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Sample records for orleans military ocean

  1. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), New Orleans, LA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crossman, M.; Ward, L.

    1994-04-11

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by Environmental Resources Management (ERM) at New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission under Public Laws 100-526 and 101-510. Under CERFA (Public Law 102-426), Federal agencies are required to identify expeditiously real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed NOMOT is a 17.6-acre site located in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOMOT has been used for warehousing and shipping of equipment since 1919. Environmentally significant operations include routine maintenance and hazardous material handling. ERM reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) , State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to NOMOT during this investigation. In addition, ERM conducted interviews and visual inspections of NOMOT as well as visual inspections of and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA report was current as of the site visit by ERM in October 1993. This information was used to divide the installation into two categories of parcels: CERFA Disqualified Parcels and CERFA Parcels, as defined by the Army. New Orleans military ocean terminal, CERF.

  2. 78 FR 5717 - Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Interim rule and... Suisun Bay near Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA in support of military onload and offload...

  3. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) Report. New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), New Orleans, LA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-11

    Exton, PA 19341 at Ion Ited t S. v .m A I or Ion WHOi nior do V tin a , Ohowr c mu R 1or Is doc MU re to: der, . .Ar VIr I Or P I Or MD 10 11 APRIL 1994...official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. This report may not be cited for purposes of advertisement. A -- i 1O TOP ITIS GRA&I...DT1STAW Uaa•mew2ce Q Justltcation ST # A , AUTH: USAEC/SFIM-AEC-WMI vlall aacaai (MS. BARRY -DSN 584-1659) Speola PER TEIJEXON 14 JULY 94 GB REPORT

  4. 33 CFR 165.1198 - Safety zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA. 165.1198 Section 165.1198... Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1198 Safety zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1198 - Safety zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Chart 18656. Upon commencement of military... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Chart 18656 (the perimeter of the existing security zone) and 3,000 yards...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1199 - Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Military Ocean... Coast Guard District § 165.1199 Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord..., extending from the surface to the sea floor, within 500 yards of the three Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1199 - Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Military Ocean... Coast Guard District § 165.1199 Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord..., extending from the surface to the sea floor, within 500 yards of the three Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1199 - Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zones; Military Ocean... Coast Guard District § 165.1199 Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord..., extending from the surface to the sea floor, within 500 yards of the three Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1199 - Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zones; Military Ocean... Coast Guard District § 165.1199 Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord..., extending from the surface to the sea floor, within 500 yards of the three Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1199 - Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Military Ocean... Coast Guard District § 165.1199 Security Zones; Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO), Concord..., extending from the surface to the sea floor, within 500 yards of the three Military Ocean Terminal Concord...

  11. U.S. Army Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command Needs to Improve its Oversight of Labor Detention Charges at Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-16

    Detention Charges at Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point Mission Our mission is to provide independent, relevant, and timely oversight of the...Charges at Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point Visit us at www.dodig.mil March 16, 2016 Objective We determined whether the U.S. Army Military Surface...did not effectively plan and manage Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point (MOTSU) terminal operations to minimize the amount of labor detention

  12. Sweet Home New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    New Orleans's collective memory is often long and surprisingly detailed, and it can surface at unexpected moments. In the last few years, a taxi driver taking a fare to the airport has more than once fondly recalled "the librarians" or those "book people" as the first ones to hold a convention in New Orleans after Hurricane…

  13. Sweet Home New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    New Orleans's collective memory is often long and surprisingly detailed, and it can surface at unexpected moments. In the last few years, a taxi driver taking a fare to the airport has more than once fondly recalled "the librarians" or those "book people" as the first ones to hold a convention in New Orleans after Hurricane…

  14. New Orleans Seizes Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Five years after the hurricane devastated the region, New Orleans schools emerge changed--and challenged. New Orleans finds itself with a transformed educational system and one that continues to evolve. This new reality comes as the city's public school population stood at about 38,000 as of February, well below the estimated 65,000 before the…

  15. New Orleans Seizes Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Five years after the hurricane devastated the region, New Orleans schools emerge changed--and challenged. New Orleans finds itself with a transformed educational system and one that continues to evolve. This new reality comes as the city's public school population stood at about 38,000 as of February, well below the estimated 65,000 before the…

  16. New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    On Sunday, February 3, roughly 800 million eyes from all over the world focused on the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans as the New England Patriots battled the St. Louis Rams for the NFL Championship in Super Bowl XXXVI. This true color image of New Orleans was acquired on April 26, 2000, by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. Lake Pontchartrain borders the city to the north. The big river winding its way east to west through the image is the Mississippi. The Louisiana Superdome, built in 1975, sits just inside the rightmost portion of the big river bend that cradles downtown New Orleans. The city, however, may not be around to hold a Super Bowl in 2102. New Orleans is slowly sinking into the Gulf of Mexico. The construction of flood walls and dams north of New Orleans over the past century have prevented sediments carried by the Mississippi River from reaching New Orleans and the Mississippi River Delta. Before the dams were built, river sediments would empty out onto the delta adding layer upon layer of new soil each year. The additional soil prevented the Gulf from subsuming the delta. Unless drastic measures are taken, the city and the delta could be awash in seawater by the end of this century. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the Landsat 7 Science Team Credit: NASA/GSFC/Landsat NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  17. Destination: New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    One can't make the trip to New Orleans for NAESP's Annual Convention and Exposition without checking out a few of the historic and cultural attractions that are within a short walk, or streetcar or cab ride, from the Morial Convention Center and the convention hotels. This article presents a taste of what one can explore between convention events.

  18. New Orleans Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The recovery and long-range redevelopment of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast region is a complex undertaking requiring simultaneous planning in a wide range of disciplines. There is a paramount need to create a planning infrastructure that will enhance collaboration and reduce duplication in all of the planning disciplines moving forward. To…

  19. Destination: New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    One can't make the trip to New Orleans for NAESP's Annual Convention and Exposition without checking out a few of the historic and cultural attractions that are within a short walk, or streetcar or cab ride, from the Morial Convention Center and the convention hotels. This article presents a taste of what one can explore between convention events.

  20. Undergraduate Program: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsock, Lori

    2008-03-01

    Undergraduate chemical science students—join us in New Orleans on April 6-7, 2008 for an educational program designed specifically for you. Attend symposia on chemistry in sports and health and learn how it impacts your life everyday; meet with graduate school recruiters. Focus on your professional future in chemistry by learning more about careers in public health and how to communicate and work effectively with cross-functional teams. Hear eminent scientist Richard B. Silverman (John Evans Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University and author of The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Drug Action 2004) speak about "Drug Discovery: Ingenuity or Serendipity?" All events will take place at the Hilton Riverside Hotel in New Orleans, except the Undergraduate Research Poster Sessions and Sci-Mix, both of which will be held in Hall A of the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

  1. CHED Events: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Spring 2008 ACS Meeting in New Orleans. Most will take place in the Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras Street; this includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet. Exceptions are the Sunday evening Poster Session and the Undergraduate Poster Sessions, which will be in Hall A of the Morial Convention Center.

  2. New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-05-08

    As one of the best ever views of the city of New Orleans, LA (30.0N, 90.0W) from space, this image allows the study of the city and the region in minute detail. Major city street and highway patterns can easily be traced. Even the Superdome near the old French Quarter can be seen as a large round white circle near the middle of the photo. The French Napoleonic Code land distribution system of long narrow fields fronting the river is also evident.

  3. Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

  4. Education in New Orleans: Some Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Aesha

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the post-storm landscape of education in New Orleans and the metro area requires a grasp of some of the pre-storm realities of New Orleans public schools. This article will provide a brief overview of three arenas important to understanding the educational landscape of New Orleans--parish governance, desegregation and private…

  5. Education in New Orleans: Some Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasheed, Aesha

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the post-storm landscape of education in New Orleans and the metro area requires a grasp of some of the pre-storm realities of New Orleans public schools. This article will provide a brief overview of three arenas important to understanding the educational landscape of New Orleans--parish governance, desegregation and private…

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-07-01

    This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

  7. New Orleans and Energy Efficiency

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenburg, Zachary

    2016-07-12

    The Saint Bernard Project works tirelessly with volunteers, veterans and homeowners to continue the rebuilding. With the help of the Department of Energy and the Department of Housing and Urban Development they will be able to apply a greater energy efficiency strategy to help New Orleans and the country reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  8. Edgar Degas in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Edgar Degas was not yet famous, but was on the point of aesthetic and commercial success when he left Paris in the fall for his New Orleans visit of about four months, during which time he painted 22 major works. It might be said that he was having a midlife crisis at this time. He had been painting ballet and horse pictures to assist his father's…

  9. Edgar Degas in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Edgar Degas was not yet famous, but was on the point of aesthetic and commercial success when he left Paris in the fall for his New Orleans visit of about four months, during which time he painted 22 major works. It might be said that he was having a midlife crisis at this time. He had been painting ballet and horse pictures to assist his father's…

  10. New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-08

    JSC2005-E-37988 (8 September 2005) --- This image, acquired on September 8, 2005 from the international space station, depicts flooded areas (dark greenish brown) to the west and southwest of the famous French Quarter (top center). Damage to the roof of the Superdome is clearly visible to the left of image center. The Greater New Orleans Bridge spans the Mississippi River in the lower right corner. North is to top of image, cropped from ISS011-E-12527.

  11. Perspectives on Ethnicity in New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, John, Ed.

    This pamphlet contains several essays on the culture and ethnic groups of New Orleans, Louisiana. Included are: (11 a discussion by Joseph Logsdon on the uniqueness of New Orleans culture, marked by its cuisine, interethnic mixtures, and its politics; (2) an article on theories of ethnicity and neo ethnicity, by Joseph V. Guillotte, III; (3) a…

  12. New Orleans Sees School Building Boom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to reinvent public education in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina have drawn such interest that it's easy to lose sight of some very concrete changes that will become obvious over time: A generation of brand-new school buildings is rising across the city. New Orleans is in the early stages of a construction spree both to build and…

  13. New Teachers Are New Orleans Norm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports how hundreds of fresh recruits, many of them new to K-12 teaching, were filling public school classrooms across New Orleans in Katrina's aftermath. The state-led Recovery School District (RSD), which now operates 34 New Orleans public schools, dramatically increased its teacher workforce for this academic year, having hired…

  14. Rebuilding New Orleans Schools after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the rebuilding of the public school system in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. A group of local and state educators, community leaders, and business people, headed by Tulane University President Scott Cowen, recommended that New Orleans become a hybrid of traditional public schools and charter schools,…

  15. Perspectives on Ethnicity in New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, John, Ed.

    This pamphlet contains several essays on the culture and ethnic groups of New Orleans, Louisiana. Included are: (11 a discussion by Joseph Logsdon on the uniqueness of New Orleans culture, marked by its cuisine, interethnic mixtures, and its politics; (2) an article on theories of ethnicity and neo ethnicity, by Joseph V. Guillotte, III; (3) a…

  16. New Orleans Sees School Building Boom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to reinvent public education in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina have drawn such interest that it's easy to lose sight of some very concrete changes that will become obvious over time: A generation of brand-new school buildings is rising across the city. New Orleans is in the early stages of a construction spree both to build and…

  17. New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-08

    JSC2005-E-37987 (8 September 2005) --- The extent of flooding in the greater New Orleans metropolitan area is clearly visible in this image, acquired from the International Space Station on September 8, 2005. Flooded areas are dark greenish brown, while dry areas to the west of the 17th Street Canal and along the banks of the Mississippi River (lower half of image) are light brown to gray. This cropped image (from the parent frame ISS011-E-12527) is oriented with north to the top.

  18. New Orleans Capacity Building Pilot Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A series of meetings involving the Port of New Orleans and near-port community organizations were convened for a community capacity building pilot project. Technical assistance is being provided by EPA to support effective engagement.

  19. Rebuilding New Orleans after Katrina, part 2.

    PubMed

    Soltau, Eleanor

    2006-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina occurred on August 29, 2005, followed by Hurricane Rita on September 24, with destruction extending along the Gulf Coast to Beaumont, Texas. Reentry into New Orleans began in mid to late September last year and occurred in stages, with the least devastated areas being gradually reopened first. People began trickling back in until the city was finally fully opened in December except for the Ninth Ward and East New Orleans.

  20. 77 FR 2120 - Environmental Impact Statement for New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG), Jefferson and Orleans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). SUMMARY: FRA is issuing this notice to advise... (LA DOTD) to evaluate environmental and related impacts of upgrading the New Orleans Rail Gateway...

  1. Solid waste resource recovery in New Orleans

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, New Orleans will become one of the nation's pioneer cities in a new field: resource recovery. A plant called Recovery I, built in east New Orleans has begun to process about half the city's trash and garbage, about 650 tons per day, to separate recyclable materials from waste. Resource recovery has been defined as the systematic diversion of waste from disposal to reuse. It offers an alternative to non-productive landfilling or incineration, and can produce revenue from the sale of recovered products. The net result of Recovery I will be to (1) conserve natural resources, (2) use the processed organic material for land reclamation in a properly designed and operated landfill, and (3) provide an operational waste disposal system for the city of New Orleans. The bibliography contains 75 references.

  2. Effect of the salts of deep ocean water on the production of cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris-fermented product.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ping; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Wei, Bai-Luh; Lee, Chun-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a type of entomogenous fungi and has been widely used as a medicinal fungus in Asia. Cordycepin produced by C. militaris has also been found to protect the liver. Moreover, deep ocean water (DOW) was proven to increase the functional compounds of functional fungi-fermented products. However, the regulation of the metals in DOW is still unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of DOW and certain major ions on the production of cordycepin and adenosine of C. militaris. The results indicated that, compared with using ultra-pure water (UPW), using DOW to cultivate C. militaris in a submerged culture increases the production of biomass and adenosine (p < 0.05). In the results of solid culture, the concentration of DOW exhibits a dose effect on cordycepin production. DOW contains ions that can improve the effectiveness of cordycepin, such as Mg(2+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), and NO3 (-), whereas the ion Cl(-) features an inhibitory effect. Moreover, Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), and SO4 (2-)can increase the production of adenosine, whereas Cl(-) cannot. However, the synthetic water made from various types of sodium salts (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, FeCl2) had nearly the same effect on cordycepin production as that of DOW.

  3. The Greater New Orleans STAR Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smollen, J. W., III

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of STAR a computer project designed to provide urban planners with needed information rapidly and accurately. Particular attention was given to planning for the New Orleans area. Attempts were also made to analyze interactive effects of urban problems and predict their effects on each other.

  4. New Orleans Eyed as Clean Educational Slate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    New Orleans will probably never be the same after Hurricane Katrina. But when it comes to schools, many educators and analysts say that might not be all bad. Both in Louisiana and beyond, the wreckage in the Big Easy has sparked thinking about how the city might reinvent its beleaguered school system, in difficult straits long before the storm was…

  5. Rebuilding for the Community in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Five years after hurricane Katrina, the City of New Orleans is now implementing a far-reaching plan for the systemic renovation and rebuilding of community programmes and infrastructure. A total of USD 3 billion has now been allocated to public building projects. With the student population down to nearly half of pre-storm totals, a recently…

  6. Rebuilding for the Community in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Five years after hurricane Katrina, the City of New Orleans is now implementing a far-reaching plan for the systemic renovation and rebuilding of community programmes and infrastructure. A total of USD 3 billion has now been allocated to public building projects. With the student population down to nearly half of pre-storm totals, a recently…

  7. New Orleans, Louisiana: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of New Orleans, LA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  8. New Orleans Eyed as Clean Educational Slate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    New Orleans will probably never be the same after Hurricane Katrina. But when it comes to schools, many educators and analysts say that might not be all bad. Both in Louisiana and beyond, the wreckage in the Big Easy has sparked thinking about how the city might reinvent its beleaguered school system, in difficult straits long before the storm was…

  9. Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of September 16, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. SEPTEMBER 16, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE AND PICTURE OF BRIDGE BID OPENING FEATURING LOUISIANA GOVERNOR HUEY LONG, NEW ORLEANS MAYOR WALMSLEY, STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION CHAIRMAN O.K. ALLEN AND PUBLIC BELT RAILROAD CHIEF ENGINEER ROBERT BARCLAY. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  10. Archaeological Test Excavations at Reaves Point, Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point (MOTSU), Brunswick County, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    discarded military gear. To locate promising areas for test excavations, we used a metal detector (Garrett Deep Seeker ADS I) to search for con- centrations... metal detector indicated isolated metal artifacts, shovel tests were dug, but in every case in which a shovel test produced a metal artifact, it either

  11. Steps to Developing the New Orleans Strategic Energy Plan (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation was given by NREL's Elizabeth Doris (Brown) to the New Orleans City Council in January 2008. NREL was funded by DOE to provide technical assistance to New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The presentation provides an overview of strategic energy planning, case studies, and suggested next steps for implementing energy efficiency and renewable energy into the city's rebuilding efforts.

  12. New Orleans Colleges Slog toward Recovery from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-eight months after Hurricane Katrina forced the closures of more than a half-dozen New Orleans colleges and universities, many of them are still struggling to regain their enrollments and restore buildings damaged by floodwater and mold. Over all, college enrollment in New Orleans increased slightly in the fall of 2007, reaching 74 percent…

  13. Depleted New Orleans Teachers' Union Vows to Rebuild

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    The three-story building that was once the United Teachers of New Orleans' office is dark and deserted, the first floor damaged by Hurricane Katrina's floodwaters. The union membership, which numbered 4,700 before the storm, is now down to 300. Of the 25 schools that are now open in New Orleans, only five are regular public schools. The rest are…

  14. New Orleans Colleges Slog toward Recovery from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-eight months after Hurricane Katrina forced the closures of more than a half-dozen New Orleans colleges and universities, many of them are still struggling to regain their enrollments and restore buildings damaged by floodwater and mold. Over all, college enrollment in New Orleans increased slightly in the fall of 2007, reaching 74 percent…

  15. School Choice Outcomes in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Jill M.; Vaughan, Debra Y.

    2013-01-01

    Today, over 80% of public school students in New Orleans attend charter schools, and just 37% of students attend school in their neighborhood (Louisiana Department of Education, 2011; Scott S. Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives, 2011). This study examines school choice participation and outcomes in New Orleans by analyzing the extent…

  16. Water resources of Orleans Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  17. The Future of Public Education in New Orleans. After Katrina: Rebuilding Opportunity and Equity into the "New" New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul; Hannaway, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Long before the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina or the chaos of evacuation, New Orleans' social infrastructure was failing. News coverage of the overcrowded Superdome and the city's flooded streets exposed the poverty and vulnerability of many residents, especially African Americans. As New Orleans begins to rebuild, can the city avoid the mistakes…

  18. Archaeological Monitoring of the St. Peter Street Floodgates Project, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-24

    the New Orleans Vieux Carre Historic District were monitored to insure that no significant cultural resources were adversely impacted. Construction...monitoring of the St. Peter Street Floodgates Project, Orleans Parish, Louisiana. Construction excavations with the New Orleans Vieux Carre Historic...Orleans Vieux Carre Historic District which became a National Historic Landmark in 1965 (Scope of Services). Archaeological monitoring of the construction

  19. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  20. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY , COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS....MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS

  1. Acoustic and visual remote sensing of barrels of radioactive waste: Application of civilian and military technology to environmental management of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, H.A.; Chin, J.L.; Maher, N.M.; Chavez, P.S. Jr.; Ueber, E.; Van Peeters, W.; Curl, H.

    1995-04-01

    As part of an ongoing strategic research project to find barrels of radioactive waste off San Francisco, the U.S. Navy (USN), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) pooled their expertise, resources, and technology to form a partnership to verify new computer enhancement techniques developed for detecting targets the size of 55 gallon barrels on sidescan sonar images. Between 1946 and 1970, approximately 47,800 large barrels and other containers of radioactive waste were dumped in the ocean west of San Francisco; the containers litter an area of the sea floor of at least 1400 km {sup 2} knows as the Farallon Island Radioactive Waste Dump. The exact location of the containers and the potential hazard the containers pose to the environment is unknown. The USGS developed computer techniques and contracted with private industry to enhance sidescan data, collected in cooperation with the GFNMS, to detect objects as small as 55 gallon steel barrels while conducting regional scale sidescan sonar surveys. Using a subset of the regional sonar survey, images were plotted over a 125 km {sub 2} area. The acoustic interpretations were verified visually using the USN DSV Sea Cliff and the unmanned Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Barrels and other physical features were found where image enhancement had indicated they would be found. The interagency cooperation among the USN, USGS, and GFNMS has led to develop a cost effective and time efficient method to locate the barrels of radioactive waste. This method has universal application for locating containers of hazardous waste over a regional scale in other ocean areas such as Boston Harbor and the Kara Sea in the Arctic. This successful application of military and civilian expertise and technology has provided scientific information to help formulate policy decisions that affect the environmental management and quality of the ocean.

  2. Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of October 4, 1931 New Orleans Morning Tribune newspaper article. Located in a photo album at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. OCTOBER 4, 1931 NEW ORLEANS MORNING TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ANNOUNCING THAT THE WORK ON THE NEW BRIDGE IS EXPECTED TO START IN 90 DAYS. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  3. The History of Otolaryngology In New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Lyons, George D

    2016-01-01

    George D. Lyons, MD, now becoming "an elder statesman," he decided summarize the early history of otolaryngology as it developed in New Orleans. Francis LeJeune, MD, Sr., a much admired and loved otolaryngologist, has afforded a great insight through his memoirs in the early development of our specialty in his report of Otolaryngology in the South. Dr. LeJune, Sr. began his brief paper just before his death. Excerpts from this paper have been used by the American Laryngological Association. There will be no bibliography. Most of this information was obtained from Dr. LeJeune's memoirs, history departments of the Academy, Touro Infirmary, Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat (EENT) archives and interviews with descendants of our early leaders. A special thanks to them for their time, research, and generosity of information. There has been some debate regarding the precision of some of the dates, but they are as chronologically accurate as possible.

  4. Space radar image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment.

  5. Space radar image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment.

  6. Space Radar Image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-14

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01300

  7. News about Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New Orleans/Lake Pontchartrain of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  8. Program Contacts for Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts

  9. Photo Gallery for Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  10. Links Related to Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts

  11. Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana) Meetings & Events

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake Pontchartrain Area/New Orleans (Louisiana) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts

  12. Archival Evaluation of Floodwall Alignments: New Orleans, Louisiana.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-15

    CENTURY: PLANTATIONS are about 90 per cent complete. The availability of transportation is essential to the success of any commercial agricultural ...developers, and Faubourg Livaudais was born. With its birth died one of the last agricultural regions on the New Orleans riverfront. 28 0 ’ i THE EIGHTEENTH...entire historic Port of New Orleans. The first impulse to growth arose from a burgeoning trade in western produce. Agricultural goods arrived from the

  13. New Orleans area as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The greater New Orleans area, including portions of Louisiana and Mississippi, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 120th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 95 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 190 hours and 45 minutes. The largest body of water in the picture is Lake Pontchartrain. The Mississippi River is clearly visible as it meanders past New Orleans. Note highway network, and 25-mile causeway across lake.

  14. New Orleans area as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-19

    The greater New Orleans area, including portions of Louisiana and Mississippi, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 120th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 95 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 190 hours and 45 minutes. The largest body of water in the picture is Lake Pontchartrain. The Mississippi River is clearly visible as it meanders past New Orleans. Note highway network, and 25-mile causeway across lake.

  15. The narcotic clinic in New Orleans, 1919-21.

    PubMed

    Tallaksen, Amund

    2017-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the narcotic clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, comparing its merits to a similar clinic in Shreveport. How do the clinics compare, and why did the Shreveport clinic operate for longer than its New Orleans counterpart? Qualitative analysis of contemporary medical journals and newspapers, as well as archival materials from the Narcotic Division. In addition, the records of Louisiana Governor John M. Parker, the papers of Dr Willis P. Butler in Shreveport, as well as the records of the Orleans Parish Medical Society have been utilized. The narcotic clinic in Shreveport benefited from strong local support, while the New Orleans clinic faced a more vocal opposition. In addition, the Shreveport clinic offered a broad array of services and was a pillar of the community; the New Orleans clinic was newly established and offered fewer services. It was especially the influx of out-of-state addicts that angered many New Orleanians, many of whom witnessed the addicts lined up in the French Quarter. The effectiveness of the narcotic clinics in Louisiana (1919-23) was influenced by local opinion. The New Orleans clinic faced a tougher political climate than its counterpart in Shreveport, and therefore proved less resilient in the face of federal opposition. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Higher Anti-Liver Fibrosis Effect of Cordyceps militaris-Fermented Product Cultured with Deep Ocean Water via Inhibiting Proinflammatory Factors and Fibrosis-Related Factors Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Deep ocean water (DOW) has been shown to enhance the functional components of fungi, resulting in increased health benefits. Therefore, using DOW for culturing fungi can enhance the cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its protective effects on the liver. In this study, the antiliver fibrosis effects and mechanisms of ultrapure water-cultured CM (UCM), DOW-cultured CM (DCM), synthetic water-cultured CM, DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine were compared in the liver fibrosis mice induced by intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA). The results indicated that DCM exhibited superior performance in reducing liver collagen accumulation, mitigating liver injuries, inhibiting proinflammatory factors and fibrosis-related factor (TGF-β1, Smad2/3, α-SMA, COL1A1) expression compared with UCM. DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine also performed antiliver fibrosis effect. Therefore, because DCM is rich in DOW and functional components, it can achieve anti-liver fibrosis effects through multiple pathways. These ameliorative effects are considerably superior to those of UCM. PMID:28594374

  17. Higher Anti-Liver Fibrosis Effect of Cordyceps militaris-Fermented Product Cultured with Deep Ocean Water via Inhibiting Proinflammatory Factors and Fibrosis-Related Factors Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Ping; Lee, Chun-Lin

    2017-06-08

    Deep ocean water (DOW) has been shown to enhance the functional components of fungi, resulting in increased health benefits. Therefore, using DOW for culturing fungi can enhance the cordycepin and adenosine of Cordyceps militaris (CM) and its protective effects on the liver. In this study, the antiliver fibrosis effects and mechanisms of ultrapure water-cultured CM (UCM), DOW-cultured CM (DCM), synthetic water-cultured CM, DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine were compared in the liver fibrosis mice induced by intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA). The results indicated that DCM exhibited superior performance in reducing liver collagen accumulation, mitigating liver injuries, inhibiting proinflammatory factors and fibrosis-related factor (TGF-β1, Smad2/3, α-SMA, COL1A1) expression compared with UCM. DOW, cordycepin, and adenosine also performed antiliver fibrosis effect. Therefore, because DCM is rich in DOW and functional components, it can achieve anti-liver fibrosis effects through multiple pathways. These ameliorative effects are considerably superior to those of UCM.

  18. Marketing family planning services in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J T; Proffitt, B J; Bartlett, T L

    1987-01-01

    The health care profession is witnessing a shift in focus from the interests and needs of the service provider to those of the potential consumer in an effort to attract and maintain clients. This study illustrates the role that marketing research can play in the development of program strategies, even for relatively small organizations. The study was conducted for Planned Parenthood of Louisiana, a recently organized affiliate that began offering clinical services in May 1984, to provide information on the four Ps of marketing: product, price, place, and promotion. Data from telephone interviews among a random sample of 1,000 women 15-35 years old in New Orleans before the clinic opened confirmed that the need for family planning services was not entirely satisfied by existing service providers. Moreover, it indicated that clinic hours and the cost of services were in line with client interests. The most useful findings for developing the promotional strategy were the relatively low name recognition of Planned Parenthood and a higher-than-expected level of interest that young, low income blacks expressed in using the service.

  19. Marketing family planning services in New Orleans.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J T; Proffitt, B J; Bartlett, T L

    1987-01-01

    The health care profession is witnessing a shift in focus from the interests and needs of the service provider to those of the potential consumer in an effort to attract and maintain clients. This study illustrates the role that marketing research can play in the development of program strategies, even for relatively small organizations. The study was conducted for Planned Parenthood of Louisiana, a recently organized affiliate that began offering clinical services in May 1984, to provide information on the four Ps of marketing: product, price, place, and promotion. Data from telephone interviews among a random sample of 1,000 women 15-35 years old in New Orleans before the clinic opened confirmed that the need for family planning services was not entirely satisfied by existing service providers. Moreover, it indicated that clinic hours and the cost of services were in line with client interests. The most useful findings for developing the promotional strategy were the relatively low name recognition of Planned Parenthood and a higher-than-expected level of interest that young, low income blacks expressed in using the service. PMID:3112854

  20. 75 FR 8486 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The... Navigational Canal, mile 0.9, (GIWW mile 6.7 EHL), at New Orleans, LA. The deviation is necessary to...

  1. New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. IV: Orleans East Bank (Metro) protected basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seed, R.B.; Bea, R.G.; Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, A.; Boutwell, G.P.; Bray, J.D.; Cheung, C.; Cobos-Roa, D.; Cohen-Waeber, J.; Collins, B.D.; Harder, L.F.; Kayen, R.E.; Pestana, J.M.; Riemer, M.F.; Rogers, J.D.; Storesund, R.; Vera-Grunauer, X.; Wartman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses damage caused by Hurricane Katrina to the main Orleans East Bank protected basin. This basin represented the heart of New Orleans, and contained the main downtown area, the historic French Quarter, the Garden District, and the sprawling Lakefront and Canal Districts. Nearly half of the loss of life during this hurricane, and a similar fraction of the overall damages, occurred in this heavily populated basin. There are a number of important geotechnical lessons, as well as geo-forensic lessons, associated with the flooding of this basin. These include the difficulties associated with the creation and operation of regional-scale flood protection systems requiring federal and local cooperation and funding over prolonged periods of time. There are also a number of engineering and policy lessons regarding (1) the accuracy and reliability of current analytical methods; (2) the shortcomings and potential dangers involved in decisions that reduced short-term capital outlays in exchange for increased risk of potential system failures; (3) the difficulties associated with integrating local issues with a flood risk reduction project; and (4) the need to design and maintain levees as systems; with each of the many individual project elements being required to mesh seamlessly. These lessons are of interest and importance for similar flood protection systems throughout numerous other regions of the United States and the world. ?? 2008 ACSE.

  2. Making Connections: New Orleans Evacuees’ Experiences in Obtaining Drugs1

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D.; Kotarba, Joseph; Fackler, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Between August 29 and September 7, 2005, almost all New Orleans residents were evacuated from the area in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. News reports indicate that almost 130,000 New Orleans Evacuees (NOEs) were evacuated to Houston, Texas, the largest recipient of the civilian population from New Orleans. Many of these NOEs were active participants in the illicit drug market in New Orleans prior to the hurricane. Their displacement to Houston and other locations provided a unique opportunity to study what occurs when illicit drug markets are disrupted. The period between the flooding and nearly complete evacuation of New Orleans provided a unique opportunity to systematically learn about the disruption of illicit drug markets since populations of illicit drug users and purchasers could no longer routinely obtain their drugs in predictable ways. Utilizing qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus groups, this article describes the ways NOEs (1) managed their drug acquisition and use following evacuation; (2) located new sources of drugs in Houston and elsewhere by tapping into shared drug culture; and (3) gained access to and learned the argot for drugs in the local drug market in new settings. This report contributes to the nascent literature on disrupted drug markets. PMID:19999675

  3. Making connections: New Orleans Evacuees' experiences in obtaining drugs.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D; Kotarba, Joseph A; Fackler, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    Between August 29 and September 7, 2005, almost all New Orleans residents were evacuated from the area in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. News reports indicate that almost 130,000 New Orleans Evacuees (NOEs) were evacuated to Houston, Texas, the largest recipient of the civilian population from New Orleans. Some of these NOEs were active participants in the illicit drug market in New Orleans prior to the hurricane. The period between the flooding and the nearly complete evacuation of New Orleans as well as their subsequent displacement to Houston and other locations provided unique opportunities to study what occurs when illicit drug markets are disrupted, since populations of illicit drug users and purchasers could no longer routinely obtain their drugs in predictable ways. Utilizing qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus groups, this article describes the ways NOEs (1) managed their drug acquisition and use following evacuation; (2) located new sources of drugs in Houston and elsewhere by tapping into shared drug culture; and (3) gained access to and learned the argot for drugs in the local drug market in new settings. This report contributes to the nascent literature on disrupted drug markets.

  4. Educational Greenfield: A Critical Policy Analysis of Plans to Transform New Orleans Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torregano, Michelle Early; Shannon, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    New Orleans is known as a unique city. It is the birthplace of jazz, delicious food, and a "gumbo" of warm friendly people. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina roared ashore, leaving death and destruction in her wake. New Orleans Mayor C. Ray Nagin recognized that rebuilding the city of New Orleans would be a daunting task; one that he…

  5. Space geodesy: subsidence and flooding in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Timothy H; Amelung, Falk; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio; Rocca, Fabio; Dokka, Roy; Sella, Giovanni; Kim, Sang-Wan; Wdowinski, Shimon; Whitman, Dean

    2006-06-01

    It has long been recognized that New Orleans is subsiding and is therefore susceptible to catastrophic flooding. Here we present a new subsidence map for the city, generated from space-based synthetic-aperture radar measurements, which reveals that parts of New Orleans underwent rapid subsidence in the three years before Hurricane Katrina struck in August 2005. One such area is next to the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) canal, where levees failed during the peak storm surge: the map indicates that this weakness could be explained by subsidence of a metre or more since their construction.

  6. Socioecological disparities in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina

    Treesearch

    Joshua A. Lewis; Wayne C. Zipperer; Henrik Ernstson; Brittany Bernik; Rebecca Hazen; Thomas Elmqvist; Michael J. Blum

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing interest in urban resilience, remarkably little is known about vegetation dynamics in the aftermath of disasters. In this study, we examined the composition and structure of plant communities across New Orleans (Louisiana, USA) following catastrophic flooding triggered by levee failures during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Focusing on eight...

  7. Proceedings of the Full Board Meeting (Orleans, France, July 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France). Abstracting Board.

    The 1971 General Assembly and full board meetings of the International Council of Scientific Unions Abstracting Board (ICSU AB) were held in July at Orleans, France. This volume is the published proceedings of those meetings. The first part of the Proceedings is a detailed description of the activities of the Board. The second part records the…

  8. Health and Safety Initiative in the New Orleans Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garibaldi, Antoine; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between suspensions and expulsions of African American students, teacher effectiveness, and school safety in New Orleans (Louisiana) public schools. Preliminary evaluations for the 1995-96 school year are presented. The initial phase of data collection focused on focus group interviews…

  9. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  10. New Teachers Search for Place in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Derek Roguski and Hannah Sadtler came to New Orleans in 2008 through Teach For America. The competitive program provided five weeks' training and helped place them in schools, and both young teachers were eager to learn to teach and help the city's students. But they quickly found that they had more questions than answers about the schools they…

  11. Resource Issues: A Case Study from New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, James R.; Young, Alma H.

    1993-01-01

    One major obstacle to collaboration is perception of value--especially in urban areas where resources are shrinking and social problems are increasing. Sharing of resources is weighted by considerations of proximal benefit and proximal concern. This article shows how a New Orleans full-services school pilot project successfully garnered funding…

  12. Some New Orleans Colleges Predict Bigger Enrollments This Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    After a difficult year for colleges and universities in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, the enrollment outlook for this fall is a lot brighter. Tulane University reported last week that 1,375 high-school seniors had committed to attending, a 56-percent jump over last year's 882 new freshmen. Xavier University of Louisiana reported that it…

  13. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  14. Louisiana Eyes Plan to Let State Control New Orleans Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2005-01-01

    Seeking to grasp what she called a "golden opportunity for rebirth" out of the wreckage of Hurricane Katrina, Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco asked the Louisiana legislature last week to embrace a plan that would give the state control of most New Orleans public schools. This article talks about the governor's plan to let the state…

  15. Resource Issues: A Case Study from New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, James R.; Young, Alma H.

    1993-01-01

    One major obstacle to collaboration is perception of value--especially in urban areas where resources are shrinking and social problems are increasing. Sharing of resources is weighted by considerations of proximal benefit and proximal concern. This article shows how a New Orleans full-services school pilot project successfully garnered funding…

  16. As Year Ends, Questions Remain for New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2008-01-01

    In rebuilding public schooling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, education reformers have managed to hire energetic teachers, break ground on a few new school buildings, raise public confidence, and show progress on test scores. But fundamental questions remain as the 2007-08 academic year draws to a close, including how the city's…

  17. As Year Ends, Questions Remain for New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2008-01-01

    In rebuilding public schooling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, education reformers have managed to hire energetic teachers, break ground on a few new school buildings, raise public confidence, and show progress on test scores. But fundamental questions remain as the 2007-08 academic year draws to a close, including how the city's…

  18. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  19. Murder rates in New Orleans, La, 2004-2006.

    PubMed

    VanLandingham, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    Murder rates for New Orleans, La, during 2005 and 2006 were calculated with the best available population trajectories for these 2 atypical years. These calculations showed that the murder rate increased substantially during this period compared with 2004. The increase in 2005 from 2004 was 14%. The best estimate of the increase in the murder rate in 2006 compared with 2004 was 69%; the large increase in 2006 began during the second quarter of that year.

  20. Murder Rates in New Orleans, La, 2004–2006

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    Murder rates for New Orleans, La, during 2005 and 2006 were calculated with the best available population trajectories for these 2 atypical years. These calculations showed that the murder rate increased substantially during this period compared with 2004. The increase in 2005 from 2004 was 14%. The best estimate of the increase in the murder rate in 2006 compared with 2004 was 69%; the large increase in 2006 began during the second quarter of that year. PMID:17666685

  1. Epidemiological dynamics of norovirus GII.4 variant New Orleans 2009.

    PubMed

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; De Grazia, Simona; Calderaro, Adriana; De Conto, Flora; Terio, Valentina; Chironna, Maria; Bonura, Floriana; Pucci, Marzia; Bányai, Kristián; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the major causes of diarrhoeal disease with epidemic, outbreak and sporadic patterns in humans of all ages worldwide. NoVs of genotype GII.4 cause nearly 80-90 % of all NoV infections in humans. Periodically, some GII.4 strains become predominant, generating major pandemic variants. Retrospective analysis of the GII.4 NoV strains detected in Italy between 2007 and 2013 indicated that the pandemic variant New Orleans 2009 emerged in Italy in the late 2009, became predominant in 2010-2011 and continued to circulate in a sporadic fashion until April 2013. Upon phylogenetic analysis based on the small diagnostic regions A and C, the late New Orleans 2009 NoVs circulating during 2011-2013 appeared to be genetically different from the early New Orleans 2009 strains that circulated in 2010. For a selection of strains, a 3.2 kb genome portion at the 3' end was sequenced. In the partial ORF1 and in the full-length ORF2 and ORF3, the 2011-2013 New Orleans NoVs comprised at least three distinct genetic subclusters. By comparison with sequences retrieved from the databases, these subclusters were also found to circulate globally, suggesting that the local circulation reflected repeated introductions of different strains, rather than local selection of novel viruses. Phylogenetic subclustering did not correlate with changes in residues located in predicted putative capsid epitopes, although several changes affected the P2 domain in epitopes A, C, D and E.

  2. Human geography of New Orleans' high-lead geochemical setting.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Richard; Mielke, Howard W

    2008-12-01

    Previous soil lead studies in New Orleans focused on the geochemical footprint and its health impacts. This study examines the human geography of race, income, and age in pre-Katrina metropolitan New Orleans within the context of lead accumulation in soils. Sample points of soil lead data (n = 5,467) collected in 1998-2000 were mapped in a geographic information system (GIS), binned into 9 ranges, and queried by (1) 2000 Census racial demographic data, (2) 1999 median household income, and (3) 2000 age data. The absolute population generally declines as lead levels increase except at lead levels from 200-400 to 400-1,000 mg/kg when population increases; the African-American population comprises a disproportionate share of this cohort. The high-lead areas occur in the inner city, home to the largest populations of African-Americans in New Orleans. The mean household income curve indicates that lower economic groups are at risk to higher levels of lead. A total of 44,701 children under the age of 5 years, plus 123,579 children aged 5-17, lived in census block groups containing at least one sample point with over 100 mg/kg lead, and these include 23,124 and 64,064 young people, respectively, who live near at least one point over 400 mg/kg. Lead exposure affects a panoply of outcomes that influence the health and welfare of the community. Unless corrected, children are likely to return to the same or, because of lack of lead-safe practices during renovation, even higher exposure risks than before the flooding of New Orleans.

  3. The struggle for mental healthcare in new orleans-one case at a time.

    PubMed

    Potash, Mordecai N

    2008-07-01

    Using cases publicized in the media, this article demonstrates key issues that have led to the crisis in mental healthcare in New Orleans. These cases demonstrate the plight of chronically mentally ill individuals returning to New Orleans, the emotional stresses faced by New Orleans residents rebuilding their lives, and the consequences of shunting mental health services from a healthcare setting to law enforcement. This article also describes preexisting deficits in Louisiana's mental health system that contributed to this crisis as well as factors that have hampered the rebuilding of the mental health infrastructure in New Orleans. Finally, this article suggests future changes for needed mental health services after a large-scale disaster.

  4. Illicit Drug Markets Among New Orleans Evacuees Before and Soon After Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D; Morse, Edward

    2007-09-01

    This paper analyzes illicit drug markets in New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina and access to drug markets following evacuation at many locations and in Houston. Among New Orleans arrestees pre-Katrina, rates of crack and heroin use and market participation was comparable to New York and higher than in other southern cities. Both cities have vigorous outdoor drug markets. Over 100 New Orleans evacuees provide rich accounts describing the illicit markets in New Orleans and elsewhere. The flooding of New Orleans disrupted the city's flourishing drug markets, both during and immediately after the storm. Drug supplies, though limited, were never completely unavailable. Subjects reported that alcohol or drugs were not being used in the Houston Astrodome, and it was a supportive environment. Outside the Astrodome, they were often approached by or could easily locate middlemen and drug sellers. Evacuees could typically access illegal drug markets wherever they went. This paper analyzes the impact of a major disaster upon users of illegal drugs and the illegal drug markets in New Orleans and among the diaspora of New Orleans evacuees following Hurricane Katrina. This analysis includes data from criminal justice sources that specify what the drug markets were like before this disaster occurred. This analysis also includes some comparison cities where no disaster occurred, but which help inform the similarities and differences in drug markets in other cities. The data presented also include an initial analysis of ethnographic interview data from over 100 New Orleans Evacuees recruited in New Orleans and Houston.

  5. Old World hantaviruses in rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Cross, Robert W; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G; Bausch, Daniel G

    2014-05-01

    Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured--all brown rats--were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans.

  6. New Orleans Topography, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-29

    The city of New Orleans, situated on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, is shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In this image bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the SRTM mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations. New Orleans is near the center of this scene, between the lake and the Mississippi River. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world’s longest overwater highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are actually below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls that are designed to protect against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04174

  7. New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina: An Unnatural Disaster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Werner, B.; Kelso, A.

    2005-12-01

    Motivated by destruction in New Orleans following hurricane Katrina, we use a numerical model to explore how natural processes, economic development, hazard mitigation measures and policy decisions intertwine to produce long periods of quiescence punctuated by disasters of increasing magnitude. Physical, economic and policy dynamics are modeled on a grid representing the subsiding Mississippi Delta region surrounding New Orleans. Water flow and resulting sediment erosion and deposition are simulated in response to prescribed river floods and storms. Economic development operates on a limited number of commodities and services such as agricultural products, oil and chemical industries and port services, with investment and employment responding to both local conditions and global constraints. Development permitting, artificial levee construction and pumping are implemented by policy agents who weigh predicted economic benefits (tax revenue), mitigation costs and potential hazards. Economic risk is reduced by a combination of private insurance, federal flood insurance and disaster relief. With this model, we simulate the initiation and growth of New Orleans coupled with an increasing level of protection from a series of flooding events. Hazard mitigation filters out small magnitude events, but terrain and hydrological modifications amplify the impact of large events. In our model, "natural disasters" are the inevitable outcome of the mismatch between policy based on short-time-scale economic calculations and stochastic forcing by infrequent, high-magnitude flooding events. A comparison of the hazard mitigation response to river- and hurricane-induced flooding will be discussed. Supported by NSF Geology and Paleontology and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation.

  8. Skylab 4 Command Module in Pacific Ocean following splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An early morning sun casts a reflection across the Skylab 4 Command Module in Pacific Ocean some 176 miles southwest of San Diego, California, following splashdown at 8:17 a.m., February 8, 1974. Swimmers from the U.S.S. New Orleans, prime recovery ship, are taking part in recovery operations, here.

  9. Slides from the 2013 Smart Growth Summit on How to Learn from the New Orleans Urban Waters Partnership

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation Slides for 2013 Smart Growth Summit, Baton Rouge, LA, H2O Overview: How to Learn from the New Orleans Urban Waters Partnership - Danny Wiegand Urban Waters Ambassador to New Orleans November 19, 2013

  10. Connecting the Disconnected: Scholar Activists and Education Reform in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniella Ann

    2014-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans on August 29, 2005, the failure of the levees resulted in the largest single human-made disaster in the United States. In addition to the physical devastation of the city, the landscape of public schools in New Orleans was permanently altered, as was the national dialogue about school reform in the…

  11. New Orleans Homecoming: Students Return to Campuses that Are Forever Changed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper; Hoover, Eric; Mangan, Katherine S.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly five months after Hurricane Katrina swept them off their campuses in and around New Orleans, thousands of college administrators, faculty members, and students began a new semester in January 2006. Students came back with a new spirit of determination to adapt to the new realities of New Orleans, and to campuses that are forever changed,…

  12. How Policymakers Define "Evidence": The Politics of Research Use in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya; La Londe, Priya Goel; Debray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Nearly ten years after Katrina and the implementation of a host of new and radical education reforms in New Orleans, there remains little evidence about whether the changes have improved school performance. Despite this lack of evidence, the New Orleans model is held up as a reform success, and is being adopted by other cities. In this article the…

  13. Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jack L.

    Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

  14. Connecting the Disconnected: Scholar Activists and Education Reform in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniella Ann

    2014-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans on August 29, 2005, the failure of the levees resulted in the largest single human-made disaster in the United States. In addition to the physical devastation of the city, the landscape of public schools in New Orleans was permanently altered, as was the national dialogue about school reform in the…

  15. Man-made New Orleans: some interactions between the physical and esthetic environments

    Treesearch

    Ronald F. Lockmann

    1977-01-01

    The relations between the physical environment and esthetic dimensions of the New Orleans cultural landscape are examined. The esthetic characteristics associated with New Orleans urban morphology are examined with respect to possible constraints by the physical environment. Salient townscape features such as street grid system, surface-drainage network, and spatial...

  16. New Orleans Homecoming: Students Return to Campuses that Are Forever Changed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper; Hoover, Eric; Mangan, Katherine S.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly five months after Hurricane Katrina swept them off their campuses in and around New Orleans, thousands of college administrators, faculty members, and students began a new semester in January 2006. Students came back with a new spirit of determination to adapt to the new realities of New Orleans, and to campuses that are forever changed,…

  17. "Drenched in the Past:" the Evolution of Market-Oriented Reforms in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2015-01-01

    As the city with the largest charter-school market share in the United States, New Orleans, Louisiana exemplifies market-oriented models in education. For a city that is so "drenched in the past," the reform movement in New Orleans typically neglects historical context, often dismissing the education system pre-Katrina as simply corrupt…

  18. Contribution of soil lead in children: A study from New Orleans, LA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the last four years, a significant number of environmental studies have been conducted in New Orleans, LA and surrounding Gulf Coast areas due in part to the occurrence of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Data collected from studies in the New Orleans area indicate that inorganic contaminants in...

  19. Participatory Research in Support of Quality Public Education in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Burel, Deirdre; Drame, Elizabeth; Frattura, Elise

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, two years after Hurricane Katrina, several education and child advocacy groups began discussing the depleted conditions of the New Orleans public school district. These groups came together to discuss how to create a sustainable education reform movement post Katrina. New Orleans-based community groups and outside university researchers…

  20. Participatory Research in Support of Quality Public Education in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Burel, Deirdre; Drame, Elizabeth; Frattura, Elise

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, two years after Hurricane Katrina, several education and child advocacy groups began discussing the depleted conditions of the New Orleans public school district. These groups came together to discuss how to create a sustainable education reform movement post Katrina. New Orleans-based community groups and outside university researchers…

  1. "Drenched in the Past:" the Evolution of Market-Oriented Reforms in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2015-01-01

    As the city with the largest charter-school market share in the United States, New Orleans, Louisiana exemplifies market-oriented models in education. For a city that is so "drenched in the past," the reform movement in New Orleans typically neglects historical context, often dismissing the education system pre-Katrina as simply corrupt…

  2. New Orleans Revisited and Revised: Recommendations for the Field of Speech Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roever, James E.; And Others

    This collection of four papers is the result of an action caucus held in association with the Speech Communication Association's 1972 convention, focusing on developments in the speech communication field since the 1968 USOE/SAA New Orleans conference (ED 028 164). In the first paper, "New Orleans Revisited but Briefly," James E. Roever summarizes…

  3. 33 CFR 165.T08-0994 - Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA. 165.T08-0994 Section 165.T08-0994 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T08-0994 Security Zone; Mississippi River, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Lower Mississippi...

  4. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  5. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  6. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  7. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  8. 33 CFR 117.458 - Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. 117.458 Section 117.458 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans. (a) The draws of the SR 46 (St. Claude Avenue) bridge, mile 0.5...

  9. Multivariate Global Ocean Assimilation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    representations of the four dimensional circulation of the ocean using data assimilation methods . We intend these representations to be applied in a variety of military, academic, as well as commercial applications.

  10. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A research perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kates, R. W.; Colten, C. E.; Laska, S.; Leatherman, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events—reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic—accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40–50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency postdisaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8–11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent. PMID:17003119

  11. Understanding policy enactment: the New Orleans Fresh Food Retailer Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Vanessa M; Rathert, Adrienne R; Rose, Donald

    2012-09-01

    Healthy-food financing initiatives have been endorsed as a way to improve food access, but relatively little research exists on understanding the formulation of such policies. This paper investigates the development of the New Orleans Fresh Food Retailer Initiative (FFRI) to highlight factors that enabled and impeded its enactment. In 2010 and 2011, semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 key informants with firsthand experience of this case, including representatives from the private sector, nonprofit organizations, and government. A participant-observer approach was used to synthesize these observations with archived written materials and the authors' own observations. Historical disparities in food access in New Orleans were exacerbated by Hurricane Katrina, which also generated neighborhood activism and a pressing need to rebuild the city. A Food Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) was formed from diverse groups. This paper describes the evolution of FPAC, its deliberations and report to the City Council, and actions to promote a financing initiative, as well as delays encountered in the process. Enactment of the FFRI was facilitated by a window of opportunity that opened in the storm's aftermath, broad-based stakeholder buy-in, the existence of political champions, and policy-relevant information that was simple and convincing. Impediments to success included the constant turnover of city staff, a skeptical state bureaucracy, and the many competing priorities in New Orleans. This study highlights the importance of having a clear policy objective to address a well-defined and illustrated problem, key advocates in diverse organizations, and broad-based support for its implementation. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors of business return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nina S N; Arenas, Helbert; Pace, Kelley; LeSage, James; Campanella, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the business reopening process in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, which hit the region on August 29, 2005, to better understand what the major predictors were and how their impacts changed through time. A telephone survey of businesses in New Orleans was conducted in October 2007, 26 months after Hurricane Katrina. The data were analyzed using a modified spatial probit regression model to evaluate the importance of each predictor variable through time. The results suggest that the two most important reopening predictors throughout all time periods were the flood depth at the business location and business size as represented by its wages in a logarithmic form. Flood depth was a significant negative predictor and had the largest marginal effects on the reopening probabilities. Smaller businesses had lower reopening probabilities than larger ones. However, the nonlinear response of business size to the reopening probability suggests that recovery aid would be most effective for smaller businesses than for larger ones. The spatial spillovers effect was a significant positive predictor but only for the first nine months. The findings show clearly that flood protection is the overarching issue for New Orleans. A flood protection plan that reduces the vulnerability and length of flooding would be the first and foremost step to mitigate the negative effects from climate-related hazards and enable speedy recovery. The findings cast doubt on the current coastal protection efforts and add to the current debate of whether coastal Louisiana will be sustainable or too costly to protect from further land loss and flooding given the threat of sea-level rise. Finally, a plan to help small businesses to return would also be an effective strategy for recovery, and the temporal window of opportunity that generates the greatest impacts would be the first 6∼9 months after the disaster.

  13. Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: a research perspective.

    PubMed

    Kates, R W; Colten, C E; Laska, S; Leatherman, S P

    2006-10-03

    Four propositions drawn from 60 years of natural hazard and reconstruction research provide a comparative and historical perspective on the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Decisions taken over its 288-year history that have made New Orleans so vulnerable to Katrina reflect a long-term pattern of societal response to hazard events--reducing consequences to relatively frequent events, and increasing vulnerability to very large and rare events. Thus Katrina's consequences for New Orleans were truly catastrophic--accounting for most of the estimated 1,570 deaths of Louisiana residents and $40-50 billion in monetary losses. A comparative sequence and timing of recovery provides a calendar of historical experience against which to gauge progress in reconstruction. Using this calendar, the emergency post-disaster period appears to be longer in duration than that of any other studied disaster. The restoration period, the time taken to restore urban services for the smaller population, is in keeping with or ahead of historical experience. The effort to reconstruct the physical environment and urban infrastructure is likely to take 8-11 years. Conflicting policy goals for reconstruction of rapid recovery, safety, betterment, and equity are already evident. Actions taken demonstrate the rush to rebuild the familiar in contrast to planning efforts that emphasize betterment. Because disasters tend to accelerate existing economic, social, and political trends, the large losses in housing, population, and employment after Katrina are likely to persist and, at best, only partly recover. However, the possibility of breaking free of this gloomy trajectory is feasible and has some historical precedent.

  14. Predictors of Business Return in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nina S. N.; Arenas, Helbert; Pace, Kelley; LeSage, James; Campanella, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the business reopening process in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, which hit the region on August 29, 2005, to better understand what the major predictors were and how their impacts changed through time. A telephone survey of businesses in New Orleans was conducted in October 2007, 26 months after Hurricane Katrina. The data were analyzed using a modified spatial probit regression model to evaluate the importance of each predictor variable through time. The results suggest that the two most important reopening predictors throughout all time periods were the flood depth at the business location and business size as represented by its wages in a logarithmic form. Flood depth was a significant negative predictor and had the largest marginal effects on the reopening probabilities. Smaller businesses had lower reopening probabilities than larger ones. However, the nonlinear response of business size to the reopening probability suggests that recovery aid would be most effective for smaller businesses than for larger ones. The spatial spillovers effect was a significant positive predictor but only for the first nine months. The findings show clearly that flood protection is the overarching issue for New Orleans. A flood protection plan that reduces the vulnerability and length of flooding would be the first and foremost step to mitigate the negative effects from climate-related hazards and enable speedy recovery. The findings cast doubt on the current coastal protection efforts and add to the current debate of whether coastal Louisiana will be sustainable or too costly to protect from further land loss and flooding given the threat of sea-level rise. Finally, a plan to help small businesses to return would also be an effective strategy for recovery, and the temporal window of opportunity that generates the greatest impacts would be the first 6∼9 months after the disaster. PMID:23133530

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building and NASA-KSC News Center. The flag is near the News Center. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building and NASA-KSC News Center. The flag is near the News Center. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. Some of the retrieval equipment can be seen on the rear deck. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. Some of the retrieval equipment can be seen on the rear deck. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Freedom Star is berthed at the Turn Basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The ship has recently returned to KSC after refurbishment at Fort George Island, Fla., including new paint. Freedom Star is one of the solid rocket booster (SRB) retrieval ships built to recover the SRB casings released over the Atlantic Ocean after launch of a Space Shuttle. In addition to the SRBs, the ship recovers the drogue and main parachutes that slow the boosters’ speed before splashdown. The ships also tow the external tanks built at the Michoud Space Systems Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla. Freedom Star was brought to KSC today for a visit by NATO Parliamentarians.

  18. New Orleans, Louisiana, Mississippi River, and Lake Pontchartrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-05-397 (22 June 1973) --- New Orleans, Louisiana, Mississippi River, and Lake Pontchartrain (31.0N, 91.0W) can all be seen in this single detailed view. The marshlands of the Atchafalaya Basin, previously the main drainage way for the Mississippi River, can be seen to be partially silted as a result of sediments. The long narrow field patterns fronting on the river is called the "Long Lot" system of equal land distribution based on the French Napoleonic Civil Code. Photo credit: NASA

  19. Death, drugs, and disaster: mortality among New Orleans' homeless.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, Rachel L; Pals, Heili; Wright, James D

    2012-01-01

    Tracking homeless individuals over time has proved to be extremely difficult; thus, only limited longitudinal data on the homeless exist. We analyze longitudinal data originally collected from the New Orleans Homeless Substance Abusers Program in 1991-1993, supplemented with mortality data for the same sample by year 2010. We use social bonding theory to examine the effect of conventional social ties on mortality among a sample of substance abusing homeless people. This is of special concern when researching the older homeless persons. We find that social bonding theory does not help to understand mortality among this population. However, alcohol abuse, as compared to crack cocaine, does increase the likelihood of early mortality.

  20. Sustainability, survivability, and the paradox of New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Richard; Etheridge, Daniel; Meffert, Douglas J

    2004-06-01

    Some precepts of the urban sustainability movement derive from the premise that economic expansion, population growth, and physical sprawl lead to a decline in quality of life, ecological damage, and eventual unsustainability. But what about cities that are failing-losing population, losing investment, losing infrastructure, even losing land? This article challenges conventional sustainability concepts, usually derived from the experiences of ascending cities, with the notion of survivability that confronts declining cities. Should troubled cities, such as New Orleans, located on the eroding Gulf of Mexico coastal region of the state of Louisiana, be held to different sustainability standards? Could urban expansion, in some cases, actually stem environmental degradation and enhance survivability?

  1. ORLEANS MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA (C5079, B5079), CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.; Marks, L.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The Orleans Mountain Roadless Area (C5079, B5079) located along the Siskiyou-Trinity County line in the Salmon Mountains of northern California was studied for mineral-resource potential. Several areas with probable gold resource potential were identified based on examination of mines and prospects, analytical values of selected elements, and historical records of gold and silver production. Gold, silver, and to a lesser extent lead and copper occur in vein systems that cut all the different lithologies in the roadless area.

  2. Non-AIDS-defining cancers in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marco; Johnson, Daniel; Reske, Tom; Cefalu, Charles; Estrada, John

    2013-01-01

    Non-AIDS-defining cancers in HIV-infected patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era have increased. To our knowledge a comprehensive review of non-AIDS-related malignancies in New Orleans has not yet been conducted. Databases from main institutions in New Orleans were queried retrospectively for the years 2001 to 2011. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used to search for HIV infection and cancer comorbidity. A total of 16 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer (mean age 50 years) with 81% of the patients presenting with advanced stages. In all, 20 (mean age 47 years) were diagnosed with anal cancer, and 35% presented in late stages. In all, 14 patients (mean age 42 years) were diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma, and 64% were diagnosed at late stage. A total of 5 women (mean age 44 years) were diagnosed with breast cancer with 40% of them presenting at late stage. Malignancies were diagnosed at late stages in the majority of the cases, presented with worse outcomes, and had higher recurrence rates. The role of HIV and other viruses (Epstein Barr virus, human papillomavirus) and the potential mechanisms or pathways of oncogene activation also need to be clarified.

  3. Break-up of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household break-up due to Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads and non–household heads (N = 242), traced just over a year later, with a matched sample from a nationally representative survey over an equivalent period. One in three among all adult non–household heads, and one in two among adult children of household heads, had separated from the household head 1 year post-Katrina. These rates were, respectively, 2.2 and 2.7 times higher than national rates. A 50% higher prevalence of adult children living with parents in pre-Katrina New Orleans than nationally increased the hurricane’s impact on household break-up. Attention to living arrangements as a dimension of social vulnerability in disaster recovery is suggested. PMID:21709733

  4. Post-Katrina mortality in the greater New Orleans area, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Eavey, Joanna; Ratard, Raoult C

    2008-01-01

    Death rates in the Greater New Orleans area were examined by month from 2002 to 2006 to assess whether mortality increased after Hurricane Katrina. Finalized death data from the Louisiana Office of Vital Statistics and the most recent population estimates were used to calculate annual mortality rates in the Greater New Orleans area by month for 2002-2006. Causes of death were also examined for changes. There was no significant increase in the death rates in the Greater New Orleans area post-Katrina. The only excesses were seen in Orleans Parish from January to June 2006. In the latter months of 2006, rates decreased to those of previous years. Mortality rates for the Greater New Orleans (GNO) area during the same time period showed no increase. In the first months of 2006, deaths due to septicemia and accidents increased significantly in Orleans Parish and returned to normal in the latter half of 2006. Causes of death in the GNO area showed no significant change after Katrina. There was no significant or lasting increase in morality rates in the Greater New Orleans area following Hurricane Katrina.

  5. Illicit Drug Markets Among New Orleans Evacuees Before and Soon After Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Eloise; Johnson, Bruce D.; Morse, Edward

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes illicit drug markets in New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina and access to drug markets following evacuation at many locations and in Houston. Among New Orleans arrestees pre-Katrina, rates of crack and heroin use and market participation was comparable to New York and higher than in other southern cities. Both cities have vigorous outdoor drug markets. Over 100 New Orleans evacuees provide rich accounts describing the illicit markets in New Orleans and elsewhere. The flooding of New Orleans disrupted the city’s flourishing drug markets, both during and immediately after the storm. Drug supplies, though limited, were never completely unavailable. Subjects reported that alcohol or drugs were not being used in the Houston Astrodome, and it was a supportive environment. Outside the Astrodome, they were often approached by or could easily locate middlemen and drug sellers. Evacuees could typically access illegal drug markets wherever they went. This paper analyzes the impact of a major disaster upon users of illegal drugs and the illegal drug markets in New Orleans and among the diaspora of New Orleans evacuees following Hurricane Katrina. This analysis includes data from criminal justice sources that specify what the drug markets were like before this disaster occurred. This analysis also includes some comparison cities where no disaster occurred, but which help inform the similarities and differences in drug markets in other cities. The data presented also include an initial analysis of ethnographic interview data from over 100 New Orleans Evacuees recruited in New Orleans and Houston. PMID:19081751

  6. Ocean Prospects: A High School Teacher's Guide to Ocean-Related Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, C. M.

    Provided in this guide are resources for these 11 topics: the physical/geological ocean; the chemical/biological ocean; the ocean's coasts; fishing and aquaculture; tourism, recreation, and development; mining and drilling; research and exploration; maritime and military; ocean technology; pollution; and resource management. These resources…

  7. Ocean Prospects: A High School Teacher's Guide to Ocean-Related Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, C. M.

    Provided in this guide are resources for these 11 topics: the physical/geological ocean; the chemical/biological ocean; the ocean's coasts; fishing and aquaculture; tourism, recreation, and development; mining and drilling; research and exploration; maritime and military; ocean technology; pollution; and resource management. These resources…

  8. A Psychosocial Comparison of New Orleans and Houston Crack Smokers in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    TIMPSON, SANDRA; RATLIFF, ERIC; ROSS, MICHAEL; WILLIAMS, MARK; ATKINSON, JOHN; BOWEN, ANNE; MCCURDY, SHERYL

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare psychological distress in a sample of African American crack cocaine users who relocated to Houston from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to African American drug users resident in Houston. Fifty-four African Americans from New Orleans were compared to a sample of 162 people in Houston. Data were collected between June 2002 and December 2005. There were no significant differences between the two groups on either depression or anxiety, but the New Orleans sample scored higher on the self-esteem scale and scored slightly lower on the risk-taking scale. PMID:19895301

  9. New Orleans Topography, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The city of New Orleans, situated on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, is shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In this image bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the SRTM mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is near the center of this scene, between the lake and the Mississippi River. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest overwater highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are actually below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls that are designed to protect against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface

  10. Change Detection Module for New Orleans City of USA Using

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharmendra

    Internationally, Scientists strive to integrate existing and emerging Earth observation systems into a global network, with enhanced data distribution, models and decision supporting modules. Remote sensing poses an effective tool for this increasing need of a synoptic frame work. The entire earth can be treated as a system that evolves from the interactions of its environment. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry allows us, in principle, to measure very small movements of the ground over time and almost continuous monitoring of large areas of Earth's surface is made possible by the availability of data from remote sensing satellites such as ERS (European Remote Sensing (ERS) and RADARSAT. The study area considered is the New Orleans city of USA. New Orleans is located in Southeastern Louisiana along the Mississippi River. This city is among the worst affected area due to land subsidence. Subsidence rate of New Orleans and its surrounding area is computed with on-the-ground measurements using man made reference points. Even though bench marks are carefully chosen, scientists doubt whether reference points are also sinking as well. Subsidence monitoring using satellite images especially SAR interferometry offers a viable alternative by which accurate surface deformations can be calculated. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a coherent imaging technique capable of generating fine-resolution images of the scene. RADARSAT C-band images are generally unhindered by atmospheric conditions. SAR Interferometry, utilizing phase information also along with intensity, is capable of producing 3-D information about the scene. Repeat pass Interferometry makes use of SAR images of same scene acquired from the same position at different times and this helps in the measurement of small scale deformations of earth's surface. SAR/ SAR Interferometry, hence, offer a powerful mapping tool to measure deformation of earth at an unprecedented spatial details and

  11. New Orleans full-scale trommel evaluation: interim test report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.

    1981-06-01

    This report presents the data from five tests of a full-scale trommel processing unsegregated municipal solid waste at throughtputs ranging from 58% to 175% of design capacity, or 32 to 98 Mg/h (36 to 109 tph). The tests were conducted between December 1980 and March 1981 at the Recovery 1 solid waste processing facility in New Orleans, La. Included in the report are a description of the equipment, discussion of the test procedures and primary summaries of data on the trommel mass balance and separation efficiency, and on the analysis of infeed and product samples for size, composition, density, and moisture. Heat content and ash values of the trommel oversize and recovery results on surrogate aluminum cans and flakes also are reported.

  12. New Orleans Topography, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The city of New Orleans, situated on the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, is shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In this image bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the SRTM mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is near the center of this scene, between the lake and the Mississippi River. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest overwater highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are actually below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls that are designed to protect against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface

  13. Water resources of the New Orleans area, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddards, Miles LeRoy; Kister, L.R.; Scarcia, Glenn

    1956-01-01

    Industry, commerce, and public utilities in 1954 withdrew about 1,500 mgd from surface- and groundwater sources in the New Orleans area. Most of the withdrawal was made from the Mississippi River. However, some withdrawal of surface water was made from Lake Pontchartrain. A large part of the withdrawal from both ground- and surface-water sources is available for reuse. Ground-water withdrawal amounts to about 100 mgd and is primarily for industrial and commercial uses. The average flow of the Mississippi River for the 23-year period, 1931--54, amounted to 309,000 mgd, and the approximate average flow of all the tributaries to Lake Pontchartrain is about 4,000 mgd. The flow of the Pearl River, which adjoins the tributary drainage area of Lake Pontchartrain, averages about 8,000 mgd. Total withdrawal of ground and surface waters amounts to less than 3 percent of the recorded minimum flow of the Mississippi River or less than 1 percent of the average flow. Although large quantities of water are always available in the Mississippi River the quality of the Water is not suitable for all uses. Streams from the north that drain into Lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain, and the aquifers in that area, offer one of the best sources of fresh water in the State. Industry, if located on the northern shores of Lake Maurepas or Lake Pontchartrain near the mouths of these tributaries, would be assured of an ample supply of either ground or surface water of excellent quality. All the tributaries north of Lake Pontchartrain have dry-weather flows which are dependable. The Pearl River above Bogalusa also is a good source of fresh water of excellent quality. At present it serves to dilute the tidal flow of salt water into Lake Pontchartrain through the Rigolets, the principal outlet of the lake. In the area north of Lake Pontchartrain, wells 60 to 2,000 feet deep yield fresh water. There are no known wells tapping sands below 2,000 feet. However, electrical logs of. oil-test wells show

  14. Surface Wave Characterization of New Orleans Levee Soil Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisser, T. A.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Hayashi, K.; Craig, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Standard geotechnical tests such as the drilling of boreholes and cone penetration tests are able to assess soil stability at point locations vertically but lack lateral resolution in a complex sedimentary environment, such as the Louisiana Coastal system. Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can complement geotechnical tests to improve certainty in resolving lateral features when predicting soil types in the near surface of levee soil foundations. A portion of the Inner-Harbor Navigation Canal levee wall that intersects the 9th Ward of New Orleans failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Failures were attributed to floodwaters overtopping the levee wall and eroding its base. Geotechnical and geological data from test points can be used to calibrate continuous shear strength estimates derived from MASW. It is important to understand soil stability and strength to prevent future failures in New Orleans levee foundation soils. MASW analyzes the dispersive property of Rayleigh waves to develop shear wave velocity profiles for the near surface. Data are acquired using a seismic land streamer containing 4.5-Hz vertical-component geophones and a sledgehammer as the source. We plot and contour 18 inverted models of the interpreted fundamental mode and generate a 200-m-long profile to help us (1) better understand the characteristics of levee foundation soils as well as (2) improve existing geological cross-sections to help in future planning and maintenance of the levees. In comparison to the prior geological models, we find unexpected large vertical and horizontal shear-velocity gradients, as well as relatively low shear strengths throughout the seismic profile.

  15. 78 FR 62439 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations; request for..., LA. This deviation will test changes to the drawbridge operation schedule to determine whether...

  16. Architectural and Archeological Investigations in and Adjacent to the Bywater Historic District, New Orleans, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    Greater New Orleans Bridae No. 2 RIaht-of-Way One of the largest archeological projects undertaken In New Orleans to date was performed to assess the...proportional floor plans and summary descriptions, and compilation of historical data. New Claiborne Bridae ROW (limited) The area encompassed by this segment...descriptive and historical data. New Claiborne Bridae ROW (expanded) The proposed expanded ROW for the New Claiborne Bridge expands the segment through

  17. Hope after Katrina: Will New Orleans become the New City of Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Kathryn G.; De Rugy, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    A student starting public school in New Orleans in the fall of 2005 had little reason to be hopeful about her education. Of her 65,000 schoolmates in the New Orleans Public Schools (NOPS), over half of those taking the state's high-stakes tests (4th, 8th, 10th, and 11th graders) did not have "basic" competence in math and English. 68 of…

  18. Hope after Katrina: Will New Orleans become the New City of Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Kathryn G.; De Rugy, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    A student starting public school in New Orleans in the fall of 2005 had little reason to be hopeful about her education. Of her 65,000 schoolmates in the New Orleans Public Schools (NOPS), over half of those taking the state's high-stakes tests (4th, 8th, 10th, and 11th graders) did not have "basic" competence in math and English. 68 of…

  19. 75 FR 4693 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ...The Commander, Eighth Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Senator Ted Hickey (Leon C. Simon) Bascule Bridge across the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, mile 4.6, at New Orleans, LA. The deviation is necessary to ensure the safety of pedestrians as they bike across the bridge for the Ochsner Ironman 70.3 New Orleans event.......

  20. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Procurement of Pumping Systems for the New Orleans Drainage Canals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-23

    Engineers’ Procurement of Pumping Systems for the New Orleans Drainage Canals Dear Madam Chairman: To avoid flooding in New Orleans after a rain...storm, the city’s Sewerage and Water Board pumps rainwater from the city into three drainage canals at 17th Street, London Avenue, and Orleans... drainage canals is 10,500 cubic feet per second (cfs) at the 17th Street Canal, 7,980 cfs at the London Avenue Canal, and 2,690 cfs at the Orleans Avenue

  1. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article…

  2. Surveillance for illness and injury after hurricane Katrina--New Orleans, Louisiana, September 8-25, 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-10-14

    Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, resulting in extensive structural damage and severe flooding from breached levees in and around New Orleans, Louisiana. The public health infrastructure of the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (LDHH) was damaged extensively, limiting surveillance for illnesses, injuries, and toxic exposures. On September 9, 2005, LDHH, CDC, and functioning emergency treatment resources (i.e., hospitals, disaster medical assistance teams, and military aid stations) established an active surveillance system to detect outbreaks of disease and characterize post-hurricane injuries and illnesses. As of September 25, the system had monitored 7,508 reports of health-related events at participating facilities. Trends observed in the data prompted investigations of respiratory and rash illnesses, but no major outbreaks of disease or hazardous environmental exposures were detected. These data also were used to identify post-hurricane injury patterns and to guide prevention messages to residents and relief workers. A natural disaster of the magnitude of Hurricane Katrina requires a sustained response and a detailed plan for return to pre-hurricane surveillance activities.

  3. Directional Analysis of the Storm Surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with Applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport / Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years. PMID:25822480

  4. Directional analysis of the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy 2012, with applications to Charleston, New Orleans, and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl; Galarneau, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy in late October 2012 drove before it a storm surge that rose to 4.28 meters above mean lower low water at The Battery in lower Manhattan, and flooded the Hugh L. Carey automobile tunnel between Brooklyn and The Battery. This study examines the surge event in New York Harbor using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model and the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave- Sediment Transport/Regional Ocean Modeling System (COAWST/ROMS). We present a new technique using directional analysis to calculate and display maps of a coastline's potential for storm surge; these maps are constructed from wind fields blowing from eight fixed compass directions. This analysis approximates the surge observed during Hurricane Sandy. The directional analysis is then applied to surge events at Charleston, South Carolina, New Orleans, Louisiana, and Tacloban City, the Philippines. Emergency managers could use these directional maps to prepare their cities for an approaching storm, on planning horizons from days to years.

  5. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane Katrina was the largest natural disaster in the United States, striking the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and flooding 80% of New Orleans; to make matters worse, the city was flooded again only three weeks later by the effects of Hurricane Rita. Many of the buildings, including schools, were heavily damaged. The devastation of schools in New Orleans from the hurricanes was exacerbated by many years of deferred school maintenance. This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The experiences of four new schools-Langston Hughes Elementary School, Andrew H. Wilson Elementary School (which was 50% new construction and 50% major renovation), L.B. Landry High School, and Lake Area High School-and one major renovation, Joseph A. Craig Elementary School-are described to help other school districts and design teams with their in-progress and future school building projects in hot-humid climates. Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had 128 public schools. As part of the recovery planning, New Orleans Public Schools underwent an assessment and planning process to determine how many schools were needed and in what locations. Following a series of public town hall meetings and a district-wide comprehensive facility assessment, a Master Plan was developed, which outlined the renovation or construction of 85 schools throughout the city, which are expected to be completed by 2017. New Orleans Public Schools expects to build or renovate approximately eight schools each year over a 10-year period to achieve 21st century schools district-wide. Reconstruction costs are estimated at nearly $2 billion.

  6. Terrestrial Lidar Datasets of New Orleans, Louisiana, Levee Failures from Hurricane Katrina, August 29, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Kayen, Robert; Minasian, Diane L.; Reiss, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall with the northern Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, as one of the strongest hurricanes on record. The storm damage incurred in Louisiana included a number of levee failures that led to the inundation of approximately 85 percent of the metropolitan New Orleans area. Whereas extreme levels of storm damage were expected from such an event, the catastrophic failure of the New Orleans levees prompted a quick mobilization of engineering experts to assess why and how particular levees failed. As part of this mobilization, civil engineering members of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) performed terrestrial lidar topographic surveys at major levee failures in the New Orleans area. The focus of the terrestrial lidar effort was to obtain precise measurements of the ground surface to map soil displacements at each levee site, the nonuniformity of levee height freeboard, depth of erosion where scour occurred, and distress in structures at incipient failure. In total, we investigated eight sites in the New Orleans region, including both earth and concrete floodwall levee breaks. The datasets extend from the 17th Street Canal in the Orleans East Bank area to the intersection of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) with the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) in the New Orleans East area. The lidar scan data consists of electronic files containing millions of surveyed points. These points characterize the topography of each levee's postfailure or incipient condition and are available for download through online hyperlinks. The data serve as a permanent archive of the catastrophic damage of Hurricane Katrina on the levee systems of New Orleans. Complete details of the data collection, processing, and georeferencing methodologies are provided in this report to assist in the visualization and analysis of the data by future users.

  7. Potential Next Steps for the New Orleans City Council Energy Efficiency Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted from an actual February 2008 deliverable memo and report delivered by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the Department of Energy Project Officer in February of 2008. In January 2008, the New Orleans Utility Committee requested review, commentary, and suggestions for Utility Committee next steps related to the Energy Efficiency Resolution (the Resolution) passed by the City Council in December 2007. The suggestions are reprinted here as: (1) An illustration of opportunities for other local governments for the development and implementation of effective energy efficiency ordinances and resolutions; and (2) An example of the type of policy technical assistance that DOE/NREL provides to communities. For more information on the strategy for delivering assistance, please see: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/48689.pdf. Based on experience in other communities and energy efficiency policies and programs, NREL found the Resolution to be a solid framework for increasing the responsible use of energy efficiency and reaping the associated economic and environmental benefits in the city of New Orleans. The remainder of this document provides the requested suggestions for next steps in implementing the word and spirit of the resolution. These suggestions integrate the extensive work of other entities, including the New Orleans Mayor's office, the New Orleans Energy Advisory Committee, the Energy Efficiency Initiative, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. In general, three actions were suggested for funding mechanisms, two for near-term successes, and two for longer-term success.

  8. Earth Scientists and Public Policy: Have We Failed New Orleans?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Dokka, Roy K.

    2008-03-01

    Earth scientists rarely influence public policy or urban planning. In defiance of geologic reality, cities are established on or expanded into floodplains, wetlands, earthquake faults, and active volcanoes. One exception to our lack of influence is that shortly after a major natural disaster, there is a brief window of heightened public awareness that may lead to sensible regulation or relocation of infrastructure. After the 1933 Long Beach earthquake, for example, California building codes were improved to reduce earthquake hazard. After Mississippi River flooding in 1993, several U.S. cities designated parts of their low-lying floodplain as green space. How have we done with New Orleans and southern Louisiana, devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005? Unfortunately, not very well. In the aftermath of those storms, an opportunity existed to educate engineers, policy makers, and the public about long-term hazards associated with land subsidence and sea level rise. This message was not conveyed, and expensive rebuilding has proceeded under the false assumption of relative coastal stability and slow sea level rise.

  9. Military Strategy,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    with a grass surface. This aircraft has the following cal- culated characteristics: maximum «peed 2500-2700 km/hour, service cell - ing up to...mobi- lisation of all the national resources to repel the enemy, and the systematic growth of the technical equipment of our Armed Forces. For...bombers. Cannon- machlnegun aircraft weapons have been replaced by rocket weapons. In recent years the speed and celling of military planes has

  10. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  11. Norm-Referenced Test Results of the New Orleans Public Schools: A Comprehensive Report on Their Relationship to Major Student Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Orleans Public Schools, Louisiana. Dept. of Educational Accountability.

    The California Achievement Test (CAT) has been administered in Orleans Parish (Louisiana) annually each spring to gauge performance of New Orleans Public Schools students since 1989. In 1992, the CAT was given to students in kindergarten and grades 3, 5, and 8. With few exceptions, median percentiles for New Orleans students were below the 40th…

  12. Counseling in New Orleans 10 Years after Hurricane Katrina: A Commentary on the Aftermath, Recovery and the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remley, Theodore P., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the counseling profession in New Orleans has changed. The author, along with a group of counseling and other mental health professionals who were providing services at the time of the hurricane and still working in the city 10 years later, provided their impressions of counseling in New Orleans a decade after the…

  13. 33 CFR 165.840 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. 165.840 Section 165.840 Navigation...: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. The following area is a...

  14. 33 CFR 165.840 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. 165.840 Section 165.840 Navigation...: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. (a) Effective date. This section is effective on...

  15. The geography of mortality from Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, J. C.; Mara, V.; Jayaprakash, S.; None

    2011-12-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the highest mortality disasters in US history. Typical hurricanes of the same strength take very few lives. Katrina's mortality is exceeded only by the so-called Galveston Flood (a hurricane) of 1900 that occurred at a time when forecasting was poor and evacuation was possible only by train or horse. The levee failures in New Orleans were a major contributing factor unique to Katrina. An examination of the characteristics of mortality may give insight into the cause of the great scope of the tragedy and the special vulnerability of those who died. We examine the spatial aspects of mortality. The locations of deceased victims were matched with victim information including age, race and gender for approximately 800 victims (data from Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals). From this we can analyze for spatial clustering of mortality. We know that Katrina took a particularly heavy toll on the elderly so we can analyze, for instance, whether the elderly were more likely to die in some locations than in others. Similarly, we analyze for gender and race against age (dividing age into five groups this gives 20 categories) as a factory in the geographic distribution of mortality as a way to recover measures of vulnerability. We can also correlate the spatial characteristics of mortality with underlying causes that might contribute to vulnerability. Data is available at a census block level on household income, poverty rates, education, home ownership, car ownership and a variety of other factors that can be correlated with the spatial mortality data. This allows for a multi-parameter estimation of factors that govern mortality in this unusually high mortality event.

  16. Slowing Military Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan,” in Theo Farrell and Terry Terriff, eds., The Sources of Military Change: Culture, Politics, Technology...2002; Farrell and Terriff, “The Sources of Military Change”; Goldman, “The Spread of Western Military Models to Ottoman Turkey and Meiji Japan.” 107

  17. Why Here and Why Now? Teacher Motivations for Unionizing in a New Orleans Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Gill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rigidity of teachers unions has been given as a primary reason for their lack of representation among America's rapidly growing, although still relatively small, charter school sector. In the case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, the city rapidly converted from a union-backed teacher workforce to a largely nonunionized charter school…

  18. New Orleans-Style Education Reform: A Guide for Cities--Lessons Learned 2004-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Dana; Boast, Lyria; Hassel, Bryan C.; Kingsland, Neerav

    2012-01-01

    New Schools for New Orleans (NSNO) commissioned this guide, in collaboration with the Louisiana Recovery School District and the Tennessee Achievement School District, to meet the Investing in Innovation (i3) requirement that grantees disseminate the lessons of their work. To create this guide, NSNO worked with Public Impact to build on prior…

  19. Public Housing Smarts: Two Universities Discover a Trove of Opportunity in New Orleans' Public Housing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulard, Garry

    1998-01-01

    Tulane University and Xavier University (Louisiana) are both taking an active role in revitalizing the New Orleans public housing authority, the sixth-largest in the country. In partnership with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development and the city's housing authority, the two institutions are cooperating in a major renovation…

  20. The Vieux Carre: A Creole Neighborhood in New Orleans. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier, Byron

    The French Quarter ("Vieux Carre" in French) is the heart and soul of modern New Orleans (Louisiana), serving as a continuous reminder of the city's Creole, colonial past. The French Quarter, lying barely above sea level, hugs the bank of the Mississippi River. Buildings with wrought-iron balconies crowd each other and the narrow…

  1. Leadership for Change in the Educational Wild West of Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of public school principals in New Orleans, Louisiana during the period of extensive decentralization in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Using the frameworks of systems theory and chaos/complexity theories, iterative interviews with 10 school principals form the core data which examines leaders' experiences…

  2. Microform Collections in New Orleans Academic and Public Libraries: A Union List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spano, Gregory P., Comp.

    This union list identifies 455 microform collections held by 8 public and academic libraries in New Orleans. It is noted that newspapers, periodicals, Government Printing Office (GPO) depository microfiche, and individual monograph titles were excluded from the list unless they are a part of a publisher's series, archival project, or manuscript…

  3. "No Excuses" in New Orleans: The Silent Passivity of Neoliberal Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondel, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on ethnographic data, this article critically analyzes pedagogy in "no excuses" charter schools in New Orleans. Employing Ladson-Billings's framework for culturally relevant pedagogy, the author describes the level of academic rigor, cultural competence, and critical consciousness development across classrooms. This study…

  4. Hurricane Chasers in New Orleans: Latino Immigrants as a Source of a Rapid Response Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the Latino workers who came to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to clean up and repair the city. The author uses data from surveys collected at the visits of the Brazilian, Mexican, and Nicaraguan consulates (N = 253) to study the internally mobile immigrants who arrived after Katrina and who anticipate leaving New Orleans…

  5. University of New Orleans Millennial Multicultural Recruitment Plan: Case Studies/Model Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Danneal La Darreaux

    This paper discusses the Multicultural Recruitment Plan that was instituted at the University of New Orleans during the fall of 1999. The historical prospectus, which necessitated this plan, and some of the initial obstacles to success are reviewed extensively. A theoretical framework, primarily the SPAR (Services, Programs, Advocacy, and…

  6. New Orleans's Unique School Reform Effort and Its Potential Implications for Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Four years following the decimation of the New Orleans Public Schools by Hurricane Katrina the city has been described as the center of a unique urban public school reform effort. This effort is a combination of events that transpired just before the storm and those that have occurred as a result of it. In particular some claim that the emerging…

  7. Education Reform in New Orleans: Voices from the Recovery School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciolino, Max S.; Kirylo, James D.; Mirón, Luis; Frazier, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    In the post-Katrina education landscape in New Orleans, teachers in charter schools and district-run schools in the Recovery School District are uniquely situated to provide a direct eyewitness account of the successes and failures of the city's new direction in public education. This narrative presents the opinions of teachers in a critical…

  8. Spiritual and Religious Supports Part 10: Congruence in Faith and Action--Inclusivity in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The First Congregational Church has a heart of mission. Yet, when the mission hits a situation that's personal and makes one squirm a bit, it becomes more of a challenge. Seven teams have been sent from the church to help the rebuilding in New Orleans. The first teams did the mucking, getting all of the belongings out of the house and putting them…

  9. Rookie Teachers, Stressed Students Confront Realities of New Orleans' Schools after Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2007-01-01

    John McDonogh Senior High School's challenges, and similar hardship at other public schools that have reopened in New Orleans, were not part of the vision advanced by politicians and educators who saw Hurricane Katrina's destruction as an unprecedented opportunity for schools. To them, Katrina, terrible though it was, had delivered a chance to…

  10. Public Housing Smarts: Two Universities Discover a Trove of Opportunity in New Orleans' Public Housing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulard, Garry

    1998-01-01

    Tulane University and Xavier University (Louisiana) are both taking an active role in revitalizing the New Orleans public housing authority, the sixth-largest in the country. In partnership with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development and the city's housing authority, the two institutions are cooperating in a major renovation…

  11. Disaster and youth violence: the experience of school-attending youth in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Aubrey S; Johnson, Carolyn C; Clum, Gretchen A; Brown, Lisanne

    2011-08-01

    Although disaster exposure has been linked with increased child aggression by previous reports, population-level trends are unknown. Pre- to post-Katrina changes in violence-related behaviors among New Orleans high school youth (ages: 12-18 years) were assessed. Data from the 2003 (pre-Katrina), 2005 (pre-Katrina), and 2007 (post-Katrina) New Orleans Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n = 5,267) were used. Crude comparisons across years of population characteristics and violence behavior prevalence were made with χ(2) analyses. Changes in violence-related behaviors over time were assessed with logistic regression models including indicators for survey years and controls for compositional changes. Age, gender, and race/ethnicity of school-attending youth were stable across years. In models controlling for demographics, most behaviors were stable over time. Some changes were observed for all groups; dating violence and forced sex increased before the storm, whereas weapon-carrying and missing school as a result of feeling unsafe decreased after the storm. Among African American adolescents only, being threatened at school increased before Katrina. Results do not support significant population-level increases in violent behavior post-Katrina among school-attending youth in New Orleans. Factors that buffered New Orleans students from post-Katrina violence increases, such as population composition changes or increased supportive services, may explain these findings. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. The Pediatric AIDS Program: A Systems Approach to Services for Children and Families in New Orleans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Patricia; Gruber, DeAnn; vonAlmen, Kris

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the multiple needs of infants and young children affected by HIV/AIDS and the compromising psychosocial factors that frequently accompany HIV/AIDS. Implications of these psychosocial medical variables for programming is presented within a systems framework and illustrated in a description of a pediatric AIDS program in New Orleans.…

  13. DISASTER AND YOUTH VIOLENCE: THE EXPERIENCE OF SCHOOL ATTENDING YOUTH IN NEW ORLEANS

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey S.; Johnson, Carolyn C.; Clum, Gretchen A.; Brown, Lisanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although disaster exposure is linked with increased child aggression, population-level trends are unknown. Pre- to post-Katrina changes in violence-related behaviors among New Orleans high school youth (ages 12-18) were assessed. Methods Data from the 2003 (pre-Katrina), 2005 (pre-Katrina) and 2007 (post-Katrina) New Orleans Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n=5,267) were utilized. Crude comparisons across years of population characteristics and violence behavior prevalence were made with chi-square analyses. Changes in violence-related behaviors over time were assessed with logistic regression models including indicators for survey years and controls for compositional changes. Results Age, gender and race/ethnicity of school-attending youth were stable across years. In models controlling for demographics, most behaviors were stable over time. Some changes were observed for all groups: dating violence and forced sex increased prior to the storm; weapon carrying and missing school due to feeling unsafe decreased after the storm. Among African American adolescents only, being threatened at school increased before Katrina. Conclusions Results do not support significant population-level increases in violent behavior among New Orleans school-attending youths post-Katrina. Factors that buffered New Orleans students from post-Katrina violence increases, such as population composition changes or increased supportive services, may explain these findings. PMID:21783056

  14. School Choice, Student Mobility, and School Quality: Evidence from Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Richard O.; Duque, Matthew; McEachin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, school choice policies predicated on student mobility have gained prominence as urban districts address chronically low-performing schools. However, scholars have highlighted equity concerns related to choice policies. The case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans provides an opportunity to examine student mobility patterns in…

  15. The Visible Hand: Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    In this article Huriya Jabbar examines how the regulatory environment in post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans has influenced choice, incentives, and competition among schools. While previous research has highlighted the mechanisms of competition and individual choice--the "invisible hand"--and the creation of markets in education, Jabbar…

  16. Crime Victimization among Immigrant Latino Day Laborers in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negi, Nalini Junko; Cepeda, Alice; Valdez, Avelardo

    2013-01-01

    Reports indicate that the criminal victimization of Latino immigrants in the United States has been increasing yet is often underreported. This may be especially true in new immigrant settlement cities that lack an established Latino community to provide support and feelings of security. New Orleans is an important context to investigate criminal…

  17. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: Winds of Change Transform a New Orleans Addiction Treatment Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Pedersen-Wasson, Else; Crisham, Erin M.; Ellis, Robert; Morse, Patricia; Morse, Edward V.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on the operations of the largest residential, addiction treatment organization in New Orleans is described. Pre- and post-Katrina experiences are discussed and augmented with organizational performance data. Suggestions for future research are provided. (Contains 4 figures.)

  18. The Rebirth of Montessori: Rebuilding a Public Charter Montessori School in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" are common terms for time frames these days in New Orleans, often reminding me of the BCE/CE timeline distinctions. You hear "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" on the news, in the paper, and in everyday conversations. Although more and more people have moved back to New…

  19. Education Reform in New Orleans: Voices from the Recovery School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciolino, Max S.; Kirylo, James D.; Mirón, Luis; Frazier, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    In the post-Katrina education landscape in New Orleans, teachers in charter schools and district-run schools in the Recovery School District are uniquely situated to provide a direct eyewitness account of the successes and failures of the city's new direction in public education. This narrative presents the opinions of teachers in a critical…

  20. BMP Report Of Survey Conducted At University Of New Orleans, LA Best Manufacturing Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Management Continuous Improvement of Drydocking Management.................................... 19 Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing in Shipbuilding...Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing in Shipbuilding The University of New Orleans, College of Engi- neering is sponsoring a Six Sigma and Lean Manu...Technology Appli- cation Center has begun a project to incorporate the principles of Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing within the shipbuilding industry

  1. National Register Evaluation of Sewerage Pumping Station B New Orleans, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-12

    dug through the middle of Faubourg Saint Marie , at the location of present-day Poydras Street. This canal became clogged with weeds and filth and fell... Vieux Carre. In addition, the Canal Girod or Orleans Canal became the primary draining artery with a pumping station located at its junction with Bayou

  2. School Choice, Student Mobility, and School Quality: Evidence from Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Richard O.; Duque, Matthew; McEachin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, school choice policies predicated on student mobility have gained prominence as urban districts address chronically low-performing schools. However, scholars have highlighted equity concerns related to choice policies. The case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans provides an opportunity to examine student mobility patterns in…

  3. The Visible Hand: Markets, Politics, and Regulation in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    In this article Huriya Jabbar examines how the regulatory environment in post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans has influenced choice, incentives, and competition among schools. While previous research has highlighted the mechanisms of competition and individual choice--the "invisible hand"--and the creation of markets in education, Jabbar…

  4. Pedagogy, Policy, and the Privatized City: Stories of Dispossession and Defiance from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buras, Kristen L.; Randels, Jim; Salaam, Kalamu ya

    2010-01-01

    In cities across the nation, communities of color find themselves resisting state disinvestment and the politics of dispossession. Students at the Center--a writing initiative based in several New Orleans high schools--takes on this struggle through a close examination of race and schools. The book builds on the powerful stories of marginalized…

  5. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  6. Good News for New Orleans: Early Evidence Shows Reforms Lifting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    What happened to the New Orleans public schools following the tragic levee breeches after Hurricane Katrina is truly unprecedented. Within the span of one year, all public-school employees were fired, the teacher contract expired and was not replaced, and most attendance zones were eliminated. The state took control of almost all public schools…

  7. Floating Foundations: "Kairos," Community, and a Composition Program in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, T. R.; Letter, Joe; Livingston, Judith Kemerait

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe their individual and collective experiences reconstructing their New Orleans-based university composition program in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. They emphasize how the concept of "floating foundations" helps account for changes in their students' interests, and they suggest that this idea is applicable to the…

  8. Discipline for Students with Disabilities in the Recovery School District (RSD) of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on special education in New Orleans post Hurricane Katrina. After Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana's Recovery School District (RSD) took over 102 of the city's 128 schools with the stated goal of creating a "choice district" for parents. This "choice distric"' is made up of RSD direct-run schools, Orleans…

  9. Out of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Researching the Katrina Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jerome E.

    2008-01-01

    The torrential rains from Hurricane Katrina, the breaking of the levees, and the subsequent flooding of New Orleans resulted in another Black Diaspora. This article focuses on Black children and families who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina but now reside in cities, towns, and suburbs outside of the Crescent City. Informed by the author's…

  10. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  11. Hurricane Chasers in New Orleans: Latino Immigrants as a Source of a Rapid Response Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the Latino workers who came to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina to clean up and repair the city. The author uses data from surveys collected at the visits of the Brazilian, Mexican, and Nicaraguan consulates (N = 253) to study the internally mobile immigrants who arrived after Katrina and who anticipate leaving New Orleans…

  12. Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Damage to New Orleans Public School Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast of the United States on August 29, 2005, and triggered one of the most devastating natural disasters in the history of the nation. New Orleans, in particular, and the schools that served the community's children, suffered severe storm damage and massive flooding. Central to the city's strategy of getting back…

  13. Floating Foundations: "Kairos," Community, and a Composition Program in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, T. R.; Letter, Joe; Livingston, Judith Kemerait

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe their individual and collective experiences reconstructing their New Orleans-based university composition program in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. They emphasize how the concept of "floating foundations" helps account for changes in their students' interests, and they suggest that this idea is applicable to the…

  14. Good News for New Orleans: Early Evidence Shows Reforms Lifting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    What happened to the New Orleans public schools following the tragic levee breeches after Hurricane Katrina is truly unprecedented. Within the span of one year, all public-school employees were fired, the teacher contract expired and was not replaced, and most attendance zones were eliminated. The state took control of almost all public schools…

  15. Discipline for Students with Disabilities in the Recovery School District (RSD) of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on special education in New Orleans post Hurricane Katrina. After Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana's Recovery School District (RSD) took over 102 of the city's 128 schools with the stated goal of creating a "choice district" for parents. This "choice distric"' is made up of RSD direct-run schools, Orleans…

  16. Feet to the Fire: New Orleans Kids Rethink Their Devastated School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Jane; Burkes, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Kids Rethink New Orleans Schools is an organization of primarily middle school youth that formed after Hurricane Katrina destroyed most of the city's schools. This chapter describes Rethink's first six years of operation, which culminated in school system policy changes and an HBO documentary about the organization's groundbreaking work.

  17. Teaching New Orleans: A Cultural Immersion and Service Learning Travel Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luquet, Wade J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a travel course to New Orleans that allows students the opportunity to study a unique culture in the United States. Students in the course are able to study how the culture developed through its immigration patterns, its food, its architecture, and the development of jazz. Since the flooding following Hurricane Katrina, a…

  18. Linda Finch speaks to children during World Flight in New Orleans, La.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Linda Finch, who re-created the flight of Amelia Earhardt's flight around the world 60 years ago, landed at New Orleans Lakefront Airport to speak to groups of inner-city school children during World Flight 1997. Stennis Space Center's Educator Resource Center played a role in the event by providing SSC-developed Geomap software to aid students in tracking Finch's flight.

  19. Selling Schools: Marketing and Recruitment Strategies in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    Under new school-choice policies, schools feel increasing pressure to market their schools to parents and students. I examine how school leaders in New Orleans used different marketing strategies based on their positions in the market hierarchy and the ways in which they used formal and informal processes to recruit students. This study relied on…

  20. The Double-Edged Sword of "Disaster Volunteerism": A Study of New Orleans Rebirth Movement Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldman, Caroline; Israel-Trummel, Mackenzie

    2012-01-01

    We examine the political and personal effects of disaster volunteerism with participants of the New Orleans Rebirth Movement (NORM) using four waves of pre- and postsurveys and qualitative analysis of participant journals. Significant increases are found in internal political efficacy, desire to be active in politics, and value placed on social…

  1. Spiritual and Religious Supports Part 10: Congruence in Faith and Action--Inclusivity in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The First Congregational Church has a heart of mission. Yet, when the mission hits a situation that's personal and makes one squirm a bit, it becomes more of a challenge. Seven teams have been sent from the church to help the rebuilding in New Orleans. The first teams did the mucking, getting all of the belongings out of the house and putting them…

  2. "Listen to the Voice of Reason": The "New Orleans Tribune" as Advocate for Public, Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melancon, Kristi Richard; Hendry, Petra Munro

    2015-01-01

    The "New Orleans Tribune" (1864-1870), the first black daily newspaper in the United States, was the singular text in the public South at its time to staunchly advocate for public, integrated education, anticipating the ruling of "Brown v. Board of Education," and arguing that separate education would always be synonymous with…

  3. Linda Finch speaks to children during World Flight in New Orleans, La.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Linda Finch, who re-created the flight of Amelia Earhardt's flight around the world 60 years ago, landed at New Orleans Lakefront Airport to speak to groups of inner-city school children during World Flight 1997. Stennis Space Center's Educator Resource Center played a role in the event by providing SSC-developed Geomap software to aid students in tracking Finch's flight.

  4. Selling Schools: Marketing and Recruitment Strategies in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2016-01-01

    Under new school-choice policies, schools feel increasing pressure to market their schools to parents and students. I examine how school leaders in New Orleans used different marketing strategies based on their positions in the market hierarchy and the ways in which they used formal and informal processes to recruit students. This study relied on…

  5. Rebuilding Inequity: The Re-Emergence of the School-to-Prison Pipeline in New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuzzolo, Ellen; Hewitt, Damon T.

    2007-01-01

    After a state take-over of most local schools, the fate of public education in New Orleans has been clouded by uncertainty. However, many problems are already clear. The community has expressed outrage on numerous occasions about the management, conditions, policies, and practices of the RSD schools. One fundamental concern has been about the lack…

  6. New Schools in New Orleans: School Reform Both Exhilarated and Imperiled by Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Jed

    2011-01-01

    Five years after Hurricane Katrina, the New Orleans public schools bear little resemblance to the disintegrating system that was further undone by the catastrophic flood. Two-thirds of city schools in 2004 were rated "Academically Unacceptable" under Louisiana's accountability standards; in 2010, about 4 in 10 rate that designation, and…

  7. Geophysical Surveys for Detecting Anomalous Conditions, Algiers Canal Levees, New Orleans, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    with grout. An electromagnetic (EM) induction survey using a Geonics EM31 terrain conductivity meter was conducted along the crest, slopes, and...other New Orleans levees, was the electromagnetic (EM) induction survey method. The general process employed for field data collection was to... Electromagnetic terrain conductivity measurements at low induction numbers. Technical Note TN-6. Mississauga, Ontario, Canada:Geonics Limited. Llopis, J

  8. Crime Victimization among Immigrant Latino Day Laborers in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negi, Nalini Junko; Cepeda, Alice; Valdez, Avelardo

    2013-01-01

    Reports indicate that the criminal victimization of Latino immigrants in the United States has been increasing yet is often underreported. This may be especially true in new immigrant settlement cities that lack an established Latino community to provide support and feelings of security. New Orleans is an important context to investigate criminal…

  9. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: Winds of Change Transform a New Orleans Addiction Treatment Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Pedersen-Wasson, Else; Crisham, Erin M.; Ellis, Robert; Morse, Patricia; Morse, Edward V.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina's impact on the operations of the largest residential, addiction treatment organization in New Orleans is described. Pre- and post-Katrina experiences are discussed and augmented with organizational performance data. Suggestions for future research are provided. (Contains 4 figures.)

  10. The Rebirth of Montessori: Rebuilding a Public Charter Montessori School in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" are common terms for time frames these days in New Orleans, often reminding me of the BCE/CE timeline distinctions. You hear "Pre-Katrina" and "Post-Katrina" on the news, in the paper, and in everyday conversations. Although more and more people have moved back to New…

  11. Fourth-Year Report: New Orleans Parent-Child Development Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Susan B.; And Others

    The New Orleans Parent-Child Development Center (NOPCDC) was funded four years ago to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a model of parent education. The ultimate goal was to prevent the effects of poverty on human development. The parent education program was designed to increase the mother's knowledge and understanding about child…

  12. "No Excuses" in New Orleans: The Silent Passivity of Neoliberal Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondel, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on ethnographic data, this article critically analyzes pedagogy in "no excuses" charter schools in New Orleans. Employing Ladson-Billings's framework for culturally relevant pedagogy, the author describes the level of academic rigor, cultural competence, and critical consciousness development across classrooms. This study…

  13. Why Here and Why Now? Teacher Motivations for Unionizing in a New Orleans Charter School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.; Gill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The rigidity of teachers unions has been given as a primary reason for their lack of representation among America's rapidly growing, although still relatively small, charter school sector. In the case of post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, the city rapidly converted from a union-backed teacher workforce to a largely nonunionized charter school…

  14. Teaching New Orleans: A Cultural Immersion and Service Learning Travel Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luquet, Wade J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a travel course to New Orleans that allows students the opportunity to study a unique culture in the United States. Students in the course are able to study how the culture developed through its immigration patterns, its food, its architecture, and the development of jazz. Since the flooding following Hurricane Katrina, a…

  15. Out of New Orleans: Race, Class, and Researching the Katrina Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jerome E.

    2008-01-01

    The torrential rains from Hurricane Katrina, the breaking of the levees, and the subsequent flooding of New Orleans resulted in another Black Diaspora. This article focuses on Black children and families who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina but now reside in cities, towns, and suburbs outside of the Crescent City. Informed by the author's…

  16. "Listen to the Voice of Reason": The "New Orleans Tribune" as Advocate for Public, Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melancon, Kristi Richard; Hendry, Petra Munro

    2015-01-01

    The "New Orleans Tribune" (1864-1870), the first black daily newspaper in the United States, was the singular text in the public South at its time to staunchly advocate for public, integrated education, anticipating the ruling of "Brown v. Board of Education," and arguing that separate education would always be synonymous with…

  17. The Double-Edged Sword of "Disaster Volunteerism": A Study of New Orleans Rebirth Movement Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldman, Caroline; Israel-Trummel, Mackenzie

    2012-01-01

    We examine the political and personal effects of disaster volunteerism with participants of the New Orleans Rebirth Movement (NORM) using four waves of pre- and postsurveys and qualitative analysis of participant journals. Significant increases are found in internal political efficacy, desire to be active in politics, and value placed on social…

  18. SCHOOL DESEGREGATION IN NEW ORLEANS, A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE FAILURE OF SOCIAL CONTROL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAIN, ROBERT L; AND OTHERS

    THE ISSUE OF SCHOOL DESEGREGATION WAS STUDIED AS IT OCCURED IN SEVEN SOUTHERN CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES, RESULTING FROM THE 1954 "BROWN" DECISION OF THE SUPREME COURT. THESE CITIES WERE COLUMBUS, JACKSONVILLE, NEW ORLEANS, MONTGOMERY, ATLANTA, MIAMI, AND BATON ROUGE. CASE STUDY DATA WERE GATHERED THROUGH INTERVIEW RESPONSES AND…

  19. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  20. Geophysical Surveys for Locating Buried Utilities, Lake Pontchartrain Levees, New Orleans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Drive and Topaz Street. It is an urbanized area that has a great deal of metallic clutter that interfered with the EM31. The survey areas within...with Topaz Street to the west bank of the Orleans Avenue Canal. The site is divided into five sections designated LPV102_A through LPV102_E for

  1. Leadership for Change in the Educational Wild West of Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of public school principals in New Orleans, Louisiana during the period of extensive decentralization in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Using the frameworks of systems theory and chaos/complexity theories, iterative interviews with 10 school principals form the core data which examines leaders' experiences…

  2. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  3. Spatial distribution of lead concentrations in urban surface soils of New Orleans, Louisiana USA.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michael T; Suedel, Burton; Presley, Steven M; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; McDaniel, Les N; Rigdon, Richard; Goebel, Timothy; Zartman, Richard; Leftwich, Blair D; Anderson, Todd A; Kendall, Ronald J; Cobb, George P

    2010-10-01

    Immediately following hurricane Katrina concern was raised over the environmental impact of floodwaters on the city of New Orleans, especially in regard to human health. Several studies were conducted to determine the actual contaminant distribution throughout the city and surrounding wetlands by analyzing soil, sediment, and water for a variety of contaminants including organics, inorganics, and biologics. Preliminary investigations by The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University concluded that soils and sediments contained pesticides, semi-volatiles, and metals, specifically arsenic, iron, and lead, at concentrations that could pose a significant risk to human health. Additional studies on New Orleans floodwaters revealed similar constituents as well as compounds commonly found in gasoline. More recently, it has been revealed that lead (Pb), arsenic, and vanadium are found intermittently throughout the city at concentrations greater than the human health soil screening levels (HHSSLs) of 400, 22 (non-cancer endpoint) and 390 μg/g, respectively. Of these, Pb appears to present the greatest exposure hazard to humans as a result of its extensive distribution in city soils. In this study, we spatially evaluated Pb concentrations across greater New Orleans surface soils. We established 128 sampling sites throughout New Orleans at approximately half-mile intervals. A soil sample was collected at each site and analyzed for Pb by ICP-AES. Soils from 19 (15%) of the sites had Pb concentrations exceeding the HHSSL threshold of 400 μg/g. It was determined that the highest concentrations of Pb were found in the south and west portions of the city. Pb concentrations found throughout New Orleans in this study were then incorporated into a geographic information system to create a spatial distribution model that can be further used to predict Pb exposure to humans in the city.

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference on LASERS 󈨖 Held at New Orleans, Louisiana on December 13-17, 1982,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This International Conference on Lasers 󈨖 was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, Dec. 13-17, 1982. More than 150 papers were presented in a wide range of topical fields related to laser development and laser applications.

  5. Military nursing competencies.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mary Candice

    2010-06-01

    Competencies for military nurses are much broader in scope than their civilian counterparts. Not only must they be proficient at basic nursing skills, but they must also quickly master such military skills as protecting themselves and others during attack or threat of attack, caring for major trauma victims under austere conditions, and preparing such patients for transport through the military system of evacuation. This requires consistent and specialized training. This article describes the competencies necessary for practice by military nurses.

  6. Military Business Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Military Business Success By: Lieutenant...TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Military Business Success 6. AUTHOR(S) Ahmad, Mohamad Krastev, Radostin Puciato, Arkadiusz 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...unlimited. MILITARY BUSINESS SUCCESS Mohamad Ahmad, Lieutenant Colonel, Malaysian Air Force Radostin Krastev, Captain, Bulgarian Air

  7. Post-Katrina fecal contamination in Violet Marsh near New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Furey, John S; Fredrickson, Herbert; Foote, Chris; Richmond, Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Fecal material entrained in New Orleans flood waters was pumped into the local environment. Violet Marsh received water pumped from St. Bernard Parish and the Lower Ninth Ward. Sediment core samples were collected from canals conducting water from these areas to pump stations and from locations within Violet Marsh. Viable indicator bacteria and fecal sterols were used to assess the levels of fecal material in sediment deposited after the levee failures and deeper sediments deposited before. Most of the cores had fecal coliform levels that exceed the biosolids criterion. All of the cores had fecal sterols that exceeded the suggested environmental quality criterion. Our data show both a long history of fecal contamination in Violet Marsh and an increase in fecal loading corresponding to the failure of the levee system. The work was performed as part of the Interagency Performance Evaluation Task Force investigation into the consequences of the failures of the New Orleans levee system.

  8. Experiences of nurse leaders surviving Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Danna, Denise; Bernard, Marirose; Schaubhut, Rose; Mathews, Pamela

    2010-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina left New Orleans, Louisiana, USA destroyed by its impact on 29 August 2005. Working during a hurricane was nothing new to these authors. Having lived in New Orleans all our lives, we were used to preparing our homes and our families to weather the storm. Nurses are in leadership positions before, during, and after any disaster. Nurses are called upon to report to duty, leaving their loved ones to care for themselves while the nurses care for the sick and frail in unbelievably difficult situations. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences as nurse survivors during Hurricane Katrina, reflecting on 10 major aspects of disaster planning from the perspective of the "Then" (during the storm) and the "Now" (current recommendations).

  9. Fumando la piedra: emerging patterns of crack use among Latino immigrant day laborers in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Avelardo; Cepeda, Alice; Negi, Nalini Junko; Kaplan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    The devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina have contributed to a dynamic demographic shift in the Latino composition of New Orleans. This article focuses on a particularly deleterious pattern of crack cocaine smoking associated with numerous social and health consequences. Utilizing a rapid assessment methodology, in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 52 Latino immigrant day laborers in New Orleans. Findings reveal that the presence of a flourishing drug market has facilitated and maintained patterns of crack use including initiation and periods of daily use. Moreover, feelings of isolation and constant exposure to victimization due to day laborers' marginal status are described as contributing to this use. This qualitative analysis reveals how social processes and contextual factors contribute to crack use among Latino day laborers in a post-disaster context. This study has important public health implications in the spread of HIV and other blood borne pathogens.

  10. Characterization of household hazardous waste from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rathje, W.L.; Wilson, D.C.; Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous wastes in residential garbage from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was conducted in order to determine the amount and characteristics of such wastes that are entering municipal landfills. The results of the survey indicate that approximately 642 metric tons of hazardous waste are discarded per year for the New Orleans study area and approximately 259 metric tons are discarded per year for the Marin County study area. Even though the percent of hazardous household waste in the garbage discarded in both study areas was less than 1%, it represents a significant quantity of hazardous waste because of the large volume of garbage involved.

  11. Evaluating elements of trust: Race and class in risk communication in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Battistoli, B F

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to determine the relative influence of race and class on trust in sources of messages of environmental risk in post-Katrina New Orleans. It poses two hypotheses to test that influence: H1-African-Americans ("Blacks") trust risk message sources less than European American ("Whites") do and H2-The higher the socioeconomic class, the lower the trust in risk message sources. A 37-question telephone survey (landlines and cellphones) was conducted in Orleans Parish in 2012 (n = 414). The overall margin of error was ±4.8% at a 95% confidence interval. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that the first hypothesis was rejected, while the second was supported. Additional data analysis revealed that frequency of use of sources of risk information appears to be a positive factor in building trust. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. West Bank of the Mississippi River in the Vicinity of New Orleans, Louisiana (East of the Harvey Canal) Hurricane Protection Study. Technical Appendixes. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    ALGIFRS CANAL ORLEANS PARISH, LA. TO ALGIERS LOCK Code Item 01ntt Unit Pie Asount Cnigces Project Cost ORLEANS PARISH LINE TO ALGIERS LOCK FLOOD...ALIGNMENT EAST O PETCR’S ROAD C0! Item Q tyU nit Unit Pie Amount Cnigcis Project Cost HARVEY LOCK TO HERO PUMPING STATION REAL ECTATE COSTS (Date of...reach lies entirely within Orleans Parish. The reach is almost pie -shaped, and therefore, has only three boundaries, the Mississippi River to the North

  13. Metal concentrations in schoolyard soils from New Orleans, Louisiana before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Presley, Steven M; Abel, Michael T; Austin, Galen P; Rainwater, Thomas R; Brown, Ray W; McDaniel, Les N; Marsland, Eric J; Fornerette, Ashley M; Dillard, Melvin L; Rigdon, Richard W; Kendall, Ronald J; Cobb, George P

    2010-06-01

    The long-term environmental impact and potential human health hazards resulting from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita throughout much of the United States Gulf Coast, particularly in the New Orleans, Louisiana, USA area are still being assessed and realized after more than four years. Numerous government agencies and private entities have collected environmental samples from throughout New Orleans and found concentrations of contaminants exceeding human health screening values as established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for air, soil, and water. To further assess risks of exposure to toxic concentrations of soil contaminants for citizens, particularly children, returning to live in New Orleans following the storms, soils collected from schoolyards prior to Hurricane Katrina and after Hurricane Rita were screened for 26 metals. Concentrations exceeding USEPA Regional Screening Levels (USEPA-RSL), total exposure, non-cancer endpoints, for residential soils for arsenic (As), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), and thallium (Tl) were detected in soil samples collected from schoolyards both prior to Hurricane Katrina and after Hurricane Rita. Approximately 43% (9/21) of schoolyard soils collected prior to Hurricane Katrina contained Pb concentrations greater than 400mgkg(-1), and samples from four schoolyards collected after Hurricane Rita contained detectable Pb concentrations, with two exceeding 1700mgkg(-1). Thallium concentrations exceeded USEPA-RSL in samples collected from five schoolyards after Hurricane Rita. Based upon these findings and the known increased susceptibility of children to the effects of Pb exposure, a more extensive assessment of the soils in schoolyards, public parks and other residential areas of New Orleans for metal contaminants is warranted.

  14. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Landsat recorded the devastation and continues to monitor the region’s wetlands. New Orleans, Louisiana, is near the bottom of the images along the Mississippi River. The city lies just south of Lake Pontchartrain. Hundreds of square miles of wetlands were lost after Katrina. Some marshlands became permanent water bodies. Some projects now aim to bring back marshlands because of their value in defending the coastline from storms.

  15. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder in a New Orleans workforce following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Karen B; Hyre, Amanda D; Ompad, Danielle C; Menke, Andy; Tynes, L Lee; Muntner, Paul

    2007-03-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall resulting in catastrophic damage and flooding to New Orleans, LA, and the Gulf Coast, which may have had significant mental health effects on the population. To determine rates and predictors of symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in New Orleans residents following Hurricane Katrina, we conducted a web-based survey 6 months after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. Participants included 1,542 employees from the largest employer in New Orleans. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 19.2%. Predictors of PTSD symptoms in a multivariate-adjusted regression model included female sex, non-black race, knowing someone who died in the storm, not having property insurance, having had a longer evacuation, a much longer work commute compared to before Hurricane Katrina, and currently living in a newly purchased or rented house or in a temporary trailer. Despite universal health coverage and the benefits of an employee assistance program for all employees, only 28.5% of those with PTSD symptoms had talked to a health professional about the events of Hurricane Katrina or issues encountered since the storm. A significant burden of PTSD symptoms was present 6 months following Hurricane Katrina among a large group of adults who had returned to work in New Orleans. Given their key role in the economic redevelopment of the region, there is a tremendous need to identify those in the workforce with symptoms consistent with PTSD and to enhance treatment options. The strong relationship between displacement from one's pre-Katrina residence and symptoms of PTSD suggests a need to focus resource utilization and interventions on individuals living in temporary housing.

  16. Factors Influencing Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables in Older Adults in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Clum, G; Gustat, J; O'Malley, K; Begalieva, M; Luckett, B; Rice, J; Johnson, C

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify demographic, social and structural factors associated with intake of fruit and vegetables in older adults in New Orleans, Louisiana. A cross-sectional randomly sampled, address-based telephone survey of households in Orleans Parish, Louisiana was conducted with the household's main grocery shopper. All participants were in the New Orleans metro area and were surveyed in 2011. Participants were 2,834 residents identified as the households' main grocery shopper in Orleans Parish, Louisiana. Participants were primarily female (75%), African-American (53%), approximately 10 percent of the sample reported receipt of government assistance. Approximately 37% of the sample was age 65 and older. Measures included a telephone administered survey assessing demographic characteristics, food intake, access to supermarkets and other food sources, transportation, self-reported health, and frequency of grocery shopping. Older adults consumed fewer fresh fruits and vegetables (FV) than younger adults (p<0.01). Bivariate associations with decreased FV included older age, receipt of government assistance, African American race, use of mobility aid, and poorer health. Multivariate factors associated with lower consumption include age, African American race, and poorer self-reported health. Women reported more fruit and vegetable consumption than men. FV consumption is associated with improved health and reduced mortality. Older adults are less likely to consume fruits and vegetables, therefore addressing reduced FV consumption in older adults is a potential target for improving health outcomes in older adults. Specifically targeting African Americans and those with poorer health, as well as males may be an important focus for interventions.

  17. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in a New Orleans Workforce Following Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Hyre, Amanda D.; Ompad, Danielle C.; Menke, Andy; Tynes, L. Lee; Muntner, Paul

    2007-01-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall resulting in catastrophic damage and flooding to New Orleans, LA, and the Gulf Coast, which may have had significant mental health effects on the population. To determine rates and predictors of symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in New Orleans residents following Hurricane Katrina, we conducted a web-based survey 6 months after Hurricane Katrina made landfall. Participants included 1,542 employees from the largest employer in New Orleans. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 19.2%. Predictors of PTSD symptoms in a multivariate-adjusted regression model included female sex, non-black race, knowing someone who died in the storm, not having property insurance, having had a longer evacuation, a much longer work commute compared to before Hurricane Katrina, and currently living in a newly purchased or rented house or in a temporary trailer. Despite universal health coverage and the benefits of an employee assistance program for all employees, only 28.5% of those with PTSD symptoms had talked to a health professional about the events of Hurricane Katrina or issues encountered since the storm. A significant burden of PTSD symptoms was present 6 months following Hurricane Katrina among a large group of adults who had returned to work in New Orleans. Given their key role in the economic redevelopment of the region, there is a tremendous need to identify those in the workforce with symptoms consistent with PTSD and to enhance treatment options. The strong relationship between displacement from ones’ pre-Katrina residence and symptoms of PTSD suggests a need to focus resource utilization and interventions on individuals living in temporary housing. PMID:17226081

  18. Risk to life due to flooding in post-Katrina New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.; Jonkman, S. N.; Van Ledden, M.

    2014-01-01

    After the catastrophic flooding of New Orleans due to hurricane Katrina in the year 2005, the city's hurricane protection system has been improved to provide protection against a hurricane load with a 1/100 per year exceedance frequency. This paper investigates the risk to life in post-Katrina New Orleans. In a risk-based approach the probabilities and consequences of various flood scenarios have been analyzed for the central area of the city (the metro bowl) to give a preliminary estimate of the risk to life in the post-Katrina situation. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model has been used to simulate flood characteristics of various breaches. The model for estimation of fatality rates is based on the loss of life data for Hurricane Katrina. Results indicate that - depending on the flood scenario - the estimated loss of life in case of flooding ranges from about 100 to nearly 500, with the highest life loss due to breaching of the river levees leading to large flood depths. The probability and consequence estimates are combined to determine the individual risk and societal risk for New Orleans. When compared to risks of other large scale engineering systems (e.g. other flood prone areas, dams and the nuclear sector) and acceptable risk criteria found in literature, the risks for the metro bowl are found to be relatively high. Thus, despite major improvements to the flood protection system, the flood risk of post-Katrina New Orleans is still expected to be significant. Effects of reduction strategies on the risk level are discussed as a basis for further evaluation.

  19. Risk to life due to flooding in post-Katrina New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.; Jonkman, S. N.; Van Ledden, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the catastrophic flooding of New Orleans due to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the city's hurricane protection system has been improved to provide protection against a hurricane load with a 1/100 per year exceedance frequency. This paper investigates the risk to life in post-Katrina New Orleans. In a flood risk analysis the probabilities and consequences of various flood scenarios have been analyzed for the central area of the city (the metro bowl) to give a preliminary estimate of the risk to life in the post-Katrina situation. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model has been used to simulate flood characteristics of various breaches. The model for estimation of fatality rates is based on the loss of life data for Hurricane Katrina. Results indicate that - depending on the flood scenario - the estimated loss of life in case of flooding ranges from about 100 to nearly 500, with the highest life loss due to breaching of the river levees leading to large flood depths. The probability and consequence estimates are combined to determine the individual risk and societal risk for New Orleans. When compared to risks of other large-scale engineering systems (e.g., other flood prone areas, dams and the nuclear sector) and acceptable risk criteria found in literature, the risks for the metro bowl are found to be relatively high. Thus, despite major improvements to the flood protection system, the flood risk to life of post-Katrina New Orleans is still expected to be significant. Indicative effects of reduction strategies on the risk level are discussed as a basis for further evaluation and discussion.

  20. Tornado Recovery Ongoing at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans LA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-07

    Teams at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans are continuing with recovery efforts following a tornado strike at the facility Tuesday, Feb. 7. Michoud remains closed to all but security and emergency operations crews. For more than half a century, Michoud has been the space agency’s premiere site for manufacturing and assembly of large-scale space structures and systems.

  1. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2016, New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Amaki, Makoto; Konagai, Nao; Fujino, Masashi; Kawakami, Shouji; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Tahara, Yoshio; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-12-22

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2016 were held on November 12-16 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA. This 5-day event featured cardiovascular clinical practice covering all aspects of basic, clinical, population, and translational content. One of the hot topics at AHA 2016 was precision medicine. The key presentations and highlights from the AHA Scientific Sessions 2016, including "precision medicine" as one of the hot topics, are herein reported.

  2. Failure in Campaign Design: The British Defeat at New Orleans December 1814 - January 1814

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    have on unifying the isolated Louisiana Territory and the gulf coast region against any British efforts to control New Orleans and the Mississippi... region . The British realized that the American control of this area was not secure and wanted to capitalize on this weakness by mounting a campaign...States as the British promised an Indian Territory to be created west of the Appalachian Mountains. After the defeat of the Creeks by Jackson, the

  3. Lead distributions and risks in New Orleans following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Abel, Michael T; Cobb, George P; Presley, Steven M; Ray, Gary L; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; Anderson, Todd A; Leftwich, Blair D; Kendall, Ronald J; Suedel, Burton C

    2010-07-01

    During the last four years, significant effort has been devoted to understanding the effects that Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had on contaminant distribution and redistribution in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, and the surrounding Gulf Coast area. Elevated concentrations were found for inorganic contaminants (including As, Fe, Pb, and V), several organic pollutants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and volatiles) and high concentration of bioaerosols, particularly Aeromonas and Vibrio. Data from different research groups confirm that some contaminant concentrations are elevated, that existing concentrations are similar to historical data, and that contaminants such as Pb and As may pose human health risks. Two data sets have been compiled in this article to serve as the foundation for preliminary risk assessments within greater New Orleans. Research from the present study suggests that children in highly contaminated areas of New Orleans may experience Pb exposure from soil ranging from 1.37 microg/d to 102 microg/d. These data are critical in the evaluation of children's health.

  4. Recovery Migration to the City of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A Migration Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fussell, Elizabeth; Curtis, Katherine J.; DeWaard, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina’s effect on the population of the City of New Orleans provides a model of how severe weather events, which are likely to increase in frequency and strength as the climate warms, might affect other large coastal cities. Our research focuses on changes in the migration system – defined as the system of ties between Orleans Parish and all other U.S. counties – between the pre-disaster (1999–2004) and recovery (2007–2009) periods. Using Internal Revenue Service county-to-county migration flow data, we find that in the recovery period Orleans Parish increased the number of migration ties with and received larger migration flows from nearby counties in the Gulf of Mexico coastal region, thereby spatially concentrating and intensifying the in-migration dimension of this predominantly urban system, while the out-migration dimension contracted and had smaller flows. We interpret these changes as the migration system relying on its strongest ties to nearby and less damaged counties to generate recovery in-migration. PMID:24729651

  5. One Year Later: Mental Illness Prevalence and Disparities Among New Orleans Residents Displaced by Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    VanLandingham, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether there were high levels of mental illness among displaced New Orleans, LA, residents in the fall of 2006, 1 year after Hurricane Katrina. Methods. We used data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study, which measured the prevalence of probable mild or moderate and serious mental illness among a representative sample of people who resided in New Orleans at the time of the hurricane, including people who evacuated the city and did not return. We also analyzed disparities in mental illness by race, education, and income. Results. We found high rates of mental illness in our sample and major disparities in mental illness by race, education, and income. Severe damage to or destruction of an individual's home was a major covariate of mental illness. Conclusions. The prevalence of mental illness remained high in the year following Hurricane Katrina, in contrast to the pattern found after other disasters. Economic losses and displacement may account for this finding as well as the disparity in mental illness between Blacks and Whites. PMID:19890178

  6. Race, socioeconomic status, and return migration to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan; VanLandingham, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on the 29th of August 2005 and displaced virtually the entire population of the city. Soon after, observers predicted the city would become whiter and wealthier as a result of selective return migration, although challenges related to sampling and data collection in a post-disaster environment have hampered evaluation of these hypotheses. In this article, we investigate return to the city by displaced residents over a period of approximately 14 months following the storm, describing overall return rates and examining differences in return rates by race and socioeconomic status. We use unique data from a representative sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans residents collected in the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Survey. We find that black residents returned to the city at a much slower pace than white residents even after controlling for socioeconomic status and demographic characteristics. However, the racial disparity disappears after controlling for housing damage. We conclude that blacks tended to live in areas that experienced greater flooding and hence suffered more severe housing damage which, in turn, led to their delayed return to the city. The full-scale survey of displaced residents being fielded in 2009–2010 will show whether the repopulation of the city was selective over a longer period. PMID:20440381

  7. Through hell and high water: New Orleans, August 29 - September 15, 2005.

    PubMed

    Cave, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In October of 2005 the Historic New Orleans Collection initiated an oral history project entitled "Through Hell and High Water: New Orleans, August 29 - September 15, 2005." The intent of the project was to capture the stories of first responders who worked in the New Orleans metropolitan area during the storm and the weeks that followed. The interview process has been linked with the after-action studies done by some of the local first-responding agencies and has provided a much-needed outlet for first responders. To date over three hundred subjects have been interviewed, and our work thus far has shown us that top-down methods of documentation do not work with an event like Katrina. The almost total loss of communications made it impossible for high-ranking members of the different agencies to control or even know what lower-ranking members were doing. As a result it will be necessary to cast a wide net in our documentation effort.

  8. One year later: mental illness prevalence and disparities among New Orleans residents displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Narayan; VanLandingham, Mark

    2009-11-01

    We examined whether there were high levels of mental illness among displaced New Orleans, LA, residents in the fall of 2006, 1 year after Hurricane Katrina. We used data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study, which measured the prevalence of probable mild or moderate and serious mental illness among a representative sample of people who resided in New Orleans at the time of the hurricane, including people who evacuated the city and did not return. We also analyzed disparities in mental illness by race, education, and income. We found high rates of mental illness in our sample and major disparities in mental illness by race, education, and income. Severe damage to or destruction of an individual's home was a major covariate of mental illness. The prevalence of mental illness remained high in the year following Hurricane Katrina, in contrast to the pattern found after other disasters. Economic losses and displacement may account for this finding as well as the disparity in mental illness between Blacks and Whites.

  9. Molds and mycotoxins in dust from water-damaged homes in New Orleans after hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bloom, E; Grimsley, L F; Pehrson, C; Lewis, J; Larsson, L

    2009-04-01

    Dust collected in New Orleans homes mold-contaminated because of the flooding after hurricane Katrina was analyzed for molds and mycotoxins. The mycoflora was studied by cultivation and quantitative PCR for selected molds. The most commonly found mold taxa were Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium. Verrucarol, a hydrolysis product of macrocyclic trichothecenes predominately produced by Stachybotrys spp. was identified in three dust samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and sterigmatocystin (produced by various Aspergillus spp.) was found in two samples by high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This is the first demonstration of mycotoxins in Katrina-associated dust samples. The analytical methods used represent valuable tools in further studies on bioaerosol exposure and health risks. In the aftermath of natural disasters like hurricane Katrina water-damages on infrastructure and public and private property are often associated with health risks for remediation workers and returning residents. In the case of New Orleans evaluations of health hazards, health studies, and assessments of bioaerosol have been conducted previously. However, until now mycotoxins have not been addressed. Our study shows, for the first time, the presence of mycotoxins in dust collected in houses in New Orleans mold-contaminated because of the hurricane Katrina. The results may highlight the potential health threats posed by mold aerosols in post-disaster inhabited areas.

  10. Role of habitat components on the dynamics of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Comiskey, N M; Lowrie, R C; Wesson, D M

    1999-05-01

    Monthly sampling of tire pile populations of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in Orleans Parish, New Orleans, LA, was done in 1995 to determine prevalence of ascogregarine parasites and changes in wing length. Prevalence of Ascogregarina taiwanensis (Lien & Levine) infection was 100% in midsummer and decreased in the fall and spring (60-70%). Wing lengths were longest in the spring and fall and shortest in midsummer. We evaluated the effect of A. taiwanensis infections under high and deficient levels of leaf litter nutrients on mortality, development time, wing length, and reproductive potential of a New Orleans strain of Ae. albopictus. Parasitism and deficient nutrients caused a 35% increase in the rate of larval mortality and significantly extended the development time of females. Parasitized adults were 5% smaller and produced 23% fewer eggs than unparasitized siblings. In addition, abnormal Malpighian tubule morphology and melanization of ascogregarines were seen in adults from nutrient-deficient microcosms. We conclude that ascogregarine infections affect the dynamics of Ae. albopictus by increasing the mortality of immature stages when nutrients supplies are scarce, and by decreasing the reproductive capacity of females under high nutrient conditions.

  11. The Location of Displaced New Orleans Residents in the Year After Hurricane Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Using individual data from the restricted version of the American Community Survey, we examined the displacement locations of pre–Hurricane Katrina adult residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. More than one-half (53 %) of adults had returned to—or remained in—the New Orleans metropolitan area, with just under one-third of the total returning to the dwelling in which they resided prior to Hurricane Katrina. Among the remainder, Texas was the leading location of displaced residents, with almost 40 % of those living away from the metropolitan area (18 % of the total), followed by other locations in Louisiana (12 %), the South region of the United States other than Louisiana and Texas (12 %), and elsewhere in the United States (5 %). Black adults were considerably more likely than nonblack adults to be living elsewhere in Louisiana, in Texas, and elsewhere in the South. The observed race disparity was not accounted for by any of the demographic or socioeconomic covariates in the multinomial logistic regression models. Consistent with hypothesized effects, we found that following Hurricane Katrina, young adults (aged 25–39) were more likely to move further away from New Orleans and that adults born outside Louisiana were substantially more likely to have relocated away from the state. PMID:24599750

  12. The location of displaced New Orleans residents in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Narayan; Gregory, Jesse

    2014-06-01

    Using individual data from the restricted version of the American Community Survey, we examined the displacement locations of pre-Hurricane Katrina adult residents of New Orleans in the year after the hurricane. More than one-half (53 %) of adults had returned to-or remained in-the New Orleans metropolitan area, with just under one-third of the total returning to the dwelling in which they resided prior to Hurricane Katrina. Among the remainder, Texas was the leading location of displaced residents, with almost 40 % of those living away from the metropolitan area (18 % of the total), followed by other locations in Louisiana (12 %), the South region of the United States other than Louisiana and Texas (12 %), and elsewhere in the United States (5 %). Black adults were considerably more likely than nonblack adults to be living elsewhere in Louisiana, in Texas, and elsewhere in the South. The observed race disparity was not accounted for by any of the demographic or socioeconomic covariates in the multinomial logistic regression models. Consistent with hypothesized effects, we found that following Hurricane Katrina, young adults (aged 25-39) were more likely to move further away from New Orleans and that adults born outside Louisiana were substantially more likely to have relocated away from the state.

  13. Mass medical evacuation: Hurricane Katrina and nursing experiences at the New Orleans airport.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kelly R; Nagel, Nanci E

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina, a category 4 storm, struck the U.S. Gulf states in late August, 2005, resulting in the most costly and second most deadly natural disaster in recent United States history. The storm and subsequent flooding due to levee failure necessitated the evacuation of 80% of the city of New Orleans' 484,674 residents. Most of the city's hospitals and other health care resources were destroyed or inoperable. The hurricane devastated many communities, stranding people in hospitals, shelters, homes, and nursing homes. Nurses and other health care providers deployed to New Orleans to provide medical assistance experienced substantial challenges in making triage and treatment decisions for patients whose numbers far exceeded supplies and personnel. This article describes the experiences and solutions of nurses and other personnel from 3 Disaster Medical Assistance Teams assigned to the New Orleans airport responsible for perhaps the most massive patient assessment, stabilization, and evacuation operation in U.S. history. As the frequency of disasters continues to rise, it is imperative that the nursing profession realize its value in the disaster arena and continually take leadership roles.

  14. Children's respiratory health and mold levels in New Orleans after Katrina: a preliminary look.

    PubMed

    Rabito, Felicia A; Iqbal, Shahed; Kiernan, Michael P; Holt, Elizabeth; Chew, Ginger L

    2008-03-01

    When the federal levee system broke after Hurricane Katrina, 80 percent of New Orleans, approximately 134,000 homes, flooded. As repopulation and revitalization activities continue, exposure to mold and other respiratory irritants has emerged as a major health concern; however, there has been no study examining children's respiratory health and indoor mold levels in the post-Katrina environment. The Children's Respiratory Health Study was designed as a preliminary examination of indoor air levels of mold, children's lung function, and common indices of respiratory health in a select sample of children returning to live in New Orleans immediately after Hurricane Katrina. Children were recruited from a private primary school in the Garden District of New Orleans. Respiratory health questionnaire and spirometric data were collected on children 7 to 14 years of age, and mold air sampling was conducted at baseline and again after 2 months. There was an overall decrease in mold levels and respiratory symptoms over the study period, and indoor mold levels were low despite reported hurricane damage.

  15. Recovery Migration to the City of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A Migration Systems Approach.

    PubMed

    Fussell, Elizabeth; Curtis, Katherine J; Dewaard, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina's effect on the population of the City of New Orleans provides a model of how severe weather events, which are likely to increase in frequency and strength as the climate warms, might affect other large coastal cities. Our research focuses on changes in the migration system - defined as the system of ties between Orleans Parish and all other U.S. counties - between the pre-disaster (1999-2004) and recovery (2007-2009) periods. Using Internal Revenue Service county-to-county migration flow data, we find that in the recovery period Orleans Parish increased the number of migration ties with and received larger migration flows from nearby counties in the Gulf of Mexico coastal region, thereby spatially concentrating and intensifying the in-migration dimension of this predominantly urban system, while the out-migration dimension contracted and had smaller flows. We interpret these changes as the migration system relying on its strongest ties to nearby and less damaged counties to generate recovery in-migration.

  16. Assessment of health-related needs after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Orleans and Jefferson Parishes, New Orleans area, Louisiana, October 17-22, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    Residents returning home after natural disasters face numerous physical, mental, and social challenges. Seven weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck the New Orleans area in Louisiana, causing levees to break and large sections of the city to flood, local authorities had reopened most of Jefferson Parish and much of Orleans Parish to residents. To identify health-related needs among returning parish residents, state and local public health and mental health agencies and CDC conducted an assessment of living conditions, access to basic services, and physical and mental health status. This report describes the results of that assessment, which determined that, approximately 7 weeks after Hurricane Katrina made landfall, 20.2% of housing units lacked water, 24.5% had no electricity, 43.2% had no telephone service, and 55.7% of households contained one or more members with a chronic health condition. In addition, 49.8% of adults exhibited levels of emotional distress, indicating a potential need for mental health services. As a result of these findings, the Louisiana Office of Mental Health established a crisis-counseling program to provide interventions and support to hurricane survivors. Community assessments after natural disasters can identify health-related needs and guide public health interventions.

  17. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  18. Military Justice: Courts-Martial, an Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-12

    the military serving a sentence imposed by a court-martial; members of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Public Health Service...suspend all or part of the sentence , disapprove a finding or conviction, or lower the sentence .66 The CA may not increase the sentence . Once the CA takes... sentenced to prison at a court-martial for the sexual assault of a civilian. The authority of the CA to modify the findings and sentence of the court

  19. New Orleans soil lead (Pb) cleanup using Mississippi River alluvium: need, feasibility, and cost.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Powell, Eric T; Gonzales, Christopher R; Mielke, Paul W; Ottesen, Rolf Tore; Langedal, Marianne

    2006-04-15

    In New Orleans, LA prior to hurricane Katrina 20-30% of inner-city children had elevated blood Pb levels > or =10 microg/ dL and 10 census tracts had a median surface soil level of Pb >1000 mg/kg (2.5 times the U.S. standard). This project tests the feasibility of transporting and grading contaminated properties (n = 25) with 15 cm (6 in.) of clean Mississippi River alluvium from the Bonnet Carré Spillway (BCS) (median soil Pb content 4.7 mg/kg; range 1.7-22.8). The initial median surface soil Pb was 1051 mg/kg (maximum 19 627). After 680 metric tons (750 tons) of clean soil cover was emplaced on 6424 m2 (69 153 ft2), the median surface soil Pb decreased to 6 mg/kg (range 3-18). Interior entrance wipe samples were collected at 10 homes before and after soil treatment and showed a decreasing trend of Pb (p value = 0.048) from a median of 52 microg/ft2 to a median of 36 microg/ft2 (25th and 75th percentiles are 22 and 142 microg/ft2 and 12 and 61 microg/ft2, respectively). Average direct costs for properties with homes were $3,377 ($1.95 per square foot), with a range of $1,910-7,020, vs $2,622 ($0.61 per square foot), with a range of $2,400-3,040 for vacant lots. Approximately 40% (86,000) of properties in New Orleans are in areas of >400 mg Pb/kg soil and estimated direct costs for treatment are between $225.5 and $290.4 million. Annual costs of Pb poisoning in New Orleans are estimated at approximately $76 million in health, education, and societal harm. Urban accumulation of Pb is an international problem; for example, the new Government of Norway established a policy precedence for an isolated soil cleanup program at daycare centers, school playgrounds, and parks to protect children. New Orleans requires a community-wide soil cleanup program because of the extent and quantity of accumulated soil Pb. The post-Katrina benefits of reducing soil Pb are expected to outweigh the foreseeable costs of Pb poisoning to children returning to New Orleans.

  20. Community-Based Wetland Restoration Workshop in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. F.; Craig, L.; Ross, J. A.; Zepeda, L.; Carpenter, Q.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2007 a workshop class of University of Wisconsin-Madison students has participated in a community-based project in New Orleans to investigate the feasibility of restoring the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle (BBWT), which is adjacent to the Lower 9th Ward in New Orleans. This 440-acre region is currently open water but was a cypress forest until the 1970s. Restoration would provide protection from storm surges, restored ecological services, and recreational use. The workshop introduced students to the multidisciplinary skills needed to work effectively with the complex and interconnected issues within a project involving many stakeholders. The stakeholders included the Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development (CSED), Lower 9th Ward residents, non-profits (e.g., Sierra Club, Environmental Defense, Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, National Wildlife Federation), government agencies (e.g., New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board, Army Corps of Engineers), neighborhood groups (e.g., Holy Cross Neighborhood Association, The Village), and universities (Tulane, U. of New Orleans, LSU, U. Colorado-Denver, Southeastern Louisiana). The course ran initially as a Water Resources Management practicum in the first two summers and then as a broader multidisciplinary project with student expertise in hydrology, social science, law, planning, policy analysis, community development, GIS, public health, environmental education and ecological restoration. The project divided into three main components: wetland science, social science, and land tenure and planning. Principal activities in wetland science were to monitor water levels and water quality, inventory flora and fauna, and plant grasses on small “floating islands.” The principal social science activity was to conduct a neighborhood survey about knowledge of the wetland and interest in its restoration. The land tenure and planning activity was to investigate ownership and transfer of property within the

  1. Apollo 14 Command Module approaches touchdown in South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-09

    S71-18753 (9 Feb. 1971) --- The Apollo 14 Command Module (CM), with astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, aboard, approaches touchdown in the South Pacific Ocean to successfully end a 10-day lunar landing mission. The splashdown occurred at 3:04:39 p.m. (CST), Feb. 9, 1971, approximately 765 nautical miles south of American Samoa. The three crew men were flown by helicopter to the USS New Orleans prime recovery ship.

  2. The "Spirit of New Orleans": translating a model of intervention with maltreated children and their families for the Glasgow context.

    PubMed

    Minnis, Helen; Bryce, Graham; Phin, Louise; Wilson, Phil

    2010-10-01

    Children in care have higher rates of mental health problems than the general population and placement instability contributes to this. Children are both most vulnerable to the effects of poor quality care and most responsive to treatment in the early weeks and months of life yet, in the UK, permanency decisions are generally not in place until around the age of four. We aimed to understand the components of an innovative system for assessing and intervening with maltreated children and their families developed in New Orleans and to consider how it might be implemented in Glasgow, UK. During and after a visit to New Orleans by a team of Glasgow practitioners, eight key interviews and meetings with New Orleans and Glasgow staff were audio-recorded. Qualitative analysis of verbatim transcripts identified key themes. Themes highlighted shared aspects of the context and attitudes of the two teams, identified gaps in the Glasgow service and steps that would be needed to implement a version of the New Orleans model in Glasgow. Our discussions with the New Orleans team have highlighted concrete steps we can take, in Glasgow, to make better decision-making for vulnerable children a reality.

  3. Immunization and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Benenson, A S

    1984-01-01

    This lecture, a memorial to Joseph E. Smadel, reviews the involvement of the military in the development and use of immunizing materials. Smallpox and smallpox immunization in the military and the development and present status of immunization against typhoid, cholera, yellow fever, typhus, tetanus, diphtheria, plague, influenza, adenovirus, meningitis, rubella, and malaria are reviewed. Dr. Smadel's personal contributions to the significant achievements of the military program to civilian practice are emphasized.

  4. Charter and Direct Run Schools of the Recovery School District (RSD) and Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) Comparison of High Stakes Tests and Dropout Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andry, Beverly Guillory

    2011-01-01

    The city of New Orleans has embarked on an historic experiment reinventing its schools--once considered among the worst in the country--from a centralized, single district model of education to a two district model in which both the Recovery School District (RSD) and the preexisting Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) both operate direct run and…

  5. Reflections on military psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, R J

    1978-07-01

    The need for psychiatrists in the military was recognized for the first time during World War I, which involved millions of men in unusually protracted warfare. The policy of treating psychiatric casualties close to the from and returning soldiers to their military units as quickly as possible proved of great significance in the U.S. war effort. During World War II, the Korean conflict, and the war in Viet Nam, military psychiatry made great contributions and learned many lessions, both at home and abroad. The lessions learned by military psychiatry have important applications for the rest of medicine, especially in the fields of stress, crisis therapy, and community psychiatry.

  6. About Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 15K ...

  7. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    MILITARY RESEARCH, * NUTRITION , MILITARY PERSONNEL, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), METABOLISM, NUTRIENTS, HIGH ENERGY, MEDICAL RESEARCH, FOOD, DIET, MENTAL ABILITY, WORKSHOPS, BIOMEDICINE, CAFFEINE, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE.

  8. Airborne Mold and Endotoxin Concentrations in New Orleans, Louisiana, after Flooding, October through November 2005

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Gina M.; Hjelmroos-Koski, Mervi; Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2006-01-01

    Background The hurricanes and flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana, in October and November 2005 resulted in damp conditions favorable to the dispersion of bioaerosols such as mold spores and endotoxin. Objective Our objective in this study was to assess potential human exposure to bioaerosols in New Orleans after the flooding of the city. Methods A team of investigators performed continuous airborne sampling for mold spores and endotoxin outdoors in flooded and nonflooded areas, and inside homes that had undergone various levels of remediation, for periods of 5–24 hr during the 2 months after the flooding. Results The estimated 24-hr mold concentrations ranged from 21,000 to 102,000 spores/m3 in outdoor air and from 11,000 to 645,000 spores/m3 in indoor air. The mean outdoor spore concentration in flooded areas was roughly double the concentration in nonflooded areas (66,167 vs. 33,179 spores/m3; p < 0.05). The highest concentrations were inside homes. The most common mold species were from the genera of Cladosporium and Aspergillus/Penicillium; Stachybotrys was detected in some indoor samples. The airborne endotoxin concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 8.3 EU (endo-toxin units)/m3 but did not vary with flooded status or between indoor and outdoor environments. Conclusions The high concentration of mold measured indoors and outdoors in the New Orleans area is likely to be a significant respiratory hazard that should be monitored over time. Workers and returning residents should use appropriate personal protective equipment and exposure mitigation techniques to prevent respiratory morbidity and long-term health effects. PMID:16966092

  9. Resident physicians' opinions and behaviors regarding the use of interpreters in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Rachel; Myers, Leann; Springgate, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    In academic medical centers, resident physicians are most involved in the care of patients, yet many have little training in the proper use of interpreters in the care of patients with limited English-language proficiency. Residents have cited lack of time and lack of access to trained medical interpreters as barriers to the use of professional interpreter services. The purpose of this study was to examine the usage patterns of interpreters and perceived barriers to using interpreters in New Orleans. Subjects included resident physicians training in internal medicine, pediatrics, and combined internal medicine and pediatrics at Tulane University and Louisiana State University in New Orleans. A survey that consisted of demographics, short-answer, and Likert-scale questions regarding attitudes related to the use of interpreters was used as the metric. The overall response rate was 55.5%. A total of 92.4% of subjects surveyed stated that they had used an interpreter during their residency. Telephone services and family members were the most commonly used types of interpreters (41.3% and 30.5%, respectively). Resident physicians were most likely to use interpreter services during their initial history taking as well as at discharge, but use declined throughout patients' hospitalization (P < 0.001). Residents cited lack of availability, lack of time, and lack of knowledge about accessing interpreter services as the major barriers to using interpreters. Resident physicians training in New Orleans have experience using interpreter services; however, they continue to use untrained interpreters and use varies during the hospital encounter. Targeted training for residents, including interpreter logistics, may help increase the use of interpreters.

  10. Soil arsenic surveys of New Orleans: localized hazards in children's play areas.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Gonzales, Chris R; Cahn, Elise; Brumfield, Jessica; Powell, Eric T; Mielke, Paul W

    2010-10-01

    Arsenic (As) ranks first on the 2005 and 2007 hazardous substances priority lists compiled for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study describes two New Orleans soil As surveys: (1) a survey of composite soil samples from 286 census tracts and (2) a field survey of soil As at 38 play areas associated with the presence of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood on residential and public properties. The survey of metropolitan New Orleans soils revealed a median As content of 1.5 mg/kg (range <0.2-16.4) and no distinctive differences between the soils of the city core and outlying areas. Play area accessible soils associated with CCA-treated wood (N = 32) had a median As of 57 mg/kg and 78% of the samples were ≥12 mg/kg, the Louisiana soil As standard. The field survey of play areas for CCA-treated wood (N = 132 samples at 38 sites) was conducted with a portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer. Seventy-five of 132 wood samples (56.8%) were deemed CCA-treated wood. Of the 38 play areas surveyed, 14 (36.8%) had CCA-treated wood. A significant association (Fisher's exact p-value = 0.348 × 10(-6)) was found between CCA-treated wood and soil As (N = 75). At one elementary school CCA-treated woodchips (As range 813-1,654 mg As/kg) covered the playgrounds. The situation in New Orleans probably exists in play areas across the nation. These findings support a precautionary program for testing soils and wood for hazardous substances at all play areas intended for children.

  11. Transforming primary care in the New Orleans safety-net: the patient experience.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Wu, Kevin J; Wiley, James A

    2013-02-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a key service delivery innovation in health reform. However, there are growing questions about whether the changes in clinics promoted by the PCMH model lead to improvements in the patient experience. To test the hypothesis that PCMH improvements in safety-net primary care clinics are associated with a more positive patient experience. Multilevel cross-sectional analysis of patients nested within the primary care clinics that serve them. Primary care clinic leaders and patients throughout the City of New Orleans health care safety-net. Dependent variables included patient ratings of accessibility, coordination, and confidence in the quality/safety of care. The key independent variable was a score measuring PCMH structural and process improvements at the clinic level. Approximately two thirds of patients in New Orleans gave positive ratings to their clinics on access and quality/safety, but only one third did for care coordination. In all but the largest clinics, patient experiences of care coordination were positively associated with the clinic's use of PCMH structural and process changes. Results for patient ratings of access and quality/safety were mixed. Among primary care clinics in the New Orleans safety-net, use of more PCMH improvements at the clinic level led to more positive patient rating of care coordination, but not of accessibility or confidence in quality/safety. Ongoing efforts to pilot, demonstrate, implement, and evaluate the PCMH should consider how the impact of medical practice transformation could vary across different aspects of the patient experience.

  12. Effects of ENSO on weather-type frequencies and properties at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Muller, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Examination of historical climate records indicates a significant relation between the El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and seasonal temperature and precipitation in Louisiana. In this study, a 40 yr record of twice daily (06:00 and 15:00 h local time) weather types are used to study the effects of ENSO variability on the local climate at New Orleans, Louisiana. Tropical Pacific sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) for the NINO3.4 region are used to define ENSO events (i.e. El Nin??o and La Nin??a events), and daily precipitation and temperature data for New Orleans are used to define weather-type precipitation and temperature properties. Data for winters (December through February) 1962-2000 are analyzed. The 39 winters are divided into 3 categories; winters with NINO3.4 SST anomalies 1??C (El Nin??o events), and neutral conditions (all other years). For each category, weather-type frequencies and properties (i.e. precipitation and temperature) are determined and analyzed. Results indicate that El Nin??o events primarily affect precipitation characteristics of weather types at New Orleans, whereas the effects of La Nin??a events are most apparent in weather-type frequencies. During El Nin??o events, precipitation for some of the weather types is greater than during neutral and La Nin??a conditions and is related to increased water vapor transport from the Tropics to the Gulf of Mexico. The changes in weather-type frequencies during La Nin??a events are indicative of a northward shift in storm tracks and/or a decrease in storm frequency in southern Louisiana.

  13. Arsenic contamination in New Orleans soil: temporal changes associated with flooding.

    PubMed

    Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; Solomon, Gina; Gonzales, Christopher R; Agwaramgbo, Lovell; Mielke, Howard W

    2010-01-01

    The flooding of New Orleans in late August and September 2005 caused widespread sediment deposition in the flooded areas of the city. Post-flood sampling by US EPA revealed that 37% of sediment samples exceeded Louisiana corrective screening guidelines for arsenic of 12mg/kg, but there was debate over whether this contamination was pre-existing, as almost no pre-flood soil sampling for arsenic had been done in New Orleans. In this study, archived soil samples collected in 1998-1999 were location-matched with 70 residential sites in New Orleans where post-flood arsenic concentrations were elevated. Those same locations were sampled again during the recovery period 18 months later. During the recovery period, sampling for arsenic was also done for the first time at school sites and playgrounds within the flooded zone. Every sample of sediment taken 1-10 months after the flood exceeded the arsenic concentration found in the matched pre-flood soils. The average difference between the two sampling periods was 19.67mg/kg (95% CI 16.63-22.71) with a range of 3.60-74.61mg/kg. At virtually all of these sites (97%), arsenic concentrations decreased substantially by 18 months into the recovery period when the average concentration of matched samples was 3.26mg/kg (95% CI 1.86-4.66). However, 21 (30%) of the samples taken during the recovery period still had higher concentrations of arsenic than the matched sample taken prior to the flooding. In addition, 33% of samples from schoolyards and 13% of samples from playgrounds had elevated arsenic concentrations above the screening guidelines during the recovery period. These findings suggest that the flooding resulted in the deposition of arsenic-contaminated sediments. Diminution of the quantity of sediment at many locations has significantly reduced overall soil arsenic concentrations, but some locations remain of concern for potential long-term soil contamination.

  14. Airborne mold and endotoxin concentrations in New Orleans, Louisiana, after flooding, October through November 2005.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gina M; Hjelmroos-Koski, Mervi; Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; Hammond, S Katharine

    2006-09-01

    The hurricanes and flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana, in October and November 2005 resulted in damp conditions favorable to the dispersion of bioaerosols such as mold spores and endotoxin. Our objective in this study was to assess potential human exposure to bioaerosols in New Orleans after the flooding of the city. A team of investigators performed continuous airborne sampling for mold spores and endotoxin outdoors in flooded and nonflooded areas, and inside homes that had undergone various levels of remediation, for periods of 5-24 hr during the 2 months after the flooding. The estimated 24-hr mold concentrations ranged from 21,000 to 102,000 spores/m3 in outdoor air and from 11,000 to 645,000 spores/m3 in indoor air. The mean outdoor spore concentration in flooded areas was roughly double the concentration in nonflooded areas (66,167 vs. 33,179 spores/m3 ; p < 0.05) . The highest concentrations were inside homes. The most common mold species were from the genera of Cladosporium and Aspergillus/Penicillium ; Stachybotrys was detected in some indoor samples. The airborne endotoxin concentrations ranged from 0.6 to 8.3 EU (endotoxin units) /m3 but did not vary with flooded status or between indoor and outdoor environments. The high concentration of mold measured indoors and outdoors in the New Orleans area is likely to be a significant respiratory hazard that should be monitored over time. Workers and returning residents should use appropriate personal protective equipment and exposure mitigation techniques to prevent respiratory morbidity and long-term health effects.

  15. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  16. Effects of flooding on field populations of Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Osbrink, Weste L A; Cornelius, Mary L; Lax, Alan R

    2008-08-01

    Hurricane Katrina (2005) resulted in extensive flooding in the city of New Orleans, LA. Periodic sampling of monitors before the flood, and of different monitors in the same areas after the flood, was used to evaluate the effects of long-term flooding on populations of Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). Monitors were located adjacent to buildings and in urban forests. Significant population reductions occurred in areas that flooded 2-3 wk with brackish water, with termite populations associated with pine (Pinus spp.) trees and buildings slower to recover than populations associated with oak trees. Alate production in flooded areas showed no reduction from previous years.

  17. Best Practices Case Study: Green Coast Enterprises - Project Home Again, New Orleans, LA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-04-01

    Case study about Green Coast Enterprises, who received design assistance and analysis from Building America team Building Science Corporation to build 100 homes for New Orleans families displaced by Hurricane Katrina. The homes incorporate a host of weather-resistant techniques: pier foundations, all borate pressure-treated lumber; hurricane strapping; moisture-resistant closed-cell spray foam insulation under the subfloor, in walls, and under the roof line to seal out moisture-laden air and glue the structure together to resist high winds; roof sheathing seams sealed with butyl-adhesive flashing tape; and a fully adhered roofing membrane over eaves and gable ends.

  18. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  19. The Effects of Hurricane Katrina on Food Access Disparities in New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, J. Nicholas; Rice, Janet C.; Swalm, Chris M.; Hutchinson, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Disparities in neighborhood food access are well documented, but little research exists on how shocks influence such disparities. We examined neighborhood food access in New Orleans at 3 time points: before Hurricane Katrina (2004–2005), in 2007, and in 2009. We combined existing directories with on-the-ground verification and geographic information system mapping to assess supermarket counts in the entire city. Existing disparities for African American neighborhoods worsened after the storm. Although improvements have been made, by 2009 disparities were no better than prestorm levels. PMID:21233432

  20. Archeological Monitoring Plan for Four Floodwall Projects in the City of New Orleans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-29

    to the Chapitoulas Coast, granted a portion of his land to the Society of Jesus ( Jesuits ). By 1740, the Jesuits owned thirty-two arpents of land...patterns of New Orleans, these 7 3 0 O0 OD Z .- ’ a) r- 00 𔃾.) : 0 0 to -4 a) 0 LW (a Ca) En .- 4 0 14J 72U the Civil War. Although no documentary ...St. James and Market Streets is recommended for monitoring. None of the documentary sources dealing with the local ice business indicate that the

  1. The Weather family's Hurricane Katrina saga: Leonard Weather Jr., MD of New Orleans. Interview by George Dawson.

    PubMed Central

    Weather, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    This interview of Leonard Weather Jr., MD was conducted so as to give our members and the medical community at large a version of what a New Orleans, LA physician of African-American descent experienced during Hurricane Katrina and its devastating aftermath. Emile Riley, MD, Meharry Medical School graduate, general surgeon, role model, and New Orleans Civic Leader who helped to blaze the trail for other local African-American physicians, died January 31, 2006 at the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, TX at the age of 71. He evacuated to Houston prior to Hurricane Katrina. PMID:16749655

  2. The Weather family's Hurricane Katrina saga: Leonard Weather Jr., MD of New Orleans. Interview by George Dawson.

    PubMed

    Weather, Leonard

    2006-05-01

    This interview of Leonard Weather Jr., MD was conducted so as to give our members and the medical community at large a version of what a New Orleans, LA physician of African-American descent experienced during Hurricane Katrina and its devastating aftermath. Emile Riley, MD, Meharry Medical School graduate, general surgeon, role model, and New Orleans Civic Leader who helped to blaze the trail for other local African-American physicians, died January 31, 2006 at the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston, TX at the age of 71. He evacuated to Houston prior to Hurricane Katrina.

  3. Hebrew Military Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abarbanel, Joel I.

    Designed to give the military student a broad range of vocabulary on military subjects and a general understanding of the structure and operations of the Israel Defense Forces, this reader parallels advanced materials prepared for Foreign Service students of Hebrew and consists of short reading passages, each followed by a vocabulary list…

  4. Military Perspectives on Cyberpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Zimet and Charles L. Barry Military cyberpower is the application of the domain of cyber- space to operational concepts to accomplish military objec...pable global backbone, unrestrained information sharing among com- mands, and truly interoperable networks wherein every authorized user can access...Special Operations Forces (SOF), and space forces performing missions around the world, and their supporting in- telligence networks. DOD divides

  5. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  6. Sustaining the Military Arts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. The military arts of strategy, operations, and tactics are merely the creative bridges that allow...Strategic pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. about military arts and sciences is not merely a ’question of rhetorical clarity. Indeed

  7. Military Culture and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mines the success of transformation. The period between 1914 and 1945 shows the dynamic nature of military innova - tion and the difficulty military...maximized unity of effort. Leaders can foster a disciplined culture that encourages change and innova - tion by “creating a consistent system with clear

  8. Advising Transfer Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Today's students can come from a larger area than just high school. With the entire world's conflicts and today's society, more and more of our present day students may have come from the military ranks. Though we have not come to an actual draft system, more and more modern day students have served their time in the military, to keep America…

  9. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  10. Case report: Military subcultural competency.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The military is comprised of numerous subcultures. These subcultures can dramatically impact perceptions of illness and care. Although efforts are currently underway to improve the military cultural competence of all health care providers, efforts to improve the subcultural competence of military providers require attention. Military providers, although part of the military culture, may not appreciate their patients' military subculture or be aware of the impact their own subculture plays on the encounter. To illustrate potential difficulties, a case is described where limited military subcultural competence disrupted care. As the military medical corps continues to integrate across service lines, this case underscores the importance of training military physicians to assess the influence of a service member's specific military subculture. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Multiple enteropathogenic viruses in a gastroenteritis outbreak in a military exercise of the Portuguese Army.

    PubMed

    Lopes-João, António; Costa, Inês; Mesquita, João R; Oleastro, Mónica; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2015-07-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the military populations and can diminish operational effectiveness and impede force readiness. The present study investigates the cause and the source of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred during a military exercise of the Portuguese Army, in February 2013. A retrospective investigation was performed and stool samples, food items and water were screened for common foodborne bacteria and viruses, namely Norovirus GI, Norovirus GII, Astrovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Sapovirus. From the total of 160 soldiers that participated in the military exercise 20 developed gastroenteritis (attack rate of 12.5%). Symptoms were predominantly vomiting (n=17, 85%) and diarrhoea (n=9, 45%). The first cases occurred 24-48h after drinking water from the creek, the plausible origin of the outbreak. The epidemic peak was registered 2 days after and the last cases 6 days after, upon returning to base. No pathogenic bacteria were found in stools however virological analysis revealed the presence of multiple enteropathogenic viruses, namely Norovirus GI (GI.3), Norovirus GII (GII.4 New Orleans 2009), Astrovirus and Sapovirus, as single or co-infections. Food and water samples were not tested for the presence of viruses due to exhaustion of samples on bacteriological analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a viral gastroenteritis outbreak among military personnel in the Portuguese Army. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Area Handbook for the Indian Ocean Territories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Theodore L.; And Others

    This volume, one of a series of handbooks on foreign culture, is intended as a reference tool for military and other personnel requiring an objective, comprehensive, and balanced description of the Indian Ocean Territories, namely, the two republics of Meldives and Mauritius, and the two European dependencies of Seychelles and Reunion. An…

  13. Building a Values-Informed Mental Model for New Orleans Climate Risk Management.

    PubMed

    Bessette, Douglas L; Mayer, Lauren A; Cwik, Bryan; Vezér, Martin; Keller, Klaus; Lempert, Robert J; Tuana, Nancy

    2017-01-13

    Individuals use values to frame their beliefs and simplify their understanding when confronted with complex and uncertain situations. The high complexity and deep uncertainty involved in climate risk management (CRM) lead to individuals' values likely being coupled to and contributing to their understanding of specific climate risk factors and management strategies. Most mental model approaches, however, which are commonly used to inform our understanding of people's beliefs, ignore values. In response, we developed a "Values-informed Mental Model" research approach, or ViMM, to elicit individuals' values alongside their beliefs and determine which values people use to understand and assess specific climate risk factors and CRM strategies. Our results show that participants consistently used one of three values to frame their understanding of risk factors and CRM strategies in New Orleans: (1) fostering a healthy economy, wealth, and job creation, (2) protecting and promoting healthy ecosystems and biodiversity, and (3) preserving New Orleans' unique culture, traditions, and historically significant neighborhoods. While the first value frame is common in analyses of CRM strategies, the latter two are often ignored, despite their mirroring commonly accepted pillars of sustainability. Other values like distributive justice and fairness were prioritized differently depending on the risk factor or strategy being discussed. These results suggest that the ViMM method could be a critical first step in CRM decision-support processes and may encourage adoption of CRM strategies more in line with stakeholders' values.

  14. The Relationship between Mold Exposure and Allergic Response in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Rabito, Felicia A.; Perry, Sara; Davis, W. Edward; Yau, C. Lillian; Levetin, Estelle

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. The study's objective was to examine the relation between mold/dampness exposure and mold sensitization among residents of Greater New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Methods. Patients were recruited from the Allergy Clinic of a major medical facility. Any patient receiving a skin prick test for one of 24 molds between December 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008 was eligible for the study. Exposure was assessed using standardized questionnaires. Positive mold reactivity was defined as a wheal diameter >3 mm to any mold genera. Results. Approximately 57% of participants tested positive to any indoor allergen, 10% to any mold. Over half of respondents had significant home damage, 34% reported dampness/mold in their home, half engaged in renovation, and one-third lived in a home undergoing renovation. Despite extensive exposure, and multiple measures of exposure, we found no relationship between mold/dampness exposure and sensitivity to mold allergens. Conclusions. These results along with results of earlier research indicate no excess risk of adverse respiratory effects for residents living in New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:20948880

  15. New music to an old melody: The 66th AAAAI meeting in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, Xavier

    2010-04-01

    With the images of the earthquake in Haiti still fresh in the memory, and a similar disaster just occurring in Chile, coming again to New Orleans brought back vivid images of the Hurricane Katrina disaster. The city has for the most part recovered from that experience, although molds persist in many historical and ancient buildings, putting allergy sufferers at risk as they breathe in allergens. The city of New Orleans is almost fully restored to its former glory, however, and music again pours out through doors and windows of the French Quarter, calling people in to share drinks and food while clearly stating which specific products contain or may contain traces of nuts, so that people with allergies do not need to run to their epinephrine autoinjector to treat life-threatening anaphylactic attacks. Against this background, and under heavy, rainy and windy skies, the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (AAAAI) held its 2010 annual meeting in the Ernst E. Memorial Convention Center, where 4 days packed with presentations and discussions displaced most other thoughts from the attendees' minds. Indeed, nights on Bourbon Street had never been so uncrowded as they were during the meeting, suggesting that attendees were perhaps sequestered in their hotel rooms, working with new information obtained at the meeting.

  16. Respiratory health effects associated with restoration work in post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rando, Roy J; Lefante, John J; Freyder, Laurie M; Jones, Robert N

    2012-01-01

    This study examines prevalence of respiratory conditions in New Orleans-area restoration workers after Hurricane Katrina. Between 2007 and 2010, spirometry and respiratory health and occupational questionnaire were administered to 791 New Orleans-area adults who mostly worked in the building construction and maintenance trades or custodial services. The associations between restoration work hours and lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms were examined by multiple linear regression, χ², or multiple logistic regression. 74% of participants performed post-Katrina restoration work (median time: 620 hours). Symptoms reported include episodes of transient fever/cough (29%), sinus symptoms (48%), pneumonia (3.7%), and new onset asthma (4.5%). Prevalence rate ratios for post-Katrina sinus symptoms (PRR = 1.3; CI: 1.1, 1.7) and fever and cough (PRR = 1.7; CI: 1.3, 2.4) were significantly elevated overall for those who did restoration work and prevalence increased with restoration work hours. Prevalence rate ratios with restoration work were also elevated for new onset asthma (PRR = 2.2; CI: 0.8, 6.2) and pneumonia (PRR = 1.3; CI: 0.5, 3.2) but were not statistically significant. Overall, lung function was slightly depressed but was not significantly different between those with and without restoration work exposure. Post-Katrina restoration work is associated with moderate adverse effects on respiratory health, including sinusitis and toxic pneumonitis.

  17. Community health workers leading the charge on workforce development: lessons from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Johnson, Liljana; Gibson, Kristina; Batta, Sarah E; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2014-12-01

    Academic institutions and community organizations engaged community health workers (CHWs) in creating a community-appropriate CHW workforce capacity-building program in an area without a previously established CHW professional group. From 2009 to 2010, we solicited New Orleans-based CHWs' opinions about CHW professional development through a survey, a community conference, and workgroup meetings. Throughout 2011 and 2012, we created and implemented a responsive 80-h workforce development program that used popular education techniques. We interviewed CHWs 6 months post-training to assess impressions of the course and application of skills and knowledge to practice. CHWs requested training to develop nationally-recognized core competencies including community advocacy, addresses issues unique to New Orleans, and mitigate common professional challenges. Thirty-five people completed the course. Among 25 interviewees, common themes included positive impressions of the course, application of skills and community-specific information to practice, understanding of CHWs' historical roles as community advocates, and ongoing professional challenges. Engaging CHW participation in workforce development programs is possible in areas lacking organized CHW groups. CHW insight supports development of training that addresses unique local concerns. Trained CHWs require ongoing professional support.

  18. Rapid community participatory assessment of health care in post-storm New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Springgate, Benjamin F; Allen, Charles; Jones, Catherine; Lovera, Shaula; Meyers, Diana; Campbell, Larry; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Wells, Kenneth B

    2009-12-01

    Hurricane Katrina and levee failures disrupted healthcare access for hundreds of thousands of New Orleans residents. Few models exist to explain community stakeholders' priorities for post-disaster recovery while building capacity for response. This project engaged community stakeholders in a rapid, participatory assessment of health priorities 1 year post-disaster, to inform the policy process and build capacity for recovery planning among community members. This project combined community-based participatory research methods and rapid assessment procedures to engage diverse community members in design, conduct, data interpretation, and dissemination of results. Thirty stakeholders in the health and healthcare fields were interviewed in Summer 2006, and four grassroots community discussion groups were held in New Orleans neighborhoods to assess perceptions of the disaster's impacts on healthcare access. Interview transcripts were reviewed in Summer 2006, and themes were elicited using methods rooted in grounded theory. Findings were shared at a public community feedback conference, and recovery-relevant community action steps were set in motion. Three main themes emerged from the data: (1) healthcare access challenges; (2) unmet needs of specific vulnerable populations; (3) opportunities, resources, and community adaptations to improve healthcare access. This rapid, community-based participatory assessment provided new information on diverse community members' concerns and priorities, and it produced a sustainable community-academic partnership dedicated to improving both access to care and the public's health following this major disaster.

  19. Opportunities and challenges of implementing collaborative mental health care in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Bentham, Wayne; Vannoy, Steven D; Badger, Katrina; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    To describe participants' experiences with training on, and implementation of, a collaborative care mental health approach for treating depression and anxiety in post-disaster New Orleans. Healthcare providers from three organizations that participated in the Mental Health Infrastructure and Training (MHIT) program underwent semi-structured interviews. The MHIT program provided training and clinical support to community-based agencies. Social workers, care/case managers, primary care providers, and a psychiatrist that participated in trainings. The MHIT project consisted of a series of trainings and clinical support designed in collaboration with specialists from Tulane University, RAND/UCLA, the University of Washington, and local community organizations with the goal of creating local resources to provide screening, diagnosis, triage, and treatment for depression and anxiety. Interview participants were asked to describe the impacts of training on the following areas: delivery of mental health services, ability to implement elements of the collaborative care model, care of clients/patients, and development of networks. Interview transcript analysis identified themes highlighting the opportunities and challenges of implementing a collaborative care model. Implementation of a collaborative care model for treating depression and anxiety was possible in post-Katrina/Rita New Orleans and has potential for implementation in future post-disaster recovery settings.

  20. Incidence of cleft pathology in Greater New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Goenjian, Haig A; Chiu, Ernest S; Alexander, Mary Ellen; St Hilaire, Hugo; Moses, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Reports after the 2005 Hurricane Katrina have documented an increase in stress reactions and environmental teratogens (arsenic, mold, alcohol). To assess the incidence of cleft pathology before and after the hurricane, and the distribution of cleft cases by gender and race. Retrospective chart review of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP) cases registered with the Cleft and Craniofacial Team at Children's Hospital of New Orleans, the surgical center that treated cleft cases in Greater New Orleans between 2004 and 2007. Live birth data were obtained from the Louisiana State Center for Health Statistics. The incidence of cleft cases, beginning 9 months after the hurricane (i.e., June 1, 2006) was significantly higher compared with the period before the hurricane (0.80 versus 1.42; p = .008). Within racial group comparisons showed a higher incidence among African Americans versus whites (0.42 versus 1.22; p = .01). The distribution of CL/P and CP cases by gender was significant (p = .05). The increase in the incidence of cleft cases after the hurricane may be attributable to increased stress and teratogenic factors associated with the hurricane. The increase among African Americans may have been due to comparatively higher exposure to environmental risk factors. These findings warrant further investigation to replicate the results elsewhere in the Gulf to determine whether there is a causal relationship between environmental risk factors and increased cleft pathology.

  1. Sexual risk behavior in men attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Nettles, Christopher D; Wong, Felicia; Redmann, Jean; Boschini, Jill; Pinkerton, Steven D; Ragsdale, Kathleen; Mikytuck, John J

    2007-10-01

    Previous research with travelers points to higher risk behaviors during vacations. Relative to their day-to-day lives, leisure travelers have more free time to pursue sexual activities and are likely to engage in higher rates of substance use than when at home. Risk behaviors during vacation have not been thoroughly examined in men who have sex with men (MSM), a key group at risk for HIV. The present investigation examined substance use, sexual risk behaviors, and components of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model in MSM attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans. Almost half of the sexually active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status while in New Orleans and a similar number did not disclose their own HIV status to all of their sexual partners. Drug use and excessive alcohol use were associated with unprotected sex (ps < .05). Components of the IMB model also predicted sexual risk behavior: individuals with more accurate HIV transmission information reported fewer unprotected sex acts, and motivation to engage in sexual activity on vacation was associated with more unprotected sex (ps < .05). Findings suggest that some MSM on vacation are placing themselves at risk for HIV. Traditional HIV prevention interventions do not readily lend themselves for use with transient populations. New intervention approaches are needed to reduce sexual risk behaviors in persons traveling for leisure.

  2. SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIOR IN MEN ATTENDING MARDI GRAS CELEBRATIONS IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

    PubMed Central

    Benotsch, Eric G.; Nettles, Christopher D.; Wong, Felicia; Redmann, Jean; Boschini, Jill; Pinkerton, Steven D.; Ragsdale, Kathleen; Mikytuck, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research with travelers points to higher risk behaviors during vacations. Relative to their day-to-day lives, leisure travelers have more free time to pursue sexual activities and are likely to engage in higher rates of substance use than when at home. Risk behaviors during vacation have not been thoroughly examined in men who have sex with men (MSM), a key group at risk for HIV. The present investigation examined substance use, sexual risk behaviors, and components of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model in MSM attending Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans. Almost half of the sexually active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status while in New Orleans and a similar number did not disclose their own HIV status to all of their sexual partners. Drug use and excessive alcohol use were associated with unprotected sex (ps < .05). Components of the IMB model also predicted sexual risk behavior: individuals with more accurate HIV transmission information reported fewer unprotected sex acts, and motivation to engage in sexual activity on vacation was associated with more unprotected sex (ps < .05). Findings suggest that some MSM on vacation are placing themselves at risk for HIV. Traditional HIV prevention interventions do not readily lend themselves for use with transient populations. New intervention approaches are needed to reduce sexual risk behaviors in persons traveling for leisure. PMID:17922205

  3. Sea-Level Rise and Subsidence: Implications for Flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, V.R.; Zilkoski, D.B.; Hart, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Global sea-level rise is projected to accelerate two-to four-fold during the next century, increasing storm surge and shoreline retreat along low-lying, unconsolidated coastal margins. The Mississippi River Deltaic Plain in southeastern Louisiana is particularly vulnerable to erosion and inundation due to the rapid deterioration of coastal barriers combined with relatively high rates of land subsidence. Land-surface altitude data collected in the leveed areas of the New Orleans metropolitan region during five survey epochs between 1951 and 1995 indicated mean annual subsidence of 5 millimeters per year. Preliminary results of other studies detecting the regional movement of the north-central Gulf Coast indicate that the rate may be as much as 1 centimeter per year. Considering the rate of subsidence and the mid-range estimate of sea-level rise during the next 100 years (480 millimeters), the areas of New Orleans and vicinity that are presently 1.5 to 3 meters below mean sea level will likely be 2.5 to 4.0 meters or more below mean sea level by 2100.

  4. African Americans’ Decisions Not to Evacuate New Orleans Before Hurricane Katrina: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Keith; Xirasagar, Sudha; Miller, Nancy; Bowen, Shelly Ann; Glover, Saundra; Piper, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the psychosocial and personal factors that influenced African Americans’ decision not to evacuate New Orleans, La, before Hurricane Katrina’s landfall. Methods. We conducted 6 focus groups with 53 African Americans from New Orleans who were evacuated to Columbia, SC, within 2 months of Hurricane Katrina. Results. The major themes identified related to participants’ decision to not evacuate were as follows: (1) perceived susceptability, including optimism about the outcome because of riding out past hurricanes at home and religious faith; (2) perceived severity of the hurricane because of inconsistent evacuation orders; (3) barriers because of financial constraints and neighborhood crime; and (4) perceived racism and inequities. Conclusions. Federal, state, and local government disaster preparedness plans should specify criteria for timely evacuation orders, needed resources, and their allocation (including a decentralized distribution system for cash or vouchers for gas and incidentals during evacuation) and culturally sensitive logistic planning for the evacuation of minority, low-income, and underserved communities. Perceptions of racism and inequities warrant further investigation. PMID:17413086

  5. Anthropogenic and geologic influences on subsidence in the vicinity of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; An, Karen; Blom, Ronald G.; Kent, Joshua D.; Ivins, Erik R.; Bekaert, David

    2016-05-01

    New measurements of ongoing subsidence of land proximal to the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, and including areas around the communities of Norco and Lutcher upriver along the Mississippi are reported. The rates of vertical motion are derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) applied to Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data acquired on 16 June 2009 and 2 July 2012. The subsidence trends are similar to those reported for 2002-2004 in parts of New Orleans where observations overlap, in particular in Michoud, the 9th Ward, and Chalmette, but are measured at much higher spatial resolution (6 m). The spatial associations of cumulative surface movements suggest that the most likely drivers of subsidence are groundwater withdrawal and surficial drainage/dewatering activities. High subsidence rates are observed localized around some major industrial facilities and can affect nearby flood control infrastructure. Substantial subsidence is observed to occur rapidly from shallow compaction in highly localized areas, which is why it could be missed in subsidence surveys relying on point measurements at limited locations.

  6. Multiple metal accumulation as a factor in learning achievement within various New Orleans elementary school communities.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Berry, Kenneth J; Mielke, Paul W; Powell, Eric T; Gonzales, Christopher R

    2005-01-01

    In New Orleans, the elementary school system is divided into attendance districts with established boundaries that define student enrollment among schools. This study concerns environmental quality as defined by amount of soil metals (Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni, Mn, Cu, Co, Cr, and V) in attendance district elementary school communities (n = 111) paired with learning achievement as measured by individual test scores (n = 32,741) of students enrolled at each school. The Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) 4th grade scores measure learning achievement for English language arts, social studies, mathematics, and science. The best fit between environmental quality and higher learning achievement is found to be inversely associated with the sum of the metals or multiple metal accumulations (MMA) in New Orleans communities. The P values for MMA partitions for ELA, SOC, MAT, and SCI are 0.57 x 10(-7), 0.29 x 10(-8), 0.41 x 10(-6), and 0.17 x 10(-8), respectively. Efforts to prevent childhood metal exposure should improve New Orleanians' learning achievement as measured by the LEAP scores and thereby enhance the socioeconomic situation in contaminated communities. This study establishes global relationships between LEAP scores in schools and soil metal concentrations in school neighborhoods. However, these data do not allow relating of the LEAP scores with metal levels for individual students.

  7. Homosexuality and the military.

    PubMed

    Jones, F D; Koshes, R J

    1995-01-01

    Homosexuality has remained a focus of military concern despite society's increasing acceptance of homosexual men and women and evidence that homosexuals have served and currently serve in the U.S. armed forces. President Clinton has stated a determination to end discrimination against homosexuals in the military and reverse the exclusionary policy on homosexuals serving in the armed forces. The authors review the history of the policy of the U.S. military to exclude homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The data for this study were drawn from military archives and court cases that have shaped U.S. policy excluding homosexuals from serving in the armed forces. The three main arguments are addressed: 1) homosexuality is a mental disorder rendering a person unstable, 2) homosexual service members are a source of poor morale for military units, and 3) homosexual service members are poor security risks. Considerable evidence demonstrates that homosexuals in the military pose no documented threat to national security and show no evidence of poor work performance. Although issues of morale and fraternization in the military remain challenges, no evidence in this review supports the exclusion of homosexuals from service in the U.S. armed forces.

  8. Ocean Fertilization and Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2008-12-01

    It has been suggested that ocean fertilization could help diminish ocean acidification. Here, we quantitatively evaluate this suggestion. Ocean fertilization is one of several ocean methods proposed to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The basic idea of this method is to enhance the biological uptake of atmospheric CO2 by stimulating net phytoplankton growth through the addition of iron to the surface ocean. Concern has been expressed that ocean fertilization may not be very effective at reducing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and may produce unintended environmental consequences. The rationale for thinking that ocean fertilization might help diminish ocean acidification is that dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in the near-surface equilibrate with the atmosphere in about a year. If ocean fertilization could reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations, it would also reduce surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations, and thus diminish the degree of ocean acidification. To evaluate this line of thinking, we use a global ocean carbon cycle model with a simple representation of marine biology and investigate the maximum potential effect of ocean fertilization on ocean carbonate chemistry. We find that the effect of ocean fertilization on ocean acidification depends, in part, on the context in which ocean fertilization is performed. With fixed emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere, ocean fertilization moderately mitigates changes in ocean carbonate chemistry near the ocean surface, but at the expense of further acidifying the deep ocean. Under the SRES A2 CO2 emission scenario, by year 2100 simulated atmospheric CO2, global mean surface pH, and saturation state of aragonite is 965 ppm, 7.74, and 1.55 for the scenario without fertilization and 833 ppm, 7.80, and 1.71 for the scenario with 100-year (between 2000 and 2100) continuous fertilization for the global ocean (For comparison, pre-industrial global mean surface pH and saturation state of

  9. 78 FR 77592 - Safety Zone; Lower Mississippi River Mile 94.1-Mile 95.1; New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lower Mississippi River Mile 94.1-Mile 95.1; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Information The Coast Guard is issuing this final rule without prior notice and opportunity to comment...

  10. Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the technical assistance that the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, provided to New Orleans, Louisiana, which helped the city incorporate energy efficiency into its rebuilding efforts for K-12 schools and homes following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. NREL also provided support and analysis on energy policy efforts.

  11. Chemical quality of depositional sediments and associated soils in New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula following Hurricane Katrina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, C.; Witt, E.C.; Wang, Jingyuan; Shaver, D.K.; Summers, D.; Filali-Meknassi, Y.; Shi, H.; Luna, R.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Louisiana peninsula south of New Orleans on Aug 29, 2005. The resulting storm surge caused numerous levy breaches in the parishes of New Orleans as well as on the Louisiana peninsula. This study was conducted to determine the concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents in sediments and associated soils in New Orleans parishes and the Louisiana peninsula after the floodwaters had been removed and/or receded following Hurricane Katrina. A total of 46 sediment and soil samples were analyzed that were collected throughout New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula. Approximately 20% of the sediment samples were analyzed, including shallow sediment samples from locations that included the top and beneath automobiles, in residential and commercial areas, and near refineries. Gasoline constituents, pesticides, and leachable heavy metals were analyzed using headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), organic extraction GC/MS, and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, respectively. A significant number of samples had leachable As and Pb concentrations in excess of drinking water standards. The remaining metals analyzed (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, and V) generally had much lower leachable levels. Of the gasoline constituents, only benzene was observed above the limit of detection (of 5 ??g/kg), with no samples observed as being above the method detection limits of 10 ??g/kg. For the 18 pesticides analyzed, most were in the nondetectable range and all were in trace amounts that were orders of magnitude below regulatory guidelines. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  12. From 9/11 to 8/29: Post-Disaster Recovery and Rebuilding in New York and New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Kevin Fox; Greenberg, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the process of post-disaster recovery and rebuilding in New York City since 9/11 and in New Orleans since the Hurricane Katrina disaster (8/29). As destabilizing events, 9/11 and 8/29 forced a rethinking of the major categories, concepts and theories that long dominated disaster research. We analyze the form, trajectory and…

  13. 77 FR 19003 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone, Caledonia, Essex and Orleans Counties, VT, Under Alternative Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Derby Line CBP port of entry. The proposed zone would include three ``magnet'' sites as follows... (Orleans County). The initial ``usage-driven'' site is as follows: Proposed Site 4 (26 acres)--AnC-BIO... the possible exemption of one magnet site from the ``sunset'' time limits that generally apply...

  14. The Variation in Student Achievement and Behavior within a Portfolio Management Model: Early Results from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachin, Andrew J.; Welsh, Richard Osbourne; Brewer, Dominic James

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of states experimented with alternative governance structures in response to pressure to raise student achievement. Post-Katrina experimentation in New Orleans was widely regarded as a model example of new governance reforms and provided a unique opportunity to learn about the variation in student achievement and behavior within…

  15. "How'd You Come out?": In New Orleans, the Library Serves Despite Struggles, and Help Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) struggled with a fraction of its former staff, limited hours, and a massive fundraising challenge after Hurricane Katrina slammed the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005. While previously 171 people staffed locations, only 40 employees plus a smaller--and shifting--cadre of…

  16. The Variation in Student Achievement and Behavior within a Portfolio Management Model: Early Results from New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachin, Andrew J.; Welsh, Richard Osbourne; Brewer, Dominic James

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of states experimented with alternative governance structures in response to pressure to raise student achievement. Post-Katrina experimentation in New Orleans was widely regarded as a model example of new governance reforms and provided a unique opportunity to learn about the variation in student achievement and behavior within…

  17. New Orleans on His Mind: A Rhode Island Choral Director Brings Katrina Victims Music--And Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    Westerly, Rhode Island, is a long way from New Orleans. But the physical distance has not stopped David DeAngelis, choral director at Westerly High School, from providing his students with one heck of a lesson: The opportunity to truly connect with others through music. Under DeAngelis' direction, Westerly's various vocal ensembles have held…

  18. A Public Private Partnership to Reopen Public Schools in New Orleans: The Edward Hynes Elementary School as a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The State of Louisiana and the City of New Orleans have a daunting task before them. They must restore community access to public education. It will not be enough to repair and rebuild buildings. The educational programs and staff must also be redeveloped. However, the improvements to public school facilities is a critical first step in…

  19. The "I" of the Storm: Teaching English and Helping Students and Instructors Cope in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This essay is entitled "The 'I' of the Storm" in order to stress the very personal nature of teaching in the immediate, post-Katrina semester of Fall 2005. The University of New Orleans (UNO) was the only university in the city to open that semester, and many traumatized instructors, the author included, were serving the thousands of…

  20. USGS environmental characterization of flood sediments left in the New Orleans area after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005--Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Lovelace, John K.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Demas, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The flooding in the greater New Orleans area that resulted from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in September, 2005, left behind accumulations of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces. These flood sediment deposits have been the focus of extensive study by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) due to concerns that the sediments may contain elevated levels of heavy metals, organic contaminants, and microbes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is characterizing a limited number of flood sediment samples that were collected on September 15-16 and October 6-7, 2005, from the greater New Orleans area by personnel from the USGS Louisiana Water Science Center in Baton Rouge. Small samples (< 3 pints each) of wet to dry flood sediment were collected from 11 localities around downtown New Orleans on September 15, 2005, and two large samples (40 pints each) of wet flood sediment were collected from the Chalmette area on September 16. Twelve additional samples (8-10 pints each) were collected from New Orleans, Slidell, Rigolets, and Violet on October 6 and 7. The USGS characterization studies of these flood sediments are designed to produce data and interpretations regarding how the sediments and any contained contaminants may respond to environmental processes. This information will be of use to cleanup managers and DoI/USGS scientists assessing environmental impacts of the hurricanes and subsequent cleanup activities.

  1. New Orleans on His Mind: A Rhode Island Choral Director Brings Katrina Victims Music--And Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    Westerly, Rhode Island, is a long way from New Orleans. But the physical distance has not stopped David DeAngelis, choral director at Westerly High School, from providing his students with one heck of a lesson: The opportunity to truly connect with others through music. Under DeAngelis' direction, Westerly's various vocal ensembles have held…

  2. 78 FR 36660 - Safety Zone; Mississippi River Mile 95.5-Mile 96.5; New Orleans, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520). 5. Federalism A rule has implications for... rule, call or email Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) Brandon Sullivan, Sector New Orleans, U.S. Coast Guard...) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). This provision authorizes an agency to...

  3. The Mass Termination of Black Veteran Teachers in New Orleans: Cultural Politics, the Education Market, and Its Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buras, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    This article chronicles the mass firing of veteran teachers in New Orleans, most of them African American, following Hurricane Katrina. The role of Teach for America in providing inexperienced White teacher recruits from outside the community is critiqued. Countering the ahistorical discourse that blames Black veteran teachers for the shortcomings…

  4. The Mass Termination of Black Veteran Teachers in New Orleans: Cultural Politics, the Education Market, and Its Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buras, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    This article chronicles the mass firing of veteran teachers in New Orleans, most of them African American, following Hurricane Katrina. The role of Teach for America in providing inexperienced White teacher recruits from outside the community is critiqued. Countering the ahistorical discourse that blames Black veteran teachers for the shortcomings…

  5. Cultural Meaning and Hip-Hop Fashion in the African-American Male Youth Subculture of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Vern Kenneth; Marina, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of African-American youth subculture in a New Orleans high school. The paper contends that youth subculture remains an important construct to situate stylistic resistance among subaltern groups like urban black youth that confront demands for conformity from representatives of institutional…

  6. Job Training and Education of Disconnected Young Adults in New Orleans: Preliminary Analysis of Federal Funding Streams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Baptist Community Ministries asked The Finance Project to examine the expenditure of federal funds for job training and education of New Orleans' disconnected young adults (i.e., persons between ages 16 and 24 who are not in school or work). Four major sources of federal funding for job training and education of this population are available: the…

  7. Cultural Meaning and Hip-Hop Fashion in the African-American Male Youth Subculture of New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Vern Kenneth; Marina, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of African-American youth subculture in a New Orleans high school. The paper contends that youth subculture remains an important construct to situate stylistic resistance among subaltern groups like urban black youth that confront demands for conformity from representatives of institutional…

  8. Chemical quality of depositional sediments and associated soils in New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Adams, Craig; Witt, Emitt C; Wang, Jianmin; Shaver, David K; Summers, David; Filali-Meknassi, Youssef; Shi, Honglan; Luna, Ronaldo; Anderson, Neil

    2007-05-15

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Louisiana peninsula south of New Orleans on Aug 29, 2005. The resulting storm surge caused numerous levy breaches in the parishes of New Orleans as well as on the Louisiana peninsula. This study was conducted to determine the concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents in sediments and associated soils in New Orleans parishes and the Louisiana peninsula after the floodwaters had been removed and/or receded following Hurricane Katrina. A total of 46 sediment and soil samples were analyzed that were collected throughout New Orleans and the Louisiana peninsula. Approximately 20% of the sediment samples were analyzed, including shallow sediment samples from locations that included the top and beneath automobiles, in residential and commercial areas, and near refineries. Gasoline constituents, pesticides, and leachable heavy metals were analyzed using headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), organic extraction GC/MS, and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, respectively. A significant number of samples had leachable As and Pb concentrations in excess of drinking water standards. The remaining metals analyzed (i.e., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, and V) generally had much lower leachable levels. Of the gasoline constituents, only benzene was observed above the limit of detection (of 5 microg/kg), with no samples observed as being above the method detection limits of 10 microg/kg. For the 18 pesticides analyzed, most were in the nondetectable range and all were in trace amounts that were orders of magnitude below regulatory guidelines.

  9. From 9/11 to 8/29: Post-Disaster Recovery and Rebuilding in New York and New Orleans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Kevin Fox; Greenberg, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the process of post-disaster recovery and rebuilding in New York City since 9/11 and in New Orleans since the Hurricane Katrina disaster (8/29). As destabilizing events, 9/11 and 8/29 forced a rethinking of the major categories, concepts and theories that long dominated disaster research. We analyze the form, trajectory and…

  10. An overview of Arctic Ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Dan

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the underwater acoustics of the Arctic Ocean. It discusses the main features of the underwater acoustic environment and how they are so strongly affected by the presence of ice cover. The paper also discusses the history of Arctic Ocean acoustics research, how the motivation was originally military in character during the Cold War and how it changed to being driven by environmental considerations today. Originally, the physics of the Arctic Ocean was studied in order to predict its acoustic properties, and now acoustic techniques are used to help understand its physical environment.

  11. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  12. A Fresh Start for New Orleans' Children: Improving Education after Katrina. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate. One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session on Examining the Education System of New Orleans (July 14, 2006, New Orleans, LA). Senate Hearing 109-626

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the education system of New Orleans. Statements were presented by: Honorable Lamar Alexander, Chairman, Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development; Honorable Mary L. Landrieu, U.S. Senator from Louisiana; Honorable Richard Burr, U.S. Senator from North Carolina; Linda Johnson, President,…

  13. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  14. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  15. Military usage of connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, R.

    1972-01-01

    Military specifications with general purpose parameters and termination data covering flat connectors and flat cables are proposed. The material, design, coating, and insulation are discussed, and drafts of specifications for flat cables including quality assurance provisions, and inspection are presented.

  16. Oceanic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    1997-01-01

    For many years, merchant ships and the naval fleets of various countries have been the major source of data over and in the open ocean. Oceanographic research experiments and process studies in the field have also contributed to the climatological data bases for the global ocean, but, for the most part, these have been limited in duration and extent. However, over the last 10 years under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program and the International Geosphere Biosphere Program the role of the oceans in global and climate change has taken on increased significance. This has created a need for a considerably improved understanding of the seasonal, interannual, decadal and longer time-scale variability of the physical and biogeochemical attributes of the global ocean. As a result, over the past 10 years several major international field programs have been implemented and have had a tremendous impact on the number of in situ observations obtained for the global ocean. The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program, the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) were designed with observational, modelling, and process study components aimed at analyzing different aspects of the ocean's role in the coupled climate system. In parallel with the field programs, continuous space-based observations of sea surface temperature, sea surface topography, and sea surface winds spanning nearly a decade or longer have become a reality. During this same time period, numerical ocean models and computational power have advanced to the point where the oceanographic observations, both in situ and remotely sensed, can be assimilated into numerical ocean models in order to provide a four-dimensional (x-y-z-t) depiction of the evolving state of the global ocean.

  17. Change in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A survey was made of much of the current literature on the behavioral aspects of organizational change and how it pertains to the military. The survey is broad in nature and extends to processes for affecting change presently in use in the armed services. The study further describes some of the various opinions expressed in current articles on the affect of societal changes on the military.

  18. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-04

    area. Convinced of its tec ity, the USA still hopesXto achieve the unachievable—to gain ty over the Soviet Union and to militarize outer space... militarism was a victory for progress over reaction. It demonstrated the invincible strength of the socialist system and its great advantages over...The scientific-technical progress in military affairs, progress that has been stimulated by the military-industrial complex, a union of militarism and

  19. Evaluating Military Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    has also compared the out-of-pocket health costs of families who use its preferred-provider organization ( PPO ) or fee-for-service options with those...comparison controlled for demographic differ- ences between military and civilian families. EVALUATING MILITARY COMPENSATION 17using PPO plans. In 2005...governments would have to absorb the difference. A PP E N D IX A Total Compensation for the Median Enlisted MemberUsing a different approach from

  20. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    o Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky, (Appendix 4) o Window to Hope: Evaluating a...Managing Suicide Risk in Primary Care . Presented at Community Based Outpatient Clinic, Appleton, WI, October 11, 2011. Gutierrez, P. M., Suicide...Appendix Pages: 32-34 A4. Suicide Bereavement in Military and their Families, Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky Appendix Pages: 35

  1. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  2. Resilience among military youth.

    PubMed

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Much research on children in military families has taken a deficit approach--that is, it has portrayed these children as a population susceptible to psychological damage from the hardships of military life, such as frequent moves and separation from their parents during deployment. But M. Ann Easterbrooks, Kenneth Ginsburg, and Richard M. Lerner observe that most military children turn out just fine. They argue that, to better serve military children, we must understand the sources of strength that help them cope with adversity and thrive. In other words, we must understand their resilience. The authors stress that resilience is not a personal trait but a product of the relationships between children and the people and resources around them. In this sense, military life, along with its hardships, offers many sources for resilience--for example, a strong sense of belonging to a supportive community with a shared mission and values. Similarly, children whose parents are deployed may build their self-confidence by taking on new responsibilities in the family, and moving offers opportunities for adventure and personal growth. As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan drew more and more service members into combat, the military and civilian groups alike rolled out dozens of programs aimed at boosting military children's resilience. Although the authors applaud this effort, they also note that few of these programs have been based on scientific evidence of what works, and few have been rigorously evaluated for their effectiveness. They call for a program of sustained research to boost our understanding of military children's resilience.

  3. Movies and the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    motion picture history- movies (with two exceptions discussed below) were not made about the war. Anti-war films , and films with...of this aberration. Motion pictures are made to make money, and producers of films about the military make movies which reflect the anti-military...screen. Much of our culture is defined and transmitted by movies .2 The images implanted in the mind by motion pictures are vivid and lasting.

  4. Military Air Cargo Containerization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 : ."•" ’* ■- ’ DEPARTMENT OF...Approved to public release; Distribution UnHmlted ? DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED 1 AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 MILITARY AIR CARGO CONTAINERIZATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...PAPER Joseph W. Mancy, Major, USAF AFIT/ GMO /LAL/96J-4 19960617 134 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The views expressed in this

  5. Military Production Urgencies System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-08-17

    echelons. I4. To guide preparation of specific urgency lists for the time -phased demands of supporting industrial resources. 5. To indicate the...AD-A270 736 ELECTE aeprlnt Incorporating Transmittal 61-2 Au-uast 17, 1955 Department of Defense Directive SUBJECT Military Production Urgencies ...Departaent of Defense Military Production Urgencies System which will provide authoritative information for guidance as to the relative urgency of desired

  6. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  7. Military Personnel Law Deskbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    February 2006). B. Purpose of the Physical Disability Evaluation System (PDES). 1. Personnel Management. a. Effective and Fit Military b. Quality ...discipline, or morale of troops on the base under his command.”). 3. Limitations. There must be some nexus between the authority sought and the effect on...preparing group for and steeling it to violent action). A-7 (2) Military Standard: Speech which undermines the effectiveness of response to command

  8. Report on the Audit of Routing of DoD Freight Shipments by the Military Traffic Management Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    total freight transportation cost), was required to be routed by the Military Traffic Management Command ( MTMC ). The remaining 1.13 million shipments...single manager operating agency for military traffic, land transportation, and common-user ocean terminals, MTMC is responsible for directing

  9. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  10. Demography and pathology of an urban slave population from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Owsley, D W; Orser, C E; Mann, R W; Moore-Jansen, P H; Montgomery, R L

    1987-10-01

    Twenty-nine skeletons from the first cemetery in New Orleans provide significant new information about urban slavery in America. Dating as early as 1720 and used perhaps as late as 1810, the cemetery provided an identifiable sample of two whites, 13 blacks, one individual of possible Indian-white ancestry, and two possibly mulatto individuals. Numerous skeletal and dental lesions were noted in the series, and historical information was used in conjunction with the physical data to draw conclusions about rates and patterns of mortality. Pathological changes indicate that the cemetery contained individuals representing two slave occupational groups, house servants and laborers. This research provides information in the expanding area of Afro-American biohistorical research.

  11. Effect of bike lane infrastructure improvements on ridership in one New Orleans neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kathryn M; Rice, Janet; Gustat, Jeanette; Ruley, Jennifer; Spriggs, Aubrey; Johnson, Carolyn

    2013-02-01

    Incorporating cycling into daily life is one way to increase physical activity. This study examined the impact of building new bike lanes in New Orleans to determine whether more people were cycling on the street and with the flow of traffic after bike lanes were built. Through direct observation of one intervention and two adjacent streets, observers counted cyclists riding on the street and sidewalk, with and against traffic, before and after installation of the lanes. Data were tallied separately for adults, children, males, females, and by race for each location. There was an increase in cyclists on all three streets after the installation of the bike lanes, with the largest increase on the street with the new lane. Additionally, the proportion of riders cycling with traffic increased after the lanes were striped. Bike lanes can have a positive impact in creating a healthy neighborhood.

  12. The Distribution and Movement of American Cockroaches in Urban Niches of New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Carlson, John C; Rabito, Felicia A; Werthmann, Derek; Fox, Mark

    2017-10-01

    American cockroaches are an important source of household allergens in tropical and semitropical climates. To determine which outdoor niches produce American cockroaches, traps were placed at 40 homes in New Orleans to collect nymphs. Nymphs were collected from the sewers, yards, and within the homes themselves. To compare sewers and yards as sources of cockroaches entering homes, adult cockroaches were collected, marked, and released into yards and sewers. No sewer-released cockroaches were collected in homes. Cockroaches released into yards were collected in the homes, suggesting that yards, rather than sewers, are a more important source niche. A field trial applying boric acid granules to the yard was performed in an effort to reduce entry of cockroaches. There was a significant reduction in the cockroach antigen collected in intervention homes compared with controls.

  13. How natural disasters change natural patterns: coccidioidomycosis imported to New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Schieffelin, John S; Torrellas, Mariclara; Lartchenko, Serge; Gill, Farrukh; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; McGoey, Robin

    2013-01-01

    To identify cases of coccidioidomycosis in the New Orleans area following Hurricane Katrina. We performed clinical surveillance across multiple medical disciplines and among three major teaching hospitals in the greater NOLA area in the posthurricane period. Each case involved a detailed history, physical examination, laboratory evaluations, and, in the two fatal cases, a comprehensive postmortem examination. We identified four cases of coccidioidomycosis during the posthurricane period: three with disseminated disease and one with disease limited to the respiratory tract. Two patients were co-infected with HIV and died during hospitalization; one was only diagnosed at autopsy. The two immunocompetent patients responded well to antimicrobial therapy. A heightened awareness of non-endemic disease is warranted in the practice of postdisaster clinical medicine and public health, as demonstrated by the appearance of coccidioidomycosis in the traditionally nonendemic NOLA area following Hurricane Katrina.

  14. Incidence of pregnancy with the IUD in private practice in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Doyle, L L; Barclay, D L; Winkel, C

    1970-02-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 54 members of the New Orleans Gynecological and Obstetrical Society to determine how many local obstetricians were using IUDs and with what results. 24 of the 44 responding physicians had been inserting either a Lippes loop, a Margulies spiral, or a Saf-T-Coil for 6 to 48 months. Out of an approximate total of 1000 women there were 20 reported pregnancies (6 with the loop and 7 each with the spiral and coil) constituting a pregnancy rate of 1.4 per 100 woman years. In almost half of the cases the interval from insertion to pregnancy was 1 year or more. Of the 20 pregnancies, 1 was lost to followup, 5 were still in progress, 3 had been terminated by spontaneous abortion, and 1 had been terminated by cesarean section for cephalopelvic disproportion. There were no reported complications in the other pregnancies.

  15. Anthropometric history of the French Revolution in the Province of Orleans.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Hermann

    2011-07-01

    We estimate the trend in average height of the population of the French province Orleans from 1715 to the beginning of the 19th century using data on recruits who were drafted either through a lottery system or through general conscription. After controlling for age, residence, and occupation, we find a general decline in the biological standard of living in the decades before the French Revolution. The results support a Ricardian-Malthusian interpretation of the causes of the French Revolution. In the debate 'Revolution de la misère ou de la prospérité' our findings support the side which argues that the French Revolution was a culmination of a long-lasting economic malaise during the final phases of the Ancien Régime.

  16. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - EARTH-SKY VIEW - NEW ORLEANS - OUTER SPACE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-03

    S66-37910 (3 June 1966) --- The Mississippi River delta, and Gulf coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida as seen from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during its first revolution of Earth. The Florida peninsula is seen at upper right corner of the picture. Lake Pontchartrain is a lower left. New Orleans is located between the lake and the U-shaped bend in the river. Large bay at top left center is Mobile Bay. The next bay to the east is Pensacola Bay. Cape San Blas near Apalachicola, Florida, is the point of land at top center of the picture. Note alluvial deposit at the mouths of the Mississippi. The image was taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Metal distributions in New Orleans following hurricanes Katrina and Rita: A continuation study.

    PubMed

    Cobb, George P; Abel, Michael T; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; Kendall, Ronald J; Marsland, Eric J; Anderson, Todd A; Leftwich, Blair D; Zak, John C; Presley, Steven M

    2006-08-01

    In late October 2005, twenty-seven metals were determined in soils and sediment layers deposited by floodwaters (flood sediments) within New Orleans, Louisiana. Samples originated from 43 sites along four transects, at an industrial canal, and near the Superdome. The sampling design encompassed flooded and nonflooded areas as well as differing economic strata within the city. Results from this effort confirmed findings of our previous study designed to quantify contaminant profiles in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The expanded sampling from this most recent investigation revealed that arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) concentrations exceeded United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) soil screening criteria indiscriminately throughout the city. However, As and Pb concentrations were lower along St. Charles Avenue, an area largely unaffected by hurricane related flooding. Toxicant concentrations did not exceed soil screening criteria values for lead within any flood sediments or for 32 of 37 soil samples, but arsenic concentrations in 40 of 43 samples exceeded screening criteria.

  18. Respiratory Health Effects Associated with Restoration Work in Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Roy J.; Lefante, John J.; Freyder, Laurie M.; Jones, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study examines prevalence of respiratory conditions in New Orleans-area restoration workers after Hurricane Katrina. Methods. Between 2007 and 2010, spirometry and respiratory health and occupational questionnaire were administered to 791 New Orleans-area adults who mostly worked in the building construction and maintenance trades or custodial services. The associations between restoration work hours and lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms were examined by multiple linear regression, χ2, or multiple logistic regression. Results. 74% of participants performed post-Katrina restoration work (median time: 620 hours). Symptoms reported include episodes of transient fever/cough (29%), sinus symptoms (48%), pneumonia (3.7%), and new onset asthma (4.5%). Prevalence rate ratios for post-Katrina sinus symptoms (PRR = 1.3; CI: 1.1, 1.7) and fever and cough (PRR = 1.7; CI: 1.3, 2.4) were significantly elevated overall for those who did restoration work and prevalence increased with restoration work hours. Prevalence rate ratios with restoration work were also elevated for new onset asthma (PRR = 2.2; CI: 0.8, 6.2) and pneumonia (PRR = 1.3; CI: 0.5, 3.2) but were not statistically significant. Overall, lung function was slightly depressed but was not significantly different between those with and without restoration work exposure. Conclusions. Post-Katrina restoration work is associated with moderate adverse effects on respiratory health, including sinusitis and toxic pneumonitis. PMID:23365586

  19. Business Return in New Orleans: Decision Making Amid Post-Katrina Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Nina S. N.; Pace, Kelley; Campanella, Richard; LeSage, James; Arenas, Helbert

    2009-01-01

    Background Empirical observations on how businesses respond after a major catastrophe are rare, especially for a catastrophe as great as Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. We analyzed repeated telephone surveys of New Orleans businesses conducted in December 2005, June 2006, and October 2007 to understand factors that influenced decisions to re-open amid post-disaster uncertainty. Methodology/Principal Findings Businesses in the group of professional, scientific, and technical services reopened the fastest in the near term, but differences in the rate of reopening for businesses stratified by type became indistinguishable in the longer term (around two years later). A reopening rate of 65% was found for all businesses by October 2007. Discriminant analysis showed significant differences in responses reflecting their attitudes about important factors between businesses that reopened and those that did not. Businesses that remained closed at the time of our third survey (two years after Katrina) ranked levee protection as the top concern immediately after Katrina, but damage to their premises and financing became major concerns in subsequent months reflected in the later surveys. For businesses that had opened (at the time of our third survey), infrastructure protection including levee, utility, and communications were the main concerns mentioned in surveys up to the third survey, when the issue of crime became their top concern. Conclusions/Significance These findings underscore the need to have public policy and emergency plans in place prior to the actual disaster, such as infrastructure protection, so that the policy can be applied in a timely manner before business decisions to return or close are made. Our survey results, which include responses from both open and closed businesses, overcome the “survivorship bias” problem and provide empirical observations that should be useful to improve micro-level spatial economic

  20. Resilience in post-Katrina New Orleans, Louisiana: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Glandon, Douglas M; Muller, Jocelyn; Almedom, Astier M

    2008-12-01

    Much scholarly and practitioner attention to the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the city of New Orleans, Louisiana has focused on the failures of government disaster prevention and management at all levels, often overlooking the human strength and resourcefulness observed in individuals and groups among the worst-affected communities. This preliminary study sought to investigate human resilience in the city of New Orleans, State of Louisiana, eighteen months after Hurricane Katrina struck the Mississippi delta region. The Sense of Coherence scale, short form (SOC-13) was administered to a sample of 41 residents of Lower Ninth Ward and adjacent Wards who had been displaced by Hurricane Katrina but were either living in or visiting their home area during March 2007. Study participants were recruited through the local branch of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), a nation-wide grassroots organization whose mission is to promote the housing rights of low and moderate-income individuals and families across the USA and in several other countries. Those who had returned to their homes had significantly higher SOC scores compared to those who were still displaced (p<0.001). Among the latter, those who were members of ACORN scored significantly higher than non-members (p<0.005), and their SOC-13 scores were not significantly different from the scores of study participants who had returned home (including both members and non-members of ACORN). The findings of this preliminary study concur with previous reports in the literature on the deleterious impact of displacement on individual and collective resilience to disasters. Relevant insight gleaned from the qualitative data gathered during the course of administering the SOC-13 scale compensate for the limitations of the small sample size as they draw attention to the importance of the study participants' sources of social support. Possible avenues for further research are outlined.

  1. The influence of the WIC food package changes on the retail food environment in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald; O'Malley, Keelia; Dunaway, Lauren Futrell; Bodor, J Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food package changes on availability of healthy foods in small stores. Pre-post comparison group design with repeat in-store observations. New Orleans. Small stores (n = 102; 77% of total) were visited in 2009. Of these, 91% were observed again in 2010, including both WIC (n = 27) and non-WIC (n = 66) stores. The 2009 WIC food package changes to include healthier foods. Change in store availability of fruits, vegetables, lower-fat milks, whole wheat bread, and brown rice. Change in number of varieties and shelf length of fruits and vegetables. Difference-in-differences analysis using logit models for change in availability and regression models for change in number of varieties or shelf length. The WIC stores were more likely to improve availability of lower-fat milks than non-WIC stores (adjusted odds ratio, 5.0, 95% confidence interval, 1.2-21.0). An even greater relative improvement was seen with whole grains. The WIC stores showed a relative increase in number of varieties of fresh fruits (0.9 ± 0.3; P < .01) and shelf length of vegetables (1.2 ± 0.4 meters; P < .01). Results suggest that WIC changes improved the availability of healthy foods in small stores in New Orleans. Similar changes throughout the country could have a significant impact on neighborhood food environments. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gunshot wounds to the spine in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Trahan, Jayme; Serban, Daniel; Tender, Gabriel C

    2013-11-01

    Gunshot wounds (GSW) to the spine represent a major health concern within today's society. Our study assessed the epidemiologic characteristics of patients with GSW to the spine treated in New Orleans. A retrospective chart review was performed from January 2007 through November 2011 on all the patients who were seen in the emergency room and diagnosed with a gunshot wound to the spine. Epidemiologic factors, as well as the results of admission toxicology screening, were noted. Outcome analysis was performed on patients undergoing conservative versus operative management for their injuries. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the ASIA classification system. Complications related to initial injury, neurosurgical procedures, and hospital stay were noted. A total of 147 patients were enrolled. Of those diagnosed with a GSW to the spine, 88 (59.8%) received an admission toxicology screen. Seventy-three (83%) patients out of those tested had a positive screen, with the most common substances detected being cannabis, cocaine, and alcohol. In regards to management, 127 (87%) patients were treated conservatively and only one (0.7%) patient improved clinically from ASIA D to E. Of the 20 patients who underwent surgery, one (5%) patient had clinical improvement post-operatively from ASIA C to D. This study evaluates the largest number of patients with GSW to the spine per year treated in a single centre, illustrating the violent nature of New Orleans. In this urban population, there was a clear correlation between drug use and suffering a GSW to the spine. Surgical intervention was seldom indicated in these patients and was predominately used for fixation of unstable fractures and decompression of compressive injuries, particularly below T11. Minimally invasive techniques were used successfully at our institution to minimize the risk of post-operative CSF leak. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 10 Years Later: Changes in Food Access Disparities in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Mundorf, Adrienne R; Willits-Smith, Amelia; Rose, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Inadequate access to healthy food is a problem in many urban neighborhoods, particularly for racial-ethnic minorities and low-income groups who are more likely to reside in food deserts. Although substantial research throughout the country has documented the existence of these disparities, few studies have focused on how this access changes over time or is affected by environmental shocks. This study examined citywide supermarket access in New Orleans as well as racial-ethnic disparities in this access, prior to Hurricane Katrina and at three times afterwards. On-the-ground verification of supermarket locations was conducted in 2004-2005, 2007, 2009, and 2014 and was mapped with secondary demographic data. Census tracts were defined as predominantly African-American neighborhoods if 80 % or more of the population identified as such. HLM Poisson regression analyses were conducted in 2014 to identify the difference in likelihood of finding supermarkets in a neighborhood by race-ethnicity and across all years of interest. Racial-ethnic disparities existed before the storm and worsened after it (IRR = 0.35; 95 % CI = 0.21, 0.60). Improvements in disparities to pre-storm levels were not seen until 2009, 4 years after the storm. By 2014, supermarket access, on average, was not significantly different in African-American neighborhoods than in others (IRR = 0.90; 95 % CI = 0.65, 1.26). The slow recovery of New Orleans' retail food infrastructure after Hurricane Katrina highlights the need for an increased focus on long-term planning to address disparities, especially those that may be exaggerated by shocks.

  4. Mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) in interior and exterior New Orleans house paint films.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Gonzales, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Pre-1992, latex paint was formulated with mercury (Hg) as phenylmercuric acetate (PMA). Hg vaporizes reducing its content, and lead (Pb) is stable and remains unchanged. The objective of this study is to describe the content of Hg and Pb in existing paint coatings. Forty paint chip samples were collected from both interior and exterior surfaces of homes in metropolitan New Orleans and analyzed for Hg and Pb. The median Hg in exterior paints is 26.9 mg kg(-1) (0.8-214.0) compared with 7.1 mg kg(-1) (0.03-39.2) for interior paints. The median Pb content is 76603 mg kg(-1) (464-317151) and 416 mg kg(-1) (24-63313) respectively, for exterior and interior paints. The Spearman correlation coefficients for Hg and Pb are -0.312 (P=0.13) and -0.471 (P=0.07) respectively, in exterior and interior samples. Hg and Pb vary independently with each other in paint films. Median Hg in exterior paints is four times larger than for interior paints. Median Pb in exterior paints is 184 times larger than interior paints. The Pb and Hg content in exterior and interior paint chips are significantly different (Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Test, P0.001 and P=0.006, respectively). Only 1 of the 25 exterior paints contained less than the current 5000 mg kg(-1) US standard for Pb, the criteria for exemption from the power-sanding restrictions of the New Orleans Lead Ordinance. Prior to banning PMA in paint, Hg poisonings presented as acrodynia were reported for children living in homes freshly painted with latex paint. Because of the affinity of Hg and Pb for sulfur-containing amino acid proteins, their presence in paint coatings poses an increased hazard when released as dust.

  5. Awareness of United States' Law for Nursing Mothers among Employers in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Alb, Caitrin H; Theall, Katherine; Jacobs, Marni B; Bales, Ana

    The U.S. Federal Reasonable Break Time for Nursing Mothers Law to support breastfeeding employees was passed in 2010, as part of the Affordable Care Act. However, few data are available assessing employers' awareness of the law or its implementation. The study aims were to 1) describe New Orleans employers' awareness of the law, 2) determine the extent of the law implementation within workplaces, and 3) determine the associations between workplace characteristics and employers' awareness and implementation. A cross-sectional survey was mailed to 652 workplaces with more than 50 employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, in the fall of 2013. A random sample of those who did not respond was called. The survey included questions about the industry category, number and type of employees, the employers' awareness of the law, if they had begun to implement the law, and their perceptions of barriers to implementation. The final sample included 182 workplaces (27.9% response rate). Eighty-seven participants (47.8%) reported having heard of the law. However, 52.7% of the participants (n = 96) responded that they had begun to implement the law. Large workplaces (≥100 employees) were more than four times as likely to be aware of the law compared with smaller workplaces (odds ratio, 4.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.69-10.59). The results were similar for beginning implementation. The proportion of large workplaces who are aware of the law remains lower than it should be, even 3 years after the institution of the Affordable Care Act. Outreach to all workplaces, including smaller ones, is needed to inform employers about the law and give them tools for implementation. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-dimensional visualization of cultural clusters in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic of New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Background An epidemic may exhibit different spatial patterns with a change in geographic scale, with each scale having different conduits and impediments to disease spread. Mapping disease at each of these scales often reveals different cluster patterns. This paper will consider this change of geographic scale in an analysis of yellow fever deaths for New Orleans in 1878. Global clustering for the whole city, will be followed by a focus on the French Quarter, then clusters of that area, and finally street-level patterns of a single cluster. The three-dimensional visualization capabilities of a GIS will be used as part of a cluster creation process that incorporates physical buildings in calculating mortality-to-mortality distance. Including nativity of the deceased will also capture cultural connection. Results Twenty-two yellow fever clusters were identified for the French Quarter. These generally mirror the results of other global cluster and density surfaces created for the entire epidemic in New Orleans. However, the addition of building-distance, and disease specific time frame between deaths reveal that disease spread contains a cultural component. Same nativity mortality clusters emerge in a similar time frame irrespective of proximity. Italian nativity mortalities were far more densely grouped than any of the other cohorts. A final examination of mortalities for one of the nativity clusters reveals that further sub-division is present, and that this pattern would only be revealed at this scale (street level) of investigation. Conclusion Disease spread in an epidemic is complex resulting from a combination of geographic distance, geographic distance with specific connection to the built environment, disease-specific time frame between deaths, impediments such as herd immunity, and social or cultural connection. This research has shown that the importance of cultural connection may be more important than simple proximity, which in turn might mean traditional

  7. Tracking Dissipation Reduction, Externalities, Stability and Sustainability for Environmental Management of New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D.; Werner, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainability requires stability, but in promoting economic development, modern economies and political systems reduce stabilizing dissipation by facilitating use and management of the environment through engineered mitigation of disturbances, which externalizes dissipation over the short to medium term. To quantitatively investigate the relationship between a range of environmental management approaches and sustainability, and the implications for Earth's future, we track the impact of management strategies on dissipation within the system and its externalities in a numerical model for the coupled economic, political/management and flooding dynamics of New Orleans. The model simulates river floods, hurricane storm-surge-induced floods, subsidence, and agent-based market interactions leading to development of port services, hotels, homes and labor relations. Flood protection decisions for levee construction based on the baseline case of cost-benefit analyses designed to prevent short-term economic loss from future floods qualitatively reproduce historical expansion of New Orleans and increases in levee height. Alternative management strategies explored include majority voting, consensus-based decision-making, and variations in discounting of costs and benefits. Enhanced dissipation is measured relative to optimal economic development without floods. The focus of modern economies on commodification is exploited to track dissipation as a scalar representing value or power, but this approach might not be applicable to more complicated traditional/indigenous cultures or cultures of resistance. For the baseline case, short-to-medium-term reductions in dissipation destabilize the coupled system, resulting in episodic bursts of externalized dissipation during flooding. Comparisons of results for a range of management options and generalizations of this approach for alternative cultural systems will be discussed.

  8. Business return in New Orleans: decision making amid post-Katrina uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nina S N; Pace, Kelley; Campanella, Richard; Lesage, James; Arenas, Helbert

    2009-08-26

    Empirical observations on how businesses respond after a major catastrophe are rare, especially for a catastrophe as great as Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans, Louisiana on August 29, 2005. We analyzed repeated telephone surveys of New Orleans businesses conducted in December 2005, June 2006, and October 2007 to understand factors that influenced decisions to re-open amid post-disaster uncertainty. Businesses in the group of professional, scientific, and technical services reopened the fastest in the near term, but differences in the rate of reopening for businesses stratified by type became indistinguishable in the longer term (around two years later). A reopening rate of 65% was found for all businesses by October 2007. Discriminant analysis showed significant differences in responses reflecting their attitudes about important factors between businesses that reopened and those that did not. Businesses that remained closed at the time of our third survey (two years after Katrina) ranked levee protection as the top concern immediately after Katrina, but damage to their premises and financing became major concerns in subsequent months reflected in the later surveys. For businesses that had opened (at the time of our third survey), infrastructure protection including levee, utility, and communications were the main concerns mentioned in surveys up to the third survey, when the issue of crime became their top concern. These findings underscore the need to have public policy and emergency plans in place prior to the actual disaster, such as infrastructure protection, so that the policy can be applied in a timely manner before business decisions to return or close are made. Our survey results, which include responses from both open and closed businesses, overcome the "survivorship bias" problem and provide empirical observations that should be useful to improve micro-level spatial economic modeling of factors that influence business return decisions.

  9. Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Rodriguez, Maria Debora

    The oceans play a central role in the maintenance of life on Earth. Oceans provide extensive ecosystems for marine animals and plants covering two-thirds of the Earth's surface, are essential sources of food, economic activity, and biodiversity, and are central to the global biogeochemical cycles. The oceans are the largest reservoir of carbon in the Planet, and absorb approximately one-third of the carbon emissions that are released to the Earth's atmosphere as a result of human activities. Since the beginning of industrialization, humans have been responsible for the increase in one greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), from approximately 280 parts per million (ppm) at the end of the nineteenth century to the current levels of 390ppm. As well as affecting the surface ocean pH, and the organisms living at the ocean surface, these increases in CO2 are causing global mean surface temperatures to rise.

  10. Cultural Resource Survey of Carrollton Bend Revetment, Mississippi River M-105.7 to 101.7-L, Jefferson and Orleans Parishes, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-26

    CARROLLTON BEND REVETMENT, MISSISSIPPI RIVER M-105.7 TO 101.7-., JEFFERSON AND ORLEANS PARISHES, LOUISIANA February 1993 FINAL REPORT DTIC,CT, R. Christopher...CULTURAL RESOURCE SURVEY OF CARROLLTON BEND REVETMENT, MISSISSIPPI RIVER M-105.7 TO 101.7-L, JEFFERSON AND ORLEANS PARISHES, LOUISIANA 12-PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...survey of the Carrollton Bend levetment, Jefferson and Orteant4 parishes, Louisiana. The project was undertaken by P.. Christopher Goodwin

  11. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? Captain LS...2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military gay ban revisited: Is our military ready for change? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender ] (LGBT) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as

  12. LOYALTY AND THE MILITARY PROFESSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    service member possesses, the author asserts that loyalty is the cornerstone for successful service. Military loyalty extends beyond commitment and...analysis of the common trends displays the role military loyalty plays in the profession of arms as key to successful military operations in peace...not be successful . The oath of office inspires or demands service members’ loyalty while the military leaders must ensure it is given. Therefore, a

  13. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  14. Technical Education in the Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles O.

    1974-01-01

    Cooperation between military and civilian technical training institutions has included evaluation and accreditation of five military training schools by a civilian evaluation team, which was impressed by the level, completeness and quality of the instruction. Additional cooperation and improved communications between military and civilian training…

  15. Academic and Military Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Robert K.

    This paper examines the practices and accomplishments of the military in the area of instructional technology. An examination of historical background is used to increase the precision of the definition of instructional technology. Specific contributions of the military are described and then uses of instructional technology in the military and…

  16. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  17. Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    widespread underemployment among military wives, this underemployment does not necessarily translate into dissatisfaction with the military...households (DMDC, 2004). Thus, a per- sistent lack of employment opportunity affects a spouse’s quality of life, and perennial dissatisfaction with...its own right, since wives’ dissatisfaction may translate into higher service member attrition from military service. The primary outcome of interest

  18. Distribution of toxic trace elements in soil/sediment in post-Katrina New Orleans and the Louisiana Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, T.; Shu, S.; Shi, H.; Wang, Jingyuan; Adams, C.; Witt, E.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study provided a comprehensive assessment of seven toxic trace elements (As, Pb, V, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Hg) in the soil/sediment of Katrina affected greater New Orleans region 1 month after the recession of flood water. Results indicated significant contamination of As and V and non-significant contamination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg and Pb at most sampling sites. Compared to the reported EPA Region 6 soil background inorganic levels, except As, the concentrations of other six elements had greatly increased throughout the studied area; St. Bernard Parish and Plaquemines Parish showed greater contamination than other regions. Comparison between pre- and post-Katrina data in similar areas, and data for surface, shallow, and deep samples indicated that the trace element distribution in post-Katrina New Orleans was not obviously attributed to the flooding. This study suggests that more detailed study of As and V contamination at identified locations is needed. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. "Bessie done cut her old man": race, common-law marriage, and homicide in New Orleans, 1925-1945.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines domestic homicide in early twentieth-century New Orleans. African-American residents killed their domestic partners at eight times the rate of white New Orleanians, and these homicides were most often committed by women, who killed their partners at fifteen times the rate of white women. Common-law marriages proved to be especially violent among African-American residents. Based on nearly two hundred cases identified in police records and other sources as partner killings between 1925 and 1945, this analysis compares lethal violence in legal marriages and in common-law unions. It also explores the social and institutional forces that buffeted common-law marriages, making this the most violent domestic arrangement and contributing to the remarkably high rate of spousal homicide by African-American women in early twentieth-century New Orleans.

  20. There's no place like home: Examining the emotional consequences of Hurricane Katrina on the displaced residents of New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Merdjanoff, Alexis A

    2013-09-01

    Using survey data from the Displaced New Orleans Residents Pilot Study (DNORPS), I examine the emotional consequences of Hurricane Katrina on the displaced residents of New Orleans. First, I employ an established framework within disaster research to investigate whether the stress level of displaced residents varies by race, income, and gender. As the residents in this dataset remained uprooted from their homes, I also examine three housing variables, including homeownership status, house type, and four levels of home damage. Contrary to previous research, home damage and homeownership status are significant predictors of displaced residents' emotional distress while the effect of race disappears. These findings suggest that future research on the mental health of disaster survivors, especially for displaced residents, expand the traditional analytical framework to consistently include housing variables, especially different categories of home damage, in addition to race, income, and gender. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Distribution of toxic trace elements in soil/sediment in post-Katrina New Orleans and the Louisiana Delta.

    PubMed

    Su, Tingzhi; Shu, Shi; Shi, Honglan; Wang, Jianmin; Adams, Craig; Witt, Emitt C

    2008-12-01

    This study provided a comprehensive assessment of seven toxic trace elements (As, Pb, V, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Hg) in the soil/sediment of Katrina affected greater New Orleans region 1 month after the recession of flood water. Results indicated significant contamination of As and V and non-significant contamination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg and Pb at most sampling sites. Compared to the reported EPA Region 6 soil background inorganic levels, except As, the concentrations of other six elements had greatly increased throughout the studied area; St. Bernard Parish and Plaquemines Parish showed greater contamination than other regions. Comparison between pre- and post-Katrina data in similar areas, and data for surface, shallow, and deep samples indicated that the trace element distribution in post-Katrina New Orleans was not obviously attributed to the flooding. This study suggests that more detailed study of As and V contamination at identified locations is needed.

  2. Military Psychology: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Department of Leadership and Law, provide academic and personal counseling to midshipmen, and conduct research. An example of psychological research...AD-Ai40 866 MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY : AN OYERYIEM(U) NAVY PERSONNEL i/i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER SAN DIEGO CR C NEMETH ET AL. MAY 84 UNCLASSIFIED F...G 5/1@ NL L 8 -1.25 1 1.4 11.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATKiAk BURAMF OF STANDARDS- 1963-A %% a • v VjUU.U. 1 // 00 Military Psychology : An

  3. Fraternization - A Military Offense?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    34While Jiaf-ing of an appropriate regulation might be diffcult, %e recommend it to the responsible military services" (8:1.60). :iteen years later in...rank or positions for personal gain, and are prejudicial to good order and discipline, action must be taken against those involved. "The basic role and...vital, and responsive military oiqa[)_Jiza-1cn5: addition, the Air Force encourages open members*,:_ arc --_ _cpation in base *recreat ional1 ac t ivi t

  4. Ocean Acidification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ocean and coastal acidification is an emerging issue caused by increasing amounts of carbon dioxide being absorbed by seawater. Changing seawater chemistry impacts marine life, ecosystem services, and humans. Learn what EPA is doing and what you can do.

  5. Ocean dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The regulation of the dumping of materials into the ocean is reviewed. Criteria to be applied in reviewing and evaluating permit applications for the transportation and dumping of materials into the ocean are established. A definition of monitoring of dumping sites, the assessment of fees to cover permit processing costs, and a moratorium is placed on the issuance of permits for the disposal of radioactive waste are included.

  6. Evaluation of three techniques for classifying urban land cover patterns using LANDSAT MSS data. [New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, P. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Three computer quantitative techniques for determining urban land cover patterns are evaluated. The techniques examined deal with the selection of training samples by an automated process, the overlaying of two scenes from different seasons of the year, and the use of individual pixels as training points. Evaluation is based on the number and type of land cover classes generated and the marks obtained from an accuracy test. New Orleans, Louisiana and its environs form the study area.

  7. The rationale behind small food store interventions in low-income urban neighborhoods: insights from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Bodor, J Nicholas; Ulmer, Vanessa M; Dunaway, Lauren Futrell; Farley, Thomas A; Rose, Donald

    2010-06-01

    Environmental approaches to the obesity problem in the US have garnered favor due to growing evidence that changes to the environment are at the root of the epidemic. Low-income urban neighborhoods, where obesity rates are disproportionately high, typically lack supermarkets yet have a high density of small food stores. This may increase the risk for unhealthy diets and obesity for neighborhood residents, because small stores carry mostly energy-dense foods and few fruits and vegetables. This paper pulls together various studies and pilot work conducted in New Orleans to explore the rationale behind small store interventions. Many low-income residents in New Orleans live within walking distance of small food stores and shop at them frequently. Marketing research has documented that changes to in-store shelf space and displays of specific foods affect the sales of these foods. Initiatives in New Orleans and elsewhere have demonstrated some success with improving healthy food availability in small stores, and an intercept survey of customers at small stores suggests that customers would purchase more fruits and vegetables if available. Efforts to encourage small store operators to offer a healthier mix of foods may, in the end, depend on the profitability of such changes. Evidence from a typical small store in New Orleans indicates that a greater percentage of gross profits come from snack foods and beverages than from fruits and vegetables. More research is needed to better understand the financial operations of small food stores and whether altering the mix of foods is economically feasible.

  8. The Rationale behind Small Food Store Interventions in Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods: Insights from New Orleans1–3

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, J. Nicholas; Ulmer, Vanessa M.; Futrell Dunaway, Lauren; Farley, Thomas A.; Rose, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Environmental approaches to the obesity problem in the US have garnered favor due to growing evidence that changes to the environment are at the root of the epidemic. Low-income urban neighborhoods, where obesity rates are disproportionately high, typically lack supermarkets yet have a high density of small food stores. This may increase the risk for unhealthy diets and obesity for neighborhood residents, because small stores carry mostly energy-dense foods and few fruits and vegetables. This paper pulls together various studies and pilot work conducted in New Orleans to explore the rationale behind small store interventions. Many low-income residents in New Orleans live within walking distance of small food stores and shop at them frequently. Marketing research has documented that changes to in-store shelf space and displays of specific foods affect the sales of these foods. Initiatives in New Orleans and elsewhere have demonstrated some success with improving healthy food availability in small stores, and an intercept survey of customers at small stores suggests that customers would purchase more fruits and vegetables if available. Efforts to encourage small store operators to offer a healthier mix of foods may, in the end, depend on the profitability of such changes. Evidence from a typical small store in New Orleans indicates that a greater percentage of gross profits come from snack foods and beverages than from fruits and vegetables. More research is needed to better understand the financial operations of small food stores and whether altering the mix of foods is economically feasible. PMID:20410086

  9. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI)-2010 annual meeting. 26 February-2 March 2010, New Orleans, LA, USA.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Leonard

    2010-05-01

    The 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) meeting, held in New Orleans, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the fields of allergy, asthma and immunological diseases. This conference report highlights selected presentations on potential treatments for food and other allergies, as well as therapies for asthma and other immunological diseases. Investigational drugs discussed include Oralair Mites (Stallergenes SA/Paladin Labs Inc), PF-03654746 (Pfizer Inc) and AMG-853 (Amgen Inc).

  10. Louisiana ground-water map no. 11: potentiometric surface, Spring, 1993, and water-level changes, 1987-93, of the Gonzales-New Orleans Aquifer in southeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David J.

    1995-01-01

    The Gonzales-New Orleans aquifer is an important source of fresh water for southeastern Louisiana. Withdrawals from the Gonzales-New Orleans aquifer in Jefferson and Orleans Parishes totaled about 33 million gallons per day in 1990, most of which was used for power generation and industrial purposes. Ground-water flow in the Gonzales-New Orleans aquifer within the study area is toward the center of a cone of depression in the potentiometric surface located just northeast of downtown New Orleans. The cone of depression has formed due to large withdrawals from the aquifer. During the spring of 1993, the altitude of water levels in the Gonzales-New Orleans aquifer within the study area ranged from about 100 feet below sea level in Orleans Parish, to about 11 feet below sea level in St. John the Baptist Parish. Water-level changes in the aquifer during the period 1987-93 ranged from little or no change in some areas, to a recovery of more than 15 feet in eastern Jefferson and western Orleans Parishes near Lake Pontchartrain. Water-level changes within the Gonzales-New Orleans aquifer are primarily related to changes in pumping.

  11. 'You fix my community, you have fixed my life': the disruption and rebuilding of ontological security in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert L; Maurer, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Using the concept of ontological security, this paper examines the physical and psychological loss of home and community following Hurricane Katrina. This qualitative longitudinal study includes 40 heads of households with school-age children who lived in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Participants describe a breakdown in their social fabric at the individual and structural/community levels that contributes to a sense of community loss and social displacement, disrupting their ontological security--their notion of safety, routine and trust in a stable environment. Three interrelated reactions were common: 1) experiencing nostalgia for their old neighbourhoods specifically and New Orleans in general; 2) experiencing a sense of loss of people and things that represented a level of security or constancy; 3) initiation of a process for re-establishing ontological security whether or not they returned to New Orleans. The paper concludes that intangible losses have an important psychological effect on community redevelopment and recovery from trauma. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  12. Understanding and preventing military suicide.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Jennings, Keith W; Jobes, David A; Bradley, John C

    2012-01-01

    The continual rise in the U.S. military's suicide rate since 2004 is one of the most vexing issues currently facing military leaders, mental health professionals, and suicide experts. Despite considerable efforts to address this problem, however, suicide rates have not decreased. The authors consider possible reasons for this frustrating reality, and question common assumptions and approaches to military suicide prevention. They further argue that suicide prevention efforts that more explicitly embrace the military culture and implement evidence-based strategies across the full spectrum of prevention and treatment could improve success. Several recommendations for augmenting current efforts to prevent military suicide are proposed.

  13. Military Forces in Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    families of military professionals withdrawn from East- em Europe are living in hostels , prefabricated barracks, or tents. In some cases, conscripts...Technological Capabilities: USSR/US Semiconductor Materials and Microelectronic C ircuils Software Producibility Parallel Computer Architectures ^ r...underground leadership bunker adjacent to Moscow State University . These fa- cilities are intended for the national command authority in wartime

  14. The Military Cooperation Group

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    stay in their respective countries and continue to face their host nation contacts daily. For host nation relations , it may be more expedient to...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THE MILITARY...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this

  15. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  16. Soviet Union, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agency of the Soviet Union. Permission for further reproduction must be obtained from copyright owner. SOVIET UNION MILITARY AFFAIRS CONTENTS...internationalists, it has always embodied the inviolable friendship of the peoples of the USSR. But are some of us not hypnotized by this principle

  17. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  18. Thirty-three years of recruiting and graduating minority students at the University of New Orleans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpa, L. F.; Pavlis, T. L.

    2006-12-01

    The University of New Orleans (UNO) began a formal program to recruit minority geoscience students in 1974 when Dr. Louis Fernandez initiated the program through a grant from the National Science Foundation. A major tool in the original program was to take minority high school students on a field trip. That early program was a major success at a time when even one African American student graduating with a B.S. degree in Geology or Geophysics from any university in the U.S. was considered to be significant. The field trip has continued every year since the program began and it continues to be part of a very successful recruiting effort. Over the last approximately 15 years, the minority geoscience undergraduate student population at UNO rose to approximately 40% with African American students making up the largest single ethnic group. The retention and graduation rates of these minority undergraduates at UNO are high and minority students are often graduating at or near the top of their class. Despite the disproportionate displacement of African Americans from the New Orleans area after Hurricane Katrina, those minority geoscience students who can return to UNO are doing so in significant numbers. Thus, the minority program appears to have achieved a high level of sustainability. Recently we took a closer look at the program to determine the possible explanations for its success. Although availability of scholarships, tutoring and mentors clearly contributes to our success, the key to the success of the program remains the field trip. The trip not only serves as an academic opportunity for students to see geological features first hand and develop a curiosity for earth sciences, but it also affords an opportunity to build trust and a relationship between the faculty on the trip and the meet other potential students. That trust may be the most important key to our successful recruitment of minority students at UNO. In addition, the approximately 2 week field trip is

  19. Persistence of mental health needs among children affected by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Olteanu, Alina; Arnberger, Ruth; Grant, Roy; Davis, Caroline; Abramson, David; Asola, Jaya

    2011-02-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August 2005 and destroyed the infrastructure ofNew Orleans. Mass evacuation ensued. The immediate and long-lasting impact of these events on the mental health of children have been reported in survey research. This study was done to describe the nature of mental health need of children during the four years after Hurricane Katrina using clinical data from a comprehensive healthcare program. Medical and mental health services were delivered on mobile clinics that traveled to medically underserved communities on a regular schedule beginning immediately after the hurricane. Patients were self-selected residents of New Orleans. Most had incomes below the federal poverty level and were severely affected by the hurricane. Paper charts of pediatric mental health patients were reviewed for visits beginning with the establishment of the mental health program from 01 July 2007 through 30 June 2009 (n = 296). Demographics, referral sources, presenting problems, diagnoses, and qualitative data describing Katrina-related traumatic exposures were abstracted. Psychosocial data were abstracted from medical charts. Data were coded and processed for demographic, referral, and diagnostic trends. Mental health service needs continued unabated throughout this period (two to nearly four years post-event). In 2008, 29% of pediatric primary care patients presented with mental health or developmental/learning problems, including the need for intensive case management. The typical presentation of pediatric mental health patients was a disruptive behavior disorder with an underlying mood or anxiety disorder. Qualitative descriptive data are presented to illustrate the traumatic post-disaster experience of many children. School referrals for mental health evaluation and services were overwhelmingly made for disruptive behavior disorders. Pediatric referrals were more nuanced, reflecting underlying mood and anxiety disorders. Histories indicated that many

  20. Shallow (0-10) seismic investigation of a distressed earthen levee, New Orleans, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Hicks, J.; Vera, E. E.

    2009-12-01

    Both deep- and near-surface hydrogeologic processes can contribute to the structural failure of artificial earthen levees. Recently, seismic geophysical methods have attempted to develop a proxy for engineering shear strength, by mapping changes in the transmission velocity of shear waves. High fluid content may indicate both weak, under-compacted materials and/or organic-rich sediments. In the absence of electromagnetic methods, Vp/Vs ratios can be used as good indicators of variations in the fluid (water, and air or gas) saturation. Cone penetration borehole tests measure the resistance of soils to penetration of the cone tip and its frictional sliding that can be correlated to sediment types and their physical properties. A distressed section of an artificial earthen levee, suitable for seismic investigation, lies ~15 km S of the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Open curvilinear fissures, 10 cm wide, 30 cm deep, and up to 100 m in length, exist along the crest at two sites. Between September 2007 and February 2008 we collect horizontally (SH) polarized shear and compressional wave (P) data in pseudo-walkaway tests for the upper 100 m of the subsurface along the protected (west) side of the earthen levee, within 30 m of its crest. One profile lies parallel and adjacent to the damaged levee crest and, for reference, two profiles lie nearby adjacent to undamaged portions of the artificial earthen levee. In the first ~30 m of sediment below the lower delta plain of the Greater New Orleans area, a complex and dynamic interaction of freshwater and marine sedimentary environments juxtaposes a diverse set of facies. We combine of Vp and Vs velocity maps, sedimentary environment interpretations, and cone-penetration-derived sediment/soil and laboratory-derived physical properties to locate possible zones of high fluid concentration, (and perhaps seepage), weak engineering materials, and natural foundation soil shear strength. Under the distressed portion of the

  1. Multiple metal contamination from house paints: consequences of power sanding and paint scraping in New Orleans.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Powell, E T; Shah, A; Gonzales, C R; Mielke, P W

    2001-01-01

    Power sanding exterior paint is a common practice during repainting of old houses in New Orleans, Louisiana, that triggers lead poisoning and releases more than Pb. In this study we quantified the Pb, zinc, cadmium, manganese, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium in exterior paint samples collected from New Orleans homes (n = 31). We used interior dust wipes to compare two exterior house-painting projects. House 1 was measured in response to the plight of a family after a paint contractor power sanded all exterior paint from the weatherboards. The Pb content (approximately 130,000 microg Pb/g) was first realized when the family pet died; the children were hospitalized, the family was displaced, and cleanup costs were high. To determine the quantity of dust generated by power sanding and the benefits of reducing Pb-contaminated dust, we tested a case study house (house 2) for Pb (approximately 90,000 microg/g) before the project was started; the house was then dry scraped and the paint chips were collected. Although the hazards of Pb-based paints are well known, there are other problems as well, because other toxic metals exist in old paints. If house 2 had been power sanded to bare wood like house 1, the repainting project would have released as dust about 7.4 kg Pb, 3.5 kg Zn, 9.7 g Cd, 14.8 g Cu, 8.8 g Mn, 1.5 g Ni, 5.4 g Co, 2.4 g Cr, and 0.3 g V. The total tolerable daily intake (TTDI) for a child under 6 years of age is 6 microg Pb from all sources. Converting 7.4 kg Pb to this scale is vexing--more than 1 billion (10(9)) times the TTDI. Also for perspective, the one-time release of 7.4 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust from sanding compares to 50 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust emitted annually per 0.1 mile (0.16 km) from street traffic during the peak use of leaded gasoline. In this paper, we broaden the discussion to include an array of metals in paint and underscore the need and possibilities for curtailing the release of metal dust. PMID:11673129

  2. Multiple metal contamination from house paints: consequences of power sanding and paint scraping in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Mielke, H W; Powell, E T; Shah, A; Gonzales, C R; Mielke, P W

    2001-09-01

    Power sanding exterior paint is a common practice during repainting of old houses in New Orleans, Louisiana, that triggers lead poisoning and releases more than Pb. In this study we quantified the Pb, zinc, cadmium, manganese, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium in exterior paint samples collected from New Orleans homes (n = 31). We used interior dust wipes to compare two exterior house-painting projects. House 1 was measured in response to the plight of a family after a paint contractor power sanded all exterior paint from the weatherboards. The Pb content (approximately 130,000 microg Pb/g) was first realized when the family pet died; the children were hospitalized, the family was displaced, and cleanup costs were high. To determine the quantity of dust generated by power sanding and the benefits of reducing Pb-contaminated dust, we tested a case study house (house 2) for Pb (approximately 90,000 microg/g) before the project was started; the house was then dry scraped and the paint chips were collected. Although the hazards of Pb-based paints are well known, there are other problems as well, because other toxic metals exist in old paints. If house 2 had been power sanded to bare wood like house 1, the repainting project would have released as dust about 7.4 kg Pb, 3.5 kg Zn, 9.7 g Cd, 14.8 g Cu, 8.8 g Mn, 1.5 g Ni, 5.4 g Co, 2.4 g Cr, and 0.3 g V. The total tolerable daily intake (TTDI) for a child under 6 years of age is 6 microg Pb from all sources. Converting 7.4 kg Pb to this scale is vexing--more than 1 billion (10(9)) times the TTDI. Also for perspective, the one-time release of 7.4 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust from sanding compares to 50 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust emitted annually per 0.1 mile (0.16 km) from street traffic during the peak use of leaded gasoline. In this paper, we broaden the discussion to include an array of metals in paint and underscore the need and possibilities for curtailing the release of metal dust.

  3. HIV/STI Risk behaviors among Latino migrant workers in New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina disaster.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Patricia; Liddon, Nicole; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erin; Salinas, Oscar; Narvaez, Alfredo

    2008-11-01

    A rapid influx of Latino migrant workers came to New Orleans after Hurricane-Katrina. Many of these men were unaccompanied by their primary sex partner potentially placing them at high-risk for HIV/STIs. The purpose of this study was to assess HIV/STI sexual risk behavior of these men. A venue-based sample of Latinos who came to New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina were administered an anonymous, structured interview in Spanish in a mobile unit and urine tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhea (GC) using the nucleic acid amplification technique. Participants (n = 180) had a mean age of 33 (range, 18-79), did not speak or understand English very well (93.9%), were undocumented (91.2%), were married (63.5%), and had children (67.4%), though the percent living with spouse and children was 6.1% and 4.9%, respectively. Although most men were born in Honduras (49.7%) and Mexico (25.4%), 61.9% came to New Orleans from another US state. The majority drank alcohol in the past week (75.5%), and of those, 68.7% engaged in binge drinking. A lower percentage used marijuana (16.6%) and cocaine (5.5%) at least once in the prior week. No men reported injection drug use. Self-reported history of HIV was 10%. No men tested positive for GC and 5 (2.8%) tested positive for CT. In the last month, 68.9% engaged in sex with high-risk sex partners, 30.0% were in potential bridge position, 50.0% used condoms inconsistently, 30.6% did not use a condom the last time they had sex, and 21.1% were abstinent. Since arriving, 9.4% reported leaving and returning to New Orleans. Latino migrant workers in New Orleans reported risky sexual behaviors and low condom use within a potential bridge position. Although a low prevalence of CT and GC was found, there was a high percent of self-reported HIV infection. The cultural and contextual factors that place these migrant workers and their sex partner(s) at risk for HIV/STI need further investigation.

  4. Ocean Piracy and its Impact on Insurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-03

    costs could adversely impact international trade during the current global economic slowdown. In addition to proposals for military deterrence and...U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration, authorizes the federal government to act as an insurer or reinsurer of last resort to...and reinsurance federal backstop automatically provides insurance and/or reinsurance to the ocean marine shipping industry (see “War Risk Insurance

  5. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  6. LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans Department of Radiology: effects of Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Anshu; Letourneau, Janis G; Bok, Leonard R

    2009-05-01

    This case study chronicles the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Department of Radiology at the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans and the department's subsequent efforts to recover and re-dedicate itself to providing quality patient care and resident education. Hurricane Katrina damaged the department's facilities, severely decreased departmental cash flow, disrupted resident education, and resulted in faculty exodus. Because of the "catastrophic loss of resources" suffered by the department, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) proposed expedited withdrawal of accreditation for the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program, to which the department agreed. Since Katrina, the program has taken steps toward regaining its pre-Katrina status as a successful residency program that produced satisfied, successful residents. These steps include the appointment of a new department head of radiology, the recruitment of academic directors for each of the nine subspecialties, the reopening of the University Hospital, and the growth of annual procedure volume. All institutions face the possibility of a natural disaster. It is imperative to have a plan in place to ensure continued resident education, patient safety, and ACGME accreditation.

  7. InSAR Remote Sensing of Localized Surface Layer Subsidence in New Orleans, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Blom, R. G.; Kent, J. D.; Ivins, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    More than half of Louisiana's drinking water is dependent on groundwater, and extraction of these resources along with high oil and gas production has contributed to localized subsidence in many parts of New Orleans. This increases the vulnerability of levee failure during intense storms such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, before which rapid subsidence had already been identified and contributed to the failing levees and catastrophic flooding. An interferogram containing airborne radar data from NASA's UAVSAR was combined with local geographic information systems (GIS) data for 2009-12 to help identify the sources of subsidence and mask out unrelated features such as surface water. We have observed the highest vertical velocity rates at the NASA Michoud Assembly Facility (high water use) and Norco (high oil/gas production). Many other notable features such as the: Bonnet-Carre Spillway, MRGO canal, levee lines along the Lower 9th Ward and power plants, are also showing concerning rates of subsidence. Even new housing loads, soil type differences, and buried beach sands seem to have modest correlations with patterns seen in UAVSAR. Current hurricane protection and coastal restoration efforts still have not incorporated late 20th century water level and geodetic data into their projections. Using SAR interferometry and local GIS datasets, areas of subsidence can be identified in a more efficient and economical manner, especially for emergency response.

  8. Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana solar energy system performance evaluation, February 1981 - June 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, K. M.

    1981-09-01

    The Loyola University site is a student dormitory in New Orleans, Louisiana whose active solar energy system is designed to supply 52% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 4590 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 5000-gallon water tank, auxiliary water supplied at high temperature and pressure from a central heating plant with a gas-fired boiler, and a differential controller that selects from 5 operating modes. System performance data are given, including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and system coefficient of performance. The solar fraction is well below the design goal; this is attributed to great fluctuations in demand. Insolation, temperature, operation and solar energy utilization data are also presented. The performance of the collector, storage, and domestic hot water subsystems, the system operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, sensor technology, and typical monthly data.

  9. Contrasting trajectories of change in primary care clinics: lessons from New Orleans safety net.

    PubMed

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Schmidt, Laura; Wu, Kevin; Wiley, James

    2013-01-01

    We sought to compare and contrast patterns of change toward patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) in 5 New Orleans primary care safety net clinics in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. We assessed the general direction of change in practice to discover possible reasons for differences in patterns of change, and to identify impediments to change. Data collection consisted of 5 semiannual telephone interviews with clinic leadership over 2.5 years supplemented by administrative audits. We used standard survey indexes of PCMH to monitor practice change. We conducted site visits and unstructured in-person interviews with clinicians and staff of the 5 clinics. PCMH index scores improved during the observation period with variations in rates of change and initial levels of PCMH. Qualitative analysis suggested possible explanations for this differential success: (1) early vs later starts in practice change, (2) funding based on patient outcomes, (3) demands that compete with practice change, (4) qualities of clinic leadership, and (5) relations with the communities where patients live. Barriers to practice change included high demand for services, deficient linkages between hospital and specialty care, lack of staff resources, and a need to focus on clinic finances. The PCMH model can successfully address the needs of safety net populations. Stable leadership committed to serving safety net patients via the PCMH model is important for successful practice transformation. Beyond clinic walls, cultivating deep ties to the communities that clinics serve also supports the PCMH model.

  10. Community perspectives on post-Katrina mental health recovery in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Diana; Allien, Charles E; Dunn, Donisha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    Disaster-affected communities may face prolonged challenges to community-wide mental health recovery due to limitations in local resources, infrastructure, and leadership. REACH NOLA, an umbrella non-profit organization comprising academic institutions and community-based agencies, sought to promote community recovery, increase mental health service delivery capacity, and develop local leadership in post-Katrina New Orleans through its Mental Health infrastructure and Training Project (MHIT). The project offered local health service providers training and follow-up support for implementing evidence-based and new approaches to mental health service delivery. This commentary shares the perspectives of three community leaders who co-directed MHIT. They describe the genesis of MHIT, the experience of each agency in adopting leadership roles in addressing post-disaster needs, challenges and growth opportunities, and then overarching lessons learned concerning leadership in a prolonged crisis. These lessons may be relevant to community agencies addressing hurricane recovery in other areas of the Gulf States as well as to inform long-term disaster recovery efforts elsewhere.

  11. Building community resilience through mental health infrastructure and training in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Springgate, Benjamin F; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Meyers, Diana; Allen, Charles E; Vannoy, Steven D; Bentham, Wayne; Wells, Kenneth B

    2011-01-01

    To describe a disaster recovery model focused on developing mental health services and capacity-building within a disparities-focused, community-academic participatory partnership framework. Community-based participatory, partnered training and services delivery intervention in a post-disaster setting. Post-Katrina Greater New Orleans community. More than 400 community providers from more than 70 health and social services agencies participated in the trainings. Partnered development of a training and services delivery program involving physicians, therapists, community health workers, and other clinical and non-clinical personnel to improve access and quality of care for mental health services in a post-disaster setting. Services delivery (outreach, education, screening, referral, direct treatment); training delivery; satisfaction and feedback related to training; partnered development of training products. Clinical services in the form of outreach, education, screening, referral and treatment were provided in excess of 110,000 service units. More than 400 trainees participated in training, and provided feedback that led to evolution of training curricula and training products, to meet evolving community needs over time. Participant satisfaction with training generally scored very highly. This paper describes a participatory, health-focused model of community recovery that began with addressing emerging, unmet mental health needs using a disparities-conscious partnership framework as one of the principle mechanisms for intervention. Population mental health needs were addressed by investment in infrastructure and services capacity among small and medium sized non-profit organizations working in disaster-impacted, low resource settings.

  12. Birth Outcomes in a Disaster Recovery Environment: New Orleans Women After Katrina.

    PubMed

    Harville, Emily W; Giarratano, Gloria; Savage, Jane; Barcelona de Mendoza, Veronica; Zotkiewicz, TrezMarie

    2015-11-01

    To examine how the recovery following Hurricane Katrina affected pregnancy outcomes. 308 New Orleans area pregnant women were interviewed 5-7 years after Hurricane Katrina about their exposure to the disaster (danger, damage, and injury); current disruption; and perceptions of recovery. Birthweight, gestational age, birth length, and head circumference were examined in linear models, and low birthweight (<2500 g) and preterm birth (<37 weeks) in logistic models, with adjustment for confounders. Associations were found between experiencing damage during Katrina and birthweight (adjusted beta for high exposure = -158 g) and between injury and gestational age (adjusted beta = -0.5 days). Of the indicators of recovery experience, most consistently associated with worsened birth outcomes was worry that another hurricane would hit the region (adjusted beta for birthweight: -112 g, p = 0.08; gestational age: -3.2 days, p = 0.02; birth length: -0.65 cm, p = 0.06). Natural disaster may have long-term effects on pregnancy outcomes. Alternately, women who are most vulnerable to disaster may be also vulnerable to poor pregnancy outcome.

  13. Shared experiences of CRNAs who were on duty in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Dodd-McCue, Dianne; Bennett, Marsha

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) who were on duty in New Orleans, Louisiana, during Hurricane Katrina as well as to elucidate the psychosocial impact the storm had on them. Ten CRNAs participated in 1 of 3 focus groups that were audio recorded. The audio recordings were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative data analysis computer software (NVivo 8, QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Six major themes emerged from the study: caught off guard; sense of duty; uncertainty/powerlessness/frustration; group identity and cohesiveness; anger; and life-changing event. The themes represented how the CRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the CRNAs resulted mainly in short-term sleep disturbances and increased drinking. Only 2 CRNAs expressed long-term psychosocial effects from the storm. The results of this study should be used to guide policies regarding disaster activation of CRNAs, to educate CRNAs on preparing for disaster duty, and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding CRNAs.

  14. Birth outcomes in a disaster recovery environment: New Orleans women after Katrina

    PubMed Central

    Harville, Emily W.; Giarratano, Gloria; Savage, Jane; de Mendoza, Veronica Barcelona; Zotkiewicz, TrezMarie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine how the recovery following Hurricane Katrina affected pregnancy outcomes. Methods 308 New Orleans area pregnant women were interviewed 5-7 years after Hurricane Katrina about their exposure to the disaster (danger, damage, and injury); current disruption; and perceptions of recovery. Birthweight, gestational age, birth length, and head circumference were examined in linear models, and low birthweight (<2500 g) and preterm birth (<37 weeks) in logistic models, with adjustment for confounders. Results Associations were found between experiencing damage during Katrina and birthweight (adjusted beta for high exposure = −158 g) and between injury and gestational age (adjusted beta= −0.5 days). Of the indicators of recovery experience, most consistently associated with worsened birth outcomes was worry that another hurricane would hit the region (adjusted beta for birthweight: −112 g, p=0.08; gestational age: −3.2 days, p=0.02; birth length: −0.65 cm, p=0.06) Conclusions Natural disaster may have long-term effects on pregnancy outcomes. Alternately, women who are most vulnerable to disaster may be also vulnerable to poor pregnancy outcome. PMID:26122255

  15. Chronic disaster syndrome: Displacement, disaster capitalism, and the eviction of the poor from New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, VINCANNE; VAN HATTUM, TASLIM; ENGLISH, DIANA

    2009-01-01

    Many New Orleans residents who were displaced in 2005 by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent levee failures and floods are still displaced. Living with long-term stress related to loss of family, community, jobs, and social security as well as the continuous struggle for a decent life in unsettled life circumstances, they manifest what we are calling “chronic disaster syndrome.” The term refers not only to the physiological and psychological effects generated at the individual level by ongoing social disruption but also to the nexus of socioeconomic and political conditions that produce this situation as a long-term and intractable problem. Chronic disaster syndrome emerges from the convergence of three phenomena that create a nexus of displacement: long-term effects of personal trauma (including near loss of life and loss of family members, homes, jobs, community, financial security, and well-being); the social arrangements that enable the smooth functioning of what Naomi Klein calls “disaster capitalism,” in which “disaster” is prolonged as a way of life; and the permanent displacement of the most vulnerable populations from the social landscape as a perceived remedy that actually exacerbates the syndrome. PMID:20161644

  16. Chronic disaster syndrome: Displacement, disaster capitalism, and the eviction of the poor from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vincanne; VAN Hattum, Taslim; English, Diana

    2009-11-01

    Many New Orleans residents who were displaced in 2005 by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the subsequent levee failures and floods are still displaced. Living with long-term stress related to loss of family, community, jobs, and social security as well as the continuous struggle for a decent life in unsettled life circumstances, they manifest what we are calling "chronic disaster syndrome." The term refers not only to the physiological and psychological effects generated at the individual level by ongoing social disruption but also to the nexus of socioeconomic and political conditions that produce this situation as a long-term and intractable problem. Chronic disaster syndrome emerges from the convergence of three phenomena that create a nexus of displacement: long-term effects of personal trauma (including near loss of life and loss of family members, homes, jobs, community, financial security, and well-being); the social arrangements that enable the smooth functioning of what Naomi Klein calls "disaster capitalism," in which "disaster" is prolonged as a way of life; and the permanent displacement of the most vulnerable populations from the social landscape as a perceived remedy that actually exacerbates the syndrome.

  17. Community Perspectives on Post-Katrina Mental Health Recovery in New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Diana; Allen, Charles E.; Dunn, Donisha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Disaster-affected communities may face prolonged challenges to community-wide mental health recovery due to limitations in local resources, infrastructure, and leadership. REACH NOLA, an umbrella non-profit organization comprising academic institutions and community-based agencies, sought to promote community recovery, increase mental health service delivery capacity, and develop local leadership in post-Katrina New Orleans through its Mental Health Infrastructure and Training Project (MHIT). The project offered local health service providers training and follow-up support for implementing evidence-based and new approaches to mental health service delivery. This commentary shares the perspectives of leaders of three community leaders who co-directed MHIT. They describe the genesis of MHIT, the experience of each agency in adopting leadership roles in addressing post-disaster needs, challenges and growth opportunities, and then overarching lessons learned concerning leadership in a prolonged crisis. These lessons may be relevant to community agencies addressing hurricane recovery in other areas of the Gulf States as well as to inform long-term disaster recovery efforts elsewhere. PMID:22352081

  18. Air quality during demolition and recovery activities in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Ravikrishna, Raghunathan; Lee, Han-Woong; Mbuligwe, Stephen; Valsaraj, K T; Pardue, John H

    2010-07-01

    Air samples were collected during demolition and cleanup operations in the Lakeview district of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, in late 2005 during the period immediately after Hurricane Katrina. Three different high-volume air samples were collected around waste collection areas that were created to temporarily hold the debris from the cleanup of residential properties in the area. Particulate concentrations were elevated and included crystalline fibers associated with asbestos. Metal concentrations on particulate matter resembled those measured in sediments deposited by floodwaters with the exception of Ba, which was elevated at all three locations. The highest organic contaminant concentration measured on particulates was the pesticide Ziram (Zinc, bis[diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S']-, [T-4]-) at 2,200 microg/g of particulate matter during sampling period 2. Ziram is used in latex paint, adhesives, caulking, and wallboard as a preservative. Fungal isolates developed from particulate air samples included species associated with disease including Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These data represent the most comprehensive assessment of demolition activities during the period immediately after Hurricane Katrina. Copyright (c) 2010 SETAC.

  19. Longitudinal and Source-to-Tap New Orleans, LA, U.S.A. Drinking Water Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Hull, Natalie M; Holinger, Eric P; Ross, Kimberly A; Robertson, Charles E; Harris, J Kirk; Stevens, Mark J; Pace, Norman R

    2017-04-18

    The two municipal drinking water systems of New Orleans, LA, U.S.A. were sampled to compare the microbiology of independent systems that treat the same surface water from the Mississippi River. To better understand temporal trends and sources of microbiology delivered to taps, these treatment plants and distribution systems were subjected to source-to-tap sampling over four years. Both plants employ traditional treatment by chloramination, applied during or after settling, followed by filtration before distribution in a warm, low water age system. Longitudinal samples indicated microbiology to have stability both spatially and temporally, and between treatment plants and distribution systems. Disinfection had the greatest impact on microbial composition, which was further refined by filtration and influenced by distribution and premise plumbing. Actinobacteria spp. exhibited trends with treatment. In particular, Mycobacterium spp., very low in finished waters, occurred idiosyncratically at high levels in some tap waters, indicating distribution and/or premise plumbing as main contributors of mycobacteria. Legionella spp., another genus containing potential opportunistic pathogens, also occurred ubiquitously. Source water microbiology was most divergent from tap water, and each step of treatment brought samples more closely similar to tap waters.

  20. Teen pregnancy in New Orleans: factors that differentiate teens who deliver, abort, and successfully contracept.

    PubMed

    Landry, E; Bertrand, J T; Cherry, F; Rice, J

    1986-06-01

    This study reports findings from interviews with 3 groups of never-married black adolescents 12-18 years old (mean age 17), in New Orleans, Louisiana, the state with the 2nd highest adolescent birth rate in the US. The 1st group consisted of 136 women who had decided to give birth, interviewed 24-48 hours postpartum at a labor and delivery unit. Group 2, n=92, consisted of adolescents requesting abortions, interviewed prior to counselling sessions and abortion procedures at a women's clinic, and the 3rd group, n=151, was made up of never-pregnant sexually active adolescents attending a state adolescent family planning clinic interviewed before or after their doctor visit. Child bearers and contraceptors tended to be older than terminators, and child bearers tended to have less education. 93% of terminators had college plans as opposed to 62% of child bearers and 79% of contraceptors. A sister or friend's having been pregnant positively influenced childbearing. The findings suggest that, among the adolescents who became pregnant, motivation to use contraceptives may be the key factor. 80% of these adolescents knew about contraceptives when they become "pregnant and nearly 3/4 knew where to obtain contraceptives. However only 16% who became pregnant reported to be using a contraceptive at the time they became pregnant. Education about the availability and mode of contraceptive use is essential.

  1. Politico-Military Relations, a Basis for Military Interaction between Argentina and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    POLITICO -MILITARY RELATIONS, A BASIS FOR MILITARY INTERACTION BETWEEN ARGENTINA AND THE UNITED STATES N IN w Fn STRATEGY AND CAMPAIGN DEPARTMENT...FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classificationi Politico -Military Relations, A...America. Politico -Military relations. civil-military relations, military coups. military to military relations. South American democracy -con- 𔄃

  2. Hybrid Warfare: A Military Revolution or Revolution in Military Affairs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    4MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray, eds., The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050 (Cambridge: Cambridge... Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050.12 A case study helps compare the extrapolation of the analysis and synthesis of their writings on MR to...affairs as defined by Knox and Murray in their book The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050. 37 Professors Knox and Murray, provide a conceptual

  3. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  4. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  5. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  6. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  7. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot...

  8. The Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    1983-01-01

    The chemistry of the ocean, whose constituents interact with those of air and land to support life and influence climate, is known to have undergone changes since the last glacial epoch. Changes in dissolved oxygen, calcium ions, phosphate, carbon dioxide, carbonate ions, and bicarbonate ions are discussed. (JN)

  9. Ocean Acidification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Claudia; Orellana, Mónica V.; DeVault, Megan; Simon, Zac; Baliga, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum module described in this article addresses the global issue of ocean acidification (OA) (Feely 2009; Figure 1). OA is a harmful consequence of excess carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in the atmosphere and poses a threat to marine life, both algae and animal. This module seeks to teach and help students master the cross-disciplinary…

  10. The Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    1983-01-01

    The chemistry of the ocean, whose constituents interact with those of air and land to support life and influence climate, is known to have undergone changes since the last glacial epoch. Changes in dissolved oxygen, calcium ions, phosphate, carbon dioxide, carbonate ions, and bicarbonate ions are discussed. (JN)

  11. Ocean Acidification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Claudia; Orellana, Mónica V.; DeVault, Megan; Simon, Zac; Baliga, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum module described in this article addresses the global issue of ocean acidification (OA) (Feely 2009; Figure 1). OA is a harmful consequence of excess carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in the atmosphere and poses a threat to marine life, both algae and animal. This module seeks to teach and help students master the cross-disciplinary…

  12. Ocean nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    Nutrients provide the chemical life-support system for phytoplankton in the ocean. Together with the carbon fixed during photosynthesis, nutrients provide the other elements, such as N and P, needed to synthesize macromolecules to build cellular constituents such as ribosomes. The makeup of these various biochemicals, such as proteins, pigments, and nucleic acids, together determine the elemental stoichiometry of an individual phytoplankton cell. The stoichiometry of different phytoplankton species or groups will vary depending on the proportions of distinct cellular machinery, such as for growth or resource acquisition, they require for their life strategies. The uptake of nutrients by phytoplankton helps to set the primary productivity, and drives the biological pump, of the global ocean. In the case of nitrogen, the supply of nutrients is categorized as either new or regenerated. The supply of new nitrogen, such as nitrate upwelled from the ocean' interior or biological nitrogen fixation, is equal to the vertical export of particular organic matter from the upper ocean on a timescale of years. Nutrients such as silica can also play a structural role in some phytoplankton groups, such as diatoms, where they are used to synthesize a siliceous frustule that offers some mechanical protection from grazers. In this chapter, we also explore nutrient uptake kinetics, patterns in nutrient distributions in space and time, the biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen, the atmospheric supply of nutrients, departures from the Redfield ratio, and whether nutrient distributions and cycling will be altered in the future

  13. Military Science and Academies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-06

    the Higher Education Institutions" note that the higher school, which has a highly qualified-staff of scientific workers at its disposal, is not taking...deemed it necessary to significantly raise the role of higher education establish- ments in the solution of the most important scientific problems. This...requirement is totally applicable also to the higher military education institutions, it obliges the professorial teaching staffs to re-examine their

  14. Soviet Military Power 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    deployed in both a fixed and mobile ver- Kremlin should cease its massive military aid rrograms. sion. the mobile SS-25, and the new version of the...Libya. Angola, Vict- ability of mobile systems, coupled with greater yield and nam, Syria, and especially Cuba, which is only 90 miles accuracy of the...of severe repression in Poland, Moscow also deployed SS-20 intermediate-range mobile nuclear missiles that These apparent contradictions in Soviet

  15. Soviet Military Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    continuously deployed it frequently in their military journals. to South Yemen and periodically deployed to Mine warfare is a major mission of the So...plague, and cholera The results of that investment are reflected in for BW purposes, as well as botulinum toxin, a number of impressive new weapons such...since World War 11. Dur- In summary: ing the siege of Leningrad, single-cell protein "* A major outbreak of anthrax occurred at (SCP) derived from wood

  16. Military Reform -- What Next?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    at the military with small pockets of support within Congress. 13. 24 End Notes 1. Association of the United States Army, "Department of Defense...strategic reappraisal and of a much overdue organizational reordering." 2. 3’ End Notes 1. Lyman L. Lemnitzer, Gen USA, (ret), "Dont Alter the Joint Chiefs...centers for strategic thinking continue to develop joint strategic concepts that match resources with national strategy. 37 End Notes I. Fredrick H

  17. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    care resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is...Psychology, 29(2), 177.,187. Gutierrez, P.M. (1999). Suicidality in parentally bereaved adolescents. Death Studies, 23(4), 359-370. Osman, A., Kopper, B. A...Gutierrez, P. M. VA continuum of care for suicidal Veterans. Panel presentation at the American Association of Suicidology conference, Pmilati.d, OR

  18. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-24

    Contents: TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE No 1, 1985 (TEKHNIKA I VOORUZHENIYE, No 1, Jan 85) 18 AIR / AIR DEFENSE FORCES Party Work, Improving Technical...One night an enemy aircraft flew over us and dropped its supply of bombs which, I think, our air defense troops and fighters did not allow it to...Eastern, Carpathian, Kiev and Turkestan military districts, the Baltic Fleet, the Moscow Air Defense District, and the organizations led by comrades

  19. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and leading seaman and honor student. The brothers Giya and Guliver Nikolaishvili of Sukhumi, Dato Metreveli of Kutaisi, who is at the Kiev higher...policy is closely related to its domestic and foreign policy and the strategy of accelerating social and economic development based on scientific...and special informational publications and become acquainted with patent materials. There is yet one more important concept in our military lexicon

  20. Military Review: Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    development this, the proponent defines the life-cycle model techn:ques, and advances in our ability todefine. to be tollowed. prect,,e, the SKAs...amnns, we nust population through the Civilian Integration continue to provide leaders the critical experi- into the Personnel Proponent System ( CIPPS ... model is not easy. Demonstrating 32 May 1991 e MILITARY REVIEW - BECKCETAMD NORTH uncompromising integrity, inculcating values But accomplishing the

  1. Prospects for Military Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    tradition has a literary side as well, one most often expressing itself through the medium of military journals. Each year, these journals publish a...beyond cranky literary mutterings and hero-worship for deceased generals of flawed reputation? Can the critique fashioned by the alternative...special timeliness. The archetypal Mac still hovered on the fringes of American politics after having been relieved the previous 40 Parameters year

  2. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Balkin, T., Wesensten, N., 2006. Impaired decision making fol- lowing 49 h of sleep deprivation . Journal of Sleep Research 15 (1), 7–13. Kim, M., Hong, S...Portland VAMC, $307,128 (Appendix 2) o A Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Suicidal Behaviors in Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Study, Dr...Moscowitz A, & Hom MH. (June 2015). Perceived Stigma Toward Mental Health in Association with Sleep Disturbances and as an Acute Predictor of Suicidal

  3. Sound Military Decision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-01-01

    included all available and’ pertinent military writings. Care has also been taken to in- S~~clude, from civil sources, the findings of those...The Advisory Function. Understanding between the civil representatives of the State and the leaders of the armed forces is manifestly essential to...conduct of war thus requires that under- standing exist (see pages 9 and 10) between the civil repre- sentatives of the State and the leaders of the armed

  4. Military Hybrid Vehicle Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-03

    Some examples include:  Allison Hybrid EP System™ - Transit buses two-mode parallel hybrid with continuously variable transmission (CVT)  Azure... Transit Buses , Proceeding of the Vehicular Technology Conference, Vol. 5, pp 3310-3315, October 2003. [3] E. Rosenthal, U.S. Military Orders Less...applications such as delivery trucks and transit busses. One of the biggest justifications for hybrids is their fuel efficiency. However, the U.S

  5. USSR Report, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to New Equipment ( Yu . Vikhrenko; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 28 Jun 86) 27 Maj Gen Avn Tabunshchikov on Results of Early Summer Training (A. Tabunshchikov...Interview; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 2 Jul 86). 31 Critique of Oversimplification in Pilot Training ( V . Vinokurov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jul 86 34 Article...Discusses Career of Maj Gen Avn N. T. Antoshkin ( V . Filatov; KRASNAYA ZVEZDA, 7 Jun 86) 38 DOSAAF Military-Patriotic Education in Arkhangelsk

  6. Selection of Military Advisors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    this thesis will focus on the methods for selecting the best military personnel for advisor tasks. In doing so, specific qualities , capabilities...attract and keep the best personnel for subsequent advisory requirements. Finally, this document will analyze the quality and suitability of advisor...2006, p. 5-2. 5 study in its own right . Lastly, this thesis relies heavily on current published counterinsurgency doctrine since many aspects of

  7. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  8. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-20

    victorious offensive of the Soviet Army which had crushed the Nazi military machine and freed many peoples from the yoke of Naziism . 25 October is celebrated...dignation and hate for Naziism and the fascist regime grew and class contradic tions became exacerbated. In telling the people the bitter truth, the...country, Romania fought along with the Soviet Union until the complete defeat of Naziism and its troops participated in the liberation of hungary and

  9. Military Pay Comparability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    for promotions and for pay based on ability. Also included in this idea is one of equal pay for basically equal work. Thus, the sub-principle of...Report established for the first time the idea that pay within the services for basically equal jobs should be the same and that the pay should be...foundation for legislation creating the first idea of 4 P "regular military compensation" (basic pay , subsistence allowance and quarters allowance) as a

  10. USSR Report, Military Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    praporshchiki] and officers bade farewell to the colors. I am sure that these instants when they pressed down to the crimson silk of the sacred military...clarify the results of the last firing in the battalion. According to the headquarters training data , those who were not at the exercise achieved...television camera, artificially developed target data is photographed and superimposed on a real air situation pre-recorded on videotape. In a matter of

  11. Rebalancing the Military Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-17

    of individual officers than the traditional ethics .”3 The authors contend this primacy of careerism over selfless service began during World War II...states the military officer, by virtue of being a professional with an oath of office and a code of ethics , is granted the moral autonomy to openly...War College on 18 April 1970, to analyze “the state of discipline, integrity, morality, ethics , and professionalism in the Army.”32 This

  12. Police or Military Police?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    their MP to Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejuene as part of the Fleet Assistance Program (FAP).12 (FAP assigns FMF Marines to fill support functions on...1778. The responsibilities of this unit were essentially the same as the MP unit of today. "...[MP] were expected to patrol the camp ... During...Marine Corps. Camp Guards turned into Base Military Police Units and the MP ranks expanded with personnel who laterally moved from every MOS in the

  13. Is Military Science Scientific?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    approaches to strategy, doctrine, and planning. Early military theory in the United States was based largely on inherited European traditions pro...frequently capi- talized and placed alongside Physics, Philosophy, and other well-established academic disciplines. An irony of the term’s decline is...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Defense University,Joint Force Quarterly,260 Fifth Avenue, S.W

  14. [The cradle of military medicine].

    PubMed

    Tsygan, V N

    2013-12-01

    The Kirov Military Medical Academy, included into the State Code of Particularly Valuable Objects of Cultural Heritage of the Peoples of the Russian Federation, plays an important role in national military-medical science and education during XVIII and XIX centuries. Today the Kirov Military Medical Academy consists of 7 faculties, 63 departments (52 military departments and 11 civil departments), 31 clinics (17 surgical clinics and 14 therapeutic clinics), center of extracorporeal detoxification, 3 departments, taking part in treatment and diagnostic process, 11 clinical subdivisions, research center consisting of 4 research subdivisions and 2 laboratories, and also 14 research laboratories, 32 supply subdivisions and publications department. Glorious staff and graduates of the Academy took part in all russian wars. All famous medical schools were founded in the Academy in XIX-XX centuries. At the present time the Kirov Military Medical Academy is the main military medical university, leading research center and treatment facility of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  15. Sexual assault in the military.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara; Schuyler, Ashley C; Lucas, Carrie L; Warner, Christopher H

    2015-07-01

    Military sexual assault is a pervasive problem throughout the military services, despite numerous initiatives to end it. No doubt the military's lack of progress stems from the complexity of sexual assaults, yet in order to develop effective strategies and programs to end sexual assault, deep understanding and appreciation of these complexities are needed. In this paper, we describe the root causes and numerous myths surrounding sexual assault, the military cultural factors that may unintentionally contribute to sexual assault, and the uncomfortable issues surrounding sexual assault that are often ignored (such as the prevalence of male sexual assault within the military). We conclude by offering a broad, yet comprehensive set of recommendations that considers all of these factors for developing effective strategies and programs for ending sexual assault within in the military.

  16. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  17. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  18. Triage in military settings.

    PubMed

    Falzone, E; Pasquier, P; Hoffmann, C; Barbier, O; Boutonnet, M; Salvadori, A; Jarrassier, A; Renner, J; Malgras, B; Mérat, S

    2017-02-01

    Triage, a medical term derived from the French word "trier", is the practical process of sorting casualties to rationally allocate limited resources. In combat settings with limited medical resources and long transportation times, triage is challenging since the objectives are to avoid overcrowding medical treatment facilities while saving a maximum of soldiers and to get as many of them back into action as possible. The new face of modern warfare, asymmetric and non-conventional, has led to the integrative evolution of triage into the theatre of operations. This article defines different triage scores and algorithms currently implemented in military settings. The discrepancies associated with these military triage systems are highlighted. The assessment of combat casualty severity requires several scores and each nation adopts different systems for triage on the battlefield with the same aim of quickly identifying those combat casualties requiring lifesaving and damage control resuscitation procedures. Other areas of interest for triage in military settings are discussed, including predicting the need for massive transfusion, haemodynamic parameters and ultrasound exploration.

  19. Military applications of lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Richard A.

    1989-05-01

    Practically every weapon system requires a battery to provide electrical power for various functions. The lithium battery is becoming the 'power source of choice' for a large number of these military systems. Lithium technology offers unique solutions to the combination of requirements imposed by military systems - low weight, low volume, long storage life, low life cycle cost, and immediate readiness over the full military environmental condition spectrum.

  20. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  1. Military Spending in Eastern Europe,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    on defense (the sums are less than the corresponding expenditures by the republics) or whether they involve military spending above and beyond that...certain military expenditures on personnel are included in budgetary categories other than defense spending . Transportation of soldiers to their first... expenditures and forces and military spending decisions in Eastern Europe. iii L SUMMARY Although the Soviet Union is the most threatening potential

  2. Hurricane Katrina: Barriers to Mental Health Services for Children Persist in Greater New Orleans, Although Federal Grants Are Helping to Address Them. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-09-563

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bascetta, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    The greater New Orleans area--Jefferson, Orleans, Plaquemines, and St. Bernard parishes--has yet to fully recover from the effects of Hurricane Katrina. As a result of the hurricane and its aftermath, many children experienced psychological trauma, which can have long-lasting effects. Experts have previously identified barriers to providing and…

  3. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Military and Contractor Justice in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    PI) governed under Article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice.xliv For the most serious offenses, such as murder or manslaughter, the IG...mission in Iraq. While the military is governed under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and the application of deadly force determined...mission of the military should be held accountable for their actions in the same manner as the US military, under the Uniform Code of Military

  5. Characterization of airborne molds, endotoxins, and glucans in homes in New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Rao, Carol Y; Riggs, Margaret A; Chew, Ginger L; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Van Sickle, David; Dunn, Kevin H; Brown, Clive

    2007-03-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused breeches in the New Orleans, LA, levee system, resulting in catastrophic flooding. The city remained flooded for several weeks, leading to extraordinary mold growth in homes. To characterize the potential risks of mold exposures, we measured airborne molds and markers of molds and bacteria in New Orleans area homes. In October 2005, we collected air samples from 5 mildly water-damaged houses, 15 moderately to heavily water-damaged houses, and 11 outdoor locations. The air filters were analyzed for culturable fungi, spores, (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans, and endotoxins. Culturable fungi were significantly higher in the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses (geometric mean=67,000 CFU/m3) than in the mildly water-damaged houses (geometric mean=3,700 CFU/m3) (P=0.02). The predominant molds found were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp., Trichoderma, and Paecilomyces. The indoor and outdoor geometric means for endotoxins were 22.3 endotoxin units (EU)/m3 and 10.5 EU/m3, respectively, and for (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans were 1.7 microg/m3 and 0.9 microg/m3, respectively. In the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses, the geometric means were 31.3 EU/m3 for endotoxins and 1.8 microg/m3 for (1-->3,1-->6)-beta-D-glucans. Molds, endotoxins, and fungal glucans were detected in the environment after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans at concentrations that have been associated with health effects. The species and concentrations were different from those previously reported for non-water-damaged buildings in the southeastern United States.

  6. Indoor Environmental Exposures for Children with Asthma Enrolled in the HEAL Study, Post-Katrina New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Chulada, Patricia C.; Kennedy, Suzanne; White, LuAnn; Wildfire, Jeremy; Cohn, Richard D.; Mitchell, Herman; Thornton, Eleanor; El-Dahr, Jane; Mvula, Mosanda M.; Sterling, Yvonne; Martin, William J.; Stephens, Kevin U.; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rain and flooding from Hurricane Katrina resulted in widespread growth of mold and bacteria and production of allergens in New Orleans, Louisiana, which may have led to increased exposures and morbidity in children with asthma. Objectives: The goal of the Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) study was to characterize post-Katrina exposures to mold and allergens in children with asthma. Methods: The homes of 182 children with asthma in New Orleans and surrounding parishes were evaluated by visual inspection, temperature and moisture measurements, and air and dust sampling. Air was collected using vacuum-pump spore traps and analyzed for > 30 mold taxa using bright field microscopy. Dust was collected from the children’s beds and bedroom floors and analyzed for mouse (Mus m 1), dust mite (Der p 1), cockroach (Bla g 1), and mold (Alternaria mix) allergens using ELISA. Results: More than half (62%) of the children were living in homes that had been damaged by rain, flooding, or both. Geometric mean indoor and outdoor airborne mold levels were 501 and 3,958 spores/m3, respectively. Alternaria antigen was detected in dust from 98% of homes, with 58% having concentrations > 10 µg/g. Mus m 1, Der p 1, and Bla g 1 were detected in 60%, 35%, and 20% of homes, respectively, at low mean concentrations. Conclusions: Except for Alternaria antigen in dust, concentrations of airborne mold (ratio of indoor to outdoor mold) and dust allergens in the homes of HEAL children were lower than measurements found in other studies, possibly because of extensive post-Katrina mold remediation and renovations, or because children moved into cleaner homes upon returning to New Orleans. PMID:22894816

  7. Indoor environmental exposures for children with asthma enrolled in the HEAL study, post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, L Faye; Chulada, Patricia C; Kennedy, Suzanne; White, LuAnn; Wildfire, Jeremy; Cohn, Richard D; Mitchell, Herman; Thornton, Eleanor; El-Dahr, Jane; Mvula, Mosanda M; Sterling, Yvonne; Martin, William J; Stephens, Kevin U; Lichtveld, Maureen

    2012-11-01

    Rain and flooding from Hurricane Katrina resulted in widespread growth of mold and bacteria and production of allergens in New Orleans, Louisiana, which may have led to increased exposures and morbidity in children with asthma. The goal of the Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) study was to characterize post-Katrina exposures to mold and allergens in children with asthma. The homes of 182 children with asthma in New Orleans and surrounding parishes were evaluated by visual inspection, temperature and moisture measurements, and air and dust sampling. Air was collected using vacuum-pump spore traps and analyzed for > 30 mold taxa using bright field microscopy. Dust was collected from the children's beds and bedroom floors and analyzed for mouse (Mus m 1), dust mite (Der p 1), cockroach (Bla g 1), and mold (Alternaria mix) allergens using ELISA. More than half (62%) of the children were living in homes that had been damaged by rain, flooding, or both. Geometric mean indoor and outdoor airborne mold levels were 501 and 3,958 spores/m3, respectively. Alternaria antigen was detected in dust from 98% of homes, with 58% having concentrations > 10 µg/g. Mus m 1, Der p 1, and Bla g 1 were detected in 60%, 35%, and 20% of homes, respectively, at low mean concentrations. Except for Alternaria antigen in dust, concentrations of airborne mold (ratio of indoor to outdoor mold) and dust allergens in the homes of HEAL children were lower than measurements found in other studies, possibly because of extensive post-Katrina mold remediation and renovations, or because children moved into cleaner homes upon returning to New Orleans.

  8. How a Beacon Community Program in New Orleans Helped Create a Better Health Care System by Building Relationships before Technology.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Anjum; Brown, Lisanne

    2014-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, much of New Orleans' healthcare infrastructure was destroyed. Initial federal funding after the storm expanded primary care services and helped set up medical homes for New Orleans' large uninsured and underinsured population. Following that, the Beacon Community in New Orleans, charged with improving health care through the use of technology, decided the best way to accomplish those goals was to build community partnerships and introduce technology improvements based on their input and on their terms. The purpose of this paper is to describe how those partnerships were wrought, including the innovative use of a conceptual framework, and how they are being sustained; how different technologies were and are being introduced; and what the results have been so far. Past successful community experiences, as well as a proven conceptual framework, were used to help establish community partnerships and governance structures, as well as to demonstrate their linkages. This paper represents a compilation of reports and information from key Beacon leaders, staff and providers and their firsthand experiences in setting up those structures, as well as their conclusions. The community partnerships proved extremely successful in not only devising successful ways to introduce new technology into healthcare settings, but in sustaining those changes by creating a governance structure that has enough fluidity to adapt to changing circumstances. Building and developing community partnerships takes time and effort; however, these relationships are necessary and essential to introducing and sustaining new technologies in a healthcare setting and should be a first step for any organization looking to accomplish such goals.

  9. Chlamydia positivity in New Orleans public high schools, 1996-2005: implications for clinical and public health practices.

    PubMed

    Nsuami, M Jacques; Nsa, Musheni; Brennan, Christine; Cammarata, Catherine L; Martin, David H; Taylor, Stephanie N

    2013-01-01

    To describe the trends in chlamydia positivity among New Orleans high school students tested in a schoolwide screening between 1996 and 2005, and to determine factors associated with chlamydia positivity among students during the 10-year period. Between school years 1995-1996 and 2004-2005, students in New Orleans public high schools were tested for chlamydia using nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) in urine specimens (LCx assay until 1999-2000; BD assay from 2000-2001 to 2004-2005). For each year, we calculated chlamydia positivity by dividing the number of students testing positive by the total number of students tested. Data were analyzed separately by gender. Logistic regressions were performed to determine independent predictors of chlamydia positivity during the 10-year period. Between 1996 and 2005, the average chlamydia positivity was 7.0% (95% confidence interval 6.6-7.4) in boys and 13.1% (95% confidence interval 12.6-13.7) in girls (P < .001). Chlamydia detection increased with the switch from LCx to BD assay. In multivariate analyses, chlamydia positivity among boys and girls was significantly associated with age, black race, and gonorrhea coinfection. Additionally, positivity was significantly different by school year among boys (P = .03) and by NAAT used among girls (P = .008). The trends in chlamydia positivity observed between 1996 and 2005 more likely reflected a high and stable prevalence of chlamydia in the New Orleans school-age adolescent population. Any benefit of screening on individuals tested was likely to be mitigated by participants' uninterrupted social interactions with the dynamic forces that sustain the sexual transmission of chlamydia in the population. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Airborne Molds, Endotoxins, and Glucans in Homes in New Orleans after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita▿

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Carol Y.; Riggs, Margaret A.; Chew, Ginger L.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Thorne, Peter S.; Van Sickle, David; Dunn, Kevin H.; Brown, Clive

    2007-01-01

    In August and September 2005, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused breeches in the New Orleans, LA, levee system, resulting in catastrophic flooding. The city remained flooded for several weeks, leading to extraordinary mold growth in homes. To characterize the potential risks of mold exposures, we measured airborne molds and markers of molds and bacteria in New Orleans area homes. In October 2005, we collected air samples from 5 mildly water-damaged houses, 15 moderately to heavily water-damaged houses, and 11 outdoor locations. The air filters were analyzed for culturable fungi, spores, (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans, and endotoxins. Culturable fungi were significantly higher in the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses (geometric mean = 67,000 CFU/m3) than in the mildly water-damaged houses (geometric mean = 3,700 CFU/m3) (P = 0.02). The predominant molds found were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp., Trichoderma, and Paecilomyces. The indoor and outdoor geometric means for endotoxins were 22.3 endotoxin units (EU)/m3 and 10.5 EU/m3, respectively, and for (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans were 1.7 μg/m3 and 0.9 μg/m3, respectively. In the moderately/heavily water-damaged houses, the geometric means were 31.3 EU/m3 for endotoxins and 1.8 μg/m3 for (1→3,1→6)-β-d-glucans. Molds, endotoxins, and fungal glucans were detected in the environment after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans at concentrations that have been associated with health effects. The species and concentrations were different from those previously reported for non-water-damaged buildings in the southeastern United States. PMID:17209066

  11. Fungal Fragments in Moldy Houses: A Field Study in Homes in New Orleans and Southern Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Reponen, Tiina; Seo, Sung-Chul; Grimsley, Faye; Lee, Taekhee; Crawford, Carlos; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2007-01-01

    Smaller-sized fungal fragments (<1 μm) may contribute to mold-related health effects. Previous laboratory-based studies have shown that the number concentration of fungal fragments can be up to 500 times higher than that of fungal spores, but this has not yet been confirmed in a field study due to lack of suitable methodology. We have recently developed a field-compatible method for the sampling and analysis of airborne fungal fragments. The new methodology was utilized for characterizing fungal fragment exposures in mold-contaminated homes selected in New Orleans, Louisiana and Southern Ohio. Airborne fungal particles were separated into three distinct size fractions: (i) >2.25 μm (spores); (ii) 1.05–2.25 μm (mixture); and (iii) < 1.0 μm (submicrometer-sized fragments). Samples were collected in five homes in summer and winter and analyzed for (1→3)-β-D-glucan. The total (1→3)-β-D-glucan varied from 0.2 to 16.0 ng m−3. The ratio of (1→3)-β-D-glucan mass in fragment size fraction to that in spore size fraction (F/S) varied from 0.011 to 2.163. The mass ratio was higher in winter (average = 1.017) than in summer (0.227) coinciding with a lower relative humidity in the winter. Assuming a mass-based F/S-ratio=1 and the spore size = 3 μm, the corresponding number-based F/S-ratio (fragment number/spore number) would be 103 and 106, for the fragment sizes of 0.3 and 0.03 μm, respectively. These results indicate that the actual (field) contribution of fungal fragments to the overall exposure may be very high, even much greater than that estimated in our earlier laboratory-based studies. PMID:19050738

  12. Repeat chlamydia screening among adolescents: cohort study in a school-based programme in New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Low, Nicola; Forster, Mathieu; Taylor, Stephanie N; Nsuami, M Jacques

    2013-02-01

    To describe uptake of chlamydia screening, determine rates of repeated yearly screening and investigate determinants of repeated participation in an organised school-based screening programme. The authors analysed data from 1995 to 2005 from female and male students in up to 13 schools in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. The authors calculated proportions of students tested among all enrolled students and among those with parental consent and the percentage of positive chlamydia tests in each school year. The authors used random effects logistic regression to examine the effect of past screening history on subsequent participation. 35 041 students were registered for at least one school year. Overall coverage was >30% in all school years. Among all students registered for 4 years, 10.6% (95% CI 9.3% to 12.0%) of women and 12.7% (95% CI 11.2% to 14.2%) of men had a test every year. Among students with parental consent for 4 years, 49.3% (95% CI 44.6% to 54.1%) of women and 59.3% (95% CI 54.5% to 64.0%) of men had a test every year. Among students registered for 2 or more years, those with a previous positive chlamydia test were less likely to have a subsequent test (female adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.88 and male adjusted OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.02). Chlamydia positivity increased over time. High levels of uptake can be achieved in school-based chlamydia screening programmes, but repeated yearly screening is difficult to sustain over time.

  13. Building Community Resilience through Mental Health Infrastructure and Training in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    PubMed Central

    Springgate, Benjamin F.; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Meyers, Diana; Allen, Charles E.; Vannoy, Steven D.; Bentham, Wayne; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe a disaster recovery model focused on developing mental health services and capacity-building within a disparities-focused, community-academic participatory partnership framework. Design Community-based participatory, partnered training and services delivery intervention in a post-disaster setting. Setting Post-Katrina Greater New Orleans community. Participants More than 400 community providers from more than 70 health and social services agencies participated in the trainings. Intervention Partnered development of a training and services delivery program involving physicians, therapists, community health workers, and other clinical and non-clinical personnel to improve access and quality of care for mental health services in a post-disaster setting. Main outcome measure Services delivery (outreach, education, screening, referral, direct treatment); training delivery; satisfaction and feedback related to training; partnered development of training products. Results Clinical services in the form of outreach, education, screening, referral and treatment were provided in excess of 110,000 service units. More than 400 trainees participated in training, and provided feedback that led to evolution of training curricula and training products, to meet evolving community needs over time. Participant satisfaction with training generally scored very highly. Conclusion This paper describes a participatory, health-focused model of community recovery that began with addressing emerging, unmet mental health needs using a disparities-conscious partnership framework as one of the principle mechanisms for intervention. Population mental health needs were addressed by investment in infrastructure and services capacity among small and medium sized non-profit organizations working in disaster-impacted, low resource settings. PMID:22352077

  14. The changing face of trauma: New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Georgia M; Marr, Alan B; Brevard, Sidney B; Weintraub, Sharon L; Hunt, John P; McSwain, Norman E; Duchesne, Juan C; Baker, Christopher C

    2009-04-01

    Charity Hospital (CH) was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and remains closed. Design and staffing of a new, temporary dedicated trauma hospital relied on data from prior experience at CH, updated census information, and a changed trauma demographic. The study objective was to analyze the new trauma program and evaluate changes in demographics, injury patterns, and outcomes between pre- (PK) and post-Katrina (POK) trauma populations. A retrospective review of trauma patients' demographics, anatomical variables, and physiological variables 6 months PK and POK was performed under an approved Institutional Review Board protocol. Trauma activation triage criteria between study periods were also analyzed. Continuous data comparisons between the two time periods were made with Student's t test. Dichotomous data were analyzed using chi2 test. The demographic of trauma patients is different in the POK interval, reflecting changes in the New Orleans population. Modification of triage criteria by the exclusion of mechanism as an activation criterion resulted in an increase of patients with higher acuity and Injury Severity Score, lower initial Glasgow Coma Score, and a higher proportion of penetrating mechanism. Outcome measures reflect longer length of stay (4.4 vs. 6.8 days, P < 0.0001) without a significant difference in mortality (6.0 vs 7.5, P = 0.227). Hospital data demonstrates that the POK trauma system was stressed by the increased acuity, penetrating injury, and number of procedures per patient (1.7 vs. 3.4). Resources should be directed toward patients requiring multidisciplinary care by increasing intensive care unit beds and operating room capacity. Future resource planning in the recovery phases of large-scale natural disasters should take into account these observations.

  15. Fungal fragments in moldy houses: A field study in homes in New Orleans and Southern Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reponen, Tiina; Seo, Sung-Chul; Grimsley, Faye; Lee, Taekhee; Crawford, Carlos; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    Smaller-sized fungal fragments (<1 μm) may contribute to mold-related health effects. Previous laboratory-based studies have shown that the number concentration of fungal fragments can be up to 500 times higher than that of fungal spores, but this has not yet been confirmed in a field study due to lack of suitable methodology. We have recently developed a field-compatible method for the sampling and analysis of airborne fungal fragments. The new methodology was utilized for characterizing fungal fragment exposures in mold-contaminated homes selected in New Orleans, Louisiana and Southern Ohio. Airborne fungal particles were separated into three distinct size fractions: (i) >2.25 μm (spores), (ii) 1.05-2.25 μm (mixture), and (iii) <1.0 μm (submicrometer-sized fragments). Samples were collected in five homes in summer and winter and analyzed for (1→3)- β- D-glucan. The total (1→3)- β- D-glucan varied from 0.2 to 16.0 ng m -3. The ratio of (1→3)- β- D-glucan mass in fragment size fraction to that in spore size fraction ( F/ S) varied from 0.011 to 2.163. The mass ratio was higher in winter (average=1.017) than in summer (0.227) coinciding with a lower relative humidity in the winter. Assuming a mass-based F/ S-ratio=1 and the spore size=3 μm, the corresponding number-based F/ S-ratio (fragment number/spore number) would be 10 3 and 10 6, for the fragment sizes of 0.3 and 0.03 μm, respectively. These results indicate that the actual (field) contribution of fungal fragments to the overall exposure may be very high, even much greater than that estimated in our earlier laboratory-based studies.

  16. Ocean bowling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Coach Scott Carpenter, a biology teacher at Lexington High School in Massachusetts, says that “some [students] want to show that they can win on a football field, and some want to show that they know science better than anyone else.”His team of four sophomores and one senior proved their mettle when they won the 1998 National Ocean Science Bowl on April 27.

  17. Ocean Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    sensing and lidar , through measurements and models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Remote sensing , ocean optics, lidar , underwater imaging, underwater turbulence...scanning system taking advantage of compressive sensing imaging techniques (B. O^ang et al.). Modeling is key in system design and performance...effect has been simulated using a fvlonte Carlo method (Z. Xu and D. K. P. Yue). Active sensing by the means of lidar eliminates many of the issues

  18. Oceans '88

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

  19. Oceanic Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Instrument concepts which measure ocean temperature, chlorophyll, sediment and Gelbstoffe concentrations in three dimensions on a quantitative, quasi-synoptic basis were considered. Coastal zone color scanner chlorophyll imagery, laser stimulated Raman temperaure and fluorescence spectroscopy, existing airborne Lidar and laser fluorosensing instruments, and their accuracies in quantifying concentrations of chlorophyll, suspended sediments and Gelbstoffe are presented. Lidar applications to phytoplankton dynamics and photochemistry, Lidar radiative transfer and signal interpretation, and Lidar technology are discussed.

  20. Oceanic Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batiza, Rodey

    2004-10-01

    The Wilson-Morgan hypothesis that fixed mantle plumes rising from deep in Earth's mantle give rise to linear island and seamount chains like Hawaii has been a leading idea in planetary geodynamics for many decades. However, the notion that these ascending columns of buoyant mantle material are fixed relative to each other or to a fixed reference frame has been questioned because the mean regional flow of the mantle (the so-called mantle wind) would be expected to entrain them and waft them about. Lately, even more fundamental questions have been raised regarding the existence of deep mantle conduits. In fact, the subject of plumes has become quite controversial, with important implications for ideas of mantle convection, Earth's differentiation, and planetary magma budgets and cooling. The appearance of Oceanic Hotspots: Intraplate Submarine Magmatism and Tectonics is thus timely. The 14 chapters contained in this nicely produced volume reflect in part the successful Franco-German collaboration spanning more than 17 years (1986 to present) and 15 expeditions to largely uncharted and unexplored regions of the South Pacific Ocean. The editors intended to produce a comprehensive multidisciplinary overview of oceanic plumes in this region, and in this they have succeeded, with both review and research chapters. Most papers document new discoveries and contain new data and/or new and original thinking, whereas others provide a broad overview and synthesis of existing data.