively of the polarization state, provides the possibility to calculate the Poynting vector. Two wavefront reconstruction possibilities are outlined: reconstruction from the phase for scalar beams and reconstruction from the Poynting vector for inhomogeneously polarized beams. To quantify single aberrations, the reconstructed wavefront is decomposed into Zernike polynomials. Our technique is applied to beams emerging from different kinds of multimode optical fibers, such as step-index, photonic crystal and multicore fibers, whereas in this work results are exemplarily shown for a step-index fiber and compared to a Shack-Hartmann measurement that serves as a reference.

  17. Wavefronts and mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idema, Timon; Dubuis, Julien; Manning, Lisa; Nelson, Philip; Liu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Mitosis in the early syncytial Drosophila embryo has a high degree of spatial and temporal correlations, visible as mitotic wavefronts that travel across the embryo. This mitosis wavefront is preceded by another wavefront which corresponds to chromosome condensation. The two wavefronts are separated by a time interval that is independent of cell cycle and propagate at the same speed for a given embryo in a given cycle. We study the wavefronts in the context of excitable medium theory, using two different models, one with biochemical signaling and one with mechanical signaling. We find that the dependence of wavefront speed on cell cycle number is most naturally explained via a mechanical signaling, and that the entire process suggests a scenario in which biochemical and mechanical signaling are coupled.

  18. Dynamics and Stability of Acoustic Wavefronts in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dynamics and Stability of Acoustic Wavefronts in the Ocean...trajectories. • To investigate and quantify effects on underwater acoustic wavefronts of internal gravity waves, sea swell, “spice,” and other small-scale...predictability of acoustic wavefronts and timefronts. 2. To quantify horizontal refraction of sound by random meso-scale inhomogeneities at O(1)Mm

  19. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  20. Bringing it all together: a unique approach to requirements for wavefront sensing and control on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contos, Adam R.; Acton, D. Scott; Atcheson, Paul D.; Barto, Allison A.; Lightsey, Paul A.; Shields, Duncan M.

    2006-06-01

    The opto-mechanical design of the 6.6 meter James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), with its actively-controlled secondary and 18-segment primary mirror, presents unique challenges from a system engineering perspective. To maintain the optical alignment of the telescope on-orbit, a process called wavefront sensing and control (WFS&C) is employed to determine the current state of the mirrors and calculate the optimal mirror move updates. The needed imagery is downloaded to the ground, where the WFS&C algorithms to process the images reside, and the appropriate commands are uploaded to the observatory. Rather than use a dedicated wavefront sensor for the imagery as is done in most other applications, a science camera is used instead. For the success of the mission, WFS&C needs to perform flawlessly using the assets available among the combination of separate elements (ground operations, spacecraft, science instruments, optical telescope, etc.) that cross institutional as well as geographic borders. Rather than be yet another distinct element with its own set of requirements to flow to the other elements as was originally planned, a novel approach was selected. This approach entails reviewing and auditing other documents for the requirements needed to satisfy the needs of WFS&C. Three actions are taken: (1) when appropriate requirements exist, they are tracked by WFS&C ; (2) when an existing requirement is insufficient to meet the need, a requirement change is initiated; and finally (3) when a needed requirement is missing, a new requirement is established in the corresponding document. This approach, deemed a "best practice" at the customer's independent audit, allows for program confidence that the necessary requirements are complete, while still maintaining the responsibility for the requirement with the most appropriate entity. This paper describes the details and execution of the approach; the associated WFS&C requirements and verification documentation; and the

  1. Wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Ryan H.

    Next generation extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems are moving to higher resolution optics to accommodate smaller length scales targeted by the semiconductor industry. As the numerical apertures (NA) of the optics become larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to characterize aberrations due to experimental challenges associated with high-resolution spatial filters and geometrical effects caused by large incident angles of the test wavefront. This dissertation focuses on two methods of wavefront metrology for high resolution optical systems. The first method, lateral shearing interferometry (LSI), is a self-referencing interferometry where the test wavefront is incident on a low spatial frequency grating, and the resulting interference between the diffracted orders is used to reconstruct the wavefront aberrations. LSI has many advantages over other interferometric tests such as phase-shifting point diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) due to its experimental simplicity, stability, relaxed coherence requirements, and its ability to scale to high numerical apertures. While LSI has historically been a qualitative test, this dissertation presents a novel quantitative investigation of the LSI interferogram. The analysis reveals the existence of systematic aberrations due to the nonlinear angular response from the diffraction grating that compromises the accuracy of LSI at medium to high NAs. In the medium NA regime (0.15 < NA < 0.35), a holographic model is presented that derives the systematic aberrations in closed form, which demonstrates an astigmatism term that scales as the square of the grating defocus. In the high NA regime (0.35 < NA), a geometrical model is introduced that describes the aberrations as a system of transcendental equations that can be solved numerically. The characterization and removal of these systematic errors is a necessary step that unlocks LSI as a viable candidate for high NA EUV optical testing. The second method is a novel image

  2. Liquid Crystal on Silicon Wavefront Corrector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix; Wang, Xinghua; Bos, Philip, J.

    2004-01-01

    A low cost, high resolution, liquid crystal on silicon, spatial light modulator has been developed for the correction of huge aberrations in an optical system where the polarization dependence and the chromatic nature are tolerated. However, the overall system performance suggests that this device is also suitable for real time correction of aberration in human eyes. This device has a resolution of 1024 x 768, and is driven by an XGA display driver. The effective stroke length of the device is 700 nm and 2000 nm for the visible and IR regions of the device, respectively. The response speeds are 50 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively, which are fast enough for real time adaptive optics for aberrations in human eyes. By modulating a wavefront of 2 pi, this device can correct for arbitrary high order wavefront aberrations since the 2-D pixel array is independently controlled by the driver. The high resolution and high accuracy of the device allow for diffraction limited correction of the tip and tilt or defocus without an additional correction loop. We have shown that for every wave of aberration, an 8 step blazed grating is required to achieve high diffraction efficiency around 80%. In light of this, up to 125 waves peak to valley of tip and tilt can be corrected if we choose the simplest aberration. Corrections of 34 waves of aberration, including high order Zernicke terms in a high magnification telescope, to diffraction limited performance (residual wavefront aberration less than 1/30 lambda at 632.8 nm) have been observed at high efficiency.

  3. Microcollimated laser diode with low wavefront aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, S.; Sekii, H.; Maeda, T.; Goto, H.; Yamashita, T.; Imanaka, K. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors developed microcollimated laser diode( MCLD) utilizing a 1 mm short focal length, phi, lc 0.5 mm small diameter micro Fresnel lens (MFL) for the first time as the collimating lens. The MCLD is assembled with a 780 nm quantum-well laser diode dice and an MFL in the smallest commercial available laser package. The radiated laser beam form the MCLD has higher than 2mW power at 50 mA driving current, narrow enough as a phi 2 mm beam diameter with nearly Gaussian intensity profile, and low wavefront aberration less than {lambda}14 (rms value) measured at 1 m distance.

  4. Improving active space telescope wavefront control using predictive thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2015-01-01

    Active control algorithms for space telescopes are less mature than those for large ground telescopes due to differences in the wavefront control problems. Active wavefront control for space telescopes at L2, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), requires weighing control costs against the benefits of correcting wavefront perturbations that are a predictable byproduct of the observing schedule, which is known and determined in advance. To improve the control algorithms for these telescopes, we have developed a model that calculates the temperature and wavefront evolution during a hypothetical mission, assuming the dominant wavefront perturbations are due to changes in the spacecraft attitude with respect to the sun. Using this model, we show that the wavefront can be controlled passively by introducing scheduling constraints that limit the allowable attitudes for an observation based on the observation duration and the mean telescope temperature. We also describe the implementation of a predictive controller designed to prevent the wavefront error (WFE) from exceeding a desired threshold. This controller outperforms simpler algorithms even with substantial model error, achieving a lower WFE without requiring significantly more corrections. Consequently, predictive wavefront control based on known spacecraft attitude plans is a promising approach for JWST and other future active space observatories.

  5. Lenses that provide the transformation between two given wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, C.; Alamo, N.

    2016-12-01

    We give an original method to design four types of lenses solving the following problems: focusing a given wavefront in a given point, and performing the transformation between two arbitrary incoming and outgoing wavefronts. The method to design the lenses profiles is based on the optical properties of the envelopes of certain families of Cartesian ovals of revolution.

  6. Shack-Hartmann and Interferometric Hybrid Wavefront Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    effective hybrid-WFS design, they are discussed in Sec. 2.8. 2.1 Wave Optics 2.1.1 The Wave-Particle Duality of Light. James Clerk Maxwell derived a...7-5-838. 47. MathWorks. “Matlabr’s unwrap function”. Matlabr Student Version 7.1, June 2004. 48. Maxwell , James Clerk . A Treatise on Electricity and...propagate [20]. But then Maxwell transformed Gauss’s, Ampere’s, and Faraday’s work into a set of four coupled vector equations describing EM waves capable

  7. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: multi-tiered wavefront measurements and novel mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Andersen, David; Chapin, Edward; Reshetov, Vlad; Wierzbicki, Ramunas; Herriot, Glen; Chalmer, Dean; Isbrucker, Victor; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) will be the first light adaptive optics instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is being built by a collaboration between Caltech, the University of California, NAOJ and NRC Herzberg. In this paper we present novel aspects of the Support Structure, Rotator and On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor systems being developed at NRC Herzberg. IRIS is suspended from the bottom port of the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), and provides its own image de-rotation to compensate for sidereal rotation of the focal plane. This arrangement is a challenge because NFIRAOS is designed to host two other science instruments, which imposes strict mass requirements on IRIS. As the mechanical design of all elements has progressed, we have been tasked with keeping the instrument mass under seven tonnes. This requirement has resulted in a mass reduction of 30 percent for the support structure and rotator compared to the most recent IRIS designs. To accomplish this goal, while still being able to withstand earthquakes, we developed a new design with composite materials. As IRIS is a client instrument of NFIRAOS, it benefits from NFIRAOS's superior AO correction. IRIS plays an important role in providing this correction by sensing low-order aberrations with three On-Instrument Wavefront Sensors (OIWFS). The OIWFS consists of three independently positioned natural guide star wavefront sensor probe arms that patrol a 2-arcminute field of view. We expect tip-tilt measurements from faint stars within the IRIS imager focal plane will further stabilize the delivered image quality. We describe how the use of On-Detector Guide Windows (ODGWs) in the IRIS imaging detector can be incorporated into the AO correction. In this paper, we present our strategies for acquiring and tracking sources with this complex AO system, and for mitigating and measuring the various potential sources of image blur and misalignment due to properties of

  8. High-Contrast Imaging and Wavefront Control with a PIAA Coronagraph: Laboratory System Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Martinache, Frantz; Totems, Julien; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Matsuo, Taro; Blain, Celia; Belikov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph is a high-performance coronagraph concept able to work at small angular separation with little loss in throughput. We present results obtained with a laboratory PIAA system including active wavefront control. The system has a 94.3% throughput (excluding coating losses) and operates in air with monochromatic light. Our testbed achieved a 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast between 1.65λ/D (inner working angle of the coronagraph configuration tested) and 4.4λ/D (outer working angle). Through careful calibration, we were able to separate this residual light into a dynamic coherent component (turbulence, vibrations) at 4.5 × 10-8 contrast and a static incoherent component (ghosts and/or polarization mismatch) at 1.6 × 10-7 contrast. Pointing errors are controlled at the 10-3λ/D level using a dedicated low-order wavefront sensor. While not sufficient for direct imaging of Earthlike planets from space, the 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast achieved already exceeds requirements for a ground-based extreme adaptive optics system aimed at direct detection of more massive exoplanets. We show that over a 4 hr period, averaged wavefront errors have been controlled to the 3.5 × 10-9 contrast level. This result is particularly encouraging for ground-based extreme-AO systems relying on long-term stability and absence of static wavefront errors to recover planets much fainter than the fast boiling speckle halo.

  9. Filter Function for Wavefront Sensing Over a Field of View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A filter function has been derived as a means of optimally weighting the wavefront estimates obtained in image-based phase retrieval performed at multiple points distributed over the field of view of a telescope or other optical system. When the data obtained in wavefront sensing and, more specifically, image-based phase retrieval, are used for controlling the shape of a deformable mirror or other optic used to correct the wavefront, the control law obtained by use of the filter function gives a more balanced optical performance over the field of view than does a wavefront-control law obtained by use of a wavefront estimate obtained from a single point in the field of view.

  10. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  11. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  12. Suppressing Anomalous Localized Waffle Behavior in Least Squares Wavefront Reconstructors

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D

    2002-10-08

    A major difficulty with wavefront slope sensors is their insensitivity to certain phase aberration patterns, the classic example being the waffle pattern in the Fried sampling geometry. As the number of degrees of freedom in AO systems grows larger, the possibility of troublesome waffle-like behavior over localized portions of the aperture is becoming evident. Reconstructor matrices have associated with them, either explicitly or implicitly, an orthogonal mode space over which they operate, called the singular mode space. If not properly preconditioned, the reconstructor's mode set can consist almost entirely of modes that each have some localized waffle-like behavior. In this paper we analyze the behavior of least-squares reconstructors with regard to their mode spaces. We introduce a new technique that is successful in producing a mode space that segregates the waffle-like behavior into a few ''high order'' modes, which can then be projected out of the reconstructor matrix. This technique can be adapted so as to remove any specific modes that are undesirable in the final reconstructor (such as piston, tip, and tilt for example) as well as suppress (the more nebulously defined) localized waffle behavior.

  13. Pupil phase discontinuity measurement: comparison of different wavefront sensing concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hadi, K.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Dohlen, K.; Fusco, T.; Neichel, B.; Marchis, F.; N'Diaye, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille is involved in the preparation of the E-ELT instrumentation framework: In particular, an ESO-EELT M1 mirror segment (1.5 m) has been demonstrated and different wavefront sensing (WFS) concepts among which Pyramid, Zernike phase mask sensor (ZELDA), Phase diversity or still NL Curvature) are also investigated. Segmented mirrors are widely used today in diverse domains: fiber coupling, laser beam shaping, microscopy or retina imaging. If, these mirrors offer a solution to realize important monolithic sizes for giant telescopes in astronomy, they also raise the problem of segments cophasing and measurement of phase discontinuities. In this work, we aim to investigate a suitable WFS approach for pupil phase discontinuity measurement. Coupling a segmented PTT mirror (Iris AO) with four different WFS (Shack-Hartmann, Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometer, Pyramid and Zernike Phase Mask), we study their sensitivity to segmented pupil: in particular, segment phasing, stability, saturation, flat, or still the addressing mode are then performed and compared.

  14. Robust Wave-front Correction in a Small Scale Adaptive Optics System Using a Membrane Deformable Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Park, S.; Baik, S.; Jung, J.; Lee, S.; Yoo, J.

    A small scale laboratory adaptive optics system using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS) and a membrane deformable mirror (DM) has been built for robust image acquisition. In this study, an adaptive limited control technique is adopted to maintain the long-term correction stability of an adaptive optics system. To prevent the waste of dynamic correction range for correcting small residual wave-front distortions which are inefficient to correct, the built system tries to limit wave-front correction when a similar small difference wave-front pattern is repeatedly generated. Also, the effect of mechanical distortion in an adaptive optics system is studied and a pre-recognition method for the distortion is devised to prevent low-performance system operation. A confirmation process for a balanced work assignment among deformable mirror (DM) actuators is adopted for the pre-recognition. The corrected experimental results obtained by using a built small scale adaptive optics system are described in this paper.

  15. On-sky tests of the CuReD and HWR fast wavefront reconstruction algorithms with CANARY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitenc, Urban; Basden, Alastair; Bharmal, Nazim Ali; Morris, Tim; Dipper, Nigel; Gendron, Eric; Vidal, Fabrice; Gratadour, Damien; Rousset, Gérard; Myers, Richard

    2015-04-01

    CuReD (Cumulative Reconstructor with domain Decomposition) and HWR (Hierarchical Wavefront Reconstructor) are novel wavefront reconstruction algorithms for the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, used in the single-conjugate adaptive optics. For a high-order system they are much faster than the traditional matrix-vector-multiplication method. We have developed three methods for mapping the reconstructed phase into the deformable mirror actuator commands and have tested both reconstructors with the CANARY instrument. We find out that the CuReD reconstructor runs stably only if the feedback loop is operated as a leaky integrator, whereas HWR runs stably with the conventional integrator control. Using the CANARY telescope simulator we find that the Strehl ratio (SR) obtained with CuReD is slightly higher than that of the traditional least-squares estimator (LSE). We demonstrate that this is because the CuReD algorithm has a smoothing effect on the output wavefront. The SR of HWR is slightly lower than that of LSE. We have tested both reconstructors extensively on-sky. They perform well and CuReD achieves a similar SR as LSE. We compare the CANARY results with those from a computer simulation and find good agreement between the two.

  16. High resolution wavefront measurement of aspheric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erichsen, I.; Krey, S.; Heinisch, J.; Ruprecht, A.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2008-08-01

    With the recently emerged large volume production of miniature aspheric lenses for a wide range of applications, a new fast fully automatic high resolution wavefront measurement instrument has been developed. The Shack-Hartmann based system with reproducibility better than 0.05 waves is able to measure highly aspheric optics and allows for real time comparison with design data. Integrated advanced analysis tools such as calculation of Zernike coefficients, 2D-Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Point Spread Function (PSF), Strehl-Ratio and the measurement of effective focal length (EFL) as well as flange focal length (FFL) allow for the direct verification of lens properties and can be used in a development as well as in a production environment.

  17. Online estimation of the wavefront outer scale profile from adaptive optics telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesalaga, A.; Neichel, B.; Correia, C. M.; Butterley, T.; Osborn, J.; Masciadri, E.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.

    2017-02-01

    We describe an online method to estimate the wavefront outer scale profile, L0(h), for very large and future extremely large telescopes. The stratified information on this parameter impacts the estimation of the main turbulence parameters [turbulence strength, Cn2(h); Fried's parameter, r0; isoplanatic angle, θ0; and coherence time, τ0) and determines the performance of wide-field adaptive optics (AO) systems. This technique estimates L0(h) using data from the AO loop available at the facility instruments by constructing the cross-correlation functions of the slopes between two or more wavefront sensors, which are later fitted to a linear combination of the simulated theoretical layers having different altitudes and outer scale values. We analyse some limitations found in the estimation process: (i) its insensitivity to large values of L0(h) as the telescope becomes blind to outer scales larger than its diameter; (ii) the maximum number of observable layers given the limited number of independent inputs that the cross-correlation functions provide and (iii) the minimum length of data required for a satisfactory convergence of the turbulence parameters without breaking the assumption of statistical stationarity of the turbulence. The method is applied to the Gemini South multiconjugate AO system that comprises five wavefront sensors and two deformable mirrors. Statistics of L0(h) at Cerro Pachón from data acquired during 3 yr of campaigns show interesting resemblance to other independent results in the literature. A final analysis suggests that the impact of error sources will be substantially reduced in instruments of the next generation of giant telescopes.

  18. Telescope Multi-Field Wavefront Control with a Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, John Z.; Redding, David; Sigrist, Norbert; Basinger, Scott

    2008-01-01

    An effective multi-field wavefront control (WFC) approach is demonstrated for an actuated, segmented space telescope using wavefront measurements at the exit pupil, and the optical and computational implications of this approach are discussed. The integration of a Kalman Filter as an optical state estimator into the wavefront control process to further improve the robustness of the optical alignment of the telescope will also be discussed. Through a comparison of WFC performances between on-orbit and ground-test optical system configurations, the connection (and a possible disconnection) between WFC and optical system alignment under these circumstances are analyzed. Our MACOS-based computer simulation results will be presented and discussed.

  19. Wavefront correction with a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Denis; Borra, Ermanno F; Thibault, Simon

    2007-12-24

    This paper discusses an innovative low-cost deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid) whose surface is actuated by an hexagonal array of small current carrying coils. Predicted and experimental performances of a 37-actuator ferrofluid deformable mirror are presented along with wavefront correction examples. We show the validity of the model used to compute the actuators currents to obtain a desired wavefront shape. We demonstrate that the ferrofluid deformable mirror can correct a 11 microm low order aberrated wavefront to a residual RMS error of 0.05 microm corresponding to a Strehl ratio of 0.82.

  20. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  1. Initial performance of the Keck AO wavefront controller system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Erik M.; Acton, D. Scott; An, Jong R.; Avicola, Kenneth; Beeman, Bart V.; Brase, James M.; Carrano, Carmen J.; Gathright, John; Gavel, Donald T.; Hurd, Randall L.; Lai, Olivier; Lupton, William; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Max, Claire E.; Olivier, Scot S.; Shelton, J. Christopher; Stomski, Paul J.; Tsubota, Kevin; Waltjen, Kenneth E.; Watson, James A.; Wizinowich, Peter L.

    2000-07-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  2. Characterization of the transmitted near-infrared wavefront error for the GRAVITY/VLTI Coudé Infrared Adaptive Optics System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengqian; Hippler, Stefan; Deen, Casey P; Brandner, Wolfgang; Clénet, Yann; Henning, Thomas; Huber, Armin; Kendrew, Sarah; Lenzen, Rainer; Pfuhl, Oliver; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2013-04-08

    The adaptive optics system for the second-generation VLT-interferometer (VLTI) instrument GRAVITY consists of a novel cryogenic near-infrared wavefront sensor to be installed at each of the four unit telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Feeding the GRAVITY wavefront sensor with light in the 1.4 to 2.4 micrometer band, while suppressing laser light originating from the GRAVITY metrology system, custom-built optical components are required. In this paper, we present the development of a quantitative near-infrared point diffraction interferometric characterization technique, which allows measuring the transmitted wavefront error of the silicon entrance windows of the wavefront sensor cryostat. The technique can be readily applied to quantitative phase measurements in the near-infrared regime. Moreover, by employing a slightly off-axis optical setup, the proposed method can optimize the required spatial resolution and enable real time measurement capabilities. The feasibility of the proposed setup is demonstrated, followed by theoretical analysis and experimental results. Our experimental results show that the phase error repeatability in the nanometer regime can be achieved.

  3. Adaptive Wireless Ad-hoc Sensor Networks for Long-term and Event-oriented Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumberger, Jan; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Schaedler, Martin; Schima, Robert; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ecosystems are often characterized by their high heterogeneity, complexity and dynamic. Hence, single point measurements are often not sufficient for their complete representation. The application of wireless sensor networks in terrestrial and aquatic environmental systems offer significant benefits as a better consideration to the local test conditions, due to the simple adjustment of the sensor distribution, the sensor types and the sample rate. Another advantage of wireless ad-hoc sensor networks is their self-organizing behavior, resulting in a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time. In addition, individual point measurements with a sensor are significantly improved by measuring at several points continuously. In this work a concept and realization for Long-term ecosystem research is given in the field monitoring of micrometeorology and soil parameters for the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes. This long term analyses are part of the Global Change Experimental Facility (GCEF), a large field-based experimental platform to assess the effects of climate change on ecosystem functions and processes under different land-use scenarios. Regarding to the adaptive behavior of the network, also a mobile version was developed to overcome the lack of information of temporally and spatially fixed measurements for the detection and recording of highly dynamic or time limited processes. First results of different field campaigns are given to present the potentials and limitations of this application in environmental science, especially for the monitoring of the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, soil-atmosphere interaction and the validation of remote sensing data.

  4. Adaptive Wireless Ad-hoc Sensor Networks for Long-term and Event-oriented Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumberger, Jan; Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Chirila, Andrei Marian; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Hutschenreuther, Tino; Toepfer, Hannes; Dietrich, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystems are often characterized by their high heterogeneity, complexity and dynamic. Hence, single point measurements are often not sufficient for their complete representation. The application of wireless sensor networks in terrestrial and aquatic environmental systems offer significant benefits as a better consideration to the local test conditions, due to the simple adjustment of the sensor distribution, the sensor types and the sample rate. Another advantage of wireless ad-hoc sensor networks is their self-organizing behavior, resulting in a major reduction in installation and operation costs and time. In addition, individual point measurements with a sensor are significantly improved by measuring at several points continuously. In this work a concept and realization for Long-term ecosystem research is given in the field monitoring of micrometeorology and soil parameters for the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes. This long term analyses are part of the Global Change Experimental Facility (GCEF), a large field-based experimental platform to assess the effects of climate change on ecosystem functions and processes under different land-use scenarios. Regarding to the adaptive behavior of the network, also a mobile version was developed to overcome the lack of information of temporally and spatially fixed measurements for the detection and recording of highly dynamic or time limited processes. First results of different field campaigns are given to present the potentials and limitations of this application in environmental science, especially for the monitoring of the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes, soil-atmosphere interaction and the validation of remote sensing data.

  5. Predicting and rationalizing the effect of surface charge distribution and orientation on nano-wire based FET bio-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vico, Luca; Iversen, Lars; Sørensen, Martin H.; Brandbyge, Mads; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.; Jensen, Jan H.

    2011-09-01

    A single charge screening model of surface charge sensors in liquids (De Vico et al., Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 706-717) is extended to multiple charges to model the effect of the charge distributions of analyte proteins on FET sensor response. With this model we show that counter-intuitive signal changes (e.g. a positive signal change due to a net positive protein binding to a p-type conductor) can occur for certain combinations of charge distributions and Debye lengths. The new method is applied to interpret published experimental data on Streptavidin (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 3969-3976) and Nucleocapsid protein (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 1219-1224).A single charge screening model of surface charge sensors in liquids (De Vico et al., Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 706-717) is extended to multiple charges to model the effect of the charge distributions of analyte proteins on FET sensor response. With this model we show that counter-intuitive signal changes (e.g. a positive signal change due to a net positive protein binding to a p-type conductor) can occur for certain combinations of charge distributions and Debye lengths. The new method is applied to interpret published experimental data on Streptavidin (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 3969-3976) and Nucleocapsid protein (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 1219-1224). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A detailed description of the SMSCSL model is given, along with the Streptavidin and N protein treatment. Additional material is provided in Tables 1S-3S and Fig. 1S-13S. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10316d

  6. Adaptive Wavefront Calibration and Control for the Gemini Planet Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2007-02-02

    Quasi-static errors in the science leg and internal AO flexure will be corrected. Wavefront control will adapt to current atmospheric conditions through Fourier modal gain optimization, or the prediction of atmospheric layers with Kalman filtering.

  7. Wavefront and divergence of the beamlet prototype laser

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M A; Salmon, J T; Seppala, L G; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wegner, P J; Weiland, T L; Williams, W H

    1998-10-30

    We have measured the wavefront and the divergence of the Beamlet prototype laser under a variety of conditions. Emphasis of the tests was on quantifying best attainable divergence in the angular regime below 30 {micro}rad to benchmark propagation models that are used to set wavefront gradient specifications for NIF optical components. Performance with and without active wavefront correction was monitored with radial shearing interferometers that measured near-field wavefront at the input and output of the main amplifier with a spatial resolution of 1 cm, and cameras which measured the corresponding intensity distributions in the far field with an angular resolution of 0.3 {micro}rad. Details of the measurements are discussed and related to NIF focal spot requirements and optics specifications.

  8. Iris-based cyclotorsional image alignment method for wavefront registration.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Dimitri A

    2005-12-01

    In refractive surgery, especially wavefront-guided refractive surgery, correct registration of the treatment to the cornea is of paramount importance. The specificity of the custom ablation formula requires that the ablation be applied to the cornea only when it has been precisely aligned with the mapped area. If, however, the eye has rotated between measurement and ablation, and this cyclotorsion is not compensated for, the rotational misalignment could impair the effectiveness of the refractive surgery. To achieve precise registration, a noninvasive method for torsional rotational alignment of the captured wavefront image to the patient's eyes at surgery has been developed. This method applies a common coordinate system to the wavefront and the eye. Video cameras on the laser and wavefront devices precisely establish the spatial relationship between the optics of the eye and the natural features of the iris, enabling the surgeon to identify and compensate for cyclotorsional eye motion, whatever its cause.

  9. Fundamental Limits to Wavefront Sensing in the Submillimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of large-format submillimeter wavelength detector arrays, and a new 25 m diameter submillimeter telescope under consideration, the question of optimal wavefront sensing methods is timely. Indeed, not only should bolometric array detectors allow the use of a variety of wavefront sensing techniques already in use in the optical/infrared, but in some cases it should actually be easier to apply these techniques because of the more benign temporal properties of the atmosphere at long wavelengths. This paper thus addresses the fundamental limits to wavefront sensing at submillimeter wavelengths, in order to determine how well a telescope surface can be measured in the submillimeter band. First several potential measurement approaches are discussed and compared. Next the theoretical accuracy of a fringe phase measurement in the submillimeter is discussed. It is concluded that with Mars as the source, wavefront sensing at the micron level should be achievable at submillimeter wavelengths in quite reasonable integration times.

  10. Multi-layer surface profiling using gated wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Nordin, Nur Dalilla; Tik, Eddy Chow Mun; Tan, ChingSeong; Chew, Kuew Wai; Menoni, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multi-layer surface profiling and inspection has been considered an emerging topic that can be used to solve various manufacturing inspection problems, such as graded index lenses, TSV (Thru-Silicon Via), and optical coating. In our study, we proposed a gated wavefront sensing approach to estimate the multi-layer surface profile. In this paper, we set up an experimental platform to validate our theoretical models and methods. Our test bed consists of pulse laser, collimator, prism, well-defined focusing lens, testing specimen, and gated wavefront sensing assembly (e.g., lenslet and gated camera). Typical wavefront measurement steps are carried out for the gated system, except the reflectance is timed against its time of flight as well as its intensity profile. By synchronizing the laser pulses to the camera gate time, it is possible to discriminate a multi-layer wavefront from its neighbouring discrete layer reflections.

  11. Wavefront shaping through emulated curved space in waveguide settings

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Bekenstein, Rivka; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in wavefront shaping, including shaping of beams in free space, of plasmonic wavepackets and of electronic wavefunctions. In all of these, the wavefront shaping was achieved by external means such as masks, gratings and reflection from metasurfaces. Here, we propose wavefront shaping by exploiting general relativity (GR) effects in waveguide settings. We demonstrate beam shaping within dielectric slab samples with predesigned refractive index varying so as to create curved space environment for light. We use this technique to construct very narrow non-diffracting beams and shape-invariant beams accelerating on arbitrary trajectories. Importantly, the beam transformations occur within a mere distance of 40 wavelengths, suggesting that GR can inspire any wavefront shaping in highly tight waveguide settings. In such settings, we demonstrate Einstein's Rings: a phenomenon dating back to 1936. PMID:26899285

  12. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  13. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  14. Experimental results for correlation-based wavefront sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Palmer, D W; LaFortune, K N; Bauman, B

    2005-07-01

    Correlation wave-front sensing can improve Adaptive Optics (AO) system performance in two keys areas. For point-source-based AO systems, Correlation is more accurate, more robust to changing conditions and provides lower noise than a centroiding algorithm. Experimental results from the Lick AO system and the SSHCL laser AO system confirm this. For remote imaging, Correlation enables the use of extended objects for wave-front sensing. Results from short horizontal-path experiments will show algorithm properties and requirements.

  15. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  16. User requirements and user acceptance of current and next-generation satellite mission and sensor complement, oriented toward the monitoring of water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.; Fowler, T. R.; Robinson, P.

    1975-01-01

    Principal water resources users were surveyed to determine the applicability of remotely sensed data to their present and future requirements. Analysis of responses was used to assess the levels of adequacy of LANDSAT 1 and 2 in fulfilling hydrological functions, and to derive systems specifications for future water resources-oriented remote sensing satellite systems. The analysis indicates that water resources applications for all but the very large users require: (1) resolutions on the order of 15 meters, (2) a number of radiometric levels of the same order as currently used in LANDSAT 1 (64), (3) a number of spectral bands not in excess of those used in LANDSAT 1, and (4) a repetition frequency on the order of 2 weeks. The users had little feel for the value of new sensors (thermal IR, passive and active microwaves). What is needed in this area is to achieve specific demonstrations of the utility of these sensors and submit the results to the users to evince their judgement.

  17. Phase-Controlled Magnetic Mirror for Wavefront Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Typically, light interacts with matter via the electric field and interaction with weakly bound electrons. In a magnetic mirror, a patterned nanowire is fabricated over a metallic layer with a dielectric layer in between. Oscillation of the electrons in the nanowires in response to the magnetic field of incident photons causes a re-emission of photons and operation as a "magnetic mirror." By controlling the index of refraction in the dielectric layer using a local applied voltage, the phase of the emitted radiation can be controlled. This allows electrical modification of the reflected wavefront, resulting in a deformable mirror that can be used for wavefront control. Certain applications require wavefront quality in the few-nanometer regime, which is a major challenge for optical fabrication and alignment of mirrors or lenses. The use of a deformable magnetic mirror allows for a device with no moving parts that can modify the phase of incident light over many spatial scales, potentially with higher resolution than current approaches. Current deformable mirrors modify the incident wavefront by using nano-actuation of a substrate to physically bend the mirror to a desired shape. The purpose of the innovation is to modify the incident wavefront for the purpose of correction of fabrication and alignment-induced wavefront errors at the system level. The advanced degree of precision required for some applications such as gravity wave detection (LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) or planet finding (FKSI - Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer) requires wavefront control at the limits of the current state of the art. All the steps required to fabricate a magnetic mirror have been demonstrated. The modification is to apply a bias voltage to the dielectric layer so as to change the index of refraction and modify the phase of the reflected radiation. Light is reflected off the device and collected by a phase-sensing interferometer. The interferometer determines the

  18. Micromachined deformable mirrors for dynamic wavefront control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, Thomas; Bierden, Paul; Perreault, Julie

    2004-10-01

    The design, manufacture, and testing of optical quality surface micromachined deformable mirrors (DMs) is described. With such mirrors, the shape of the reflective surface can be modified dynami-cally to compensate for optical aberrations and thereby improve image resolution in telescopes or microscopes. Over several years, we have developed microelectromechanical system (MEMS) processing technologies that allow production of optical quality of surface micromachined mirrors. These process steps have been integrated with a commercial foundry process to produce deformable mirrors of unprecedented quality. The devices employ 140 electrostatic actuators. Measurements of their performance detailed in this paper include 2µm of useful stroke, 3nm position repeatability, >90% reflectivity, and flatness better than 20nm RMS. A chemo-mechanical polishing process has been used to improve surface quality of the mirrors, and a gold coating process has been developed to improve the reflectivity without introducing a significant amount of stress in the mirror mem-brane. An ion bombardment technique has been developed to flatten mirrors. These silicon based deformable mirrors have the potential to modulate spatial and temporal features of an optical wave-front, and have applications in imaging, beam-forming, and optical communication systems. Design considerations and performance evaluation of recently fabricated DMs are presented.

  19. Wave-front aberrations in the anterior corneal surface and the whole eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ji C.; Gwiazda, Jane; Thorn, Frank; Held, Richard

    2003-07-01

    In order to investigate the sources of wave-front aberrations in the human eye, we have measured the aberrations of the anterior cornea and the whole eye using a topographic system and a psychophysical wave-front sensor. We have also calculated the aberrations for the internal optics of both eyes of 45 young subjects (aged 9 to 29 years). The mean rms for the anterior cornea was similar to that for the internal optics and the whole eye when astigmatism was included, but less than that for both the internal optics and the whole eye with astigmatism removed. For eyes with low whole-eye rms values, mean rms for the anterior cornea was greater than that for the whole eye, suggesting that the anterior corneal aberration is partially compensated by the internal optics of the eye to produce the low whole-eye rms. For eyes with larger whole-eye rms values, the rms values for both the anterior cornea and the internal optics were less than that for the whole eye. Thus the aberrations for the two elements tend to be primarily additive. This pattern exists whether or not astigmatism was included in the wave-front aberration rms. For individual Zernike terms, astigmatism and spherical aberration in the anterior cornea were partially compensated by internal optics, while some other Zernike terms showed addition between the anterior cornea and internal optics. Individual eyes show different combinations of compensation and addition across different Zernike terms. Our data suggest that the reported loss of internal compensation for anterior corneal aberrations in elderly eyes with large whole-eye aberrations J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 19 , 137 (2002) may also occur in young eyes. 2003 Optical Society of America

  20. Detecting Significant Change in Wavefront Error: How long does it take?

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Darren E.; Applegate, Raymond A.; Marsack, Jason D.; Sarver, Edwin J.; Nguyen, Lan Chi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Measurement noise in ocular wavefront sensing limits detection of statistically significant change in high-order wavefront error (HO WFE). Consequently, measurement noise is problematic when trying to detect progressive change in HO WFE. Our aim is to 1) determine the necessary amount of time to detect age-related change in HO WFE given measurement variability and HO WFE composition and magnitude and 2) minimize the length of time necessary to detect change. Methods Five subjects with 0.26 to 1.57 micrometers root mean square HO WFE (HO RMS) over a 6 mm pupil were measured 12 times in 10–15 minutes using a custom Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Each individual’s standard deviation of measures was used to calculate the 95% confidence interval around their mean HO RMS. Data previously reported on the rate of change in the HO RMS due to normal aging and pupil diameter was used to calculate time to detect change exceeding this interval given measurement variability. Results Single measurements limit statistical detection to a range of 8 to 30 years. Increasing the number of WFE measurements per visit decreases time to detection (e.g., 7 measurements reduce the range to 3 to 14 years). The number of years to detect a change requires consideration of the subject’s measurement variability, level and distribution of aberrations and age. Uncertainty in locating pupil centre accounts for 39 ± 8% of the total variability. Conclusions The ability to detect change in HO WFE over a short period of time due to normal aging is difficult but possible with current WFE measurement technology. Single measurements of HO WFE become less predictive of true HO WFE with increasing measurement variability. Multiple measurements reduce the variability. Even with proper fixation and instrument alignment, pupil centre location uncertainty in HO WFE measurements is a nontrivial contributor to measurement variability. PMID:19469015

  1. Non-iterative adaptive optical microscopy using wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Azucena, O.; Kubby, J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will review the development of wide-field and confocal microscopes with wavefront sensing and adaptive optics for correcting refractive aberrations and compensating scattering when imaging through thick tissues (Drosophila embryos and mouse brain tissue). To make wavefront measurements in biological specimens we have modified the laser guide-star techniques used in astronomy for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as star light passes through Earth's turbulent atmosphere. Here sodium atoms in Earth's mesosphere, at an altitude of 95 km, are excited to fluoresce at resonance by a high-power sodium laser. The fluorescent light creates a guide-star reference beacon at the top of the atmosphere that can be used for measuring wavefront aberrations that occur as the light passes through the atmosphere. We have developed a related approach for making wavefront measurements in biological specimens using cellular structures labeled with fluorescent proteins as laser guide-stars. An example is a fluorescently labeled centrosome in a fruit fly embryo or neurons and dendrites in mouse brains. Using adaptive optical microscopy we show that the Strehl ratio, the ratio of the peak intensity of an aberrated point source relative to the diffraction limited image, can be improved by an order of magnitude when imaging deeply into live dynamic specimens, enabling near diffraction limited deep tissue imaging.

  2. Double-shearing interferometer for accurate test of laser wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren; Zu, Jifeng; Teng, Shuyun

    2004-01-01

    Inter-satellite laser communications require nearly diffraction-limited laser beam, correspondingly an accurate test of laser wavefront is necessary. In this paper, an aperture-divided double lateral-shearing interferometer is developed which can be used for wavefront analysis ranged nearly from 0.1λ to λ with a simple structure and no alignment needed. The interferometer includes two Jamin plane parallel plates and four slightly wedge-shaped plates of the same size. The four wedged plates are combined into two pairs of different wedges, which are separately placed in the arms of the Jamin interferometer. The thickness of a plate leads to a beam shift, and the wedge a beam inclination, so that there appears two shearing interferogram of different background fringes in a divided aperture. Plane wavefront, perfect spherical wavefront and some types of aberration including primary spherical aberration, primary coma are simulated. It is concluded that the measurable wavefront height of laser beam reaches to better than 0.1λ. Note that the interference is from the beams of equal optical distance thus suitable for semiconductor lasers for the space application, which may be with the coherent length of millimeters.

  3. Spatial-temporal-covariance-based modeling, analysis, and simulation of aero-optics wavefront aberrations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Curtis R; Tyler, Glenn A; Wittich, Donald J

    2014-07-01

    We introduce a framework for modeling, analysis, and simulation of aero-optics wavefront aberrations that is based on spatial-temporal covariance matrices extracted from wavefront sensor measurements. Within this framework, we present a quasi-homogeneous structure function to analyze nonhomogeneous, mildly anisotropic spatial random processes, and we use this structure function to show that phase aberrations arising in aero-optics are, for an important range of operating parameters, locally Kolmogorov. This strongly suggests that the d5/3 power law for adaptive optics (AO) deformable mirror fitting error, where d denotes actuator separation, holds for certain important aero-optics scenarios. This framework also allows us to compute bounds on AO servo lag error and predictive control error. In addition, it provides us with the means to accurately simulate AO systems for the mitigation of aero-effects, and it may provide insight into underlying physical processes associated with turbulent flow. The techniques introduced here are demonstrated using data obtained from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory.

  4. Distributed computing architecture for image-based wavefront sensing and 2D FFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-06-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefront sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computationally intensive, and therefore, applications utilizing the image-based approach gain substantial benefits using specialized high-performance computing architectures. The development and testing of these computing architectures are essential to missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestrial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The algorithms implemented on these specialized computing architectures make use of numerous two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of digital signal processors (DSPs) and multiple DSP field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), offering a novel application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis are presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other computationally complex all-to-all communication problems.

  5. Testbed for extended-scene Shack-Hartmann and phase retrieval wavefront sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Rhonda M.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Green, Joseph J.; Roberts, Jennifer; Sidick, Erkin; Shcheglov, Kirill

    2005-01-01

    We have implemented a testbed to demonstrate wavefront sensing and control on an extended scene using Shack-Hartmann and MGS phase retrieval simultaneously. This dual approach allows for both high sensitivity and high dynamic range wavefront sensing.

  6. Relating the dynamics of membrane mirrors to holographic wavefront correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Dan K.; Wilkes, James M.; Gruneisen, Mark T.; Tran, Hy D.

    2002-09-01

    The Directed Energy Directorate is developing technologies for large space-based optical membrane telescopes. The goal is to develop technologies that will enable 20-meter or greater diameter telescopes, with areal densities of less than 1 kilogram per square meter. The challenge of building these precise structures is reduced by employing a diffractive wavefront controller, which will significantly relax the structural tolerances normally associated with conventional optical systems. A significant portion of the corrector's range and bandwidth can be consumed by structural disturbances. This survey will describe the relationship between the structural dynamics of a highly compliant, 11 inch diameter, planar optical aperture and the diffractive wavefront controller's ability to compensate for the resulting wavefront error. This overview should give the optical physicist and the opto-mechanical engineer a starting point to communicate system design and research needs.

  7. Design of wavefront coding optical system with annular aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Jiankang; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    Wavefront coding can extend the depth of field of traditional optical system by inserting a phase mask into the pupil plane. In this paper, the point spread function (PSF) of wavefront coding system with annular aperture are analyzed. Stationary phase method and fast Fourier transform (FFT) method are used to compute the diffraction integral respectively. The OTF invariance is analyzed for the annular aperture with cubic phase mask under different obscuration ratio. With these analysis results, a wavefront coding system using Maksutov-Cassegrain configuration is designed finally. It is an F/8.21 catadioptric system with annular aperture, and its focal length is 821mm. The strength of the cubic phase mask is optimized with user-defined operand in Zemax. The Wiener filtering algorithm is used to restore the images and the numerical simulation proves the validity of the design.

  8. Reflected wavefront manipulation based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Gu, Zhong-ming; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metasurfaces has renewed the Snell's law and opened up new degrees of freedom to tailor the optical wavefront at will. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the generalized Snell's law can be achieved for reflected acoustic waves based on ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces. The metasurfaces are constructed with eight units of a solid structure to provide discrete phase shifts covering the full 2π span with steps of π/4 by coiling up the space. By careful selection of the phase profiles in the transverse direction of the metasurfaces, some fascinating wavefront engineering phenomena are demonstrated, such as anomalous reflections, conversion of propagating waves into surface waves, planar aberration-free lens and nondiffracting Bessel beam generated by planar acoustic axicon. Our results could open up a new avenue for acoustic wavefront engineering and manipulations. PMID:23986034

  9. Tomographic wave-front sensing with a single guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Michael; Jefferies, Stuart; Hope, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics or numerical restoration algorithms that restore high resolution imaging through atmospheric turbulence are subject to isoplanatic wave-front errors. Mitigating those errors requires that the wave-front aberrations be estimated within the 3D volume of the atmosphere. Present techniques rely on multiple beacons, either natural stars or laser guide stars, to probe the atmospheric aberration along different lines of sight, followed by tomographic projection of the measurements onto layers at defined ranges. In this paper we show that a three-dimensional estimate of the wave-front aberration can be recovered from measurements by a single guide star in the case where the aberration is stratified, provided that the telescope tracks across the sky with non-uniform angular velocity. This is generally the case for observations of artificial earth-orbiting satellites, and the new method is likely to find application in ground-based telescopes used for space situational awareness.

  10. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  11. Asphericity analysis using corneal wavefront and topographic meridional fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; de Ortueta, Diego

    2010-03-01

    The calculation of corneal asphericity as a 3-D fit renders more accurate results when it is based on the corneal wavefront aberrations rather than on the corneal topography of the principal meridians. A more accurate prediction could be obtained for hyperopic treatments compared to myopic treatments. We evaluate a method to calculate corneal asphericity and asphericity changes after refractive surgery. Sixty eyes of 15 consecutive myopic patients and 15 consecutive hyperopic patients (n=30 each) are retrospectively evaluated. Preoperative and 3-month-postoperative topographic and corneal wavefront analyses are performed using corneal topography. Ablations are performed using a laser with an aberration-free profile. Topographic changes in asphericity and corneal aberrations are evaluated for a 6-mm corneal diameter. The induction of corneal spherical aberrations and asphericity changes correlates with the achieved defocus correction. Preoperatively as well as postoperatively, asphericity calculated from the topography meridians correlates with asphericity calculated from the corneal wavefront in myopic and hyperopic treatments. A stronger correlation between postoperative asphericity and the ideally expected/predicted asphericity is obtained based on aberration-free assumptions calculated from corneal wavefront values rather than from the meridians. In hyperopic treatments, a better correlation can be obtained compared to the correlation in myopic treatments. Corneal asphericity calculated from corneal wavefront aberrations represents a 3-D fit of the corneal surface; asphericity calculated from the main topographic meridians represents a 2-D fit of the principal corneal meridians. Postoperative corneal asphericity can be calculated from corneal wavefront aberrations with higher fidelity than from corneal topography of the principal meridians. Hyperopic treatments show a greater accuracy than myopic treatments.

  12. Wavefront sensing for WFIRST with a linear optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  13. Dynamic wavefront control for lightweight mirrors in space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2007-09-01

    Future space telescopes require larger apertures to continue to improve performance. However, balancing the large, high performance optics with the desire for lightweight systems proves quite challenging. One way to achieve both goals is to utilize active, on-orbit wavefront control. A promising method of wavefront control implementation is surface-parallel piezo-electric actuation. The primary mirror backplane is ribbed to provide increased stiffness even at very low areal densities, with piezo-electric actuators embedded at the top of each rib. When the piezo-electrics expand or contract, they bend the surface of the mirror and can be used to directly correct for dynamic distortions of the wavefront. In addition, rigid-body petal control can be used to allow for the possibility of systems with segmented primary mirrors. This paper examines the implementation of both the piezoelectric deformable mirror and petal wavefront controllers, along with their implications on both optical performance and stability robustness. The systems analyzed in this paper are integrated models of the entire space telescope system, considering the transmission of disturbances and vibrations from the reaction wheels in the bus through the structure, isolators, and bipods to the aperture. The deformable mirror control is performed using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, while the mirror segment control is performed using a positive position feedback (PPF) controller. For all cases, the wavefront error is the primary optical performance metric and is calculated using the Zernikes of the primary mirror. The major deterrents to the use of control are complexity and the loss of stability robustness. The integrated model allows for the calculation of all metrics together to enable the examination of the potential benefits of implementing dynamic wavefront control.

  14. Aspheric wave-front recording optics for holographic gratings.

    PubMed

    Namioka, T; Koike, M

    1995-05-01

    The geometric theory of aspheric wave-front recording optics is extended to include the fourth-order groove parameters that correspond to the fourth-order holographic terms in the light-path function. We derived explicit expressions of the groove parameters by analytically following an exact ray-tracing procedure for a double-element optical system that consists of a point source, an ellipsoidal mirror, and an ellipsoidal grating blank. Design examples of holographic gratings for an in-plane Eagle-type vacuum-UV monochromator are given to demonstrate the capability of the present theory in the design of aspheric wave-front recording optics.

  15. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-30

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  16. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  17. Recent Advances in Seismic Wavefront Tracking Techniques and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambridge, M.; Rawlinson, N.; Hauser, J.

    2007-12-01

    In observational seismology, wavefront tracking techniques are becoming increasingly popular as a means of predicting two point traveltimes and their associated paths. Possible applications include reflection migration, earthquake relocation and seismic tomography at a wide variety of scales. Compared with traditional ray based techniques such as shooting and bending, wavefront tracking has the advantage of locating traveltimes between the source and every point in the medium; in many cases, improved efficiency and robustness; and greater potential for tracking multiple arrivals. In this presentation, two wavefront tracking techniques will be considered: the so-called Fast Marching Method (FMM), and a wavefront construction (WFC) scheme. Over the last several years, FMM has become a mature technique in seismology, with a number of improvements to the underlying theory and the release of software tools that allow it to be used in a variety of applications. At its core, FMM is a grid based solver that implicitly tracks a propagating wavefront by seeking finite difference solutions to the eikonal equation along an evolving narrow band. Recent developments include the use of source grid refinement to improve accuracy, the introduction of a multi-stage scheme to allow reflections and refractions to be tracked in layered media, and extension to spherical coordinates. Implementation of these ideas has led to a number of different applications, including teleseismic tomography, wide-angle reflection and refraction tomography, earthquake relocation, and ambient noise imaging using surface waves. The WFC scheme represents the wavefront surface as a set of points in 6-D phase space; these points are advanced in time using local initial value ray tracing in order to form a sequence of wavefront surfaces that fill the model volume. Surface refinement and simplification techniques inspired by recent developments in computer graphics are used to maintain a fixed density of nodes

  18. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-11-01

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  19. Wavefront Engineering with Phase Discontinuities: Designer Interfaces for High Performance Planar Optical Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    and polarization of wavefronts, the detection of wavefronts using metasurfaces, new metasurfaces for controlling surface plasmon wavefronts and high...the orbital angular momentum of vortex beams and integrated them into commercial silicon photodiodes. They studied surface plasmon wakes, showing...that they can be steered using a one dimensional metamaterial made of rotated apertures, and demonstrated “fishbone” plasmonic couplers that enable

  20. Dependence of the wave-front aberration on the radius of the reference sphere.

    PubMed

    Miks, Antonín

    2002-06-01

    Wave-front aberration is a basic characteristic of the imaging properties of optical systems. The value of the wave-front aberration is obtained by calculating the difference between the optical path lengths of the real wave front and the reference sphere. The general relations for calculated dependence of the wave-front aberration on the radius of the reference sphere are given.

  1. Improved sensitivity of polychlorinated-biphenyl-orientated porous-ZnO surface photovoltage sensors from chemisorption-formed ZnO-CuPc composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingtao; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for the enhancement of porous-ZnO surface photovoltage (SPV) response to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a notorious class of persistent organic pollutants as global environmental hazard) based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) chemisorptive bonding on porous-ZnO. A new ZnO-CuPc composite is formed on the porous-ZnO surface due to the interaction between the surface ZnO and CuPc, with its valence band (VB) energy level being higher than that of the pristine porous-ZnO. So that the efficiency of the photogenerated-electron transfer from the composite VB to the adjacent ZnO's surface states is drastically increased due to the reduced energy gap between the transition states. As a result, the sensitivity of the PCB-orientated SPV sensor is much improved by showing amplified variation of the SPV-signals perturbed by PCBs adsorbed on the ZnO-CuPc@porous-ZnO sensitive material. PMID:24594662

  2. Measurement and compensation of laser-induced wavefront deformations and focal shifts in near IR optics.

    PubMed

    Stubenvoll, Martin; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate the feasibility of passive compensation of the thermal lens effect in fused silica optics, placing suitable optical materials with negative dn/dT in the beam path of a high power near IR fiber laser. Following a brief overview of the involved mechanisms, photo-thermal absorption measurements with a Hartmann-Shack sensor are described, from which coefficients for surface/coating and bulk absorption in various materials are determined. Based on comprehensive knowledge of the 2D wavefront deformations resulting from absorption, passive compensation of thermally induced aberrations in complex optical systems is possible, as illustrated for an F-Theta objective. By means of caustic measurements during high-power operation we are able to demonstrate a 60% reduction of the focal shift in F-Theta lenses through passive compensation.

  3. Wavefront reconstruction for extremely large telescopes via CuRe with domain decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rosensteiner, Matthias

    2012-11-01

    The Cumulative Reconstructor is an accurate, extremely fast reconstruction algorithm for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor data. But it has shown an unacceptable high noise propagation for large apertures. Therefore, in this paper we describe a domain decomposition approach to deal with this drawback. We show that this adaptation of the algorithm gives the same reconstruction quality as the original algorithm and leads to a significant improvement with respect to noise propagation. The method is combined with an integral control and compared to the classical matrix vector multiplication algorithm on an end-to-end simulation of a single conjugate adaptive optics system. The reconstruction time is 20n (number of subapertures), and the method is parallelizable.

  4. Biometric iris image acquisition system with wavefront coding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Hsun; Yang, Hsi-Wen; Huang, Shao-Hung; Li, Yung-Hui; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Biometric signatures for identity recognition have been practiced for centuries. Basically, the personal attributes used for a biometric identification system can be classified into two areas: one is based on physiological attributes, such as DNA, facial features, retinal vasculature, fingerprint, hand geometry, iris texture and so on; the other scenario is dependent on the individual behavioral attributes, such as signature, keystroke, voice and gait style. Among these features, iris recognition is one of the most attractive approaches due to its nature of randomness, texture stability over a life time, high entropy density and non-invasive acquisition. While the performance of iris recognition on high quality image is well investigated, not too many studies addressed that how iris recognition performs subject to non-ideal image data, especially when the data is acquired in challenging conditions, such as long working distance, dynamical movement of subjects, uncontrolled illumination conditions and so on. There are three main contributions in this paper. Firstly, the optical system parameters, such as magnification and field of view, was optimally designed through the first-order optics. Secondly, the irradiance constraints was derived by optical conservation theorem. Through the relationship between the subject and the detector, we could estimate the limitation of working distance when the camera lens and CCD sensor were known. The working distance is set to 3m in our system with pupil diameter 86mm and CCD irradiance 0.3mW/cm2. Finally, We employed a hybrid scheme combining eye tracking with pan and tilt system, wavefront coding technology, filter optimization and post signal recognition to implement a robust iris recognition system in dynamic operation. The blurred image was restored to ensure recognition accuracy over 3m working distance with 400mm focal length and aperture F/6.3 optics. The simulation result as well as experiment validates the proposed code

  5. Preconditioned conjugate gradient wave-front reconstructors for multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Luc; Ellerbroek, Brent L; Vogel, Curtis R

    2003-09-10

    Multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems with 10(4)-10(5) degrees of freedom have been proposed for future giant telescopes. Using standard matrix methods to compute, optimize, and implement wavefront control algorithms for these systems is impractical, since the number of calculations required to compute and apply the reconstruction matrix scales respectively with the cube and the square of the number of adaptive optics degrees of freedom. We develop scalable open-loop iterative sparse matrix implementations of minimum variance wave-front reconstruction for telescope diameters up to 32 m with more than 10(4) actuators. The basic approach is the preconditioned conjugate gradient method with an efficient preconditioner, whose block structure is defined by the atmospheric turbulent layers very much like the layer-oriented MCAO algorithms of current interest. Two cost-effective preconditioners are investigated: a multigrid solver and a simpler block symmetric Gauss-Seidel (BSGS) sweep. Both options require off-line sparse Cholesky factorizations of the diagonal blocks of the matrix system. The cost to precompute these factors scales approximately as the three-halves power of the number of estimated phase grid points per atmospheric layer, and their average update rate is typically of the order of 10(-2) Hz, i.e., 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than the typical 10(3) Hz temporal sampling rate. All other computations scale almost linearly with the total number of estimated phase grid points. We present numerical simulation results to illustrate algorithm convergence. Convergence rates of both preconditioners are similar, regardless of measurement noise level, indicating that the layer-oriented BSGS sweep is as effective as the more elaborated multiresolution preconditioner.

  6. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  7. Wavefronts and caustic associated with Durnin’s beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Cabrera-Rosas, Omar; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Alejandro Juárez-Reyes, Salvador; Julián-Macías, Israel; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to give a geometrical characterization of Durnin’s beams. That is, we compute the wavefronts and caustic associated with the nondiffracting solutions to the scalar wave equation introduced by Durnin. To this end, first we show that in an isotropic optical medium \\psi ({r},t)={{{e}}}{{i}[{k}0S({r})-ω t]} is an exact solution of the wave equation, if and only if, S is a solution of both the eikonal and Laplace equations, then from one and two-parameter families of this type of solution and the superposition principle we define new solutions of the wave equation, in particular we show that the ideal nondiffracting beams are one example of this type of construction in free space. Using this fact, the wavefronts and caustic associated with those beams are computed. We find that their caustic has only one branch, which is invariant under translations along the direction of evolution of the beam. Finally, the Bessel beam of order m is worked out explicitly and we find that it is characterized by wavefronts that are deformations of conical ones and the caustic is an infinite cylinder of radius proportional to m. In the case m = 0, the wavefronts are cones and the caustic degenerates into an infinite line.

  8. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  9. Wavefront Control Toolbox for James Webb Space Telescope Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Ron; Aronstein, David L.; Smith, Jeffery Scott; Dean, Bruce H.; Sabatke, Erin

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a Matlab toolbox for wavefront control of optical systems. We have applied this toolbox to the optical models of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in general and to the JWST Testbed Telescope (TBT) in particular, implementing both unconstrained and constrained wavefront optimization to correct for possible misalignments present on the segmented primary mirror or the monolithic secondary mirror. The optical models implemented in Zemax optical design program and information is exchanged between Matlab and Zemax via the Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) interface. The model configuration is managed using the XML protocol. The optimization algorithm uses influence functions for each adjustable degree of freedom of the optical mode. The iterative and non-iterative algorithms have been developed to converge to a local minimum of the root-mean-square (rms) of wavefront error using singular value decomposition technique of the control matrix of influence functions. The toolkit is highly modular and allows the user to choose control strategies for the degrees of freedom to be adjusted on a given iteration and wavefront convergence criterion. As the influence functions are nonlinear over the control parameter space, the toolkit also allows for trade-offs between frequency of updating the local influence functions and execution speed. The functionality of the toolbox and the validity of the underlying algorithms have been verified through extensive simulations.

  10. Linear-constraint wavefront control for exoplanet coronagraphic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2017-01-01

    A coronagraph is a leading technology for achieving high-contrast imaging of exoplanets in a space telescope. It uses a system of several masks to modify the diffraction and achieve extremely high contrast in the image plane around target stars. However, coronagraphic imaging systems are very sensitive to optical aberrations, so wavefront correction using deformable mirrors (DMs) is necessary to avoid contrast degradation in the image plane. Electric field conjugation (EFC) and Stroke minimization (SM) are two primary high-contrast wavefront controllers explored in the past decade. EFC minimizes the average contrast in the search areas while regularizing the strength of the control inputs. Stroke minimization calculates the minimum DM commands under the constraint that a target average contrast is achieved. Recently in the High Contrast Imaging Lab at Princeton University (HCIL), a new linear-constraint wavefront controller based on stroke minimization was developed and demonstrated using numerical simulation. Instead of only constraining the average contrast over the entire search area, the new controller constrains the electric field of each single pixel using linear programming, which could led to significant increases in speed of the wavefront correction and also create more uniform dark holes. As a follow-up of this work, another linear-constraint controller modified from EFC is demonstrated theoretically and numerically and the lab verification of the linear-constraint controllers is reported. Based on the simulation and lab results, the pros and cons of linear-constraint controllers are carefully compared with EFC and stroke minimization.

  11. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-16

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  12. Application of Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to transmissive optic metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammage, Ron R.; Neal, Daniel R.; Copland, Richard J.

    2002-11-01

    Human vision correction optics must be produced in quantity to be economical. At the same time every human eye is unique and requires a custom corrective solution. For this reason the vision industries need fast, versatile and accurate methodologies for characterizing optics for production and research. Current methods for measuring these optics generally yield a cubic spline taken from less than 10 points across the surface of the lens. As corrective optics have grown in complexity this has become inadequate. The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is a device that measures phase and irradiance of light in a single snapshot using geometric properties of light. Advantages of the Shack-Hartmann sensor include small size, ruggedness, accuracy, and vibration insensitivity. This paper discusses a methodology for designing instruments based on Shack-Hartmann sensors. The method is then applied to the development of an instrument for accurate measurement of transmissive optics such as gradient bifocal spectacle lenses, progressive addition bifocal lenses, intrarocular devices, contact lenses, and human corneal tissue. In addition, this instrument may be configured to provide hundreds of points across the surface of the lens giving improved spatial resolution. Methods are explored for extending the dynamic range and accuracy to meet the expanding needs of the ophthalmic and optometric industries. Data is presented demonstrating the accuracy and repeatability of this technique for the target optics.

  13. Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A focus-diverse phase-retrieval algorithm has been shown to perform adequately for the purpose of image-based wavefront sensing when (1) broadband light (typically spanning the visible spectrum) is used in forming the images by use of an optical system under test and (2) the assumption of monochromaticity is applied to the broadband image data. Heretofore, it had been assumed that in order to obtain adequate performance, it is necessary to use narrowband or monochromatic light. Some background information, including definitions of terms and a brief description of pertinent aspects of image-based phase retrieval, is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the present development. Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to denote estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations of an optical system under test. The term image-based wavefront sensing refers to a general class of algorithms that recover optical phase information, and phase-retrieval algorithms constitute a subset of this class. In phase retrieval, one utilizes the measured response of the optical system under test to produce a phase estimate. The optical response of the system is defined as the image of a point-source object, which could be a star or a laboratory point source. The phase-retrieval problem is characterized as image-based in the sense that a charge-coupled-device camera, preferably of scientific imaging quality, is used to collect image data where the optical system would normally form an image. In a variant of phase retrieval, denoted phase-diverse phase retrieval [which can include focus-diverse phase retrieval (in which various defocus planes are used)], an additional known aberration (or an equivalent diversity function) is superimposed as an aid in estimating unknown aberrations by use of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm. Image-based phase-retrieval differs from such other wavefront-sensing methods, such as interferometry, shearing interferometry, curvature

  14. Integrated Wavefront Correction and Bias Estimation for the High-Contrast Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado

    Just over two decades ago the first planet outside our solar system was found, and thousands more have been discovered since. Nearly all these exoplanets were indirectly detected by sensing changes in their host stars' light. However, exoplanets must be directly imaged to determine their atmospheric compositions and the orbital parameters unavailable from only indirect detections. The main challenge of direct imaging is to observe stellar companions much fainter than the star and at small angular separations. Coronagraphy is one method of suppressing stellar diffraction to provide high star-to-planet contrast, but coronagraphs are extremely sensitive to quasi-static aberrations in the optical system. Active correction of the stellar wavefront is performed with deformable mirrors to recover high-contrast regions in the image. Estimation and control of the stellar electric field is performed iteratively in the camera's focal plane to avoid non-common path aberrations arising from a separate pupil sensor. Estimation can thus be quite time consuming because it requires several high-contrast intensity images per correction iteration. This thesis focuses on efficient focal plane wavefront correction (FPWC) for coronagraphy. Time is a precious commodity for a space telescope, so there is a strong incentive to reduce the total exposure time required for focal plane wavefront estimation. Much of our work emphasizes faster, more robust estimation via Kalman filtering, which optimally combines prior data with new measurements. The other main contribution of this thesis is a paradigm shift in the use of estimation images. Time for FPWC has generally been considered to be lost overhead, but we demonstrate that estimation images can be used for the detection and characterization of exoplanets and disks. These science targets are incoherent with their host stars, so we developed and implemented an iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) for simultaneous estimation of the stellar

  15. Optimization-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Jacopo; van Werkhoven, Tim; Verhaegen, Michel; Truong, Hoa H; Keller, Christoph U; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2014-06-01

    Optical aberrations have detrimental effects in multiphoton microscopy. These effects can be curtailed by implementing model-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics, which only requires the addition of a wavefront shaping device, such as a deformable mirror (DM) to an existing microscope. The aberration correction is achieved by maximizing a suitable image quality metric. We implement a model-based aberration correction algorithm in a second-harmonic microscope. The tip, tilt, and defocus aberrations are removed from the basis functions used for the control of the DM, as these aberrations induce distortions in the acquired images. We compute the parameters of a quadratic polynomial that is used to model the image quality metric directly from experimental input-output measurements. Finally, we apply the aberration correction by maximizing the image quality metric using the least-squares estimate of the unknown aberration.

  16. Terahertz wavefront control by tunable metasurface made of graphene ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yatooshi, Takumi; Ishikawa, Atsushi Tsuruta, Kenji

    2015-08-03

    We propose a tunable metasurface consisting of an array of graphene ribbons on a silver mirror with a SiO{sub 2} gap layer to control reflected wavefront at terahertz frequencies. The graphene ribbons exhibit localized plasmon resonances depending on their Fermi levels to introduce abrupt phase shifts along the metasurface. With interference of the Fabry-Perot resonances in the SiO{sub 2} layer, phase shift through the system is largely accumulated, covering the 0-to-2π range for full control of the wavefront. Numerical simulations prove that wide-angle beam steering up to 53° with a high reflection efficiency of 60% is achieved at 5 THz within a switching time shorter than 0.6 ps.

  17. Applications of ultrafast wavefront rotation in highly nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéré, F.; Vincenti, H.; Borot, A.; Monchocé, S.; Hammond, T. J.; Taec Kim, Kyung; Wheeler, J. A.; Zhang, Chunmei; Ruchon, T.; Auguste, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Lopez-Martens, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of ultrafast wavefront rotation of femtosecond laser pulses and its various applications in highly nonlinear optics, focusing on processes that lead to the generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses. In this context, wavefront rotation can be exploited in different ways, to obtain new light sources for time-resolved studies, called ‘attosecond lighthouses’, to perform time-resolved measurements of nonlinear optical processes, using ‘photonic streaking’, or to track changes in the carrier-envelope relative phase of femtosecond laser pulses. The basic principles are explained qualitatively from different points of view, the experimental evidence obtained so far is summarized, and the perspectives opened by these effects are discussed.

  18. Ultrasonically encoded wavefront shaping for focusing into random media

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Jian Wei; Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Phase distortions due to scattering in random media restrict optical focusing beyond one transport mean free path. However, scattering can be compensated for by applying a correction to the illumination wavefront using spatial light modulators. One method of obtaining the wavefront correction is by iterative determination using an optimization algorithm. In the past, obtaining a feedback signal required either direct optical access to the target region, or invasive embedding of molecular probes within the random media. Here, we propose using ultrasonically encoded light as feedback to guide the optimization dynamically and non-invasively. In our proof-of-principle demonstration, diffuse light was refocused to the ultrasound focal zone, with a focus-to-background ratio of more than one order of magnitude after 600 iterations. With further improvements, especially in optimization speed, the proposed method should find broad applications in deep tissue optical imaging and therapy. PMID:24472822

  19. Wavefront sensing for anisotropic turbulence using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurman, Samuel T.; Gatt, Philip; Alley, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We report on digital holographic imaging through atmospheric turbulence. Data recorded with aberrations is corrected during post processing using an iterative sharpness-metric maximization algorithm. Assuming the correction cancels the actual wavefront error, this process is equivalent to wavefront sensing. Much of our past work focused on imaging through isotropic turbulence with phase corrections using a Zernike-polynomial expansion. Here, we describe algorithm modifications for imaging through anisotropic turbulence, similar to what is seen when looking through the aero-optic boundary layer surrounding a moving aircraft. Specifically, we explore tradeoffs associated with switching from a Zernike representation to Karhunen-Loève basis functions. In some cases, the dimensionality of the phase correction estimation algorithm can be reduced significantly by this change. This reduces the computational burden

  20. Wavefront retrieval from lateral shearing interferograms with Fourier techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Paez, Gonzalo; Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge

    1999-08-01

    The wavefront shape can be obtained from lateral shear interferograms even if the lateral shear is large. Many procedures have been devised in the past to achieve this purpose. However, all of them have serious practical restrictions. A method is reported here using a digital analysis of the interferogram in the Fourier space. An alternative iterative method also using Fourier transform techniques is also presented with detail. A comparison of this method with alternative existing procedures is described.

  1. The radiation-wavefront instability in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Iur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    The space-time evolution of a small-scale perturbation against a background of a smooth input beam which is incident on a pulsed CO2 amplifier is studied theoretically. Ranges of transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time values are found in which the perturbation growth is exponential in nature. It is shown that the wavefront instability is stabilized by the amplification of the main beam and sound damping.

  2. Parallel-Computing Architecture for JWST Wavefront-Sensing Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Hubble Space Telescope and will be NASA’s premier observatory of the next decade. Image-based wavefront sensing (phase retrieval) is the primary...INTRODUCTION The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the next-generation successor to the Hubble Space Telescope . It is a large, space -based infrared...ABSTRACT The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope and will be NASA?s premier

  3. Dynamics and Stability of Acoustic Wavefronts in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    approaches to solve the eikonal equation without ray tracing have been developed in mathematical and seismological communities (Vidale, 1990; Sava and...techniques (Vinje et al., 1993, 1999; Lambaré et al., 1996; Sava and Fomel, 2001; Chambers and Kendall, 2008; Hauser et al., 2008), which have been developed...codes originally developed by Sava and Fomel (2001) for seismic modeling and imaging. The codes implement an approach known as Huygens wavefront

  4. Robust wavefront reconstruction using multiple directional derivatives and computer monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarda-Saenz, Ricardo

    2007-03-01

    A simple and automatic wavefront reconstruction is presented. This technique is based on the use of a plane computer display (a thin film transistor monitor) to generate the fringe patterns and compute the gradients field produced by the phase object. The accurate reconstruction is proved by the estimation of the surface map of a progressive ophthalmic lens, which is obtained using computational efficient techniques for the fringe pattern demodulation and gradient field integration.

  5. Dynamics and Stability of Acoustic Wavefronts in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    studied by deriving elementary asymptotic solutions in the frequency and time domains for the acoustic Green’s functions in a homogeneous fluid...in a homogeneous fluid uniformly moving with a speed, which is less than the sound speed, are non-concentric spheres. Comparison of the exact...of wavefronts and timefronts. Acoustic travel-time bias, multi-pathing, rapid proliferation of eigenrays , penetration into shadow zones, and other

  6. Hybrid architecture active wavefront sensing and control system, and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D. (Inventor); Dean, Bruce H. (Inventor); Hyde, Tristram T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    According to various embodiments, provided herein is an optical system and method that can be configured to perform image analysis. The optical system can comprise a telescope assembly and one or more hybrid instruments. The one or more hybrid instruments can be configured to receive image data from the telescope assembly and perform a fine guidance operation and a wavefront sensing operation, simultaneously, on the image data received from the telescope assembly.

  7. Low order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Bartos, Randall; Hein, Randall; Lam, Raymond; Mandic, Milan; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, James K.; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel W.

    2016-07-01

    To maintain the required WFIRST Coronagraph starlight suppression performance in a realistic space environment, a low order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as the low order wavefront errors due to changes in thermal loading on the telescope and the rest of the observatory. In this paper we will present an overview of the low order wavefront sensing and control subsystem for the WFIRST Coronagraph and describe the WFIRST Coronagraph LOWFS function, its design, and modeled performance. We will present experimental results on a dedicated LOWFS/C testbed that show that the LOWFS/C subsystem not only can sense pointing errors better than 0.2 mas but has also experimentally demonstrated closed loop pointing error suppression with residuals better than 0.4 mas rms per axis for the vast majority of observatory reaction wheel speeds.

  8. Research on technique of wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Lvjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2010-05-01

    During finely grinding the best fit sphere and initial stage of polishing, surface error of large aperture aspheric mirrors is too big to test using common interferometer. Foucault test is widely used in fabricating large aperture mirrors. However, the optical path is disturbed seriously by air turbulence, and changes of light and dark zones can not be identified, which often lowers people's judging ability and results in making mistake to diagnose surface error of the whole mirror. To solve the problem, the research presents wavefront retrieval based on Foucault test through digital image processing and quantitative calculation. Firstly, real Foucault image can be gained through collecting a variety of images by CCD, and then average these image to eliminate air turbulence. Secondly, gray values are converted into surface error values through principle derivation, mathematical modeling, and software programming. Thirdly, linear deviation brought by defocus should be removed by least-square method to get real surface error. At last, according to real surface error, plot wavefront map, gray contour map and corresponding pseudo color contour map. The experimental results indicates that the three-dimensional wavefront map and two-dimensional contour map are able to accurately and intuitively show surface error on the whole mirrors under test, and they are beneficial to grasp surface error as a whole. The technique can be used to guide the fabrication of large aperture and long focal mirrors during grinding and initial stage of polishing the aspheric surface, which improves fabricating efficiency and precision greatly.

  9. Preparing for JWST wavefront sensing and control operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Marshall D.; Acton, D. Scott; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Knight, J. Scott; Lallo, Matthew D.; Allen, Marsha; Baggett, Wayne; Barker, Elizabeth; Comeau, Thomas; Coppock, Eric; Dean, Bruce H.; Hartig, George; Hayden, William L.; Jordan, Margaret; Jurling, Alden; Kulp, Trey; Long, Joseph; McElwain, Michael W.; Meza, Luis; Nelan, Edmund P.; Soummer, Remi; Stansberry, John; Stark, Christopher; Telfer, Randal; Welsh, Andria L.; Zielinski, Thomas P.; Zimmerman, Neil T.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescopes segmented primary and deployable secondary mirrors will be actively con- trolled to achieve optical alignment through a complex series of steps that will extend across several months during the observatory's commissioning. This process will require an intricate interplay between individual wavefront sensing and control tasks, instrument-level checkout and commissioning, and observatory-level calibrations, which involves many subsystems across both the observatory and the ground system. Furthermore, commissioning will often exercise observatory capabilities under atypical circumstances, such as fine guiding with unstacked or defocused images, or planning targeted observations in the presence of substantial time-variable offsets to the telescope line of sight. Coordination for this process across the JWST partnership has been conducted through the Wavefront Sensing and Control Operations Working Group. We describe at a high level the activities of this group and the resulting detailed commissioning operations plans, supporting software tools development, and ongoing preparations activities at the Science and Operations Center. For each major step in JWST's wavefront sensing and control, we also explain the changes and additions that were needed to turn an initial operations concept into a flight-ready plan with proven tools. These efforts are leading to a robust and well-tested process and preparing the team for an efficient and successful commissioning of JWSTs active telescope.

  10. Analysis of wavefront reconstruction in 8 meter ring solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yichun; Jin, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    Chinese Giant Solar Telescope (CGST) is the next generation infrared and optical solar telescope of China, which is proposed and pushed by the solar astronomy community of China and listed into the National Plans of Major Science and Technology Infrastructures. CGST is currently proposed to be an 8 meter Ring Solar Telescope (RST) with width of 1 meter, the hollow and symmetric structure of such an annular aperture facilitates the thermal control and high precision magnetic field measurement for a solar telescope. Adaptive optics (AO) is an indispensable tool of RST to obtain diffraction limited observations. How to realize AO involved wavefront sensing and correcting, and the degree of compensating in a narrow annular aperture is the primary problem of AO implementation of RST. Wavefront reconstruction involved problems of RST are first investigated and discussed in this paper using end to end simulation based on Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing (SHWFS). The simulation results show that performance of zonal reconstruction with measurement noise no more than 0.05 arc sec can meets the requirement of RST for diffraction-limited imaging at wavelength of 1μm, which satisfies most science cases of RST in near infrared waveband.

  11. Interferometric focusing of guide-stars for direct wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Dean, Ziah; Chien, Christopher; Azucena, Oscar; Kubby, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Optical microscopy allows noninvasive imaging of biological tissues at a subcellular level. However, the optimal performance of the microscope is hard to achieve because of aberrations induced from tissues. The shallow penetration depth and degraded resolution provide a limited degree of information for biologists. In order to compensate for aberrations, adaptive optics with direct wavefront sensing, where guide-stars are used for wavefront measurement, has been applied in microscopy. The scattering effect limits the intensity of a guide-star and hence reduces the signal to noise ratio of the wavefront measurement. In this paper, we propose to use interferometric focusing of excitation light onto a guide-star embedded deeply in tissue to increase its fluorescence intensity, thus overcoming the signal loss caused by scattering. With interferometric focusing of light, we increase the signal to noise ratio of the laser guide-star through scattering tissue by more than two times as well as potentially extending the thickness of tissue that can be corrected using AO microscopy.

  12. Phase-sensitive two-dimensional neutron shearing interferometer and Hartmann sensor

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin

    2015-12-08

    A neutron imaging system detects both the phase shift and absorption of neutrons passing through an object. The neutron imaging system is based on either of two different neutron wavefront sensor techniques: 2-D shearing interferometry and Hartmann wavefront sensing. Both approaches measure an entire two-dimensional neutron complex field, including its amplitude and phase. Each measures the full-field, two-dimensional phase gradients and, concomitantly, the two-dimensional amplitude mapping, requiring only a single measurement.

  13. Pyramid wavefront sensing with a laser guide star for an ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Brice

    2010-07-01

    The wavefront sensor [WFS] is a key element of an Adaptive Optics [AO] system. It gives access to a direct measurement of the turbulent phase, its curvature or its slope, from which the mirror voltages are computed. The ability of the system to correct efficiently the atmospheric turbulence is strongly dependent on the performance of the WFS in estimating the turbulent phase. The Shack-Hartmann [SH] WFS has been for a long time the standard used in AO systems. In 1996, it has been proposed1 a new generation WFS, the pyramid WFS. It is a focal plane WFS, based on the principle of a Foucault knife-edge. It has been demonstrated that it provides a consistent gain with respect to the Shack-Hartmann.2,5-7 More recently, improvements were proposed to increase the pyramid performance.3, 4 On the framework of the developpement of extremely large telescopes, the interest of a pyramid wave front sensor appears clearly. But its behaviour with laser guide stars [LGS], most probably necessary in any Extremely Large Telescope [ELT], is still relatively unknown. Some WFS dedicated to LGS wave front sensing has already been proposed8,9 but a full study of the pyramid WFS behaviour is still necessary. This work's aim is to bring answers to this topic.

  14. DIORAMA Model of Satellite Body Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, Kenneth Alan

    2016-03-04

    The DIORAMA GPS satellite platform orientation model is described. Satellites need to keep sensors pointed towards the earth and solar panels oriented to face the sun (when not in the earth’s shadow) while they orbit the earth.

  15. Simulation of wavefront reconstruction in beam reshaping system for rectangular laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Wenguang; Jiang, Zongfu

    2014-05-01

    A new method to calculating the wavefront of slap laser is studied in this paper. The method is based on the ray trace theory of geometrical optics. By using the Zemax simulation software and Matlab calculation software, the wavefront of rectangular beam in beam reshaping system is reconstructed. Firstly, with the x- and y-slope measurement of reshaping beam the direction cosine of wavefront can be calculated. Then, the inverse beam path of beam reshaping system is built by using Zemax simulation software and the direction cosine of rectangular beam can be given, too. Finally, Southwell zonal model is used to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam in computer simulation. Once the wavefront is received, the aberration of laser can be eliminated by using the proper configuration of beam reshaping system. It is shown that this method to reconstruct the wavefront of rectangular beam can evidently reduce the negative influence of additional aberration induced by beam reshaping system.

  16. Wavefront Sensing With Switched Lenses for Defocus Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    In an alternative hardware design for an apparatus used in image-based wavefront sensing, defocus diversity is introduced by means of fixed lenses that are mounted in a filter wheel (see figure) so that they can be alternately switched into a position in front of the focal plane of an electronic camera recording the image formed by the optical system under test. [The terms image-based, wavefront sensing, and defocus diversity are defined in the first of the three immediately preceding articles, Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing (GSC-14899-1).] Each lens in the filter wheel is designed so that the optical effect of placing it at the assigned position is equivalent to the optical effect of translating the camera a specified defocus distance along the optical axis. Heretofore, defocus diversity has been obtained by translating the imaging camera along the optical axis to various defocus positions. Because data must be taken at multiple, accurately measured defocus positions, it is necessary to mount the camera on a precise translation stage that must be calibrated for each defocus position and/or to use an optical encoder for measurement and feedback control of the defocus positions. Additional latency is introduced into the wavefront sensing process as the camera is translated to the various defocus positions. Moreover, if the optical system under test has a large focal length, the required defocus values are large, making it necessary to use a correspondingly bulky translation stage. By eliminating the need for translation of the camera, the alternative design simplifies and accelerates the wavefront-sensing process. This design is cost-effective in that the filterwheel/lens mechanism can be built from commercial catalog components. After initial calibration of the defocus value of each lens, a selected defocus value is introduced by simply rotating the filter wheel to place the corresponding lens in front of the camera. The rotation of the

  17. Laboratory evaluation of the GreenSeeker (TM) hand-held optical sensor to variations in orientation and height above canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Handheld optical sensors recently have been introduced to the agricultural market to simplify acquisition of spectral reflectance data. These handheld sensors are able to provide operators with Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI) data when cloud cover prevents acquisition of satellite or ...

  18. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  19. Simulation and Fabrication of SAW-Based Gas Sensor with Modified Surface State of Active Layer and Electrode Orientation for Enhanced H2 Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazibul; Maity, Santanu; Sarkar, Argha; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak; Acharjee, Debabrata; Joseph, Aneesh M.

    2017-02-01

    The design, analysis, optimization, and fabrication of layered and nanostructure-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors are presented. A lithium niobate and zinc oxide (ZnO) nano multilayer structure is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of the SAW-based gas sensor. Different materials are considered for the intermediate layer in the design for optimization purposes. The sensitivity of the sensor could be improved due to increased active surface area obtained by varying the aspect ratio of the nanorods, the thickness of the intermediate layer, and the gap between the electrodes. The total displacement and frequency shift of the device were significantly improved. Overall, the mechanically engineered surface-based (nanorod) SAW gas sensor offered better sensing response than the layered SAW gas sensor in terms of sensitivity performance.

  20. Wave-front error breakdown in laser guide star multi-object adaptive optics validated on-sky by Canary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, O. A.; Gendron, É.; Rousset, G.; Gratadour, D.; Vidal, F.; Morris, T. J.; Basden, A. G.; Myers, R. M.; Correia, C. M.; Henry, D.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Canary is the multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) on-sky pathfinder developed in the perspective of multi-object spectrograph on extremely large telescopes (ELTs). In 2013, Canary was operated on-sky at the William Herschel telescope (WHT), using three off-axis natural guide stars (NGS) and four off-axis Rayleigh laser guide stars (LGS), in open-loop, with the on-axis compensated turbulence observed with a H-band imaging camera and a Truth wave-front sensor (TS) for diagnostic purposes. Aims: Our purpose is to establish a reliable and accurate wave-front error breakdown for LGS MOAO. This will enable a comprehensive analysis of Canary on-sky results and provide tools for validating simulations of MOAO systems for ELTs. Methods: To evaluate the MOAO performance, we compared the Canary on-sky results running in MOAO, in single conjugated adaptive optics (SCAO) and in ground layer adaptive optics (GLAO) modes, over a large set of data acquired in 2013. We provide a statistical study of the seeing. We also evaluated the wave-front error breakdown from both analytic computations, one based on a MOAO system modelling and the other on the measurements from the Canary TS. We have focussed especially on the tomographic error and we detail its vertical error decomposition. Results: We show that Canary obtained 30.1%, 21.4% and 17.1% H-band Strehl ratios in SCAO, MOAO and GLAO respectively, for median seeing conditions with 0.66'' of total seeing including 0.59'' at the ground. Moreover, we get 99% of correlation over 4500 samples, for any AO modes, between two analytic computations of residual phase variance. Based on these variances, we obtain a reasonable Strehl-ratio (SR) estimation when compared to the measured IR image SR. We evaluate the gain in compensation for the altitude turbulence brought by MOAO when compared to GLAO.

  1. Partial coherence and imperfect optics at a synchrotron radiation source modeled by wavefront propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundy, David; Alcock, Simon G.; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal J. S.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    A full wave propagation of X-rays from source to sample at a storage ring beamline requires simulation of the electron beam source and optical elements in the beamline. The finite emittance source causes the appearance of partial coherence in the wave field. Consequently, the wavefront cannot be treated exactly with fully coherent wave propagation or fully incoherent ray tracing. We have used the wavefront code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) to perform partially coherent wavefront propagation using a parallel computing cluster at the Diamond Light Source. Measured mirror profiles have been used to correct the wavefront for surface errors.

  2. High-accuracy wavefront control for retinal imaging with Adaptive-Influence-Matrix Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an iterative technique for improving adaptive optics (AO) wavefront correction for retinal imaging, called the Adaptive-Influence-Matrix (AIM) method. This method is based on the fact that the deflection-to-voltage relation of common deformable mirrors used in AO are nonlinear, and the fact that in general the wavefront errors of the eye can be considered to be composed of a static, non-zero wavefront error (such as the defocus and astigmatism), and a time-varying wavefront error. The aberrated wavefront is first corrected with a generic influence matrix, providing a mirror compensation figure for the static wavefront error. Then a new influence matrix that is more accurate for the specific static wavefront error is calibrated based on the mirror compensation figure. Experimental results show that with the AIM method the AO wavefront correction accuracy can be improved significantly in comparison to the generic AO correction. The AIM method is most useful in AO modalities where there are large static contributions to the wavefront aberrations. PMID:19997241

  3. Three-dimensional particle imaging by wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Towers, Catherine E; Towers, David P; Campbell, Heather I; Zhang, Sijiong; Greenaway, Alan H

    2006-05-01

    We present two methods for three-dimensional particle metrology from a single two-dimensional view. The techniques are based on wavefront sensing where the three-dimensional location of a particle is encoded into a single image plane. The first technique is based on multiplanar imaging, and the second produces three-dimensional location information via anamorphic distortion of the recorded images. Preliminary results show that an uncertainty of 8 microm in depth can be obtained for low-particle density over a thin plane, and an uncertainty of 30 microm for higher particle density over a 10 mm deep volume.

  4. Towards feasible and effective predictive wavefront control for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2008-06-04

    We have recently proposed Predictive Fourier Control, a computationally efficient and adaptive algorithm for predictive wavefront control that assumes frozen flow turbulence. We summarize refinements to the state-space model that allow operation with arbitrary computational delays and reduce the computational cost of solving for new control. We present initial atmospheric characterization using observations with Gemini North's Altair AO system. These observations, taken over 1 year, indicate that frozen flow is exists, contains substantial power, and is strongly detected 94% of the time.

  5. Wavefront sensing with Hypertelescope Laser-Guide-Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, P. D.; Labeyrie, L.

    2014-04-01

    A Hypertelescope with a spherical architecture is an attractive solution to simultaneously use tens to hundreds of mirrors in a ˜ 100 m interferometric array. Provided that phasing is possible, such an instrument will allow us to obtain direct images as well as to push the limiting magnitude in optical interferometry. In order to achieve this a modified laser guide star technique has been proposed. We summarize the status of recent simulation studies of wavefront-sensing with hypertelescopes equipped with laser-guide-stars.

  6. Zernike aberration coefficients transformed to and from Fourier series coefficients for wavefront representation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guang-Ming

    2006-02-15

    The set of Fourier series is discussed following some discussion of Zernike polynomials. Fourier transforms of Zernike polynomials are derived that allow for relating Fourier series expansion coefficients to Zernike polynomial expansion coefficients. With iterative Fourier reconstruction, Zernike representations of wavefront aberrations can easily be obtained from wavefront derivative measurements.

  7. Wavefront analysis of the laser beam propagating through a turbid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Galaktionov, I V; Sheldakova, J V; Kudryashov, A V

    2015-02-28

    Laser beam propagation through a scattering suspension of polystyrene microspheres in distilled water is studied theoretically and experimentally. The dependence of wavefront aberrations on the particle concentration is investigated. The existence of symmetric wavefront aberrations of the laser beam passed through a turbid medium is shown. (light scattering)

  8. Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Tana; Deaver, Dawne; Howell, Christopher; Moyer, Steve; Nguyen, Oanh; Mueller, Greg; Ryan, Denise; Sia, Rose K.; Stutzman, Richard; Pasternak, Joseph; Bower, Kraig

    2014-06-01

    Major decisions regarding life and death are routinely made on the modern battlefield, where visual function of the individual soldier can be of critical importance in the decision-making process. Glasses in the combat environment have considerable disadvantages: degradation of short term visual performance can occur as dust and sweat accumulate on lenses during a mission or patrol; long term visual performance can diminish as lenses become increasingly scratched and pitted; during periods of intense physical trauma, glasses can be knocked off the soldier's face and lost or broken. Although refractive surgery offers certain benefits on the battlefield when compared to wearing glasses, it is not without potential disadvantages. As a byproduct of refractive surgery, elevated optical aberrations can be induced, causing decreases in contrast sensitivity and increases in the symptoms of glare, halos, and starbursts. Typically, these symptoms occur under low light level conditions, the same conditions under which most military operations are initiated. With the advent of wavefront aberrometry, we are now seeing correction not only of myopia and astigmatism but of other, smaller optical aberrations that can cause the above symptoms. In collaboration with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center (WRESP-RC) at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), the overall objective of this study is to determine the impact of wavefront guided (WFG) versus wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on military task visual performance. Psychophysical perception testing was conducted before and after surgery to measure each participant's performance regarding target detection and identification using thermal imagery. The results are presented here.

  9. Anti-aliasing Wiener filtering for wave-front reconstruction in the spatial-frequency domain for high-order astronomical adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Teixeira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Computationally efficient wave-front reconstruction techniques for astronomical adaptive-optics (AO) systems have seen great development in the past decade. Algorithms developed in the spatial-frequency (Fourier) domain have gathered much attention, especially for high-contrast imaging systems. In this paper we present the Wiener filter (resulting in the maximization of the Strehl ratio) and further develop formulae for the anti-aliasing (AA) Wiener filter that optimally takes into account high-order wave-front terms folded in-band during the sensing (i.e., discrete sampling) process. We employ a continuous spatial-frequency representation for the forward measurement operators and derive the Wiener filter when aliasing is explicitly taken into account. We further investigate and compare to classical estimates using least-squares filters the reconstructed wave-front, measurement noise, and aliasing propagation coefficients as a function of the system order. Regarding high-contrast systems, we provide achievable performance results as a function of an ensemble of forward models for the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (using sparse and nonsparse representations) and compute point-spread-function raw intensities. We find that for a 32×32 single-conjugated AOs system the aliasing propagation coefficient is roughly 60% of the least-squares filters, whereas the noise propagation is around 80%. Contrast improvements of factors of up to 2 are achievable across the field in the H band. For current and next-generation high-contrast imagers, despite better aliasing mitigation, AA Wiener filtering cannot be used as a standalone method and must therefore be used in combination with optical spatial filters deployed before image formation actually takes place.

  10. Modal wavefront estimation from its slopes by numerical orthogonal transformation method over general shaped aperture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jingfei; Wang, Wei; Gao, Zhishan; Liu, Zhiying; Wang, Shuai; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Yuan, Qun

    2015-10-05

    Wavefront estimation from the slope-based sensing metrologies zis important in modern optical testing. A numerical orthogonal transformation method is proposed for deriving the numerical orthogonal gradient polynomials as numerical orthogonal basis functions for directly fitting the measured slope data and then converting to the wavefront in a straightforward way in the modal approach. The presented method can be employed in the wavefront estimation from its slopes over the general shaped aperture. Moreover, the numerical orthogonal transformation method could be applied to the wavefront estimation from its slope measurements over the dynamic varying aperture. The performance of the numerical orthogonal transformation method is discussed, demonstrated and verified by the examples. They indicate that the presented method is valid, accurate and easily implemented for wavefront estimation from its slopes.

  11. Wavefront-error evaluation by mathematical analysis of experimental Foucault-test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The diffraction theory of the Foucault test provides an integral formula expressing the complex amplitude and irradiance distribution in the Foucault pattern of a test mirror (lens) as a function of wavefront error. Recent literature presents methods of inverting this formula to express wavefront error in terms of irradiance in the Foucault pattern. The present paper describes a study in which the inversion formulation was applied to photometric Foucault-test measurements on a nearly diffraction-limited mirror to determine wavefront errors for direct comparison with ones determined from scatter-plate interferometer measurements. The results affirm the practicability of the Foucault test for quantitative wavefront analysis of very small errors, and they reveal the fallacy of the prevalent belief that the test is limited to qualitative use only. Implications of the results with regard to optical testing and the potential use of the Foucault test for wavefront analysis in orbital space telescopes are discussed.

  12. Optical compensation for hologram distortion using wavefront interpolation in angle-multiplexed holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Distortion of the hologram may occur when the photopolymer material used in the medium shrinks or expands. We analyzed interference fringe distortion for plane waves and a reference beam with an angular gap between recording and reproducing for the purpose of compensating for the distortion. We found that the wavefronts that could compensate for the distortion could approximately be obtained by linear interpolation of such angle-multiplexed holograms. We recorded 80 data pages with the angle-multiplexing method and obtained an optimized wavefront to compensate for hologram distortion on the first, fortieth, and eightieth data pages using adaptive optics with genetic algorithms and linear interpolated wavefronts at the other data pages. The calculation time for 80 wavefronts to compensate for distortion fell to 3/80th of that of having to calculate optimizations for all pages. The bit error rates were lower than 1.0 × 10-2 on all data pages reproduced using these wavefronts.

  13. Wave-front aberration measurements on GRIN-rod lenses.

    PubMed

    Cline, T W; Jander, R B

    1982-03-15

    A survey of the optical quality of commercial and experimental Selfoc GRIN-rod lenses was made using a digital Twyman-Green wave-front interferometer. The technique provides an accurate and reproducible method for predicting lens performance in microoptic devices. Wave-front aberrations are reported for (1/4) pitch lenses measured in a double-pass configuration. It was found that spherical aberration is dominant in commercial lenses. SLW (1/4) pitch lenses have lower aberrations than SLS lenses and are quite suitable for microoptic devices based on fiber-to-fiber coupling. Measured multimode coupling efficiency under steady-state modal propagation is compared to measured spherical aberration for a number of lenses. The slope of the coupling dependence on spherical aberration was found to be -0.1 dB/wave. Effects due to mechanical alignment and the modal distribution in the fibers had a greater influence on the measured coupling efficiency than the contribution due the intrinsic lens aberrations, especially for the SLW lenses. Comparison of this empirical dependence with theoretical predictions for a uniform distribution, which suggests a stronger dependence, is discussed. This work suggests that commercially available GRIN-rod lenses are suitable for use in microoptic components.

  14. X-ray wavefront modeling of Bragg diffraction from crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, John P.

    2011-09-01

    The diffraction of an X-ray wavefront from a slightly distorted crystal can be modeled by the Takagi-Taupin theory, an extension of the well-known dynamical diffraction theory for perfect crystals. Maxwell's equations applied to a perturbed periodic medium yield two coupled differential equations in the incident and diffracted amplitude. These equations are discretized for numerical calculation into the determination of the two amplitudes on the points of an integration mesh, beginning with the incident amplitudes at the crystal's top surface. The result is a set of diffracted amplitudes on the top surface (in the Bragg geometry) or the bottom surface (in the Laue geometry), forming a wavefront that in turn can be propagated through free space using the Fresnel- Huygens equations. The performance of the Diamond Light Source I20 dispersive spectrometer has here been simulated using this method. Methods are shown for transforming displacements calculated by finite element analysis into local lattice distortions, and for efficiently performing 3-D linear interpolations from these onto the Takagi-Taupin integration mesh, allowing this method to be extended to crystals under thermal load or novel mechanical bender designs.

  15. Color wavefront printer with mosaic delivery of primary colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hoonjong; Stoykova, Elena; Kim, Youngmin; Hong, Sunghee; Park, Joosup; Hong, Jisoo

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents design and implementation of a color wavefront holographic printer which prints white light viewable holograms of three-dimensional (3D) objects from digital contents. Similarly to other holographic printers, the printed hologram is composed as a two-dimensional array of elemental volume holograms. In the proposed wavefront printer, the 3D information was encoded in computer generated holograms displayed in succession on an amplitude spatial light modulator. The light beam diffracted from the modulator was filtered to extract the beam coming from the object and demagnified to be recorded onto the holographic emulsion as a small size elemental hologram that made possible application of mosaic delivery of exposures at primary colors. As a result, each elemental hologram corresponded to a single color channel. A modified phase-added stereogram approach based on a hologram partitioning method was proposed to accelerate computer generation of digital contents. We achieved bright 3D reconstruction with a motion parallax at saturated colors from holograms of test objects that were printed on a silver-halide emulsion. Thus we proved experimentally feasibility of recording analog color volume holograms from digital contents by applying spatially separated exposures at primary colors to the elemental holograms.

  16. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking.

    PubMed

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-07-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology.

  17. Wavefront modulation of water surface wave by a metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Tao; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Jing-Shi; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    We design a planar metasurface to modulate the wavefront of a water surface wave (WSW) on a deep sub-wavelength scale. The metasurface is composed of an array of coiling-up-space units with specially designed parameters, and can take on the work of steering the wavefront when it is pierced into water. Like their acoustic counterparts, the modulation of WSW is ascribed to the gradient phase shift of the coiling-up-space units, which can be perfectly tuned by changing the coiling plate length and channel number inside the units. According to the generalized Snell’s law, negative refraction and ‘driven’ surface mode of WSW are also demonstrated at certain incidences. Specially, the transmitted WSW could be efficiently guided out by linking a symmetrically-corrugated channel in ‘driven’ surface mode. This work may have potential applications in water wave energy extraction and coastal protection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474162, 11274171, 11274099, and 11204145), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant Nos. 20110091120040 and 20120091110001).

  18. X-ray ptychography with highly-curved wavefront

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Shapiro, D.; Kaznatcheev, K.

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of scanning coherent x-ay diffraction microscopy (also known as ptychography) eliminates several constraints exerted by coherent imaging. In particular, an illuminating wave (the probe) can have an arbitrary shape, as a diffraction data redundancy due to multiple measurements at overlapping neighboring probe positions permits its independent reconstruction along with the scattering potential (the object wave). A priori knowledge, such as a finite sample support, is reduced to a recording of sequential probe positions and a plausible guess to be used as a starting estimate for iterative phase retrieval. Using a focusing probe, such as one produced by a zone plate, we investigate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithm and find that it is significantly less successful at reconstructing wavefronts with large curvature (extended phase variation) than the wavefronts with almost flat phase structure. Our simulations show that when the actual probe has large phase variation, the amount of overlap required for a successful reconstruction of both object and probe depends upon the phase difference between the actual probe and the probe used as a starting estimate for the reconstruction. We quantitatively define the circumstances for successful reconstruction of an object placed away from focus. We use an experimental dataset measured with a moderate amount of overlap to show that a successful reconstruction of the test sample can be done using a curved probe as an initial guess.

  19. X-ray pulse wavefront metrology using speckle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric; Cloetens, Peter

    2015-01-01

    An instrument allowing the quantitative analysis of X-ray pulsed wavefronts is presented and its processing method explained. The system relies on the X-ray speckle tracking principle to accurately measure the phase gradient of the X-ray beam from which beam optical aberrations can be deduced. The key component of this instrument, a semi-transparent scintillator emitting visible light while transmitting X-rays, allows simultaneous recording of two speckle images at two different propagation distances from the X-ray source. The speckle tracking procedure for a reference-less metrology mode is described with a detailed account on the advanced processing schemes used. A method to characterize and compensate for the imaging detector distortion, whose principle is also based on speckle, is included. The presented instrument is expected to find interest at synchrotrons and at the new X-ray free-electron laser sources under development worldwide where successful exploitation of beams relies on the availability of an accurate wavefront metrology. PMID:26134791

  20. A procedure for accurate calibration of the orientation of the three sensors in a vector magnetometer. [at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures are described for the calibration of a vector magnetometer of high absolute accuracy. It is assumed that the calibration will be performed in the magnetic test facility of Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The first main section of the report describes the test equipment and facility calibrations required. The second presents procedures for calibrating individual sensors. The third discusses the calibration of the sensor assembly. In a final section recommendations are made to GSFC for modification of the test facility required to carry out the calibration procedures.

  1. Study of preferred orientation of zinc oxide films on the 64 deg. LiNbO{sub 3} substrates and their applications as liquid sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, S.-J.; Chu, S.-Y.; Huang, T.-Y.; Water, Walter

    2004-11-01

    The preferred (002) orientation of zinc oxide (ZnO) films has been grown and demonstrated on 64 deg. LiNbO{sub 3} substrates using a rf magnetron sputtering system. The film orientations and crystallinity are strongly dependent on the rf power, total chamber pressure, ratio of argon to oxygen, and substrate temperature. We investigated the crystalline structure of the films by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Highly oriented (002) films were obtained under a total chamber pressure of 1.33 Pa, containing 40% oxygen and 60% argon, and a substrate temperature around 120 deg. C. Love-wave devices based on this structure (ZnO/IDTs/64 deg. LiNbO{sub 3}) are presented.

  2. Coronagraphic wavefront sensing with COFFEE: high spatial-frequency diversity and other news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, L. M.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Herscovici-Schiller, O.; Baudoz, P.; Galicher, R.; Le Duigou, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. In order to reach very high contrasts, these aberrations needs to be compensated for. We have proposed a focalplane wave-font sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), which consists in an extension of conventional phase diversity to a coronagraphic system. In this communication, we study the extension of COFFEE to the joint estimation of the phase and the amplitude in the context of space-based coronagraphic instruments: we optimize the diversity phase in order to minimize the reconstruction error; we also propose and optimize a novel low-amplitude high-frequency diversity that should allow the phase-diverse images to still be used for science. Lastly, we perform a first experimental validation of COFFEE in the very high, space-like contrast conditions of the THD bench and show that COFFEE is able to distinguish between phase and amplitude aberrations.

  3. Measurement of wavefront and Wigner distribution function for optics alignment and full beam characterization of FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus; Keitel, Barbara; Kreis, Svea; Kuhlmann, Marion; Plönjes, Elke; Tiedtke, Kai

    2013-05-01

    Free-electron lasers deliver EUV and soft x-ray pulses with the highest brilliance available and high spatial coherence. Users of such facilities have high demands on the coherence properties of the beam, for instance when working with coherent di ractive imaging (CDI). Experimentally, we are recovering the phase distribition with an EUV Hartmann wavefront sensor. This allows for online adjustment of focusing optics such as ellipsoidal or Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors minimizing the aberrations in the focused beam. To gain highly resolved spatial coherence information, we have performed a caustic scan at beamline BL2 of the free-electron laser FLASH using the ellipsoidal focusing mirror and a movable EUV sensitized CCD detector. This measurement allows for retrieving the Wigner distribution function, being the two-dimensional Fourier transform of the mutual intensity of the beam. Computing the reconstruction on a four-dimensional grid, this yields the entire Wigner distribution which describes the beam propagation completely. Hence, we are able to provide comprehensive information about spatial coherence properties of the FLASH beam including the global degree of coherence. Additionally, we derive the beam propagation parameters such as Rayleigh length, waist diameter and M2.

  4. Computational methods to compute wavefront error due to aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genberg, Victor; Michels, Gregory; Doyle, Keith; Bury, Mark; Sebastian, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Aero-optic effects can have deleterious effects on high performance airborne optical sensors that must view through turbulent flow fields created by the aerodynamic effects of windows and domes. Evaluating aero-optic effects early in the program during the design stages allows mitigation strategies and optical system design trades to be performed to optimize system performance. This necessitates a computationally efficient means to evaluate the impact of aero-optic effects such that the resulting dynamic pointing errors and wavefront distortions due to the spatially and temporally varying flow field can be minimized or corrected. To this end, an aero-optic analysis capability was developed within the commercial software SigFit that couples CFD results with optical design tools. SigFit reads the CFD generated density profile using the CGNS file format. OPD maps are then created by converting the three-dimensional density field into an index of refraction field and then integrating along specified paths to compute OPD errors across the optical field. The OPD maps may be evaluated directly against system requirements or imported into commercial optical design software including Zemax® and Code V® for a more detailed assessment of the impact on optical performance from which design trades may be performed.

  5. Laser guide star wavefront sensing for ground-layer adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Clare, Richard M; Le Louarn, Miska; Béchet, Clementine

    2011-02-01

    We propose ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) to improve the seeing on the 42 m European Extremely Large Telescope. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs) with laser guide stars (LGSs) will experience significant spot elongation due to off-axis observation. This spot elongation influences the design of the laser launch location, laser power, WFS detector, and centroiding algorithm for LGS GLAO on an extremely large telescope. We show, using end-to-end numerical simulations, that with a noise-weighted matrix-vector-multiply reconstructor, the performance in terms of 50% ensquared energy (EE) of the side and central launch of the lasers is equivalent, the matched filter and weighted center of gravity centroiding algorithms are the most promising, and approximately 10×10 undersampled pixels are optimal. Significant improvement in the 50% EE can be observed with a few tens of photons/subaperture/frame, and no significant gain is seen by adding more than 200 photons/subaperture/frame. The LGS GLAO is not particularly sensitive to the sodium profile present in the mesosphere nor to a short-timescale (less than 100 s) evolution of the sodium profile. The performance of LGS GLAO is, however, sensitive to the atmospheric turbulence profile.

  6. Distributed Computing Architecture for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing and 2 D FFTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Dean, Bruce H.; Haghani, Shadan

    2006-01-01

    Image-based wavefront sensing (WFS) provides significant advantages over interferometric-based wavefi-ont sensors such as optical design simplicity and stability. However, the image-based approach is computational intensive, and therefore, specialized high-performance computing architectures are required in applications utilizing the image-based approach. The development and testing of these high-performance computing architectures are essential to such missions as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestial Planet Finder-Coronagraph (TPF-C and CorSpec), and Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT). The development of these specialized computing architectures require numerous two-dimensional Fourier Transforms, which necessitate an all-to-all communication when applied on a distributed computational architecture. Several solutions for distributed computing are presented with an emphasis on a 64 Node cluster of DSPs, multiple DSP FPGAs, and an application of low-diameter graph theory. Timing results and performance analysis will be presented. The solutions offered could be applied to other all-to-all communication and scientifically computationally complex problems.

  7. Performance of Dispersed Fringe Sensor in the Presence of Segmented Mirror Aberrations: Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is an efficient and robust method for coarse phasing of a segmented primary mirror such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In this paper, modeling and simulations are used to study the effect of segmented mirror aberrations on the fringe image, DFS signals and DFS detection accuracy. The study has shown due to the pixilation spatial filter effect from DFS signal extraction the effect of wavefront error is reduced and DFS algorithm will be more robust against wavefront aberration by using multi-trace DFS approach. We also studied the JWST Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS) performance in presence of wavefront aberrations caused by the gravity sag and we use the scaled gravity sag to explore the JWST DHS performance relationship with the level of the wavefront aberration. This also includes the effect from line-of-sight jitter.

  8. Gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  9. Novel Adaptive Optics concepts : wavefront sensing with sodium laser guide stars at Extemely Large Telescopes and simultaneous differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Stephan Albert

    2005-12-01

    Since more than 15 years, Adaptive Optics (AO) is a proven concept to reach diffraction limited imaging at modern astronomical telescopes. In the case of next generation telescopes (Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)) with aperture diameters of up to 100m, sodium laser guide star based multi-conjugated-AO systems will be a basic requirement to exploit their full capability in terms of resolution and light concentration. A drawback of such an approach emerges in the finite distance and vertical extent of the sodium beacon in the mesosphere with respect to the telescope. This induces effects such as perspective elongation, where conventional wavefront sensing mechanisms will fail. Although several engineering concepts are under development to counteract these constraints at the cost of overall light efficiency and increased system complexity, this thesis proposes a novel kind of wavefront sensing technique to overcome the imposed limitations in a more natural way. The sensing technique is composed of two independently working sensors, a reflective rod and a mask with circular slits, each a representative of a novel wavefront sensor class, the so called z-invariant and Inverse Bessel Beam technique. Both are discussed in this thesis with a focus on the Inverse Bessel Beam technique. The latter is compared to alternative concepts such as temporal gating, with respect to the photon efficiency. Furthermore, the reflective rod was tested for its feasibility in laboratory conditions and in a more realistic environment at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at La Palma. With this test run its sensing principle has been verified. A novel technique already intensively used at 8m class telescopes is Simultaneous Differential Imaging. The direct detection of giant extra-solar planets is and will be a major science driver for galactic astronomy in the coming years. Modern telescope facilities such as the VLT reach, by means of adaptive optics, potentially the capability in terms

  10. Relative optical wavefront measurement in displacement measuring interferometer systems with sub-nm precision.

    PubMed

    Meskers, Arjan J H; Voigt, Dirk; Spronck, Jo W

    2013-07-29

    Many error sources can affect the accuracy of displacement measuring interferometer systems. In heterodyne interferometry two laser source frequencies constitute the finally detected wavefront. When the wavefronts of these source frequencies are non-ideal and one of them walks off the detector, the shape of the detected wavefront will vary. This leads to a change in measured phase at the detector resulting in increased measurement uncertainty. A new wavefront measurement tool described in this publication measures the relative phase difference between the two wavefronts of the two source frequencies of a coaxial heterodyne laser source as used in commercial heterodyne interferometer systems. The proposed measurement method uses standard commercial optics and operates with the same phase measurement equipment that is normally used for heterodyne displacement interferometry. In the presented method a bare tip of a multimode fiber represents the receiving detection aperture and is used for locally sampling the wavefront during a line scan. The difference in phase between the beating frequency of the scanning fiber and a reference beating frequency that results from integration over the entire beam, is used for the reconstruction of the wavefront. The method shows to have a phase resolution in the order of ~25 pm or ~λ/25000 for λ 632.8 nm, and a spatial resolution of ~60 µm at a repeatability better than 1 nm over one week.

  11. Airborne Sensor Thermal Management Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K. K.

    2015-06-03

    The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft. The customer wants to outfit aircraft (de Havilland Twin Otter) with optical sensors. In previous product generations the sensor line-of-sight direction was fixed – the sensor’s direction relied on the orientation of the aircraft. The next generation sensor will be packaged in a rotatable turret so that the line-of-sight is reasonably independent of the aircraft’s orientation. This turret will be mounted on a boom protruding from the side of the aircraft.

  12. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  13. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence-induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Gregory, Don A.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time liquid crystal television-based technique for simulating optical wavefront distortion due to atmospheric turbulence is presented and demonstrated. A liquid crystal television (LCTV) operating in the "phase mostly" mode was used as an array of spatially correlated phase delays. A movie of the arrays in motion was then generated and displayed on the LCTV. The turbulence simulation system was verified by passing a collimated and doubled diode pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser beam (532 nm) through the transparent LCTV screen. The beam was then passed through a lens and the power spectra of the turbulence information carrying beam was detected as a measure of the far-field distribution. The same collimated laser beam, without the LCTV, was also transmitted down an open-air range and the power spectra detected as a measure of a real far-field distribution. Accepted turbulence parameters were measured for both arrangements and then compared.

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  15. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence induced optical wavefront distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Travis Shane

    1999-11-01

    Many creative approaches have been taken in the past for simulating the effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams. Most of the experimental architectures have been complicated and consisted of many optical elements as well as moving components. These techniques have shown a modicum of success; however, they are not completely controllable or predictable. A benchtop technique for experimentally producing one important effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams (phase distortion) is presented here. The system is completely controllable and predictable while accurately representing the statistical nature of the problem. Previous experimentation in optical processing through turbulent media has demonstrated that optical wavefront distortions can be produced via spatial light modulating (SLM) devices, and most turbulence models and experimental results indicate that turbulence can be represented as a phase fluctuation. The amplitude distributions in the resulting far field are primarily due to propagation of the phase. Operating a liquid crystal television (LCTV) in the ``phase- mostly'' mode, a phase fluctuation type model for turbulence is utilized in the present investigation, and a real-time experiment for demonstrating the effects was constructed. For an optical system to simulate optical wavefront distortions due to atmospheric turbulence, the following are required: (1)An optical element that modulates the phasefront of an optical beam (2)A model and a technique for generating spatially correlated turbulence simulating distributions (3)Hardware and software for displaying and manipulating the information addressing the optical phase modulation device The LCTV is ideal for this application. When operated in the ``phase-mostly'' mode some LCTVs can modulate the phasefront of an optical beam by as much as 2π and an algorithm for generating spatially correlated phase screens can be constructed via mathematical modeling software such as

  16. Amplitude-masked photoacoustic wavefront shaping and application in flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Jian Wei; Liang, Jinyang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic flowmetry allows non-invasive single-cell flow measurements. However, its operational depth is limited by optical diffusion, which prevents focusing beyond shallow depths in scattering media, as well as reducing the measurement signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome this limitation, we used binary-amplitude wavefront shaping to enhance light focusing in the presence of scattering. Here, the transmission modes that contributed constructively to the intensity at the optical focus were identified and selectively illuminated, resulting in a 14-fold intensity increase and a corresponding increase in SNR. This technique can potentially extend the operational depth of optical-resolution photoacoustic flowmetry beyond 1 mm in tissue. PMID:25360912

  17. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved.

  18. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  19. TRL-6 for JWST Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Smith, Scott; Aronstein, David; Shiri, Ron; Lyon, Rick; Hayden, Bill; Bowers, Chuck; Acton, D. Scott; Shields, Duncan; Sabatke, Erin; Schwenker, John; Towell, Tim; Carey, Larkin; Contos, Adam; Shi, Fang; Mesa, Luis

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Technology Readiness Level (TRL)-6 is documented for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) subsystem. The WFSC subsystem is needed to align the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after all deployments have occurred, and achieves that requirement through a robust commissioning sequence consisting of unique commissioning algorithms, all of which are part of the WFSC algorithm suite. This paper identifies the technology need, algorithm heritage, describes the finished TRL-6 design platform, and summarizes the TRL-6 test results and compliance. Additionally, the performance requirements needed to satisfy JWST science goals as well as the criterion that relate to the TRL-6 Testbed Telescope (TBT) performance requirements are discussed

  20. TRL-6 for JWST wavefront sensing and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.; Dean, Bruce H.; Aronstein, David L.; Bowers, Charles W.; Hayden, William; Lyon, Richard G.; Shiri, Ron; Smith, J. Scott; Acton, D. Scott; Carey, Larkin; Contos, Adam; Sabatke, Erin; Schwenker, John; Shields, Duncan; Towell, Tim; Shi, Fang; Meza, Luis

    2007-09-01

    NASA's Technology Readiness Level (TRL)-6 is documented for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Wavefront Sensing and Control (WFSC) subsystem. The WFSC subsystem is needed to align the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) after all deployments have occurred, and achieves that requirement through a robust commissioning sequence consisting of unique commissioning algorithms, all of which are part of the WFSC algorithm suite. This paper identifies the technology need, algorithm heritage, describes the finished TRL-6 design platform, and summarizes the TRL-6 test results and compliance. Additionally, the performance requirements needed to satisfy JWST science goals as well as the criterion that relate to the TRL-6 Testbed Telescope (TBT) performance requirements are discussed.

  1. A wavefront interpretation of the singularity expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, E.; Felsen, L. B.

    1985-07-01

    Felsen (1984) has shown that transient fields scattered by an object may be synthesized in terms of progressing waves (wavefronts) or oscillatory waves (resonances). The present paper is concerned with multiple interaction and resonance phenomena in a broad sense, taking into account the employment of ray terminology to identify wave transport and interaction trajectories. Along those trajectories, the time harmonic field may be expressed by the ray approximation and is then subject to the rules and constraints of the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). However, the field may be expressed more generally by a 'better' wave function, for example a ray integral spanning a spectrum of local plane waves whose stationary phase approximation yields GTD but which, when kept intact, is uniformly valid in transition regions where GTD fails. Attention is given to the singularity expansion method (SEM) formulation, the ray formulation, the flow graph representation, and the illustration of the presented concepts with the aid of an example.

  2. Broadband reflected wavefronts manipulation using structured phase gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le; Chen, Tian-Ning; Song, Ai-Ling; Du, Xiao-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic metasurface (AMS) is a good candidate to manipulate acoustic waves due to special acoustic performs that cannot be realized by traditional materials. In this paper, we design the AMS by using circular-holed cubic arrays. The advantages of our AMS are easy assemble, subwavelength thickness, and low energy loss for manipulating acoustic waves. According to the generalized Snell's law, acoustic waves can be manipulated arbitrarily by using AMS with different phase gradients. By selecting suitable hole diameter of circular-holed cube (CHC), some interesting phenomena are demonstrated by our simulations based on finite element method, such as the conversion of incoming waves into surface waves, anomalous reflections (including negative reflection), acoustic focusing lens, and acoustic carpet cloak. Our results can provide a simple approach to design AMSes and use them in wavefront manipulation and manufacturing of acoustic devices.

  3. Polarization-independent silicon metadevices for efficient optical wavefront control

    DOE PAGES

    Chong, Katie E.; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony Randolph; ...

    2015-07-20

    In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0–2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the latticemore » spacing as a single geometric control parameter.« less

  4. Polarization-independent silicon metadevices for efficient optical wavefront control

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Katie E.; Staude, Isabelle; James, Anthony Randolph; Dominguez, Jason James; Liu, Sheng; Campione, Salvatore; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Luk, Ting S.; Decker, Manuel; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Brener, Igal; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-20

    In this study, we experimentally demonstrate a functional silicon metadevice at telecom wavelengths that can efficiently control the wavefront of optical beams by imprinting a spatially varying transmittance phase independent of the polarization of the incident beam. Near-unity transmittance efficiency and close to 0–2π phase coverage are enabled by utilizing the localized electric and magnetic Mie-type resonances of low-loss silicon nanoparticles tailored to behave as electromagnetically dual-symmetric scatterers. We apply this concept to realize a metadevice that converts a Gaussian beam into a vortex beam. The required spatial distribution of transmittance phases is achieved by a variation of the lattice spacing as a single geometric control parameter.

  5. Fourier optics for wavefront engineering and wavelength control of lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Romain

    Since their initial demonstration in 1994, quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become prominent sources of mid-infrared radiation. Over the years, a large scientific and engineering effort has led to a dramatic improvement in their efficiency and power output, with continuous wave operation at room temperature and Watt-level output power now standard. However, beyond this progress, new functionalities and capabilities need to be added to this compact source to enable its integration into consumer-ready systems. Two main areas of development are particularly relevant from an application standpoint and were pursued during the course of this thesis: wavelength control and wavefront engineering of QCLs. The first research direction, wavelength control, is mainly driven by spectroscopic applications of QCLs, such as trace gas sensing, process monitoring or explosive detection. We demonstrated three different capabilities, corresponding to different potential spectroscopic measurement techniques: widely tunable single longitudinal mode lasing, simultaneous lasing on multiple well-defined longitudinal modes, and simultaneous lasing over a broad and continuous range of the spectrum. The second research direction, wavefront engineering of QCLs, i.e. the improvement of their beam quality, is relevant for applications necessitating transmission of the QCL output over a large distance, for example for remote sensing or military countermeasures. To address this issue, we developed plasmonic lenses directly integrated on the facets of QCLs. The plasmonic structures designed are analogous to antenna arrays imparting directionality to the QCLs, as well as providing means for polarization control. Finally, a research interest in plasmonics led us to design passive flat optical elements using plasmonic antennas. All these projects are tied together by the involvement of Fourier analysis as an essential design tool to predict the interaction of light with various gratings and periodic

  6. Iterative Transform Phase Diversity: An Image-Based Object and Wavefront Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The Iterative Transform Phase Diversity algorithm is designed to solve the problem of recovering the wavefront in the exit pupil of an optical system and the object being imaged. This algorithm builds upon the robust convergence capability of Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM), in combination with the known success of various deconvolution algorithms. VSM is an alternative method for enforcing the amplitude constraints of a Misell-Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm. When provided the object and additional optical parameters, VSM can accurately recover the exit pupil wavefront. By combining VSM and deconvolution, one is able to simultaneously recover the wavefront and the object.

  7. The DeMi CubeSat: Wavefront Control with a MEMS Deformable Mirror in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Bendek, Eduardo; Marinan, Anne; Belikov, Ruslan; Merck, John; Cahoy, Kerri Lynn

    2017-01-01

    High-contrast imaging instruments on future space telescopes will require precise wavefront correction to detect small exoplanets near their host stars. High-actuator count microelectromechanical system (MEMS) deformable mirrors provide a compact form of wavefront control. The 6U DeMi CubeSat will demonstrate wavefront control with a MEMS deformable mirror over a yearlong mission. The payload includes both an internal laser source and a small telescope, with both focal plane and pupil plane sensing, for deformable mirror characterization. We detail the DeMi payload design, and describe future astrophysics enabled by high-actuator count deformable mirrors and small satellites.

  8. Collaborative effects of wavefront shaping and optical clearing agent in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, Peter; Jo, YoungJu; Lee, KyeoReh; Tuchin, Valery V.; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that simultaneous application of optical clearing agents (OCAs) and complex wavefront shaping in optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide significant enhancement of penetration depth and imaging quality. OCA reduces optical inhomogeneity of a highly scattering sample, and the wavefront shaping of illumination light controls multiple scattering, resulting in an enhancement of the penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio. A tissue phantom study shows that concurrent applications of OCA and wavefront shaping successfully operate in OCT imaging. The penetration depth enhancement is further demonstrated for ex vivo mouse ears, revealing hidden structures inaccessible with conventional OCT imaging.

  9. Primary wavefront aberrations calculation from a defocused image or a Hartmanngram.

    PubMed

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernández, Zacarias; Gómez-Vieyra, Armando

    2010-04-20

    A wavefront aberration can be retrieved from a defocused image or a Hartmanngram by several different methods using diffraction theory and Fourier transforms. In this manuscript, we describe an alternate method for wavefront aberration determination from a defocused image or a Hartmanngram using a geometric l approximation. The main assumption is that the image is defocused, with the observation plane outside the caustic limits. The result will be applied to the retrieval of a wavefront with primary aberrations from a Hartmanngram or defocused image without the need for any transversal aberration integration.

  10. Evaluating noise performance of the IUCAA sidecar drive electronics controller (ISDEC) based system for TMT on-instrument wavefront sensing (OIWFS) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burse, Mahesh; Chattopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Sinha, Sakya; Prabhudesai, Swapnil; Punnadi, Sujit; Chordia, Pravin; Kohok, Abhay

    2016-07-01

    As a part of a design study for the On-Instrument Low Order Wave-front Sensor (OIWFS) for the TMT Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we recently evaluated the noise performance of a detector control system consisting of IUCAA SIDECAR DRIVE ELECRONICS CONTROLLER (ISDEC), SIDECAR ASIC and HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) MUX. To understand and improve the performance of this system to serve as a near infrared wavefront sensor, we implemented new read out modes like multiple regions of interest with differential multi-accumulate readout schemes for the HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) detector. In this system, the firmware running in SIDECAR ASIC programs the detector for ROI readout, reads the detector, processes the detector output and writes the digitized data into its internal memory. ISDEC reads the digitized data from ASIC, performs the differential multi-accumulate operations and then sends the processed data to a PC over a USB interface. A special loopback board was designed and used to measure and reduce the noise from SIDECAR ASIC DC biases2. We were able to reduce the mean r.m.s read noise of this system down to 1-2 e. for any arbitrary window frame of 4x4 size at frame rates below about 200 Hz.

  11. A novel method of measuring the interaction matrix for diffractive liquid crystal wavefront correctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaoliang; Shao, Lina; Wang, Yukun; Mu, Quanquan; Hu, Lifa; Zhang, Xingyun; Xuan, Li

    2016-12-01

    The interaction matrix significantly affects the correction accuracy of wavefront correctors. For diffractive liquid crystal wavefront correctors (LCWFCs), the diffraction wavefront error must be taken into account to improve the accuracy of the interaction matrix. In this paper, a tunable Zernike polynomial coefficient method is demonstrated that decreases the effect of the diffraction wavefront error on the interaction matrix. Moreover, to eliminate the effect of the random error, a least squares method is combined with the tunable coefficient method. Experimental results show that, with the combined method, the error of the interaction matrix is decreased by a factor of 2.5 compared to that when the least squares method is used alone. Furthermore, an open loop adaptive correction experiment was performed and a considerable improvement of the image resolution was obtained by the novel method. Therefore, this method is very useful for liquid crystal adaptive optics systems to acquire the high correction accuracy.

  12. Performance of wavefront-sensorless adaptive optics using modal and zonal correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzuola, Esdras; Segel, Max; Gladysz, Szymon; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    Unconventional wavefront sensing strategies are being developed to provide alternatives for measuring the wavefront deformation of a laser beam propagating through strong turbulence and/or along a horizontal-path. In this paper we present results from two "wavefront-sensorless" approaches: stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) and its modal version (M-SPGD). We compare the performance of both algorithms through experimental measurements under emulated dynamic atmospheric turbulence by using the coupling efficiency in a single mode fiber as performance metric. We estimate probability density function of coupling efficiency for free-space optical links using adaptive optics (AO) as a function of key parameters such us turbulence strength and AO loop rate. We demonstrate faster convergence rate of the M-SPGD algorithm as compared to the traditional SPGD, although classic SPGD achieves higher correction. Additionally, we constrain the main temporal requirements of an AO system using wavefront-sensorless architectures.

  13. Adaptive Optics Correction in Real-Time for Dynamic Wavefront Errors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    This paper reports on the principles for the use of, and the experimental results obtained from, an adaptive optics system for correcting dynamic...control system. Keywords: Adaptive optics ; Wavefront sensing; Deformable mirror; Chinese translations.

  14. Differential focal anisoplanatism in laser guide star wavefront sensing on extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nicolas; Michau, Vincent; Robert, Clélia; Rousset, Gérard

    2011-10-15

    Laser guide stars (LGSs) aim at increasing the sky coverage of adaptive optics (AO) as this is highly restricted when using only natural guide stars. With such three-dimensional extended objects, spot elongation may limit the measurement accuracy of wavefronts. We evaluate the effect of differential focal anisoplanatism, induced solely by the longitudinal extension of a side-launched LGS, on the slope measurements performed by a Shack-Hartmann for a 40 m class telescope. We also take this effect into account in the wavefront reconstruction and derive estimations of the resulting wavefront error in a multi-LGS AO system. We find an error of 100 nm in the worst case at the subaperture level and a small error of the order of 10 nm for six LGSs after wavefront reconstruction.

  15. Bicubic uniform B-spline wavefront fitting technology applied in computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Sun, Jun-qiang; Chen, Guo-jie

    2006-02-01

    This paper presented a bicubic uniform B-spline wavefront fitting technology to figure out the analytical expression for object wavefront used in Computer-Generated Holograms (CGHs). In many cases, to decrease the difficulty of optical processing, off-axis CGHs rather than complex aspherical surface elements are used in modern advanced military optical systems. In order to design and fabricate off-axis CGH, we have to fit out the analytical expression for object wavefront. Zernike Polynomial is competent for fitting wavefront of centrosymmetric optical systems, but not for axisymmetrical optical systems. Although adopting high-degree polynomials fitting method would achieve higher fitting precision in all fitting nodes, the greatest shortcoming of this method is that any departure from the fitting nodes would result in great fitting error, which is so-called pulsation phenomenon. Furthermore, high-degree polynomials fitting method would increase the calculation time in coding computer-generated hologram and solving basic equation. Basing on the basis function of cubic uniform B-spline and the character mesh of bicubic uniform B-spline wavefront, bicubic uniform B-spline wavefront are described as the product of a series of matrices. Employing standard MATLAB routines, four kinds of different analytical expressions for object wavefront are fitted out by bicubic uniform B-spline as well as high-degree polynomials. Calculation results indicate that, compared with high-degree polynomials, bicubic uniform B-spline is a more competitive method to fit out the analytical expression for object wavefront used in off-axis CGH, for its higher fitting precision and C2 continuity.

  16. On-sky multiwavelength phasing of segmented telescopes with the Zernike phase contrast sensor.

    PubMed

    Vigan, Arthur; Dohlen, Kjetil; Mazzanti, Silvio

    2011-06-10

    Future extremely large telescopes will adopt segmented primary mirrors with several hundreds of segments. Cophasing of the segments together is essential to reach high wavefront quality. The phasing sensor must be able to maintain very high phasing accuracy during the observations, while being able to phase segments dephased by several micrometers. The Zernike phase contrast sensor has been demonstrated on-sky at the Very Large Telescope. We present the multiwavelength scheme that has been implemented to extend the capture range from ±λ/2 on the wavefront to many micrometers, demonstrating that it is successful at phasing mirrors with piston errors up to ±4.0  μm on the wavefront. We discuss the results at different levels and conclude with a phasing strategy for a future extremely large telescope.

  17. Zernike-like Orthogonal Basis Functions for Wavefront Characterization over Sampled, Irregular Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Smith, J. Scott

    2007-01-01

    For optical systems with circular apertures, wavefronts are often analyzed using Zernike polynomials, and individual Zernike functions are associated with familiar optical aberrations. For systems with noncircular apertures, or in practical situations in which wavefronts are measured at a limited number of points in the aperture, the Zernike polynomials are no longer an orthogonal basis for the measured data. Although there are an endless number of ways to create a basis for such measured data, a "Zernike-like" basis is useful to connect with our experience with the usual optical aberrations. In this paper, the steps required to identify a Zernike-like basis for wavefronts over sampled, irregular apertures are presented, based on the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization technique. The benefits of analyzing optical wavefronts using an orthogonal basis specific to an optical system's aperture shape and wavefront sampling, instead of using the traditional Zernike polynomials, are detailed in two examples, from image-based wavefront sensing on a segmented-aperture telescope (the James Webb Space Telescope Testbed Telescope at Ball Aerospace) and from interferometer characterization for surface metrology of a hexagonal mirror segment.

  18. X-ray grating interferometer for in situ and at-wavelength wavefront metrology.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Yves; David, Christian; Flechsig, Uwe; Krempasky, Juraj; Schlott, Volker; Abela, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    A wavefront metrology setup based on the X-ray grating interferometry technique for spatially resolved, quantitative, in situ and at-wavelength measurements of the wavefront at synchrotron radiation and hard X-ray free-electron laser beamlines is reported. Indeed, the ever-increasing demands on the optical components to preserve the wavefront shape and the coherence of the delivered X-ray beam call for more and more sensitive diagnostic instruments. Thanks to its angular sensitivity, X-ray grating interferometry has been established in recent years as an adequate wavefront-sensing technique for quantitatively assessing the quality of the X-ray wavefront under working conditions and hence for the in situ investigation of X-ray optical elements. In order to characterize the optical elements at any given beamline by measuring the aberrations introduced in the wavefront, a transportable X-ray grating interferometry setup was realised at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The instrument, which is expected to be a valuable tool for investigating the quality of the X-ray beam delivered at an endstation, will be described hereafter in terms of the hardware setup and the related data analysis procedure. Several exemplary experiments performed at the X05DA Optics beamline of the SLS will be presented.

  19. Influence of wavefront aberration on the imaging performance of the solar grating spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L H; Rao, C H; Gu, N T; Huang, L H; Qiu, Q

    2016-01-11

    The solar grating spectrometer is an important tool to study the thermodynamic properties of the solar atmosphere with different height distribution, but its imaging performance will be degraded by the wavefront aberration. On the other hand, narrow slit of the grating spectrometer will filter the wavefront aberration to a certain extent. In this paper, the mathematical relation between the wavefront aberration and the imaging performance of the grating spectrometer is derived. The numerical simulation is performed and is validated by the experiment. The results demonstrate that: The influence of the wavefront aberration with the different types and magnitudes on the spectral resolution and the energy utilization is different. The influence of the different slits on the wavefront aberrations is different. Generally, the smaller the slit is, the better the spectral resolution is. However, this is not true for the low-frequency dominated aberration, e.g. the defocus, since its low frequency will also be blocked by the narrow slit. If the influence of the filter slit on the wavefront aberration cannot be taken into account, it will lead to adaptive optics over-compensation.

  20. Common-path and compact wavefront diagnosis system based on cross grating lateral shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tong; Yang, Yongying; Yue, Xiumei; Liu, Dong; Ma, Yifang; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei

    2014-10-20

    A common-path and compact wavefront diagnosis system for both continuous and transient wavefronts measurement is proposed based on cross grating lateral shearing interferometer (CGLSI). Derived from the basic CGLSI configuration, this system employs an aplanatic lens to convert the wavefront under test into a convergent beam, which makes it possible for CGLSI to test the wavefront of collimated beams. A geometrical optics model for grating pitch determination and a Fresnel diffraction model for order selection mask design are presented. Then a detailed analysis about the influence of the grating pitch, the distance from the cross grating to the order selection mask and the numerical aperture of the aplanatic lens on the system error is made, and a calibration method is proposed to eliminate the system error. In addition, the differential Zernike polynomials fitting method is introduced for wavefront retrieval. Before our experiment, we have designed several grating pitches and their corresponding order selection mask parameters. In the final comparative experiment with ZYGO interferometer, the wavefront diagnosis system exhibits both high precision and repeatability.

  1. Wavefront Sensing Analysis of Grazing Incidence Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, Scott; Saha, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Wavefront sensing is a process by which optical system errors are deduced from the aberrations in the image of an ideal source. The method has been used successfully in near-normal incidence, but not for grazing incidence systems. This innovation highlights the ability to examine out-of-focus images from grazing incidence telescopes (typically operating in the x-ray wavelengths, but integrated using optical wavelengths) and determine the lower-order deformations. This is important because as a metrology tool, this method would allow the integration of high angular resolution optics without the use of normal incidence interferometry, which requires direct access to the front surface of each mirror. Measuring the surface figure of mirror segments in a highly nested x-ray telescope mirror assembly is difficult due to the tight packing of elements and blockage of all but the innermost elements to normal incidence light. While this can be done on an individual basis in a metrology mount, once the element is installed and permanently bonded into the assembly, it is impossible to verify the figure of each element and ensure that the necessary imaging quality will be maintained. By examining on-axis images of an ideal point source, one can gauge the low-order figure errors of individual elements, even when integrated into an assembly. This technique is known as wavefront sensing (WFS). By shining collimated light down the optical axis of the telescope and looking at out-of-focus images, the blur due to low-order figure errors of individual elements can be seen, and the figure error necessary to produce that blur can be calculated. The method avoids the problem of requiring normal incidence access to the surface of each mirror segment. Mirror figure errors span a wide range of spatial frequencies, from the lowest-order bending to the highest order micro-roughness. While all of these can be measured in normal incidence, only the lowest-order contributors can be determined

  2. Telescope Alignment From Sparsely Sampled Wavefront Measurements Over Pupil Subapertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.; An, Xin; Kuan, Gary M.; Moore, Douglas M.; OShay, Joseph F.; Tang, Hong; Page, Norman A.

    2012-01-01

    Alignment of two-element telescopes is a classic problem. During recent integration and test of the Space Interferometry Mission s (SIM s) Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC), the innovators were faced with aligning two such telescope subsystems in the presence of a further complication: only two small subapertures in each telescope s pupil were accessible for measuring the wavefront with a Fizeau interferometer. This meant that the familiar aberrations that might be interpreted to infer system misalignments could be viewed only over small sub-regions of the pupil, making them hard to recognize. Further, there was no contiguous surface of the pupil connecting these two subapertures, so relative phase piston information was lost; the underlying full-aperture aberrations therefore had an additional degree of ambiguity. The solution presented here is to recognize that, in the absence of phase piston, the Zygo measurements primarily provide phase tilt in the subaperture windows of interest. Because these windows are small and situated far from the center of the (inaccessible) unobscured full aperture, any aberrations that are higher-order than tilt will be extremely high-order on the full aperture, and so not necessary or helpful to the alignment. Knowledge of the telescope s optical prescription allows straightforward evaluation of sensitivities (subap mode strength per unit full-aperture aberration), and these can be used in a predictive matrix approach to move with assurance to an aligned state. The technique is novel in every operational way compared to the standard approach of alignment based on full-aperture aberrations or searching for best rms wavefront. This approach is closely grounded in the observable quantities most appropriate to the problem. It is also more intuitive than inverting full phase maps (or subaperture Zernike spectra) with a ray-tracing program, which must certainly work in principle, but in practice met with limited success. Even if such

  3. Advances in Focal Plane Wavefront Estimation for Directly Imaging Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2015-01-01

    To image cold exoplanets directly in visible light, an instrument on a telescope needs to suppress starlight by about 9 orders of magnitude at small separations from the star. A coronagraph changes the point spread function to create regions of high contrast where exoplanets or disks can be seen. Aberrations on the optics degrade the contrast by several orders of magnitude, so all high-contrast imaging systems incorporate one or more deformable mirrors (DMs) to recover regions of high contrast. With a coronagraphic instrument planned for the WFIRST-AFTA space telescope, there is a pressing need for faster, more robust estimation and control schemes for the DMs. Non-common path aberrations limit conventional phase conjugation schemes to medium star-to-planet contrast ratios of about 1e-6. High-contrast imaging requires estimation and control of both phase and amplitude in the same beam path as the science camera. Field estimation is a challenge since only intensity is measured; the most common approach, including that planned for WFIRST-AFTA, is to use DMs to create diversity, via pairs of small probe shapes, thereby allowing disambiguation of the electric field. Most implementations of DM Diversity require at least five images per electric field estimate and require narrowband measurements. This paper describes our new estimation algorithms that improve the speed (by using fewer images) and bandwidth of focal plane wavefront estimation. For narrowband estimation, we are testing nonlinear, recursive algorithms such as an iterative extended Kalman filter (IEKF) to use three images each iteration and build better, more robust estimates. We are also exploring the use of broadband estimation without the need for narrowband sub-filters and measurements. Here we present simulations of these algorithms with realistic noise and small signals to show how they might perform for WFIRST-AFTA. Once validated in simulations, we will test these algorithms experimentally in

  4. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects.

  5. Beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Salmon, J.T.; Wilcox, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    The Beamlet pulse-generation system (or {open_quotes}front end{close_quotes}) refers to the laser hardware that generates the spatially and temporally shaped pulse that is injected into the main laser cavity. All large ICF lasers have pulse-generation systems that typically consist of a narrow-band oscillator, elector-optic modulators for temporal and bandwidth shaping, and one or more preamplifiers. Temporal shaping is used to provide the desired laser output pulse shape and also to compensate for gain saturation effects in the large-aperture amplifiers. Bandwidth is applied to fulfill specific target irradiation requirements and to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in large-aperture laser components. Usually the sharp edge of the beam`s spatial intensity profile is apodized before injection in the main amplifier beam line. This prevents large-amplitude ripples on the intensity profile. Here the authors briefly review the front-end design and discuss improvements to the oscillator and modulator systems. Their main focus, however, is to describe Beamlet`s novel beam-shaping and wavefront-control systems that have recently been fully activated and tested.

  6. The National Ignition Facility Wavefront Requirements and Optical Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W H; Whitman, P K; Henesian, M A; Stowers, I F; Honig, J

    2004-06-03

    With the first four of its eventual 192 beams now executing shots and generating more than 100 kilojoules of laser energy at its primary wavelength of 1.06 {micro}m, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is already the world's largest and most energetic laser. The optical system performance requirements that are in place for NIF are derived from the goals of the missions it is designed to serve. These missions include inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and the study of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. These mission requirements have led to a design strategy for achieving high quality focusable energy and power from the laser and to specifications on optics that are important for an ICF laser. The design of NIF utilizes a multipass architecture with a single large amplifier type that provides high gain, high extraction efficiency and high packing density. We have taken a systems engineering approach to the practical implementation of this design that specifies the wavefront parameters of individual optics in order to achieve the desired cumulative performance of the laser beamline. This presentation provides a detailed look at the causes and effects of performance degradation in large laser systems and how NIF has been designed to overcome these effects. We will also present results of spot size performance measurements that have validated many of the early design decisions that have been incorporated in the NIF laser architecture.

  7. Micropatterned photoalignment for wavefront controlled switchable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazar, Nikolaus

    Photoalignment is a well-established technique for surface alignment of the liquid crystal director. Previously, chrome masks were necessary for patterned photoalignment but were difficult to use, costly, and inflexible. To extend the capabilities of photoalignment we built an automated maskless multi-domain photoalignment device based on a DMD (digital multimirror device) projection system. The device is capable of creating arbitrary photoalignment patterns with micron-sized features. Pancharatnam-Berry phase (PB-phase) is a geometric phase that arises from cyclic change of polarization state. By varying the azimuthal anchoring angle in a hybrid-aligned liquid crystal cell we can control the spatial variation of the PB-phase shift. Using our automated photoalignment device to align the liquid crystal arbitrary wave front manipulations are possible. The PB-phase shift effect is maximized when the cell is tuned to have a half-wave retardation and disappears at full-wave retardation, so the cell can be switched on and off by applying a voltage. Two wavefront controlled devices developed using this technique will be discussed: A switchable liquid crystal phase shift mask for creating sub-diffraction sized photolithographic features, and a transparent diffractive display that utilizes a switchable liquid crystal diffraction grating.

  8. The National Ignition Facility Wavefront Requirements and Optical Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Spaeth, M L; Manes, K R; Widmayer, C C; Williams, W; Whitman, P A; Henesian, M

    2004-01-05

    With the first four of its eventual 192 beams now executing shots, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is already the world's largest and most energetic laser. The optical system performance requirements that are in place for NIF are derived from the goals of the missions it is designed to serve. These missions include inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and the study of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. These mission requirements have led to a design strategy for achieving high quality focusable energy and power from the laser and to specifications on optics that are important for an ICF laser. The design of NIF utilizes a multipass architecture with a single large amplifier type that provides high gain, high extraction efficiency and high packing density. We have taken a systems engineering approach to the practical implementation of this design that specifies the wavefront parameters of individual optics in order to achieve the desired cumulative performance of the laser beamline. This presentation provides a detailed look at the causes and effects of performance degradation in large laser systems and how NIF has been designed to overcome these effects. We will also present results of spot size performance measurements that have validated many of the early design decisions that have been incorporated in the NIF laser architecture.

  9. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  10. Lens-based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics swept source OCT

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Ding, Weiguang; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized modern ophthalmology, providing depth resolved images of the retinal layers in a system that is suited to a clinical environment. Although the axial resolution of OCT system, which is a function of the light source bandwidth, is sufficient to resolve retinal features at a micrometer scale, the lateral resolution is dependent on the delivery optics and is limited by ocular aberrations. Through the combination of wavefront sensorless adaptive optics and the use of dual deformable transmissive optical elements, we present a compact lens-based OCT system at an imaging wavelength of 1060 nm for high resolution retinal imaging. We utilized a commercially available variable focal length lens to correct for a wide range of defocus commonly found in patient’s eyes, and a novel multi-actuator adaptive lens for aberration correction to achieve near diffraction limited imaging performance at the retina. With a parallel processing computational platform, high resolution cross-sectional and en face retinal image acquisition and display was performed in real time. In order to demonstrate the system functionality and clinical utility, we present images of the photoreceptor cone mosaic and other retinal layers acquired in vivo from research subjects. PMID:27278853

  11. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  12. The wavefront of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.D.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J.C.; Bähren, L.; Falcke, H.; Bertaina, M.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Pierro, F. Di; Biermann, P.L.; Brancus, I.M.; De Souza, V.; Fuchs, B.; Gemmeke, H.; Grupen, C.; and others

    2014-09-01

    Analyzing measurements of the LOPES antenna array together with corresponding CoREAS simulations for more than 300 measured events with energy above 10{sup 17} eV and zenith angles smaller than 45{sup o}, we find that the radio wavefront of cosmic-ray air showers is of approximately hyperbolic shape. The simulations predict a slightly steeper wavefront towards East than towards West, but this asymmetry is negligible against the measurement uncertainties of LOPES. At axis distances ∼> 50 m, the wavefront can be approximated by a simple cone. According to the simulations, the cone angle is clearly correlated with the shower maximum. Thus, we confirm earlier predictions that arrival time measurements can be used to study the longitudinal shower development, but now using a realistic wavefront. Moreover, we show that the hyperbolic wavefront is compatible with our measurement, and we present several experimental indications that the cone angle is indeed sensitive to the shower development. Consequently, the wavefront can be used to statistically study the primary composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. At LOPES, the experimentally achieved precision for the shower maximum is limited by measurement uncertainties to approximately 140 g/c {sup 2}. But the simulations indicate that under better conditions this method might yield an accuracy for the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum, X{sub max}, better than 30 g/c {sup 2}. This would be competitive with the established air-fluorescence and air-Cherenkov techniques, where the radio technique offers the advantage of a significantly higher duty-cycle. Finally, the hyperbolic wavefront can be used to reconstruct the shower geometry more accurately, which potentially allows a better reconstruction of all other shower parameters, too.

  13. Adaptive optics wavefront sensors based on photon-counting detector arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ltp ,,, Government. THIS MAW’IAL HAS BEEN CLEARED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE BY 66 ABW/PA , I’ , DAH,: ’( ’l-il0--~ I () CASE # 1,G’~3i’.J -.:)i’/o- 0𔄁...fanning a guard-ring diode that collects dark current generated in the region between pixels. This dark current does not undergo avalanche...multiplication and hence does not cause spurious detection events. The guard-ring structure also prevents breakdown at the periphery of the diode , since the

  14. Linear and Non-Linear Preprocessing of Wavefront Sensor Slope Measurements for Improved Adaptive Optics Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    of WFS Slope Measurement Error Through Slope Vector Processing ............................ 22 iv Page 3.1.2 Reduction of WFS Slope Measurement Error... Processing a Frame of WFS Slope Measurements . . . . 67 5.1.2 Reducing WFS Mean Square Slope Estimation Error Through Improving the Centroid Estimation...91 vi List of Figures Figure Page 1. Lenslet image on detector array when image main lobe is smaller than a

  15. FlyEyes: A CCD-Based Wavefront Sensor for PUEO, the CFHT Curvature AO System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-28

    but have been known to fail. Furthermore, curvature systems with large numbers of subapertures are now in operation and the cost of individual APDs...Astronomy and Astrophysics , National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. Gerry Luppino GL Scientific, 3367 Waialae avenue, Honolulu, Hawaii 96816...Furthermore, curvature systems with large numbers of subapertures are now in operation and the cost of individual APDs may become prohibitive for

  16. Performance analysis of field-of-view shifted Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor based on splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, R.; Grasso, G.; Parlato, S.; Simone, S.; Spoto, G.

    2007-10-01

    The study of ancient works of art is a very challenging task, mainly due to the impossibility of applying experimental approaches that could damage anyhow the object from which analytical information has to be obtained. Spatially resolved analytical methods have significantly enhanced our capacity to study ancient material since they cause minimal and at times no damage to the studied object. Unfortunately, only a few analytical techniques operating within the requested spatial resolution are applicable for the investigation of the organic components of artistic and archaeological objects. In this work, iron-gall ink was prepared according to ancient recipes and its composition was evaluated by AP/MALDI-MS. The latter is demonstrated to be a very valuable tool for the study of the organic components of ancient works of art as it combines the advantages of the vacuum MALDI-MS analytical approach to the possibility of analysing samples in air. In situ analyses were also carried out by analysing strokes of ink directly from paper and parchment.

  17. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  18. Orientation and the Young Orienteer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. E.; Martland, J. R.

    Orientation within orienteering is dependent on the use of two basic strategies; that is, either a compass or Magnetic-North-based strategy, which relies on the use of one set of information; or the use of a map and landmark-based strategy which relies on the use of at least two sets of information. Walsh and found that, when given the choice, young children use the compass-based strategy when following complex potentially disorientating routes.The efficacy of these two basic orientation strategies was investigated within three different orienteering environments: (1) a familiar known environment; (2) a familiar unknown environment and (3) an unfamiliar unknown environment.Subjects, age range from 9 to 10think aloud particularly the introduction of basic skills to young performers. They support the argument that is essential to introduce the map and compass simultaneously and that relocation and orientation skills should be coached concurrently.

  19. Wavefront alignment research of segmented mirror synthetic aperture optical (SAO) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; An, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Hao

    2010-05-01

    Wavefront control technology and imaging experiment are introduced for a segmented mirror SAO system with deformable sub-mirrors. This system is a RC style with 300mm aperture, 4.5 F#, +/-0.4°FOV, 0.45~0.75μm wave band, and diffraction-limit design MTF. The primary mirror is composed by three sub-mirrors, with parabolic shape, and each deformable sub-mirror has 19 actuators to control and keep the surface shape, and 5 actuators to align sub-mirrors location in 5 degree of freedom. Interferometer is used to feed back and control exit wavefront error, and base on measurement and finite element analysis, location and quanitity of actuators are optimized, making the surface shape and misadjustment errors interact and compensate each other, and the synthetic system exit pupil wavefront error is controlled. The integrated exit pupil wavefront errors are gotten by ZYGO interferometer, and central FOV is 0.077λRMS, and edge FOV is 0.093λRMS. At the end, an imaging experiment is executed, and good results are obtained, which proves, the deformable sub-mirrors have the ability to meliorate alignment and the latter can retroact the former, and this relationship iterate make system exit pupil wavefront error convergence and improve segmented mirror SAO system imaging ability.

  20. Wavefront-guided correction of ocular aberrations: Are phase plate and refractive surgery solutions equal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda E.; Munger, Rejean; Priest, David

    2005-08-01

    Wavefront-guided laser eye surgery has been recently introduced and holds the promise of correcting not only defocus and astigmatism in patients but also higher-order aberrations. Research is just beginning on the implementation of wavefront-guided methods in optical solutions, such as phase-plate-based spectacles, as alternatives to surgery. We investigate the theoretical differences between the implementation of wavefront-guided surgical and phase plate corrections. The residual aberrations of 43 model eyes are calculated after simulated refractive surgery and also after a phase plate is placed in front of the untreated eye. In each case, the current wavefront-guided paradigm that applies a direct map of the ocular aberrations to the correction zone is used. The simulation results demonstrate that an ablation map that is a Zernike fit of a direct transform of the ocular wavefront phase error is not as efficient in correcting refractive errors of sphere, cylinder, spherical aberration, and coma as when the same Zernike coefficients are applied to a phase plate, with statistically significant improvements from 2% to 6%.