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Sample records for orotic aciduria reveals

  1. Hereditary Orotic Aciduria and the Excretion of Orotidine.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, William L; Gangoiti, Jon A

    2016-12-01

    Objective Orotic aciduria and deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthetase have been observed in a patient, studied over 10 years, who had no megaloblastic anemia. Excretion of orotic acid and orotidine were 8.24 and 0.52 mmol/mol of creatinine. The ratio of 15.85 differed appreciably from that of 6 patients reported with no megaloblastic anemia. Methods The analysis of orotidine by gas chromotography mass spectrometry was conducted. Conclusion Patients with orotic aciduria with and without megaloblastic anemia cannot be distinguished by ratio of orotic acid to orotidine.

  2. Hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria in portacaval-shunted rats.

    PubMed

    Steele, R D

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a portacaval shunt-induced alteration in liver function on nitrogen metabolism was studied in rats. Within a few days after surgery, portacaval-shunted rats grew with an average daily gain in body weight equal to sham-operated control rats. Within 1 week after surgery, portacaval-shunted rats excreted 20% more orotic acid in their urine compared to control rats. The difference increased to 37% after 3 weeks. Plasma ammonia levels were elevated by 78% in portacaval-shunted rats compared to control rats after 2 weeks. Portacaval-shunted rats injected with a challenging load of ammonium chloride (5 mmol/kg) excreted half as much orotic acid in their urine over a 24-hour period as similarly injected controls. The simultaneous injection of 1.5 mmol/kg of arginine prevented the ammonia-induced increase in orotic acid excretion in both shunted and control rats. However, feeding rats diets supplemented with 1% arginine did not prevent the chronic hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria produced by the construction of portacaval shunts. Similar experiments with diets supplemented with 1% sodium benzoate to induce alternative pathways for nitrogen excretion were also without effect. These results are in contrast to recent clinical studies reporting the effectiveness of sodium benzoate in treating hyperammonemia in patients with urea cycle enzyme defects.

  3. Molecular cloning of the human UMP synthase gene and characterization of point mutations in two hereditary orotic aciduria families.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, M; Mizuno, H; Kawai, Y; Tsuboi, T; Sumi, S; Okajima, K; Hodgson, M E; Ogawa, H; Wada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Uridine monophosphate (UMP) synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the last two steps of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODC). Loss of either enzymatic activity results in hereditary orotic aciduria, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retarded growth, anemia, and excessive urinary excretion of orotic acid. We have isolated the UMP synthase chromosomal gene from a lambdaEMBL-3 human genomic library and report a single-copy gene spanning approximately 15 kb. The UMP synthase genomic structure encodes six exons ranging in size from 115 bp to 672 bp, and all splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. Cognate promoter elements implicated in glucocorticoid- and cAMP-mediated regulation as well as in liver-, myeloid-, and lymphocyte-specific expression are located within the 5' flanking sequence. Molecular investigation of UMP synthase deficiency in a Japanese orotic aciduria patient revealed mutations R96G (A-to-G transition; nt 286) and G429R (G-to-C transversion; nt 1285) in one allele and V109G (T-to-G transversion; nt 326) in the other allele. Expression of human UMP synthase cDNAs containing these mutations in pyrimidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli and in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf21 cells demonstrates impaired activity presumably associated with the urinary orotic acid substrate accumulations observed in vivo. We further establish the identity of two polymorphisms, G213A (v = .26) and 440Gpoly (v = .27) located in exons 3 and 6, respectively, which did not significantly compromise either OPRT or ODC function. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9042911

  4. Hereditary orotic aciduria, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum probed by herpes simplex virus: /sup 125/I-iododeoxycytidine incorporation as an assay for viral growth. [Human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.; Hafner, J.; Boorstein, R.; Pardee, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    /sup 125/I-Iododeoxycytidine (/sup 125/IdC) incorporation into acid-insoluble material was a sensitive, rapid, and quantitative assay for the growth of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in human fibroblasts. Cellular utilization of the isotope was 10 to 25% of the incorporation by infected cells and could be 80% inhibited by tetrahydrouridine (THU). Viral utilization was inhibited by acycloguanosine, thioguanine (TG), and cytosine arabinoside. Isotope was incorporated equally well by growing or quiescent infected cells. HSV-1 was used to probe the metabolic capabilities of three mutant human fibroblast strains. /sup 125/IdC incorporation quantitatively measured the ability of the virus to grow in these cells. Viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to TG in normal fibroblasts but showed a 8- to 10-fold greater resistance to TG in fibroblasts derived from patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LN). Similarly, the growth of ultraviolet irradiated HSV-1 in normal fibroblasts was 5-fold greater than in fibroblasts derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In fibroblasts derived from patients with hereditary orotic aciduria, viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to adenosine (AD) at concentrations which were slightly stimulatory in normal fibroblasts. This was a 2-fold difference in AD sensitivity, which the radioassay reliably and quantitatively documented. HSV-1 infected cells could be individually identified by their incorporated /sup 125/IdC; such cells had blackened nuclei in autoradiograms prepared 12 hr after infection. Normal cells infected in the presence of TG had many fewer labeled nuclei than LN cells similarly infected in the presence of the drug. (JMT)

  5. Isolated adipic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Hasbini, D A; Mikati, M A; Habbal, Z M

    2001-01-01

    Adipic acid can appear, in combination with other dicarboxylic acids, in the urine of patients in a number of underlying metabolic diseases. A child with seizures and mental retardation of unknown etiology who was found to have elevated isolated adipic aciduria on investigation for metabolic diseases is reported. A dietary artifact was suspected, and the adipic aciduria resolved after the child was kept on a specific restricted diet for 3 days. This is the third report of isolated adipic aciduria secondary to food. Findings confirm the previous reports of dietary origin of isolated adipic aciduria and should alert clinicians to such artifact before committing patients to unnecessary treatments.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: argininosuccinic aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... unwilling to eat, and have poorly controlled breathing rate or body temperature. Some babies with this disorder ... InfoSearch: Argininosuccinic Aciduria Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) MalaCards: argininosuccinic aciduria My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: ...

  7. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  8. Progress in understanding 2-hydroxyglutaric acidurias.

    PubMed

    Kranendijk, Martijn; Struys, Eduard A; Salomons, Gajja S; Van der Knaap, Marjo S; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2012-07-01

    The organic acidurias D: -2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2-HGA), L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), and combined D,L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D,L-2-HGA) cause neurological impairment at young age. Accumulation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG) and/or L-2-hydroxyglutarate (L-2-HG) in body fluids are the biochemical hallmarks of these disorders. The current review describes the knowledge gathered on 2-hydroxyglutaric acidurias (2-HGA), since the description of the first patients in 1980. We report on the clinical, genetic, enzymatic and metabolic characterization of D-2-HGA type I, D-2-HGA type II, L-2-HGA and D,L-2-HGA, whereas for D-2-HGA type I and type II novel clinical information is presented which was derived from questionnaires.

  9. Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome as a presenting feature of L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Céline; Born, Mark; Salomons, Gajja S; Jakobs, Cornelis; Woelfle, Joachim

    2006-06-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria was diagnosed in a 9-month-old female infant after a complex febrile convulsion with subsequent transient left-sided hemiplegia. The symptoms were consistent with acute hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed distinct white-matter abnormalities in the bifrontal and bioccipital periventricular area and increased signal intensity in the lenticular, caudate, and dentate nuclei, consistent with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. Increased concentrations of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid were detected in the urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was homozyous for the p.Lys81Glu (c.241A>G) missense mutation in the L-2-HGA gene, confirming the diagnosis of L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. Acute hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome has not been reported as a presenting feature in L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. In patients with prolonged or complicated febrile seizures such as hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in children with concomitant macrocephaly.

  10. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  11. [Magnesium orotate in treatment of chronic hypertension in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Gaĭsin, I R; Valeeva, R M; Maksimov, N I; Iskhakova, A S; Khodyrev, L A; Shilina, L V

    2013-01-01

    We examined 150 pregnant women with essential hypertension (EHT), EHT and connective tissue dysplasia (CTD), and healthy. Presence of CTD aggravated clinical picture of EHT and was associated with pronounced cardialgic, neurological, asthenic, vertebrogenic, visceral, and other syndromes. The use of antihypertensive, metabolic (magnesium orotate) drugs, sedative and uroseptic phytotherapy, application of other nondrug measures in conditions of multidisciplinary dynamic support of the gestational period facilitated regress of clinical symptoms of EHT and EHT+CTD, favorable course of pregnancy and successful delivery.

  12. Reference intervals for orotic acid in urine, plasma and dried blood spot using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    D'Apolito, Oceania; Garofalo, Daniela; la Marca, Giancarlo; Dello Russo, Antonio; Corso, Gaetano

    2012-02-01

    Orotic acid (OA), a marker of hereditary orotic aciduria, is usually used for the differential diagnosis of some hyperammonemic inherited defects of urea cycle and of basic amino acid transporters. This study was aimed to establish age related reference intervals of OA in urine, and for the first time in plasma, and dried blood spot (DBS) from 229 apparently healthy subjects aged from three days to 40 years. The quantification of OA was performed by a previously implemented method, using a stable isotope dilution with 1,3-[(15)N(2)]-orotic acid and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). The method has proved to be sensitive and accurate for a quantitative analysis of OA also in DBS and plasma. According to previous studies, urinary OA levels (mmol/mol of creatinine) decrease significantly with age. The upper limits (as 99th %ile) were of 3.44 and 1.30 in groups aged from three days to 1 year (group 1) and from 1 year to 12 years (group 2), respectively; in teenagers (from 13 to 19 years; group 3) and adults (from 20 to 40 years; group 4) urinary levels became more stable and the upper limits were of 0.64 and 1.21, respectively. Furthermore, OA levels in DBS (μM) also resulted significantly higher in subjects of group 1 (upper limit of 0.89) than in subjects of groups 2, 3 and 4 (upper limits of 0.24, 0.21, and 0.29, respectively). OA levels in plasma (μM) were significantly lower in subjects of group 3 (upper limit of 0.30) than in subjects of groups 1, 2, and 4 (upper limits of 0.59, 0.48, and 0.77, respectively). This method was also employed for OA quantification in plasma and DBS of 17 newborns affected by urea cycle defects, resulting sensitive and specific enough to screen these disorders.

  13. The mechanistic study of Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase based on steady- and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Ferreira, Patricia; Medina, Milagros; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODHLm) has been considered as a potential therapeutic target against leishmaniasis. DHODHLm, a member of class 1A DHODH, oxidizes dihydro-orotate (DHO) to orotate (ORO) during pyrimidine biosynthesis using fumarate (FUM) as the oxidizing substrate. In the present study, the chemistry of reduction and reoxidation of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor in DHODHLm was examined by steady- and pre-steady state kinetics under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Our results provide for the first time the experimental evidence of co-operative behaviour in class 1A DHODH regulated by DHO binding and reveal that the initial reductive flavin half-reaction follows a mechanism with two steps. The first step is consistent with FMN reduction and shows a hyperbolic dependence on the DHO concentration with a limiting rate (kred) of 110±6 s(-1) and a K(DHO) d of 180±27 μM. Dissociation of the reduced flavin-ORO complex corresponds to the second step, with a limiting rate of 6 s(-1). In the oxidative half-reaction, the oxygen-sensitive reoxidation of the reduced FMN cofactor of DHODHLm by FUM exhibited a hyperbolic saturation profile dependent on FUM concentration allowing estimation of K(FUM) d and the limiting rate (kreox) of 258±53 μM and 35±2 s(-1), respectively. Comparison between steady- and pre-steady-state parameters together with studies of interaction for DHODHLm with both ORO and succinate (SUC), suggests that ORO release is the rate-limiting step in overall catalysis. Our results provide evidence of mechanistic differences between class 1A and class 2 individual half-reactions to be exploited for the development of selective inhibitors.

  14. Glutaric aciduria type 1--importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Afroze, Bushra; Yunus, Zabedah Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 is a rare inherited organic academia. Untreated patients characteristically develop dystonia secondary to striatal injury during early childhood, which results in high morbidity and mortality. In patients diagnosed during neonatal period, striatal injury can be prevented by metabolic treatment including low lysine diet, carnitine supplementation and aggressive emergency treatment during acute episode of inter current illnesses. However, after the onset of neurological damage initiation of treatment is generally not effective. Therefore; glutaric aciduria type 1 is included in newborn screening panel for inherited metabolic diseases in many countries. We describe two children in a family with glutaric aciduria type 1 and their different long term outcomes. The first child was diagnosed late leading to severe neurological damage. The second child was diagnosed in the neonatal period as a result of selective high-risk screening and was treated appropriately giving a normal growth.

  15. Overexpression of orotate phosphoribosyl transferase in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomoaki; Kawashima, Hidenori; Matsumura, Kentaro; Yamashita-Hosono, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Rikio; Kuratsukuri, Katsuyuki; Harimoto, Koji; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) is the initial enzyme of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) activation, in which 5-FU is converted to 5-fluorouridinemonophosphate. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a degrading enzyme that catabolizes 5-FU. In this study, we investigated the expression of these enzymes in normal prostate gland (NP), hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (HSPC) and hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Forty-two prostatic tissue specimens were obtained from patients who had undergone prostate needle biopsies without any treatments or with PSA failure after initial androgen deprivation. The tissue samples derived from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were made by laser-captured microdissection and from those RNA was extracted. The levels of OPRT and DPD mRNA expression were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The level of OPRT mRNA expression in the HSPC or the HRPC specimens was significantly higher than that in the NP specimens. Immunohistochemical staining for OPRT revealed strong expression of OPRT in prostate cancer cells. There was a significant correlation between OPRT mRNA expression levels and the tumor pathological grade. Furthermore, the OPRT/DPD expression ratio, a powerful predictive factor to evaluate 5-FU sensitivity, in the HRPC group was significantly higher than that in the low grade HSPC group. Thus, 5-FU may be an effective option for some HRPC patients.

  16. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cellular structures called mitochondria . Based on this activity, the enzyme is classified as a malonyl-CoA synthetase. The ... that have little or no function. Because the enzyme cannot convert malonic and methylmalonic acids, they build up in the body. Damage to ... methylmalonic aciduria with normal malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase activity: a case supporting multiple aetiologies. J Inherit Metab ...

  1. Refractory seizures associated with an organic aciduria in a dog.

    PubMed

    Platt, Simon; McGrotty, Yvonne L; Abramson, Carley J; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2007-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female Cavalier King Charles spaniel exhibited seizures that were difficult to control with standard anticonvulsants over a 12-month period. The diagnosis of an organic aciduria with excessive excretion of hexanoylglycine was determined when the dog was 20 months old. Recurrent and cluster seizures were eventually controlled with the addition of levetiracetam to potassium bromide and phenobarbital.

  2. [D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Mahfoud, Antionieta; Domínguez, Carmen Luisa; Rashed, Mohamed; Durán, Marinus; Rodríguez, Tania; Rodríguez, Daniel; Landa, Vanesa

    2009-09-01

    D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2-HGA) is a cerebral organic aciduria characterized by the accumulation of abnormal amounts of D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and urine. The clinical phenotype varies widely from neonatal severe epileptic encephalopathy to asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging of affected patients typically show signs of delayed cerebral maturation, ventricular abnormalities and the presence of sub-ependymal cysts in the first months of life. We present clinical, biochemical and brain magnetic resonance imaging data of two pediatric patients with D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. One patient presented with severe early infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathy, marked hypotonia, visual deficit, developmental delay and abnormal neuroradiological findings; while the other had hypotonia and development delay. Our findings reinforce the described phenotype of this rare neurometabolic inherited disorder. The diagnostic approach is based on clinical findings and the neuroimaging pattern and is established by the detection of D-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in body fluids. We suggest considering D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with epileptic encephalopathy and CNS dysfunction of unknown origin.

  3. Methylmalonic acid, a biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidurias but no inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Kölker, Stefan; Schwab, Marina; Hörster, Friederike; Sauer, Sven; Hinz, Angela; Wolf, Nicole I; Mayatepek, Ertan; Hoffmann, Georg F; Smeitink, Jan A M; Okun, Jürgen G

    2003-11-28

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and alternative metabolites. An impairment of energy metabolism plays a key role in the pathophysiology of this disease, resulting in neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia and renal failure. It has become the subject of intense debates whether methylmalonic acid is the major toxin, inhibiting respiratory chain complex II. To elucidate whether methylmalonic acid is a respiratory chain inhibitor, we used spectrophotometric analysis of complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart, radiometric analysis of 14C-labeled substrates (pyruvate, malate, succinate), and analysis of ATP production in muscle from mice. Methylmalonic acid revealed no direct effects on the respiratory chain function, i.e. on single electron transferring complexes I-IV, ATPase, and mitochondrial transporters. However, we identified a variety of variables that must be carefully controlled to avoid an artificial inhibition of complex II activity. In summary, the study verifies our hypothesis that methylmalonic acid is not the major toxic metabolite in methylmalonic acidurias. Inhibition of respiratory chain and tricarboxylic acid cycle is most likely induced by synergistically acting alternative metabolites, in particular 2-methylcitric acid, malonic acid, and propionyl-CoA.

  4. [Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans and amino-aciduria (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grosshans, E; Heid, E; Stoll, C

    1978-04-01

    A new case of keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (Siemens, 1925) in a 12 1/2 year old boy is related. This X-dominant inherited disturbance of follicular keratinization is associated with an amino-aciduria in the propositus and his mother, especially an increase of aspartic acid in urin and blood. The scarring infundibular plugs are constituted by nucleated keratin, which brightened up in polarized light and seems to be of internal trichilemmal origin.

  5. Glutaric aciduria type 1 as a cause of dystonic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an inherited inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme glutaryl Co-A dehydrogenase (GCDH). Here, we report a 14-month-old Saudi boy with GA1 who presented with severe dystonia and was mis-diagnosed as cerebral palsy (CP). He presented to our institute with encephalopathy following an episode of gastroenteritis. His physical examination showed dystonia and spastic quadriplegia. His investigations revealed elevated both urinary 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, and serum glutarylcarnitine. The DNA analysis confirmed homozygosity for a mutation in the GCDH-coding gene (c.482G>A;p.R161Q). This case alerts pediatricians to consider GA1 as a differential diagnosis of children presenting with dystonic CP. PMID:26593172

  6. Theoretical calculations of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of liquid phase Orotic acid radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Ebru Karakaş; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-02-01

    To obtain liquid phase molecular structure, conformational analysis of Orotic acid was performed and six conformers were determined. For these conformations, eight possible radicals were modelled by using Density Functional Theory computations with respect to molecular structure. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of these model radicals were calculated and then they were compared with the experimental ones. Geometry optimizations of the molecule and modeled radicals were performed using Becke's three-parameter hybrid-exchange functional combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional of Density Functional Theory and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets in p-dioxane solution. Because Orotic acid can be mutagenic in mammalian somatic cells and it is also mutagenic for bacteria and yeast, it has been studied.

  7. Transition metal(II) complexes of vitamin B13 with monodentate orotate(1-) ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Dursun Ali; Zümreoglu-Karan, Birgül; Şahin, Onur; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2006-05-01

    The formation of bisorotate(1-) complexes of the type [M(C 5H 3N 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 4]· nH 2O (M=Co, Ni, Zn and n=2, 4) was achieved by the reaction of ammonium orotate with the corresponding M(II) ions. The crystal structure of [Co(C 5H 3N 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 4]·2H 2O was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Each Co(II) ion in the monomeric Co(C 5H 3N 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 4 units adapts a slightly distorted octahedral geometry comprised of two monodentate orotate anions and four H 2O ligands. Columnar packing of pyrimidine rings along the c axis leads to the formation of layers that propagate parallel to the b axis and the adjacent layers are linked by hydrogen bonds forming a 3D lattice. Complexes of nickel and zinc were assumed to contain monodentate bound orotate ligands as well on the basis of physical and spectroscopic data.

  8. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  9. [Quantitative evaluation of the anxiolytic and nootropic effects of potassium orotate in a wide range of doses].

    PubMed

    Karkishchenko, N N; Khaĭtin, M I

    1986-01-01

    Chronic administration of potassium orotate to rats per os in doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 mg/kg was followed by different correlations of the training under stress with anxiolytic activity. The doses of the drug were defined, at which the maximally pronounced effects under consideration were in optimal correlations, as were doses which entailed inhibition of the training in the presence of a relatively low tranquilizing activity, low emotional responsiveness and aggressiveness. It is suggested that natural analogs of pyrimidine, whose precursor is orotic acid, are universal endogenous regulators of mnemonic and antianxiety functions.

  10. The persistence of the effect of methylglucamine orotate on the retention of a learned behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rüthrich, H L; Wetzel, W; Matthies, H

    1980-01-01

    The effects of methylglucamine orotate (MGO) on the retention of a brightness discrimination in rats was investigated after different intervals between treatment and acquisition, 225 mg MGO/kg were injected intraperitoneally each day over a period of 10 days. Control animals received a NaCl-solution. After drug-free intervals of 5 days or 12 days respectively, MGO-treated rats showed significantly better retention of the learned reaction than controls, whereas their training performance was not influenced. Possible interpretations of the long-lasting persistence of the orotate effect are discussed.

  11. Glutaric aciduria type I: outcome in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Naughten, E R; Mayne, P D; Monavari, A A; Goodman, S I; Sulaiman, G; Croke, D T

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-one patients have been diagnosed with glutaric aciduria type I over a 16-year period in the Republic of Ireland, 11 following clinical presentation and 10 following a high-risk screen. Nineteen have been managed with diet. Eight patients have died, of whom 7 were diagnosed clinically. Six had dystonic and one spastic cerebral palsy. Of the 11 patients who did not have cerebral palsy, 10 were diagnosed following a high-risk screen. Seven of the 11 have no abnormal neurological signs; 6 of the 7 have abnormal CT or MRI findings; and no case of striatal degeneration has occurred during the past 14 years in the high-risk screened group.

  12. 33 CFR 334.1420 - Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. 334.1420 Section 334.1420... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1420 Pacific Ocean off Orote Point, Apra Harbor, Island of Guam, Marianas Islands; small arms firing range. (a) The danger zone. The waters within an area delineated by...

  13. Methylmalonic Aciduria Secondary to Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption in a Yorkshire Terrier.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, Gerard; McLaughlin, Angela; Sewell, Adrian C; Bell, Rory

    2015-01-01

    An 8 wk old male Yorkshire terrier was presented with a 2 wk history of recurrent hypoglycemia, lethargy, and seizures. Investigations revealed a marked increase in blood ammonia, low serum cobalamin, and increased levels of urinary methylmalonic acid (MMA) excretion. No liver vascular abnormality was detected. The patient was diagnosed with methylmalonic aciduria due to cobalamin malabsorption. The patient responded well to parenteral cobalamin administration, and the urinary MMA levels normalized rapidly following instigation of treatment. Due to the suspected hereditary nature of selective cobalamin deficiency, one sibling of this dog was screened and found to be normal. This is the first reported case of MMA secondary to hypocobalaminemia in Yorkshire terriers, and the second report of this disease in a dog in the United Kingdom. Given the fact that clinical signs of MMA are similar to those seen in dogs with portosystemic shunts and that Yorkshire terriers are predisposed to liver vascular abnormalities, this case report adds important clinical information to the current available literature.

  14. Clinical and Mutational Analysis of the GCDH Gene in Malaysian Patients with Glutaric Aciduria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yakob, Yusnita; Abdul Azize, Nor Azimah; Md Yunus, Zabedah; Huey Yin, Leong; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam; Lock Hock, Ngu

    2016-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme encoded by the GCDH gene. In this study, we presented the clinical and molecular findings of seven GA1 patients in Malaysia. All the patients were symptomatic from infancy and diagnosed clinically from large excretion of glutaric and 3-hydroxyglutaric acids. Bidirectional sequencing of the GCDH gene revealed ten mutations, three of which were novel (Gln76Pro, Glu131Val, and Gly390Trp). The spectrum of mutations included eight missense mutations, a nonsense mutation, and a splice site mutation. Two mutations (Gln76Pro and Arg386Gln) were homozygous in two patients with parental consanguinity. All mutations were predicted to be disease causing by MutationTaster2. In conclusion, this is the first report of both clinical and molecular aspects of GA1 in Malaysian patients. Despite the lack of genotype and phenotype correlation, early diagnosis and timely treatment remained the most important determinant of patient outcome. PMID:27672653

  15. Correction of Methylmalonic Aciduria In Vivo Using a Codon-Optimized Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edward S.Y.; McIntyre, Chantelle; Peters, Heidi L.; Ranieri, Enzo; Anson, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder of organic acid metabolism with limited therapeutic options, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Positive results from combined liver/kidney transplantation suggest, however, that metabolic sink therapy may be efficacious. Gene therapy offers a more accessible approach for the treatment of methylmalonic aciduria than organ transplantation. Accordingly, we have evaluated a lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer approach in an in vivo mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria. A mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria (Mut−/−MUTh2) was injected intravenously at 8 weeks of age with a lentiviral vector that expressed a codon-optimized human methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase transgene, HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM. Untreated Mut−/−MUTh2 and normal mice were used as controls. HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM-treated mice achieved near-normal weight for age, and Western blot analysis demonstrated significant methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme expression in their livers. Normalization of liver methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme activity in the treated group was associated with a reduction in plasma and urine methylmalonic acid levels, and a reduction in the hepatic methylmalonic acid concentration. Administration of the HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM vector provided significant, although incomplete, biochemical correction of methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model, suggesting that gene therapy is a potential treatment for this disorder. PMID:24568291

  16. Metabolic decompensation in methylmalonic aciduria: which biochemical parameters are discriminative?

    PubMed

    Zwickler, Tamaris; Haege, Gisela; Riderer, Alina; Hörster, Friederike; Hoffmann, Georg F; Burgard, Peter; Kölker, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent, life-threatening metabolic decompensations often occur in patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria). Our study evaluated (impending) metabolic decompensations in these patients aiming to identify the most frequent and reliable clinical and biochemical abnormalities that could be helpful for decision-making on when to start an emergency treatment. Seventy-six unscheduled and 179 regular visits of 10 patients with confirmed MMAuria continuously followed by our metabolic centre between 1975 and 2009 were analysed. The most frequent symptom of an impending acute metabolic decompensation was vomiting (90% of episodes), whereas symptoms of intercurrent infectious disease (29%) or other symptoms (such as food refusal and impaired consciousness) were found less often. Thirty-five biochemical parameters were included in the analysis. Among them, pathological changes of acid-base balance reflecting metabolic acidosis with partial respiratory compensation (decreased pH, pCO(2), standard bicarbonate, and base excess) and elevated ammonia were the most reliable biochemical parameters for the identification of a metabolic decompensation and the estimation of its severity. In contrast, analyses of organic acids, acylcarnitines and carnitine status were less discriminative. In conclusion, careful history taking and identification of suspicious symptoms in combination with a small number of rapidly available biochemical parameters are helpful to differentiate compensated metabolic condition and (impending) metabolic crisis and to decide when to start an emergency treatment.

  17. Mevalonate kinase deficiencies: from mevalonic aciduria to hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Dorothea; Hoffmann, Georg F

    2006-01-01

    Mevalonic aciduria (MVA) and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) represent the two ends of a clinical spectrum of disease caused by deficiency of mevalonate kinase (MVK), the first committed enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis. At least 30 patients with MVA and 180 patients with HIDS have been reported worldwide. MVA is characterized by psychomotor retardation, failure to thrive, progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysmorphic features, progressive visual impairment and recurrent febrile crises. The febrile episodes are commonly accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, abdominal symptoms, arthralgia and skin rashes. Life expectancy is often compromised. In HIDS, only febrile attacks are present, but a subgroup of patients may also develop neurological abnormalities of varying degree such as mental retardation, ataxia, ocular symptoms and epilepsy. A reduced activity of MVK and pathogenic mutations in the MVK gene have been demonstrated as the common genetic basis in both disorders. In MVA, the diagnosis is established by detection of highly elevated levels of mevalonic acid excreted in urine. Increased levels of immunoglobulin D (IgD) and, in most patients of immunoglobulin A (IgA), in combination with enhanced excretion of mevalonic acid provide strong evidence for HIDS. The diagnosis is confirmed by low activity of mevalonate kinase or by demonstration of disease-causing mutations. Genetic counseling should be offered to families at risk. There is no established successful treatment for MVA. Simvastatin, an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, and anakinra have been shown to have beneficial effect in HIDS. PMID:16722536

  18. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  19. Complexes of uranyl(II), vanadyl(II) and zirconyl(II) with orotic acid “vitamin B13”: Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal studies and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.

    2007-10-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of complexes of the uranyl [UO 2] 2+, vanadyl [VO] 2+ and [ZrO] 2+ ions with vitamin B13 (Orotic acid; H 3OA) is reported and this has enabled three complexes of orotate anion (1-) to be formulated: [M(C 5H 3N 2O 4) 2(H 2O) 2]·(H 2O) n [where M = [UO 2] 2+, [VO] 2+, [ZrO] 2+; n = 1, 6, 3, respectively]. The new bisorotate (H 2OA) 1- complexes were synthesis and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, spectral methods (UV-vis, mass, 1H NMR and mid infrared spectra), and simultaneous thermal analysis (TG and DTG) techniques. Physical measurements indicate that the neutral orotic acid ligand in its mono/anion form, is bonded to oxometal ions through the carboxylic groups (two monodentate orotate anions and complete the coordination sphere by coordinated water molecules). The molar conductance data confirm that the orotate complexes are non-electrolytes. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the studied complexes have amorphous structures. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters, such as, E∗, Δ H∗, Δ S∗ and Δ G∗ are calculated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial activity of the orotic acid and their complexes was evaluated against gram positive/negative bacteria.

  20. Mechanistic Effects of Amino Acids and Glucose in a Novel Glutaric Aciduria Type 1 Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xi; Gao, Hongjie; Tian, Fengyan; Gao, Jinzhi; Lou, Liping; Liang, Yan; Ning, Qin; Luo, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Acute neurological crises involving striatal degeneration induced by a deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) and the accumulation of glutaric (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OHGA) are considered to be the most striking features of glutaric aciduria type I (GA1). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis and energy metabolism impairment in our novel GA1 neuronal model. We also explored the effects of appropriate amounts of amino acids (2 mM arginine, 2 mM homoarginine, 0.45 g/L tyrosine and 10 mM leucine) and 2 g/L glucose on these cells. Our results revealed that the novel GA1 neuronal model effectively simulates the hypermetabolic state of GA1. We found that leucine, tyrosine, arginine, homoarginine or glucose treatment of the GA1 model cells reduced the gene expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, bax, fos, and jun and restored the intracellular NADH and ATP levels. Tyrosine, arginine or homoarginine treatment in particular showed anti-apoptotic effects; increased α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC), fumarase (FH), and citrate synthase (CS) expression; and relieved the observed impairment in energy metabolism. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the protective mechanisms of amino acids and glucose in GA1 at the cellular level from the point of view of apoptosis and energy metabolism. Our data support the results of previous studies, indicating that supplementation of arginine and homoarginine as a dietary control strategy can have a therapeutic effect on GA1. All of these findings facilitate the understanding of cell apoptosis and energy metabolism impairment in GA1 and reveal new therapeutic perspectives for this disease. PMID:25333616

  1. Mechanistic effects of amino acids and glucose in a novel glutaric aciduria type 1 cell model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Gao, Hongjie; Tian, Fengyan; Gao, Jinzhi; Lou, Liping; Liang, Yan; Ning, Qin; Luo, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Acute neurological crises involving striatal degeneration induced by a deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) and the accumulation of glutaric (GA) and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OHGA) are considered to be the most striking features of glutaric aciduria type I (GA1). In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis and energy metabolism impairment in our novel GA1 neuronal model. We also explored the effects of appropriate amounts of amino acids (2 mM arginine, 2 mM homoarginine, 0.45 g/L tyrosine and 10 mM leucine) and 2 g/L glucose on these cells. Our results revealed that the novel GA1 neuronal model effectively simulates the hypermetabolic state of GA1. We found that leucine, tyrosine, arginine, homoarginine or glucose treatment of the GA1 model cells reduced the gene expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, bax, fos, and jun and restored the intracellular NADH and ATP levels. Tyrosine, arginine or homoarginine treatment in particular showed anti-apoptotic effects; increased α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC), fumarase (FH), and citrate synthase (CS) expression; and relieved the observed impairment in energy metabolism. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the protective mechanisms of amino acids and glucose in GA1 at the cellular level from the point of view of apoptosis and energy metabolism. Our data support the results of previous studies, indicating that supplementation of arginine and homoarginine as a dietary control strategy can have a therapeutic effect on GA1. All of these findings facilitate the understanding of cell apoptosis and energy metabolism impairment in GA1 and reveal new therapeutic perspectives for this disease.

  2. Nitric-oxide supplementation for treatment of long-term complications in argininosuccinic aciduria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both urea...

  3. Dynamic Changes of Striatal and Extrastriatal Abnormalities in Glutaric Aciduria Type I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M.; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Muhlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P. S.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Garbade, Sven F.; Kolker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as…

  4. Trichloroethylene-induced formic aciduria: effect of dose, sex and strain of rat.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Noreen; Evans, Andrew R; Lock, Edward A

    2013-02-08

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) has been reported to increase the excretion of formic acid in the urine of male Fischer 344 (F-344) rats following large oral doses. We have examined the dose-response relationship for formic aciduria in male and female Fischer 344 rats, the effect of some known metabolites of TCE and examined the response in male Wistar rats to help understand its relevance to renal toxicity. We report that doses of TCE as low as 8 mg/kg for 3 days to both male and female F344 rats produced formic aciduria. The formic aciduria was time-dependent being more marked after 3 doses compared to one dose in male F344 rats and to a lesser extent in female F344 rats. TCE administration to male Wistar rats produced less formic aciduria than in male F344 rats, indicating a strain difference in response. As TCE is primarily metabolised by cytochrome P450 2E1, Wistar rats were administered inducers of cytochrome P450 2E1 followed by TCE, this increased formic acid excretion to a concentration similar to that observed in male F344 rats, indicating a role for P450. Administration of the major metabolites of TCE, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid to male F344 rats also produced a marked and sustained formic aciduria, while the metabolite of TCE formed via glutathione conjugation had no effect on formic acid excretion. The mechanism whereby this response occurs is currently not understood, but the formic acid excreted is not a metabolite of TCE, but appears to be due to interference with the metabolic utilisation of formate by a down stream metabolite of TCE. Over the three days of the studies no histopathological evidence of kidney toxicity was observed in F344 rats given TCE, indicating that the perturbation of formate metabolism does not lead to acute renal injury.

  5. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase is overexpressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma: Dramatically responds one case in high OPRT expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Yoichiro; Takeoka, Shinjiro; Mouri, Atsuto; Fukusumi, Munehisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ibe, Tatsuya; Honma, Chie; Arimoto, Yoshihito; Yamada, Kazuaki; Wagatsuma, Miyuki; Tashiro, Akito; Kamoshida, Shingo; Kamimura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive, treatment-resistant cancer. Pemetrexed, an inhibitor of thymidylate synthase (TS), is used worldwide for MPM as a first-line chemotherapy regimen. However, there is little consensus for a second-line chemotherapy. S-1, a highly effective dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD)-inhibitory fluoropyrimidine, mainly acts via a TS inhibitory mechanism similar to pemetrexed. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is a key enzyme related to the first step activation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for inhibiting RNA synthesis. We investigated 5-FU related-metabolism proteins, especially focusing on OPRT expression, in MPM Methods and Patients: Fifteen MPM patients who were diagnosed between July 2004 and December 2013 were enrolled. We examined the protein levels of 5-FU metabolism-related enzymes (TS, DPD, OPRT, and thymidine phosphorylase [TP]) in 14 cases Results: High TS, DPD, OPRT, and TP expressions were seen in 28.6%, 71.4%, 85.7%, and 35.7% of patients, respectively. We found that OPRT expression was extremely high in MPM tissue. We experienced one remarkable case of highly effective S-1 combined therapy for pemetrexed refractory MPM. This case also showed high OPRT protein expression Conclusion: The present study suggests that OPRT expression is high in MPM tumors. Although pemetrexed is mainly used for MPM chemotherapy as a TS inhibitor, S-1 has potential as an anticancer drug not only as a TS inhibitor but also inhibiting RNA synthesis through the OPRT pathway. This is the first report investigating OPRT protein expressions in MPM. PMID:27274438

  6. Glutaric aciduria type II presenting as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manish; Hussain, Shanawaz

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset glutaric aciduria type II has been described recently as a rare but treatable cause of proximal myopathy in teenagers and adults. It is an autosomal recessive disease affecting fatty acid, amino acid, and choline metabolism. This is usually a result of 2 defective flavoproteins: either electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). We present a 14-year-old boy with a background of autistic spectrum disorder who presented with severe muscle weakness and significant rhabdomyolysis. Before the onset of muscle weakness, he was very active but was completely bedridden at presentation. Diagnosis was established quickly by urine organic acid and plasma acylcarnitine analysis. He has shown significant improvement after starting oral riboflavin supplementation and is now fully mobile. This case highlights that late-onset glutaric aciduria type II is an important differential diagnosis to consider in teenagers presenting with proximal myopathy and rhabdomyolysis and it may not be associated with hypoglycemia.

  7. Neurodegeneration and chronic renal failure in methylmalonic aciduria--a pathophysiological approach.

    PubMed

    Morath, M A; Okun, J G; Müller, I B; Sauer, S W; Hörster, F; Hoffmann, G F; Kölker, S

    2008-02-01

    In the last decades the survival of patients with methylmalonic aciduria has been improved. However, the overall outcome of affected patients remains disappointing. The disease course is often complicated by acute life-threatening metabolic crises, which can result in multiple organ failure or even death, resembling primary defects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Biochemical abnormalities during metabolic derangement, such as metabolic acidosis, ketonaemia/ketonuria, lactic acidosis, hypoglycaemia and hyperammonaemia, suggest mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, long-term complications such as chronic renal failure and neurological disease are frequently found. Neuropathophysiological studies have focused on various effects caused by accumulation of putatively toxic organic acids, the so-called 'toxic metabolite' hypothesis. In previous studies, methylmalonate (MMA) has been considered as the major neurotoxin in methylmalonic aciduria, whereas more recent studies have highlighted a synergistic inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, mitochondrial salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)) induced by propionyl-CoA, 2-methylcitrate and MMA as the key pathomechanism of inherited disorders of propionate metabolism. Intracerebral accumulation of toxic metabolites ('trapping' hypothesis') is considered a biochemical risk factor for neurodegeneration. Secondary effects of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as oxidative stress and impaired mtDNA homeostasis, contribute to pathogenesis of these disorders. The underlying pathomechanisms of chronic renal insufficiency in methylmalonic acidurias are not yet understood. We hypothesize that renal and cerebral pathomechanisms share some similarities, such as an involvement of dicarboxylic acid transport. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on recent pathomechanistic concepts for methylmalonic acidurias.

  8. Trichloroethylene-induced formic aciduria in the male C57 Bl/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Keane, Paul; Rowe, Philip H; Foster, John R; Antoine, Daniel; Morris, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    1, 1, 2-Trichloroethylene (TCE) is of environmental concern, due to evaporation while handling, chemical processing and leakage from chemical waste sites, leading to its contamination of ground water and air. For several decades there has been issues about possible long term health effects of TCE but recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the US Environmental Protection Agency classified TCE as a human carcinogen. Links having been established between occupational exposures and kidney cancer and possible links to non-Hodgkin lymphoma and liver cancer, but there is more still more to learn. In male rats, TCE produces a small increase in the incidence of renal tubule tumours but not in female rats or mice of either sex. However, chronic renal injury was seen in these bioassays in both sexes of rats and mice. The mechanism of kidney injury from TCE is thought to be due to reductive metabolism forming a cysteine conjugate that is converted to a reactive metabolite via the enzyme cysteine conjugate β-lyase. However, TCE also produces a marked and sustained formic aciduria in male rats and it has been suggested that long term exposure to formic acid could lead to renal tubule injury and regeneration. In this study we have determined if TCE produces formic aciduria in male mice following a single and repeat dosing. Male C57 Bl/6OlaHsd mice were dosed with 1000mg/kg by ip injection and urine collected overnight 24, 48, 72 and 96h after dosing. Formic acid was present in urine 24h after dosing, peaked around 48h at 8mg formic acid excreted/mouse, and remained constant over the next 24h and was not back to normal 96h after dosing. This was associated with a marked acidification of the urine. Plasma creatinine and renal pathology was normal. Plasma kinetics of formic acid showed it was readily cleared with an initial half-life of 2.42h followed by a slower rate with a half-life of 239h. Male mice were then dosed twice/week at 1000mg/kg TCE for 56

  9. Glutaric aciduria type 2 presenting with acute respiratory failure in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Ebru Ortac; Rama, Dorina; Ünal, Özlem; Sivri, Serap; Topeli, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria (GTA) type II can be seen as late onset form with myopathic phenotype. We present a case of a 19-year old female with progressive muscle weakness was admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with respiratory failure and acute renal failure. Patient was unconscious. Pupils were anisocoric and light reflex was absent. She had hepatomegaly. The laboratory results showed a glucose level of 70 mg/dl and the liver enzymes were high. The patient also had hyponatremia (117 mEq/L) and lactate level of 3.9 mmol/L. Tandem MS and organic acid analysis were compatible with GTA type II. Carnitine 1gr, riboflavin 100 mg and co-enzymeQ10 100 mg was arranged. After four months from beginning of treatment tandem MS results are improved. Respiratory failure, acute renal failure due to profound proximal myopathy can be due to glutaric aciduria type II that responded rapidly to appropriate therapy. PMID:26236614

  10. Profile of polychlorinated biphenyls in the brown alga Padina sanctae-crucis along the Orote dump coastline, Orote Peninsula, Western Guam.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Brian Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the brown seaweed Padina sanctae-crucis might be used as a biomonitor organism to determine the location, distribution, and type of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) present along a contaminated tropical coastline. Polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in P. sanctae-crucis collected from near-shore waters along a 4-km stretch of coastline. The profile of PCB levels from samples obtained at 13 sites along the coastline demonstrated a positive concentration gradient as sample locations progressed toward the dump site. Sample locations nearest the dump site revealed PCB levels twofold higher than background levels for P. sanctae-crucis. Chromatograms of samples obtained nearest the dump site indicated a similarity to the Aroclor 1260 fingerprint. The P. sanctae-crucis frond trimmings used for laboratory analysis were approximately 3-5 wk old. This study was conducted 8 mo following the completion of the removal actions at the dump site. Data suggest a release of Aroclor 1260 into the marine environment approximately 7 mo following the completion of removal actions at the dump site.

  11. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria with bilateral basal ganglia lesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HAO, XIAOSHENG; WANG, JIANGTAO; LIU, SONGYAN; CHEN, YINBO; ZHANG, YAN; HAO, YUNPENG

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria (3-HMG, OMIN 246450) is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase, a key enzyme in leucine metabolism and ketone body synthesis. Acute episodes of 3-HMG may be triggered by fasting or infection, and symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and hypotonia. If left untreated, prolonged hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis may cause breathing problems, seizures, and coma. In addition, 3-HMG is associated with damage to the central nervous system, and there are several reports of white matter abnormality or cerebral atrophy. The presence of bilateral basal ganglia damage in 3-HMG has been rarely reported. Here, we present a case report of a 20-month old male with severe 3-HMG and prominent bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia. PMID:27284350

  12. Enzymatic activities of Ura2 and Ura1 proteins (aspartate carbamoyltransferase and dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase) are present in both isolated membranes and cytoplasm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vorísek, J; Techniková, Z; Schwippel, J; Benoist, P

    2002-03-30

    Computational analysis predicted three potential hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices within the Ura2 multidomain protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the C-terminal subdomain of which catalyses the second step of uridine-monophosphate biosynthesis by its L-aspartate carbamoyltransferase activity (EC 2.1.3.2). The fourth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis is catalysed by dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (Ura1 protein; EC 1.3.99.11), which was similarly characterized as a peripheral membrane protein. Ex situ, the activities of the investigated enzymes were associated both with isolated yeast membranes, fractionated by differential centrifugation to remove intact nuclei, and with soluble cytoplasmic proteins.

  13. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Nicole E.; Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R.; Pitt, James J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15-17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 {+-} 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 {+-} 157 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 {+-} 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 {+-} 1.9 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may

  14. Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis in organic acidurias: insights from human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Moacir; Goodman, Stephen I

    2011-02-01

    Organic acidurias or organic acidemias constitute a group of inherited disorders caused by deficient activity of specific enzymes of amino acids, carbohydrates or lipids catabolism, leading to large accumulation and excretion of one or more carboxylic (organic) acids. Affected patients usually present neurologic symptoms and abnormalities, sometimes accompanied by cardiac and skeletal muscle alterations, whose pathogenesis is poorly known. However, in recent years growing evidence has emerged indicating that mitochondrial dysfunction is directly or indirectly involved in the pathology of various organic acidemias. Mitochondrial impairment in some of these diseases are generally due to mutations in nuclear genes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle or oxidative phosphorylation, while in others it seems to result from toxic influences of the endogenous organic acids to the mitochondrion. In this minireview, we will briefly summarize the present knowledge obtained from human and animal studies showing that disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis may represent a relevant pathomechanism of tissue damage in selective organic acidemias. The discussion will focus on mitochondrial alterations found in patients affected by organic acidemias and by the deleterious effects of the accumulating organic acids on mitochondrial pathways that are crucial for ATP formation and transfer. The elucidation of the mechanisms of toxicity of these acidic compounds offers new perspectives for potential novel adjuvant therapeutic strategies in selected disorders of this group.

  15. Hyperprolinemia in Type 2 Glutaric Aciduria and MADD-Like Profiles.

    PubMed

    Pontoizeau, Clément; Habarou, Florence; Brassier, Anaïs; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Grisel, Coraline; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Barouki, Robert; Chadefaux-Vekemans, Bernadette; Acquaviva, Cécile; de Lonlay, Pascale; Ottolenghi, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Classical neonatal-onset glutaric aciduria type 2 (MAD deficiency) is a severe disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation associated with poor survival. Secondary dysfunction of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases may result from deficiency for riboflavin transporters, leading to severe disorders that, nevertheless, are treatable by riboflavin supplementation. In the last 10 years, we identified nine newborns with biochemical features consistent with MAD deficiency, only four of whom survived past the neonatal period. A likely iatrogenic cause of riboflavin deficiency was found in two premature newborns having parenteral nutrition, one of whom recovered upon multivitamin supplementation, whereas the other died before diagnosis. Four other patients had demonstrated mutations involving ETF or ETF-DH flavoproteins, whereas the remaining three patients presumably had secondary deficiencies of unknown mechanism. Interestingly, six newborns among the seven tested for plasma amino acids had pronounced hyperprolinemia. In one case, because the initial diagnostic workup did not include organic acids and acylcarnitine profiling, clinical presentation and hyperprolinemia suggested the diagnosis. Analysis of our full cohort of >50,000 samples from >30,000 patients suggests that the proline/alanine ratio may be a good marker of MAD deficiency and could contribute to a more effective management of the treatable forms.

  16. Methylmalonic aciduria cblB type: characterization of two novel mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction studies.

    PubMed

    Brasil, S; Richard, E; Jorge-Finnigan, A; Leal, F; Merinero, B; Banerjee, R; Desviat, L R; Ugarte, M; Pérez, B

    2015-06-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene, which codes for the enzyme adenosine triphosphate (ATP): cobalamin adenosyltransferase (ATR). This study reports differences in the metabolic and disease outcomes of two pairs of siblings with MMA cblB type, respectively harbouring the novel changes p.His183Leu/p.Arg190dup (P1 and P2) and the previously described mutations p.Ile96Thr/p.Ser174fs (P3 and P4). Expression analysis showed p.His183Leu and p.Arg190dup to be destabilizing mutations. Both were associated with reduced ATR stability and a shorter half-life than wild-type ATR. Analysis of several parameters related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function showed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, a decrease in mitochondrial respiration and changes in mitochondria morphology and structure in patient-derived fibroblasts compared to control cells. The impairment in energy production and the presence of oxidative stress and fission of the mitochondrial reticulum suggested mitochondrial dysfunction in cblB patients' fibroblasts. The recovery of mitochondrial function should be a goal in efforts to improve the clinical outcome of MMA cblB type.

  17. Current concepts in organic acidurias: understanding intra- and extracerebral disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Kölker, Stefan; Burgard, Peter; Sauer, Sven W; Okun, Jürgen G

    2013-07-01

    This review focuses on the pathophysiology of organic acidurias (OADs), in particular, OADs caused by deficient amino acid metabolism. OADs are termed classical if patients present with acute metabolic decompensation and multiorgan dysfunction or cerebral if patients predominantly present with neurological symptoms but without metabolic crises. In both groups, however, the brain is the major target. The high energy demand of the brain, the gate-keeping function of the blood-brain barrier, a high lipid content, vulnerable neuronal subpopulations, and glutamatergic neurotransmission all make the brain particularly vulnerable against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity. In fact, toxic metabolites in OADs are thought to cause secondary impairment of energy metabolism; some of these toxic metabolites are trapped in the brain. In contrast to cerebral OADs, patients with classical OADs have an increased risk of multiorgan dysfunction. The lack of the anaplerotic propionate pathway, synergistic inhibition of energy metabolism by toxic metabolites, and multiple oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiency may best explain the involvement of organs with a high energy demand. Intriguingly, late-onset organ dysfunction may manifest even under metabolically stable conditions. This might be explained by chronic mitochondrial DNA depletion, increased production of reactive oxygen species, and altered gene expression due to histone modification. In conclusion, pathomechanisms underlying the acute disease manifestation in OADs, with a particular focus on the brain, are partially understood. More work is required to predict the risk and to elucidate the mechanism of late-onset organ dysfunction, extracerebral disease manifestation, and tumorigenesis.

  18. Bioequivalence evaluation of two amlodipine salts, besylate and orotate, each in a fixed-dose combination with olmesartan in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Yun; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Jung, Jin Ah; Huh, Wooseong; Bahng, Mi Young; Ko, Jae-Wook

    2015-01-01

    A fixed-dose combination of amlodipine and olmesartan is used to treat high blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is not sufficiently controlled with either drug alone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of two fixed-dose combinations, ie, amlodipine orotate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg and amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg, in healthy subjects. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-sequence, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 30 healthy adult volunteers. Blood samples were collected for up to 72 hours post-dose in each period. Safety data included the results of physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, vital signs, an electrocardiogram, and adverse events. For both amlodipine and olmesartan, the 90% confidence intervals for the geometric mean ratios of AUClast and time to peak plasma concentration fell within the bioequivalence acceptance criteria. The two fixed-dose combinations showed similar safety profiles. Amlodipine orotate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg was bioequivalent to amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil 10/40 mg.

  19. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Importance of Residues in the Orotate Binding Site†

    PubMed Central

    Iiams, Vanessa; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by exceptional values for the rate enhancement [kcat/knon = 7.1 × 1016] and catalytic proficiency [(kcat/KM)/knon = 4.8 × 1022 M−1]. Although a stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate is located on the reaction coordinate, the structural strategies by which the reduction in the activation energy barrier is realized remain incompletely understood. This laboratory recently reported that “substrate destabilization” by Asp 70 in the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) lowers the activation energy barrier by ~5 kcal/mol (contributing ~2.7 × 103 to the rate enhancement) [K. K. Chan, B. M. Wood, A. A. Fedorov, E. V. Fedorov, H. J. Imker, T. L. Amyes, J. P. Richard, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5518–31]. We now report that substitutions of hydrophobic residues in a pocket proximal to the carboxylate group of the substrate (Ile 96, Leu 123, and Val 155) with neutral hydrophilic residues decrease the value of kcat by as much as 400-fold but have minimal effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of the FUMP product analog with solvent deuterium; we hypothesize that this pocket destabilizes the substrate by preventing hydration of the substrate carboxylate group. We also report that substitutions for Ser 127 that is proximal to O4 of the orotate ring decrease the value of kcat/KM, with the S127P substitution that eliminates hydrogen-bonding interactions with O4 producing a 2.5 × 106-fold reduction in the value of kcat/KM; this effect is consistent with delocalization of the negative charge of the carbanionic intermediate on O4 to produce an anionic carbene intermediate and thereby provide a structural strategy for stabilization of the intermediate. These observations provide additional information on the identities of the active site residues that contribute to the rate enhancement and, therefore, insights into the

  20. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  1. Cannabinoid receptor antagonist-induced striated muscle toxicity and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Lindsay; Tirmenstein, Mark A; Janovitz, Evan B; Aranibar, Nelly; Ott, Karl-Heinz; Kozlosky, John C; Patrone, Laura M; Achanzar, William E; Augustine, Karen A; Brannen, Kimberly C; Carlson, Kenneth E; Charlap, Jeffrey H; Dubrow, Katherine M; Kang, Liya; Rosini, Laura T; Panzica-Kelly, Julieta M; Flint, Oliver P; Moulin, Frederic J; Megill, John R; Zhang, Haiying; Bennett, Michael J; Horvath, Joseph J

    2012-10-01

    Ibipinabant (IBI), a potent cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist, previously in development for the treatment of obesity, causes skeletal and cardiac myopathy in beagle dogs. This toxicity was characterized by increases in muscle-derived enzyme activity in serum and microscopic striated muscle degeneration and accumulation of lipid droplets in myofibers. Additional changes in serum chemistry included decreases in glucose and increases in non-esterified fatty acids and cholesterol, and metabolic acidosis, consistent with disturbances in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. No evidence of CB1R expression was detected in dog striated muscle as assessed by polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and competitive radioligand binding. Investigative studies utilized metabonomic technology and demonstrated changes in several intermediates and metabolites of fatty acid metabolism including plasma acylcarnitines and urinary ethylmalonate, methylsuccinate, adipate, suberate, hexanoylglycine, sarcosine, dimethylglycine, isovalerylglycine, and 2-hydroxyglutarate. These results indicated that the toxic effect of IBI on striated muscle in beagle dogs is consistent with an inhibition of the mitochondrial flavin-containing enzymes including dimethyl glycine, sarcosine, isovaleryl-CoA, 2-hydroxyglutarate, and multiple acyl-CoA (short, medium, long, and very long chain) dehydrogenases. All of these enzymes converge at the level of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and ETF oxidoreductase. Urinary ethylmalonate was shown to be a biomarker of IBI-induced striated muscle toxicity in dogs and could provide the ability to monitor potential IBI-induced toxic myopathy in humans. We propose that IBI-induced toxic myopathy in beagle dogs is not caused by direct antagonism of CB1R and could represent a model of ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria in humans.

  2. Therapeutic intervention in mice deficient for succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh; Greven, Rachel; Jansen, Erwin E W; Jakobs, Cornelis; Hogema, Boris M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Snead, O Carter; Bartels, Hilke; Grompe, Markus; Gibson, K Michael

    2002-07-01

    Therapeutic intervention for human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) has been limited to vigabatrin (VGB). Pharmacologically, VGB should be highly effective due to 4-aminobutyrate-transaminase (GABA-transaminase) inhibition, lowering succinic semialdehyde and, thereby, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) levels. Unfortunately, clinical efficacy has been limited. Because GHB possesses a number of potential receptor interactions, we addressed the hypothesis that antagonism of these interactions in mice with SSADH deficiency could lead to the development of novel treatment strategies for human patients. SSADH-deficient mice have significantly elevated tissue GHB levels, are neurologically impaired, and die within 4 weeks postnatally. In the current report, we compared oral versus intraperitoneal administration of VGB, CGP 35348 [3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist], and the nonprotein amino acid taurine in rescue of SSADH-deficient mice from early death. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of the specific GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-[H]benzocycloheptene-5-ol-6-ylideneacetic acid) using i.p. administration. All interventions led to significant lifespan extension (22-61%), with NCS-382 being most effective (50-61% survival). To explore the limited human clinical efficacy of VGB, we measured brain GHB and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in SSADH-deficient mice receiving VGB. Whereas high-dose VGB led to the expected elevation of brain GABA, we found no parallel decrease in GHB levels. Our data indicate that, at a minimum, GHB and GABA(B) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of SSADH deficiency. We conclude that taurine and NCS-382 may have therapeutic relevance in human SSADH deficiency and that the poor clinical efficacy of VGB in this disease may relate to an inability to decrease brain GHB concentrations.

  3. Proposed recommendations for diagnosing and managing individuals with glutaric aciduria type I: second revision.

    PubMed

    Boy, Nikolas; Mühlhausen, Chris; Maier, Esther M; Heringer, Jana; Assmann, Birgit; Burgard, Peter; Dixon, Marjorie; Fleissner, Sandra; Greenberg, Cheryl R; Harting, Inga; Hoffmann, Georg F; Karall, Daniela; Koeller, David M; Krawinkel, Michael B; Okun, Jürgen G; Opladen, Thomas; Posset, Roland; Sahm, Katja; Zschocke, Johannes; Kölker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I; synonym, glutaric acidemia type I) is a rare inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase located in the catabolic pathways of L-lysine, L-hydroxylysine, and L-tryptophan. The enzymatic defect results in elevated concentrations of glutaric acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, glutaconic acid, and glutaryl carnitine in body tissues, which can be reliably detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (organic acids) and tandem mass spectrometry (acylcarnitines). Most untreated individuals with GA-I experience acute encephalopathic crises during the first 6 years of life that are triggered by infectious diseases, febrile reaction to vaccinations, and surgery. These crises result in striatal injury and consequent dystonic movement disorder; thus, significant mortality and morbidity results. In some patients, neurologic disease may also develop without clinically apparent crises at any age. Neonatal screening for GA-I us being used in a growing number of countries worldwide and is cost effective. Metabolic treatment, consisting of low lysine diet, carnitine supplementation, and intensified emergency treatment during catabolism, is effective treatment and improves neurologic outcome in those individuals diagnosed early; treatment after symptom onset, however, is less effective. Dietary treatment is relaxed after age 6 years and should be supervised by specialized metabolic centers. The major aim of this second revision of proposed recommendations is to re-evaluate the previous recommendations (Kölker et al. J Inherit Metab Dis 30:5-22, 2007b; J Inherit Metab Dis 34:677-694, 2011) and add new research findings, relevant clinical aspects, and the perspective of affected individuals.

  4. The multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation disorders, glutaric aciduria type II and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and electron transfer flavoprotein activities in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, B A; Rhead, W J

    1986-01-01

    The multiple acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenation disorders (MAD) include severe (S) and mild (M) variants, glutaric aciduria type II (MAD:S) and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria (MAD:M). Intact MAD:M mitochondria oxidized [1-14C]octanoate, [1-14C]palmityl-CoA, and [1,5-14C]glutarate at 20-46% of control levels; MAD:S mitochondria oxidized these three substrates at 0.4-18% of control levels. In MAD:M mitochondria, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were similar to control, whereas MAD:S ADH activities ranged from 38% to 73% of control. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) activities in five MAD:M cell lines ranged from 29 to 51% of control (P less than 0.01); ETF deficiency was the primary enzymatic defect in two MAD:M lines. In four MAD:S patients, ETF activities ranged from 3% to 6% of control (P less than 0.001); flavin adenine dinucleotide addition increased residual ETF activity from 4% to 21% of control in a single MAD:S line (P less than 0.01). Three MAD:S patients had ETF activities ranging from 33 to 53% of control; other investigators found deficient ETF-dehydrogenase activity in these MAD:S and three of our MAD:M cell lines. PMID:3722376

  5. Neurodegeneration in methylmalonic aciduria involves inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and synergistically acting excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okun, Jürgen G; Hörster, Friederike; Farkas, Lilla M; Feyh, Patrik; Hinz, Angela; Sauer, Sven; Hoffmann, Georg F; Unsicker, Klaus; Mayatepek, Ertan; Kölker, Stefan

    2002-04-26

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) and alternative metabolites. There is growing evidence for basal ganglia degeneration in these patients. The pathomechanisms involved are still unknown, a contribution of toxic organic acids, in particular MMA, has been suggested. Here we report that MMA induces neuronal damage in cultures of embryonic rat striatal cells at a concentration range encountered in affected patients. MMA-induced cell damage was reduced by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, antioxidants, and succinate. These results suggest the involvement of secondary excitotoxic mechanisms in MMA-induced cell damage. MMA has been implicated in inhibition of respiratory chain complex II. However, MMA failed to inhibit complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart. To unravel the mechanism underlying neuronal MMA toxicity, we investigated the formation of intracellular metabolites in MMA-loaded striatal neurons. There was a time-dependent intracellular increase in malonate, an inhibitor of complex II, and 2-methylcitrate, a compound with multiple inhibitory effects on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting their putative implication in MMA neurotoxicity. We propose that neuropathogenesis of methylmalonic aciduria may involve an inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle by accumulating toxic organic acids, and synergistic secondary excitotoxic mechanisms.

  6. Trichloroethylene and trichloroethanol-induced formic aciduria and renal injury in male F-344 rats following 12 weeks exposure.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Noreen; Evans, Andrew; Foster, John R; Lock, Edward A

    2014-09-02

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is widely used as a cleaning and decreasing agent and has been shown to cause liver tumours in rodents and a small incidence of renal tubule tumours in male rats. The basis for the renal tubule injury is believed to be related to metabolism of TCE via glutathione conjugation to yield the cysteine conjugate that can be activated by the enzyme cysteine conjugate β-lyase in the kidney. More recently TCE and its major metabolite trichloroethanol (TCE-OH) have been shown to cause formic aciduria which can cause renal injury after chronic exposure in rats. In this study we have compared the renal toxicity of TCE and TCE-OH in rats to try and ascertain whether the glutathione pathway or formic aciduria can account for the toxicity. Male rats were given TCE (500mg/kg/day) or TCE-OH at (100mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks and the extent of renal injury measured at several time points using biomarkers of nephrotoxicity and prior to termination assessing renal tubule cell proliferation. The extent of formic aciduria was also determined at several time points, while renal pathology and plasma urea and creatinine were determined at the end of the study. TCE produced a very mild increase in biomarkers of renal injury, total protein, and glucose over the first two weeks of exposure and increased Kim-1 and NAG in urine after 1 and 5 weeks exposure, while TCE-OH did not produce a consistent increase in these biomarkers in urine. However, both chemicals produced a marked and sustained increase in the excretion of formic acid in urine to a very similar extent. The activity of methionine synthase in the liver of TCE and TCE-OH treated rats was inhibited by about 50% indicative of a block in folate synthesis. Both renal pathology and renal tubule cell proliferation were reduced after TCE and TCE-OH treatment compared to controls. Our findings do not clearly identify the pathway which is responsible for the renal toxicity of TCE but do provide some support for metabolism

  7. Investigation of the cerebral energy status in patients with glutaric aciduria type I by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Möller, H E; Koch, H G; Weglage, J; Freudenberg, F; Ullrich, K

    2003-04-01

    In vivo phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to investigate markers of the cerebral energy status in two patients with glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I). Besides an increased concentration of phosphomonoesters in one patient, no other significant alterations from controls were found. This might indicate increased resynthesis of dendritic processes secondary to preceding metabolic crises. In contrast to previous cell-culture studies, no cerebral depletion of phosphocreatine (PCr) was observed. In conclusion, a severe global and permanent depletion of cerebral energy supplies must be ruled out. The benefit of a permanent creatine substitution to stabilize mitochondrial energy metabolism seems thus questionable. However, as MRS was performed during stable clinical conditions, the possibility of a PCr decrease during acute metabolic crises cannot be assessed.

  8. Differential HMG-CoA lyase expression in human tissues provides clues about 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Puisac, Beatriz; Arnedo, María; Casale, Cesar H.; Ribate, María Pilar; Castiella, Tomás; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Ribes, Antonia; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Casals, Nuria; Hegardt, Fausto G.

    2010-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL). This mitochondrial enzyme catalyzes the common final step of leucine degradation and ketogenesis. Acute symptoms include vomiting, seizures and lethargy, accompanied by metabolic acidosis and hypoketotic hypoglycaemia. Such organs as the liver, brain, pancreas, and heart can also be involved. However, the pathophysiology of this disease is only partially understood. We measured mRNA levels, protein expression and enzyme activity of human HMG-CoA lyase from liver, kidney, pancreas, testis, heart, skeletal muscle, and brain. Surprisingly, the pancreas is, after the liver, the tissue with most HL activity. However, in heart and adult brain, HL activity was not detected in the mitochondrial fraction. These findings contribute to our understanding of the enzyme function and the consequences of its deficiency and suggest the need for assessment of pancreatic damage in these patients. PMID:20532825

  9. Resolution of cor pulmonale after medical management in a patient with cblC-type methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Profitlich, Laurie; Kirmse, Brian; Wasserstein, Melissa P; Diaz, George; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2009-07-30

    We describe a 3-year-old Hispanic male with cblC-type methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria who presented to the emergency department with progressive tachypnea, vomiting, and edema secondary to pulmonary embolism and cor pulmonale. With aggressive medical management, there was complete resolution of right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension after 3 months. Pulmonary embolism is rare in the pediatric population. Children with cblC-type methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria may be at increased risk for thrombus formation and pulmonary embolism due to chronic hyperhomocystinemia, a risk factor for thrombus formation in the adult population. Aspirin therapy may be indicated in children with inborn errors of metabolism that predispose to hyperhomocystinemia.

  10. Preclinical Evaluation of a Clinical Candidate AAV8 Vector for Ornithine Transcarbamylase (OTC) Deficiency Reveals Functional Enzyme from Each Persisting Vector Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Morizono, Hiroki; Lin, Jianping; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L.; Wilson, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD), the most common and severe urea cycle disorder, is an excellent model for developing liver-directed gene therapy. No curative therapy exists except for liver transplantation which is limited by available donors and carries significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) has been shown to be the most efficient vector for liver-directed gene transfer and is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial for treating hemophilia B. In this study, we generated a clinical candidate vector for a proposed OTC gene therapy trial in humans based on a self-complementary AAV8 vector expressing codon-optimized human OTC (hOTCco) under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Codon-optimization dramatically improved the efficacy of OTC gene therapy. Supraphysiological expression levels and activity of hOTC were achieved in adult spfash mice following a single intravenous injection of hOTCco vector. Vector doses as low as 1×1010 genome copies (GC) achieved robust and sustained correction of the OTCD biomarker orotic aciduria and clinical protection against an ammonia challenge. Functional expression of hOTC in 40% of liver areas was found in mice treated with a low vector dose of 1×109 GC. We suggest that the clinical candidate vector we have developed has the potential to achieve therapeutic effects in OTCD patients. PMID:22133298

  11. Preclinical evaluation of a clinical candidate AAV8 vector for ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency reveals functional enzyme from each persisting vector genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Morizono, Hiroki; Lin, Jianping; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L; Wilson, James M

    2012-02-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD), the most common and severe urea cycle disorder, is an excellent model for developing liver-directed gene therapy. No curative therapy exists except for liver transplantation which is limited by available donors and carries significant risk of mortality and morbidity. Adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) has been shown to be the most efficient vector for liver-directed gene transfer and is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial for treating hemophilia B. In this study, we generated a clinical candidate vector for a proposed OTC gene therapy trial in humans based on a self-complementary AAV8 vector expressing codon-optimized human OTC (hOTCco) under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Codon-optimization dramatically improved the efficacy of OTC gene therapy. Supraphysiological expression levels and activity of hOTC were achieved in adult spf(ash) mice following a single intravenous injection of hOTCco vector. Vector doses as low as 1×10(10) genome copies (GC) achieved robust and sustained correction of the OTCD biomarker orotic aciduria and clinical protection against an ammonia challenge. Functional expression of hOTC in 40% of liver areas was found in mice treated with a low vector dose of 1×10(9) GC. We suggest that the clinical candidate vector we have developed has the potential to achieve therapeutic effects in OTCD patients.

  12. Dilated cardiomyopathy due to type II X-linked 3-methylglutaconic aciduria: successful treatment with pantothenic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ostman-Smith, I; Brown, G; Johnson, A; Land, J M

    1994-01-01

    A case of dilated cardiomyopathy in a young boy secondary to type II 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is described. A metabolic cause for his dilated cardiomyopathy was suspected because of the development on the electrocardiogram of an unusual "camel's hump" shape of the T waves, and of progressive thickening with increasing echogenicity of the left ventricular wall. He initially improved on digoxin treatment, but did not maintain the response with conventional dietary treatment for this condition. Supplementation with L-carnitine was associated with rapid deterioration in cardiac state, and may be contraindicated in this condition. At a point when the patient was moribund, large doses of pantothenic acid, a precursor of coenzyme A, produced a dramatic and sustained improvement in myocardial function and in growth, neutrophil cell count, hypocholesterolaemia, and hyperuricaemia, which suggests that limitation of availability of coenzyme A is a fundamental pathological process in this condition. The clinical improvement has been maintained for 13 months, and myocardial function is now nearly normal. Oral pantothenol, unlike pantothenic acid, is not efficacious. PMID:7833193

  13. Two exon-skipping mutations as the molecular basis of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (4-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed Central

    Chambliss, K L; Hinson, D D; Trettel, F; Malaspina, P; Novelletto, A; Jakobs, C; Gibson, K M

    1998-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a rare metabolic disorder of 4-aminobutyric acid degradation, has been identified in approximately 150 patients. Affected individuals accumulate large quantities of 4-hydroxybutyric acid, a compound with a wide range of neuropharmacological activities, in physiological fluids. As a first step in beginning an investigation of the molecular genetics of SSADH deficiency, we have utilized SSADH cDNA and genomic sequences to identify two point mutations in the SSADH genes derived from four patients. These mutations, identified by standard methods of reverse transcription, PCR, dideoxy-chain termination, and cycle sequencing, alter highly conserved sequences at intron/exon boundaries and prevent the RNA-splicing apparatus from properly recognizing the normal splice junction. Each family segregated a mutation in a different splice site, resulting in exon skipping and, in one case, a frameshift and premature termination and, in the other case, an in-frame deletion in the resulting protein. Family members, including parents and siblings of these patients, were shown to be heterozygotes for the splicing abnormality, providing additional evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance. Our results provide the first evidence that 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria, resulting from SSADH deficiency, is the result of genetic defects in the human SSADH gene. PMID:9683595

  14. A Korean patient with glutaric aciduria type 1 with a novel mutation in the glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kim, Ji Hye; Shin, Hyung-Jin; Jin, Dong Kyu; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene can result in Glutaric aciduria type 1(GA 1) by accumulation of glutaric acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3-OH-GA), and glutarylcarnitine (C5DC). GA 1 is characterized by macrocephaly, subdural hemorrhage (SDH), and dystonic movement disorder after acute encephalopathic crisis. We report a Korean patient with GA1 and a novel mutation. A 16-month-old boy presented with SDH, macrocephaly, and developmental delay. In the neurologic examination, the patient had mild axial hypotonia, but otherwise normal neurologic functions. The brain MRI showed large amounts of bilateral SDH and high signal intensity in both basal ganglia and thalamus. Metabolic screening tests detected highly elevated urinary GA levels but 3-OH-glutaric acid was normal. C5DC was 0.94 μM/L (reference range < 0.3 μM/L). The patient had compound heterozygous mutations of the GCDH gene: p.Arg257Gln (c.770G>A) and p.Cys308Arg (c.922T>C). p.Cys308Arg is a novel mutation; reports of p.Arg257Gln were also rare both in Caucasians and Asian populations. In summary, we hereby report one Korean patient with GA1 with clinical, biochemical, and radiologic characteristics confirmed by genetic analysis.

  15. N-Carbamylglutamate Is an Effective Treatment for Acute Neonatal Hyperammonaemia in a Patient with Methylmalonic Aciduria.

    PubMed

    Yap, Sufin; Leong, Huey Yin; Abdul Aziz, Fadzlina; Hassim, Haszlin; Sthaneshwar, Pavai; Teh, Ser Huy; Abdullah, Ili Syazwana; Ngu, Lock Hock; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2016-01-01

    N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) has been used in combination with ammonia scavengers (sodium benzoate, sodium phenylbutyrate) and dialysis to treat hyperammonaemia in methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). The sole use of NCG for acute neonatal hyperammonaemia secondary to MMA is demonstrated in a neonate presenting at day 9 with encephalopathy, severe metabolic acidosis, hyperammonaemia (1,089 μmol/l), ketonuria and urinary methylmalonic acids. Emergency treatment included discontinuing protein feeds, providing high calories, carnitine and hydroxocobalamin. NCG 200 mg given at 0 and 90 min decreased plasma ammonia dramatically from 1,089 to 567 µmol/l at 90 min and further to 236 µmol/l at 6 h. Normalisation of ammonia was achieved at 12 h with two further doses of NCG 100 mg. This allowed for early re-institution of feeds at 14 h, followed by metabolic stabilization and recovery. Due to the effectiveness of NCG in this case, the use of the more invasive conventional ammonia-lowering therapeutic options could be avoided.

  16. Dietary saponins of sea cucumber alleviate orotic acid-induced fatty liver in rats via PPARα and SREBP-1c signaling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in the world, and is becoming increasingly prevalent. Saponins of sea cucumber (SSC) are proven to exhibit various biological activities. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effect of saponins extracted from sea cucumber (Pearsonothuria graeffei) on the preventive activity of fatty liver in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, including normal control group, fatty liver model group, SSC-treated group with SSC at levels of 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.05%. Model rats were established by administration with 1% orotic acid (OA). After the experiment period, serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and hepatic lipid concentrations were determined. To search for a possible mechanism, we examined the changes of key enzymes and transcriptional factors involved in hepatic lipids biosynthesis, fatty acid β-oxidation. Results Both 0.03% and 0.05% SSC treatment alleviated hepatic steatosis and reduced serum TG and TC concentration significantly in OA fed rats. Hepatic lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme (ME), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activities were inhibited by SSC treatment. SSC also decreased the gene expression of FAS, ME, G6PDH and sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1c). Otherwise, the rats feeding with SSC showed increased carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) activity in the liver. Hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), together with its target gene CPT and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) mRNA expression were also upregulated by SSC. Conclusions According to our study, the lipids-lowering effect of dietary SSC may be partly associated with the enhancement of β-oxidation via PPARα activation. In addition, the inhibited SREBP-1c- mediated lipogenesis caused by SSC may also contribute to alleviating fatty liver. PMID:20211032

  17. Unstable argininosuccinate lyase in variant forms of the urea cycle disorder argininosuccinic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Pandey, Amit V; Balmer, Cécile; Eggimann, Sandra; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    Loss of function of the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is caused by mutations in the ASL gene leading to ASL deficiency (ASLD). ASLD has a broad clinical spectrum ranging from life-threatening severe neonatal to asymptomatic forms. Different levels of residual ASL activity probably contribute to the phenotypic variability but reliable expression systems allowing clinically useful conclusions are not yet available. In order to define the molecular characteristics underlying the phenotypic variability, we investigated all ASL mutations that were hitherto identified in patients with late onset or mild clinical and biochemical courses by ASL expression in human embryonic kidney 293 T cells. We found residual activities >3% of ASL wild type (WT) in nine of 11 ASL mutations. Six ASL mutations (p.Arg95Cys, p.Ile100Thr, p.Val178Met, p.Glu189Gly, p.Val335Leu, and p.Arg379Cys) with residual activities ≥16% of ASL WT showed no significant or less than twofold reduced Km values, but displayed thermal instability. Computational structural analysis supported the biochemical findings by revealing multiple effects including protein instability, disruption of ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds between residues in the monomeric form of the protein, and disruption of contacts between adjacent monomeric units in the ASL tetramer. These findings suggest that the clinical and biochemical course in variant forms of ASLD is associated with relevant residual levels of ASL activity as well as instability of mutant ASL proteins. Since about 30% of known ASLD genotypes are affected by mutations studied here, ASLD should be considered as a candidate for chaperone treatment to improve mutant protein stability.

  18. Methylmalonic and propionic acidurias: management without or with a few supplements of specific amino acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Touati, G; Valayannopoulos, V; Mention, K; de Lonlay, P; Jouvet, P; Depondt, E; Assoun, M; Souberbielle, J C; Rabier, D; Ogier de Baulny, H; Saudubray, J-M

    2006-01-01

    In a series of 137 patients with methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA) and propionic acidaemia (PA) diagnosed since the early 1970s, we report in more detail 81 patients (51 MMA and 30 PA) diagnosed between 1988 and 2005. In this series, 14% of patients died at initial access revealing the disease before or despite treatment, 18% died later, and the remainder (68%) are still alive. All patients were treated with the same protocol of enteral feeds with a low-protein diet adjusted to individual tolerance, carnitine, antibiotics, and only occasional use of an amino acid (AA) mixture. There was intensive follow-up and monitoring using measurements of urinary urea. Thirty-nine patients with severe forms, followed for more than 3 years, are analysed in particular detail. Of the 17 PA patients, 6 had moderate disability (all neonatal-onset forms), whereas 11 were normal or slightly delayed in their mental development. Four presented with cardiomyopathy, of whom 2 died. Of the 22 MMA patients, 13 presented in the neonatal period, of whom 3 died later, 2 are in renal failure and only 5 are still alive and have a normal or slightly delayed mental development. In the 9 patients with late-onset forms, there were no deaths and all patients but one have normal mental development. Among the 39 patients, only 40% were given an AA supplement at 3 years, and 50% between 6 and 11 years. The actual intake of natural protein was 0.92, 0.78 and 0.77 g/kg per day at 3, 6 and 11 years, respectively, in patients without AA supplementation, whereas it was 0.75, 0.74 and 0.54 g/kg per day in the group who received small quantities of AA (0.4-0.6 g/kg per day). In both groups, feeding disorders were frequent: 55% at 3 years, 35% at 6 years and 12% at 11 years. Many patients were given a food supplement by tube overnight or were even exclusively tube fed: 60% at 3 years, 48% at 6 years and still 27% at 11 years. Growth velocity was near the normal values. Plasma valine and isoleucine were low to very

  19. The M405V allele of the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene is an important marker for glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) low excretors.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Lori-Anne P; Greene, Carol L; Strovel, Erin; Rispoli-Joines, Jessica; Spector, Elaine; Woontner, Michael; Scharer, Gunter; Enns, Gregory M; Gallagher, Renata; Zinn, Arthur B; McCandless, Shawn E; Hoppel, Charles L; Goodman, Stephen I; Bedoyan, Jirair K

    2016-09-01

    Glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) is an autosomal recessive organic aciduria resulting from a functional deficiency of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase, encoded by GCDH. Two clinically indistinguishable diagnostic subgroups of GA-I are known; low and high excretors (LEs and HEs, respectively). Early medical and dietary interventions can result in significantly better outcomes and improved quality of life for patients with GA-I. We report on nine cases of GA-I LE patients all sharing the M405V allele with two cases missed by newborn screening (NBS) using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We describe a novel case with the known pathogenic M405V variant and a novel V133L variant, and present updated and previously unreported clinical, biochemical, functional and molecular data on eight other patients all sharing the M405V allele. Three of the nine patients are of African American ancestry, with two as siblings. GCDH activity was assayed in six of the nine patients and varied from 4 to 25% of the control mean. We support the use of urine glutarylcarnitine as a biochemical marker of GA-I by demonstrating that glutarylcarnitine is efficiently cleared by the kidney (50-90%) and that plasma and urine glutarylcarnitine follow a linear relationship. We report the allele frequencies for three known GA-I LE GCDH variants (M405V, V400M and R227P) and note that both the M405V and V400M variants are significantly more common in the population of African ancestry compared to the general population. This report highlights the M405V allele as another important molecular marker in patients with the GA-I LE phenotype. Therefore, the incorporation into newborn screening of molecular screening for the M405V and V400M variants in conjunction with MS/MS could help identify asymptomatic at-risk GA-I LE patients that could potentially be missed by current NBS programs.

  20. Nucleic acid labeling with ( sup 3 H)orotic acid and nucleotide profile in rats in protein deprivation, enteral and parenteral essential amino acid administration, and 5-fluorouracil treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, B.; el Hag, I.A.; Andersson, M.; Christensson, P.I.; Stenram, U. )

    1990-09-01

    Rats were fed a 0% casein diet for 1 week, with or without enteral or parenteral administration of essential amino acids, or a 25% casein diet, in one group supplemented with 5-fluorouracil treatment. Ninety minutes before sacrifice the rats were given a tracer of (3H)orotic acid. Incorporation into the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA was determined in liver, small intestine, bone marrow, and kidney. Nucleotide profile was examined in liver and intestine. Protein deficiency caused inter alia a decrease in body weight; a decrease in RNA/DNA ratio and an increase in the specific RNA labeling in liver and kidney; an altered nucleotide profile in the liver; an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios and a decrease in the specific labeling of the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA in the bone marrow. These changes were prevented to the same extent by giving essential amino acids, either orally or intravenously. The minor changes in intestinal nucleotide profile in protein deprivation were prevented to a slightly larger extent by amino acids orally than parenterally. 5-Fluorouracil treatment gave a decrease in the RNA/DNA ratio in the liver and kidney but an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios in the bone marrow. Nucleotide profiles were unaltered. The amount of DNA per gram of tissue decreased in bone marrow and increased in kidney. Parenteral administration per se resulted in almost no changes.

  1. Proteomic and Biochemical Studies of Lysine Malonylation Suggest Its Malonic Aciduria-associated Regulatory Role in Mitochondrial Function and Fatty Acid Oxidation*

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Gozde; Pougovkina, Olga; Dai, Lunzhi; Tan, Minjia; te Brinke, Heleen; Huang, He; Cheng, Zhongyi; Park, Jeongsoon; Wan, Xuelian; Liu, Xiaojing; Yue, Wyatt W.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Locasale, Jason W.; Lombard, David B.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Zhao, Yingming

    2015-01-01

    The protein substrates of sirtuin 5-regulated lysine malonylation (Kmal) remain unknown, hindering its functional analysis. In this study, we carried out proteomic screening, which identified 4042 Kmal sites on 1426 proteins in mouse liver and 4943 Kmal sites on 1822 proteins in human fibroblasts. Increased malonyl-CoA levels in malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD)-deficient cells induces Kmal levels in substrate proteins. We identified 461 Kmal sites showing more than a 2-fold increase in response to MCD deficiency as well as 1452 Kmal sites detected only in MCD−/− fibroblast but not MCD+/+ cells, suggesting a pathogenic role of Kmal in MCD deficiency. Cells with increased lysine malonylation displayed impaired mitochondrial function and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting that lysine malonylation plays a role in pathophysiology of malonic aciduria. Our study establishes an association between Kmal and a genetic disease and offers a rich resource for elucidating the contribution of the Kmal pathway and malonyl-CoA to cellular physiology and human diseases. PMID:26320211

  2. Clinical and laboratory analysis of late-onset glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) in Uighur: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Luo, Qiong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical, biochemical and genetic mutation characteristics of two cases of late-onset glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I) in Uighur. The clinical data and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) genetic test results of two cases of late-onset GA-I in Uighur were collected and analyzed, and reviewed with relevant literature. One patient with late-onset GA-I primarily exhibited clinical intermittent headache, while the other patient was asymptomatic. The urinary organic acid analysis detected a large number of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, 3-hydroxy-propionic acid. One patient exhibited white matter degeneration in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the other patient showed no abnormality. The two patients both exhibited c. 1204C >T, p.R402W, heterozygous mutation, and c. 532G >A, p.G178R, heterozygous mutation. Besides central nervous system infectious diseases, patients with clinical headache, cranial MRI-suggested bilateral temporal lobe arachnoid cyst and abnormal signals in the basal ganglia should be highly suspected as late-onset GA-I. Early diagnosis and correct treatment are key to improve its prognosis. PMID:28352331

  3. Mevalonolactone disrupts mitochondrial functions and induces permeability transition pore opening in rat brain mitochondria: Implications for the pathogenesis of mevalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; da Silva, Janaína Camacho; Wajner, Alessandro; Godoy, Kálita Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Rafael Teixeira; Gonçalves, Aline de Mello; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2017-03-09

    Mevalonic aciduria (MVA) is caused by severe deficiency of mevalonic kinase activity leading to tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of mevalonic acid (MA) and mevalonolactone (ML). Patients usually present severe neurologic symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the major accumulating metabolites are toxic by investigating the in vitro effects of MA and ML on important mitochondrial functions in rat brain and liver mitochondria. ML, but not MA, markedly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), NAD(P)H content and the capacity to retain Ca(2+) in the brain, besides inducing mitochondrial swelling. These biochemical alterations were totally prevented by the classical inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) cyclosporine A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, indicating the involvement of MPT and an important role for mitochondrial Ca(2+) in these effects. ML also induced lipid peroxidation and markedly inhibited aconitase activity, an enzyme that is highly susceptible to free radical attack, in brain mitochondrial fractions, indicating that lipid and protein oxidative damage may underlie some of ML-induced deleterious effects including MTP induction. In contrast, ML and MA did not compromise oxidative phosphorylation in the brain and all mitochondrial functions evaluated in the liver, evidencing a selective toxicity of ML towards the central nervous system. Our present study provides for the first time evidence that ML impairs essential brain mitochondrial functions with the involvement of MPT pore opening. It is therefore presumed that disturbance of brain mitochondrial homeostasis possibly contributes to the neurologic symptoms in MVA.

  4. Experimental evidence of oxidative stress in patients with l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria and that l-carnitine attenuates in vitro DNA damage caused by d-2-hydroxyglutaric and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daiane Grigolo Bardemaker; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Sitta, Ângela; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Hauschild, Tatiane; Manfredini, Vanusa; Bakkali, Abdellatif; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2017-04-07

    d-2-hydroxyglutaric (D-2-HGA) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric (L-2-HGA) acidurias are rare neurometabolic disorders biochemically characterized by increased levels of d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D-2-HG) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (L-2-HG) respectively, in biological fluids and tissues. These diseases are caused by mutations in the specific enzymes involved in the metabolic pathways of these organic acids. In the present work, we first investigated whether D-2-HG and L-2-HGA could provoke DNA oxidative damage in blood leukocytes and whether l-carnitine (LC) could prevent the in vitro DNA damage induced by these organic acids. It was verified that 50μM of D-2-HG and 30μM of L-2-HG significantly induced DNA damage that was prevented by 30 and 150μM of LC. We also evaluated oxidative stress parameters in urine of L-2-HGA patients and observed a significant increase of oxidized guanine species and di-tyrosine, biomarkers of oxidative DNA and protein damage, respectively. In contrast, no significant changes of urinary isoprostanes and reactive nitrogen species levels were observed in these patients. Taken together, our data indicate the involvement of oxidative damage, especially on DNA, in patients affected by these diseases and the protective effect of LC.

  5. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Errami A, Gissen P, Gradowska W, Hobson E, Islam L, Korman SH, Kurczynski T, Maranda B, Meli ... Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. ...

  7. Complete recovery from acute encephalopathy of late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in a 3-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Mak, C M; Siu, T-S; Lam, C-W; Chan, G C-F; Poon, G W-K; Wong, K-Y; Low, L C-K; Tang, N L; Li, S K; Lau, K-Y; Kwong, N-S; Tam, S

    2007-11-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the commonest urea cycle disorder which is transmitted in X-linked inheritance. It is mainly characterized in males by acute encephalopathy and hyperammonaemia with fatal outcomes in both classical neonatal and late-onset types. We report a 3-year-old healthy Hong Kong Chinese boy who presented with acute encephalopathy and coma after three days of gastroenteritis. He had no focal neurological deficit and brain CT imaging was normal. His plasma ammonia (54 micromol/L) and glutamine (747 micromol/L) concentrations were normal. The only biochemical abnormalities detected were marked orotic aciduria (700 micromol/mmol creatinine) and elevated urinary uracil. He regained consciousness spontaneously after three days under intensive care with parenteral fluid therapy. He recovered completely without any neurological deficits. Five months after discharge, urinary uracil concentration remained elevated despite normalized orotic acid concentration. Finally, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency was diagnosed by DNA analysis. A missense mutation of arginine-to-glutamine substitution on amino acid 277 (p.R277Q) was revealed to be a late-onset mutant. Our case strengthens the argument that in any child with coma or acute encephalopathy of undetermined cause, genetic analysis of the OTC gene and the measurement of urinary uracil concentration remain the most reliable indicators of late-onset OTCD during acute and even quiescent phases. Existing neonatal screening programmes for inheritable metabolic disorders fail to detect late-onset variants. Therefore, a high clinical suspicion is a key to correct and timely diagnosis, especially in those patients with atypical presentations.

  8. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  9. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  10. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  11. An OTC deficiency 'phenocopy' in association with Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Swarts, L; Leisegang, F; Owen, E P; Henderson, H E

    2007-02-01

    Late-onset urea cycle disorder in a 20-month-old boy is unusually associated with Klinefelter syndrome with a 47XXY karyotype. We record the typical clinical and biochemical findings of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in a young boy with a short history of recurrent vomiting, self mutilating behaviour, lethargy, ataxia and seizures. Laboratory studies showed hyperammonaemia and orotic aciduria, with normal citrulline and other urea cycle amino acids. Unfortunately, a liver biopsy for OTC activity measurement was refused by the parents. A rapid reversal of phenotype was seen on the introduction of a low-protein diet with accompanying benzoate and phenylbutyrate administration. Linkage studies suggested the inheritance of two X chromosomes, which was confirmed by karyotype analysis. Sequencing of all exons and immediate splice site regions revealed no sequence alterations in these sections of the OTC gene. A search for skewing of X-inactivation in the liver was not possible but we did show a random pattern of X-inactivation in leukocytes. The possibility of maternal X chromosome iso-disomy in our patient was discounted by microsatellite analysis, which revealed the inheritance of two independent X chromosomes. Mutation analysis in the OTC gene has shown that approximately 20% of patients with liver biopsy confirmed OTC deficiency do not have mutations in the coding or immediate splice-site sequences of this gene. Their classification as OTC phenocopies remains speculative, awaiting clarification of the underlying DNA alteration. We report on the novel association of OTC deficiency and Klinefelter syndrome with the additional interest of a probable unusual genetic defect underlying the OTC abnormality.

  12. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  13. Ancient River revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) mission aboard the space shuttle Endeavour discovered a previously unknown branch of an ancient river. The images, released at AGU's Spring Meeting, show the river channel buried under thousands of years worth of windblown sand in a region of North Africa's Sahara Desert near the Kufra Oasis in southeast Libya, centered at 23.3°N latitude, 22.9°E longitude. The image from the flight last October reveals a system of old, now inactive stream valleys, called “paleodrainage systems,” which carried running water northward across the Sahara during periods of wetter climate.

  14. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  15. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  16. [Nephrocutaneous fistula revealing xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Scotté, M; Sibert, L; Soury, P; Lebret, T; Gobet, F; Grise, P; Tenière, P

    1993-01-01

    A patient presented with a reno-cutaneous fistula revealing a xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis secondary to staghorn calculus. Total nephrectomy was necessary because of renal destruction. This treatment allowed closure of the fistula and a good clinical result.

  17. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  18. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  19. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  20. Revealing the microstructure of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate how the microstructure of materials may be revealed by abrasive polishing and chemical etching, and to illustrate how microstructural information is used to monitor manufacturing processes, provide in-depth inspection, and perform failure analysis. Microstructural analysis is the procedure used to reveal the internal microstructural details of a material or part by sectioning and polishing the cut surface so that it may be examined under a suitable microscope. A printed wiring board was selected as the test material because it contains both metals and nonmetals that have distinctive microstructures, and because this technique is used throughout the electronic industry as a key quality control tool. The three principle component materials in printed circuit boards are glass/epoxy laminates faced with copper foil; copper, deposited by both electroless and electrolytic plating; and tin/lead solder. Sample preparation, mounting, grinding, polishing, and examination and analysis are discussed.

  1. Archimedes: Accelerator Reveals Ancient Text

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2004-02-24

    Archimedes (287-212 BC), who is famous for shouting 'Eureka' (I found it) is considered one of the most brilliant thinkers of all times. The 10th-century parchment document known as the 'Archimedes Palimpsest' is the unique source for two of the great Greek's treatises. Some of the writings, hidden under gold forgeries, have recently been revealed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. An intense x-ray beam produced in a particle accelerator causes the iron in original ink, which has been partly erased and covered, to send out a fluorescence glow. A detector records the signal and a digital image showing the ancient writings is produced. Please join us in this fascinating journey of a 1,000-year-old parchment from its origin in the Mediterranean city of Constantinople to a particle accelerator in Menlo Park.

  2. Revealing Non-Covalent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erin R.; Keinan, Shahar; Mori-Sánchez, Paula; Contreras-García, Julia; Cohen, Aron J.; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-01

    Molecular structure does not easily identify the intricate non-covalent interactions that govern many areas of biology and chemistry, including design of new materials and drugs. We develop an approach to detect non-covalent interactions in real space, based on the electron density and its derivatives. Our approach reveals underlying chemistry that compliments the covalent structure. It provides a rich representation of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, and steric repulsion in small molecules, molecular complexes, and solids. Most importantly, the method, requiring only knowledge of the atomic coordinates, is efficient and applicable to large systems, such as proteins or DNA. Across these applications, a view of non-bonded interactions emerges as continuous surfaces rather than close contacts between atom pairs, offering rich insight into the design of new and improved ligands. PMID:20394428

  3. Revealing hidden genuine tripartite nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-11-01

    Nonlocal correlations arising from measurements on tripartite entangled states can be classified into two groups, one genuinely three-way nonlocal and other local with respect to some bipartition. Still, whether a genuinely tripartite entangled quantum state can exhibit genuine three-way nonlocality remains a challenging problem as far as measurement context is concerned. Here we introduce an approach in this regard. We consider three tripartite quantum states, none of which is genuinely three-way nonlocal in a specific Bell scenario (three parties, two measurements per party, two outcomes per measurement), but they can exhibit genuine three-way nonlocality when the initial states are subjected to stochastic local operations and classical communication. So, genuine three-way nonlocality is a resource which can be revealed by using a sequence of measurements.

  4. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition.

  5. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  6. Erosion and what it Reveals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 November 2003

    This image is located near the boundary between Syrtis Major and Isidis Planitia. The top of the image shows rough material that has eroded away from the lower portion of the image, revealing an underlying surface that has many small craters. It also reveals an ancient flow lobe that is barely discernable, crossing the southern part of the image (this flow lobe is much easier to see as a smooth region in the context image).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.4, Longitude 77.9 East (282.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  8. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  9. Chandra Reveals Rich Oxygen Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This striking Chandra X-Ray Observatory image of supernova remnant SNR0103-72.6 reveals a nearly perfect ring about 150 light years in diameter surrounding a cloud of gas enriched in oxygen and shock-heated to millions of degrees Celsius. The ring marks the outer limits of a shock wave produced as material ejected in the supernova explosion collides with the interstellar gas. The size of the ring indicates that we see the supernova remnant as it was about 10,000 years after its progenitor star exploded. Located in the Small Magenellanic Cloud (SMC), SNR 0103-72.6 is about 190,000 light years from Earth. The x-rays take about 190,000 years to reach us from the SMC, so the supernova explosion occurred about 200,000 years ago, as measured on Earth. Scientists have know for years that oxygen and many other elements necessary for life are created in massive stars and dispersed in supernova explosions, but few remnants rich in these elements have been observed. This supernova remnant will hence become an important laboratory for studying how stars forge the elements necessary for life.

  10. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Lucien; Segrestin, Bérénice; Lapoirie, Marion; Favrel, Véronique; Dementhon, Julie; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular impairments are frequent in Cushing's syndrome and the hypercortisolism can result in cardiac structural and functional changes that lead in rare cases to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Such cardiac impairment may be reversible in response to a eucortisolaemic state. A 43-year-old man with a medical past of hypertension and history of smoking presented to the emergency department with global heart failure. Coronary angiography showed a significant stenosis of a marginal branch and cardiac MRI revealed a nonischemic DCM. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was estimated as 28% to 30%. Clinicobiological features and pituitary imaging pointed toward Cushing's disease and administration of adrenolytic drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) was initiated. Despite the normalization of cortisol which had been achieved 2 months later, the patient presented an acute heart failure. A massive mitral regurgitation secondary to posterior papillary muscle rupture was diagnosed as a complication of the occlusion of the marginal branch. After 6 months of optimal pharmacological treatment for systolic heart failure, as well as treatment with inhibitors of steroidogenesis, there was no improvement of LVEF. The percutaneous mitral valve was therefore repaired and a defibrillator implanted. The severity of heart failure contraindicated pituitary surgery and the patient was instead treated by stereotaxic radiotherapy. This is the first case reporting a Cushing's syndrome DCM without improvement of LVEF despite normalization of serum cortisol levels. PMID:26579807

  11. Satellites reveal Antarctic mass imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite radar observations have revealed a widespread mass imbalance in western Antarctica and rapid thinning of ice shelves at the Antarctic Peninsula. The former shows grounded ice retreat in a region previously considered unstable to such events, and the latter illuminates an ongoing debate as to the mechanism through which ice shelves have disintegrated over the past decade. Both measurements inform us as to the present state of balance of the cryosphere and its interactions with the southern oceans. Since 1992, the Amundsen Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has lost 39 cubic kilometers of its volume each year due to an imbalance between snow accumulation and ice discharge. A flow disturbance is responsible for removing the majority of that ice from the trunks of the Pine Island, Thwaites and Smith glacier drainage systems, raising global sea level by over 1 mm during the past decade alone. The coincidence of rapid ice thinning at the Amundsen Coast and warm circumpolar deep water intrusion in Pine Island Bay, coupled with a ~ 50 cubic kilometre annual freshening of the Ross Sea Gyre downstream, makes ocean melting an attractive proposition for the origin of the regional disturbance. At the same time, the Larsen Ice Shelf surface has lowered by up to 0.27 m per year, in tandem with a period of atmospheric warming and ice shelf collapse. The lowering cannot be explained by increased summer melt-water production alone, and must reflect a loss of basal ice through melting. Ocean temperature measurements close to the ice shelf barrier support this conclusion, making enhanced basal ice melting a likely factor linking the regional climate warming and the successive disintegration of sections of the Larsen Ice Shelf.

  12. Sustained Correction of OTC Deficiency in Spf ash mice Using Optimized Self-complementary AAV2/8 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Wang, Huan; Morizono, Hiroki; Bell, Peter; Jones, David; Lin, Jianping; McMenamin, Deirdre; Yu, Hongwei; Batshaw, Mark L.; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common inborn error of urea synthesis. Complete OTCD can result in hyperammonemic coma in the neonatal period which can rapidly become fatal. Current acute therapy involves dialysis; chronic therapy involves the stimulation of alternate nitrogen clearance pathways; and the only curative approach is liver transplantation. AAV vector based gene therapy would add to current treatment options provided the vector delivers high level and stable transgene expression in liver without dose limiting toxicity. In this study, we employed an AAV2/8-based self-complementary (sc) vector expressing the murine OTC gene under a liver-specific thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) promoter and examined the therapeutic effects in a mouse model of OTCD, the spf ash mouse. Seven days after a single intravenous injection of vector, treated mice showed complete normalization of urinary orotic acid, a measure of OTC activity. We further improved vector efficacy by incorporating a Kozak or Kozak-like sequence into mOTC cDNA which increased the OTC activity by 5- or 2-fold and achieved sustained correction of orotic aciduria for up to 7 months. Our results demonstrate that vector optimizations can significantly improve the efficacy of gene therapy. PMID:21850052

  13. A new mouse model of mild ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (spf-j) displays cerebral amino acid perturbations at baseline and upon systemic immune activation.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Rosas, Odrick R; Singh, Larry N; Kristaponis, Kara; Vernon, Hilary; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD, OMIM# 311250) is an inherited X-linked urea cycle disorder that is characterized by hyperammonemia and orotic aciduria. In this report, we describe a new animal model of OTCD caused by a spontaneous mutation in the mouse Otc gene (c.240T>A, p.K80N). This transversion in exon 3 of ornithine transcarbamylase leads to normal levels of mRNA with low levels of mature protein and is homologous to a mutation that has also been described in a single patient affected with late-onset OTCD. With higher residual enzyme activity, spf-J were found to have normal plasma ammonia and orotate. Baseline plasma amino acid profiles were consistent with mild OTCD: elevated glutamine, and lower citrulline and arginine. In contrast to WT, spf-J displayed baseline elevations in cerebral amino acids with depletion following immune challenge with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid. Our results indicate that the mild spf-J mutation constitutes a new mouse model that is suitable for mechanistic studies of mild OTCD and the exploration of cerebral pathophysiology during acute decompensation that characterizes proximal urea cycle dysfunction in humans.

  14. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-04

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function.

  15. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases*

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  16. [Cholangitis revealing an intrahepatic Osler's disease].

    PubMed

    Asma, Kochlef; Dalila, Gargouri; Olfa, Bousnina; Malika, Romani; Afef, Kilani; Najet, BelHadg; Jamel, Kharrat; Abdeljabbar, Gorbel; Sarra, Shili; Chiraz, Jemli; Mohamed, Habib Daghfous; Slim, Khlifi; Anis, Ben Maamer; Abdelmajid, Letaïef

    2005-08-01

    Osler Weber Rendu Disease is an hereditary haemorrhagic télangectasia habitually revealed by reccurent bleeding (epistaxis). Hepatic involvement in Osler disease is found in 8 to 31%, manifested by cholestasis. We report an original observation of a cholangitis revealing Osler disease.

  17. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  18. [The influence of 'potassium orotate' on neocollagenogenesis in implantation of polypropylene endoprosthesis and polypropylene combined with polylactic acid endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S V; Lazarenko, V A; Ivanov, I S; Parfenov, I P; Tsukanov, A V; Tarabrin, D V; Ob''edkov, E G

    2017-01-01

    Цель исследования — изучить неоколлагеногенез при имплантации комбинированного эндопротеза и полипропиленового эндопротеза на фоне применения калия оротата. Материал и методы. Экспериментальным животным выполняли имплантацию двух типов эндопротеза. Первый эндопротез имел в своей структуре нити из полипропилена. Второй эндопротез являлся комбинированным, в его состав входили нити из полипропилена и полимолочной кислоты. Гистологические препараты исследовали с помощью поляризационной микроскопии. Анализ соотношения типов коллагена в соединительной ткани вокруг эндопротеза проводили по цветовой гамме, индивидуальной для каждого типа. Результаты. При сравнении результатов исследования соотношения типов коллагена в группах с использованием одного и того же эндопротеза, начиная с 30-х суток и в последующие сроки эксперимента, отмечались достоверно лучшие результаты в группах, в которых выполняли стимуляцию коллагеногенеза калия оротата. Также в ходе нашего исследования, начиная с 30-х суток и до окончания эксперимента, было выявлено лучшее течение процесса коллагеногенеза и формирование соединительнотканной парапротезной капсулы при использовании комбинированного эндопротеза. В ходе эксперимента нами было выявлено стимулирующее действие калия оротата на синтез коллагена в условиях имплантации синтетических материалов, проявляющееся преобладанием I типа над III. Вывод. Оптимизация коллагеногенеза в эксперименте заключалась в увеличении соотношения коллагена I и III типов в 1,37 раза при имплантации комбинированного эндопротеза по сравнению с таковым при использовании стандартного полипропиленового материала на 90-е сутки эксперимента, что проявлялось ускорением созревания соединительнотканной капсулы и способствовало ранней изоляции эндопротеза от прилежащих тканей.

  19. Multidisciplinary Redesign of Hill Air Force Base Modular Storage Magazine for Orote Point, Guam. 2010 DDESB Seminar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    destructive is the burn bar. The burn bar is a steel tube filled with iron rods which is burned with pressurized oxygen. The combustion of the iron...To provide the support along the bottom edge an 8 by 8-inch steel tube is embedded in the magazine floor as shown in Figure 2. The elevation...difference between the top of the steel and the concrete can be as much as 4-inches. Although portable ramps, seen in Figure 3, are used to allow weight

  20. Hiding personal information reveals the worst

    PubMed Central

    John, Leslie K.; Barasz, Kate; Norton, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Seven experiments explore people’s decisions to share or withhold personal information, and the wisdom of such decisions. When people choose not to reveal information—to be “hiders”—they are judged negatively by others (experiment 1). These negative judgments emerge when hiding is volitional (experiments 2A and 2B) and are driven by decreases in trustworthiness engendered by decisions to hide (experiments 3A and 3B). Moreover, hiders do not intuit these negative consequences: given the choice to withhold or reveal unsavory information, people often choose to withhold, but observers rate those who reveal even questionable behavior more positively (experiments 4A and 4B). The negative impact of hiding holds whether opting not to disclose unflattering (drug use, poor grades, and sexually transmitted diseases) or flattering (blood donations) information, and across decisions ranging from whom to date to whom to hire. When faced with decisions about disclosure, decision-makers should be aware not just of the risk of revealing, but of what hiding reveals. PMID:26755591

  1. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  2. The neuropsychological profile of patients with 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, Costeff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sofer, S; Schweiger, A; Blumkin, L; Yahalom, G; Anikster, Y; Lev, D; Ben-Zeev, B; Lerman-Sagie, T; Hassin-Baer, S

    2015-04-01

    Costeff syndrome is a rare genetic neuro-ophthalmological syndrome consisting of early-onset bilateral optic atrophy along with a progressive complex motor disorder with elevated levels of urinary 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. While borderline to mild cognitive deficits have been considered to be common in patients with this syndrome, a comprehensive cognitive assessment has never been performed. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive profile associated with Costeff syndrome. Sixteen adult patients diagnosed with Costeff syndrome were administered a neuropsychological test battery that was composed of standardized verbal tests adapted for the blind. General intelligence ranged from average to borderline, with a group mean consistent with intact general cognitive functioning (VIQmean  = 85, z = -1) in the low-average range of the general population. The auditory immediate and delayed memory indexes were in the average range and were significantly higher than the general cognitive functioning, whereas the working memory index was significantly lower than the general cognitive functioning. Adult patients with Costeff syndrome have intact global cognition and learning abilities and strong auditory memory performance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Dicarboxylic aciduria during ketotic phases in various types of glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, J E; Winsnes, A

    1981-01-01

    Urine samples were collected before and after a starvation period of 14-16 h from patients with glycogen storage disease, one with type III (amylo-1,6-glucosidase deficiency), four with type VIII (phosphorylase-b-kinase deficiency), and one with an unclassified type. The excretion of adipic, suberic, and 3-hydroxybutyric acid was measured by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The tendency towards ketosis seemed to decline with age in the patients with type VIII. In the non-ketotic patients no excess amounts of dicarboxylic acids were excreted. Therefore, glycogen storage disease per se seems to have no direct relationship to the excretion of adipic or suberic acid. A positive correlation was, however, found between the urinary excretion of on one side 3-hydroxybutyric and on the other adipic (correlation coefficient (Kendall's tau) +0.64, P less than 0.002 (one-sided test)) or suberic (+0.61, P less than 0.003) acid. The two dicarboxylic acids are most probably formed from long-chain monocarboxylic acids by omega- and beta-oxidation. It is speculated that succinyl-CoA formed by this pathway may counteract the tendency to ketosis in patients with glycogen storage disease.

  4. Comparing SessionStateReveal and EphemeralKeyReveal for Diffie-Hellman Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaoglu, Berkant

    Both the "eCK" model, by LaMacchia, Lauter and Mityagin, and the "CK01" model, by Canetti and Krawczyk, address the effect of leaking session specific ephemeral data on the security of key establishment schemes. The CK01-adversary is given a SessionStateReveal query to learn session-specific private data defined by the protocol specification, whereas the eCK-adversary is equipped with an EphemeralKeyReveal query to access all ephemeral private input required to carry session computations. SessionStateReveal cannot be issued against the test session; by contrast EphemeralKeyReveal can be used against the test session under certain conditions. On the other hand, it is not obvious how EphemeralKeyReveal compares to SessionStateReveal. Thus it is natural to ask which model is more useful and practically relevant.

  5. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  6. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  7. Revealing Student Teacher's Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers' thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers' dilemmas fall into two…

  8. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  9. Revealing Student Teachers' Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-06-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers’ thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers’ dilemmas fall into two main groups: dilemmas about student performance and dilemmas associated with instructional decisions. These dilemmas reveal a variety of concerns that student teachers have about their work. In particular, concerns about lack of student motivation and its consequences on performance and instruction play a central role in student teachers’ thinking. The recognition of common patterns of thought in our student teacher thinking has made us reflect on and re-evaluate important components of the curriculum in our science teacher preparation program.

  10. [Pseudotumoral toxoplasmic cystitis revealing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ples, Raluca; Méchaï, Frédéric; Champiat, Bernard; Droupy, Stéphane; Huerre, Michel; Guettier, Catherine; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2011-02-01

    A case of bladder toxoplasmosis in a 57-year-old male Caucasian patient was diagnosed with difficulty due to misleading clinical presentation. The patient presented with pollakiuria and urination burning. Imagery showed pseudotumoral thickening of the vesicle wall. Previously unknown status of HIV infection was found positive through the diagnosis of bladder toxoplasmosis. The patient died rapidly from neurological complications. This is the second published case in which bladder toxoplasmosis reveals an HIV infection.

  11. Experts reveal catalyst-selection methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-14

    Refining catalyst selection procedure were discussed in detail at Oil and Gas Journal`s International Catalyst Conference, Feb. 1--2, in Houston. Marathon Oil Co.`s James P. Wick revealed details of Marathon`s program for review and optimization of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrotreating catalysts. And renowned FCC expert Del Tolen outlined a step-by-step procedure for choosing an FCC catalyst. The paper describes Marathon`s program and Tolen`s selection process.

  12. Satellite altimetry reveals seafloor tectonic fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Mcadoo, D.C.; Marks, K.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Seasat altimeter observations of sea-surface topography have revealed much that was unsuspected about the marine gravity field and seafloor topography, which in conjunction with crustal/upper-mantle density variations generates short wavelength (less than 200-km) marine gravity field fluctuations. Such high-resolution altimeter data is currently available, however, only for 6 percent of the world's ocean surface area; future efforts with Geosat Geodetic Mission and ERS-1 data will expand coverage to the entire world ocean. 4 refs.

  13. Apocalypto: revealing lost text with XMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, David; Davis, Graham R.; Lai, Yu-kun; Rosin, Paul

    2014-09-01

    "Can brute-force high-contrast tomography techniques and image processing techniques retrieve textual content from damaged heritage materials?" The Dental Institute at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is the leading centre for very high contrast X-Ray Microtomography imaging. The Apocalypto Project is our collaboration with the heritage community and experts in Computer Vision systems in the Computer Science Department at Cardiff University. This collaboration has developed techniques and a workflow that allows us to reveal textual content from moisture-damaged parchment rolls. This article will also present some initial results from burned and heat shrunken parchment rolls, an insect damaged Mamluk cap and a birch bark roll.

  14. Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the 'Anatolia' region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

  15. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  16. Symbiotic conversations are revealed under genetic interrogation

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    The recent development and application of molecular genetics to the symbionts of invertebrate animal species have advanced our knowledge of the biochemical communication that occurs between the host and its bacterial symbionts. In particular, the ability to manipulate these associations experimentally by introducing genetic variants of the symbionts into naive hosts has allowed the discovery of novel colonization mechanisms and factors. In addition, the role of the symbionts in inducing normal host development has been revealed, and its molecular basis described. In this Review, I discuss many of these developments, focusing on what has been discovered in five well-understood model systems. PMID:18794913

  17. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  18. Revealing Event Saliency in Unconstrained Video Collection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingwen; Han, Junwei; Jiang, Lu; Ye, Senmao; Chang, Xiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Recent progresses in multimedia event detection have enabled us to find videos about a predefined event from a large-scale video collection. Research towards more intrinsic unsupervised video understanding is an interesting but understudied field. Specifically, given a collection of videos sharing a common event of interest, the goal is to discover the salient fragments, i.e., the curt video fragments that can concisely portray the underlying event of interest, from each video. To explore this novel direction, this paper proposes an unsupervised event saliency revealing framework. It first extracts features from multiple modalities to represent each shot in the given video collection. Then, these shots are clustered to build the cluster-level event saliency revealing framework, which explores useful information cues (i.e., the intra-cluster prior, inter-cluster discriminability, and inter-cluster smoothness) by a concise optimization model. Compared with the existing methods, our approach could highlight the intrinsic stimulus of the unseen event within a video in an unsupervised fashion. Thus, it could potentially benefit to a wide range of multimedia tasks like video browsing, understanding, and search. To quantitatively verify the proposed method, we systematically compare the method to a number of baseline methods on the TRECVID benchmarks. Experimental results have demonstrated its effectiveness and efficiency.

  19. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  20. Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bradney, D R; Davidson, A; Evans, S P; Wueringer, B E; Morgan, D L; Clausen, P D

    2017-02-27

    Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's lateral line sensory system during pursuits. Moreover, during lateral swipes, the rostra were found to induce little velocity into the surrounding fluid. Consistent with previous data of sawfish feeding behaviour, these data indicate that the rostrum is therefore unlikely to be used to stir up the bottom to uncover benthic prey. Whilst swimming with the rostrum inclined at a small angle to the horizontal, the coefficient of drag of the rostrum is relatively low and the coefficient of lift is zero.

  1. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  2. Paraventricular meningioma revealed by mental disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hilmani, Said; Houass, Yassine; El Azhari, Abdessamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventricular meningioma constitutes 2% of intracranial meningioma, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons. Although cognitive impairment is one of the major symptoms of ventricular tumors, few studies have reported the details of cognitive impairment before and after their surgical removal. The expected effects on cognitive function should also be considered when choosing a surgical approach. Case Descriptions: We report the case of a large lateral ventricle meningioma revealed by cognitive dysfunction and moderate intellectual disability. The patient underwent subtotal resection of the tumor which had partial improvement in cognitive disorders. It is important to precisely assess neuropsychological function in patients with large brain tumors, and judicious preoperative plan, adequate knowledge of anatomy, and use of correct microsurgical techniques are fundamental in achieving complete resection of paraventricular meningioma with low morbidity. Conclusion: Pre and postoperative precise neuropsychological examinations may identify the potential cognitive impairment and beneficial effects of surgery in patients with large lateral ventricle meningiomas. PMID:28144473

  3. Memory strength and specificity revealed by pupillometry.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Megan H; Goldinger, Stephen D; Hout, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Voice-specificity effects in recognition memory were investigated using both behavioral data and pupillometry. Volunteers initially heard spoken words and nonwords in two voices; they later provided confidence-based old/new classifications to items presented in their original voices, changed (but familiar) voices, or entirely new voices. Recognition was more accurate for old-voice items, replicating prior research. Pupillometry was used to gauge cognitive demand during both encoding and testing: enlarged pupils revealed that participants devoted greater effort to encoding items that were subsequently recognized. Further, pupil responses were sensitive to the cue match between encoding and retrieval voices, as well as memory strength. Strong memories, and those with the closest encoding-retrieval voice matches, resulted in the highest peak pupil diameters. The results are discussed with respect to episodic memory models and Whittlesea's (1997) SCAPE framework for recognition memory.

  4. Fracture reveals clustering in cohesive granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Franco; Santucci, Stéphane; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental study of the morphology of fractures in cohesive granular materials. Cohesion is introduced by equilibrating the grains with a humid atmosphere. The setup allows to produce a controlled crack in a thin layer of a glass beads assembly, and observe with an extremely high resolution the edge of the fracture at the free surface of the layer. The detailed multi-scale analysis of the fracture profile reveals the presence, in the bulk of the material, of clusters of grains whose size increases monotonically with the relative humidity. These results are important because the formation of clusters, resulting in a heterogeneity of the cohesion force, governs the mechanical properties of cohesive granular matter in contact with a humid atmosphere.

  5. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  6. Revealing effective classifiers through network comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compare complex systems can provide new insight into the fundamental nature of the processes captured, in ways that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. Here, we introduce the n-tangle method to directly compare two networks for structural similarity, based on the distribution of edge density in network subgraphs. We demonstrate that this method can efficiently introduce comparative analysis into network science and opens the road for many new applications. For example, we show how the construction of a “phylogenetic tree” across animal taxa according to their social structure can reveal commonalities in the behavioral ecology of the populations, or how students create similar networks according to the University size. Our method can be expanded to study many additional properties, such as network classification, changes during time evolution, convergence of growth models, and detection of structural changes during damage.

  7. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  8. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Fries, M.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  9. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  10. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  11. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  12. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation.

  13. Revealing Open Quantum Systems with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    The traditional quantum chemical methods, wave function or density based, are designed to solve for a closed system, where the Hamiltonian contains all relevant interactions. The closed system is, however, not realistic, as in real life the system is embedded in an environment with which it interacts to some degree. Including the description of the environment at the full quantum mechanical level leads to the Open Quantum Systems (OQS) theory: the only theory which can describe non-Markovian dynamics between the system and the environment. By allowing the flow of information in both directions phenomena such as quantum entanglement, relevant for the design of quantum computers, become available. While most OQS theories rely on the density matrix to describe the system-bath interaction, time-dependent subsystem DFT allows to approach the problem using the electron density. Through Dyson-like equations connecting the density-density response kernels of the OQS and its environment, the extent to which non-Markovian dynamics is present can be revealed. We illustrate this for the process of excitation energy transfer in coupled chromophores embedded in explicit solvent.

  14. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C; Codreanu, Simona G; Liebler, Daniel C; Collins, Ben C; Pennington, Stephen R; Gallagher, William M; Tabb, David L

    2011-02-18

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here, we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty-five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications.

  15. Phylogenetic proximity revealed by neurodevelopmental event timings.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Clancy, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Statistical properties such as distribution and correlation signatures were investigated using a temporal database of common neurodevelopmental events in the three species most frequently used in experimental studies, rat, mouse, and macaque. There was a fine nexus between phylogenetic proximity and empirically derived dates of the occurrences of 40 common events including the neurogenesis of cortical layers and outgrowth milestones of developing axonal projections. Exponential and power-law approximations to the distribution of the events reveal strikingly similar decay patterns in rats and mice when compared to macaques. Subsequent hierarchical clustering of the common event timings also captures phylogenetic proximity, an association further supported by multivariate linear regression data. These preliminary results suggest that statistical analyses of the timing of developmental milestones may offer a novel measure of phylogenetic classifications. This may have added pragmatic value in the specific support it offers for the reliability of rat/mouse comparative modeling, as well as in the broader implications for the potential of meta-analyses using databases assembled from the extensive empirical literature.

  16. Revealing global regulatory perturbations across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of pathways and regulatory networks whose perturbation contributes to neoplastic transformation remains a fundamental challenge for cancer biology. We show that such pathway perturbations, and the cis-regulatory elements through which they operate, can be efficiently extracted from global gene-expression profiles. Our approach utilizes information-theoretic analysis of expression levels, pathways, and genomic sequences. Analysis across a diverse set of human cancers reveals the majority of previously known cancer pathways. Through de novo motif discovery we associate these pathways with transcription-factor binding sites and miRNA targets, including those of E2F, NF-Y, p53, and let-7. Follow-up experiments confirmed that these predictions correspond to functional in vivo regulatory interactions. Strikingly, the majority of the perturbations, associated with putative cis-regulatory elements, fall outside of known cancer pathways. Our study provides a systems-level dissection of regulatory perturbations in cancer—an essential component of a rational strategy for therapeutic intervention and drug-target discovery. PMID:20005852

  17. Revealing the dual streams of speech processing

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksson, Julius; Yourganov, Grigori; Bonilha, Leonardo; Basilakos, Alexandra; Rorden, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Several dual route models of human speech processing have been proposed suggesting a large-scale anatomical division between cortical regions that support motor–phonological aspects vs. lexical–semantic aspects of speech processing. However, to date, there is no complete agreement on what areas subserve each route or the nature of interactions across these routes that enables human speech processing. Relying on an extensive behavioral and neuroimaging assessment of a large sample of stroke survivors, we used a data-driven approach using principal components analysis of lesion-symptom mapping to identify brain regions crucial for performance on clusters of behavioral tasks without a priori separation into task types. Distinct anatomical boundaries were revealed between a dorsal frontoparietal stream and a ventral temporal–frontal stream associated with separate components. Collapsing over the tasks primarily supported by these streams, we characterize the dorsal stream as a form-to-articulation pathway and the ventral stream as a form-to-meaning pathway. This characterization of the division in the data reflects both the overlap between tasks supported by the two streams as well as the observation that there is a bias for phonological production tasks supported by the dorsal stream and lexical–semantic comprehension tasks supported by the ventral stream. As such, our findings show a division between two processing routes that underlie human speech processing and provide an empirical foundation for studying potential computational differences that distinguish between the two routes. PMID:27956600

  18. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment.

  19. Revealing the values behind convenience food consumption.

    PubMed

    Botonaki, Anna; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2010-12-01

    The increasing importance of convenience in consumer food choices has attracted researchers' interest. In the effort to understand how convenience affects consumers' food preferences, values are believed to play an important role. The present study attempts to examine the way personal values suggested by Schwartz (1992) are associated with behaviour and attitudes regarding convenience food. A number of constructs describing food related attitudes and behaviours were developed and their relationship with personal values was analyzed following the methodology proposed by Brunsø, Scholderer, and Grunert (2004). Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from a random sample of consumers in Thessaloniki city, Greece. The results reveal that convenience food consumption and convenience orientation in the food domain are mainly connected with values that motivate people to seek new experiences, act independently and enhance their own personal interests, while are in conflict with values of conservation and self-transcendence. The opposite holds for other food related attitudes and behaviours like involvement with cooking and variety in diet. The findings seem to be of particular interest not only for marketers of food products, but also for food policy makers.

  20. The IC 342-Maffei 1 Group Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, M. L.; Buta, R.

    1996-12-01

    Deep wide-field CCD images of thirteen members of the IC 342-Maffei 1 Group in the Northern Milky Way have been acquired in the Johnson V and Cousins I photometric systems. The observations were obtained with the Kitt Peak Burrell-Schmidt telescope in Arizona during six nights in November 1995. Almost none of these galaxies was effectively studied in the past because of the heavy foreground extinction and significant foreground star contamination in the direction of the group. The tens of thousands of foreground stars included on the Schmidt images have been successfully subtracted using DAOPHOT, revealing the true extent and total brightness of most of the galaxies for the first time. In the absence of galactic extinction, Maffei 1, Maffei 2, and IC 342 would be among the five brightest galaxies in the northern sky, and both Maffei 1 and IC 342 would subtend angles as large as the full Moon. The results are critical for assessing the degree to which the group influenced the dynamical evolution of the Local Group. In this poster, we will present deep photographs, total magnitudes and color indices, luminosity profiles, and distance estimates for the member galaxies.

  1. Community structure revealed by phase locking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Cai, Shi-min; Fu, Zhongqian

    2014-09-01

    Community structure can naturally emerge in paths to synchronization, and scratching it from the paths is a tough issue that accounts for the diverse dynamics of synchronization. In this paper, with assumption that the synchronization on complex networks is made up of local and collective processes, we proposed a scheme to lock the local synchronization (phase locking) at a stable state, meanwhile, suppress the collective synchronization based on Kuramoto model. Through this scheme, the network dynamics only contains the local synchronization, which suggests that the nodes in the same community synchronize together and these synchronization clusters well reveal the community structure of network. Furthermore, by analyzing the paths to synchronization, the relations or overlaps among different communities are also obtained. Thus, the community detection based on the scheme is performed on five real networks and the observed community structures are much more apparent than modularity-based fast algorithm. Our results not only provide a deep insight to understand the synchronization dynamics on complex network but also enlarge the research scope of community detection.

  2. Caged Naloxone Reveals Opioid Signaling Deactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Banghart, Matthew R.; Shah, Ruchir C.; Lavis, Luke D.

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of opioid signaling in the brain remain poorly defined. Photoactivatable opioid ligands provide a means to quantitatively measure these dynamics and their underlying mechanisms in brain tissue. Although activation kinetics can be assessed using caged agonists, deactivation kinetics are obscured by slow clearance of agonist in tissue. To reveal deactivation kinetics of opioid signaling we developed a caged competitive antagonist that can be quickly photoreleased in sufficient concentrations to render agonist dissociation effectively irreversible. Carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (CNV-NLX), a caged analog of the competitive opioid antagonist NLX, was readily synthesized from commercially available NLX in good yield and found to be devoid of antagonist activity at heterologously expressed opioid receptors. Photolysis in slices of rat locus coeruleus produced a rapid inhibition of the ionic currents evoked by multiple agonists of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), but not of α-adrenergic receptors, which activate the same pool of ion channels. Using the high-affinity peptide agonist dermorphin, we established conditions under which light-driven deactivation rates are independent of agonist concentration and thus intrinsic to the agonist-receptor complex. Under these conditions, some MOR agonists yielded deactivation rates that are limited by G protein signaling, whereas others appeared limited by agonist dissociation. Therefore, the choice of agonist determines which feature of receptor signaling is unmasked by CNV-NLX photolysis. PMID:23960100

  3. Biosignatures as revealed by spectropolarimetry of Earthshine.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Michael F; Bagnulo, Stefano; Palle, Enric

    2012-02-29

    Low-resolution intensity spectra of Earth's atmosphere obtained from space reveal strong signatures of life ('biosignatures'), such as molecular oxygen and methane with abundances far from chemical equilibrium, as well as the presence of a 'red edge' (a sharp increase of albedo for wavelengths longer than 700 nm) caused by surface vegetation. Light passing through the atmosphere is strongly linearly polarized by scattering (from air molecules, aerosols and cloud particles) and by reflection (from oceans and land). Spectropolarimetric observations of local patches of Earth's sky light from the ground contain signatures of oxygen, ozone and water, and are used to characterize the properties of clouds and aerosols. When applied to exoplanets, ground-based spectropolarimetry can better constrain properties of atmospheres and surfaces than can standard intensity spectroscopy. Here we report disk-integrated linear polarization spectra of Earthshine, which is sunlight that has been first reflected by Earth and then reflected back to Earth by the Moon. The observations allow us to determine the fractional contribution of clouds and ocean surface, and are sensitive to visible areas of vegetation as small as 10 per cent. They represent a benchmark for the diagnostics of the atmospheric composition, mean cloud height and surfaces of exoplanets.

  4. Balance Trees Reveal Microbial Niche Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morton, James T; Sanders, Jon; Quinn, Robert A; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Navas-Molina, Jose A; Song, Se Jin; Metcalf, Jessica L; Hyde, Embriette R; Lladser, Manuel; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Knight, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled novel insights into microbial niche differentiation, from analyzing environmental samples to understanding human diseases and informing dietary studies. However, identifying the microbial taxa that differentiate these samples can be challenging. These issues stem from the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data (or, more generally, taxon or functional gene data); the changes in the relative abundance of one taxon influence the apparent abundances of the others. Here we acknowledge that inferring properties of individual bacteria is a difficult problem and instead introduce the concept of balances to infer meaningful properties of subcommunities, rather than properties of individual species. We show that balances can yield insights about niche differentiation across multiple microbial environments, including soil environments and lung sputum. These techniques have the potential to reshape how we carry out future ecological analyses aimed at revealing differences in relative taxonomic abundances across different samples. IMPORTANCE By explicitly accounting for the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data through the concept of balances, balance trees yield novel biological insights into niche differentiation. The software to perform this analysis is available under an open-source license and can be obtained at https://github.com/biocore/gneiss. Author Video: An author video summary of this article is available.

  5. Balance Trees Reveal Microbial Niche Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Morton, James T.; Sanders, Jon; Quinn, Robert A.; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Navas-Molina, Jose A.; Metcalf, Jessica L.; Hyde, Embriette R.; Lladser, Manuel; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled novel insights into microbial niche differentiation, from analyzing environmental samples to understanding human diseases and informing dietary studies. However, identifying the microbial taxa that differentiate these samples can be challenging. These issues stem from the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data (or, more generally, taxon or functional gene data); the changes in the relative abundance of one taxon influence the apparent abundances of the others. Here we acknowledge that inferring properties of individual bacteria is a difficult problem and instead introduce the concept of balances to infer meaningful properties of subcommunities, rather than properties of individual species. We show that balances can yield insights about niche differentiation across multiple microbial environments, including soil environments and lung sputum. These techniques have the potential to reshape how we carry out future ecological analyses aimed at revealing differences in relative taxonomic abundances across different samples. IMPORTANCE By explicitly accounting for the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data through the concept of balances, balance trees yield novel biological insights into niche differentiation. The software to perform this analysis is available under an open-source license and can be obtained at https://github.com/biocore/gneiss. Author Video: An author video summary of this article is available. PMID:28144630

  6. Feather corticosterone reveals developmental stress in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Will, Alexis P; Suzuki, Yuya; Elliott, Kyle H; Hatch, Scott A; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kitaysky, Alexander S

    2014-07-01

    In nest-bound avian offspring, food shortages typically trigger a release of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT). Recent studies indicate that CORT is passively deposited in the tissue of growing feathers and thus may provide an integrated measure of stress incurred during development in the nest. The current hypothesis predicts that, assuming a constant rate of feather growth, elevated CORT circulating in the blood corresponds to higher levels of CORT in feather tissue, but experimental evidence for nutritionally stressed chicks is lacking. Here, we examined how food limitation affects feather CORT content in the rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca moncerata). We (i) used captive chicks reared on control versus restricted diets, and (ii) applied this technique to free-living chicks with unknown nutritional histories that fledged at three separate colonies. We found that (i) feather growth was not affected by experimentally induced nutritional stress; (ii) captive chicks raised on a restricted diet had higher levels of CORT in their primary feathers; (iii) feather CORT deposition is a sensitive method of detecting nutritional stress; and (iv) free-living fledglings from the colony with poor reproductive performance had higher CORT in their primary feathers. We conclude that feather CORT is a sensitive integrated measure revealing the temporal dynamics of food limitations experienced by rhinoceros auklet nestlings. The use of feather CORT may be a powerful endocrine tool in ecological and evolutionary studies of bird species with similar preferential allocation of limited resources to feather development.

  7. Radio Telescopes Reveal Unseen Galactic Cannibalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Radio-telescope images have revealed previously-unseen galactic cannibalism -- a triggering event that leads to feeding frenzies by gigantic black holes at the cores of galaxies. Astronomers have long suspected that the extra-bright cores of spiral galaxies called Seyfert galaxies are powered by supermassive black holes consuming material. However, they could not see how the material is started on its journey toward the black hole. Optical/Radio Comparison Visible-light (left) and radio (right) image of galaxy pair: Radio image shows gas streaming between galaxies. CREDIT: Kuo et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for more graphics. One leading theory said that Seyfert galaxies have been disturbed by close encounters with neighboring galaxies, thus stirring up their gas and bringing more of it within the gravitational reach of the black hole. However, when astronomers looked at Seyferts with visible-light telescopes, only a small fraction showed any evidence of such an encounter. Now, new images of hydrogen gas in Seyferts made using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope show the majority of them are, in fact, disturbed by ongoing encounters with neighbor galaxies. "The VLA lifted the veil on what's really happening with these galaxies," said Cheng-Yu Kuo, a graduate student at the University of Virginia. "Looking at the gas in these galaxies clearly showed that they are snacking on their neighbors. This is a dramatic contrast with their appearance in visible starlight," he added. The effect of the galactic encounters is to send gas and dust toward the black hole and produce energy as the material ultimately is consumed. Black holes, concentrations of matter so dense that not even light can escape their gravitational pull, reside at the cores of many galaxies. Depending on how rapidly the black hole is eating, the galaxy can show a wide range of energetic activity. Seyfert galaxies have the mildest version of this activity, while

  8. Revealing atropisomer axial chirality in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    LaPlante, Steven R; Edwards, Paul J; Fader, Lee D; Jakalian, Araz; Hucke, Oliver

    2011-03-07

    An often overlooked source of chirality is atropisomerism, which results from slow rotation along a bond axis due to steric hindrance and/or electronic factors. If undetected or not managed properly, this time-dependent chirality has the potential to lead to serious consequences, because atropisomers can be present as distinct enantiomers or diastereoisomers with their attendant different properties. Herein we introduce a strategy to reveal and classify compounds that have atropisomeric chirality. Energy barriers to axial rotation were calculated using quantum mechanics, from which predicted high barriers could be experimentally validated. A calculated rotational energy barrier of 20 kcal mol(-1) was established as a suitable threshold to distinguish between atropisomers and non-atropisomers with a prediction accuracy of 86%. This methodology was applied to subsets of drug databases in the course of which atropisomeric drugs were identified. In addition, some drugs were exposed that were not yet known to have this chiral attribute. The most valuable utility of this tool will be to predict atropisomerism along the drug discovery pathway. When used in concert with our compound classification scheme, decisions can be made during early discovery stages such as "hit-to-lead" and "lead optimization," to foresee and validate the presence of atropisomers and to exercise options of removing, further stabilizing, or rendering the chiral axis of interest more freely rotatable via SAR design, thereby decreasing this potential liability within a compound series. The strategy can also improve drug development plans, such as determining whether a drug or series should be developed as a racemic mixture or as an isolated single compound. Moreover, the work described herein can be extended to other chemical fields that require the assessment of potential chiral axes.

  9. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  10. Quadrupole transitions revealed by Borrmann spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pettifer, Robert F; Collins, Stephen P; Laundy, David

    2008-07-10

    The Borrmann effect-a dramatic increase in transparency to X-ray beams-is observed when X-rays satisfying Bragg's law diffract through a perfect crystal. The minimization of absorption seen in the Borrmann effect has been explained by noting that the electric field of the X-ray beam approaches zero amplitude at the crystal planes, thus avoiding the atoms. Here we show experimentally that under conditions of absorption suppression, the weaker electric quadrupole absorption transitions are effectively enhanced to such a degree that they can dominate the absorption spectrum. This effect can be exploited as an atomic spectroscopy technique; we show that quadrupole transitions give rise to additional structure at the L(1), L(2) and L(3) absorption edges of gadolinium in gadolinium gallium garnet, which mark the onset of excitations from 2s, 2p(1/2) and 2p(3/2) atomic core levels, respectively. Although the Borrmann effect served to underpin the development of the theory of X-ray diffraction, this is potentially the most important experimental application of the phenomenon since its first observation seven decades ago. Identifying quadrupole features in X-ray absorption spectroscopy is central to the interpretation of 'pre-edge' spectra, which are often taken to be indicators of local symmetry, valence and atomic environment. Quadrupolar absorption isolates states of different symmetries to that of the dominant dipole spectrum, and typically reveals orbitals that dominate the electronic ground-state properties of lanthanides and 3d transition metals, including magnetism. Results from our Borrmann spectroscopy technique feed into contemporary discussions regarding resonant X-ray diffraction and the nature of pre-edge lines identified by inelastic X-ray scattering. Furthermore, because the Borrmann effect has been observed in photonic materials, it seems likely that the quadrupole enhancement reported here will play an important role in modern optics.

  11. NASA's Hyperwall Revealing the Big Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2011-01-01

    NASA:s hyperwall is a sophisticated visualization tool used to display large datasets. The hyperwall, or video wall, is capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. The traveling version of the hyperwall is typically comprised of nine 42-50" flat-screen monitors arranged in a 3x3 array (as depicted below). However, it is not limited to monitor size or number; screen sizes can be as large as 52" and the arrangement of screens can include more than nine monitors. Generally, NASA satellite and model data are used to highlight particular themes in atmospheric, land, and ocean science. Many of the existing hyperwall stories reveal change across space and time, while others display large-scale still-images accompanied by descriptive, story-telling captions. Hyperwall content on a variety of Earth Science topics already exists and is made available to the public at: eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/hyperwall. Keynote and PowerPoint presentations as well as Summary of Story files are available for download on each existing topic. New hyperwall content and accompanying files will continue being developed to promote scientific literacy across a diverse group of audience members. NASA invites the use of content accessible through this website but requests the user to acknowledge any and all data sources referenced in the content being used.

  12. Chemical provinces reveal Elysium Volcano's compositional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susko, D. A.; Karunatillake, S.; Wray, J. J.; Skok, J. R.; Hurowitz, J.; Ojha, L.; Judice, T.; Bently, R. O. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars became definable[1-3] with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data[4,5]. Previous work highlighted the Elysium lava flow province as anomalous, with a depletion in K and Th relative to the average crust in the rest of Mars (ROM).[3] We characterize the elemental composition, geology, and geomorphology of the region to constrain the processes that have contributed to its evolution. We compare SE Elysium with its North West lava fields, advancing prior work on thermal evolution of the martian mantle.[6] Lava fields at both sites probably source from Elysium eruptions. Both show similar Si content, as well as a Ca-enrichment compared to ROM, consistent with prior models.[6,7] Nevertheless, the two fields are compositionally distinct from each other, with NW Elysium decisively depleted in Ca and Fe, but enriched in K and Th. Such distinctness, in elements that reflect magmatic fractionation, reveals the possibility that a single volcanic complex on Mars may evolve rapidly during the Amazonian era, causing variable flow compositions. Interestingly, a chemical province containing volcanics that is contemporaneous with Elysium, overlaps the Tharsis region.[3] Unlike Elysium, the K and Th distributions within Tharsis are indistinguishable from ROM. Meanwhile, the mass fraction signature in Tharsis is enriched in Cl and depleted in Si. Such contrast, in chemical anomalies between volcanic constructs of similar age, may indicate that the depletion of K and Th in SE Elysium did not arise from temporal evolution of the mantle. [1] Taylor, G. et al. Geology 38, 183-186, 2010 [2] Gasnault, O. et al. 207, 226-247, 2010 [3] Karunatillake, S. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E12001, 2009 [4] Boynton, W. V. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E12S99, 2007 [5] Feldman, W. C. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E09006, 2004 [6] Baratoux, D. et al. Nature 472, 338-41, 2011 [7] Balta, J. et al. Geology 41, 1115

  13. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.; Peale, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Holin, I. V.

    2002-12-01

    The spin state of a planet depends on the distribution of mass within the interior, gradual and discrete changes in its moments of inertia, dissipation mechanisms at the surface and below, and external torques. Detailed measurements of the spin dynamics can therefore reveal much about planetary interior structure, interactions at the core-mantle and atmosphere-surface boundaries, and mass redistribution events. Studies of the spin precession, polar wobble, and length of day variations have been used to determine Earth's moments of inertia and rigidity and to study the effects of atmospheric angular momentum changes, post-glacial rebound, and large earthquakes. In planetary investigations the spin measurements are particularly important because other means of constraining interior properties require in-situ or orbiting sensors (e.g. seismometers, magnetometers, and Doppler tracking of spacecraft). Here we describe the successful implementation of a new Earth-based radar technique (Holin, 1992) that provides spin state measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Our first observations were designed to characterize Mercury's core. Peale (1976) showed that the measurement of four quantities (the obliquity of the planet, the amplitude of its longitude librations, and the second-degree gravitational harmonics) are sufficient to determine the size and state of Mercury's core. The existence of a molten core would place strong constraints on the thermal and rotational histories of the planet, with profound implications for the composition and rotation state of the planet at the time of formation. A solid core would have a fundamental impact on theories of planetary magnetic field generation. We observed Mercury with the Goldstone radar and the Green Bank Telescope in May-June 2002. We illuminated the planet with a monochromatic signal, recorded the scattered power at the two antennas, and cross-correlated the echoes in the time domain. We obtained strong correlations which

  14. Microradiometers Reveal Ocean Health, Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA researcher Stanford Hooker is in the field, he pays close attention to color. For Hooker, being in the field means being at sea. On one such research trip to the frigid waters of the Arctic, with a Coast Guard icebreaker looming nearby and the snow-crusted ice shelf a few feet away, Hooker leaned over the edge of his small boat and lowered a tethered device into the bright turquoise water, a new product devised by a NASA partner and enabled by a promising technology for oceanographers and atmospheric scientists alike. Color is a function of light. Pure water is clear, but the variation in color observed during a visit to the beach or a flight along a coastline depends on the water s depth and the constituents in it, how far down the light penetrates and how it is absorbed and scattered by dissolved and suspended material. Hooker cares about ocean color because of what it can reveal about the health of the ocean, and in turn, the health of our planet. "The main thing we are interested in is the productivity of the water," Hooker says. The seawater contains phytoplankton, microscopic plants, which are the food base for the ocean s ecosystems. Changes in the water s properties, whether due to natural seasonal effects or human influence, can lead to problems for delicate ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ocean color can inform researchers about the quantities and distribution of phytoplankton and other materials, providing clues as to how the world ocean is changing. NASA s Coastal Zone Color Scanner, launched in 1978, was the first ocean color instrument flown on a spacecraft. Since then, the Agency s ocean color research capabilities have become increasingly sophisticated with the launch of the SeaWiFS instrument in 1997 and the twin MODIS instruments carried into orbit on NASA s Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites. The technology provides sweeping, global information on ocean color on a scale unattainable by any other means. One issue that arises from

  15. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes

  16. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Sgr. The radio observations revealed the presence of a jet escaping from the system at mind-boggling speeds. Only three other galactic X-ray stellar systems have been found to eject material at such speeds. They have been dubbed "microquasars" because, on a smaller scale, they resemble quasars, which lie at the hearts of distant galaxies and also spew out high-velocity jets of particles. In galaxy-core quasars, the black holes are millions of times more massive than the Sun; in the more nearby microquasars the black holes are roughly three to twenty times more massive than the Sun. The extremely high velocity of the jets suggests that their origin lies close to the event horizon of a black hole. Microquasar activity is thought to arise when the black hole in the binary system draws material away from its companion star. The material surrounding the black hole forms a rapidly spinning disk called an accretion disk. This disk is heated by friction to millions of degrees, causing it to emit X-rays. As spiralling gas moves into the gravity well of the black hole, it moves faster and faster. Magnetic fields in the disk are believed to expel the charged subatomic particles at speeds close to that of light. As the charged particles interact with the magnetic fields, they emit radio waves. If some of the material escapes by being magnetically expelled into space, the matter may continue moving at the tremendous speed it had attained near the black hole. After their ejection, the jets of particles expand and cool, fading from astronomers' view. V4641 Sgr excites astronomers because it is close and because it acted so differently from other microquasars. In other microquasars, outbursts have dimmed more slowly over weeks or months rather than hours. "There's something fundamentally different about this one; it's more extreme than any other example," Hjellming said. "And because this system happens to be so close to us, `it is very likely that there are more objects like V4641

  17. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  18. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  19. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Reginald B.; Garrido, Carlos O.; Albohn, Daniel N.; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one’s innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  20. Induction and prevention of severe hyperammonemia in the spfash mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency using shRNA and rAAV-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Sharon C; Kok, Cindy Y; Dane, Allison P; Carpenter, Kevin; Kizana, Eddy; Kuchel, Philip W; Alexander, Ian E

    2011-05-01

    Urea cycle defects presenting early in life with hyperammonemia remain difficult to treat and commonly necessitate liver transplantation. Gene therapy has the potential to prevent hyperammonemic episodes while awaiting liver transplantation, and possibly also to avert the need for transplantation altogether. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most prevalent urea cycle disorder, provides an ideal model for the development of liver-targeted gene therapy. While we and others have successfully cured the spf(ash) mouse model of OTC deficiency using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors, a major limitation of this model is the presence of residual OTC enzymatic activity which confers a mild phenotype without clinically significant hyperammonemia. To better model severe disease we devised a strategy involving AAV2/8-mediated delivery of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to specifically knockdown residual endogenous OTC messenger RNA (mRNA). This strategy proved highly successful with vector-treated mice developing severe hyperammonemia and associated neurological impairment. Using this system, we showed that the dose of an AAV rescue construct encoding the murine OTC (mOTC) cDNA required to prevent hyperammonemia is fivefold lower than that required to control orotic aciduria. This result is favorable for clinical translation as it indicates that the threshold for therapeutic benefit is likely to be lower than indicated by earlier studies.

  1. Facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Samia, Younes; Yosra, Cherif; Foued, Bellazreg; Mouna, Aissi; Olfa, Berriche; Jihed, Souissi; Hammadi, Braham; Mahbouba, Frih-Ayed; Amel, Letaief; Habib, Sfar Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report a 62 year-old-man with facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc). He showed chorea that started 20 years ago. The orofacial dyskinisia with tongue and cheek biting resulted in facial cellulitis. The peripheral blood smear revealed acanthocytosis of 25%. The overall of chorea, orofacial dyskinetic disorder, peripheral neuropathy, disturbed behavior, acanthocytosis and the atrophy of caudate nuclei was suggestive of a diagnosis of ChAc. To our knowledge no similar cases of facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc) were found in a review of the literature.

  2. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT OF HOUSE DEMOLITION - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  3. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  4. Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162699.html Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals Holiday activities can ... dangerous time of year, but many families ignore fire and burn safety tips, a new survey finds. ...

  5. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of international researchers supported by the ... when they divide and grow uncontrollably, develop into melanoma. Also, MITF activity is known to be amplified ...

  6. [Deep vein thrombosis revealing myeloproliferative syndrome in two adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Heissat, S; Caron, N; Viremouneix, L; Pracros, J-P; Javouhey, E; Lachaux, A; Mialou, V

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis occurs in 30% of patients with essential thrombocythemia, but rarely at initial diagnosis. We report two pediatric patients with essential thrombocythemia revealed by atypical deep vein thrombosis. First, a 16-year-old girl presented Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed by a hemorrhagic shock. Clinical exam revealed isolated splenomegaly. A search for thrombophilia found a factor V Leiden homozygous mutation and a Jak2 mutation. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder. The second case, a 17-year-old girl, had a routine examination by her physician that revealed splenomegaly. Ultrasonography displayed thrombus in the splenic and portal vein. An isolated Jak2 mutation was found and a myeloproliferative disorder was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. The diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorder was made in both patients presenting atypical venous thrombosis with a Jak2 mutation and confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. These initial presentations of myeloproliferative disorders are rare in childhood and possibly underdiagnosed.

  7. Direct sequencing of the human microbiome readily reveals community differences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Culture-independent studies of human microbiota by direct genomic sequencing reveal quite distinct differences among communities, indicating that improved sequencing capacity can be most wisely utilized to study more samples, rather than more sequences per sample. PMID:20441597

  8. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  9. 14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY BETWEEN VESTIBULE AND STAIRHALL (NOTE WOOD GRAINING), WITH SCALE - Bowieville, 522 Church Road South, Leeland, Prince George's County, MD

  10. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  11. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system's model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems.

  12. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-10-21

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments.

  13. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  14. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  15. Primary Splenic Angiosarcoma Revealed by Bone Marrow Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Anoun, Soumaya; Marouane, Sofia; Quessar, Asmae; Benchekroun, Said

    2014-01-01

    Primary splenic angiosarcomas are the most common malignant non-hematopoietic tumors of the spleen. Metastatic diseases were found in 69% of patients in a reported series but the incidence of bone marrow involvement is unclear. We report a rare case of a 25-years-old Moroccan woman with unsuspected primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis. She presented with serious anemia and splenomegaly. Bone marrow biopsy revealed proliferating spindle cells. Computed tomography scanning showed an enlarged spleen with heterogeneous lesions. Splenectomy was performed and retrospective histological study of the spleen confirmed the diagnosis. She died 1 year after splenectomy. PMID:25541659

  16. Primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis.

    PubMed

    Anoun, Soumaya; Marouane, Sofia; Quessar, Asmae; Benchekroun, Said

    2014-12-05

    Primary splenic angiosarcomas are the most common malignant non-hematopoietic tumors of the spleen. Metastatic diseases were found in 69% of patients in a reported series but the incidence of bone marrow involvement is unclear. We report a rare case of a 25-years-old Moroccan woman with unsuspected primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis. She presented with serious anemia and splenomegaly. Bone marrow biopsy revealed proliferating spindle cells. Computed tomography scanning showed an enlarged spleen with heterogeneous lesions. Splenectomy was performed and retrospective histological study of the spleen confirmed the diagnosis. She died 1 year after splenectomy.

  17. Wigner flow reveals topological order in quantum phase space dynamics.

    PubMed

    Steuernagel, Ole; Kakofengitis, Dimitris; Ritter, Georg

    2013-01-18

    The behavior of classical mechanical systems is characterized by their phase portraits, the collections of their trajectories. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle precludes the existence of sharply defined trajectories, which is why traditionally only the time evolution of wave functions is studied in quantum dynamics. These studies are quite insensitive to the underlying structure of quantum phase space dynamics. We identify the flow that is the quantum analog of classical particle flow along phase portrait lines. It reveals hidden features of quantum dynamics and extra complexity. Being constrained by conserved flow winding numbers, it also reveals fundamental topological order in quantum dynamics that has so far gone unnoticed.

  18. Puzzles in modern biology. I. Male sterility, failure reveals design.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Many human males produce dysfunctional sperm. Various plants frequently abort pollen. Hybrid matings often produce sterile males. Widespread male sterility is puzzling. Natural selection prunes reproductive failure. Puzzling failure implies something that we do not understand about how organisms are designed. Solving the puzzle reveals the hidden processes of design.

  19. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  20. 24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at the track well in transverse section. Note structural system of first, second, and third floors, as well as the monitor roof. - Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pier G, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  1. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  2. Revealing the Effects of Cognitive Education Programmes through Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzuriel, David

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment (DA) in revealing outcomes of cognitive education programmes. Three programmes based on "mediated learning experience" theory are reviewed: "Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment", "Bright Start", and "Peer Mediation with…

  3. Puzzles in modern biology. I. Male sterility, failure reveals design

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Many human males produce dysfunctional sperm. Various plants frequently abort pollen. Hybrid matings often produce sterile males. Widespread male sterility is puzzling. Natural selection prunes reproductive failure. Puzzling failure implies something that we do not understand about how organisms are designed. Solving the puzzle reveals the hidden processes of design. PMID:28004842

  4. When Values and Behaviors Conflict: Immigrant BSW Students' Experiences Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Kimberly; Harper, Kim; Ball, Kellie; Liang, David

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reveals the discomfort seven immigrant bachelor of social work students reported experiencing when the behaviors expected of them as Canadian social workers conflicted with their fundamental family values. Behaviorally, participants had assimilated to Canadian and to social work cultures; however, the values they held from…

  5. Integrated genomics of Mucorales reveals novel therapeutic targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. We sequenced 30 fungal genomes and performed transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing ...

  6. Fundamental Patterns Underlying Neurotoxicity Revealed by DNA Microarray Expression Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    microarray analysis of the dopaminergic cell line, SN4741 , revealed induction of stress indices following MPP* treatment (Chun et al., 2001). To...response to a wide range of cellular stresses including oxidative insult of the nigral dopaminergic cell line SN4741 with hydrogen peroxide or MPP* (Salinas

  7. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  9. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome revealing dual malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nasri, A; Kacem, I; Jerdak, F; Djebara, M Ben; Mejri, N; Sidhom, Y; Gargouri, A; Gouider, Riadh

    2016-10-01

    Dual malignancy has been rarely associated to paraneoplastic syndromes. We describe an unusual case of metachronous small cell lung carcinoma revealed by opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome in a 69-year-old patient with known prostate adenocarcinoma, with positive anti-Hu and anti-Yo antibodies and good responsiveness to corticosteroids and chemotherapy.

  10. The Basics of How to Reveal Epilepsy--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    In the April 2009 edition of "Exceptional Parent," Part One of this series explored why, for their own emotional well-being, it is so important for parents to tell others about their or their child's epilepsy. This month's installment will discuss the basics of how to reveal epilepsy to others, including some additional advantages one receives in…

  11. Natural Disasters that Reveal Cracks in Our Social Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Nieli

    2004-01-01

    The recent deaths of more than 13,000 French elderly in the European heat wave of 2003 revealed cracks in the social foundation of urban communities, here and abroad. The breakdown occurred in community services, neighborhood networks, and governmental agencies that were responsible for warning of impending dangers to at-risk elderly. This paper…

  12. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Revealing Bone Metastases from an Ethmoid Sinus Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morisse, Mony Chenda; Kontar, Loay; Bihan, Céline; Boone, Mathieu; Lachaier, Emma; Titeca-Beauport, Dimitri; Maizel, Julien; Chauffert, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare entity whose clinical and biological characteristics have been described in various tumors. Here we describe the first case of cancer-related TMA revealing diffuse bone metastases from an ethmoid sinus carcinoma. PMID:27721770

  13. Cassini Flybys Reveal Details About Titan Seas and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's flybys of Saturn's moon Titan reveal new details about the sizes, depths, and locations of the seas and lakes, whose liquid is mostly methane, that dot the moon's northern hemisphere, according to findings presented by scientists at a 12 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

  14. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  15. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  16. Acting without seeing: eye movements reveal visual processing without awareness.

    PubMed

    Spering, Miriam; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Visual perception and eye movements are considered to be tightly linked. Diverse fields, ranging from developmental psychology to computer science, utilize eye tracking to measure visual perception. However, this prevailing view has been challenged by recent behavioral studies. Here, we review converging evidence revealing dissociations between the contents of perceptual awareness and different types of eye movement. Such dissociations reveal situations in which eye movements are sensitive to particular visual features that fail to modulate perceptual reports. We also discuss neurophysiological, neuroimaging, and clinical studies supporting the role of subcortical pathways for visual processing without awareness. Our review links awareness to perceptual-eye movement dissociations and furthers our understanding of the brain pathways underlying vision and movement with and without awareness.

  17. Sequencing of Seven Haloarchaeal Genomes Reveals Patterns of Genomic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Erin A.; Langille, Morgan G. I.; Darling, Aaron; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G.; Haltiner, Caitlin; Shao, Katie S. Y.; Starr, Michael O.; Teiling, Clotilde; Harkins, Timothy T.; Edwards, Robert A.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula. Ease of cultivation and the existence of well-developed genetic and biochemical tools for several diverse haloarchaeal species make haloarchaea a model group for the study of archaeal biology. The unique physiological properties of these organisms also make them good candidates for novel enzyme discovery for biotechnological applications. Seven genomes were sequenced to ∼20×coverage and assembled to an average of 50 contigs (range 5 scaffolds - 168 contigs). Comparisons of protein-coding gene compliments revealed large-scale differences in COG functional group enrichment between these genera. Analysis of genes encoding machinery for DNA metabolism reveals genera-specific expansions of the general transcription factor TATA binding protein as well as a history of extensive duplication and horizontal transfer of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Insights gained from this study emphasize the importance of haloarchaea for investigation of archaeal biology. PMID:22848480

  18. Mitogenome revealed multiple postdomestication genetic mixtures of West African sheep.

    PubMed

    Brahi, O H D; Xiang, H; Chen, X; Farougou, S; Zhao, X

    2015-10-01

    Notable diversity observed within African ovine breeds makes them of great interests, but limited studies on genetic origins and domestications remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the evolutionary status of West African native breeds, Djallonke and Sahelian sheep using mitogenome sequencing. Compared with other ovine mitogenome sequences, West African sheep were revealed a Eurasian origin, and the initially tamed sheep breeds in West Africa have been genetically mixed with each other and mixed with European breeds. Worldwide domestic sheep is deemed the Eurasian origin and migrated west to Europe and Africa and east to the Far East, in which dispersed and received selection for acclimation to autochthonic environment independently and ultimately evolved into different native breeds, respectively. Our results contribute to the comprehensive understanding of the domestic sheep origin and reveal multiple postdomestication genetic amelioration processes.

  19. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  20. Drosophila models reveal novel insights into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ryan D; Workman, Jerry L; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The SAGA chromatin modifying complex functions as a transcriptional coactivator for a large number of genes, and SAGA dysfunction has been linked to carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disease. The protein complex is comprised of approximately 20 subunits, arranged in a modular fashion, and includes 2 enzymatic subunits: the Gcn5 acetyltransferase and the Non-stop deubiquitinase. As we learn more about SAGA, it becomes evident that this complex functions through sophisticated mechanisms that support very precise regulation of gene expression. Here we describe recent findings in which a Drosophila loss-of-function model revealed novel mechanisms for regulation of SAGA-mediated histone H2B deubiquitination. This model also yielded novel and surprising insights into mechanisms that underlie progressive neurodegenerative disease. Lastly, we comment on the utility of Drosophila as a model for neurodegenerative disease through which crucial and conserved mechanisms may be revealed. PMID:25483136

  1. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  2. Revealing bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticle formation by the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticles by the Kirkendall effect using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rich dynamics of bismuth diffusion through the bismuth oxide shell have been captured in situ. The diffusion coefficient of bismuth through bismuth oxide shell is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk. Observation reveals that defects, temperature, sizes of the particles, and so forth can affect the diffusion of reactive species and modify the kinetics of the hollowing process.

  3. Parascapular mass revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch

    PubMed Central

    Arbault, Anais; Ornetti, Paul; Chevallier, Olivier; Avril, Julien; Pottecher, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a parascapular abscess revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch in a 31-year-old man. Sectional imaging is essential in order to detect the different lesions of this atypical spinal tuberculosis as osteolysis of the posterior arch extendible to vertebral body, osteocondensation, epidural extension which is common in this location, and high specificity of a zygapophysial, costo-vertebral or transverse arthritis. PMID:27709081

  4. Placental Abruption Revealed by Hemoperitoneum: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bertholdt, C.; Vincent-Rohfritsch, A.; Tsatsaris, V.; Goffinet, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemoperitoneum is a life-threatening surgical emergency. Diagnosis of the cause is often difficult, in particular, during pregnancy when it may be either obstetric or nonobstetric. Case We report the case of a hemoperitoneum caused by the backflow of blood through a uterine tube, due to placental abruption. Conclusion Hemoperitoneum in pregnant women with no other signs can reveal placental abruption. The difficulty in identifying the cause may delay appropriate management. PMID:27994944

  5. Dermatomyositis revealing breast cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lamquami, Safae; Errarhay, Sanae; Mamouni, Nisrine; Bouchikhi, Chahrazad; Banani, Abdelaziz

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare connective corresponding to an inflammatory disease of skeletal muscles. Paraneoplastic origin must always be sought, primarily gynecological tumor in women, but the investigations are often made difficult by the fact that a primary tumor is often not detectable at the time of the cutaneous manifestations. This approach includes in addition to the monitoring report at regular intervals of 6 to 12 months for two years after diagnosis. We report a case of Dermatomyositis revealing breast cancer.

  6. Spectral Imaging for Revealing and Preserving World Cultural Heritage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    of appearance of the original woodcut features Other signal processing included a PCA spectral separation of an iron gall ink inscription most...likely added by Schöner, 1451 as shown in Figure 3. The image processing clearly illus- trates the iron gall ink writing on top of the printing ink ...Figure 3 – PCA of printing and iron gall ink inscription (sheet 10) Other obscured historical information included revealing the text of a

  7. Revealing Companions to Nearby Stars with Astrometric Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    of 57 stars, we compare the statistics of resolved astrometric companions with those of a simulated binary population. The fraction of resolved...frequency of supernovae, blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, etc. The statistical properties of binaries strongly depend on stellar mass. Only for nearby solar ...a large fraction of these stars by the Geneva-Copenhagen Sur- vey of the Solar neighborhood, GCS (Nordströem et al. 2004), revealing short-period

  8. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  9. Revealing topological superconductivity in extended quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Ping; Michaeli, Karen; Alicea, Jason; Yacoby, Amir

    2014-11-07

    Quantum spin Hall-superconductor hybrids are promising sources of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes, particularly given recent progress on HgTe and InAs/GaSb. We propose a new method of revealing topological superconductivity in extended quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions supporting "fractional Josephson currents." Specifically, we show that as one threads magnetic flux between the superconductors, the critical current traces an interference pattern featuring sharp fingerprints of topological superconductivity-even when noise spoils parity conservation.

  10. [Chicken pox recurrence revealing a renal adenocarcinoma in an adult].

    PubMed

    Thieulent, N; Grezard, P; Wolf, F; Barrut, D; Perrot, H

    2000-09-01

    A new episode of chicken pox in adults who had a well documented infection previously is usually observed in immunocompromised individuals. The principal immunodeficiency factors are hematology diseases, acquired immunodeficiency disease and old age. We report here the case of a young woman who after a contaminating contact presented a recurrence of typical chicken pox. Morphological investigations evidenced a right kidney tumor which pathology revealed to be a renal adenocarcinoma. We discuss this pathological association and review cases reported in the literature.

  11. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  12. Tal1 transgenic expression reveals absence of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami I; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Santanam, Urmila; Hagan, John P; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2006-06-15

    TAL1 oncogene encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Tal1, which is required for blood cell development, and its activation is a frequent event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tal1 interacts and inhibits other helix-loop-helix factors such as E47 and HEB. To investigate the function of Tal1 in B cells, we generated Emu-TAL1 transgenic mouse line, expressing Tal1 in mouse B-cell lineage. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes isolated from spleens of five out of five founders reveals complete absence of IgM- or CD19-expressing cells. Only 2% to 3% of these cells were B220+ and 100% of B220+ cells were CD43+, indicating that these mice were able to make pro-B cells. Similarly, FACS analysis of bone marrow cells in Emu-TAL1 mice revealed complete absence of B220+IgM+ and B220+CD19+ cells. Analysis of the recombination status of IgH genes revealed the presence of D-J but absence or drastic reduction of V-D-J rearrangements. Our results suggest that Tal1 overexpression in B cells results in a phenotype similar to that of B cells of E47/E2A knockout animals. This represents first in vivo evidence that Tal1 can completely inhibit E47/E2A function.

  13. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  14. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  15. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charles Y; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V; Millen, Kathleen J; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Pfister, Stefan M; Bradner, James E; Northcott, Paul A

    2016-02-04

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Here, using H3K27ac and BRD4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-seq, that is responsible for subgroup divergence, and implicates candidate cells of origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins.

  16. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  17. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-06-03

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole.

  18. Interior Evolution of Ceres and Vesta Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Bland, M. T.; Castillo, J. C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ermakov, A.; Jaumann, R.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marchi, S.; McCord, T. B.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Nathues, A.; Park, R. S.; Prettyman, T. H.; Toplis, M. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Dawn's exploration of Vesta and Ceres has revealed their geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that shaped the bodies. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. These observations may indicate that Ceres lost a significant amount of an original surface ice layer due to impact erosion. The lack of large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body. In contrast to Ceres, Vesta formed very early and hot, resulting in a fully differentiated body. Dawn's exploration revealed geophysical and geochemical evidence for an iron-rich core and basaltic crust. However, unlike the pre-Dawn paradigm of Vesta's evolution, Dawn found that the crust and mantle of Vesta are less distinct than predicted by classical differentiation models. [1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev
DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  19. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  20. Estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Keith W.; Morell, Larry J.; Noonan, Robert E.; Park, Stephen K.; Nicol, David M.; Murrill, Branson W.; Voas, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    Formulas for estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no errors are introduced. These formulas incorporate random testing results, information about the input distribution, and prior assumptions about the probability of failure of the software. The formulas are not restricted to equally likely input distributions, and the probability of failure estimate can be adjusted when assumptions about the input distribution change. The formulas are based on a discrete sample space statistical model of software and include Bayesian prior assumptions. Reusable software and software in life-critical applications are particularly appropriate candidates for this type of analysis.

  1. Cutaneous metastasis revealing a relapse of gastric linitis: Another case

    PubMed Central

    Kairouani, Mouna; Perrin, Julie; Dietemann-Barabinot, Anne; Diab, Rafiq; Ruck, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cutaneous metastasis from gastric cancer is a rare occurrence. The linitis gastric carcinoma accounts only 8.7% of all gastric cancers. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of female patient who was followed for linits cancer with peritoneal metastasis treated by six cycles of chemotherapy. After seventeen months of control, the relapse of the disease revealed by occurrence of cutaneous metastatsis. DISCUSSION Cutaneous metastasis from linit gastric is rare and the prognostic remains poor. The treatment is palliative. CONCLUSION This rare presentation should encourage the practitioners to biopsy any suspicion skin lesion. PMID:23276763

  2. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3 min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation.

  3. How the ``Blues'' reveals the intimacy of music and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2013-03-01

    Little do most people know when they hear blues piano - and you'll hear some live in this talk - that physics permeates the style, as it does all of music. Why should you care? By deconstructing blues piano the intimacy of physics, mathematics and music will be revealed in its glory.[1] The exercise says something about how the brains of the music composer and of the listener must be intimately linked to the physical principles of acoustics. And it provides a great vehicle to explain physical phenomena to non-scientists - everything from quantum mechanics to protein structure.

  4. Protein tagging reveals new insights into signaling in flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2014-03-03

    In this issue, Oda et al. (2014. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201312014) use mutant analysis, protein tagging, and cryoelectron tomography to determine the detailed location of components in flagellar radial spokes-a complex of proteins that connect the peripheral microtubule doublets to the central pair. Remarkably, this approach revealed an interaction between radial spokes and the central pair based on geometry rather than a specific signaling mechanism, highlighting the importance of studying a system in three dimensions.

  5. Tributaries of West Antarctic Ice Streams Revealed by RADARSAT Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Joughin; Gray; Bindschadler; Price; Morse; Hulbe; Mattar; Werner

    1999-10-08

    Interferometric RADARSAT data are used to map ice motion in the source areas of four West Antarctic ice streams. The data reveal that tributaries, coincident with subglacial valleys, provide a spatially extensive transition between slow inland flow and rapid ice stream flow and that adjacent ice streams draw from shared source regions. Two tributaries flow into the stagnant ice stream C, creating an extensive region that is thickening at an average rate of 0.49 meters per year. This is one of the largest rates of thickening ever reported in Antarctica.

  6. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  7. The Microbiome of Brazilian Mangrove Sediments as Revealed by Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Andreote, Fernando Dini; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Chaves, Diego; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Luvizotto, Danice Mazzer; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Lopez, Maryeimy Varon; Baena, Sandra; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2012-01-01

    Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H2S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments. PMID:22737213

  8. Computational modeling reveals molecular details of epidermal growth factor binding

    PubMed Central

    Mayawala, Kapil; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2005-01-01

    Background The ErbB family of receptors are dysregulated in a number of cancers, and the signaling pathway of this receptor family is a critical target for several anti-cancer drugs. Therefore a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of receptor activation is critical. However, despite a plethora of biochemical studies and recent single particle tracking experiments, the early molecular mechanisms involving epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding and EGF receptor (EGFR) dimerization are not as well understood. Herein, we describe a spatially distributed Monte Carlo based simulation framework to enable the simulation of in vivo receptor diffusion and dimerization. Results Our simulation results are in agreement with the data from single particle tracking and biochemical experiments on EGFR. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the sequence of receptor-receptor and ligand-receptor reaction events depends on the ligand concentration, receptor density and receptor mobility. Conclusion Our computer simulations reveal the mechanism of EGF binding on EGFR. Overall, we show that spatial simulation of receptor dynamics can be used to gain a mechanistic understanding of receptor activation which may in turn enable improved cancer treatments in the future. PMID:16318625

  9. Microsatellite genotyping reveals a signature in breast cancer exomes.

    PubMed

    McIver, L J; Fonville, N C; Karunasena, E; Garner, H R

    2014-06-01

    Genomic instability at microsatellite loci is a hallmark of many cancers, including breast cancer. However, much of the genomic variation and many of the hereditary components responsible for breast cancer remain undetected. We hypothesized that variation at microsatellites could provide additional genomic markers for breast cancer risk assessment. A total of 1,345 germline and tumor DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, exome sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation. The comparison group for our analysis, representing healthy individuals, consisted of 249 females which were exome sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We applied our microsatellite-based genotyping pipeline to identify 55 microsatellite loci that can distinguish between the germline of individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and healthy individuals with a sensitivity of 88.4 % and a specificity of 77.1 %. Further, we identified additional microsatellite loci that are potentially useful for distinguishing between breast cancer subtypes, revealing a possible fifth subtype. These findings are of clinical interest as possible risk diagnostics and reveal genes that may be of potential therapeutic value, including genes previously not associated with breast cancer.

  10. Piriform spider silk sequences reveal unique repetitive elements.

    PubMed

    Perry, David J; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2010-11-08

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple, and repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces, has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species: A. trifasciata , N. clavipes , and N. cruentata . The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif, where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6-8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species, with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA is larger than 11 kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the piriform sequences form an ortholog group.

  11. Blue whale earplug reveals lifetime contaminant exposure and hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Stephen J; Robinson, Eleanor M; Berman-Kowalewski, Michelle; Potter, Charles W; Usenko, Sascha

    2013-10-15

    Lifetime contaminant and hormonal profiles have been reconstructed for an individual male blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, Linnaeus 1758) using the earplug as a natural aging matrix that is also capable of archiving and preserving lipophilic compounds. These unprecedented lifetime profiles (i.e., birth to death) were reconstructed with a 6-mo resolution for a wide range of analytes including cortisol (stress hormone), testosterone (developmental hormone), organic contaminants (e.g., pesticides and flame retardants), and mercury. Cortisol lifetime profiles revealed a doubling of cortisol levels over baseline. Testosterone profiles suggest this male blue whale reached sexual maturity at approximately 10 y of age, which corresponds well with and improves on previous estimates. Early periods of the reconstructed contaminant profiles for pesticides (such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers demonstrate significant maternal transfer occurred at 0-12 mo. The total lifetime organic contaminant burden measured between the earplug (sum of contaminants in laminae layers) and blubber samples from the same organism were similar. Total mercury profiles revealed reduced maternal transfer and two distinct pulse events compared with organic contaminants. The use of a whale earplug to reconstruct lifetime chemical profiles will allow for a more comprehensive examination of stress, development, and contaminant exposure, as well as improve the assessment of contaminant use/emission, environmental noise, ship traffic, and climate change on these important marine sentinels.

  12. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  13. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-02-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane.

  14. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-01-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane. PMID:11806917

  15. Blue whale earplug reveals lifetime contaminant exposure and hormone profiles

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Stephen J.; Robinson, Eleanor M.; Berman-Kowalewski, Michelle; Potter, Charles W.; Usenko, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime contaminant and hormonal profiles have been reconstructed for an individual male blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, Linnaeus 1758) using the earplug as a natural aging matrix that is also capable of archiving and preserving lipophilic compounds. These unprecedented lifetime profiles (i.e., birth to death) were reconstructed with a 6-mo resolution for a wide range of analytes including cortisol (stress hormone), testosterone (developmental hormone), organic contaminants (e.g., pesticides and flame retardants), and mercury. Cortisol lifetime profiles revealed a doubling of cortisol levels over baseline. Testosterone profiles suggest this male blue whale reached sexual maturity at approximately 10 y of age, which corresponds well with and improves on previous estimates. Early periods of the reconstructed contaminant profiles for pesticides (such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers demonstrate significant maternal transfer occurred at 0–12 mo. The total lifetime organic contaminant burden measured between the earplug (sum of contaminants in laminae layers) and blubber samples from the same organism were similar. Total mercury profiles revealed reduced maternal transfer and two distinct pulse events compared with organic contaminants. The use of a whale earplug to reconstruct lifetime chemical profiles will allow for a more comprehensive examination of stress, development, and contaminant exposure, as well as improve the assessment of contaminant use/emission, environmental noise, ship traffic, and climate change on these important marine sentinels. PMID:24043814

  16. Genome Sequencing Reveals a Phage in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lehours, Philippe; Vale, Filipa F.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Melefors, Ojar; Advani, Reza; Glavas, Steve; Guegueniat, Julia; Gontier, Etienne; Lacomme, Sabrina; Alves Matos, António; Menard, Armelle; Mégraud, Francis; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Anders F.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa in more than half of the human population; in a subset of this population, its presence is associated with development of severe disease, such as gastric cancer. Genomic analysis of several strains has revealed an extensive H. pylori pan-genome, likely to grow as more genomes are sampled. Here we describe the draft genome sequence (63 contigs; 26× mean coverage) of H. pylori strain B45, isolated from a patient with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The major finding was a 24.6-kb prophage integrated in the bacterial genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (22/27) with prophage region II of Helicobacter acinonychis strain Sheeba. After UV treatment of liquid cultures, circular DNA carrying the prophage integrase gene could be detected, and intracellular tailed phage-like particles were observed in H. pylori cells by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that phage production can be induced from the prophage. PCR amplification and sequencing of the integrase gene from 341 H. pylori strains from different geographic regions revealed a high prevalence of the prophage (21.4%). Phylogenetic reconstruction showed four distinct clusters in the integrase gene, three of which tended to be specific for geographic regions. Our study implies that phages may play important roles in the ecology and evolution of H. pylori. PMID:22086490

  17. Previously Unrecognized Large Lunar Impact Basins Revealed by Topographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of a large population of apparently buried impact craters on Mars, revealed as Quasi- Circular Depressions (QCDs) in Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data [1,2,3] and as Circular Thin Areas (CTAs) [4] in crustal thickness model data [5] leads to the obvious question: are there unrecognized impact features on the Moon and other bodies in the solar system? Early analysis of Clementine topography revealed several large impact basins not previously known [6,7], so the answer certainly is "Yes." How large a population of previously undetected impact basins, their size frequency distribution, and how much these added craters and basins will change ideas about the early cratering history and Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon remains to be determined. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data [8] will be able to address these issues. As a prelude, we searched the state-of-the-art global topographic grid for the Moon, the Unified Lunar Control Net (ULCN) [9] for evidence of large impact features not previously recognized by photogeologic mapping, as summarized by Wilhelms [lo].

  18. Proteomics Reveals Novel Drosophila Seminal Fluid Proteins Transferred at Mating

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Geoffrey D; Yi, Xianhua; MacCoss, Michael J; Swanson, Willie J

    2008-01-01

    Across diverse taxa, seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) transferred at mating affect the reproductive success of both sexes. Such reproductive proteins often evolve under positive selection between species; because of this rapid divergence, Sfps are hypothesized to play a role in speciation by contributing to reproductive isolation between populations. In Drosophila, individual Sfps have been characterized and are known to alter male sperm competitive ability and female post-mating behavior, but a proteomic-scale view of the transferred Sfps has been missing. Here we describe a novel proteomic method that uses whole-organism isotopic labeling to detect transferred Sfps in mated female D. melanogaster. We identified 63 proteins, which were previously unknown to function in reproduction, and confirmed the transfer of dozens of predicted Sfps. Relative quantification of protein abundance revealed that several of these novel Sfps are abundant in seminal fluid. Positive selection and tandem gene duplication are the prevailing forces of Sfp evolution, and comparative proteomics with additional species revealed lineage-specific changes in seminal fluid content. We also report a proteomic-based gene discovery method that uncovered 19 previously unannotated genes in D. melanogaster. Our results demonstrate an experimental method to identify transferred proteins in any system that is amenable to isotopic labeling, and they underscore the power of combining proteomic and evolutionary analyses to shed light on the complex process of Drosophila reproduction. PMID:18666829

  19. Memory in motion: movement dynamics reveal memory strength.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Megan H; Goldinger, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Recognition memory is typically examined as a discrete end-state, describable by static variables, such as accuracy, response time, and confidence. In the present study, we combined real-time mouse-tracking with subsequent, overt confidence estimates to examine the dynamic nature of memory decisions. By examining participants' streaming x-, y- mouse coordinates during recognition decisions, we observed that movement trajectories revealed underlying response confidence. More confident decisions were associated with shorter decision times and more linear response trajectories. Less confident decisions were made slowly, with increased trajectory curvature. Statistical indices of curvature and decision times, including area-under-the-curve and time to maximum deviation, suggested that memory strength relates to response dynamics. Whether participants were correct or incorrect, old responses showed a stronger correspondence between mouse trajectories and confidence, relative to new responses. We suggest that people subjectively experience a correspondence between feelings of memory and feelings of confidence; that subjective experience reveals itself in real-time decision processes, as suggested by sequential sampling models of recognition decisions.

  20. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing.

  1. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE PAGES

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore » homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  2. Circadian acetylome reveals regulation of mitochondrial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Masri, Selma; Patel, Vishal R; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Peleg, Shahaf; Forne, Ignasi; Ladurner, Andreas G; Baldi, Pierre; Imhof, Axel; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-02-26

    The circadian clock is constituted by a complex molecular network that integrates a number of regulatory cues needed to maintain organismal homeostasis. To this effect, posttranslational modifications of clock proteins modulate circadian rhythms and are thought to convert physiological signals into changes in protein regulatory function. To explore reversible lysine acetylation that is dependent on the clock, we have characterized the circadian acetylome in WT and Clock-deficient (Clock(-/-)) mouse liver by quantitative mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed that a number of mitochondrial proteins involved in metabolic pathways are heavily influenced by clock-driven acetylation. Pathways such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, amino acid metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism were found to be highly enriched hits. The significant number of metabolic pathways whose protein acetylation profile is altered in Clock(-/-) mice prompted us to link the acetylome to the circadian metabolome previously characterized in our laboratory. Changes in enzyme acetylation over the circadian cycle and the link to metabolite levels are discussed, revealing biological implications connecting the circadian clock to cellular metabolic state.

  3. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  4. Anticipatory eye fixations reveal tool knowledge for tool interaction.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Anna; Barabas, Marissa; Himmelbach, Marc; Butz, Martin V

    2016-08-01

    Action-oriented eye-tracking studies have shown that eye fixations reveal much about current behavioral intentions. The eyes typically fixate those positions of a tool or an object where the fingers will be placed next, or those positions in a scene, where obstacles need to be avoided to successfully reach or transport a tool or object. Here, we asked to what extent eye fixations can also reveal active cognitive inference processes, which are expected to integrate bottom-up visual information with internal knowledge for planning suitable object interactions task-dependently. In accordance to the available literature, we expected that task-relevant knowledge will include sensorimotor, semantic, and mechanical aspects. To investigate if and in which way this internal knowledge influences eye fixation behavior while planning an object interaction, we presented pictures of familiar and unfamiliar tools and instructed participants to either pantomime 'lifting' or 'using' the respective tool. When confronted with unfamiliar tools, participants fixated the tool's effector part closer and longer in comparison with familiar tools. This difference was particularly prominent during 'using' trials when compared with 'lifting' trials. We suggest that this difference indicates that the brain actively extracts mechanical information about the unknown tool in order to infer its appropriate usage. Moreover, the successive fixations over a trial indicate that a dynamic, task-oriented, active cognitive process unfolds, which integrates available tool knowledge with visually gathered information to plan and determine the currently intended tool interaction.

  5. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Marcelo M.; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C. B.; Rocha, Andréa S. L.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code. PMID:26159228

  6. Offenders' crime narratives as revealed by the Narrative Roles Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Donna; Canter, David V

    2013-03-01

    The study of narrative processes as part of the immediate factors that shape criminal action is limited by the lack of a methodology for differentiating the narrative themes that characterise specific crime events. The current study explores how the roles offenders see themselves as playing during an offence encapsulate their underlying crime narratives and thus provide the basis for a quantitative methodology. To test this possibility, a 33-item Narrative Roles Questionnaire (NRQ) was developed from intensive interviews with offenders about their experience of committing a recent offence. A multidimensional analysis of the NRQ completed by 71 convicted offenders revealed life narrative themes similar to those identified in fiction by Frye and with noncriminals by McAdams, labelled The Professional, Victim, Hero, and Revenger offence roles. The NRQ thus is a first step in opening up the possibility of empirical studies of the narrative aetiological perspective in criminology.

  7. [Elderly women: revealing their experiences and care needs].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Souto, Rafaella Queiroga; Thamada, Andressa Akina

    2013-04-01

    This qualitative study used a social phenomenology approach to elucidate the experiences, care needs and expectations of the elderly women. Nine elderly women were interviewed between February and May 2011 using a semi-structured questionnaire. The elderly women referred to their physical, mental, and social limitations. They valued ​​the preservation of their autonomy in daily activities and in self-care and considered their families to be a fundamental support. They had expectations of remaining healthy, pursuing leisure activities, and having improved access to healthcare information and treatment. The absence of prospects at this stage of life was related to the loss of significant people and the loss of health. The results of this study reveal important aspects of the experiences of elderly women and encourage further research and improvement in teaching, clinical practice and management policies in relation to the needs of these women.

  8. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  9. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  10. Heat islands over Mumbai as revealed by autorecorded thermograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Voogt, James; Kshirsagar, S. R.; Srivastava, Kavita

    2016-02-01

    This study examined hourly temperature data of two locations of Mumbai metropolitan city. One data point (Coloba, Mumbai) is in centre of the city and the other one (Santacruz, Mumbai) is at the airport. The study finds that there were many occasions when night-time hourly temperatures over the city centre were considerably higher than that of the airport, even though temperature at the time of sunset at both the places was nearly same. In this study, the occasions, when hourly night-time temperature over city was more than that of the airport by objectively defined threshold value (3.0 ∘C in this study) for most of the hours in the night, were termed as heat island events. Analysis of the study reveals that these events are mostly confined to November-February months. The study also found that frequency of such events has doubled in recent two decades in comparison to the earlier two decades.

  11. Marine and terrestrial ecology: unifying concepts, revealing differences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which similar ecological processes operate on land and in the sea has been much debated, with apparently 'fundamental' differences often disappearing when appropriate comparisons are made. However, marine and terrestrial ecology have developed as largely separate intellectual endeavours, which has hampered the search for general patterns and mechanisms. Here, I argue that marine-terrestrial comparative studies can be extremely useful at uncovering mechanisms when they explicitly consider those facets of the environment that are important to a particular hypothesis. Furthermore, the binary 'marine-terrestrial' division misses many opportunities for more interesting comparisons, several of which I highlight here. Increasing the flow of concepts, hypotheses, and data between marine and terrestrial ecologists is essential to reveal those differences that really are important.

  12. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-17

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. As a result, the active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  13. The genome of Tetranychus urticae reveals herbivorous pest adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Grbić, Miodrag; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Clark, Richard M.; Rombauts, Stephane; Rouzé, Pierre; Grbić, Vojislava; Osborne, Edward J.; Dermauw, Wannes; Ngoc, Phuong Cao Thi; Ortego, Félix; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel; Navajas, Maria; Sucena, Élio; Magalhães, Sara; Nagy, Lisa; Pace, Ryan M.; Djuranović, Sergej; Smagghe, Guy; Iga, Masatoshi; Christiaens, Olivier; Veenstra, Jan A.; Ewer, John; Villalobos, Rodrigo Mancilla; Hutter, Jeffrey L.; Hudson, Stephen D.; Velez, Marisela; Yi, Soojin V.; Zeng, Jia; Pires-daSilva, Andre; Roch, Fernando; Cazaux, Marc; Navarro, Marie; Zhurov, Vladimir; Acevedo, Gustavo; Bjelica, Anica; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Bonnet, Eric; Martens, Cindy; Baele, Guy; Wissler, Lothar; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Aminael; Tirry, Luc; Blais, Catherine; Demeestere, Kristof; Henz, Stefan R.; Gregory, T. Ryan; Mathieu, Johannes; Verdon, Lou; Farinelli, Laurent; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lindquist, Erika; Feyereisen, René; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a cosmopolitan agricultural pest with an extensive host plant range and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Here we present the completely sequenced and annotated spider mite genome, representing the first complete chelicerate genome. At 90 megabases T. urticae has the smallest sequenced arthropod genome. Compared with other arthropods, the spider mite genome shows unique changes in the hormonal environment and organization of the Hox complex, and also reveals evolutionary innovation of silk production. We find strong signatures of polyphagy and detoxification in gene families associated with feeding on different hosts and in new gene families acquired by lateral gene transfer. Deep transcriptome analysis of mites feeding on different plants shows how this pest responds to a changing host environment. The T. urticae genome thus offers new insights into arthropod evolution and plant–herbivore interactions, and provides unique opportunities for developing novel plant protection strategies. PMID:22113690

  14. Revealing the Genetic Basis of Natural Bacterial Phenotypic Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Freddolino, Peter L.; Goodarzi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Divergent phenotypes for distantly related strains of bacteria, such as differing antibiotic resistances or organic solvent tolerances, are of keen interest both from an evolutionary perspective and for the engineering of novel microbial organisms and consortia in synthetic biology applications. A prerequisite for any practical application of this phenotypic diversity is knowledge of the genetic determinants for each trait of interest. Sequence divergence between strains is often so extensive as to make brute-force approaches to identifying the loci contributing to a given trait impractical. Here we describe a global linkage analysis approach, GLINT, for rapid discovery of the causal genetic variants underlying phenotypic divergence between distantly related strains of Escherichia coli. This general strategy will also be usable, with minor modifications, for revealing genotype-phenotype associations between naturally occurring strains of other bacterial species. PMID:24317396

  15. Hybridization Reveals the Evolving Genomic Architecture of Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Kronforst, Marcus R.; Hansen, Matthew E.B.; Crawford, Nicholas G.; Gallant, Jason R.; Zhang, Wei; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Kapan, Durrell D.; Mullen, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rate at which genomes diverge during speciation is unknown, as are the physical dynamics of the process. Here, we compare full genome sequences of 32 butterflies, representing five species from a hybridizing Heliconius butterfly community, to examine genome-wide patterns of introgression and infer how divergence evolves during the speciation process. Our analyses reveal that initial divergence is restricted to a small fraction of the genome, largely clustered around known wing-patterning genes. Over time, divergence evolves rapidly, due primarily to the origin of new divergent regions. Furthermore, divergent genomic regions display signatures of both selection and adaptive introgression, demonstrating the link between microevolutionary processes acting within species and the origin of species across macroevolutionary timescales. Our results provide a uniquely comprehensive portrait of the evolving species boundary due to the role that hybridization plays in reducing the background accumulation of divergence at neutral sites. PMID:24183670

  16. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic.

  17. Chaos in spin glasses revealed through thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2015-09-01

    We study the fragility of spin glasses to small temperature perturbations numerically using population annealing Monte Carlo. We apply thermal boundary conditions to a three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass. In thermal boundary conditions all eight combinations of periodic versus antiperiodic boundary conditions in the three spatial directions are present, each appearing in the ensemble with its respective statistical weight determined by its free energy. We show that temperature chaos is revealed in the statistics of crossings in the free energy for different boundary conditions. By studying the energy difference between boundary conditions at free-energy crossings, we determine the domain-wall fractal dimension. Similarly, by studying the number of crossings, we determine the chaos exponent. Our results also show that computational hardness in spin glasses and the presence of chaos are closely related.

  18. Multicentric Castleman's Disease in a Child Revealed by Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Chaouki, Sana; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a rare benign and unexplained lymphoproliferative disorder that is extremely uncommon in children. It presents with fever, systemic symptoms, generalized lymphadenopathy, and laboratory markers of inflammation. Its treatment is not standardized and its prognosis is poor. We report a novel case of multicentric Castleman's disease in a 13-year-old girl who had presented with chronic diarrhea as the only initial presenting symptom. The diagnosis of celiac or inflammatory bowel diseases was suspected, but two and a half years later, the diagnosis of multicentric Castleman's disease was brought following the appearance of abdominal mass whose biopsy revealed Castleman's disease in the plasma cell form. The outcome was favorable after treatment by corticosteroid, chemotherapy, and surgery. The occurrence of diarrhea as the initial symptom of multicentric Castleman's disease without lymph node involvement is very rare. This case report underlines the diagnostic difficulties and the long interval between onset and diagnosis when diarrhea occurs first. PMID:25737793

  19. Hodgkin's Lymphoma Revealed by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Benmiloud, Sarra; Hbibi, Mohamed; Chaouki, Sana; Abourazzak, Sana; Hida, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a severe life-threatening disorder, responsible for extensive phagocytosis of hematopoietic cells and causing a multisystem organ failure. If lymphomas are common causes of HLH, the association with Hodgkin's lymphoma is rarely described in children. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy presenting with HLH as an initial manifestation of Hodgkin's lymphoma. He has been suffering from persistent high fever, asthenia, weight loss, and hepatosplenomegaly with no lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis of HLH secondary to infectious disease was initially worn. The patient received high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin with broad-spectrum antibiotics. However, his state got worse with the onset of dry cough and pleural effusion. Histopathologic examination of pleural fluid showed the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells. The outcome was favorable after treatment by corticosteroid and chemotherapy. Hodgkin's lymphoma revealed by HLH is a source of delayed diagnosis and should be borne in mind in children. PMID:25328742

  20. Revealing invisible photonic printing: colorful pattern shown by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Dong, Z. Q.; Chen, Y.; Hu, X. B.; Zhu, X. R.; Zhu, Z. G.; Qian, S. H.; Shih, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Patterning and displaying of photonic crystals are critical for building advanced photonic materials. We developed a monolayered colloidal crystal (MCC) based photonic material through a mask-assistant photo-polymerization process. Polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles were firstly assembled on the glass slide to form highly ordered MCC, this template is invisible and could diffract visible light when infiltrated by solvent. This reversibly displaying property was successfully maintained after the MCC was surrounding by a polymer layer via photo-polymerization, meanwhile a pattern could also be printed on the polymer with the help of a mask. Such photonic printing could be reversibly shown and hidden, revealing the colorful pattern was mainly due to the non-uniform cross-linking density of the polymer.

  1. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes 'ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data.

  2. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes ‘ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data. PMID:20160710

  3. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  4. Physical Principles of Skeletal Minerals Revealed with Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Pupa

    2009-08-05

    Skeletal elements of marine and terrestrial organisms have the most fascinating nano-to-macro-structures, attracting the attention of physicists, biologists, chemists, and materials scientists. Using X-PEEM spectromicroscopy we revealed some of the fundamental mechanisms leading to the formation of these biominerals. Specifically, we addressed the following questions and provided the answers: 1Q) How do teeth, bones, and echinoderm and mollusk shells acquire their unusual, curved and complex morphology, if they are composed of single crystals? 1A) Via amorphous precursor phases; 2Q) How does crystallinity propagate through the amorophous precursor phases in sea urchin spicules and teeth? 2A) By secondary nucleation, following random walk patterns; 3Q) How does iridescent mother-of-pearl become ordered? 3A) Gradually, through a kinetic mechanisms in which fastest growing single-crystals win the competition for space, thus end up being approximately co-oriented.

  5. Axis Patterning by BMPs: Cnidarian Network Reveals Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Genikhovich, Grigory; Fried, Patrick; Prünster, M. Mandela; Schinko, Johannes B.; Gilles, Anna F.; Fredman, David; Meier, Karin; Iber, Dagmar; Technau, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary BMP signaling plays a crucial role in the establishment of the dorso-ventral body axis in bilaterally symmetric animals. However, the topologies of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling networks vary drastically in different animal groups, raising questions about the evolutionary constraints and evolvability of BMP signaling systems. Using loss-of-function analysis and mathematical modeling, we show that two signaling centers expressing different BMPs and BMP antagonists maintain the secondary axis of the sea anemone Nematostella. We demonstrate that BMP signaling is required for asymmetric Hox gene expression and mesentery formation. Computational analysis reveals that network parameters related to BMP4 and Chordin are constrained both in Nematostella and Xenopus, while those describing the BMP signaling modulators can vary significantly. Notably, only chordin, but not bmp4 expression needs to be spatially restricted for robust signaling gradient formation. Our data provide an explanation of the evolvability of BMP signaling systems in axis formation throughout Eumetazoa. PMID:25772352

  6. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-10-18

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance.

  7. Physical Principles of Skeletal Minerals Revealed with Spectromicroscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Gilbert, Pupa [U of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, United States

    2016-07-12

    Skeletal elements of marine and terrestrial organisms have the most fascinating nano-to-macro-structures, attracting the attention of physicists, biologists, chemists, and materials scientists. Using X-PEEM spectromicroscopy we revealed some of the fundamental mechanisms leading to the formation of these biominerals. Specifically, we addressed the following questions and provided the answers: 1Q) How do teeth, bones, and echinoderm and mollusk shells acquire their unusual, curved and complex morphology, if they are composed of single crystals? 1A) Via amorphous precursor phases; 2Q) How does crystallinity propagate through the amorophous precursor phases in sea urchin spicules and teeth? 2A) By secondary nucleation, following random walk patterns; 3Q) How does iridescent mother-of-pearl become ordered? 3A) Gradually, through a kinetic mechanisms in which fastest growing single-crystals win the competition for space, thus end up being approximately co-oriented.

  8. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance. PMID:27763546

  9. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.

  10. Spring-Block Model Reveals Region-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Máté, Gabriell; Néda, Zoltán; Benedek, József

    2011-01-01

    A mechanical spring-block model is used for realizing an objective space partition of settlements from a geographic territory in region-like structures. The method is based on the relaxation-dynamics of the spring-block system and reveals in a hierarchical manner region-like entities at different spatial scales. It takes into account in an elegant manner both the spatiality of the elements and the connectivity relations among them. Spatiality is taken into account by using the geographic coordinates of the settlements, and by detecting the neighbors with the help of a Delaunay triangulation. Connectivity between neighboring settlements are quantified using a Pearson-like correlation for the relative variation of a relevant socio-economic parameter (population size, GDP, tax payed per inhabitant, etc.). The method is implemented in an interactive JAVA application and it is applied with success for an artificially generated society and for the case of USA, Hungary and Transylvania. PMID:21346819

  11. Macrophage characteristics of stem cells revealed by transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Charriere, Guillaume M.; Cousin, Beatrice; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Saillan-Barreau, Corinne; Andre, Mireille; Massoudi, Ali; Dani, Christian; Penicaud, Luc; Casteilla, Louis . E-mail: casteil@toulouse.inserm.fr

    2006-10-15

    We previously showed that the phenotypes of adipocyte progenitors and macrophages were close. Using functional analyses and microarray technology, we first tested whether this intriguing relationship was specific to adipocyte progenitors or could be shared with other progenitors. Measurements of phagocytic activity and gene profiling analysis of different progenitor cells revealed that the latter hypothesis should be retained. These results encouraged us to pursue and to confirm our analysis with a gold-standard stem cell population, embryonic stem cells or ESC. The transcriptomic profiles of ESC and macrophages were clustered together, unlike differentiated ESC. In addition, undifferentiated ESC displayed higher phagocytic activity than other progenitors, and they could phagocytoze apoptotic bodies. These data suggest that progenitors and stem cells share some characteristics of macrophages. This opens new perspectives on understanding stem cell phenotype and functionalities such as a putative role of stem cells in tissue remodeling by discarding dead cells but also their immunomodulation or fusion properties.

  12. ALMA Reveals Internal Structure of Molecular Clouds in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    We carried out high-resolution (0.7 pc) CO J=1-0 mosaic observations of five giant molecular clouds, which cover a wide range of evolutionary stages based on their associations to recent star formation, in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ALMA. The observations revealed a variety of spatial structures of the gas, from faint and diffuse emission to bright and compact structures. The variation of structures, which is similar to that seen in the Milky Way, is quantified by the brightness distribution function (BDF) and brightness distribution index (BDI) established in our prior studies. The structured molecular gas may indicate the readiness for, rather than the outcome of, star formation.

  13. Inheritance Patterns in Citation Networks Reveal Scientific Memes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Tobias; Perc, Matjaž; Helbing, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with data from close to 50 million publication records from the Web of Science, PubMed Central, and the American Physical Society. Evaluations relying on human annotators, citation network randomizations, and comparisons with several alternative approaches confirm that our formula is accurate and effective, without a dependence on linguistic or ontological knowledge and without the application of arbitrary thresholds or filters.

  14. ID-Check: Online Concealed Information Test Reveals True Identity.

    PubMed

    Verschuere, Bruno; Kleinberg, Bennett

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has already changed people's lives considerably and is likely to drastically change forensic research. We developed a web-based test to reveal concealed autobiographical information. Initial studies identified a number of conditions that affect diagnostic efficiency. By combining these moderators, this study investigated the full potential of the online ID-check. Participants (n = 101) tried to hide their identity and claimed a false identity in a reaction time-based Concealed Information Test. Half of the participants were presented with personal details (e.g., first name, last name, birthday), whereas the others only saw irrelevant details. Results showed that participants' true identity could be detected with high accuracy (AUC = 0.98; overall accuracy: 86-94%). Online memory detection can reliably and validly detect whether someone is hiding their true identity. This suggests that online memory detection might become a valuable tool for forensic applications.

  15. Endoperoxides Revealed as Origin of the Toxicity of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Hanna; Chercheja, Serghei; Eigler, Siegfried; Halbig, Christian E; Filipovic, Milos R; Mokhir, Andriy

    2016-01-04

    Potential biomedicinal applications of graphene oxide (GO), for example, as a carrier of biomolecules or a reagent for photothermal therapy and biosensing, are limited by its cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. It is believed that these properties are at least partially caused by GO-induced oxidative stress in cells. However, it is not known which chemical fragments of GO are responsible for this unfavorable effect. We generated four GOs containing variable redox-active groups on the surface, including Mn(2+), C-centered radicals, and endoperoxides (EPs). A comparison of the abilities of these materials to generate reactive oxygen species in human cervical cancer cells revealed that EPs play a crucial role in GO-induced oxidative stress. These data could be applied to the rational design of biocompatible nontoxic GOs for biomedical applications.

  16. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Keogh, Aaron; Vogeley, Lutz; Howe, Nicole; Lyons, Joseph A.; Aragao, David; Fromme, Petra; Fromme, Raimund; Basu, Shibom; Grotjohann, Ingo; Kupitz, Christopher; Rendek, Kimberley; Weierstall, Uwe; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Bandaru, Sateesh; English, Niall J.; Gati, Cornelius; Barty, Anton; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Chapman, Henry N.; Diederichs, Kay; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Marvin Seibert, M.; Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternary structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. The active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution. PMID:26673816

  17. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Larkin, Denis M; Lee, Chul; Storz, Jay F; Antunes, Agostinho; Greenwold, Matthew J; Meredith, Robert W; Ödeen, Anders; Cui, Jie; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Wang, Zongji; Jin, Lijun; Zhang, Pei; Hu, Haofu; Yang, Wei; Hu, Jiang; Xiao, Jin; Yang, Zhikai; Liu, Yang; Xie, Qiaolin; Yu, Hao; Lian, Jinmin; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Yongli; Xiong, Zijun; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Long; Huang, Zhiyong; An, Na; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Qiumei; Xiong, Yingqi; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jingjing; Fan, Yu; da Fonseca, Rute R; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Schubert, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Mourier, Tobias; Howard, Jason T; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Pfenning, Andreas; Whitney, Osceola; Rivas, Miriam V; Hara, Erina; Smith, Julia; Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho; Romanov, Michael N; Borges, Rui; Machado, João Paulo; Khan, Imran; Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John; Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Håstad, Olle; Sawyer, Roger H; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Li, Ning; Huang, Yinhua; Bruford, Michael W; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Dixon, Andrew; Bertelsen, Mads F; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Warren, Wesley; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Shengbin; Ray, David A; Green, Richard E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Griffin, Darren; Johnson, Warren E; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver A; Willerslev, Eske; Graves, Gary R; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Mindell, David P; Edwards, Scott V; Braun, Edward L; Rahbek, Carsten; Burt, David W; Houde, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Jarvis, Erich D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-12

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.

  18. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Larkin, Denis M.; Lee, Chul; Storz, Jay F.; Antunes, Agostinho; Greenwold, Matthew J.; Meredith, Robert W.; Ödeen, Anders; Cui, Jie; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Wang, Zongji; Jin, Lijun; Zhang, Pei; Hu, Haofu; Yang, Wei; Hu, Jiang; Xiao, Jin; Yang, Zhikai; Liu, Yang; Xie, Qiaolin; Yu, Hao; Lian, Jinmin; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Yongli; Xiong, Zijun; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Long; Huang, Zhiyong; An, Na; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Qiumei; Xiong, Yingqi; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jingjing; Fan, Yu; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Schubert, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Mourier, Tobias; Howard, Jason T.; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Pfenning, Andreas; Whitney, Osceola; Rivas, Miriam V.; Hara, Erina; Smith, Julia; Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho; Romanov, Michael N; Borges, Rui; Machado, João Paulo; Khan, Imran; Springer, Mark S.; Gatesy, John; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Håstad, Olle; Sawyer, Roger H.; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Li, Ning; Huang, Yinhua; Bruford, Michael W.; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Dixon, Andrew; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Warren, Wesley; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Shengbin; Ray, David A.; Green, Richard E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Griffin, Darren; Johnson, Warren E.; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver A.; Willerslev, Eske; Graves, Gary R.; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Mindell, David P.; Edwards, Scott V.; Braun, Edward L.; Rahbek, Carsten; Burt, David W.; Houde, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Jarvis, Erich D.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits. PMID:25504712

  19. Suit to proceed in claim that pharmacy revealed HIV status.

    PubMed

    1999-12-24

    A Federal judge in Milwaukee left intact a claim that the Osco Drug Store chain negligently caused ¿John Doe' emotional distress and exposed him to harassment. The store published, without his permission, his letter of thanks to an Osco pharmacist for helping him to obtain the protease inhibitor Norvir. After the letter was printed in an internal newsletter and posted at the store, John Doe received anonymous phone calls and his house was vandalized. The judge called Osco's argument that Osco was entrapped into revealing John Doe's HIV status "absurd." The judge dismissed the violation of privacy counts stating that Wisconsin's privacy law was only linked to HIV test results, which the Osco document did not mention. However, the judge left intact the claim of negligent infliction of emotional distress. The plaintiff's attorney plans to file a motion for reconsideration of the privacy and HIV information claims in Florida, John Doe's primary area of residence.

  20. Surprise maximization reveals the community structure of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    How to determine the community structure of complex networks is an open question. It is critical to establish the best strategies for community detection in networks of unknown structure. Here, using standard synthetic benchmarks, we show that none of the algorithms hitherto developed for community structure characterization perform optimally. Significantly, evaluating the results according to their modularity, the most popular measure of the quality of a partition, systematically provides mistaken solutions. However, a novel quality function, called Surprise, can be used to elucidate which is the optimal division into communities. Consequently, we show that the best strategy to find the community structure of all the networks examined involves choosing among the solutions provided by multiple algorithms the one with the highest Surprise value. We conclude that Surprise maximization precisely reveals the community structure of complex networks. PMID:23320141

  1. Insights revealed by rodent models of sugar binge eating.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan M; Tulloch, Alastair J; Chen, Eunice Y; Avena, Nicole M

    2015-12-01

    Binge eating is seen across the spectrum of eating disorder diagnoses as well as among individuals who do not meet diagnostic criteria. Analyses of the specific types of foods that are frequently binged upon reveal that sugar-rich items feature prominently in binge-type meals, making the effects of binge consumption of sugar an important focus of study. One avenue to do this involves the use of animal models. Foundational and recent studies of animal models of sugar bingeing, both outlined here, lend insight into the various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that may participate in or be altered by this behavior. Further, several preclinical studies incorporating sugar bingeing paradigms have explored the utility of pharmacological agents that target such neural systems for reducing sugar bingeing in an effort to enhance clinical treatment. Indeed, the translational implications of findings generated using animal models of sugar bingeing are considered here, along with potential avenues for further study.

  2. Direct brain recordings reveal hippocampal rhythm underpinnings of language processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristopher L.; Lin, Jack J.; Dewar, Callum; Parvizi, Josef; Dronkers, Nina F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Language is classically thought to be supported by perisylvian cortical regions. Here we provide intracranial evidence linking the hippocampal complex to linguistic processing. We used direct recordings from the hippocampal structures to investigate whether theta oscillations, pivotal in memory function, track the amount of contextual linguistic information provided in sentences. Twelve participants heard sentences that were either constrained (“She locked the door with the”) or unconstrained (“She walked in here with the”) before presentation of the final word (“key”), shown as a picture that participants had to name. Hippocampal theta power increased for constrained relative to unconstrained contexts during sentence processing, preceding picture presentation. Our study implicates hippocampal theta oscillations in a language task using natural language associations that do not require memorization. These findings reveal that the hippocampal complex contributes to language in an active fashion, relating incoming words to stored semantic knowledge, a necessary process in the generation of sentence meaning. PMID:27647880

  3. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S.; Jakosky, B.; Halekas, J.; Grebowsky, J.; Luhmann, J.; Mahaffy, P.; Connerney, J.; Eparvier, F.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; Mitchell, D.; Schneider, N.; Zurek, R.; Mazelle, C.; Andersson, L.; Andrews, D.; Baird, D.; Baker, D. N.; Bell, J. M.; Benna, M.; Brain, D.; Chaffin, M.; Chamberlin, P.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Clarke, J.; Collinson, G.; Combi, M.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Crismani, M.; Curry, S.; Curtis, D.; Deighan, J.; Delory, G.; Dewey, R.; DiBraccio, G.; Dong, C.; Dong, Y.; Dunn, P.; Elrod, M.; England, S.; Eriksson, A.; Espley, J.; Evans, S.; Fang, X.; Fillingim, M.; Fortier, K.; Fowler, C. M.; Fox, J.; Gröller, H.; Guzewich, S.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Holsclaw, G.; Jain, S. K.; Jolitz, R.; Leblanc, F.; Lee, C. O.; Lee, Y.; Lefevre, F.; Lillis, R.; Livi, R.; Lo, D.; Ma, Y.; Mayyasi, M.; McClintock, W.; McEnulty, T.; Modolo, R.; Montmessin, F.; Morooka, M.; Nagy, A.; Olsen, K.; Peterson, W.; Rahmati, A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Russell, C. T.; Sakai, S.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Seki, K.; Steckiewicz, M.; Stevens, M.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Stiepen, A.; Stone, S.; Tenishev, V.; Thiemann, E.; Tolson, R.; Toublanc, D.; Vogt, M.; Weber, T.; Withers, P.; Woods, T.; Yelle, R.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  4. Early MAVEN Deep Dip campaign reveals thermosphere and ionosphere variability.

    PubMed

    Bougher, S; Jakosky, B; Halekas, J; Grebowsky, J; Luhmann, J; Mahaffy, P; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Larson, D; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D N; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Brain, D; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, J-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Ma, Y; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-06

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission, during the second of its Deep Dip campaigns, made comprehensive measurements of martian thermosphere and ionosphere composition, structure, and variability at altitudes down to ~130 kilometers in the subsolar region. This altitude range contains the diffusively separated upper atmosphere just above the well-mixed atmosphere, the layer of peak extreme ultraviolet heating and primary reservoir for atmospheric escape. In situ measurements of the upper atmosphere reveal previously unmeasured populations of neutral and charged particles, the homopause altitude at approximately 130 kilometers, and an unexpected level of variability both on an orbit-to-orbit basis and within individual orbits. These observations help constrain volatile escape processes controlled by thermosphere and ionosphere structure and variability.

  5. An Addison disease revealed with a serious hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Maguet, Hadrien; Carreau, Agnès; Hautefeuille, Serge; Bonnin, Pierre; Beaune, Gaspard

    2017-02-01

    We present the case of an Addison's disease revealed by a serious hyponatremia. The serum concentration of ACTH and 21-hydroxylase antibodies were increased and lead to the diagnosis. The cortisol blood level was lowered but required to take into account the stress induced by the hospitalisation of the patient. Addison's disease is characterized by the destruction of the adrenal cortex. Autoimmune adrenalitis is the main cause of adrenal insufficiency. Treatment involves normalisation of sodium concentration and corticosteroids replacement. With a good patient compliance, the survival rate of Addisonian patient is similar to that of the normal population. Management of patient requires vigilance because of the occurrence of others autoimmunes diseases during patient life.

  6. Early allelic selection in maize as revealed by ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Jaenicke-Després, Viviane; Buckler, Ed S; Smith, Bruce D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Cooper, Alan; Doebley, John; Pääbo, Svante

    2003-11-14

    Maize was domesticated from teosinte, a wild grass, by approximately 6300 years ago in Mexico. After initial domestication, early farmers continued to select for advantageous morphological and biochemical traits in this important crop. However, the timing and sequence of character selection are, thus far, known only for morphological features discernible in corn cobs. We have analyzed three genes involved in the control of plant architecture, storage protein synthesis, and starch production from archaeological maize samples from Mexico and the southwestern United States. The results reveal that the alleles typical of contemporary maize were present in Mexican maize by 4400 years ago. However, as recently as 2000 years ago, allelic selection at one of the genes may not yet have been complete.

  7. Experimental evolution reveals hidden diversity in evolutionary pathways.

    PubMed

    Lind, Peter A; Farr, Andrew D; Rainey, Paul B

    2015-03-25

    Replicate populations of natural and experimental organisms often show evidence of parallel genetic evolution, but the causes are unclear. The wrinkly spreader morph of Pseudomonas fluorescens arises repeatedly during experimental evolution. The mutational causes reside exclusively within three pathways. By eliminating these, 13 new mutational pathways were discovered with the newly arising WS types having fitnesses similar to those arising from the commonly passaged routes. Our findings show that parallel genetic evolution is strongly biased by constraints and we reveal the genetic bases. From such knowledge, and in instances where new phenotypes arise via gene activation, we suggest a set of principles: evolution proceeds firstly via pathways subject to negative regulation, then via promoter mutations and gene fusions, and finally via activation by intragenic gain-of-function mutations. These principles inform evolutionary forecasting and have relevance to interpreting the diverse array of mutations associated with clinically identical instances of disease in humans.

  8. Metagenome mining reveals polytheonamides as posttranslationally modified ribosomal peptides.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael F; Gurgui, Cristian; Helf, Maximilian J; Morinaka, Brandon I; Uria, Agustinus R; Oldham, Neil J; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2012-10-19

    It is held as a paradigm that ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins contain only l-amino acids. We demonstrate a ribosomal origin of the marine sponge-derived polytheonamides, exceptionally potent, giant natural-product toxins. Isolation of the biosynthetic genes from the sponge metagenome revealed a bacterial gene architecture. Only six candidate enzymes were identified for 48 posttranslational modifications, including 18 epimerizations and 17 methylations of nonactivated carbon centers. Three enzymes were functionally validated, which showed that a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme is responsible for the unidirectional epimerization of multiple and different amino acids. Collectively, these complex alterations create toxins that function as unimolecular minimalistic ion channels with near-femtomolar activity. This study broadens the biosynthetic scope of ribosomal systems and creates new opportunities for peptide and protein bioengineering.

  9. Spring-block model reveals region-like structures.

    PubMed

    Máté, Gabriell; Néda, Zoltán; Benedek, József

    2011-02-08

    A mechanical spring-block model is used for realizing an objective space partition of settlements from a geographic territory in region-like structures. The method is based on the relaxation-dynamics of the spring-block system and reveals in a hierarchical manner region-like entities at different spatial scales. It takes into account in an elegant manner both the spatiality of the elements and the connectivity relations among them. Spatiality is taken into account by using the geographic coordinates of the settlements, and by detecting the neighbors with the help of a Delaunay triangulation. Connectivity between neighboring settlements are quantified using a Pearson-like correlation for the relative variation of a relevant socio-economic parameter (population size, GDP, tax payed per inhabitant, etc.). The method is implemented in an interactive JAVA application and it is applied with success for an artificially generated society and for the case of USA, Hungary and Transylvania.

  10. Structure of mega-hemocyanin reveals protein origami in snails.

    PubMed

    Gatsogiannis, Christos; Hofnagel, Oliver; Markl, Jürgen; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-06

    Mega-hemocyanin is a 13.5 MDa oxygen transporter found in the hemolymph of some snails. Similar to typical gastropod hemocyanins, it is composed of 400 kDa building blocks but has additional 550 kDa subunits. Together, they form a large, completely filled cylinder. The structural basis for this highly complex protein packing is not known so far. Here, we report the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of mega-hemocyanin complexes from two different snail species. The structures reveal that mega-hemocyanin is composed of flexible building blocks that differ in their conformation, but not in their primary structure. Like a protein origami, these flexible blocks are optimally packed, implementing different local symmetries and pseudosymmetries. A comparison between the two structures suggests a surprisingly simple evolutionary mechanism leading to these large oxygen transporters.

  11. [Hodgkin disease revealed by a nephrotic syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Cheptou, M; Pichault, V; Campagni, R; Vodoff, M-V; Fischbach, M; Paillard, C

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric nephrotic syndrome (NS) is most often idiopathic or primary but in rare cases, it can be secondary to neoplasia. We report on a case of steroid-resistant NS revealing as a paraneoplastic syndrome of Hodgkin disease (HD) in a 12-year-old boy. The onset of the NS can be earlier, later, or simultaneous to the HD. Treatment of the lymphoma allows the disappearance of the NS. In the case we observed, the diagnosis of HD was delayed because HD presented with an isolated, hilar adenopathy in the absence of retroperitoneal or peripheral locations. In children aged 10 years or more presenting with NS, steroid-resistant or otherwise, a possible paraneoplastic origin such as Hodgkin lymphoma should always be taken into consideration and eventually eliminated.

  12. High throughput sequencing reveals a novel fabavirus infecting sweet cherry.

    PubMed

    Villamor, D E V; Pillai, S S; Eastwell, K C

    2017-03-01

    The genus Fabavirus currently consists of five species represented by viruses that infect a wide range of hosts but none reported from temperate climate fruit trees. A virus with genomic features resembling fabaviruses (tentatively named Prunus virus F, PrVF) was revealed by high throughput sequencing of extracts from a sweet cherry tree (Prunus avium). PrVF was subsequently shown to be graft transmissible and further identified in three other non-symptomatic Prunus spp. from different geographical locations. Two genetic variants of RNA1 and RNA2 coexisted in the same samples. RNA1 consisted of 6,165 and 6,163 nucleotides, and RNA2 consisted of 3,622 and 3,468 nucleotides.

  13. Treated-skin temperature regularities revealed by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2001-03-01

    Experimental results disclosing temperature change of human skin affected by various unnatural factors are presented in detail. Thermograms are obtained with the IR thermograph containing high performance InAs CID FPA-based photosensitive unit. Using logarithmic scale of time, evolution of skin temperature after moistening, spirit sponging, and olive oil lubrication is investigated. A comparative analysis of the resulting effects of treatments including alpha-hydroxy acid, cosmetic regenerating cream, spirit, and water, is made. Quantitative distinctions between skin regions characterized by ordinary, and depleted blood supply, including areas located directly above surface main vessels, are revealed. Strongly logarithmic time- dependence of a skin temperature is discovered when the skin is cooled down after its preliminary heating with a hot wax. Non-monotonic change of a local temperature during electrically active procedure is described. Low level light therapy equipment is also applied. A special role of the temperature of nose is discussed.

  14. Quasisoft X-ray Sources: their physical natures revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Primini, Francis A.; Guo, Jincheng; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-04-01

    Quasisoft X-ray sources (QSSs) have been the Mona Lisa of X-ray sources. They have remained enigmatic, even though we have known of their existence and basic properties for more than a decade. QSSs have X-ray luminosities greater than 10^{36} erg/s, but emit few or no photons above 2 keV. They were discovered in external galaxies during searches for softer sources, supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). Every external galaxy contains QSSs, but it has been challenging to find any in the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. Recent work, however, reveals that a significant fraction of QSSs may be black holes. We review what is known about QSSs to date, because this obscure class of objects may at last to be ready for "prime time'', capable of identifying BHs in a wide range of Galactic environments.

  15. Biosensor reveals multiple sources for mitochondrial NAD⁺.

    PubMed

    Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Stewart, Melissa L; Kim, DongHo; Jones-Brunette, Amber M; Morgan, Rory K; Farrens, David L; Cohen, Michael S; Goodman, Richard H

    2016-06-17

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential substrate for sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), which are NAD(+)-consuming enzymes localized in the nucleus, cytosol, and mitochondria. Fluctuations in NAD(+) concentrations within these subcellular compartments are thought to regulate the activity of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes; however, the challenge in measuring compartmentalized NAD(+) in cells has precluded direct evidence for this type of regulation. We describe the development of a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor for directly monitoring free NAD(+) concentrations in subcellular compartments. We found that the concentrations of free NAD(+) in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria approximate the Michaelis constants for sirtuins and PARPs in their respective compartments. Systematic depletion of enzymes that catalyze the final step of NAD(+) biosynthesis revealed cell-specific mechanisms for maintaining mitochondrial NAD(+) concentrations.

  16. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K.; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H.; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M.; Urban, Jennifer A.; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J.; Kingston, Robert E.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  17. Satellite nighttime lights reveal increasing human exposure to floods worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, Serena; Laio, Francesco; Montanari, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    River floods claim thousands of lives every year, but effective and high-resolution methods to map human exposure to floods at the global scale are still lacking. We use satellite nightlight data to prove that nocturnal lights close to rivers are consistently related to flood damages. We correlate global data of economic losses caused by flooding events with nighttime lights and find that increasing nightlights are associated to flood damage intensification. Then, we analyze the temporal evolution of nightlights along the river network all over the world from 1992 to 2012 and obtain a global map of nightlight trends, which we associate with increasing human exposure to floods, at 1 km2 resolution. An enhancement of exposure to floods worldwide, particularly in Africa and Asia, is revealed, which may exacerbate the projected effects of climate change on flood-related losses and therefore argues for the development of valuable flood preparedness and mitigation strategies.

  18. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (<2% of row-crop land), the extent of highly unprofitable land increased to 2.5 Mha, or 27% of row-crop land, in the 2015 projection. Aggregation of these areas to the township level revealed ‘hotspots’ for potential management change in Western, Central, and Northeast Iowa. In these least profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  19. Martian Channels and their Geomorphologic Development as Revealed by MOLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, J. K.; Hebenstreit, R.; Jaumann, R.

    2000-08-01

    One of the most striking features of Mars are enormous channels and channel systems that shape its surface. Outflow channels more than 2000 km long and several 100 km wide reveal a vast amount of erosional landforms resembling terrestrial flood features. Runoff channels with dendritic networks and fretted channels with features resembling terrestrial rock glaciers show the variety of processes that shaped the landscape. Newly released Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) tracks give a detailed insight in the development of the shape of cross sections along those Martian channels. We have studied numerous such cross sections (sometimes more than 100 per channel!) looking for the processes involved in the evolution of the channels. The MOLA data also allowed the generation of longitudinal profiles, by extracting the deepest points of all cross sections as given by the MOLA tracks.Cross sections of runoff channels (e.g. Nirgal Vallis) showed a striking similarity with terrestrial channel networks that were formed by sapping. They are U-shaped in the upper parts of the channels and box-shaped in the lower parts. They generally increase in width and depth downstream but often stagnate over long distances. No inner channels were found, possibly because of the limited vertical resolution of the MOLA tracks. The longitudinal profile of Nirgal Vallis shows a continuous downstream slope as one would expect from a channel formed by sapping as well as by surface runoff. These observations currently are compared with MOLA tracks of the more dendritic type of runoff channels hoping to find similarities or differences that might reveal more about the evolution of those channels and the processes involved.

  20. Vibrio cholerae classical biotype strains reveal distinct signatures in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alam, Munirul; Islam, M Tarequl; Rashed, Shah Manzur; Johura, Fatema-tuz; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Delgado, Gabriela; Morales, Rosario; Mendez, Jose Luis; Navarro, Armando; Watanabe, Haruo; Hasan, Nur-A; Colwell, Rita R; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical (CL) biotype caused the fifth and sixth pandemics, and probably the earlier cholera pandemics, before the El Tor (ET) biotype initiated the seventh pandemic in Asia in the 1970s by completely displacing the CL biotype. Although the CL biotype was thought to be extinct in Asia and although it had never been reported from Latin America, V. cholerae CL and ET biotypes, including a hybrid ET, were found associated with areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1991 and 1997. In this study, CL biotype strains isolated from areas of cholera endemicity in Mexico between 1983 and 1997 were characterized in terms of major phenotypic and genetic traits and compared with CL biotype strains isolated in Bangladesh between 1962 and 1989. According to sero- and biotyping data, all V. cholerae strains tested had the major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics specific for the CL biotype. Antibiograms revealed the majority of the Bangladeshi strains to be resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, furazolidone, ampicillin, and gentamicin, while the Mexican strains were sensitive to all of these drugs, as well as to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI-digested genomic DNA revealed characteristic banding patterns for all of the CL biotype strains although the Mexican strains differed from the Bangladeshi strains in 1 to 2 DNA bands. The difference was subtle but consistent, as confirmed by the subclustering patterns in the PFGE-based dendrogram, and can serve as a regional signature, suggesting the pre-1991 existence and evolution of the CL biotype strains in the Americas, independent from Asia.

  1. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Seile; Bekele, Endashaw

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund's variance, Nei's measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei's standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01), the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144), and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66) are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub-divided populations and

  2. Architecture of cognitive flexibility revealed by lesion mapping.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-11-15

    Neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the architecture of human intelligence, identifying a distributed network of brain structures that support goal-directed, intelligent behavior. However, the neural foundations of cognitive flexibility and adaptive aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here, we report a human lesion study (n=149) that investigates the neural bases of key competencies of cognitive flexibility (i.e., mental flexibility and the fluent generation of new ideas) and systematically examine their contributions to a broad spectrum of cognitive and social processes, including psychometric intelligence (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality (Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Latent variable modeling was applied to obtain error-free indices of each factor, followed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Regression analyses revealed that latent scores for psychometric intelligence reliably predict latent scores for cognitive flexibility (adjusted R(2)=0.94). Lesion mapping results further indicated that these convergent processes depend on a shared network of frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into an integrated system. A targeted analysis of the unique variance explained by cognitive flexibility further revealed selective damage within the right superior temporal gyrus, a region known to support insight and the recognition of novel semantic relations. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of adaptive behavior, suggesting that core elements of cognitive flexibility emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for human intelligence.

  3. Replication Study: Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Stephen K; Courville, Pascal; Sampey, Darryl; Zhou, Faren; Cai, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Chroscinski et al., 2014) that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper "Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations" (Berger et al., 2012). Here we report the results of those experiments. We regenerated cells stably expressing ectopic wild-type and mutant phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchange factor 2 (PREX2) using the same immortalized human NRASG12D melanocytes as the original study. Evaluation of PREX2 expression in these newly generated stable cells revealed varying levels of expression among the PREX2 isoforms, which was also observed in the stable cells made in the original study (Figure S6A; Berger et al., 2012). Additionally, ectopically expressed PREX2 was found to be at least 5 times above endogenous PREX2 expression. The monitoring of tumor formation of these stable cells in vivo resulted in no statistically significant difference in tumor-free survival driven by PREX2 variants, whereas the original study reported that these PREX2 mutations increased the rate of tumor incidence compared to controls (Figure 3B and S6B; Berger et al., 2012). Surprisingly, the median tumor-free survival was 1 week in this replication attempt, while 70% of the control mice were reported to be tumor-free after 9 weeks in the original study. The rapid tumor onset observed in this replication attempt, compared to the original study, makes the detection of accelerated tumor growth in PREX2 expressing NRASG12D melanocytes extremely difficult. Finally, we report meta-analyses for each result. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21634.001 PMID:28100394

  4. Regulatory phenotyping reveals important diversity within the species Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Herwig; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Dijkstra, Annereinou; Molenaar, Douwe; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Rademaker, Jan L W; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2009-09-01

    The diversity in regulatory phenotypes among a collection of 84 Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from dairy and nondairy origin was explored. The specific activities of five enzymes were assessed in cell extracts of all strains grown in two different media, a nutritionally rich broth and a relatively poor chemically defined medium. The five investigated enzymes, branched chain aminotransferase (BcaT), aminopeptidase N (PepN), X-prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase (PepX), alpha-hydroxyisocaproic acid dehydrogenase (HicDH), and esterase, are involved in nitrogen and fatty acid metabolism and catalyze key steps in the production of important dairy flavor compounds. The investigated cultures comprise 75 L. lactis subsp. lactis isolates (including 7 L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis isolates) and 9 L. lactis subsp. cremoris isolates. All L. lactis subsp. cremoris and 22 L. lactis subsp. lactis (including 6 L. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis) cultures originated from a dairy environment. All other cultures originated from (fermented) plant materials and were isolated at different geographic locations. Correlation analysis of specific enzyme activities revealed significantly different regulatory phenotypes for dairy and nondairy isolates. The enzyme activities in the two investigated media were in general poorly correlated and revealed a high degree of regulatory diversity within this collection of closely related strains. To the best of our knowledge, these results represent the most extensive diversity analysis of regulatory phenotypes within a single bacterial species to date. The presented findings underline the importance of the availability of screening procedures for, e.g., industrially relevant enzyme activities in models closely mimicking application conditions. Moreover, they corroborate the notion that regulatory changes are important drivers of evolution.

  5. Probing lysozyme conformation with light reveals a new folding intermediate.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Andrea C; Wang, Shao-Chun; Lee, C Ted

    2005-11-22

    A means to control lysozyme conformation with light illumination has been developed using the interaction of the protein with a photoresponsive surfactant. Upon exposure to the appropriate wavelength of light, the azobenzene surfactant undergoes a reversible photoisomerization, with the visible-light (trans) form being more hydrophobic than the UV-light (cis) form. As a result, surfactant binding to the protein and, thus, protein unfolding, can be tuned with light. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were used to provide detailed information of the protein conformation in solution. Shape-reconstruction methods applied to the SANS data indicate that under visible light the protein exhibits a native-like form at low surfactant concentrations, a partially swollen form at intermediate concentrations, and a swollen/unfolded form at higher surfactant concentrations. Furthermore, the SANS data combined with FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of the protein secondary structure reveal that unfolding occurs primarily in the alpha domain of lysozyme, while the beta domain remains relatively intact. Thus, the surfactant-unfolded intermediate of lysozyme appears to be a separate structure than the well-known alpha-domain intermediate of lysozyme that contains a folded alpha domain and unfolded beta domain. Because the interactions between the photosurfactant and protein can be tuned with light, illumination with UV light returns the protein to a native-like conformation. Fluorescence emission data of the nonpolar probe Nile red indicate that hydrophobic domains become available for probe partitioning in surfactant-protein solutions under visible light, while the availability of these hydrophobic domains to the probe decrease under UV light. Dynamic light scattering and UV-vis spectroscopic measurements further confirm the shape-reconstruction findings and reveal three discrete conformations of lysozyme. The results clearly demonstrate that visible light causes a

  6. Next Generation Sequencing Reveals the Hidden Diversity of Zooplankton Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, Rachel A.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Atkinson, Angus

    2013-01-01

    Background Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. Methodology/Principle Findings Plankton net hauls (200 µm) were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. Conclusions Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may become increasingly

  7. Revealing parasite influence in metabolic pathways in Apicomplexa infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As an obligate intracellular parasite, Apicomplexa interacts with the host in the special living environment, competing for energy and nutrients from the host cells by manipulating the host metabolism. Previous studies of host-parasite interaction mainly focused on using cellular and biochemical methods to investigate molecular functions in metabolic pathways of parasite infected hosts. Computational approaches taking advantage of high-throughput biological data and topology of metabolic pathways have a great potential in revealing the details and mechanism of parasites-to-host interactions. A new analytical method was designed in this work to study host-parasite interactions in human cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Cryptosporidium parvum. Results We introduced a new method that analyzes the host metabolic pathways in divided parts: host specific subpathways and host-parasite common subpathways. Upon analysis on gene expression data from cells infected by Plasmodium falciparum or Cryptosporidium parvum, we found: (i) six host-parasite common subpathways and four host specific subpathways were significantly altered in plasmodium infected human cells; (ii) plasmodium utilized fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation, and Pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis to obtain nutrients from host environment; (iii) in Cryptosporidium parvum infected cells, most of the host-parasite common enzymes were down-regulated, whereas the host specific enzymes up-regulated; (iv) the down-regulation of common subpathways in host cells might be caused by competition for the substrates and up-regulation of host specific subpathways may be stimulated by parasite infection. Conclusion Results demonstrated a significantly coordinated expression pattern between the two groups of subpathways. The method helped expose the impact of parasite infection on host cell metabolism, which was previously concealed in the pathway enrichment analysis. Our approach revealed detailed

  8. HUBBLE REVEALS THE HEART OF THE WHIRLPOOL GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    New images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are helping researchers view in unprecedented detail the spiral arms and dust clouds of a nearby galaxy, which are the birth sites of massive and luminous stars. The Whirlpool galaxy, M51, has been one of the most photogenic galaxies in amateur and professional astronomy. Easily photographed and viewed by smaller telescopes, this celestial beauty is studied extensively in a range of wavelengths by large ground- and space-based observatories. This Hubble composite image shows visible starlight as well as light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms. M51, also known as NGC 5194, is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of this image. The companion's gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, as seen in brilliant detail by numerous, luminous clusters of young and energetic stars. The bright clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas. This Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image enables a research group, led by Nick Scoville (Caltech), to clearly define the structure of both the cold dust clouds and the hot hydrogen and link individual clusters to their parent dust clouds. Team members include M. Polletta (U. Geneva); S. Ewald and S. Stolovy (Caltech); R. Thompson and M. Rieke (U. of Arizona). Intricate structure is also seen for the first time in the dust clouds. Along the spiral arms, dust 'spurs' are seen branching out almost perpendicular to the main spiral arms. The regularity and large number of these features suggests to astronomers that previous models of 'two-arm' spiral galaxies may need to be revisited. The new images also reveal a dust disk in the nucleus, which may provide fuel for a nuclear black hole. The team is also studying this galaxy at near-infrared wavelengths with the NICMOS instrument onboard Hubble. At these

  9. Tripartite Mushroom Body Architecture Revealed by Antigenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Jill R.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M.C.; Han, Kyung-An; Kalderon, Daniel; Davis, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    We have explored the organization of the axonal lobes in Drosophila mushroom bodies by using a panel of immunohistochemical markers. These markers consist of antibodies to eight proteins expressed preferentially in the mushroom bodies: DAMB, DCO, DRK, FASII, LEO, OAMB, PKA RII, and RUT. Previous to this work, four axonal lobes, two projecting dorsally (α and α′) and two medially (β and γ), had been described in Drosophila mushroom bodies. However, our analysis of immunohistochemically stained frontal and sagittal sections of the brain revealed three medially projecting lobes. The newly distinguished lobe, which we term β′, lies along the dorsal surface of β, just posterior to γ. In addition to resolving a fifth lobe, our studies revealed that there are specific lobe sets defined by equivalent marker expression levels. These sets are (1) the α and β lobes, (2) the α′ and β′ lobes, and (3) the γ lobe and heel (a lateral projection formed by a hairpin turn of some of the peduncle fibers). All of the markers we have examined are consistent with these three sets. Previous Golgi studies demonstrate that each mushroom body cell projects one axon that branches into a dorsal lobe and a medial lobe, or one unbranched axon that projects medially. Taken together with the lobe sets listed above, we propose that there are three major projection configurations of mushroom body cell axons: (1) one branch in the α and one in the β lobe, (2) one branch in the α′ and one in the β′ lobe, and (3) one unbranched axon projecting to the heel and the γ lobe. The fact that these neuron types exhibit differential expression levels of a number of mushroom body genes suggests that they may have corresponding functional differences. These functions may be conserved in the larvae, as several of these genes were expressed in larval and embryonic mushroom bodies as well. The basic mushroom body structure, including the denritic calyx, peduncle, and lobes, was already

  10. Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Maanasa; Skoglund, Pontus; Graf, Kelly E; Metspalu, Mait; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Rasmussen, Simon; Stafford, Thomas W; Orlando, Ludovic; Metspalu, Ene; Karmin, Monika; Tambets, Kristiina; Rootsi, Siiri; Mägi, Reedik; Campos, Paula F; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Litvinov, Sergey; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana A; Voevoda, Mikhail I; DeGiorgio, Michael; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Demeshchenko, Svetlana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Jakobsson, Mattias; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-01-02

    The origins of the First Americans remain contentious. Although Native Americans seem to be genetically most closely related to east Asians, there is no consensus with regard to which specific Old World populations they are closest to. Here we sequence the draft genome of an approximately 24,000-year-old individual (MA-1), from Mal'ta in south-central Siberia, to an average depth of 1×. To our knowledge this is the oldest anatomically modern human genome reported to date. The MA-1 mitochondrial genome belongs to haplogroup U, which has also been found at high frequency among Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic European hunter-gatherers, and the Y chromosome of MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and near the root of most Native American lineages. Similarly, we find autosomal evidence that MA-1 is basal to modern-day western Eurasians and genetically closely related to modern-day Native Americans, with no close affinity to east Asians. This suggests that populations related to contemporary western Eurasians had a more north-easterly distribution 24,000 years ago than commonly thought. Furthermore, we estimate that 14 to 38% of Native American ancestry may originate through gene flow from this ancient population. This is likely to have occurred after the divergence of Native American ancestors from east Asian ancestors, but before the diversification of Native American populations in the New World. Gene flow from the MA-1 lineage into Native American ancestors could explain why several crania from the First Americans have been reported as bearing morphological characteristics that do not resemble those of east Asians. Sequencing of another south-central Siberian, Afontova Gora-2 dating to approximately 17,000 years ago, revealed similar autosomal genetic signatures as MA-1, suggesting that the region was continuously occupied by humans throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Our findings reveal that western Eurasian genetic signatures in modern-day Native

  11. Bahamian speleothems reveal Atlantic climate variability during Heinrich Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienzo, M. M.; Swart, P. K.; Broad, K.; Clement, A. C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Kakuk, B.

    2010-12-01

    During the last glacial period there is confounding evidence for global millennial scale variability in climate, dominated by Heinrich events and Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) events. These events have been documented in the ice core records, deep-sea sediment records and speleothems. Speleothem records have been studied from diverse localities such as South and Central America, Continental United States, Europe, and China, however, there is a significant lack of paleoclimate data from the subtropical Atlantic. Our analyses of stalagmites from the Bahamas reveal that Heinrich events are preserved in the geochemical signature of our samples. To date, over 15 stalagmites have been collected and dated from Blue Holes in the Bahamas. Currently submerged, the speleothems are collected using advanced diving technologies at depths ranging from 10-40 meters below sea level. Sample DC-09 was collected at 16.5 meters below sea level from Dan’s Cave, Abaco Island, Bahamas and was forming from approximately 13,700 to 30,000 ybp, determined from U/Th age dates. Sample DC-14 was collected at 23.5 meters below sea level from the same cave and was dated from 13,800 to 54,000 ybp. These samples provide a continuous record and replicate records from the same cave aid in the interpretation of the geochemical data. These samples have been analyzed for stable carbon and oxygen isotopes as well as trace elements at a 20 μm resolution. Preliminary analysis reveals enrichment in the carbon and oxygen isotope values with amplitudes as large as 4.5‰ associated with Heinrich events. This reflects a change from relatively arid to wetter conditions, which occur over periods as short as 50 years. When comparing the record from DC-09 to DC-14, DC-09 consists of a greater C and O change associated with each Heinrich Event. This is possibly driven in part by the differences in depth at which the samples were forming. There is a greater amount of material overlying the deeper sample, therefore

  12. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    DOE PAGES

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; ...

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacylmore » intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.« less

  13. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music.

    PubMed

    Savage, Patrick E; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E

    2015-07-21

    Music has been called "the universal language of mankind." Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation.

  14. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  15. Genomic profiling reveals mutational landscape in parathyroid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bellizzi, Justin; Lau, Chun Yee; Moe, Aye S.; Strahl, Maya; Newman, Leah C.; Fink, Marc Y.; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Yu, Willie; Stevenson, Mark; Cavaco, Branca M.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Morreau, Hans; Schadt, Eric E.; Sebra, Robert; Li, Shuyu D.

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) is an extremely rare malignancy lacking effective therapeutic intervention. We generated and analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 17 patients to identify somatic and germline genetic alterations. A panel of selected genes was sequenced in a 7-tumor expansion cohort. We show that 47% (8 of 17) of the tumors harbor somatic mutations in the CDC73 tumor suppressor, with germline inactivating variants in 4 of the 8 patients. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway was altered in 21% of the 24 cases, revealing a major oncogenic pathway in PC. We observed CCND1 amplification in 29% of the 17 patients, and a previously unreported recurrent mutation in putative kinase ADCK1. We identified the first sporadic PCs with somatic mutations in the Wnt canonical pathway, complementing previously described epigenetic mechanisms mediating Wnt activation. This is the largest genomic sequencing study of PC, and represents major progress toward a full molecular characterization of this rare malignancy to inform improved and individualized treatments. PMID:28352668

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals Regulatory Mechanisms at the Kidney Filtration Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rinschen, Markus M.; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R.; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry–based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  17. Metagenomics reveals flavour metabolic network of cereal vinegar microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin-Huan; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Zong-Min; Yu, Yong-Jian; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Multispecies microbial community formed through centuries of repeated batch acetic acid fermentation (AAF) is crucial for the flavour quality of traditional vinegar produced from cereals. However, the metabolism to generate and/or formulate the essential flavours by the multispecies microbial community is hardly understood. Here we used metagenomic approach to clarify in situ metabolic network of key microbes responsible for flavour synthesis of a typical cereal vinegar, Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar, produced by solid-state fermentation. First, we identified 3 organic acids, 7 amino acids, and 20 volatiles as dominant vinegar metabolites. Second, we revealed taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiota by metagenomic shotgun sequencing. A total of 86 201 predicted protein-coding genes from 35 phyla (951 genera) were involved in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of Metabolism (42.3%), Genetic Information Processing (28.3%), and Environmental Information Processing (10.1%). Furthermore, a metabolic network for substrate breakdown and dominant flavour formation in vinegar microbiota was constructed, and microbial distribution discrepancy in different metabolic pathways was charted. This study helps elucidating different metabolic roles of microbes during flavour formation in vinegar microbiota.

  18. Family level phylogenies reveal modes of macroevolution in RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Andrew; Shackelton, Laura A.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the patterns and processes of microevolution in RNA viruses, little is known about the determinants of viral diversification at the macroevolutionary scale. In particular, the processes by which viral lineages assigned as different “species” are generated remain largely uncharacterized. To address this issue, we use a robust phylogenetic approach to analyze patterns of lineage diversification in five representative families of RNA viruses. We ask whether the process of lineage diversification primarily occurs when viruses infect new host species, either through cross-species transmission or codivergence, and which are defined here as analogous to allopatric speciation in animals, or by acquiring new niches within the same host species, analogous to sympatric speciation. By mapping probable primary host species onto family level viral phylogenies, we reveal a strong clustering among viral lineages that infect groups of closely related host species. Although this is consistent with lineage diversification within individual hosts, we argue that this pattern more likely represents strong biases in our knowledge of viral biodiversity, because we also find that better-sampled human viruses rarely cluster together. Hence, although closely related viruses tend to infect related host species, it is unlikely that they often infect the same host species, such that evolutionary constraints hinder lineage diversification within individual host species. We conclude that the colonization of new but related host species may represent the principle mode of macroevolution in RNA viruses. PMID:21173251

  19. First cranial remains of a gondwanatherian mammal reveal remarkable mosaicism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David W.; Hoffmann, Simone; Wible, John R.; Kirk, E. Christopher; Schultz, Julia A.; von Koenigswald, Wighart; Groenke, Joseph R.; Rossie, James B.; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Holloway, Waymon L.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Rahantarisoa, Lydia J.; Kemp, Addison D.; Andriamialison, Haingoson

    2014-11-01

    Previously known only from isolated teeth and lower jaw fragments recovered from the Cretaceous and Palaeogene of the Southern Hemisphere, the Gondwanatheria constitute the most poorly known of all major mammaliaform radiations. Here we report the discovery of the first skull material of a gondwanatherian, a complete and well-preserved cranium from Upper Cretaceous strata in Madagascar that we assign to a new genus and species. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supports its placement within Gondwanatheria, which are recognized as monophyletic and closely related to multituberculates, an evolutionarily successful clade of Mesozoic mammals known almost exclusively from the Northern Hemisphere. The new taxon is the largest known mammaliaform from the Mesozoic of Gondwana. Its craniofacial anatomy reveals that it was herbivorous, large-eyed and agile, with well-developed high-frequency hearing and a keen sense of smell. The cranium exhibits a mosaic of primitive and derived features, the disparity of which is extreme and probably reflective of a long evolutionary history in geographic isolation.

  20. Revealing Transcriptome Landscape of Mouse Spermatogonial Cells by Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tin-Lap.; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Spermatogenesis is a highly regulated developmental process by which spermatogonia develop into mature spermatozoa. This process involves many testis- or male germ cell-specific events through tightly regulated gene expression programs. In the past decade the advent of microarray technologies has allowed functional genomic studies of male germ cell development, resulting in the identification of genes governing various processes. A major limitation with conventional gene expression microarray is that there is a bias from gene probe design. The gene probes for expression microarrays are usually represented by a small number probes located at the 3’ end of a transcirpt. Tiling microarrays eliminate such issue by interrogating the genome in an unbiased fashion through probes tiled for the entire genome. These arrays provide a higher genomic resolution and allow identification of novel transcripts. To reveal the complexity of the genomic landscape of developing male germ cells, we applied tiling microarray to evaluate the transcriptome in spermatogonial cells. Over 50% of the mouse and rat genome are expressed during testicular development. More than 47% of transcripts are uncharacterized. The results suggested the transcription machinery in spermaotogonial cells are more complex than previously envisioned. PMID:22144238

  1. Mechanics of Viral Chromatin Reveals the Pressurization of Human Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Condezo, Gabriela N; Pérez-Berná, Ana J; Chillón, Miguel; Flint, S Jane; Reguera, David; San Martín, Carmen; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2015-11-24

    Tight confinement of naked genomes within some viruses results in high internal pressure that facilitates their translocation into the host. Adenovirus, however, encodes histone-like proteins that associate with its genome resulting in a confined DNA-protein condensate (core). Cleavage of these proteins during maturation decreases core condensation and primes the virion for proper uncoating via unidentified mechanisms. Here we open individual, mature and immature adenovirus cages to directly probe the mechanics of their chromatin-like cores. We find that immature cores are more rigid than the mature ones, unveiling a mechanical signature of their condensation level. Conversely, intact mature particles demonstrate more rigidity than immature or empty ones. DNA-condensing polyamines revert the mechanics of mature capsid and cores to near-immature values. The combination of these experiments reveals the pressurization of adenovirus particles induced by maturation. We estimate a pressure of ∼30 atm by continuous elasticity, which is corroborated by modeling the adenovirus mini-chromosome as a confined compact polymer. We propose this pressurization as a mechanism that facilitates initiating the stepwise disassembly of the mature particle, enabling its escape from the endosome and final genome release at the nuclear pore.

  2. Widespread distribution of encapsulin nanocompartments reveals functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Tobias W; Silver, Pamela A

    2017-03-06

    Cells organize and regulate their metabolism via membrane- or protein-bound organelles. In this way, incompatible processes can be spatially separated and controlled. In prokaryotes, protein-based compartments are used to sequester harmful reactions and store useful compounds. These protein compartments play key roles in various metabolic and ecological processes, ranging from iron homeostasis to carbon fixation. One of the newest types of protein organelle are encapsulin nanocompartments. They are able to encapsulate specific protein cargo and are proposed to be involved in redox-related processes. We identified more than 900 putative encapsulin systems in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Encapsulins can be found in fifteen bacterial and two archaeal phyla. Our analysis reveals one new capsid type and nine previously unknown cargo proteins targeted to the interior of encapsulins. We experimentally characterize three newly identified encapsulin systems and illustrate their probable involvement in iron mineralization, oxidative and nitrosative stress resistance and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, a process responsible for 30% of the nitrogen lost from the oceans.

  3. Next generation sequencing in sporadic retinoblastoma patients reveals somatic mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Amitrano, Sara; Marozza, Annabella; Somma, Serena; Imperatore, Valentina; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; De Francesco, Sonia; Toti, Paolo; Galimberti, Daniela; Meloni, Ilaria; Cetta, Francesco; Piu, Pietro; Di Marco, Chiara; Dosa, Laura; Lo Rizzo, Caterina; Carignani, Giulia; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    In about 50% of sporadic cases of retinoblastoma, no constitutive RB1 mutations are detected by conventional methods. However, recent research suggests that, at least in some of these cases, there is somatic mosaicism with respect to RB1 normal and mutant alleles. The increased availability of next generation sequencing improves our ability to detect the exact percentage of patients with mosaicism. Using this technology, we re-tested a series of 40 patients with sporadic retinoblastoma: 10 of them had been previously classified as constitutional heterozygotes, whereas in 30 no RB1 mutations had been found in lymphocytes. In 3 of these 30 patients, we have now identified low-level mosaic variants, varying in frequency between 8 and 24%. In 7 out of the 10 cases previously classified as heterozygous from testing blood cells, we were able to test additional tissues (ocular tissues, urine and/or oral mucosa): in three of them, next generation sequencing has revealed mosaicism. Present results thus confirm that a significant fraction (6/40; 15%) of sporadic retinoblastoma cases are due to postzygotic events and that deep sequencing is an efficient method to unambiguously distinguish mosaics. Re-testing of retinoblastoma patients through next generation sequencing can thus provide new information that may have important implications with respect to genetic counseling and family care.

  4. Nicotinamide riboside kinase structures reveal new pathways to NAD+.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Wolfram; Rabeh, Wael M; Bogan, Katrina L; Belenky, Peter; Wojcik, Marzena; Seidle, Heather F; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Yang, Tianle; Sauve, Anthony A; Park, Hee-Won; Brenner, Charles

    2007-10-02

    The eukaryotic nicotinamide riboside kinase (Nrk) pathway, which is induced in response to nerve damage and promotes replicative life span in yeast, converts nicotinamide riboside to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by phosphorylation and adenylylation. Crystal structures of human Nrk1 bound to nucleoside and nucleotide substrates and products revealed an enzyme structurally similar to Rossmann fold metabolite kinases and allowed the identification of active site residues, which were shown to be essential for human Nrk1 and Nrk2 activity in vivo. Although the structures account for the 500-fold discrimination between nicotinamide riboside and pyrimidine nucleosides, no enzyme feature was identified to recognize the distinctive carboxamide group of nicotinamide riboside. Indeed, nicotinic acid riboside is a specific substrate of human Nrk enzymes and is utilized in yeast in a novel biosynthetic pathway that depends on Nrk and NAD+ synthetase. Additionally, nicotinic acid riboside is utilized in vivo by Urh1, Pnp1, and Preiss-Handler salvage. Thus, crystal structures of Nrk1 led to the identification of new pathways to NAD+.

  5. Ternary structure reveals mechanism of a membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Dianfan; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; ...

    2015-12-17

    Diacylglycerol kinase catalyses the ATP-dependent conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid in the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli. The small size of this integral membrane trimer, which has 121 residues per subunit, means that available protein must be used economically to craft three catalytic and substrate-binding sites centred about the membrane/cytosol interface. How nature has accomplished this extraordinary feat is revealed here in a crystal structure of the kinase captured as a ternary complex with bound lipid substrate and an ATP analogue. Residues, identified as essential for activity by mutagenesis, decorate the active site and are rationalized by the ternarymore » structure. The γ-phosphate of the ATP analogue is positioned for direct transfer to the primary hydroxyl of the lipid whose acyl chain is in the membrane. A catalytic mechanism for this unique enzyme is proposed. As a result, the active site architecture shows clear evidence of having arisen by convergent evolution.« less

  6. Parallel Selection Revealed by Population Sequencing in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Qanbari, Saber; Seidel, Michael; Strom, Tim-Mathias; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Preisinger, Ruedi; Simianer, Henner

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven selection during domestication and subsequent breed formation has likely left detectable signatures within the genome of modern chicken. The elucidation of these signatures of selection is of interest from the perspective of evolutionary biology, and for identifying genes relevant to domestication and improvement that ultimately may help to further genetically improve this economically important animal. We used whole genome sequence data from 50 hens of commercial white (WL) and brown (BL) egg-laying chicken along with pool sequences of three meat-type chicken to perform a systematic screening of past selection in modern chicken. Evidence of positive selection was investigated in two steps. First, we explored evidence of parallel fixation in regions with overlapping elevated allele frequencies in replicated populations of layers and broilers, suggestive of selection during domestication or preimprovement ages. We confirmed parallel fixation in BCDO2 and TSHR genes and found four candidates including AGTR2, a gene heavily involved in “Ascites” in commercial birds. Next, we explored differentiated loci between layers and broilers suggestive of selection during improvement in chicken. This analysis revealed evidence of parallel differentiation in genes relevant to appearance and production traits exemplified with the candidate gene OPG, implicated in Osteoporosis, a disorder related to overconsumption of calcium in egg-laying hens. Our results illustrate the potential for population genetic techniques to identify genomic regions relevant to the phenotypes of importance to breeders. PMID:26568375

  7. Exceptional structured noncoding RNAs revealed by bacterial metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Zasha; Perreault, Jonathan; Meyer, Michelle M; Breaker, Ronald R

    2009-12-03

    Estimates of the total number of bacterial species indicate that existing DNA sequence databases carry only a tiny fraction of the total amount of DNA sequence space represented by this division of life. Indeed, environmental DNA samples have been shown to encode many previously unknown classes of proteins and RNAs. Bioinformatics searches of genomic DNA from bacteria commonly identify new noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as riboswitches. In rare instances, RNAs that exhibit more extensive sequence and structural conservation across a wide range of bacteria are encountered. Given that large structured RNAs are known to carry out complex biochemical functions such as protein synthesis and RNA processing reactions, identifying more RNAs of great size and intricate structure is likely to reveal additional biochemical functions that can be achieved by RNA. We applied an updated computational pipeline to discover ncRNAs that rival the known large ribozymes in size and structural complexity or that are among the most abundant RNAs in bacteria that encode them. These RNAs would have been difficult or impossible to detect without examining environmental DNA sequences, indicating that numerous RNAs with extraordinary size, structural complexity, or other exceptional characteristics remain to be discovered in unexplored sequence space.

  8. Maximal Neighbor Similarity Reveals Real Communities in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Žalik, Krista Rizman

    2015-01-01

    An important problem in the analysis of network data is the detection of groups of densely interconnected nodes also called modules or communities. Community structure reveals functions and organizations of networks. Currently used algorithms for community detection in large-scale real-world networks are computationally expensive or require a priori information such as the number or sizes of communities or are not able to give the same resulting partition in multiple runs. In this paper we investigate a simple and fast algorithm that uses the network structure alone and requires neither optimization of pre-defined objective function nor information about number of communities. We propose a bottom up community detection algorithm in which starting from communities consisting of adjacent pairs of nodes and their maximal similar neighbors we find real communities. We show that the overall advantage of the proposed algorithm compared to the other community detection algorithms is its simple nature, low computational cost and its very high accuracy in detection communities of different sizes also in networks with blurred modularity structure consisting of poorly separated communities. All communities identified by the proposed method for facebook network and E-Coli transcriptional regulatory network have strong structural and functional coherence. PMID:26680448

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  10. Diagnostic phylogenetics reveals a new Porcine circovirus 2 cluster.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brendan; Wang, Xiong; Dvorak, Cheryl M T; Marthaler, Douglas; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-06-02

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) was prevalent in swine in the United States before PCV2-associated disease (PCVAD) appeared in 2006. Limited nucleotide sequencing of open reading frame 2 (ORF2) encoding capsid, the only structural protein, revealed the presence of two genotypes, PCV2a and PCV2b. Later, PCV2c and mutant PCV2b, or PCV2d, were also described. However, extensive PCV2 ORF2 sequence databases in veterinary diagnostic laboratories have not been analyzed systematically to determine the genetic diversity of field isolates. Here, we interrogated >1100 PCV2 ORF2 nucleotide sequences to assess population diversity and genetic variation. We detected a novel PCV2 genotype that is substantially different, primarily in ORF2, from all known PCV2. Notably, ORF2 contains a unique carboxyl terminal amino acid insertion resulting in a 238 amino acid ORF2. All other PCV2 ORF2 proteins are 233 or 234 aa in length. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is more ancient than other PCV2 genotypes. The findings demonstrate the value of analyzing routine diagnostic laboratory sequence databases in population genetic analyses of animal pathogens.

  11. Phenotypic Expression in Wheat Revealed Using FT-IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, L.; Wetzel, D

    2009-01-01

    Wheat selected for cultivation through the centuries has a glume that is 'soft' instead of 'tough' as naturally occurring. In production, this is desirable because it enables mechanical threshing with efficient separation of kernel from the head of each stalk without damaging the kernel. FT-IR microspectroscopy provides chemically based, objective assessment of genetic expression by measuring the extent of genetic expression. In the Microbeam Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, Manhattan, KS, an imaging FT-IR microspectrometer with a detector array focused on the image plane was used to obtain spectral data from dissected glume specimens of nine tough and eleven soft wheat cultivars in a rectangular mapping pattern. With cellulose as the substrate, the extent of lignification is measurable from the ratio of the lignin (1508 cm{sup -1}) baseline adjusted band area to the representative cellulosic (1370 cm{sup -1}) band area. A distinction between soft and tough glumes is obtained in numerical terms. Using a band ratio minimizes variation due to thickness differences. While analyzing mapped sections of glume, care is taken to avoid tabulation of spectral data from vascular bundles. Inclusion of these data would to avoid tabulation of spectral data from vascular bundles. Inclusion of these data would bias the analysis toward the composition of highly lignified vascular bundles. Spatially resolved focal plane array FT-IR microspectroscopy reveals the extent of glume lignification that is coincident with the toughness trait. This enables breeders to rank the degree of lignin expression and discriminate between soft and tough breeding results.

  12. Modeling malaria genomics reveals transmission decline and rebound in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel F; Schaffner, Stephen F; Wenger, Edward A; Proctor, Joshua L; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Wong, Wesley; Baro, Nicholas; Ndiaye, Daouda; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiop, Medoune; Ba, Mady; Milner, Danny A; Taylor, Terrie E; Neafsey, Daniel E; Volkman, Sarah K; Eckhoff, Philip A; Hartl, Daniel L; Wirth, Dyann F

    2015-06-02

    To study the effects of malaria-control interventions on parasite population genomics, we examined a set of 1,007 samples of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum collected in Thiès, Senegal between 2006 and 2013. The parasite samples were genotyped using a molecular barcode of 24 SNPs. About 35% of the samples grouped into subsets with identical barcodes, varying in size by year and sometimes persisting across years. The barcodes also formed networks of related groups. Analysis of 164 completely sequenced parasites revealed extensive sharing of genomic regions. In at least two cases we found first-generation recombinant offspring of parents whose genomes are similar or identical to genomes also present in the sample. An epidemiological model that tracks parasite genotypes can reproduce the observed pattern of barcode subsets. Quantification of likelihoods in the model strongly suggests a reduction of transmission from 2006-2010 with a significant rebound in 2012-2013. The reduced transmission and rebound were confirmed directly by incidence data from Thiès. These findings imply that intensive intervention to control malaria results in rapid and dramatic changes in parasite population genomics. The results also suggest that genomics combined with epidemiological modeling may afford prompt, continuous, and cost-effective tracking of progress toward malaria elimination.

  13. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.

  14. Ancestral resurrection reveals evolutionary mechanisms of kinase plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Conor J; Hanson-Smith, Victor; Kennedy, Kristopher J; Miller, Chad J; Lou, Hua Jane; Johnson, Alexander D; Turk, Benjamin E; Holt, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases have evolved diverse specificities to enable cellular information processing. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying kinase diversification, we studied the CMGC protein kinases using ancestral reconstruction. Within this group, the cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) require proline at the +1 position of their substrates, while Ime2 prefers arginine. The resurrected common ancestor of CDKs, MAPKs, and Ime2 could phosphorylate substrates with +1 proline or arginine, with preference for proline. This specificity changed to a strong preference for +1 arginine in the lineage leading to Ime2 via an intermediate with equal specificity for proline and arginine. Mutant analysis revealed that a variable residue within the kinase catalytic cleft, DFGx, modulates +1 specificity. Expansion of Ime2 kinase specificity by mutation of this residue did not cause dominant deleterious effects in vivo. Tolerance of cells to new specificities likely enabled the evolutionary divergence of kinases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04126.001 PMID:25310241

  15. Proteomics Reveal Cochlin Deposits Associated with Glaucomatous Trabecular Meshwork* S

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Rockwood, Edward J.; Smith, Scott D.; Bonilha, Vera L.; Crabb, John S.; Kuchtey, Rachel W.; Robertson, Nahid G.; Peachey, Neal S.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Crabb, John W.

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of primary open angle glaucoma, a leading cause of age-related blindness, remains poorly defined, although elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) contributes to the disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms causing elevated IOP from aqueous humor circulation, we pursued proteomic analyses of trabecular meshwork (TM) from glaucoma and age-matched control donors. These analyses demonstrated that Cochlin, a protein associated with deafness disorder DFNA9, is present in glaucomatous but absent in normal TM. Cochlin was also detected in TM from the glaucomatous DBA/2J mouse preceding elevated IOP but found to be absent in three other mouse lines that do not develop elevated IOP. Histochemical analyses revealed co-deposits of Cochlin and mucopolysaccharide in human TM around Schlemm’s canal, similar to that observed in the cochlea in DFNA9 deafness. Purified Cochlin was found to aggregate after sheer stress and to induce the aggregation of TM cells in vitro. Age-dependent in vivo increases in Cochlin were observed in glaucomatous TM, concomitant with a decrease in type II collagen, suggesting that Cochlin may disrupt the TM architecture and render components like collagen more susceptible to degradation and collapse. Overall, these observations suggest that Cochlin contributes to elevated IOP in primary open angle glaucoma through altered interactions within the TM extracellular matrix, resulting in cell aggregation, mucopolysaccharide deposition, and significant obstruction of the aqueous humor circulation. PMID:15579465

  16. Eukaryote culturomics of the gut reveals new species.

    PubMed

    Gouba, Nina; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The repertoire of microeukaryotes in the human gut has been poorly explored, mainly in individuals living in northern hemisphere countries. We further explored this repertoire using PCR-sequencing and culture in seven individuals living in four tropical countries. A total of 41 microeukaryotes including 38 different fungal species and three protists were detected. Four fungal species, Davidiella tassiana, Davidiella sp., Corticiaceae sp., and Penicillium sp., were uniquely detected by culture; 27 fungal species were uniquely detected using PCR-sequencing and Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Trichosporon asahii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Malassezia restricta, and Malassezia sp. were detected using both molecular and culture methods. Fourteen microeukaryotes were shared by the seven individuals, whereas 27 species were found in only one individual, including 11 species in Amazonia, nine species in Polynesia, five species in India, and two species in Senegal. These data support a worldwide distribution of Malassezia sp., Trichosporon sp., and Candida sp. in the gut mycobiome. Here, 13 fungal species and two protists, Stentor roeseli and Vorticella campanula, were observed for first time in the human gut. This study revealed a previously unsuspected diversity in the repertoire of human gut microeukaryotes, suggesting spots for further exploring this repertoire.

  17. Eukaryote Culturomics of the Gut Reveals New Species

    PubMed Central

    Gouba, Nina; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The repertoire of microeukaryotes in the human gut has been poorly explored, mainly in individuals living in northern hemisphere countries. We further explored this repertoire using PCR-sequencing and culture in seven individuals living in four tropical countries. A total of 41 microeukaryotes including 38 different fungal species and three protists were detected. Four fungal species, Davidiella tassiana, Davidiella sp., Corticiaceae sp., and Penicillium sp., were uniquely detected by culture; 27 fungal species were uniquely detected using PCR-sequencing and Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Trichosporon asahii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Malassezia restricta, and Malassezia sp. were detected using both molecular and culture methods. Fourteen microeukaryotes were shared by the seven individuals, whereas 27 species were found in only one individual, including 11 species in Amazonia, nine species in Polynesia, five species in India, and two species in Senegal. These data support a worldwide distribution of Malassezia sp., Trichosporon sp., and Candida sp. in the gut mycobiome. Here, 13 fungal species and two protists, Stentor roeseli and Vorticella campanula, were observed for first time in the human gut. This study revealed a previously unsuspected diversity in the repertoire of human gut microeukaryotes, suggesting spots for further exploring this repertoire. PMID:25210972

  18. Orientation processing mechanisms revealed by the plaid tilt illusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S.; Wenderoth, P.; van der Zwan, R.

    2001-01-01

    The tilt after-effect (TAE) and tilt illusion (TI) have revealed a great deal about the nature of orientation coding of 1-dimensional (1D) lines and gratings. Comparatively little research however has addressed the mechanisms responsible for encoding the orientation of 2-dimensional (2D) plaid stimuli. A multi-stage model of edge detection has recently been proposed [Georgeson, M. A. (1998) Image & Vision Computing, 16(6-7), 389-405] to account for the perceived structure of a plaid stimulus that incorporates extraction of the zero-crossings (ZCs) of the plaid. Data is presented showing that the ZCs of a plaid inducing stimulus can interact with vertical grating test stimulus to induce a standard tilt illusion. However, by considering the second-order structure of a plaid rather than ZCs, it was shown that the perceived orientation of the vertical test grating results from the combination of orientation illusions due to the first- and second-order components of an inducing plaid. The data suggest that the mechanisms encoding the orientation of second-order contours are similar to, and interact directly with, those that encode first-order contours.

  19. Revealing biological information using data structuring and automated learning.

    PubMed

    Mohorianu, Irina; Moulton, Vincent

    2010-11-01

    The intermediary steps between a biological hypothesis, concretized in the input data, and meaningful results, validated using biological experiments, commonly employ bioinformatics tools. Starting with storage of the data and ending with a statistical analysis of the significance of the results, every step in a bioinformatics analysis has been intensively studied and the resulting methods and models patented. This review summarizes the bioinformatics patents that have been developed mainly for the study of genes, and points out the universal applicability of bioinformatics methods to other related studies such as RNA interference. More specifically, we overview the steps undertaken in the majority of bioinformatics analyses, highlighting, for each, various approaches that have been developed to reveal details from different perspectives. First we consider data warehousing, the first task that has to be performed efficiently, optimizing the structure of the database, in order to facilitate both the subsequent steps and the retrieval of information. Next, we review data mining, which occupies the central part of most bioinformatics analyses, presenting patents concerning differential expression, unsupervised and supervised learning. Last, we discuss how networks of interactions of genes or other players in the cell may be created, which help draw biological conclusions and have been described in several patents.

  20. Comparative genomics reveals mobile pathogenicity chromosomes in Fusarium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Li Jun; van der Does, H. C.; Borkovich, Katherine A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Daboussi, Marie-Jose; Di Pietro, Antonio; Dufresne, Marie; Freitag, Michael; Grabherr, Manfred; Henrissat, Bernard; Houterman, Petra M.; Kang, Seogchan; Shim, Won-Bo; Wolochuk, Charles; Xie, Xiaohui; Xu, Jin Rong; Antoniw, John; Baker, Scott E.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Breakspear, Andrew; Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Chapman, Sinead; Coulson, Richard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Danchin, Etienne G.; Diener, Andrew; Gale, Liane R.; Gardiner, Donald; Goff, Steven; Hammond-Kossack, Kim; Hilburn, Karen; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Jonkers, Wilfried; Kazan, Kemal; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Koehrsen, Michael; Kumar, Lokesh; Lee, Yong Hwan; Li, Liande; Manners, John M.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Mukherjee, Mala; Park, Gyungsoon; Park, Jongsun; Park, Sook Young; Proctor, Robert H.; Regev, Aviv; Ruiz-Roldan, M. C.; Sain, Divya; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Sykes, Sean; Schwartz, David C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Wapinski, Ilan; Yoder, Olen; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhou, Shiguo; Galagan, James; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kistler, H. Corby; Rep, Martijn

    2010-03-18

    Fusarium species are among the most important phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, having significant impact on crop production and animal health. Distinctively, members of the F. oxysporum species complex exhibit wide host range but discontinuously distributed host specificity, reflecting remarkable genetic adaptability. To understand the molecular underpinnings of diverse phenotypic traits and their evolution in Fusarium, we compared the genomes of three economically important and phylogenetically related, yet phenotypically diverse plant-pathogenic species, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Our analysis revealed greatly expanded lineage-specific (LS) genomic regions in F. oxysporum that include four entire chromosomes, accounting for more than one-quarter of the genome. LS regions are rich in transposons and genes with distinct evolutionary profiles but related to pathogenicity. Experimentally, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of two LS chromosomes between strains of F. oxysporum, resulting in the conversion of a non-pathogenic strain into a pathogen. Transfer of LS chromosomes between otherwise genetically isolated strains explains the polyphyletic origin of host specificity and the emergence of new pathogenic lineages in the F. oxysporum species complex, putting the evolution of fungal pathogenicity into a new perspective.

  1. Scurvy revealed by difficulty walking: three cases in young children.

    PubMed

    Kitcharoensakkul, Maleewan; Schulz, Christa G; Kassel, Rachel; Khanna, Geetika; Liang, Shannon; Ngwube, Alexander; Baszis, Kevin W; Hunstad, David A; White, Andrew J

    2014-06-01

    Scurvy is rare in developed countries but is known to cause lower-extremity pain and refusal to ambulate in children. Since the discovery of the link between scurvy and dietary deficiency of ascorbic acid, there has been a substantial decrease in its prevalence and recognition. Here we describe 3 cases of scurvy in young children presenting with difficulty walking. Only 1 of 3 patients had gingival lesions at the initial presentation. Two cases underwent an extensive evaluation for hematologic and rheumatologic diseases before the diagnosis of scurvy was made. Dietary histories eventually revealed that all 3 patients had sharply limited intake of fruits and vegetables secondary to oral aversion, and 1 patient had autism. Radiographic changes of long bones were observed in all patients. Interestingly, all patients had concomitant vitamin D deficiency. After replacement with vitamin C, all patients recovered and started to walk again with improved leg pain. These clinical manifestations and radiologic findings highlight the importance for rheumatologists to have a higher index of suspicion for scurvy in nonambulatory children.

  2. Marine viruses, a genetic reservoir revealed by targeted viromics

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Joaquín Martínez; Swan, Brandon K; Wilson, William H

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics has opened new windows on investigating viral diversity and functions. Viromic studies typically require large sample volumes and filtration through 0.2 μm pore-size filters, consequently excluding or under-sampling tailed and very large viruses. We have optimized a targeted viromic approach that employs fluorescence-activated sorting and whole genome amplification to produce dsDNA-enriched libraries from discrete viral populations from a 1-ml water sample. Using this approach on an environmental sample from the Patagonian Shelf, we produced three distinct libraries. One of the virus libraries was dominated (79.65% of sequences with known viral homology) by giant viruses from the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families, while the two other viromes were dominated by smaller phycodnaviruses, cyanophages and other bacteriophages. The estimated genotypic richness and diversity in our sorted viromes, with 52–163 estimated genotypes, was much lower than in previous virome reports. Fragment recruitment of metagenome reads to selected reference viral genomes yields high genome coverage, suggesting little amplification and sequencing bias against some genomic regions. These results underscore the value of our approach as an effective way to target and investigate specific virus groups. In particular, it will help reveal the diversity and abundance of giant viruses in marine ecosystems. PMID:24304671

  3. Directional postcopulatory sexual selection revealed by artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan P; Zane, Lorenzo; Francescato, Samuela; Pilastro, Andrea

    2003-01-23

    Postcopulatory sexual selection comprises both sperm competition, where the sperm from different males compete for fertilization, and cryptic female choice, where females bias sperm use in favour of particular males. Despite intense current interest in both processes as potential agents of directional sexual selection, few studies have attributed the success of attractive males to events that occur exclusively after insemination. This is because the interactions between pre- and post-insemination episodes of sexual selection can be important sources of variation in paternity. The use of artificial insemination overcomes this difficulty because it controls for variation in male fertilization success attributable to the female's perception of male quality, as well as effects due to mating order and the relative contribution of sperm from competing males. Here, we adopt this technique and show that in guppies, when equal numbers of sperm from two males compete for fertilization, relatively colourful individuals achieve greater parentage than their less ornamented counterparts. This finding indicates that precopulatory female mating preferences can be reinforced exclusively through postcopulatory processes occurring at a physiological level. Our analysis also revealed that relatively small individuals were advantaged in sperm competition, suggesting a possible trade-off between sperm competitive ability and body growth.

  4. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oddo, Calogero M.; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M. D.; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models. PMID:28374841

  5. Cytoplasmic dynamics reveals two modes of nucleoid-dependent mobility.

    PubMed

    Stylianidou, Stella; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A

    2014-12-02

    It has been proposed that forces resulting from the physical exclusion of macromolecules from the bacterial nucleoid play a central role in organizing the bacterial cell, yet this proposal has not been quantitatively tested. To investigate this hypothesis, we mapped the generic motion of large protein complexes in the bacterial cytoplasm through quantitative analysis of thousands of complete cell-cycle trajectories of fluorescently tagged ectopic MS2-mRNA complexes. We find the motion of these complexes in the cytoplasm is strongly dependent on their spatial position along the long axis of the cell, and that their dynamics are consistent with a quantitative model that requires only nucleoid exclusion and membrane confinement. This analysis also reveals that the nucleoid increases the mobility of MS2-mRNA complexes, resulting in a fourfold increase in diffusion coefficients between regions of the lowest and highest nucleoid density. These data provide strong quantitative support for two modes of nucleoid action: the widely accepted mechanism of nucleoid exclusion in organizing the cell and a newly proposed mode, in which the nucleoid facilitates rapid motion throughout the cytoplasm.

  6. NMR reveals a dynamic allosteric pathway in thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Lindsey D.; Fuglestad, Brian; Stearns, Kyle; Tonelli, Marco; Fenwick, R. Bryn; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found ubiquitously in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, and they comprise the largest of all of the peptidase families, their dynamic motions remain obscure. The backbone dynamics of the coagulation serine protease, apo-thrombin (S195M-thrombin), were compared to the substrate-bound form (PPACK-thrombin). R1, R2, 15N-{1H}NOEs, and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments were measured to capture motions across the ps to ms timescale. The ps-ns motions were not significantly altered upon substrate binding. The relaxation dispersion data revealed that apo-thrombin is highly dynamic, with μs-ms motions throughout the molecule. The region around the N-terminus of the heavy chain, the Na+-binding loop, and the 170 s loop, all of which are implicated in allosteric coupling between effector binding sites and the active site, were dynamic primarily in the apo-form. Most of the loops surrounding the active site become more ordered upon PPACK-binding, but residues in the N-terminal part of the heavy chain, the γ-loop, and anion-binding exosite 1, the main allosteric binding site, retain μs-ms motions. These residues form a dynamic allosteric pathway connecting the active site to the main allosteric site that remains in the substrate-bound form. PMID:28059082

  7. Effective Connectivity Reveals Strategy Differences in an Expert Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Minati, Ludovico; Sigala, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical reasoning is a core component of cognition and the study of experts defines the upper limits of human cognitive abilities, which is why we are fascinated by peak performers, such as chess masters and mental calculators. Here, we investigated the neural bases of calendrical skills, i.e. the ability to rapidly identify the weekday of a particular date, in a gifted mental calculator who does not fall in the autistic spectrum, using functional MRI. Graph-based mapping of effective connectivity, but not univariate analysis, revealed distinct anatomical location of “cortical hubs” supporting the processing of well-practiced close dates and less-practiced remote dates: the former engaged predominantly occipital and medial temporal areas, whereas the latter were associated mainly with prefrontal, orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate connectivity. These results point to the effect of extensive practice on the development of expertise and long term working memory, and demonstrate the role of frontal networks in supporting performance on less practiced calculations, which incur additional processing demands. Through the example of calendrical skills, our results demonstrate that the ability to perform complex calculations is initially supported by extensive attentional and strategic resources, which, as expertise develops, are gradually replaced by access to long term working memory for familiar material. PMID:24086291

  8. Revealing the hidden structural phases of FeRh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwoong; Ramesh, R.; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations reveal that tetragonal distortion has a dramatic effect on the relative stability of the various magnetic structures (C-, A-, G-, A'-AFM, and FM) of FeRh giving rise to a wide range of novel stable/metastable structures and magnetic phase transitions between these states. We predict that the cubic G-AFM structure, which was believed thus far to be the ground state, is metastable and that the tetragonally expanded G-AFM is the stable structure. The low energy barrier separating these states suggests phase coexistence at room temperature. We propose an A'-AFM phase to be the global ground state among all magnetic phases which arises from the strain-induced tuning of the exchange interactions. The results elucidate the underlying mechanism for the recent experimental findings of electric-field control of magnetic phase transition driven via tetragonal strain. The magnetic phase transitions open interesting prospects for exploiting strain engineering for the next-generation memory devices.

  9. Towards revealing the structure of bacterial inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a widely observed phenomenon in human diseases, biopharmaceutical production, and biological research. Protein aggregates are generally classified as highly ordered, such as amyloid fibrils, or amorphous, such as bacterial inclusion bodies. Amyloid fibrils are elongated filaments with diameters of 6-12 nm, they are comprised of residue-specific cross-beta structure, and display characteristic properties, such as binding with amyloid-specific dyes. Amyloid fibrils are associated with dozens of human pathological conditions, including Alzheimer disease and prion diseases. Distinguished from amyloid fibrils, bacterial inclusion bodies display apparent amorphous morphology. Inclusion bodies are formed during high-level recombinant protein production, and formation of inclusion bodies is a major concern in biotechnology. Despite of the distinctive morphological difference, bacterial inclusion bodies have been found to have some amyloid-like properties, suggesting that they might contain structures similar to amyloid-like fibrils. Recent structural data further support this hypothesis, and this review summarizes the latest progress towards revealing the structural details of bacterial inclusion bodies.

  10. Artemin Crystal Structure Reveals Insights into Heparan Sulfate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Silvian,L.; Jin, P.; Carmillo, P.; Boriack-Sjodin, P.; Pelletier, C.; Rushe, M.; Gong, B.; Sah, D.; Pepinsky, B.; Rossomando, A.

    2006-01-01

    Artemin (ART) promotes the growth of developing peripheral neurons by signaling through a multicomponent receptor complex comprised of a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor (cRET) and a specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked co-receptor (GFR{alpha}3). Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signals through a similar ternary complex but requires heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for full activity. HSPG has not been demonstrated as a requirement for ART signaling. We crystallized ART in the presence of sulfate and solved its structure by isomorphous replacement. The structure reveals ordered sulfate anions bound to arginine residues in the pre-helix and amino-terminal regions that were organized in a triad arrangement characteristic of heparan sulfate. Three residues in the pre-helix were singly or triply substituted with glutamic acid, and the resulting proteins were shown to have reduced heparin-binding affinity that is partly reflected in their ability to activate cRET. This study suggests that ART binds HSPGs and identifies residues that may be involved in HSPG binding.

  11. Voluminous volcanism on early mars revealed in valles marineris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Malin, M.C.; Carr, M.H.; Hartmann, W.K.

    1999-01-01

    The relative rates and importance of impact cratering, volcanism, erosion, and the deposition of sediments to the early geological history of Mars are poorly known. That history is recorded in the upper crust of the planet, which is best exposed along the 4,000km-long canyon system called Valles Marineris. Previous studies of the stratigraphy of this region have assumed that it consists of megabreccia and fractured bedrock resulting from impacts, overlain by or interbedded with relatively thin layers of lava, and with the layering restricted to the uppermost level of the crust. Here we report new high-resolution images that reveal ubiquitous horizontal layering to depths of at least 8 km in the canyons. Megabreccia should be only coarsely layered and fractured bedrock should be unlayered, so these observations indicate that volcanic or sedimentary processes were much more important in early martian history than previously believed. Morphological and compositional data suggest that the layers were formed mainly by volcanic flood lavas. Mars was therefore probably very volcanically active during at least the first billion years and after the period when the heaviest impact bombardment had ended.

  12. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  13. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks.

    PubMed

    Cagua, E Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E M; Rohner, Christoph A; Prebble, Clare E M; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H; Pierce, Simon J; Berumen, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long 'off-seasons' at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna.

  14. Distributed neural system for emotional intelligence revealed by lesion mapping.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has made considerable progress in understanding the neural architecture of human intelligence, identifying a broadly distributed network of frontal and parietal regions that support goal-directed, intelligent behavior. However, the contributions of this network to social and emotional aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here we investigated the neural basis of emotional intelligence in 152 patients with focal brain injuries using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Latent variable modeling was applied to obtain measures of emotional intelligence, general intelligence and personality from the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Neuroticism-Extroversion-Openness Inventory, respectively. Regression analyses revealed that latent scores for measures of general intelligence and personality reliably predicted latent scores for emotional intelligence. Lesion mapping results further indicated that these convergent processes depend on a shared network of frontal, temporal and parietal brain regions. The results support an integrative framework for understanding the architecture of executive, social and emotional processes and make specific recommendations for the interpretation and application of the MSCEIT to the study of emotional intelligence in health and disease.

  15. Historical Reconstruction Reveals Recovery in Hawaiian Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Kittinger, John N.; Pandolfi, John M.; Blodgett, Jonathan H.; Hunt, Terry L.; Jiang, Hong; Maly, Kepā; McClenachan, Loren E.; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are declining worldwide, yet regional differences in the trajectories, timing and extent of degradation highlight the need for in-depth regional case studies to understand the factors that contribute to either ecosystem sustainability or decline. We reconstructed social-ecological interactions in Hawaiian coral reef environments over 700 years using detailed datasets on ecological conditions, proximate anthropogenic stressor regimes and social change. Here we report previously undetected recovery periods in Hawaiian coral reefs, including a historical recovery in the MHI (∼AD 1400–1820) and an ongoing recovery in the NWHI (∼AD 1950–2009+). These recovery periods appear to be attributed to a complex set of changes in underlying social systems, which served to release reefs from direct anthropogenic stressor regimes. Recovery at the ecosystem level is associated with reductions in stressors over long time periods (decades+) and large spatial scales (>103 km2). Our results challenge conventional assumptions and reported findings that human impacts to ecosystems are cumulative and lead only to long-term trajectories of environmental decline. In contrast, recovery periods reveal that human societies have interacted sustainably with coral reef environments over long time periods, and that degraded ecosystems may still retain the adaptive capacity and resilience to recover from human impacts. PMID:21991311

  16. Knock-Out Models Reveal New Aquaporin Functions

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ‘aquaglyceroporins’, aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function – as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  17. Tectonic deformation revealed in baldcypress trees at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    VanArsdale, R.; Stahle, D.; Cleaveland, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Tree-ring analyses of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) from Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee, support historical accounts that the lake formed during the great New Madrid earthquakes of 1811--1812. Due to ground subsidence and permanent flooding all of the bottomland hardwood trees within the impounded area were killed. However, many water tolerant baldcypress survived, and hundreds of 200 to 800 year old baldcypress outline the positions of former stream channels drowned by the subsidence. Dendrochronological analyses of multiple cores from 21 baldcypress in the lake reveal several pronounced growth responses to the 1811--1812 earthquakes. These responses include a great surge in radial growth during the decade following the earthquakes and a permanent reduction in wood density beginning in 1812. These and other growth responses to the 1811--1912 earthquakes may allow us to determine if there have been other large earthquakes in the Reelfoot basin during the late Holocene and may help date the formation of other suspected sunk lands in the New Madrid seismic zone. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Structure of the Angiotensin Receptor Revealed by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haitao; Unal, Hamiyet; Gati, Cornelius; ...

    2015-05-07

    We report that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that serves as a primary regulator for blood pressure maintenance. Although several anti-hypertensive drugs have been developed as AT1R blockers (ARBs), the structural basis for AT1R ligand-binding and regulation has remained elusive, mostly due to the difficulties of growing high quality crystals for structure determination using synchrotron radiation. By applying the recently developed method of serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser, we successfully determined the room-temperature crystal structure of the human AT1R in complex with its selective antagonist ZD7155 at 2.9 Å resolution. Themore » AT1R-ZD7155 complex structure revealed key structural features ofAT1R and critical interactions for ZD7155 binding. Finally, docking simulations of the clinically used ARBs into the AT1R structure further elucidated both the common and distinct binding modes for these anti-hypertensive drugs. Our results thereby provide fundamental insights into AT1R structure-function relationship and structure-based drug design.« less

  19. Structure of the Angiotensin Receptor Revealed by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haitao; Unal, Hamiyet; Gati, Cornelius; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Weierstall, Uwe; Sawaya, Michael R.; Xu, Qingping; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Wang, Chong; Ishchenko, Andrii; Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Desnoyer, Russell; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Petra; Stevens, Raymond C.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-05-07

    We report that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that serves as a primary regulator for blood pressure maintenance. Although several anti-hypertensive drugs have been developed as AT1R blockers (ARBs), the structural basis for AT1R ligand-binding and regulation has remained elusive, mostly due to the difficulties of growing high quality crystals for structure determination using synchrotron radiation. By applying the recently developed method of serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser, we successfully determined the room-temperature crystal structure of the human AT1R in complex with its selective antagonist ZD7155 at 2.9 Å resolution. The AT1R-ZD7155 complex structure revealed key structural features ofAT1R and critical interactions for ZD7155 binding. Finally, docking simulations of the clinically used ARBs into the AT1R structure further elucidated both the common and distinct binding modes for these anti-hypertensive drugs. Our results thereby provide fundamental insights into AT1R structure-function relationship and structure-based drug design.

  20. Color-Shape Associations Revealed with Implicit Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky’s color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky’s theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people’s color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods. PMID:25625717

  1. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Hwang, Sunyoung; O'Sullivan, Ciara; Dodgson, Stacie E; Gygi, Steven P; Amon, Angelika; Torres, Eduardo M

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our proteomic analyses further revealed a novel aneuploidy-associated protein expression signature characteristic of altered metabolism and redox homeostasis. Indeed aneuploid cells harbor increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, increased protein turnover attenuates ROS levels and this novel aneuploidy-associated signature and improves the fitness of most aneuploid strains. Our results show that aneuploidy causes alterations in metabolism and redox homeostasis. Cells respond to these alterations through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03023.001 PMID:25073701

  3. Metabolomics reveals insect metabolic responses associated with fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Feifei; Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-06-01

    The interactions between insects and pathogenic fungi are complex. We employed metabolomic techniques to profile insect metabolic dynamics upon infection by the pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. Silkworm larvae were infected with fungal spores and microscopic observations demonstrated that the exhaustion of insect hemocytes was coupled with fungal propagation in the insect body cavity. Metabolomic analyses revealed that fungal infection could significantly alter insect energy and nutrient metabolisms as well as the immune defense responses, including the upregulation of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids, but the downregulation of eicosanoids and amines. The insect antifeedant effect of the fungal infection was evident with the reduced level of maclurin (a component of mulberry leaves) in infected insects but elevated accumulations in control insects. Insecticidal and cytotoxic mycotoxins like oosporein and beauveriolides were also detected in insects at the later stages of infection. Taken together, the metabolomics data suggest that insect immune responses are energy-cost reactions and the strategies of nutrient deprivation, inhibition of host immune responses, and toxin production would be jointly employed by the fungus to kill insects. The data obtained in this study will facilitate future functional studies of genes and pathways associated with insect-fungus interactions.

  4. Whole-genome analyses reveal genetic instability of Acetobacter pasteurianus

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Yoshinao; Hosoyama, Akira; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Furuya, Naoko; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Shirai, Mutsunori

    2009-01-01

    Acetobacter species have been used for brewing traditional vinegar and are known to have genetic instability. To clarify the mutability, Acetobacter pasteurianus NBRC 3283, which forms a multi-phenotype cell complex, was subjected to genome DNA sequencing. The genome analysis revealed that there are more than 280 transposons and five genes with hyper-mutable tandem repeats as common features in the genome consisting of a 2.9-Mb chromosome and six plasmids. There were three single nucleotide mutations and five transposon insertions in 32 isolates from the cell complex. The A. pasteurianus hyper-mutability was applied for breeding a temperature-resistant strain grown at an unviable high-temperature (42°C). The genomic DNA sequence of a heritable mutant showing temperature resistance was analyzed by mutation mapping, illustrating that a 92-kb deletion and three single nucleotide mutations occurred in the genome during the adaptation. Alpha-proteobacteria including A. pasteurianus consists of many intracellular symbionts and parasites, and their genomes show increased evolution rates and intensive genome reduction. However, A. pasteurianus is assumed to be a free-living bacterium, it may have the potentiality to evolve to fit in natural niches of seasonal fruits and flowers with other organisms, such as yeasts and lactic acid bacteria. PMID:19638423

  5. Channels of oxygen diffusion in single crystal rubrene revealed.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert J; Bennett, Thomas; Fearn, Sarah; Kamaludin, Muhammad; Kloc, Christian; McPhail, David S; Mitrofanov, Oleg; Curson, Neil J

    2016-11-30

    Electronic devices made from organic materials have the potential to support a more ecologically friendly and affordable future. However, the ability to fabricate devices with well-defined and reproducible electrical and optical properties is hindered by the sensitivity to the presence of chemical impurities. Oxygen in particular is an impurity that can trap electrons and modify conductive properties of some organic materials. Until now the 3-dimensional profiling of oxygen species in organic semiconductors has been elusive and the effect of oxygen remains disputed. In this study we map out high-spatial resolution 3-dimensional distributions of oxygen inclusions near the surface of single crystal rubrene, using Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). Channels of diffused oxygen are found extending from uniform oxygen inclusion layers at the surface. These channels extend to depths in excess of 1.8 μm and act as an entry point for oxygen to diffuse along the ab-plane of the crystal with at least some of the diffused oxygen molecularly binding to rubrene. Our investigation of surfaces at different stages of evolution reveals the extent of oxygen inclusion, which affects rubrene's optical and transport properties, and is consequently of importance for the reliability and longevity of devices.

  6. Proteomics reveals potential biomarkers of seed vigor in sugarbeet.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Meinhard, Juliane; Job, Claudette; Strub, Jean-Marc; Fischer, Uwe; Pestsova, Elena; Westhoff, Peter; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2011-05-01

    To unravel biomarkers of seed vigor, an important trait conditioning crop yield, a comparative proteomic study was conducted with sugarbeet seed samples of varying vigor as generated by an invigoration treatment called hydropriming and an aging treatment called controlled deterioration. Comparative proteomics revealed proteins exhibiting contrasting behavior between seed samples. Thus, 18 proteins were up-regulated during priming and down-regulated during aging and further displayed an up-regulation upon priming of the aged seeds, meaning that down-regulation of these spot volumes during aging was reversible upon subsequent priming. Also, 11 proteins exhibited the converse behavior characterized by a decrease and an increase of the spot volumes during priming and aging of the control seeds, respectively, and a decrease in the spot volumes upon priming of the aged seeds. The results underpinned the role in seed vigor of several metabolic pathways involved in lipid and starch mobilization, protein synthesis or the methyl cycle. They also corroborate previous studies suggesting that the glyoxylate enzyme isocitrate lyase, the capacity of protein synthesis and components of abscisic acid signaling pathways are likely contributors of seed vigor.

  7. Cyp1a reporter zebrafish reveals target tissues for dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Hee; Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Suhyun; Williams, Darren R; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Jung, Young Do; Teraoka, Hiroki; Park, Hae-Chul; Choy, Hyon E; Shin, Boo Ahn; Choi, Seok-Yong

    2013-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the unintentional byproduct of various industrial processes, is classified as human carcinogen and could disrupt reproductive, developmental and endocrine systems. Induction of cyp1a1 is used as an indicator of TCDD exposure. We sought to determine tissues that are vulnerable to TCDD toxicity using a transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. We inserted a nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP) into the start codon of a zebrafish cyp1a gene in a fosmid clone using DNA recombineering. The resulting recombineered fosmid was then used to generate cyp1a reporter zebrafish, embryos of which were exposed to TCDD. Expression pattern of EGFP in the reporter zebrafish mirrored that of endogenous cyp1a mRNA. In addition, exposure of the embryos to TCDD at as low as 10 pM for 72 h, which does not elicit morphological abnormalities of embryos, markedly increased GFP expression. Furthermore, the reporter embryos responded to other AhR ligands as well. Exposure of the embryos to TCDD revealed previously reported (the cardiovascular system, liver, pancreas, kidney, swim bladder and skin) and unreported target tissues (retinal bipolar cells, otic vesicle, lateral line, cloaca and pectoral fin bud) for TCDD. Transgenic cyp1a reporter zebrafish we have developed can further understanding of ecotoxicological relevance and human health risks by TCDD. In addition, they could be used to identify agonists of AhR and antidotes to TCDD toxicity.

  8. Zircon thermometer reveals minimum melting conditions on earliest Earth.

    PubMed

    Watson, E B; Harrison, T M

    2005-05-06

    Ancient zircons from Western Australia's Jack Hills preserve a record of conditions that prevailed on Earth not long after its formation. Widely considered to have been a uniquely violent period geodynamically, the Hadean Eon [4.5 to 4.0 billion years ago (Ga)] has recently been interpreted by some as far more benign-possibly even characterized by oceans like those of the present day. Knowledge of the crystallization temperatures of the Hadean zircons is key to this debate. A thermometer based on titanium content revealed that these zircons cluster strongly at approximately 700 degrees C, which is indistinguishable from temperatures of granitoid zircon growth today and strongly suggests a regulated mechanism producing zircon-bearing rocks during the Hadean. The temperatures substantiate the existence of wet, minimum-melting conditions within 200 million years of solar system formation. They further suggest that Earth had settled into a pattern of crust formation, erosion, and sediment recycling as early as 4.35 Ga.

  9. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  10. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Hypothalamic Cell Diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renchao; Wu, Xiaoji; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-28

    The hypothalamus is one of the most complex brain structures involved in homeostatic regulation. Defining cell composition and identifying cell-type-specific transcriptional features of the hypothalamus is essential for understanding its functions and related disorders. Here, we report single-cell RNA sequencing results of adult mouse hypothalamus, which defines 11 non-neuronal and 34 neuronal cell clusters with distinct transcriptional signatures. Analyses of cell-type-specific transcriptomes reveal gene expression dynamics underlying oligodendrocyte differentiation and tanycyte subtypes. Additionally, data analysis provides a comprehensive view of neuropeptide expression across hypothalamic neuronal subtypes and uncover Crabp1(+) and Pax6(+) neuronal populations in specific hypothalamic sub-regions. Furthermore, we found food deprivation exhibited differential transcriptional effects among the different neuronal subtypes, suggesting functional specification of various neuronal subtypes. Thus, the work provides a comprehensive transcriptional perspective of adult hypothalamus, which serves as a valuable resource for dissecting cell-type-specific functions of this complex brain region.

  11. Revealing hidden regularities with a general approach to fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Selected aspects of a general approach to nuclear fission are described with the focus on the possible benefit of meeting the increasing need of nuclear data for the existing and future emerging nuclear applications. The most prominent features of this approach are the evolution of quantum-mechanical wave functions in systems with complex shape, memory effects in the dynamics of stochastic processes, the influence of the Second Law of thermodynamics on the evolution of open systems in terms of statistical mechanics, and the topological properties of a continuous function in multi-dimensional space. It is demonstrated that this approach allows reproducing the measured fission barriers and the observed properties of the fission fragments and prompt neutrons. Our approach is based on sound physical concepts, as demonstrated by the fact that practically all the parameters have a physical meaning, and reveals a high degree of regularity in the fission observables. Therefore, we expect a good predictive power within the region extending from Po isotopes to Sg isotopes where the model parameters have been adjusted. Our approach can be extended to other regions provided that there is enough empirical information available that allows determining appropriate values of the model parameters. Possibilities for combining this general approach with microscopic models are suggested. These are supposed to enhance the predictive power of the general approach and to help improving or adjusting the microscopic models. This could be a way to overcome the present difficulties for producing evaluations with the required accuracy.

  12. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation. PMID:25565451

  13. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  14. Archaeopteryx feathers and bone chemistry fully revealed via synchrotron imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, U.; Morton, R. W.; Manning, P. L.; Sellers, W. I.; Farrar, S.; Huntley, K. G.; Wogelius, R. A.; Larson, P.

    2010-01-01

    Evolution of flight in maniraptoran dinosaurs is marked by the acquisition of distinct avian characters, such as feathers, as seen in Archaeopteryx from the Solnhofen limestone. These rare fossils were pivotal in confirming the dinosauria-avian lineage. One of the key derived avian characters is the possession of feathers, details of which were remarkably preserved in the Lagerstätte environment. These structures were previously simply assumed to be impressions; however, a detailed chemical analysis has, until now, never been completed on any Archaeopteryx specimen. Here we present chemical imaging via synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) of the Thermopolis Archaeopteryx, which shows that portions of the feathers are not impressions but are in fact remnant body fossil structures, maintaining elemental compositions that are completely different from the embedding geological matrix. Our results indicate phosphorous and sulfur retention in soft tissue as well as trace metal (Zn and Cu) retention in bone. Other previously unknown chemical details of Archaeopteryx are also revealed in this study including: bone chemistry, taphonomy (fossilization process), and curation artifacts. SRS-XRF represents a major advancement in the study of the life chemistry and fossilization processes of Archaeopteryx and other extinct organisms because it is now practical to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly at concentration levels of parts per million. This technique has wider application to the archaeological, forensic, and biological sciences, enabling the mapping of “unseen” compounds critical to understanding biological structures, modes of preservation, and environmental context. PMID:20457935

  15. Archaeopteryx feathers and bone chemistry fully revealed via synchrotron imaging.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, U; Morton, R W; Manning, P L; Sellers, W I; Farrar, S; Huntley, K G; Wogelius, R A; Larson, P

    2010-05-18

    Evolution of flight in maniraptoran dinosaurs is marked by the acquisition of distinct avian characters, such as feathers, as seen in Archaeopteryx from the Solnhofen limestone. These rare fossils were pivotal in confirming the dinosauria-avian lineage. One of the key derived avian characters is the possession of feathers, details of which were remarkably preserved in the Lagerstätte environment. These structures were previously simply assumed to be impressions; however, a detailed chemical analysis has, until now, never been completed on any Archaeopteryx specimen. Here we present chemical imaging via synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) of the Thermopolis Archaeopteryx, which shows that portions of the feathers are not impressions but are in fact remnant body fossil structures, maintaining elemental compositions that are completely different from the embedding geological matrix. Our results indicate phosphorous and sulfur retention in soft tissue as well as trace metal (Zn and Cu) retention in bone. Other previously unknown chemical details of Archaeopteryx are also revealed in this study including: bone chemistry, taphonomy (fossilization process), and curation artifacts. SRS-XRF represents a major advancement in the study of the life chemistry and fossilization processes of Archaeopteryx and other extinct organisms because it is now practical to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly at concentration levels of parts per million. This technique has wider application to the archaeological, forensic, and biological sciences, enabling the mapping of "unseen" compounds critical to understanding biological structures, modes of preservation, and environmental context.

  16. Automatic decoding of facial movements reveals deceptive pain expressions.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Littlewort, Gwen C; Frank, Mark G; Lee, Kang

    2014-03-31

    In highly social species such as humans, faces have evolved to convey rich information for social interaction, including expressions of emotions and pain [1-3]. Two motor pathways control facial movement [4-7]: a subcortical extrapyramidal motor system drives spontaneous facial expressions of felt emotions, and a cortical pyramidal motor system controls voluntary facial expressions. The pyramidal system enables humans to simulate facial expressions of emotions not actually experienced. Their simulation is so successful that they can deceive most observers [8-11]. However, machine vision may be able to distinguish deceptive facial signals from genuine facial signals by identifying the subtle differences between pyramidally and extrapyramidally driven movements. Here, we show that human observers could not discriminate real expressions of pain from faked expressions of pain better than chance, and after training human observers, we improved accuracy to a modest 55%. However, a computer vision system that automatically measures facial movements and performs pattern recognition on those movements attained 85% accuracy. The machine system's superiority is attributable to its ability to differentiate the dynamics of genuine expressions from faked expressions. Thus, by revealing the dynamics of facial action through machine vision systems, our approach has the potential to elucidate behavioral fingerprints of neural control systems involved in emotional signaling.

  17. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  18. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3−/− mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3−/− mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension. PMID:25882670

  19. Phylogenies reveal predictive power of traditional medicine in bioprospecting.

    PubMed

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C Haris; Savolainen, Vincent; Williamson, Elizabeth M; Forest, Félix; Wagstaff, Steven J; Baral, Sushim R; Watson, Mark F; Pendry, Colin A; Hawkins, Julie A

    2012-09-25

    There is controversy about whether traditional medicine can guide drug discovery, and investment in bioprospecting informed by ethnobotanical data has fluctuated. One view is that traditionally used medicinal plants are not necessarily efficacious and there are no robust methods for distinguishing those which are most likely to be bioactive when selecting species for further testing. Here, we reconstruct a genus-level molecular phylogenetic tree representing the 20,000 species found in the floras of three disparate biodiversity hotspots: Nepal, New Zealand, and the Cape of South Africa. Borrowing phylogenetic methods from community ecology, we reveal significant clustering of the 1,500 traditionally used species, and provide a direct measure of the relatedness of the three medicinal floras. We demonstrate shared phylogenetic patterns across the floras: related plants from these regions are used to treat medical conditions in the same therapeutic areas. This finding strongly indicates independent discovery of plant efficacy, an interpretation corroborated by the presence of a significantly greater proportion of known bioactive species in these plant groups than in random samples. We conclude that phylogenetic cross-cultural comparisons can focus screening efforts on a subset of traditionally used plants that are richer in bioactive compounds, and could revitalize the use of traditional knowledge in bioprospecting.

  20. Strategy Revealing Phenotypic Differences among Synthetic Oscillator Designs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in identifying and characterizing the component parts of genetic oscillators, which play central roles in all organisms. Nonlinear interaction among components is sufficiently complex that mathematical models are required to elucidate their elusive integrated behavior. Although natural and synthetic oscillators exhibit common architectures, there are numerous differences that are poorly understood. Utilizing synthetic biology to uncover basic principles of simpler circuits is a way to advance understanding of natural circadian clocks and rhythms. Following this strategy, we address the following questions: What are the implications of different architectures and molecular modes of transcriptional control for the phenotypic repertoire of genetic oscillators? Are there designs that are more realizable or robust? We compare synthetic oscillators involving one of three architectures and various combinations of the two modes of transcriptional control using a methodology that provides three innovations: a rigorous definition of phenotype, a procedure for deconstructing complex systems into qualitatively distinct phenotypes, and a graphical representation for illuminating the relationship between genotype, environment, and the qualitatively distinct phenotypes of a system. These methods provide a global perspective on the behavioral repertoire, facilitate comparisons of alternatives, and assist the rational design of synthetic gene circuitry. In particular, the results of their application here reveal distinctive phenotypes for several designs that have been studied experimentally as well as a best design among the alternatives that has yet to be constructed and tested. PMID:25019938

  1. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  2. Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence.

    PubMed

    Alshamsi, Aamena; Pianesi, Fabio; Lepri, Bruno; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2015-01-01

    Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people's behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

  3. Experimental evolution reveals hidden diversity in evolutionary pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Peter A; Farr, Andrew D; Rainey, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Replicate populations of natural and experimental organisms often show evidence of parallel genetic evolution, but the causes are unclear. The wrinkly spreader morph of Pseudomonas fluorescens arises repeatedly during experimental evolution. The mutational causes reside exclusively within three pathways. By eliminating these, 13 new mutational pathways were discovered with the newly arising WS types having fitnesses similar to those arising from the commonly passaged routes. Our findings show that parallel genetic evolution is strongly biased by constraints and we reveal the genetic bases. From such knowledge, and in instances where new phenotypes arise via gene activation, we suggest a set of principles: evolution proceeds firstly via pathways subject to negative regulation, then via promoter mutations and gene fusions, and finally via activation by intragenic gain-of-function mutations. These principles inform evolutionary forecasting and have relevance to interpreting the diverse array of mutations associated with clinically identical instances of disease in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07074.001 PMID:25806684

  4. Enzyme kinetics: the whole picture reveals hidden meanings.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Maria F; Estevinho, Berta N; Crespo, Rosa; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2015-06-01

    The methodology adopted by Michaelis and Menten in 1913 is still routinely used to characterize the catalytic power and selectivity of enzymes. These kinetic measurements must be performed soon after the purified enzyme is mixed with a large excess of substrate. Other time scales and solution compositions are no less physiologically relevant, but fall outside the range of applicability of the classical formalism. Here we show that the complete picture of an enzyme's mode of function is critically obscured by the limited scope of conventional kinetic analysis, even in the simplest case of a single active site without inhibition. This picture is now unveiled in a mathematically closed form that remains valid over the reaction time for all combinations of enzyme/substrate concentrations and rate constants. Algebraic simplicity is maintained in the new formalism when stationary reaction phases are considered. By achieving this century-old objective, the otherwise hidden role of the reversible binding step is revealed and atypical kinetic profiles are explained. Most singular kinetic behaviors are identified in a critical region of conditions that coincide with typical cell conditions. Because it is not covered by the Michaelis-Menten model, the critical region has been missed until now by low- and high-throughput screenings of new drugs. New possibilities are therefore raised for novel and once-promising inhibitors to therapeutically target enzymes.

  5. Spatial Congruity Effects Reveal Metaphorical Thinking, not Polarity Correspondence.

    PubMed

    Dolscheid, Sarah; Casasanto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial congruity effects have often been interpreted as evidence for metaphorical thinking, but an alternative account based on polarity correspondence (a.k.a. markedness) has challenged this view. Here we compared metaphor- and polarity-correspondence-based explanations for spatial congruity effects, using musical pitch as a testbed. In one experiment, English speakers classified high- and low-frequency pitches as "high" and "low," or as "front" and "back," to determine whether space-pitch congruity effects could be elicited by any marked spatial continuum. Although both pairs of terms describe bipolar spatial continuums, we found congruity effects only for high/low judgments, indicating that markedness is not sufficient to produce space-pitch congruity effects. A second experiment confirmed that there were no space-pitch congruity effects for another pair of terms that have clear markedness (big/small), but which do not denote spatial height. By contrast, this experiment showed congruity effects for words that cued an appropriate vertical spatial schema (tall/short), even though these words are not used conventionally in English to describe pitches, ruling out explanations for the observed pattern of results based on verbal polysemy. Together, results suggest that space-pitch congruity effects reveal metaphorical uses of spatial schemas, not polarity correspondence effects.

  6. Tracking of Arctic terns Sterna paradisaea reveals longest animal migration.

    PubMed

    Egevang, Carsten; Stenhouse, Iain J; Phillips, Richard A; Petersen, Aevar; Fox, James W; Silk, Janet R D

    2010-02-02

    The study of long-distance migration provides insights into the habits and performance of organisms at the limit of their physical abilities. The Arctic tern Sterna paradisaea is the epitome of such behavior; despite its small size (<125 g), banding recoveries and at-sea surveys suggest that its annual migration from boreal and high Arctic breeding grounds to the Southern Ocean may be the longest seasonal movement of any animal. Our tracking of 11 Arctic terns fitted with miniature (1.4-g) geolocators revealed that these birds do indeed travel huge distances (more than 80,000 km annually for some individuals). As well as confirming the location of the main wintering region, we also identified a previously unknown oceanic stopover area in the North Atlantic used by birds from at least two breeding populations (from Greenland and Iceland). Although birds from the same colony took one of two alternative southbound migration routes following the African or South American coast, all returned on a broadly similar, sigmoidal trajectory, crossing from east to west in the Atlantic in the region of the equatorial Intertropical Convergence Zone. Arctic terns clearly target regions of high marine productivity both as stopover and wintering areas, and exploit prevailing global wind systems to reduce flight costs on long-distance commutes.

  7. mTOR-sensitive translation: Cleared fog reveals more trees.

    PubMed

    Masvidal, Laia; Hulea, Laura; Furic, Luc; Topisirovic, Ivan; Larsson, Ola

    2017-02-10

    Translation is fundamental for many biologic processes as it enables cells to rapidly respond to stimuli without requiring de novo mRNA synthesis. The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of translation. Although mTOR affects global protein synthesis, translation of a subset of mRNAs appears to be exceptionally sensitive to changes in mTOR activity. Recent efforts to catalog these mTOR-sensitive mRNAs resulted in conflicting results. Whereas ribosome-profiling almost exclusively identified 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNAs as mTOR-sensitive, polysome-profiling suggested that mTOR also regulates translation of non-TOP mRNAs. This inconsistency was explained by analytical and technical biases limiting the efficiency of ribosome-profiling in detecting mRNAs showing differential translation. Moreover, genome-wide characterization of 5'UTRs of non-TOP mTOR-sensitive mRNAs revealed 2 subsets of transcripts which differ in their requirement for translation initiation factors and biologic functions. We summarize these recent advances and their impact on the understanding of mTOR-sensitive translation.

  8. Color-shape associations revealed with implicit association tests.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Kandinsky proposed a correspondence theory that suggests associations between specific colors and shapes (i.e., circle-blue, square-red, triangle-yellow). Makin and Wuerger tested the theory using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) and did not find clear evidence for Kandinsky's color-shape associations among British participants. In the present study, we first replicated the previous study among Japanese participants and found similar results to those of Makin and Wuerger, showing little support for Kandinsky's theory. In the subsequent experiment, we tested another set of color-shape associations that had been revealed by using an explicit matching method (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) in Japanese participants. The IAT tests showed that response times were significantly faster when circle-red, square-blue, and triangle-yellow combinations were mapped onto the same response key, rather than different key combinations, indicating that these color-shape combinations were encoded. These results provide the first empirical evidence that color-shape associations can be measured by indirect behavioral methods, and in particular, Japanese people's color-shape associations (circle-red, square-blue, triangle-yellow) can be observed by both direct and indirect experimental methods.

  9. Revealing the structure of the world airline network

    PubMed Central

    Verma, T.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Resilience of most critical infrastructures against failure of elements that appear insignificant is usually taken for granted. The World Airline Network (WAN) is an infrastructure that reduces the geographical gap between societies, both small and large, and brings forth economic gains. With the extensive use of a publicly maintained data set that contains information about airports and alternative connections between these airports, we empirically reveal that the WAN is a redundant and resilient network for long distance air travel, but otherwise breaks down completely due to removal of short and apparently insignificant connections. These short range connections with moderate number of passengers and alternate flights are the connections that keep remote parts of the world accessible. It is surprising, insofar as there exists a highly resilient and strongly connected core consisting of a small fraction of airports (around 2.3%) together with an extremely fragile star-like periphery. Yet, in spite of their relevance, more than 90% of the world airports are still interconnected upon removal of this core. With standard and unconventional removal measures we compare both empirical and topological perceptions for the fragmentation of the world. We identify how the WAN is organized into different classes of clusters based on the physical proximity of airports and analyze the consequence of this fragmentation. PMID:25005934

  10. Maximal Neighbor Similarity Reveals Real Communities in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žalik, Krista Rizman

    2015-12-01

    An important problem in the analysis of network data is the detection of groups of densely interconnected nodes also called modules or communities. Community structure reveals functions and organizations of networks. Currently used algorithms for community detection in large-scale real-world networks are computationally expensive or require a priori information such as the number or sizes of communities or are not able to give the same resulting partition in multiple runs. In this paper we investigate a simple and fast algorithm that uses the network structure alone and requires neither optimization of pre-defined objective function nor information about number of communities. We propose a bottom up community detection algorithm in which starting from communities consisting of adjacent pairs of nodes and their maximal similar neighbors we find real communities. We show that the overall advantage of the proposed algorithm compared to the other community detection algorithms is its simple nature, low computational cost and its very high accuracy in detection communities of different sizes also in networks with blurred modularity structure consisting of poorly separated communities. All communities identified by the proposed method for facebook network and E-Coli transcriptional regulatory network have strong structural and functional coherence.

  11. Maximal Neighbor Similarity Reveals Real Communities in Networks.

    PubMed

    Žalik, Krista Rizman

    2015-12-18

    An important problem in the analysis of network data is the detection of groups of densely interconnected nodes also called modules or communities. Community structure reveals functions and organizations of networks. Currently used algorithms for community detection in large-scale real-world networks are computationally expensive or require a priori information such as the number or sizes of communities or are not able to give the same resulting partition in multiple runs. In this paper we investigate a simple and fast algorithm that uses the network structure alone and requires neither optimization of pre-defined objective function nor information about number of communities. We propose a bottom up community detection algorithm in which starting from communities consisting of adjacent pairs of nodes and their maximal similar neighbors we find real communities. We show that the overall advantage of the proposed algorithm compared to the other community detection algorithms is its simple nature, low computational cost and its very high accuracy in detection communities of different sizes also in networks with blurred modularity structure consisting of poorly separated communities. All communities identified by the proposed method for facebook network and E-Coli transcriptional regulatory network have strong structural and functional coherence.

  12. Seabird movement reveals the ecological footprint of fishing vessels.

    PubMed

    Bodey, Thomas W; Jessopp, Mark J; Votier, Stephen C; Gerritsen, Hans D; Cleasby, Ian R; Hamer, Keith C; Patrick, Samantha C; Wakefield, Ewan D; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-06-02

    Exploitation of the seas is currently unsustainable, with increasing demand for marine resources placing intense pressure on the Earth's largest ecosystem [1]. The scale of anthropogenic effects varies from local to entire ocean basins [1-3]. For example, discards of commercial capture fisheries can have both positive and negative impacts on scavengers at the population and community-level [2-6], although this is driven by individual foraging behaviour [3,7]. Currently, we have little understanding of the scale at which individual animals initiate such behaviours. We use the known interaction between fisheries and a wide-ranging seabird, the Northern gannet Morus bassanus[3], to investigate how fishing vessels affect individual birds' behaviours in near real-time. We document the footprint of fishing vessels' (≥15 m length) influence on foraging decisions (≤11 km), and a potential underlying behavioural mechanism, by revealing how birds respond differently to vessels depending on gear type and activity. Such influences have important implications for fisheries, including the proposed discard ban [8]), and wider marine management.

  13. Extensive chordate and annelid macrosynteny reveals ancestral homeobox gene organization.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jerome H L; McDougall, Carmel; Monteiro, Ana S; Holland, Peter W H; Arendt, Detlev; Balavoine, Guillaume; Ferrier, David E K

    2012-01-01

    Genes with the homeobox motif are crucial in developmental biology and widely implicated in the evolution of development. The Antennapedia (ANTP)-class is one of the two major classes of animal homeobox genes, and includes the Hox genes, renowned for their role in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of animals. The origin and evolution of the ANTP-class genes are a matter of some debate. A principal guiding hypothesis has been the existence of an ancient gene Mega-cluster deep in animal ancestry. This hypothesis was largely established from linkage data from chordates, and the Mega-cluster hypothesis remains to be seriously tested in protostomes. We have thus mapped ANTP-class homeobox genes to the chromosome level in a lophotrochozoan protostome. Our comparison of gene organization in Platynereis dumerilii and chordates indicates that the Mega-cluster, if it did exist, had already been broken up onto four chromosomes by the time of the protostome-deuterostome ancestor (PDA). These results not only elucidate an aspect of the genome organization of the PDA but also reveal high levels of macrosynteny between P. dumerilii and chordates. This implies a very low rate of interchromosomal genome rearrangement in the lineages leading to P. dumerilii and the chordate ancestor since the time of the PDA.

  14. Covert Waking Brain Activity Reveals Instantaneous Sleep Depth

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Scott M.; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Solet, Jo M.; Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of the wake-sleep continuum remain incompletely understood, limiting the development of adaptive drug delivery systems for promoting sleep maintenance. The most useful measure for resolving early positions along this continuum is the alpha oscillation, an 8–13 Hz electroencephalographic rhythm prominent over posterior scalp locations. The brain activation signature of wakefulness, alpha expression discloses immediate levels of alertness and dissipates in concert with fading awareness as sleep begins. This brain activity pattern, however, is largely ignored once sleep begins. Here we show that the intensity of spectral power in the alpha band actually continues to disclose instantaneous responsiveness to noise—a measure of sleep depth—throughout a night of sleep. By systematically challenging sleep with realistic and varied acoustic disruption, we found that sleepers exhibited markedly greater sensitivity to sounds during moments of elevated alpha expression. This result demonstrates that alpha power is not a binary marker of the transition between sleep and wakefulness, but carries rich information about immediate sleep stability. Further, it shows that an empirical and ecologically relevant form of sleep depth is revealed in real-time by EEG spectral content in the alpha band, a measure that affords prediction on the order of minutes. This signal, which transcends the boundaries of classical sleep stages, could potentially be used for real-time feedback to novel, adaptive drug delivery systems for inducing sleep. PMID:21408616

  15. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future.

  16. Algal genomes reveal evolutionary mosaicism and the fate of nucleomorphs

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Bruce A.; Tanifuji, Goro; Burki, Fabien; Gruber, Ansgar; Irimia, Manuuel; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Arias, Maria C.; Ball, Steven G.; Gile, Gillian H.; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Hopkins, Julia F.; Kuo, Alan; Rensing, Stefan A.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Elias, Marek; Eveleigh, Robert J. M.; Herman, Emily K.; Klute, Mary J.; Nakayama, Takuro; Obornik, Miroslav; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Aves, Stephen J.; Beiko, Robert G.; Coutinho, Pedro; Dacks, Joel B.; Durnford, Dion G.; Fast, Naomi M.; Green, Beverley R.; Grisdale, Cameron J.; Hempel, Franziska; Henrissat, Bernard; Hoppner, Marc P.; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Kim, Eunsoo; Koreny, Ludek; Kroth, Peter G.; Liu, Yuan; Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Maier, Uwe G.; McRose, Darcy; Mock, Thomas; Neilson, Jonathan A. D.; Onodera, Naoko T.; Poole, Anthony M.; Pritham, Ellen J.; Richards, Thomas A.; Rocap, Gabrielle; Roy, Scott W.; Sarai, Chihiro; Schaack, Sarah; Shirato, Shu; Slamovits, Claudio H.; Spencer, Davie F.; Suzuki, Shigekatsu; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Zauner, Stefan; Barry, Kerrie; Bell, Callum; Bharti, Arvind K.; Crow, John A.; Grimwood, Jane; Kramer, Robin; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Lane, Christopher E.; Keeling, Patrick J.; Gray, Michael W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Archibald, John M.

    2012-08-10

    Cryptophyte and chlorarachniophyte algae are transitional forms in the widespread secondary endosymbiotic acquisition of photosynthesis by engulfment of eukaryotic algae. Unlike most secondary plastid-bearing algae, miniaturized versions of the endosymbiont nuclei (nucleomorphs) persist in cryptophytes and chlorarachniophytes. To determine why, and to address other fundamental questions about eukaryote eukaryote endosymbiosis, we sequenced the nuclear genomes of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta and the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans. Both genomes have 21,000 protein genes and are intron rich, and B. natans exhibits unprecedented alternative splicing for a single-celled organism. Phylogenomic analyses and subcellular targeting predictions reveal extensive genetic and biochemical mosaicism, with both host- and endosymbiont-derived genes servicing the mitochondrion, the host cell cytosol, the plastid and the remnant endosymbiont cytosol of both algae. Mitochondrion-to-nucleus gene transfer still occurs in both organisms but plastid-to-nucleus and nucleomorph-to-nucleus transfers do not, which explains why a small residue of essential genes remains locked in each nucleomorph.

  17. Revealing the spin optics in conic-shaped metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yanjun; Zu, Shuai; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2017-02-01

    Ellipse and hyperbola are two well-known curves in mathematics with numerous applications in various fields, but their properties and inherent differences in spin optics are less understood. Here, we investigate the peculiar optical spin properties of the two curves and establish a connection between their foci and the spin states of incident light by introducing a geometric-phase distribution along the conic curve. We show that the optical spin Hall effect is the intrinsic optical spin property of ellipse, where photons with different spin states can be exactly separated to each of its two foci, while a hyperbola exhibits optical spin-selective effect, where only photons with one particular spin state can be accumulated at its foci. These properties are then experimentally demonstrated in near field by arranging nanoslits in conic shapes. Based on the spin properties of the curves, we design spin-based plasmonic devices with various functionalities. Our results reveal the intrinsic optical spin properties behind conic curves and provide a route for designing spin-based plasmonic devices.

  18. Genomic analysis reveals selection in Chinese native black pig

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yuhua; Li, Cencen; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Jin, Long; Chen, Jianhai; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genomic signatures that help reveal mechanisms underlying desirable traits in domesticated pigs is of significant biological, agricultural and medical importance. To identify the genomic footprints left by selection during domestication of the Enshi black pig, a typical native and meat-lard breed in China, we generated about 72-fold coverage of the pig genome using pools of genomic DNA representing three different populations of Enshi black pigs from three different locations. Combining this data with the available whole genomes of 13 Chinese wild boars, we identified 417 protein-coding genes embedded in the selected regions of Enshi black pigs. These genes are mainly involved in developmental and metabolic processes, response to stimulus, and other biological processes. Signatures of selection were detected in genes involved in body size and immunity (RPS10 and VASN), lipid metabolism (GSK3), male fertility (INSL6) and developmental processes (TBX19). These findings provide a window into the potential genetic mechanism underlying development of desirable phenotypes in Enshi black pigs during domestication and subsequent artificial selection. Thus, our results illustrate how domestication has shaped patterns of genetic variation in Enshi black pigs and provide valuable genetic resources that enable effective use of pigs in agricultural production. PMID:27808243

  19. Key herbivores reveal limited functional redundancy on inshore coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C. L.; van de Leemput, I. A.; Depczynski, M.; Hoey, A. S.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems are facing increasing exposure to a range of stressors and declines in critical ecological functions. The likelihood of further loss of functions and resilience is dependent, in part, on the extent of functional redundancy (i.e. the capacity of one species to functionally compensate for the loss of another species) within critical functional groups. We used multiple metrics; species richness, generic richness, abundance and reserve capacity (i.e. the relative number of individuals available to fulfil the function if the numerically dominant species is lost), as indicators to assess the potential functional redundancy of four functional groups of herbivorous fishes (browsers, excavators, grazers and scrapers) in two of the worlds' most intact coral reef ecosystems: the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. We found marked variations in potential redundancy among habitats within each reef system and functional groups. Despite negligible fishing of herbivorous fishes, coastal habitats in both reef systems had lower functional redundancy compared to offshore locations for all herbivorous fishes collectively and the four functional groups independently. This pattern was consistent in all four indicators of redundancy. The potential vulnerability of these coastal habitats is highlighted by recent shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance on several coastal reefs of the GBR. Our approach provides a simple yet revealing evaluation of potential functional redundancy. Moreover, it highlights the spatial variation in potential vulnerability and resilience of reef systems.

  20. Revealing Amphiphilic Nanodornains of Anti-Biofouling Polymer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amadei, CA; Yang, R; Chiesa, M; Gleason, KK; Santos, S

    2014-04-09

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be similar to 1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  1. Revealing catastrophic failure of leaf networks under stress

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, Timothy J.; Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The intricate patterns of veins that adorn the leaves of land plants are among the most important networks in biology. Water flows in these leaf irrigation networks under tension and is vulnerable to embolism-forming cavitations, which cut off water supply, ultimately causing leaf death. Understanding the ways in which plants structure their vein supply network to protect against embolism-induced failure has enormous ecological and evolutionary implications, but until now there has been no way of observing dynamic failure in natural leaf networks. Here we use a new optical method that allows the initiation and spread of embolism bubbles in the leaf network to be visualized. Examining embolism-induced failure of architecturally diverse leaf networks, we found that conservative rules described the progression of hydraulic failure within veins. The most fundamental rule was that within an individual venation network, susceptibility to embolism always increased proportionally with the size of veins, and initial nucleation always occurred in the largest vein. Beyond this general framework, considerable diversity in the pattern of network failure was found between species, related to differences in vein network topology. The highest-risk network was found in a fern species, where single events caused massive disruption to leaf water supply, whereas safer networks in angiosperm leaves contained veins with composite properties, allowing a staged failure of water supply. These results reveal how the size structure of leaf venation is a critical determinant of the spread of embolism damage to leaves during drought. PMID:27071104

  2. Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence

    PubMed Central

    Alshamsi, Aamena; Pianesi, Fabio; Lepri, Bruno; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2015-01-01

    Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people’s behavior and affective (emotional) states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported) face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people) cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals’ behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits) of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being. PMID:26313449

  3. Global Population Genetic Structure of Caenorhabditis remanei Reveals Incipient Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Alivia; Jeon, Yong; Wang, Guo-Xiu; Cutter, Asher D.

    2012-01-01

    Mating system transitions dramatically alter the evolutionary trajectories of genomes that can be revealed by contrasts of species with disparate modes of reproduction. For such transitions in Caenorhabditis nematodes, some major causes of genome variation in selfing species have been discerned. And yet, we have only limited understanding of species-wide population genetic processes for their outcrossing relatives, which represent the reproductive state of the progenitors of selfing species. Multilocus–multipopulation sequence polymorphism data provide a powerful means to uncover the historical demography and evolutionary processes that shape genomes. Here we survey nucleotide polymorphism across the X chromosome for three populations of the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei and demonstrate its divergence from a fourth population describing a closely related new species from China, C. sp. 23. We find high genetic variation globally and within each local population sample. Despite geographic barriers and moderate genetic differentiation between Europe and North America, considerable gene flow connects C. remanei populations. We discovered C. sp. 23 while investigating C. remanei, observing strong genetic differentiation characteristic of reproductive isolation that was confirmed by substantial F2 hybrid breakdown in interspecific crosses. That C. sp. 23 represents a distinct biological species provides a cautionary example of how standard practice can fail for mating tests of species identity in this group. This species pair permits full application of divergence population genetic methods to obligately outcrossing species of Caenorhabditis and also presents a new focus for interrogation of the genetics and evolution of speciation with the Caenorhabditis model system. PMID:22649079

  4. Apo raver1 structure reveals distinct RRM domain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Izard, Tina

    2012-09-17

    Raver1 is a multifunctional protein that modulates both alternative splicing and focal adhesion assembly by binding to the nucleoplasmic splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract protein (PTB) or to the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and {alpha}-actinin. The amino-terminal region of raver1 has three RNA recognition motif (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM3) domains, and RRM1 interacts with the vinculin tail (Vt) domain and vinculin mRNA. We previously determined the crystal structure of the raver1 RRM1-3 domains in complex with Vt at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. Here, we report crystal structure of the unbound raver1 RRM1-3 domains at 2 {angstrom} resolution. The apo structure reveals that a bound sulfate ion disrupts an electrostatic interaction between the RRM1 and RRM2 domains, triggering a large relative domain movement of over 30{sup o}. Superposition with other RNA-bound RRM structures places the sulfate ion near the superposed RNA phosphate group suggesting that this is the raver1 RNA binding site. While several single and some tandem RRM domain structures have been described, to the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of a three-tandem RRM domain structure.

  5. Mitochondrial Genome Sequences Effectively Reveal the Phylogeny of Hylobates Gibbons

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yi-Chiao; Roos, Christian; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Inoue, Eiji; Shih, Chih-Chin; Pei, Kurtis Jai-Chyi; Vigilant, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Background Uniquely among hominoids, gibbons exist as multiple geographically contiguous taxa exhibiting distinctive behavioral, morphological, and karyotypic characteristics. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships of the various gibbons, especially among Hylobates species, is still limited because previous studies used limited taxon sampling or short mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Here we use mtDNA genome sequences to reconstruct gibbon phylogenetic relationships and reveal the pattern and timing of divergence events in gibbon evolutionary history. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of 51 individuals representing 11 species belonging to three genera (Hylobates, Nomascus and Symphalangus) using the high-throughput 454 sequencing system with the parallel tagged sequencing approach. Three phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, Bayesian analysis and neighbor-joining) depicted the gibbon phylogenetic relationships congruently and with strong support values. Most notably, we recover a well-supported phylogeny of the Hylobates gibbons. The estimation of divergence times using Bayesian analysis with relaxed clock model suggests a much more rapid speciation process in Hylobates than in Nomascus. Conclusions/Significance Use of more than 15 kb sequences of the mitochondrial genome provided more informative and robust data than previous studies of short mitochondrial segments (e.g., control region or cytochrome b) as shown by the reliable reconstruction of divergence patterns among Hylobates gibbons. Moreover, molecular dating of the mitogenomic divergence times implied that biogeographic change during the last five million years may be a factor promoting the speciation of Sundaland animals, including Hylobates species. PMID:21203450

  6. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Marine viruses, a genetic reservoir revealed by targeted viromics.

    PubMed

    Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Swan, Brandon K; Wilson, William H

    2014-05-01

    Metagenomics has opened new windows on investigating viral diversity and functions. Viromic studies typically require large sample volumes and filtration through 0.2 μm pore-size filters, consequently excluding or under-sampling tailed and very large viruses. We have optimized a targeted viromic approach that employs fluorescence-activated sorting and whole genome amplification to produce dsDNA-enriched libraries from discrete viral populations from a 1-ml water sample. Using this approach on an environmental sample from the Patagonian Shelf, we produced three distinct libraries. One of the virus libraries was dominated (79.65% of sequences with known viral homology) by giant viruses from the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families, while the two other viromes were dominated by smaller phycodnaviruses, cyanophages and other bacteriophages. The estimated genotypic richness and diversity in our sorted viromes, with 52-163 estimated genotypes, was much lower than in previous virome reports. Fragment recruitment of metagenome reads to selected reference viral genomes yields high genome coverage, suggesting little amplification and sequencing bias against some genomic regions. These results underscore the value of our approach as an effective way to target and investigate specific virus groups. In particular, it will help reveal the diversity and abundance of giant viruses in marine ecosystems.

  8. High resolution spectroscopy reveals fibrillation inhibition pathways of insulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fibril formation implies the conversion of a protein’s native secondary structure and is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of fibrillation inhibition and fibril dissection requires nanoscale molecular characterization of amyloid structures involved. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has already been used to chemically analyze amyloid fibrils on a sub-protein unit basis. Here, TERS in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conventional Raman spectroscopy characterizes insulin assemblies generated during inhibition and dissection experiments in the presence of benzonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, quercetin, and β-carotene. The AFM topography indicates formation of filamentous or bead-like insulin self-assemblies. Information on the secondary structure of bulk samples and of single aggregates is obtained from standard Raman and TERS measurements. In particular the high spatial resolution of TERS reveals the surface conformations associated with the specific agents. The insulin aggregates formed under different inhibition and dissection conditions can show a similar morphology but differ in their β-sheet structure content. This suggests different aggregation pathways where the prevention of the β-sheet stacking of the peptide chains plays a major role. The presented approach is not limited to amyloid-related reasearch but can be readily applied to systems requiring extremely surface-sensitive characterization without the need of labels.

  9. Statistical universals reveal the structures and functions of human music

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Patrick E.; Brown, Steven; Sakai, Emi; Currie, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Music has been called “the universal language of mankind.” Although contemporary theories of music evolution often invoke various musical universals, the existence of such universals has been disputed for decades and has never been empirically demonstrated. Here we combine a music-classification scheme with statistical analyses, including phylogenetic comparative methods, to examine a well-sampled global set of 304 music recordings. Our analyses reveal no absolute universals but strong support for many statistical universals that are consistent across all nine geographic regions sampled. These universals include 18 musical features that are common individually as well as a network of 10 features that are commonly associated with one another. They span not only features related to pitch and rhythm that are often cited as putative universals but also rarely cited domains including performance style and social context. These cross-cultural structural regularities of human music may relate to roles in facilitating group coordination and cohesion, as exemplified by the universal tendency to sing, play percussion instruments, and dance to simple, repetitive music in groups. Our findings highlight the need for scientists studying music evolution to expand the range of musical cultures and musical features under consideration. The statistical universals we identified represent important candidates for future investigation. PMID:26124105

  10. Substrate Channel in Nitrogenase Revealed by a Molecular Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2014-03-22

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to 2NH3 at the FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized sub-microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel not previously reported. The viability of the proposed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, with discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  11. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure.

  12. Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks

    PubMed Central

    Cagua, E. Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E. M.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Prebble, Clare E. M.; Sinclair-Taylor, Tane H.; Pierce, Simon J.; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Although whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) have been documented to move thousands of kilometres, they are most frequently observed at a few predictable seasonal aggregation sites. The absence of sharks at the surface during visual surveys has led to the assumption that sharks disperse to places unknown during the long ‘off-seasons’ at most of these locations. Here we compare 2 years of R. typus visual sighting records from Mafia Island in Tanzania to concurrent acoustic telemetry of tagged individuals. Sightings revealed a clear seasonal pattern with a peak between October and February and no sharks observed at other times. By contrast, acoustic telemetry demonstrated year-round residency of R. typus. The sharks use a different habitat in the off-season, swimming deeper and further away from shore, presumably in response to prey distributions. This behavioural change reduces the sharks' visibility, giving the false impression that they have left the area. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, year-round residency of unprovisioned, individual R. typus at an aggregation site, and highlight the importance of using multiple techniques to study the movement ecology of marine megafauna. PMID:25832816

  13. High resolution spectroscopy reveals fibrillation inhibition pathways of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Fibril formation implies the conversion of a protein’s native secondary structure and is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of fibrillation inhibition and fibril dissection requires nanoscale molecular characterization of amyloid structures involved. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has already been used to chemically analyze amyloid fibrils on a sub-protein unit basis. Here, TERS in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conventional Raman spectroscopy characterizes insulin assemblies generated during inhibition and dissection experiments in the presence of benzonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, quercetin, and β-carotene. The AFM topography indicates formation of filamentous or bead-like insulin self-assemblies. Information on the secondary structure of bulk samples and of single aggregates is obtained from standard Raman and TERS measurements. In particular the high spatial resolution of TERS reveals the surface conformations associated with the specific agents. The insulin aggregates formed under different inhibition and dissection conditions can show a similar morphology but differ in their β-sheet structure content. This suggests different aggregation pathways where the prevention of the β-sheet stacking of the peptide chains plays a major role. The presented approach is not limited to amyloid-related reasearch but can be readily applied to systems requiring extremely surface-sensitive characterization without the need of labels. PMID:28008970

  14. Calling by concluding sentinels: coordinating cooperation or revealing risk?

    PubMed

    Hollén, Linda I; Bell, Matthew B V; Russell, Alexis; Niven, Fraser; Ridley, Amanda R; Radford, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Efficient cooperation requires effective coordination of individual contributions to the cooperative behaviour. Most social birds and mammals involved in cooperation produce a range of vocalisations, which may be important in regulating both individual contributions and the combined group effort. Here we investigate the role of a specific call in regulating cooperative sentinel behaviour in pied babblers (Turdoides bicolor). 'Fast-rate chuck' calls are often given by sentinels as they finish guard bouts and may potentially coordinate the rotation of individuals as sentinels, minimising time without a sentinel, or may signal the presence or absence of predators, regulating the onset of the subsequent sentinel bout. We ask (i) when fast-rate chuck calls are given and (ii) what effect they have on the interval between sentinel bouts. Contrary to expectation, we find little evidence that these calls are involved in regulating the pied babbler sentinel system: observations revealed that their utterance is influenced only marginally by wind conditions and not at all by habitat, while observations and experimental playback showed that the giving of these calls has no effect on inter-bout interval. We conclude that pied babblers do not seem to call at the end of a sentinel bout to maximise the efficiency of this cooperative act, but may use vocalisations at this stage to influence more individually driven behaviours.

  15. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Hansen, Martin A.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. PMID:28337181

  16. Bioluminescence to reveal structure and interaction of coastal planktonic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Blackwell, Shelley M.; Case, James F.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Herren, Christen M.; Orrico, Cristina M.; Terrill, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Ecosystem function will in large part be determined by functional groups present in biological communities. The simplest distinction with respect to functional groups of an ecosystem is the differentiation between primary and secondary producers. A challenge thus far has been to examine these groups simultaneously with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution for observations to be relevant to the scales of change in coastal oceans. This study takes advantage of general differences in the bioluminescence flash kinetics between planktonic dinoflagellates and zooplankton to measure relative abundances of the two groups within the same-time space volume. This novel approach for distinguishing these general classifications using a single sensor is validated using fluorescence data and exclusion experiments. The approach is then applied to data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle surveying >500 km in Monterey Bay and San Luis Obispo Bay, CA during the summers of 2002-2004. The approach also reveals that identifying trophic interaction between the two planktonic communities may also be possible.

  17. Electrical neuroimaging reveals early generator modulation to emotional words.

    PubMed

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M; Mohr, Christine; Carbonnel, Serge; Landis, Theodor

    2004-04-01

    Functional electrical neuroimaging investigated incidental emotional word processing. Previous research suggests that the brain may differentially respond to the emotional content of linguistic stimuli pre-lexically (i.e., before distinguishing that these stimuli are words). We investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms of this apparent paradox and in particular whether the initial differentiation of emotional stimuli is marked by different brain generator configurations using high-density, event-related potentials. Such would support the existence of specific cerebral resources dedicated to emotional word processing. A related issue concerns the possibility of right-hemispheric specialization in the processing of emotional stimuli. Thirteen healthy men performed a go/no-go lexical decision task with bilateral word/non-word or non-word/non-word stimulus pairs. Words included equal numbers of neutral and emotional stimuli, but subjects made no explicit discrimination along this dimension. Emotional words appearing in the right visual field (ERVF) yielded the best overall performance, although the difference between emotional and neutral words was larger for left than for right visual field presentations. Electrophysiologically, ERVF presentations were distinguished from all other conditions over the 100-140 ms period by a distinct scalp topography, indicative of different intracranial generator configurations. A distributed linear source estimation (LAURA) of this distinct scalp potential field revealed bilateral lateral-occipital sources with a right hemisphere current density maximum. These data support the existence of a specialized brain network triggered by the emotional connotation of words at a very early processing stage.

  18. Single-cell chromatin accessibility reveals principles of regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Jason D; Wu, Beijing; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Ruff, Dave; Gonzales, Michael L; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-07-23

    Cell-to-cell variation is a universal feature of life that affects a wide range of biological phenomena, from developmental plasticity to tumour heterogeneity. Although recent advances have improved our ability to document cellular phenotypic variation, the fundamental mechanisms that generate variability from identical DNA sequences remain elusive. Here we reveal the landscape and principles of mammalian DNA regulatory variation by developing a robust method for mapping the accessible genome of individual cells by assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) integrated into a programmable microfluidics platform. Single-cell ATAC-seq (scATAC-seq) maps from hundreds of single cells in aggregate closely resemble accessibility profiles from tens of millions of cells and provide insights into cell-to-cell variation. Accessibility variance is systematically associated with specific trans-factors and cis-elements, and we discover combinations of trans-factors associated with either induction or suppression of cell-to-cell variability. We further identify sets of trans-factors associated with cell-type-specific accessibility variance across eight cell types. Targeted perturbations of cell cycle or transcription factor signalling evoke stimulus-specific changes in this observed variability. The pattern of accessibility variation in cis across the genome recapitulates chromosome compartments de novo, linking single-cell accessibility variation to three-dimensional genome organization. Single-cell analysis of DNA accessibility provides new insight into cellular variation of the 'regulome'.

  19. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  20. Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Hu, Hao; Garshasbi, Masoud; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Chen, Wei; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Haas, Stefan; Jamali, Payman; Zecha, Agnes; Mohseni, Marzieh; Püttmann, Lucia; Vahid, Leyla Nouri; Jensen, Corinna; Moheb, Lia Abbasi; Bienek, Melanie; Larti, Farzaneh; Mueller, Ines; Weissmann, Robert; Darvish, Hossein; Wrogemann, Klaus; Hadavi, Valeh; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kariminejad, Roxana; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Cohen, Monika; Fattahi, Zohreh; Rost, Imma; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Hertzberg, Christoph; Dehghan, Atefeh; Rajab, Anna; Banavandi, Mohammad Javad Soltani; Hoffer, Julia; Falah, Masoumeh; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, H Hilger

    2011-09-21

    Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function.

  1. Global Isotope Metabolomics Reveals Adaptive Strategies for Nitrogen Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Kurczy, Michael E; Forsberg, Erica M; Thorgersen, Michael P; Poole, Farris L; Benton, H Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Tran, Minerva L; Wall, Judy D; Elias, Dwayne A; Adams, Michael W W; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-06-17

    Nitrogen cycling is a microbial metabolic process essential for global ecological/agricultural balance. To investigate the link between the well-established ammonium and the alternative nitrate assimilation metabolic pathways, global isotope metabolomics was employed to examine three nitrate reducing bacteria using (15)NO3 as a nitrogen source. In contrast to a control (Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2), the results show that two of the isolates from Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Pseudomonas N2A2 and N2E2) utilize nitrate and ammonia for assimilation concurrently with differential labeling observed across multiple classes of metabolites including amino acids and nucleotides. The data reveal that the N2A2 and N2E2 strains conserve nitrogen-containing metabolites, indicating that the nitrate assimilation pathway is a conservation mechanism for the assimilation of nitrogen. Co-utilization of nitrate and ammonia is likely an adaption to manage higher levels of nitrite since the denitrification pathways utilized by the N2A2 and N2E2 strains from the Oak Ridge site are predisposed to the accumulation of the toxic nitrite. The use of global isotope metabolomics allowed for this adaptive strategy to be investigated, which would otherwise not have been possible to decipher.

  2. Early Neolithic water wells reveal the world's oldest wood architecture.

    PubMed

    Tegel, Willy; Elburg, Rengert; Hakelberg, Dietrich; Stäuble, Harald; Büntgen, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The European Neolithization ~6000-4000 BC represents a pivotal change in human history when farming spread and the mobile style of life of the hunter-foragers was superseded by the agrarian culture. Permanent settlement structures and agricultural production systems required fundamental innovations in technology, subsistence, and resource utilization. Motivation, course, and timing of this transformation, however, remain debatable. Here we present annually resolved and absolutely dated dendroarchaeological information from four wooden water wells of the early Neolithic period that were excavated in Eastern Germany. A total of 151 oak timbers preserved in a waterlogged environment were dated between 5469 and 5098 BC and reveal unexpectedly refined carpentry skills. The recently discovered water wells enable for the first time a detailed insight into the earliest wood architecture and display the technological capabilities of humans ~7000 years ago. The timbered well constructions made of old oak trees feature an unopened tree-ring archive from which annually resolved and absolutely dated environmental data can be culled. Our results question the principle of continuous evolutionary development in prehistoric technology, and contradict the common belief that metal was necessary for complex timber constructions. Early Neolithic craftsmanship now suggests that the first farmers were also the first carpenters.

  3. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  4. Temporal dynamics of reward processing revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Doñamayor, Nuria; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Heldmann, Marcus; Schoenfeld, M Ariel; Münte, Thomas F

    2011-12-01

    Monetary gains and losses in gambling situations are associated with a distinct electroencephalographic signature: in the event-related potentials (ERPs), a mediofrontal feedback-related negativity (FRN) is seen for losses, whereas oscillatory activity shows a burst of in the θ-range for losses and in the β-range for gains. We used whole-head magnetoencephalography to pinpoint the magnetic counterparts of these effects in young healthy adults and explore their evolution over time. On each trial, participants bet on one of two visually presented numbers (25 or 5) by button-press. Both numbers changed color: if the chosen number turned green (red), it indicated a gain (loss) of the corresponding sum in Euro cent. For losses, we found the magnetic correlate of the FRN extending between 230 and 465 ms. Source localization with low-resolution electromagnetic tomography indicated a first generator in posterior cingulate cortex with subsequent activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. Importantly, this effect was sensitive to the magnitude of the monetary loss (25 cent > 5 cent). Later activation was also found in the right insula. Time-frequency analysis revealed a number of oscillatory components in the theta, alpha, and high-beta/low-gamma bands associated to gains, and in the high-beta band, associated to the magnitude of the loss. All together, these effects provide a more fine-grained picture of the temporal dynamics of the processing of monetary rewards and losses in the brain.

  5. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava.

  6. Spatial Congruity Effects Reveal Metaphorical Thinking, not Polarity Correspondence

    PubMed Central

    Dolscheid, Sarah; Casasanto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial congruity effects have often been interpreted as evidence for metaphorical thinking, but an alternative account based on polarity correspondence (a.k.a. markedness) has challenged this view. Here we compared metaphor- and polarity-correspondence-based explanations for spatial congruity effects, using musical pitch as a testbed. In one experiment, English speakers classified high- and low-frequency pitches as “high” and “low,” or as “front” and “back,” to determine whether space-pitch congruity effects could be elicited by any marked spatial continuum. Although both pairs of terms describe bipolar spatial continuums, we found congruity effects only for high/low judgments, indicating that markedness is not sufficient to produce space-pitch congruity effects. A second experiment confirmed that there were no space-pitch congruity effects for another pair of terms that have clear markedness (big/small), but which do not denote spatial height. By contrast, this experiment showed congruity effects for words that cued an appropriate vertical spatial schema (tall/short), even though these words are not used conventionally in English to describe pitches, ruling out explanations for the observed pattern of results based on verbal polysemy. Together, results suggest that space-pitch congruity effects reveal metaphorical uses of spatial schemas, not polarity correspondence effects. PMID:26635713

  7. Connexin43 null mice reveal that astrocytes express multiple connexins.

    PubMed

    Dermietzel, R; Gao, Y; Scemes, E; Vieira, D; Urban, M; Kremer, M; Bennett, M V; Spray, D C

    2000-04-01

    The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) is the primary component of intercellular channels in cardiac tissue and in astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells in the brain. Mice in which the gene for Cx43 is deleted by homologous recombination die at birth, due to profound hypertrophy of the ventricular outflow tract and stenosis of the pulmonary artery. Despite this significant cardiovascular abnormality, brains of connexin43 null [Cx43 (-/-)] animals are shown to be macroscopically normal and to display a pattern of cortical lamination that is not detectably different from wildtype siblings. Presence of Cx40 and Cx45 in brains and astrocytes cultured from both Cx43 (-/-) mice and wildtype littermates was confirmed by RT-PCR, Northern blot analyses and by immunostaining; Cx46 was detected by RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses. Presence of Cx26 in astrocyte cultures was indicated by RT-PCR and by Western blot analysis, although we were unable to resolve whether it was contributed by contaminating cells; Cx30 mRNA was detected by Northern blot in long term (2 weeks) but not fresh cultures of astrocytes. These studies thus reveal that astrocyte gap junctions may be formed of multiple connexins. Presumably, the metabolic and ionic coupling provided by these diverse gap junction types may functionally compensate for the absence of the major astrocyte gap junction protein in Cx43 (-/-) mice, providing whatever intercellular signaling is necessary for brain development and cortical lamination.

  8. Laser microsurgery reveals conserved viscoelastic behavior of the kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Cojoc, Gheorghe; Roscioli, Emanuele; Zhang, Lijuan; García-Ulloa, Alfonso; Shah, Jagesh V.; Berns, Michael W.; Pavin, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on proper kinetochore–microtubule attachment. Upon microtubule interaction, kinetochores are subjected to forces generated by the microtubules. In this work, we used laser ablation to sever microtubules attached to a merotelic kinetochore, which is laterally stretched by opposing pulling forces exerted by microtubules, and inferred the mechanical response of the kinetochore from its length change. In both mammalian PtK1 cells and in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, kinetochores shortened after microtubule severing. Interestingly, the inner kinetochore–centromere relaxed faster than the outer kinetochore. Whereas in fission yeast all kinetochores relaxed to a similar length, in PtK1 cells the more stretched kinetochores remained more stretched. Simple models suggest that these differences arise because the mechanical structure of the mammalian kinetochore is more complex. Our study establishes merotelic kinetochores as an experimental model for studying the mechanical response of the kinetochore in live cells and reveals a viscoelastic behavior of the kinetochore that is conserved in yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:27002163

  9. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-07-14

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼ 400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the "olfactory fingerprint." Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P < 10(-10)), which was odor specific but descriptor independent. We could identify individuals from this pool using randomly selected sets of 7 odors and 11 descriptors alone. Extrapolating from this data, we determined that using 34 odors and 35 descriptors we could individually identify each of the 7 billion people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10(-4)), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10(-6)). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

  10. Do Voice Recordings Reveal whether a Person Is Intoxicated?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Keith; Pisoni, David B.; Bernacki, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we consider the possibility that speech analysis techniques may be used to determine whether an individual was intoxicated at the time that a voice recording was made, and discuss an analysis of the speech produced by the captain of the Exxon Valdez recorded at several points around the time of the accident at Prince William Sound, Alaska. A review of previous research on the effects of alcohol and other effects on speech production suggests that it may be possible to attribute a certain, unique pattern of changes in speech to the influence of alcohol. However, the rate of occurrence of this pattern or the reliability of a decision based on observations such as these is not known. Acoustic-phonetic analysis of a small number of tokens of Captain Hazelwood’s speech recorded before, during and after the accident revealed a number of changes in speech behavior which are similar to the pattern of changes observed in previous laboratory-based research on the effects of alcohol on speech production. We conclude with a discussion of the limitations in making inferences concerning the state of the speaker upon the basis of phonetic data and then discuss several possible explanations of the pattern of change found in the recordings of Captain Hazelwood. PMID:2130381

  11. Slowed diffusion in tumors revealed by microfiberoptic epifluorescence photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Kim, Jung Kyung; Magzoub, Mazin; Verkman, A S

    2006-04-01

    It has not been possible to measure diffusion deep in solid tissues such as tumors because of the limited light penetration of conventional optical techniques. Here we report a microfiberoptic epifluorescence photobleaching (MFEP) method in which photobleaching is done by laser epi-illumination through a multimode fiberoptic whose micron-sized tip can be introduced deep into tissues. We applied MFEP to measure the diffusion of fluorescent macromolecules in tumors in living mice, at depths well beyond those accessible by surface optical measurements. Macromolecule diffusion was slowed about twofold within 200 microm of the surface of a solid tumor, but was slowed greater than tenfold beyond 500 microm. Our results reveal a remarkable and previously unrecognized slowing of diffusion deep in tumors, which correlated with the differing tissue architectures of tumor periphery versus core, and with altered tumor vasculature produced by aquaporin-1 deletion. MFEP should have wide applications for measuring diffusion in organs, solid tumors and other light-inaccessible tissue masses.

  12. Single molecule studies reveal new mechanisms for microtubule severing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Diaz-Valencia, Juan Daniel; Morelli, Margaret; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David

    2011-03-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are hexameric complexes made from monomeric enzyme subunits that remove tubulin dimers from the microtubule lattice. Severing proteins are known to remodel the cytoskeleton during interphase and mitosis, and are required in proper axon morphology and mammalian bone and cartilage development. We have performed the first single molecule imaging to determine where and how severing enzymes act to cut microtubules. We have focused on the original member of the group, katanin, and the newest member, fidgetin to compare their biophysical activities in vitro. We find that, as expected, severing proteins localize to areas of activity. Interestingly, the association is very brief: they do not stay bound nor do they bind cooperatively at active sites. The association duration changes with the nucleotide content, implying that the state in the catalytic cycle dictates binding affinity with the microtubule. We also discovered that, at lower concentrations, both katanin and fidgetin can depolymerize taxol-stabilized microtubules by removing terminal dimers. These studies reveal the physical regulation schemes to control severing activity in cells, and ultimately regulate cytoskeletal architecture. This work is supported by the March of Dimes Grant #5-FY09-46.

  13. Revealing and reducing uncertainties in climate impact assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Water resources planning and management involves understanding the vulnerability of water resource systems to a wide range of different stresses. A key responsibility is to identify defensible options for the design and management of systems under an uncertain and changing climate. In the water resources sector this requires defining a range of different climate change narratives in order to evaluate the vulnerability of infrastructure and the effectiveness of different management strategies to climate-related stresses. Recent research is just now beginning to reveal how different methodological choices can impact portrayals of climate risk. We present research showing that the common approaches to climate change assessments in the water sector are affected by substantial uncertainties in methods used for climate downscaling and hydrologic modeling, and suggest that many of these uncertainties are reducible. For example, improving continental scale hydrologic model parameters can reduce one source of uncertainty. We also present research to improve characterization of uncertainty, in order to reduce the extent to which the portrayal of climate change impacts depends on ad hoc methodological choices and provide a holistic estimate of the degree to which the climate change signal emerges from the envelope of uncertainty. We hope that this presentation stimulates discussion on the best practices for climate impact assessments, and ways to improve the robustness of water resources planning under a changing climate.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-09-28

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to "phenylpropanoid biosynthesis", "tyrosine metabolism", "flavonoid biosynthesis", "ascorbate and aldarate metabolism", "betalains biosynthesis" and "anthocyanin biosynthesis". In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  15. ATP-induced helicase slippage reveals highly coordinated subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle D.

    2012-02-01

    Helicases are vital enzymes that carry out strand separation of duplex nucleic acids during replication, repair and recombination. T7 helicase, a model hexameric motor, has been observed to use dTTP, but not ATP, to unwind dsDNA as it translocates along ssDNA. Whether and how different subunits of the helicase coordinate their chemo-mechanical activities and DNA binding during translocation is still under debate. Here we address this question using a single-molecule approach to monitor helicase unwinding. We found that T7 helicase does in fact unwind dsDNA in the presence of ATP and that the unwinding rate is even faster than that with dTTP. However, unwinding was repeatedly interrupted by sudden slippage events, ultimately preventing unwinding over a substantial distance. This behaviour was greatly reduced with the supplement of a small amount of dTTP. These findings presented an opportunity to use nucleotide mixtures to investigate helicase subunit coordination. Our results support a model where nearly all subunits coordinate their chemo-mechanical activities and DNA binding. Such subunit coordination may be general to many ring-shaped helicases and reveals a potential mechanism for regulation of DNA unwinding during replication.

  16. Submillisecond Elastic Recoil Reveals Molecular Origins of Fibrin Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Nathan E.; Ding, Feng; Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Timothy; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Superfine, Richard; Lord, Susan T.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Falvo, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural scaffold of blood clots. Thus, their mechanical properties are of central importance to understanding hemostasis and thrombotic disease. Recent studies have revealed that fibrin fibers are elastomeric despite their high degree of molecular ordering. These results have inspired a variety of molecular models for fibrin’s elasticity, ranging from reversible protein unfolding to rubber-like elasticity. An important property that has not been explored is the timescale of elastic recoil, a parameter that is critical for fibrin’s mechanical function and places a temporal constraint on molecular models of fiber elasticity. Using high-frame-rate imaging and atomic force microscopy-based nanomanipulation, we measured the recoil dynamics of individual fibrin fibers and found that the recoil was orders of magnitude faster than anticipated from models involving protein refolding. We also performed steered discrete molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular origins of the observed recoil. Our results point to the unstructured αC regions of the otherwise structured fibrin molecule as being responsible for the elastic recoil of the fibers. PMID:23790375

  17. Ecoinformatics reveals effects of crop rotational histories on cotton yield.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Matthew H; Rosenheim, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    Crop rotation has been practiced for centuries in an effort to improve agricultural yield. However, the directions, magnitudes, and mechanisms of the yield effects of various crop rotations remain poorly understood in many systems. In order to better understand how crop rotation influences cotton yield, we used hierarchical Bayesian models to analyze a large ecoinformatics database consisting of records of commercial cotton crops grown in California's San Joaquin Valley. We identified several crops that, when grown in a field the year before a cotton crop, were associated with increased or decreased cotton yield. Furthermore, there was a negative association between the effect of the prior year's crop on June densities of the pest Lygus hesperus and the effect of the prior year's crop on cotton yield. This suggested that some crops may enhance L. hesperus densities in the surrounding agricultural landscape, because residual L. hesperus populations from the previous year cannot continuously inhabit a focal field and attack a subsequent cotton crop. In addition, we found that cotton yield declined approximately 2.4% for each additional year in which cotton was grown consecutively in a field prior to the focal cotton crop. Because L. hesperus is quite mobile, the effects of crop rotation on L. hesperus would likely not be revealed by small plot experimentation. These results provide an example of how ecoinformatics datasets, which capture the true spatial scale of commercial agriculture, can be used to enhance agricultural productivity.

  18. Global isotope metabolomics reveals adaptive strategies for nitrogen assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Forsberg, Erica M.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Poole, Farris L.; Benton, H. Paul; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Tran, Minerva L.; Wall, Judy D.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Siuzdak, Gary

    2016-04-05

    Nitrogen cycling is a microbial metabolic process essential for global ecological/agricultural balance. To investigate the link between the well-established ammonium and the alternative nitrate assimilation metabolic pathways, global isotope metabolomics was employed to examine three nitrate reducing bacteria using 15NO3 as a nitrogen source. In contrast to a control (Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2), the results show that two of the isolates from Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Pseudomonas N2A2 and N2E2) utilize nitrate and ammonia for assimilation concurrently with differential labeling observed across multiple classes of metabolites including amino acids and nucleotides. The data reveal that the N2A2 and N2E2 strains conserve nitrogen-containing metabolites, indicating that the nitrate assimilation pathway is a conservation mechanism for the assimilation of nitrogen. Co-utilization of nitrate and ammonia is likely an adaption to manage higher levels of nitrite since the denitrification pathways utilized by the N2A2 and N2E2 strains from the Oak Ridge site are predisposed to the accumulation of the toxic nitrite. In conclusion, the use of global isotope metabolomics allowed for this adaptive strategy to be investigated, which would otherwise not have been possible to decipher.

  19. Global isotope metabolomics reveals adaptive strategies for nitrogen assimilation

    DOE PAGES

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Forsberg, Erica M.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; ...

    2016-04-05

    Nitrogen cycling is a microbial metabolic process essential for global ecological/agricultural balance. To investigate the link between the well-established ammonium and the alternative nitrate assimilation metabolic pathways, global isotope metabolomics was employed to examine three nitrate reducing bacteria using 15NO3 as a nitrogen source. In contrast to a control (Pseudomonas stutzeri RCH2), the results show that two of the isolates from Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Pseudomonas N2A2 and N2E2) utilize nitrate and ammonia for assimilation concurrently with differential labeling observed across multiple classes of metabolites including amino acids and nucleotides. The data reveal that the N2A2 and N2E2 strains conserve nitrogen-containingmore » metabolites, indicating that the nitrate assimilation pathway is a conservation mechanism for the assimilation of nitrogen. Co-utilization of nitrate and ammonia is likely an adaption to manage higher levels of nitrite since the denitrification pathways utilized by the N2A2 and N2E2 strains from the Oak Ridge site are predisposed to the accumulation of the toxic nitrite. In conclusion, the use of global isotope metabolomics allowed for this adaptive strategy to be investigated, which would otherwise not have been possible to decipher.« less

  20. Breast tumor subgroups reveal diverse clinical prognostic power

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqi; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Zhang, Shihua

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of cancer therapies using molecular features and clinical observations is a key goal of cancer biology, which has been addressed comprehensively using whole patient datasets without considering the effect of tumor heterogeneity. We hypothesized that molecular features and clinical observations have different prognostic abilities for different cancer subtypes, and made a systematic study using both clinical observations and gene expression data. This analysis revealed that (1) gene expression profiles and clinical features show different prognostic power for the five breast cancer subtypes; (2) gene expression data of the normal-like subgroup contains more valuable prognostic information and survival associated contexts than the other subtypes, and the patient survival time of the normal-like subtype is more predictable based on the gene expression profiles; and (3) the prognostic power of many previously reported breast cancer gene signatures increased in the normal-like subtype and reduced in the other subtypes compared with that in the whole sample set. PMID:24499868

  1. Sparse expression bases in cancer reveal tumor drivers

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Miller, Chris P.; Blau, C. Anthony; Becker, Pamela S.; Lee, Su-In

    2015-01-01

    We define a new category of candidate tumor drivers in cancer genome evolution: ‘selected expression regulators’ (SERs)—genes driving dysregulated transcriptional programs in cancer evolution. The SERs are identified from genome-wide tumor expression data with a novel method, namely SPARROW (SPARse selected expRessiOn regulators identified With penalized regression). SPARROW uncovers a previously unknown connection between cancer expression variation and driver events, by using a novel sparse regression technique. Our results indicate that SPARROW is a powerful complementary approach to identify candidate genes containing driver events that are hard to detect from sequence data, due to a large number of passenger mutations and lack of comprehensive sequence information from a sufficiently large number of samples. SERs identified by SPARROW reveal known driver mutations in multiple human cancers, along with known cancer-associated processes and survival-associated genes, better than popular methods for inferring gene expression networks. We demonstrate that when applied to acute myeloid leukemia expression data, SPARROW identifies an apoptotic biomarker (PYCARD) for an investigational drug obatoclax. The PYCARD and obatoclax association is validated in 30 AML patient samples. PMID:25583238

  2. Microsatellite markers reveal multiple origins for Italian weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Annabelle; Fogliatto, Silvia; Nick, Peter; Ferrero, Aldo; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Weedy rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the major issues of rice cultivation worldwide. In Italy, it infests about 70% of the total rice area. Different Weedy Rice populations can be distinguished based on variable morphological and physiological traits; however, little is known about genetic differentiation and origin of Italian weedy rice populations. The objective of this study was to genetically and morphologically characterize and compare different Italian weedy rice populations selected on the basis of different phenotypes. The main Italian rice territory was divided into 10 geographical areas in which 40 weedy rice populations were collected and grouped according to the awn traits. All the individuals of the populations were morphologically characterized according to plant and seed traits. Genetic characterization was performed using 19 SSR markers on all the collected accessions, and several rice cultivars, including some very old (late 19th century), nowadays are no longer cultivated. ANOVA showed that morphological plant and seed traits were significantly affected by the collection area and awnedness group. The importance of the awn morphology was also reflected in the Bayesian clustering where, despite a relatively low genetic diversity, the clusters displayed different awn types. An UPGMA dendrogram confirmed the clusters detected in STRUCTURE analysis and also revealed a grouping of certain old cultivars with the weedy rice, suggesting a common origin. PMID:24363904

  3. Microscopic spiral waves reveal positive feedback in subcellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, P; Niggli, E

    1993-01-01

    The regenerative Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release mechanism is an important amplifier of signal transduction in diverse cells. In heart muscle cells, this mechanism contributes to the Ca2+ transient activating the mechanical contraction, but it is also believed to drive Ca2+ waves propagating within the cytosol. We investigated the subcellular Ca2+ distribution in heart muscle cells during spontaneous Ca2+ release using laser scanning confocal microscopy with a ratiometric fluorescent indicator technique. Besides planar Ca2+ waves with linear propagation, sequences of confocal optical sections also revealed spiral Ca2+ waves spinning around a subcellular core at approximately 1 Hz. Although the Ca2+ spirals were continuous processes they frequently exhibited an apparently oscillatory output function into the elongated cell body. These oscillatory waves emanating from the spiral at regular intervals were formally considered to be short outer segments of the spiral but could not be distinguished from planar Ca2+ waves propagating along the longitudinal cell axis. The complex spatiotemporal pattern of spiral Ca2+ waves implies the participation of an active process exhibiting a large degree of positive feedback, most likely the Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release mechanism. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8312468

  4. NICMOS PEERS THROUGH DUST TO REVEAL YOUNG STELLAR DISKS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following images were taken by NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). All of the objects are extremely young stars, 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Most of the nebulae represent small dust particles around the stars, which are seen because they are reflecting starlight. In the color-coding, regions of greatest dust concentration appear red. All photo credits: D. Padgett (IPAC/Caltech), W. Brandner (IPAC), K. Stapelfeldt (JPL) and NASA [Top left]: CoKu Tau/1. This image shows a newborn binary star system, CoKu Tau/1, lying at the center of four 'wings' of light extending as much as 75 billion miles from the pair. The 'wings' outline the edges of a region in the stars' dusty surroundings, which have been cleared by outflowing gas. A thin, dark lane extends to the left and to right of the binary, suggesting that a disk or ring of dusty material encircles the two young stars. [Top center]: DG Tau B - An excellent example of the complementary nature of Hubble's instruments may be found by comparing the infrared NICMOS image of DG Tau B to the visible-light Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image of the same object. WFPC2 highlights the jet emerging from the system, while NICMOS penetrates some of the dust near the star to more clearly outline the 50 billion-mile-long dust lane (the horizontal dark band, which indicates the presence of a large disk forming around the infant star). The young star itself appears as the bright red spot at the corner of the V-shaped nebula. [Top right]: Haro 6-5B - This image of the young star Haro 6-5B shows two bright regions separated by a dark lane. As seen in the WFPC2 image of the same object, the bright regions represent starlight reflecting from the upper and lower surfaces of the disk, which is thicker at its edges than its center. However, the infrared view reveals the young star just above the dust lane. [Bottom left]: I04016 - A very young star

  5. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  6. Revealing the crust of western Romania using CCP tehniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataru, D.; Stuart, G.; Grecu, B.

    2012-04-01

    weight is determined from a 2-D Gaussian function whose one standard deviation width is chosen appropriately by the array aperture and/or Fresnel zone at the imaging target (Eagar et al., 2011). Our results reveal an average crustal thickness of 28-30 km beneath the Romanian sector of the Panonian Basin and a thicker crust for stations within the Southern Carpathian Orogen (~35km). For two stations located in the Apuseni Mountains the Moho discontinuity is replaced by a transition zone extended between 36 and 40 km depth. The H-k stacking solutions reveal significant variations in crustal thickness across the study region. Both H-k and GCCP stacking show general agreement in the pattern of Moho topography. Discrepancies between the two results are mostly linear shifts and both exhibit the same broad-scale patterns. Poisson's ratios across the region vary strongly and regional patterns do not directly correlate with variations in Moho depth.

  7. Seafood prices reveal impacts of a major ecological disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Martin D.; Oglend, Atle; Kirkpatrick, A. Justin; Asche, Frank; Bennear, Lori S.; Craig, J. Kevin; Nance, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia (dissolved oxygen ≤ 2 mg/L) is a growing problem worldwide that threatens marine ecosystem services, but little is known about economic effects on fisheries. Here, we provide evidence that hypoxia causes economic impacts on a major fishery. Ecological studies of hypoxia and marine fauna suggest multiple mechanisms through which hypoxia can skew a population’s size distribution toward smaller individuals. These mechanisms produce sharp predictions about changes in seafood markets. Hypoxia is hypothesized to decrease the quantity of large shrimp relative to small shrimp and increase the price of large shrimp relative to small shrimp. We test these hypotheses using time series of size-based prices. Naive quantity-based models using treatment/control comparisons in hypoxic and nonhypoxic areas produce null results, but we find strong evidence of the hypothesized effects in the relative prices: Hypoxia increases the relative price of large shrimp compared with small shrimp. The effects of fuel prices provide supporting evidence. Empirical models of fishing effort and bioeconomic simulations explain why quantifying effects of hypoxia on fisheries using quantity data has been inconclusive. Specifically, spatial-dynamic feedbacks across the natural system (the fish stock) and human system (the mobile fishing fleet) confound “treated” and “control” areas. Consequently, analyses of price data, which rely on a market counterfactual, are able to reveal effects of the ecological disturbance that are obscured in quantity data. Our results are an important step toward quantifying the economic value of reduced upstream nutrient loading in the Mississippi Basin and are broadly applicable to other coupled human-natural systems. PMID:28137850

  8. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  9. Complete Mitochondrial Genomes Reveal Neolithic Expansion into Europe

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiaomei; Rudan, Pavao; Pääbo, Svante; Krause, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The Neolithic transition from hunting and gathering to farming and cattle breeding marks one of the most drastic cultural changes in European prehistory. Short stretches of ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from skeletons of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers as well as early Neolithic farmers support the demic diffusion model where a migration of early farmers from the Near East and a replacement of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers are largely responsible for cultural innovation and changes in subsistence strategies during the Neolithic revolution in Europe. In order to test if a signal of population expansion is still present in modern European mitochondrial DNA, we analyzed a comprehensive dataset of 1,151 complete mtDNAs from present-day Europeans. Relying upon ancient DNA data from previous investigations, we identified mtDNA haplogroups that are typical for early farmers and hunter-gatherers, namely H and U respectively. Bayesian skyline coalescence estimates were then used on subsets of complete mtDNAs from modern populations to look for signals of past population expansions. Our analyses revealed a population expansion between 15,000 and 10,000 years before present (YBP) in mtDNAs typical for hunters and gatherers, with a decline between 10,000 and 5,000 YBP. These corresponded to an analogous population increase approximately 9,000 YBP for mtDNAs typical of early farmers. The observed changes over time suggest that the spread of agriculture in Europe involved the expansion of farming populations into Europe followed by the eventual assimilation of resident hunter-gatherers. Our data show that contemporary mtDNA datasets can be used to study ancient population history if only limited ancient genetic data is available. PMID:22427842

  10. When COI barcodes deceive: complete genomes reveal introgression in hairstreaks.

    PubMed

    Cong, Qian; Shen, Jinhui; Borek, Dominika; Robbins, Robert K; Opler, Paul A; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2017-02-08

    Two species of hairstreak butterflies from the genus Calycopis are known in the United States: C. cecrops and C. isobeon Analysis of mitochondrial COI barcodes of Calycopis revealed cecrops-like specimens from the eastern US with atypical barcodes that were 2.6% different from either USA species, but similar to Central American Calycopis species. To address the possibility that the specimens with atypical barcodes represent an undescribed cryptic species, we sequenced complete genomes of 27 Calycopis specimens of four species: C. cecrops, C. isobeon, C. quintana and C. bactra Some of these specimens were collected up to 60 years ago and preserved dry in museum collections, but nonetheless produced genomes as complete as fresh samples. Phylogenetic trees reconstructed using the whole mitochondrial and nuclear genomes were incongruent. While USA Calycopis with atypical barcodes grouped with Central American species C. quintana by mitochondria, nuclear genome trees placed them within typical USA C. cecrops in agreement with morphology, suggesting mitochondrial introgression. Nuclear genomes also show introgression, especially between C. cecrops and C. isobeon About 2.3% of each C. cecrops genome has probably (p-value < 0.01, FDR < 0.1) introgressed from C. isobeon and about 3.4% of each C. isobeon genome may have come from C. cecrops. The introgressed regions are enriched in genes encoding transmembrane proteins, mitochondria-targeting proteins and components of the larval cuticle. This study provides the first example of mitochondrial introgression in Lepidoptera supported by complete genome sequencing. Our results caution about relying solely on COI barcodes and mitochondrial DNA for species identification or discovery.

  11. TSLP Signaling Network Revealed by SILAC-Based Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Wu, Xinyan; Huang, Tai-Chung; Getnet, Derese; Mitchell, Christopher J.; Palapetta, Shyam M.; Sharma, Jyoti; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Yoda, Akinori; Moritz, Albrecht; Loriaux, Marc M.; Rush, John; Weinstock, David M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. TSLP requires a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-7 receptor α subunit and its unique TSLP receptor (gene symbol CRLF2) to transmit signals in cells. Abnormal TSLP signaling (e.g. overexpression of TSLP or its unique receptor TSLPR) contributes to the development of a number of diseases including asthma and leukemia. However, a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by TSLP remains elusive. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling network using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. By employing titanium dioxide in addition to antiphosphotyrosine antibodies as enrichment methods, we identified 4164 phosphopeptides on 1670 phosphoproteins. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation, we determined that the phosphorylation status of 226 proteins was modulated by TSLP stimulation. Our analysis identified activation of several members of the Src and Tec families of kinases including Btk, Lyn, and Tec by TSLP for the first time. In addition, we report TSLP-induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatases such as Ptpn6 (SHP-1) and Ptpn11 (Shp2), which has also not been reported previously. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Shp2 binds to the adapter protein Gab2 in a TSLP-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of an inducible protein complex in TSLP signaling. A kinase inhibitor screen revealed that pharmacological inhibition of PI-3 kinase, Jak family kinases, Src family kinases or Btk suppressed TSLP-dependent cellular proliferation making them candidate therapeutic targets in diseases resulting from aberrant TSLP signaling. Our study is the first phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling pathway that greatly expands our understanding of TSLP signaling and provides novel therapeutic targets

  12. Molecular and morphologic data reveal multiple species in Peromyscus pectoralis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert D.; Schmidly, David J.; Amman, Brian R.; Platt, Roy N.; Neumann, Kathy M.; Huynh, Howard M.; Muñiz-Martínez, Raúl; López-González, Celia; Ordóñez-Garza, Nicté

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequence and morphometric data were used to re-evaluate the taxonomy and systematics of Peromyscus pectoralis. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference) of DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene in 44 samples of P. pectoralis indicated 2 well-supported monophyletic clades. The 1st clade contained specimens from Texas historically assigned to P. p. laceianus; the 2nd was comprised of specimens previously referable to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis obtained from northern and eastern Mexico. Levels of genetic variation (~7%) between these 2 clades indicated that the genetic divergence typically exceeded that reported for other species of Peromyscus. Samples of P. p. laceianus north and south of the Río Grande were not monophyletic. In addition, samples representing P. p. collinus and P. p. pectoralis formed 2 clades that differed genetically by 7.14%. Multivariate analyses of external and cranial measurements from 63 populations of P. pectoralis revealed 4 morpho-groups consistent with clades in the DNA sequence analysis: 1 from Texas and New Mexico assignable to P. p. laceianus; a 2nd from western and southern Mexico assignable to P. p. pectoralis; a 3rd from northern and central Mexico previously assigned to P. p. pectoralis but herein shown to represent an undescribed taxon; and a 4th from southeastern Mexico assignable to P. p. collinus. Based on the concordance of these results, populations from the United States are referred to as P. laceianus, whereas populations from Mexico are referred to as P. pectoralis (including some samples historically assigned to P. p. collinus, P. p. laceianus, and P. p. pectoralis). A new subspecies is described to represent populations south of the Río Grande in northern and central Mexico. Additional research is needed to discern if P. p. collinus warrants species recognition. PMID:26937045

  13. Phylogeny of African cichlid fishes as revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Mayer, W E; Tichy, H; Klein, J

    1998-06-01

    The species flocks of cichlid fish in the three great East African Lakes, Victoria, Malawi, and Tanganyika, have arisen in each lake by explosive adaptive radiation. Various questions concerning their phylogeny have not yet been answered. In particular, the identity of the ancestral founder species and the monophyletic origin of the haplochromine cichlids from the East African lakes have not been established conclusively. In the present study, we used the anonymous nuclear DNA marker DXTU1 as a step towards answering these questions. A 280 bp-fragment of the DXTU1 locus was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction from East African lacustrine species, the East African riverine cichlid species Haplochromis bloyeti, H. burtoni and H. sparsidens, and other African cichlids. Sequencing revealed several indels and substitutions that were used as cladistically informative markers to support a phylogenetic tree constructed by the neighbor-joining method. The topology, although not supported by high bootstrap values, corresponds well to the geographical distribution and previous classification of the cichlids. Markers could be defined that: (i) differentiate East African from West African cichlids; (ii) distinguish the riverine and Lake Victoria/Malawi haplochromines from Lake Tanganyika cichlids; and (iii) indicate the existence of a monophyletic Lake Victoria cichlid superflock which includes haplochromines from satellite lakes and East African rivers. In order to resolve further the relationship of East African riverine and lacustrine species, mtDNA cytochrome b and control region segments were sequenced. The mtDNA-based trees support the notion of the monophyly of the Lake Victoria superflock but are ambiguous with respect to the phylogenetic position of the Lake Malawi flock.

  14. Evolutionary Pets: Offspring Numbers Reveal Speciation Process in Domesticated Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tiemann, Inga; Rehkämper, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Since Darwin, the nature of the relationship between evolution and domestication has been debated. Evolution offers different mechanisms of selection that lead to adaptation and may end in the origin of new species as defined by the biological species concept. Domestication has given rise to numerous breeds in almost every domesticated species, including chickens. At the same time, so-called artificial selection seems to exclude mechanisms of sexual selection by the animals themselves. We want to forward the question to the animal itself: With whom do you reproduce successfully? This study focused on the sexual behavior of the domestic chicken Gallus gallus f.dom., particularly the White Crested Polish breed. Experiments on mate choice and the observation of fertilization and hatching rates of mixed-breeding groups revealed breed-specific preferences. In breeding groups containing White Crested Polish and a comparative breed, more purebred chicks hatched than hybrids (number of eggs collected: 1059). Mating was possible in equal shares, but in relation to the number of eggs collected, purebred offspring (62.75%±7.10%, M±SE) hatched to a greater extend compared to hybrid offspring (28.75%±15.32%, M±SE). These data demonstrate that the mechanism of sexual selection is still present in domestic chicken breeds, which includes the alteration of gene frequencies typical for domestication and evolutionary speciation. Due to selection and mate choice we state that breeding in principle can generate new species. Therefore, we see domestication as an evolutionary process that integrates human interests of animal breeding with innate mate choice by the animal. PMID:22879889

  15. Active Mars Revealed through HiRISE DTMs and Orthoimages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Sarah; McEwen, Alfred S.; Bridges, Nathan; Byrne, Shane; Chojnacki, Matthew; Daubar, Ingrid; Dundas, Colin; Russell, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Before the arrival of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) with the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), the amount of surface activity on Mars was not well known. HiRISE repeat imaging (often at ~30 cm/pixel), combined with the ability to take stereo images and generate high resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) reveals the many types of surface processes that are currently active on Mars. Examples of active processes on Mars studied with HiRISE data include aeolian activity [Bridges et al., 2012, Nature 485; Chojnacki et al., 2014, Icarus 232], Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL) [McEwen et al., 2011, Science 333; 2014, Nature Geoscience 7], active gullies [Dundas et al., 2012, Icarus 220], polar processes [Hansen et al., 2011, Science 331; Portyankina et al. 2013, AGU], new impacts [Byrne et al., 2009, Science 325; Daubar et al., 2013, Icarus 225; Dundas et al., 2014, JGR 119], and north polar scarp avalanches [Russell et al., 2008, GRL 35, 2014, LPSC]. These studies utilize images from multiple Mars years and seasons. We generate animated gifs with sequences of orthorectified images to analyze temporal changes (see http://www.uahirise.org/sim/). HiRISE DTMs and orthoimages can be used to quantitatively map and record changes in geospatial software. More than 200 DTMs and 400 orthoimages are available through the Planetary Data System (see http://uahirise.org/dtm). Three-band color (blue-green, red, and near infrared) orthoimages are also available in many cases. The ability to monitor the surface of Mars at high spatial and temporal resolution provides insight into seasonal and annual changes, further increasing our understanding of Mars as an active planet.

  16. Signs of Early-stage Disk Growth Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aso, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    We present ALMA 1.3 mm continuum, 12CO, C18O, and SO data for the Class 0 protostars Lupus 3 MMS, IRAS 15398‑3559, and IRAS 16253‑2429 at resolutions of ∼100 au. By measuring a rotational profile in C18O, a 100 au Keplerian disk around a 0.3 M⊙ protostar is observed in Lupus 3 MMS. No 100 au Keplerian disks are observed in IRAS 15398‑3559 and IRAS 16253‑2429. Nevertheless, embedded compact (<30 au) continuum components are detected. The C18O emission in IRAS 15398‑3559 shows signatures of infall with a constant angular momentum. IRAS 16253‑2429 exhibits signatures of infall and rotation, but its rotational profile is unresolved. By fitting the C18O data with our kinematic models, the protostellar masses and the disk radii are inferred to be 0.01 M⊙ and 20 au in IRAS 15398‑3559, and 0.03 M⊙ and 6 au in IRAS 16253‑2429. By comparing the specific angular momentum profiles from 10,000 au to 100 au in eight Class 0 and I protostars, we find that the evolution of envelope rotation can be described with conventional inside-out collapse models. In comparison with a sample of 18 protostars with known disk radii, our results reveal signs of disk growth, with the disk radius increasing as {{M}* }0.8+/- 0.14 or {t}1.09+/- 0.37 in the Class 0 stage, where M* is the protostellar mass and t is the age. The disk growth rate slows down in the Class I stage. In addition, we find a hint that the mass accretion rate declines as {t}-0.26+/- 0.04 from the Class 0 to the Class I stages.

  17. Acoustic terahertz graphene plasmons revealed by photocurrent nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-González, Pablo; Nikitin, Alexey Y.; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Lundeberg, Mark B.; Principi, Alessandro; Forcellini, Nicolò; Yan, Wenjing; Vélez, Saül; Huber, Andreas. J.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Casanova, Félix; Hueso, Luis E.; Polini, Marco; Hone, James; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) fields are widely used for sensing, communication and quality control. In future applications, they could be efficiently confined, enhanced and manipulated well below the classical diffraction limit through the excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs). These possibilities emerge from the strongly reduced GP wavelength, λp, compared with the photon wavelength, λ0, which can be controlled by modulating the carrier density of graphene via electrical gating. Recently, GPs in a graphene/insulator/metal configuration have been predicted to exhibit a linear dispersion (thus called acoustic plasmons) and a further reduced wavelength, implying an improved field confinement, analogous to plasmons in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) near conductive substrates. Although infrared GPs have been visualized by scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), the real-space imaging of strongly confined THz plasmons in graphene and 2DEGs has been elusive so far—only GPs with nearly free-space wavelengths have been observed. Here we demonstrate real-space imaging of acoustic THz plasmons in a graphene photodetector with split-gate architecture. To that end, we introduce nanoscale-resolved THz photocurrent near-field microscopy, where near-field excited GPs are detected thermoelectrically rather than optically. This on-chip detection simplifies GP imaging as sophisticated s-SNOM detection schemes can be avoided. The photocurrent images reveal strongly reduced GP wavelengths (λp ≈ λ0/66), a linear dispersion resulting from the coupling of GPs with the metal gate below the graphene, and that plasmon damping at positive carrier densities is dominated by Coulomb impurity scattering.

  18. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Origin of the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Polina Yu; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Simon, Samson; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Voronin, Viktor; Burns, Robin; Fedorenko, Olga M; Holm, Svante; Säll, Torbjörn; Prat, Elisa; Marande, William; Castric, Vincent; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Polyploidy is an example of instantaneous speciation when it involves the formation of a new cytotype that is incompatible with the parental species. Because new polyploid individuals are likely to be rare, establishment of a new species is unlikely unless polyploids are able to reproduce through self-fertilization (selfing), or asexually. Conversely, selfing (or asexuality) makes it possible for polyploid species to originate from a single individual-a bona fide speciation event. The extent to which this happens is not known. Here, we consider the origin of Arabidopsis suecica, a selfing allopolyploid between Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa, which has hitherto been considered to be an example of a unique origin. Based on whole-genome re-sequencing of 15 natural A. suecica accessions, we identify ubiquitous shared polymorphism with the parental species, and hence conclusively reject a unique origin in favor of multiple founding individuals. We further estimate that the species originated after the last glacial maximum in Eastern Europe or central Eurasia (rather than Sweden, as the name might suggest). Finally, annotation of the self-incompatibility loci in A. suecica revealed that both loci carry non-functional alleles. The locus inherited from the selfing A. thaliana is fixed for an ancestral non-functional allele, whereas the locus inherited from the outcrossing A. arenosa is fixed for a novel loss-of-function allele. Furthermore, the allele inherited from A. thaliana is predicted to transcriptionally silence the allele inherited from A. arenosa, suggesting that loss of self-incompatibility may have been instantaneous.

  19. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, David; Wallen, Rick L; Dobson, Lauren K; Derr, James N

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  20. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    PubMed Central

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  1. Marine bacterial, archaeal and protistan association networks reveal ecological linkages.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joshua A; Countway, Peter D; Xia, Li; Vigil, Patrick D; Beman, J Michael; Kim, Diane Y; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Sachdeva, Rohan; Jones, Adriane C; Schwalbach, Michael S; Rose, Julie M; Hewson, Ian; Patel, Anand; Sun, Fengzhu; Caron, David A; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2011-09-01

    Microbes have central roles in ocean food webs and global biogeochemical processes, yet specific ecological relationships among these taxa are largely unknown. This is in part due to the dilute, microscopic nature of the planktonic microbial community, which prevents direct observation of their interactions. Here, we use a holistic (that is, microbial system-wide) approach to investigate time-dependent variations among taxa from all three domains of life in a marine microbial community. We investigated the community composition of bacteria, archaea and protists through cultivation-independent methods, along with total bacterial and viral abundance, and physico-chemical observations. Samples and observations were collected monthly over 3 years at a well-described ocean time-series site of southern California. To find associations among these organisms, we calculated time-dependent rank correlations (that is, local similarity correlations) among relative abundances of bacteria, archaea, protists, total abundance of bacteria and viruses and physico-chemical parameters. We used a network generated from these statistical correlations to visualize and identify time-dependent associations among ecologically important taxa, for example, the SAR11 cluster, stramenopiles, alveolates, cyanobacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea. Negative correlations, perhaps suggesting competition or predation, were also common. The analysis revealed a progression of microbial communities through time, and also a group of unknown eukaryotes that were highly correlated with dinoflagellates, indicating possible symbioses or parasitism. Possible 'keystone' species were evident. The network has statistical features similar to previously described ecological networks, and in network parlance has non-random, small world properties (that is, highly interconnected nodes). This approach provides new insights into the natural history of microbes.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genomes reveal neolithic expansion into Europe.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiaomei; Rudan, Pavao; Pääbo, Svante; Krause, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The Neolithic transition from hunting and gathering to farming and cattle breeding marks one of the most drastic cultural changes in European prehistory. Short stretches of ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from skeletons of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers as well as early Neolithic farmers support the demic diffusion model where a migration of early farmers from the Near East and a replacement of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers are largely responsible for cultural innovation and changes in subsistence strategies during the Neolithic revolution in Europe. In order to test if a signal of population expansion is still present in modern European mitochondrial DNA, we analyzed a comprehensive dataset of 1,151 complete mtDNAs from present-day Europeans. Relying upon ancient DNA data from previous investigations, we identified mtDNA haplogroups that are typical for early farmers and hunter-gatherers, namely H and U respectively. Bayesian skyline coalescence estimates were then used on subsets of complete mtDNAs from modern populations to look for signals of past population expansions. Our analyses revealed a population expansion between 15,000 and 10,000 years before present (YBP) in mtDNAs typical for hunters and gatherers, with a decline between 10,000 and 5,000 YBP. These corresponded to an analogous population increase approximately 9,000 YBP for mtDNAs typical of early farmers. The observed changes over time suggest that the spread of agriculture in Europe involved the expansion of farming populations into Europe followed by the eventual assimilation of resident hunter-gatherers. Our data show that contemporary mtDNA datasets can be used to study ancient population history if only limited ancient genetic data is available.

  3. Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Taneri, Bahar; Asilmaz, Esra; Gaasterland, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Splicing is a cellular mechanism, which dictates eukaryotic gene expression by removing the noncoding introns and ligating the coding exons in the form of a messenger RNA molecule. Alternative splicing (AS) adds a major level of complexity to this mechanism and thus to the regulation of gene expression. This widespread cellular phenomenon generates multiple messenger RNA isoforms from a single gene, by utilizing alternative splice sites and promoting different exon–intron inclusions and exclusions. AS greatly increases the coding potential of eukaryotic genomes and hence contributes to the diversity of eukaryotic proteomes. Mutations that lead to disruptions of either constitutive splicing or AS cause several diseases, among which are myotonic dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Aberrant splicing is also well established in cancer states. Identification of rare novel mutations associated with splice-site recognition, and splicing regulation in general, could provide further insight into genetic mechanisms of rare diseases. Here, disease relevance of aberrant splicing is reviewed, and the new methodological approach of starting from disease phenotype, employing exome sequencing and identifying rare mutations affecting splicing regulation is described. Exome sequencing has emerged as a reliable method for finding sequence variations associated with various disease states. To date, genetic studies using exome sequencing to find disease-causing mutations have focused on the discovery of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms that alter amino acids or introduce early stop codons, or on the use of exome sequencing as a means to genotype known single nucleotide polymorphisms. The involvement of splicing mutations in inherited diseases has received little attention and thus likely occurs more frequently than currently estimated. Studies of exome sequencing followed by molecular and bioinformatic analyses have great potential to reveal the high impact of splicing

  4. Snow metamorphism as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Lauzier, Thomas; Cabanes, Axel; Legagneux, Loïc; Kuhs, Werner F; Techmer, Kirsten; Heinrichs, Till

    2003-09-01

    Current theories of snow metamorphism indicate that sublimating snow crystals have rounded shapes, while growing crystals have shapes that depend on growth rates. At slow growth rates, crystals are rounded. At moderate rates, they have flat faces with rounded edges. At fast growth rates, crystals have flat faces with sharp edges, and they have hollow faces at very fast growth rates. The main growth/sublimation mechanism is thought to be by the homogeneous nucleation of new layers at or near crystal edges. It was also suggested that the equilibrium shape of snow crystals would be temperature dependent: rounded above -10.5 degrees C, and faceted below. To test these paradigms, we have performed SEM investigations of snow samples having undergone metamorphism under natural conditions, and of snow samples subjected to isothermal metamorphism at -4 degrees and -15 degrees C in the laboratory. In general, current theories predicting crystal shapes as a function of growth rates, and of whether crystals are growing or sublimating, are verified. However, the transition in equilibrium shapes from rounded to faceted at -10.5 degrees C is not observed in our isothermal experiments that reveal a predominance of rounded shapes after more than a month of metamorphism at -4 and -15 degrees C. Some small crystals with flat faces that also have sharp angles at -15 degrees C, are observed in our isothermal experiments. These faces are newly formed, and contradict current theory. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain their occurrence. One is that they are due to sublimation at emerging dislocations.

  5. Neural correlates of the LSD experience revealed by multimodal neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh; Roseman, Leor; Kaelen, Mendel; Droog, Wouter; Murphy, Kevin; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Schenberg, Eduardo E; Nest, Timothy; Orban, Csaba; Leech, Robert; Williams, Luke T; Williams, Tim M; Bolstridge, Mark; Sessa, Ben; McGonigle, John; Sereno, Martin I; Nichols, David; Hellyer, Peter J; Hobden, Peter; Evans, John; Singh, Krish D; Wise, Richard G; Curran, H Valerie; Feilding, Amanda; Nutt, David J

    2016-04-26

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state conditions, revealed marked changes in brain activity after LSD that correlated strongly with its characteristic psychological effects. Increased visual cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF), decreased visual cortex alpha power, and a greatly expanded primary visual cortex (V1) functional connectivity profile correlated strongly with ratings of visual hallucinations, implying that intrinsic brain activity exerts greater influence on visual processing in the psychedelic state, thereby defining its hallucinatory quality. LSD's marked effects on the visual cortex did not significantly correlate with the drug's other characteristic effects on consciousness, however. Rather, decreased connectivity between the parahippocampus and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) correlated strongly with ratings of "ego-dissolution" and "altered meaning," implying the importance of this particular circuit for the maintenance of "self" or "ego" and its processing of "meaning." Strong relationships were also found between the different imaging metrics, enabling firmer inferences to be made about their functional significance. This uniquely comprehensive examination of the LSD state represents an important advance in scientific research with psychedelic drugs at a time of growing interest in their scientific and therapeutic value. The present results contribute important new insights into the characteristic hallucinatory and consciousness-altering properties of psychedelics that inform on how they can model certain pathological states and potentially treat others.

  6. Pyrosequencing reveals bacteria carried in different wind-eroded sediments.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Terrence; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; Calderón, Francisco J; Zobeck, Ted M; Baddock, Matthew; Van Pelt, R Scott; Senwo, Zachary; Dowd, Scot; Cox, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the microbial communities carried in wind-eroded sediments from various soil types and land management systems. The novel technique of pyrosequencing promises to expand our understanding of the microbial diversity of soils and eroded sediments because it can sequence 10 to 100 times more DNA fragments than previous techniques, providing enhanced exploration into what microbes are being lost from soil due to wind erosion. Our study evaluated the bacterial diversity of two types of wind-eroded sediments collected from three different organic-rich soils in Michigan using a portable field wind tunnel. The wind-eroded sediments evaluated were a coarse sized fraction with 66% of particles >106 μm (coarse eroded sediment) and a finer eroded sediment with 72% of particles <106 μm. Our findings suggested that (i) bacteria carried in the coarser sediment and fine dust were effective fingerprints of the source soil, although their distribution may vary depending on the soil characteristics because certain bacteria may be more protected in soil surfaces than others; (ii) coarser wind-eroded sediment showed higher bacterial diversity than fine dust in two of the three soils evaluated; and (iii) certain bacteria were more predominant in fine dust (, , and ) than coarse sediment ( and ), revealing different locations and niches of bacteria in soil, which, depending on wind erosion processes, can have important implications on the soil sustainability and functioning. Infrared spectroscopy showed that wind erosion preferentially removes particular kinds of C from the soil that are lost via fine dust. Our study shows that eroded sediments remove the active labile organic soil particulates containing key microorganisms involved in soil biogeochemical processes, which can have a negative impact on the quality and functioning of the source soil.

  7. Drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance revealed by atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Gatti, L V; Gloor, M; Miller, J B; Doughty, C E; Malhi, Y; Domingues, L G; Basso, L S; Martinewski, A; Correia, C S C; Borges, V F; Freitas, S; Braz, R; Anderson, L O; Rocha, H; Grace, J; Phillips, O L; Lloyd, J

    2014-02-06

    Feedbacks between land carbon pools and climate provide one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our predictions of global climate. Estimates of the sensitivity of the terrestrial carbon budget to climate anomalies in the tropics and the identification of the mechanisms responsible for feedback effects remain uncertain. The Amazon basin stores a vast amount of carbon, and has experienced increasingly higher temperatures and more frequent floods and droughts over the past two decades. Here we report seasonal and annual carbon balances across the Amazon basin, based on carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide measurements for the anomalously dry and wet years 2010 and 2011, respectively. We find that the Amazon basin lost 0.48 ± 0.18 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C yr(-1)) during the dry year but was carbon neutral (0.06 ± 0.1 Pg C yr(-1)) during the wet year. Taking into account carbon losses from fire by using carbon monoxide measurements, we derived the basin net biome exchange (that is, the carbon flux between the non-burned forest and the atmosphere) revealing that during the dry year, vegetation was carbon neutral. During the wet year, vegetation was a net carbon sink of 0.25 ± 0.14 Pg C yr(-1), which is roughly consistent with the mean long-term intact-forest biomass sink of 0.39 ± 0.10 Pg C yr(-1) previously estimated from forest censuses. Observations from Amazonian forest plots suggest the suppression of photosynthesis during drought as the primary cause for the 2010 sink neutralization. Overall, our results suggest that moisture has an important role in determining the Amazonian carbon balance. If the recent trend of increasing precipitation extremes persists, the Amazon may become an increasing carbon source as a result of both emissions from fires and the suppression of net biome exchange by drought.

  8. Fatty acids profiling reveals potential candidate markers of semen quality.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, C; Caponecchia, L; Rago, R; Leoncini, E; Bottaccioli, A G; Ciacciarelli, M; Pacelli, A; Salacone, P; Sebastianelli, A; Pastore, A; Palleschi, G; Boccia, S; Carbone, A; Iuliano, L

    2016-11-01

    Previous reports showed altered fatty acid content in subjects with altered sperm parameters compared to normozoospermic individuals. However, these studies focused on a limited number of fatty acids, included a short number of subjects and results varied widely. We conducted a case-control study involving 155 patients allocated into four groups, including normozoospermia (n = 33), oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (n = 32), asthenozoospermia (n = 25), and varicocoele (n = 44). Fatty acid profiling, including 30 species, was analyzed by a validated gas chromatography (GC) method on the whole seminal fluid sample. Multinomial logistic regression modeling was used to identify the associations between fatty acids and the four groups. Specimens from 15 normozoospermic subjects were also analyzed for fatty acids content in the seminal plasma and spermatozoa to study the distribution in the two compartments. Fatty acids lipidome varied markedly between the four groups. Multinomial logistic regression modeling revealed that high levels of palmitic acid, behenic acid, oleic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) confer a low risk to stay out of the normozoospermic group. In the whole population, seminal fluid stearic acid was negatively correlated (r = -0.53), and DHA was positively correlated (r = 0.65) with sperm motility. Some fatty acids were preferentially accumulated in spermatozoa and the highest difference was observed for DHA, which was 6.2 times higher in spermatozoa than in seminal plasma. The results of this study highlight complete fatty acids profile in patients with different semen parameters. Given the easy-to-follow and rapid method of analysis, fatty acid profiling by GC method can be used for therapeutic purposes and to measure compliance in infertility trials using fatty acids supplements.

  9. Acoustic terahertz graphene plasmons revealed by photocurrent nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Pablo; Nikitin, Alexey Y; Gao, Yuanda; Woessner, Achim; Lundeberg, Mark B; Principi, Alessandro; Forcellini, Nicolò; Yan, Wenjing; Vélez, Saül; Huber, Andreas J; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Casanova, Félix; Hueso, Luis E; Polini, Marco; Hone, James; Koppens, Frank H L; Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) fields are widely used for sensing, communication and quality control. In future applications, they could be efficiently confined, enhanced and manipulated well below the classical diffraction limit through the excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs). These possibilities emerge from the strongly reduced GP wavelength, λp, compared with the photon wavelength, λ0, which can be controlled by modulating the carrier density of graphene via electrical gating. Recently, GPs in a graphene/insulator/metal configuration have been predicted to exhibit a linear dispersion (thus called acoustic plasmons) and a further reduced wavelength, implying an improved field confinement, analogous to plasmons in two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) near conductive substrates. Although infrared GPs have been visualized by scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), the real-space imaging of strongly confined THz plasmons in graphene and 2DEGs has been elusive so far-only GPs with nearly free-space wavelengths have been observed. Here we demonstrate real-space imaging of acoustic THz plasmons in a graphene photodetector with split-gate architecture. To that end, we introduce nanoscale-resolved THz photocurrent near-field microscopy, where near-field excited GPs are detected thermoelectrically rather than optically. This on-chip detection simplifies GP imaging as sophisticated s-SNOM detection schemes can be avoided. The photocurrent images reveal strongly reduced GP wavelengths (λp ≈ λ0/66), a linear dispersion resulting from the coupling of GPs with the metal gate below the graphene, and that plasmon damping at positive carrier densities is dominated by Coulomb impurity scattering.

  10. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains. PMID:27035434

  11. Time-resolved metabolomics reveals metabolic modulation in rice foliage

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shigeru; Arita, Masanori; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nishioka, Takaaki; Tomita, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    Background To elucidate the interaction of dynamics among modules that constitute biological systems, comprehensive datasets obtained from "omics" technologies have been used. In recent plant metabolomics approaches, the reconstruction of metabolic correlation networks has been attempted using statistical techniques. However, the results were unsatisfactory and effective data-mining techniques that apply appropriate comprehensive datasets are needed. Results Using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and capillary electrophoresis diode-array detection (CE-DAD), we analyzed the dynamic changes in the level of 56 basic metabolites in plant foliage (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) at hourly intervals over a 24-hr period. Unsupervised clustering of comprehensive metabolic profiles using Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) allowed classification of the biochemical pathways activated by the light and dark cycle. The carbon and nitrogen (C/N) metabolism in both periods was also visualized as a phenotypic linkage map that connects network modules on the basis of traditional metabolic pathways rather than pairwise correlations among metabolites. The regulatory networks of C/N assimilation/dissimilation at each time point were consistent with previous works on plant metabolism. In response to environmental stress, glutathione and spermidine fluctuated synchronously with their regulatory targets. Adenine nucleosides and nicotinamide coenzymes were regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We also demonstrated that SOM analysis was applicable to the estimation of unidentifiable metabolites in metabolome analysis. Hierarchical clustering of a correlation coefficient matrix could help identify the bottleneck enzymes that regulate metabolic networks. Conclusion Our results showed that our SOM analysis with appropriate metabolic time-courses effectively revealed the synchronous dynamics among metabolic modules and elucidated the underlying biochemical

  12. Proximity Labeling Reveals Molecular Determinants of FGFR4 Endosomal Transport.

    PubMed

    Haugsten, Ellen Margrethe; Sørensen, Vigdis; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; de Souza, Gustavo Antonio; Krejci, Pavel; Wiedlocha, Antoni; Wesche, Jørgen

    2016-10-07

    The fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are important oncogenes promoting tumor progression in many types of cancer, such as breast, bladder, and lung cancer as well as multiple myeloma and rhabdomyosarcoma. However, little is known about how these receptors are internalized and down-regulated in cells. We have here applied proximity biotin labeling to identify proteins involved in FGFR4 signaling and trafficking. For this purpose we fused a mutated biotin ligase, BirA*, to the C-terminal tail of FGFR4 (FGFR4-BirA*) and the fusion protein was stably expressed in U2OS cells. Upon addition of biotin to these cells, proteins in proximity to the FGFR4-BirA* fusion protein became biotinylated and could be isolated and identified by quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified in total 291 proteins, including 80 proteins that were enriched in samples where the receptor was activated by the ligand (FGF1), among them several proteins previously found to be involved in FGFR signaling (e.g., FRS2, PLCγ, RSK2 and NCK2). Interestingly, many of the identified proteins were implicated in endosomal transport, and by precise annotation we were able to trace the intracellular pathways of activated FGFR4. Validating the data by confocal and three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy analysis, we concluded that FGFR4 uses clathrin-mediated endocytosis for internalization and is further sorted from early endosomes to the recycling compartment and the trans-Golgi network. Depletion of cells for clathrin heavy chain led to accumulation of FGFR4 at the cell surface and increased levels of active FGFR4 and PLCγ, while AKT and ERK signaling was diminished, demonstrating that functional clathrin-mediated endocytosis is required for proper FGFR4 signaling. Thus, this study reveals proteins and pathways involved in FGFR4 transport and signaling that provide possible targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention in FGFR4 aberrant cancer.

  13. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  14. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  15. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  16. Genome-wide SNP typing reveals signatures of population history.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Welch, Robert; Puri, Vinita; Matthews, Casey; Haque, Kashif; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith

    2008-07-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have become a popular technology for disease-association studies, but they also have potential for studying the genetic differentiation of human populations. Application of the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set to a population of 102 individuals representing the major ethnic groups in the United States (African, Asian, European, and Hispanic) revealed patterns of gene diversity and genetic distance that reflected population history. We analyzed allelic frequencies at 388,654 autosomal SNP sites that showed some variation in our study population and 10% or fewer missing values. Despite the small size (23-31 individuals) of each subpopulation, there were no fixed differences at any site between any two subpopulations. As expected from the African origin of modern humans, greater gene diversity was seen in Africans than in either Asians or Europeans, and the genetic distance between the Asian and the European populations was significantly lower than that between either of these two populations and Africans. Principal components analysis applied to a correlation matrix among individuals was able to separate completely the major continental groups of humans (Africans, Asians, and Europeans), while Hispanics overlapped all three of these groups. Genes containing two or more markers with extraordinarily high genetic distance between subpopulations were identified as candidate genes for health differences between subpopulations. The results show that, even with modest sample sizes, genome-wide SNP genotyping technologies have great promise for capturing signatures of gene frequency difference between human subpopulations, with applications in areas as diverse as forensics and the study of ethnic health disparities.

  17. Most small bowel cancers are revealed by a complication

    PubMed Central

    Negoi, Ionut; Paun, Sorin; Hostiuc, Sorin; Stoica, Bodgan; Tanase, Ioan; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To characterize the pattern of primary small bowel cancers in a tertiary East-European hospital. Methods A retrospective study of patients with small bowel cancers admitted to a tertiary emergency center, over the past 15 years. Results There were 57 patients with small bowel cancer, representing 0.039% of admissions and 0.059% of laparotomies. There were 37 (64.9%) men, mean age of 58 years; and 72 years for females. Out of 57 patients, 48 (84.2%) were admitted due to an emergency situation: obstruction in 21 (38.9%), perforation in 17 (31.5%), upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 8 (14.8%), and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (3.7%). There were 10 (17.5%) duodenal tumors, 21 (36.8%) jejunal tumors and 26 (45.6%) ileal tumors. The most frequent neoplasms were gastrointestinal stromal tumor in 24 patients (42.1%), adenocarcinoma in 19 (33.3%), lymphoma in 8 (14%), and carcinoids in 2 (3.5%). The prevalence of duodenal adenocarcinoma was 14.55 times greater than that of the small bowel, and the prevalence of duodenal stromal tumors was 1.818 time greater than that of the small bowel. Obstruction was the complication in adenocarcinoma in 57.9% of cases, and perforation was the major local complication (47.8%) in stromal tumors. Conclusion Primary small bowel cancers are usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and revealed by a local complication of the tumor. Their surgical management in emergency setting is associated to significant morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:26676271

  18. Shaping Outflows from Evolved Stars: Secrets Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel H.

    2011-05-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe), the near-endpoints of stellar evolution for intermediate-mass stars, exhibit a dizzying variety of optical/near-infrared morphologies: round; elliptical; bipolar; highly point-symmetric; chaotic and clumpy. The physical mechanisms responsible for this morphological menagerie are hotly debated. It is thought that the shape of a PN results from the sculpting of previously ejected, slow-moving (red giant) stellar envelope material by a fast wind from a (newly unveiled) white dwarf at the PN's core. But to explain the large fraction of nonspherical PNe -- which are presumably shaped by aspherical fast winds -- some models now further propose that many (perhaps most) PNe are the products of interacting binary systems. Chandra is yielding valuable insight into these stellar outflow shaping processes. Chandra imaging spectroscopy of PNe provides a unique means to determine the X-ray surface brightness distributions, temperatures, emission measures, and elemental abundances within the "hot bubbles" generated by fast wind shocks. Chandra observations of PNe have also revealed intriguing examples of unresolved X-ray sources that are too hard to be modeled as photospheric emission from hot white dwarfs. Such hard X-ray point sources are likely indicative of the presence of binary companions and/or accretion processes at PN central stars. I summarize the progress in these areas resulting from Chandra's first dozen years, and present early results from the first systematic Chandra survey of PNe in the solar neighborhood -- a survey designed to understand the formation and evolution of hot bubbles, and to establish the frequency and characteristics of point-like X-ray sources, within PNe with names like the Ring, the Dumbbell, the Owl, and Saturn. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program and Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) grants to RIT. The CXC is operated by SAO for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  19. A fifth major genetic group among honeybees revealed in Syria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Apiculture has been practiced in North Africa and the Middle-East from antiquity. Several thousand years of selective breeding have left a mosaic of Apis mellifera subspecies in the Middle-East, many uniquely adapted and survived to local environmental conditions. In this study we explore the genetic diversity of A. mellifera from Syria (n = 1258), Lebanon (n = 169) and Iraq (n = 35) based on 14 short tandem repeat (STR) loci in the context of reference populations from throughout the Old World (n = 732). Results Our data suggest that the Syrian honeybee Apis mellifera syriaca occurs in both Syrian and Lebanese territories, with no significant genetic variability between respective populations from Syria and Lebanon. All studied populations clustered within a new fifth independent nuclear cluster, congruent with an mtDNA Z haplotype identified in a previous study. Syrian honeybee populations are not associated with Oriental lineage O, except for sporadic introgression into some populations close to the Turkish and Iraqi borders. Southern Syrian and Lebanese populations demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity compared to the northern populations. Conclusion This study revealed the effects of foreign queen importations on Syrian bee populations, especially for the region of Tartus, where extensive introgression of A. m. anatolica and/or A. m. caucasica alleles were identified. The policy of creating genetic conservation centers for the Syrian subspecies should take into consideration the influence of the oriental lineage O from the northern Syrian border and the large population of genetically divergent indigenous honeybees located in southern Syria. PMID:24314104

  20. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.