Science.gov

Sample records for orthopedic fixation devices

  1. Design and Optimization of Resorbable Silk Internal Fixation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Dylan S.

    Limitations of current material options for internal fracture fixation devices have resulted in a large gap between user needs and hardware function. Metal systems offer robust mechanical strength and ease of implantation but require secondary surgery for removal and/or result in long-term complications (infection, palpability, sensitivity, etc.). Current resorbable devices eliminate the need for second surgery and long-term complications but are still associated with negative host response as well as limited functionality and more difficult implantation. There is a definitive need for orthopedic hardware that is mechanically capable of immediate fracture stabilization and fracture fixation during healing, can safely biodegrade while allowing complete bone remodeling, can be resterilized for reuse, and is easily implantable (self-tapping). Previous work investigated the use of silk protein to produce resorbable orthopedic hardware for non- load bearing fracture fixation. In this study, silk orthopedic hardware was further investigated and optimized in order to better understand the ability of silk as a fracture fixation system and more closely meet the unfulfilled market needs. Solvent-based and aqueous-based silk processing formulations were cross-linked with methanol to induce beta sheet structure, dried, autoclaved and then machined to the desired device/geometry. Silk hardware was evaluated for dry, hydrated and fatigued (cyclic) mechanical properties, in vitro degradation, resterilization, functionalization with osteoinductive molecules and implantation technique for fracture fixation. Mechanical strength showed minor improvements from previous results, but remains comparable to current resorbable fixation systems with the advantages of self-tapping ability for ease of implantation, full degradation in 10 months, ability to be resterilized and reused, and ability to release molecules for osteoinudction. In vivo assessment confirmed biocompatibility, showed

  2. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  7. Application of magnetic rods for fixation in orthopedic treatments.

    PubMed

    Shelyakova, Tatiana; Russo, Alessandro; Visani, Andrea; Dediu, Valentin Alek; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-06-01

    Achieving an efficient fixation for complicated fractures and scaffold application treatments is a challenging surgery problem. Although many fixation approaches have been advanced and actively pursued, the optimal solution for long bone defects has not yet been defined. This paper promotes an innovative fixation method based on application of magnetic forces. The efficiency of this approach was investigated on the basis of finite element modeling for scaffold application and analytical calculations for diaphyseal fractures. Three different configurations have been analyzed including combinations of small cylindrical permanent magnets or stainless steel rods, inserted rigidly in the bone intramedullary canals and in the scaffold. It was shown that attractive forces as high as 75 N can be achieved. While these forces do not reach the strength of mechanical forces in traditional fixators, the employment of magnetic rods is expected to be beneficial by reducing considerably the interface micromotions. It can additionally support magneto-mechanical stimulations as well as enabling a magnetically assisted targeted delivery of drugs and other bio-agents.

  8. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  13. High energy devices versus low energy devices in orthopedics treatment modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheiss, Reiner

    2003-10-01

    The orthopedic consensus group defined in 1997 the 42 most likely relevant parameters of orthopedic shock wave devices. The idea of this approach was to correlate the different clinical outcomes with the physical properties of the different devices with respect to their acoustical waves. Several changes in the hypothesis of the dose effect relationship have been noticed since the first orthopedic treatments. The relation started with the maximum pressure p+, followed by the total energy, the energy density; and finally the single treatment approach using high, and then the multiple treatment method using low energy. Motivated by the reimbursement situation in Germany some manufacturers began to redefine high and low energy devices independent of the treatment modality. The OssaTron as a high energy, single treatment electro hydraulic device gained FDA approval as the first orthopedic ESWT device for plantar fasciitis and, more recently, for lateral epicondylitis. Two low energy devices have now also gained FDA approval based upon a single treatment. Comparing the acoustic data, differences between the OssaTron and the other devices are obvious and will be elaborated upon. Cluster analysis of the outcomes and the acoustical data are presented and new concepts will be suggested.

  14. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  15. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such...

  1. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    PubMed

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology.

  2. A Review of the Design Process for Implantable Orthopedic Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, G.A; Hukins, D.W.L; Parry, J.J; Shepherd, D.E.T; Trotman, S.G

    2009-01-01

    The design process for medical devices is highly regulated to ensure the safety of patients. This paper will present a review of the design process for implantable orthopedic medical devices. It will cover the main stages of feasibility, design reviews, design, design verification, manufacture, design validation, design transfer and design changes. PMID:19662153

  3. The role of external fixation and emergency fracture management in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Adams, S B

    1985-03-01

    External fixation is a very useful method of treating selected fractures in cattle. The economics of therapy and the availability of the techniques to all veterinarians will continue to make external fixation the most frequently used method of fracture repair in cattle.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur.

  5. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  6. The use of silk-based devices for fracture fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Gabriel S.; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Moreau, Jodie E.; Haas, Dylan S.; Papenburg, Bernke J.; Golden, Ethan B.; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Fox, Sharon E.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Lin, Samuel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic fixation systems are currently the gold standard for fracture fixation but have problems including stress shielding, palpability and temperature sensitivity. Recently, resorbable systems have gained interest because they avoid removal and may improve bone remodelling due to the lack of stress shielding. However, their use is limited to paediatric craniofacial procedures mainly due to the laborious implantation requirements. Here we prepare and characterize a new family of resorbable screws prepared from silk fibroin for craniofacial fracture repair. In vivo assessment in rat femurs shows the screws to be self-tapping, remain fixed in the bone for 4 and 8 weeks, exhibit biocompatibility and promote bone remodelling. The silk-based devices compare favourably with current poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid fixation systems, however, silk-based devices offer numerous advantages including ease of implantation, conformal fit to the repair site, sterilization by autoclaving and minimal inflammatory response.

  7. Nanomaterials and synergistic low-intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopedic implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Shirwaiker, Rohan A; Samberg, Meghan E; Cohen, Paul H; Wysk, Richard A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications because of their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilized to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopedic residual hardware devices (e.g., hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopedic implants is also discussed, the focus being on a low-intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The article concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these.

  8. The impact of orthopedic device associated with carbonated hydroxyapatite on the oxidative balance: experimental study of bone healing rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Jebahi, Samira; Nsiri, Riadh; Boujbiha, Mohammed; Bouroga, Ezedine; Rebai, Tarek; Keskes, Hassib; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Oudadesse, Hassane; El Feki, Hafed

    2013-10-01

    Orthopedic devices are used in pathologic disorder as an adjunct to bone grafts to provide immediate structural stability. Unfortunately, the use of metallic devices has some complications. This study aimed to characterize the oxidative stress biomarker and the antioxidant enzyme profiles during bone regeneration. New Zealand White rabbits were divided into 4 groups: Group (I) was used as control (T), Groups II, III, and IV were used, respectively, as implanted tissue with carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA), carbonated hydroxyapatite associated with external fixator (CHA + EF), and presenting empty defects (ED). Grafted bone tissues were carefully removed to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase activities (GPx). Our results showed that 4 weeks after operation, treatment of rabbits with CHA + EF showed a significantly higher malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration when compared to that of control group. The SOD, CAT, and GPx in CHA + EF group showed significantly lower activities when compared to those in control group. Eight weeks after surgery, the CHA + EF group presented a lower concentration of MDA as compared to those seen after the first 4 weeks after surgery. On the other hand, the SOD, CAT, and GPx showed a higher activity when compared with the same group. Consequently, MDA concentration and the antioxidant enzyme activities were not significant (p > 0.05) when compared to those in control group rabbits. Histologic sampling has demonstrated successful time-patterned resorption accompanied by bone replacement and remodeling. These results suggest that there was a temporary increase in the oxidative marker level in CHA + EF healing bone and the 8-week period was sufficient to re-establish oxidant-antioxidant balance accompanied by bone repair in the tibia rabbit model.

  9. Doctors and the Etiquette of Mobile Device Use in Trauma and Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Lydia; Bullock, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiquette surrounding the use of mobile devices, so-called "mobiquette," has been previously identified as a barrier to use in an educational context. Objective To investigate the influence of mobile device use on patient and staff opinions in the trauma and orthopedics department at a teaching hospital in Wales. Methods A survey of patients at the bedside and staff in their work environment was undertaken. Data included age, frequency of observed use, suspected main reason for use, and whether doctors’ use of a mobile device positively or negatively influenced participants' opinions of them as a professional and as a person. Results A total of 59 patients and 35 staff responded. The modal age range was 40 to 54 years old. Most patients (78%) never see doctors using mobile devices in the workplace, compared with 3% of staff. The main reason for use was thought to be "communicating with colleagues" (48%) followed by "Internet use/applications for work reasons" (40%). Approximately 40% of patients' opinions of doctors were positively influenced by device use, compared with 82% of staff. This difference between patient and staff opinions was statistically significant for both professional (P<.001) and personal (P=.002) opinions. Conclusions Patients are likely to have a negative opinion of doctors using mobile devices in the workplace. This can be balanced by the more positive opinions of colleagues. We advise doctors to remember "mobiquette" around patients. PMID:26116061

  10. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  11. A novel internal fixator device for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E; Love, James M; Fisher, John P; Shah, Sameer B

    2013-06-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension--traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration.

  12. Orthopedic intrusion of premaxilla with distraction devices before alveolar bone grafting in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Liou, Eric Jein-Wein; Chen, Philip K T; Huang, C Shing; Chen, Y Ray

    2004-03-01

    Surgical repositioning of the downward displaced premaxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients remains a controversial and perplexing issue because of its detrimental effects on the growth of the premaxilla. The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to introduce and evaluate the treatment results of an innovative technique for nonsurgically intruding the downward displaced premaxilla. Eight consecutive cases of bilateral cleft lip and palate at the age of mixed dentition were included for the correction of their premaxillary deformities. A pair of intraoral tooth-borne distraction devices was used for the orthopedic intrusion. Serial lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiographs were taken periodically for evaluating the growth of the premaxilla 1 year before the intrusion, changes during the intrusion, and growth/relapse up to 1 year after the intrusion. There was no overgrowth of the premaxilla or overeruption of the maxillary incisors during the 1-year observing period before the orthopedic intrusion. The treatment results revealed that the downward displaced premaxillae were all corrected within 1 month. Cephalometrically, 46 percent of the correction resulted from a true orthopedic intrusion and another 54 percent from a dentoalveolar effect in which the maxillary incisors were intruded and the premaxillary dentoalveolus was shortened. The cephalometric evaluations also implied that what occurred during the orthopedic intrusion was mostly the sutural contraction osteogenesis/osteolysis in the vomeropremaxillary suture combined with slightly mechanical upward displacement of the vomeronasal septum complex and nasal bones. The orthopedic intrusion of the premaxilla with distraction devices is an effective nonsurgical method for correcting the downward displaced premaxilla before alveolar bone grafting in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and the results remained stable after 1 year.

  13. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  18. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  19. Porous orthopedic steel implant as an antibiotic eluting device: prevention of post-surgical infection on an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Vázquez, Francisco J; Pérez, Marta; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2013-08-16

    Traumatology and orthopedic surgery can benefit from the use of efficient local antibiotic-eluting systems to avoid bacterial contamination of implanted materials. In this work a new percutaneous porous-wall hollow implant was successfully used as a local antibiotic-eluting device both in vitro and in vivo. The implant is a macroporous 316 L stainless steel filter tube with a nominal filtration cut-off size of 200 nm with one open end which was used to load the synthetic antibiotic linezolid and an opposite blind end. The antibiotic release kinetics from the device on a simulated biological fluid under in vitro conditions demonstrated an increased concentration during the first five days that subsequently was sustained for at least seven days, showing a kinetic close to a zero order release. Antibiotic-loaded implants were placed in the tibia of four sheep which were trans-surgically experimentally infected with a biofilm forming strain of Staphylococcus aureus. After 7 and 9 days post infection, sheep did not show any evidence of infection as demonstrated by clinical, pathological and microbiological findings. These results demonstrate the capability of such an antibiotic-loaded implant to prevent infection in orthopedic devices in vivo. Further research is needed to assess its possible use in traumatology and orthopedic surgery.

  20. A device for continuous monitoring of true central fixation based on foveal birefringence.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris; Irsch, Kristina; Müllenbroich, Marie; Frindt, Nicole; Qu, Yinhong; Gutmark, Ron; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2013-09-01

    A device for continuous monitoring of central fixation utilizes birefringence, the property of the Henle fibers surrounding the human fovea, to change the polarization state of light. A circular scan of retinal birefringence, where the scanning circle encompasses the fovea, allows identification of true central fixation-an assessment much needed in various applications in ophthalmology, psychology, and psychiatry. The device allows continuous monitoring for central fixation over an extended period of time in the presence of fixation targets and distracting stimuli, which may be helpful in detecting attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and other disorders characterized by changes in the subject's ability to maintain fixation. A proof-of-concept has been obtained in a small study of ADHD patients and normal control subjects.

  1. Attention attraction in an ophthalmic diagnostic device using sound-modulated fixation targets.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Rangarajan, Shreya; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2016-08-01

    This study relates to eye fixation systems with combined optical and audio systems. Many devices for eye diagnostics and some devices for eye therapeutics require the patient to fixate on a small target for a certain period of time, during which the eyes do not move and data from substructures of one or both eyes are acquired and analyzed. With young pediatric patients, a monotonously blinking target is not sufficient to retain attention steadily. We developed a method for modulating the intensity of a point fixation target using sounds appropriate to the child's age and preference. The method was realized as a subsystem of a Pediatric Vision Screener which employs retinal birefringence scanning for detection of central fixation. Twenty-one children, age 2-18, were studied. Modulation of the fixation target using sounds ensured the eye fixated on the target, and with appropriate choice of sounds, performed significantly better than a monotonously blinking target accompanied by a plain beep. The method was particularly effective with children of ages up to 10, after which its benefit disappeared. Typical applications of target modulation would be as supplemental subsystems in pediatric ophthalmic diagnostic devices, such as scanning laser ophthalmoscopes, optical coherence tomography units, retinal birefringence scanners, fundus cameras, and perimeters.

  2. Clamping stiffness and its influence on load distribution between paired internal spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Rohlmann, A; Calisse, J; Bergmann, G; Radvan, J; Mayer, H M

    1996-06-01

    The load distribution between two internal spinal fixation devices depends, besides other factors, on their stiffness. The stiffness ranges were determined experimentally for the clamps of the AO internal fixator with lateral nut and with posterior nut as well as for the clamps of the SOCON fixator. The stiffness of eight devices each differed by a factor of 3.1 for the clamp with lateral nut, by a factor of 1.5 for the clamp with posterior nut, and by a factor of 1.4 for the clamp of the SOCON fixator. For the AO clamp with lateral nut, the influence of the nut-tightening torque on the stiffness was determined. Using instrumented internal spinal fixation devices mounted to plastic vertebrae and simulating a corpectomy, the load distribution between the implants was measured for different tightening torques. It could be shown that, for the AO internal fixator whose clamps have a lateral nut, a nut-tightening torque > 5 Nm has only a negligible influence on load-sharing between the implants. Tooth damage occurs when the teeth of the clamp body and clamping jaw of the clamp with lateral nut do not gear together exactly, which leads to changes in the clamping stiffness and load-sharing between the two implants.

  3. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  4. NiTiNol Hernia Device Stability in Inguinal Hernioplasty Without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: To determine whether the NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh for inguinal hernioplasty remains stable and intransient without fixation after a minimum of 6 months. Methods: Twenty patients had 27 inguinal hernias repaired using a novel hernia repair device that has a NiTiNol frame without any fixation. Initial single-view, postoperative X-rays were compared with a second X-ray obtained at least 6 months later. The NiTiNol frame, which can be easily visualized on a plain X-ray, was measured in 2 dimensions, as were anatomic landmarks. The measurements obtained and the appearances of the 2 X-rays were compared to determine the percentage of change in device size and device stability with regard to device location and shape. Results: There were minimal changes noted between the 2 sets of measurements obtained with an overall trend towards a slight increase in the size of the hernia repair device. The devices demonstrated intransience of position and stability of shape. Conclusions: The NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh exhibits radiographic evidence of size and shape stability and intransience of position without fixation when used in inguinal hernioplasty after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. PMID:21902967

  5. Are there any complications with bioabsorbable fixation devices? A 10 year review in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Laine, P; Kontio, R; Lindqvist, C; Suuronen, R

    2004-04-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation devices have been used in our departments between November 1991 and November 2001 in orthognathic surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess all complications experienced during this time period, when we have operated 163 patients who have undergone 329 orthognathic osteotomies fixated with bioresorbable devices. No postoperative intermaxillary fixation was used. Light guiding elastics were used for 5 to 7 weeks. Patients' acceptance was generally excellent and very few complications occurred during this follow-up of 10 years. The complications were minor and did not affect the end results of the operations. Minor complications occurred in 14 patients (8.6%). Only one patient (0.6%) had a postoperative infection with elevated infection parameters. The other minor complications consisted mainly of dehiscence of the wound and plate exposure together with granulation tissue in the operation field. The rest of the complications occurred in the beginning of our study, when large screw heads on top of the bone irritated the patient and had to be removed. Insufficient fixation resulted in open bite in three patients (1.8%) in the beginning of the trial use of new devices, which no longer are used. Based on our experience, bioresorbable devices are safe to be used in orthognathic procedures. However, there is a learning curve, as there is with all new methods introduced.

  6. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  7. The effects of laparoscopic mesh fixation device on bone, costo-chondral junction and tendon site.

    PubMed

    Ekçi, Baki; Altinli, Ediz; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Demir, Mustafa; Tasci, Ihsan

    2011-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is one of the important complications of inguinal hernia repair surgery occurring with the placement of sutures through the periosteum. The aim of this study is to evaluate scintigraphic and histopathological alterations associated with the use of mesh fixation device on pelvic bone, cartilage and tendons in an experimental animal model. Twenty New-Zealand young male rabbits were used. A mesh fixation device was inserted at each animal's costa-chondral junction, superior anterior iliac crest, and achiles tendon. One week prior to the surgery and 16 weeks after the operation, scintigraphic evaluation was performed. Histopathological evaluation was performed at the end of study. No nuclear activity or pathological change was found at bone site (p > 0.05). Foreign body reaction was evident at the tendon and costa-chondral site (p = 0.001). In conclusion; the mesh fixation device leads to foreign body reaction in costa-chondral junction and tendon. It does not cause any nuclear activity increase.

  8. IMF Screw: An Ideal Intermaxillary Fixation Device During Open Reduction of Mandibular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, N K; Mohan, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is conventionally used for treatment of fractures involving maxillomandibular complex both for closed reduction and as an adjuvant to open reduction. To overcome the cumbersome procedure of tooth borne appliances cortical bone screws were introduced in the year of 1989 to achieve IMF which is essentially a bone borne appliance. In our institution we treated 45 cases of mandibular fracture both single and multiple fractures by open reduction over a period of 24 months. IMF screws were used to achieve dental occlusion in all the cases. Various advantages, disadvantages and complications are discussed. In our institutional experience we found that the IMF screws are an ideal device for temporary intermaxillary fixation for the cases having only mandibular fracture.

  9. Vacuum sealing drainage therapy in the presence of an external fixation device

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dahui; Ju, Weina; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Tiecheng; Qi, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) is widely utilized for treating traumatic wounds. Patient concerns: It is particularly difficult and time consuming to use in combination with an external fixator. Diagnoses: This is because the hardware or pins used for fixation interfere with maintaining a seal, resulting in poor adhesion and subsequent air leakage. Interventions: To resolve this problem, we have devised a new method for sealing the wound dressing, while maintaining the required vacuum.When using this technique, a rubber strip is wrapped around each pin in 3 circles outside the plastic drape, and then tightly tied. Outcomes: After completing this procedure, a vacuum is obtained, and any air leakage stops. We employed this technique to treat a cohort of patients in our department over a period of two years, and obtained good healing of soft tissue without air leakage, as well as good clinical outcomes. Lessons: We have observed that patients treated with this method experienced good clinical outcomes without air leakage, and we recommend its use in treating cases where an external fixation device is present. PMID:27861393

  10. Implantable Subcutaneous Venous Access Devices: Is Port Fixation Necessary? A Review of 534 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, Nancy J. Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.; Linville, Robert M.; Forauer, Andrew R.

    2010-08-15

    Conventional surgical technique of subcutaneous venous port placement describes dissection of the port pocket to the pectoralis fascia and suture fixation of the port to the fascia to prevent inversion of the device within the pocket. This investigation addresses the necessity of that step. Between October 8, 2004 and October 19, 2007, 558 subcutaneous chest ports were placed at our institution; 24 cases were excluded from this study. We performed a retrospective review of the remaining 534 ports, which were placed using standard surgical technique with the exception that none were sutured into the pocket. Mean duration of port use, total number of port days, indications for removal, and complications were recorded and compared with the literature. Mean duration of port use was 341 days (182,235 total port days, range 1-1279). One port inversion/flip occurred, which resulted in malfunction and necessitated port revision (0.2%). Other complications necessitating port removal included infection 26 (5%), thrombosis n = 2 (<1%), catheter fracture/pinch n = 1 (<1%), pain n = 2 (<1%), and skin erosion n = 3 (1%). There were two arrhythmias at the time of placement; neither required port removal. The overall complication rate was 7%. The 0.2% incidence of port inversion we report is concordant with that previously published, although many previous reports do not specify if suture fixation of the port was performed. Suture fixation of the port, in our experience, is not routinely necessary and may negatively impact port removal.

  11. Orthopedic evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, T.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical performance of the Lixiscope in orthopedics was compared with routine radiography. Portability and size were the major advantages of the Lixiscope. The main disadvantage at this point in time was the Lixiscope's inability to study large areas.

  12. Effect of hydroxyapatite concentration on high-modulus composite for biodegradable bone-fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Bryant; Grassie, Kevin; Shaw, Montgomery T; Olson, James R; Wei, Mei

    2016-06-14

    There are over 3 million bone fractures in the United States annually; over 30% of which require internal mechanical fixation devices to aid in the healing process. The current standard material used is a metal plate that is implanted onto the bone. However, metal fixation devices have many disadvantages, namely stress shielding and metal ion leaching. This study aims to fix these problems of metal implants by making a completely biodegradable material that will have a high modulus and exhibit great toughness. To accomplish this, long-fiber poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) was utilized in combination with a matrix composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-rods. Through single fibril tensile tests, it was found that the PLLA fibers have a Young's modulus of 8.09 GPa. Synthesized HA nanorods have dimensions in the nanometer range with an aspect ratio over 6. By dip coating PLLA fibers in a suspension of PCL and HA and hot pressing the resulting coated fibers, dense fiber-reinforced samples were made having a flexural modulus up to 9.2 GPa and a flexural strength up to 187 MPa. The flexural modulus of cortical bone ranges from 7 to 25 GPa, so the modulus of the composite material falls into the range of bone. The typical flextural strength of bone is 130 MPa, and the samples here greatly exceed that with a strength of 187 MPa. After mechanical testing to failure the samples retained their shape, showing toughness with no catastrophic failure, indicating the possibility for use as a fixation material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  13. An application of principal component analysis to the clavicle and clavicle fixation devices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Principal component analysis (PCA) enables the building of statistical shape models of bones and joints. This has been used in conjunction with computer assisted surgery in the past. However, PCA of the clavicle has not been performed. Using PCA, we present a novel method that examines the major modes of size and three-dimensional shape variation in male and female clavicles and suggests a method of grouping the clavicle into size and shape categories. Materials and methods Twenty-one high-resolution computerized tomography scans of the clavicle were reconstructed and analyzed using a specifically developed statistical software package. After performing statistical shape analysis, PCA was applied to study the factors that account for anatomical variation. Results The first principal component representing size accounted for 70.5 percent of anatomical variation. The addition of a further three principal components accounted for almost 87 percent. Using statistical shape analysis, clavicles in males have a greater lateral depth and are longer, wider and thicker than in females. However, the sternal angle in females is larger than in males. PCA confirmed these differences between genders but also noted that men exhibit greater variance and classified clavicles into five morphological groups. Discussion And Conclusions This unique approach is the first that standardizes a clavicular orientation. It provides information that is useful to both, the biomedical engineer and clinician. Other applications include implant design with regard to modifying current or designing future clavicle fixation devices. Our findings support the need for further development of clavicle fixation devices and the questioning of whether gender-specific devices are necessary. PMID:20346123

  14. Spontaneous locking of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as a result of a broken tibial fixation device.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew J; James, Stuart H; Fairclough, John A

    2008-10-01

    The Intrafix device (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is one of a number of recently developed products whose aim is to improve fixation of quadrupled hamstring grafts when used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We present a case of failure and intra-articular migration of the sleeve of an Intrafix device causing locking of the knee 10 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We were unable to identify the cause of the failure or migration of the device. Rehabilitation had been progressing normally and without incident. The broken fragments were removed arthroscopically, and the reconstruction was found to be intact and healing well. Presumably, the device retained enough mechanical function to allow healing to progress, despite failure of the sleeve. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of such an event occurring with the new generation of hamstring graft fixation devices.

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Inflow Cannula Fixation Techniques in Left Ventricular Assist Device Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Krabatsch, Thomas; Rojas, Sebastian V; Deniz, Ezin; Ismail, Issam; Martens, Andreas; Shrestha, Malakh; Haverich, Axel; Netuka, Ivan; Schmitto, Jan D

    2017-03-01

    The therapy of terminal heart failure with left ventricular assist devices has become a standard in cardiac surgery. Yet the surgical implantation technique is not standardized and differs from center to center. Complications associated with left ventricular assist device (LVAD) inflow cannula placement are thrombosis, suction events, and flow disturbances. Within this in vitro study we aimed to investigate if the fixation technique of the sewing ring has an impact on the position of the inflow cannula. For this in vitro study the HeartMate III LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) was used. In five sessions, two approaches were considered for coring of the ventricle for LVAD inflow cannula insertion: "sew-then-core" and "core-then-sew." In the "sew-then-core" technique, the sewing cuff is first affixed to the heart, usually with 8-16 interrupted pledgeted mattress sutures. Subsequently, a cylindrical knife is used to resect a cylindrical core of myocardium to permit cannula insertion. In the "core-then-sew" technique, the sequence is reversed such that the knife is used before the suture ring is affixed. When the "sew-then-core" technique is used, the mattress sutures may be placed with full-thickness bites that penetrate the endocardium (i.e., transmural stitching) or partial-thickness bites that do not penetrate the endocardium (i.e., epicardial stitching). When the "core-then-sew" technique is used, the suture is passed fully into the ventricular lumen and fed back through the cored hole, at which point the needle may be reinserted into the freshly cored myocardium such that it exits the epicardium (i.e., transmural stitching with back stitch) or not (i.e., transmural stitching without back stitch). These four different sewing ring fixation suturing techniques were tested by experienced surgeons to affix the sewing ring: transmural stitching, epicardial stitching, transmural stitching with back stitch, and transmural stitching without back stitch

  16. Comparison of theoretical fixation stability of three devices employed in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis and symptomatic varus malalignment. We hypothesized that different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for the various wedge sizes in a finite element (FE) analysis. Methods Four types of fixation were compared: 1) first and 2) second generation Puddu plates, and 3) TomoFix plate with and 4) without bone graft. Cortical and cancellous bone was modelled and five different opening wedge sizes were studied for each model. Outcome measures included: 1) stresses in bone, 2) relative displacement of the proximal and distal tibial fragments, 3) stresses in the plates, 4) stresses on the upper and lower screw surfaces in the screw channels. Results The highest load for all fixation types occurred in the plate axis. For the vast majority of the wedge sizes and fixation types the shear stress (von Mises stress) was dominating in the bone independent of fixation type. The relative displacements of the tibial fragments were low (in μm range). With an increasing wedge size this displacement tended to increase for both Puddu plates and the TomoFix plate with bone graft. For the TomoFix plate without bone graft a rather opposite trend was observed. For all fixation types the occurring stresses at the screw-bone contact areas pulled at the screws and exceeded the allowable threshold of 1.2 MPa for at least one screw surface. Of the six screw surfaces that were studied, the TomoFix plate with bone graft showed a stress excess of one out of twelve and without bone graft, five out of twelve. With the Puddu plates, an excess stress occurred in the majority of screw surfaces. Conclusions The different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for different opening wedge sizes. Based on the computational simulations, none of the studied osteosynthesis fixation types warranted an intransigent full

  17. Orthopedic services

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Orthopedic services URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the Bio-TransFix femoral fixation device and anteromedial portal technique.

    PubMed

    Hantes, Michael E; Dailiana, Zoe; Zachos, Vasilios C; Varitimidis, Sokratis E

    2006-05-01

    The cross-pin femoral fixation technique for soft tissue grafts is a popular option in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. One of these devices is the Bio-TransFix (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL, USA) which provides high fixation strength. According to the manufacturer, the femoral tunnel is created by placing the femoral aiming device through the tibial tunnel (transtibial technique). However, using this technique it is very difficult or even impossible to place the graft at the anatomical ACL attachment site at the "10 o'clock" position. In this report, we describe the use of the Bio-TransFix device with an anteromedial portal technique. Using this technique, the surgeon has more freedom to place the graft in an anatomical position, while combining the advantages of the excellent biomechanical properties of this device.

  19. Effects of rigidity of an internal fixation device. A comprehensive biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Goel, V K; Lim, T H; Gwon, J; Chen, J Y; Winterbottom, J M; Park, J B; Weinstein, J N; Ahn, J Y

    1991-03-01

    Internal fixation with instrumentation often accompanies surgical fusion to augment spinal stability, provide temporary fixation while the surgical fusion mass unites, and enhance postoperative mobilization of a patient. Some surgeons, however, feel that the existing plate-screw designs are too rigid and are the primary cause of "iatrogenic" adverse effects clinically observed. A three-part study, involving in vitro experimental protocol, analytical finite-element-based models, and an in vivo canine investigation, was undertaken to study the role of decreasing rigidity of a device on the biomechanical response of the stabilized segments. Two alternatives--the use of one variable screw placement (Steffee plate [unilateral, 1VSP model]) as opposed to two VSP plates (bilateral, 2VSP model) and two VSP plates with polymer washers placed in between the integral nut and plate (2MVSP model)--were considered for achieving a reduction in the rigidity of the conventional VSP system. The load-displacement data obtained from the in vitro experiments and the stress distributions within the stabilized and intact models predicted by the finite-element models revealed that the unilateral VSP system is less rigid and is likely to reduce stress shielding of the vertebral bodies compared with the 2VSP model. The undesirable effects associated with the use of the 1VSP plate system are the presence of coupled motions due to the inherent asymmetry and the likely inability to provide enough rigidity for decompression procedures requiring a complete excision of the disc. The use of two MVSP plates overcomes these deficiencies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. EVALUATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE ON COST OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS AMONG ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Batista, Alysson Ferreira; Astur, Diego Costa; Falotico, Guilherme Guadagnini; Cohen, Moises

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic surgical devices used in surgical implants. Methods: A questionnaire was applied to Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons during the 46th Brazilian Congress on Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: Two hundred and one Orthopedic Surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire. The difference between the average prices estimated by the surgeons and the average prices provided by the supplier companies was 47.1%. No differences were found between the orthopedic specialists and other subspecialties on the prices indicated for specific orthopedic implants. However, differences were found among orthopedic surgeons who received visits from representatives of implant companies and those who did not receive those visits on prices indicated for shaver and radiofrequency device. Correlation was found between length of orthopedic experience and prices indicated for shaver and interference screw, and higher the experience time the lower the price indicated by Surgeons for these materials. Conclusion: The knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic implants is precarious. Reduction of cost of orthopedics materials depends on a more effective communication and interaction between doctors, hospitals and supplier companies with solid orientation programs and awareness for physicians about their importance in this scenario.Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:28243178

  1. Fixation filter, device for the rapid in situ preservation of particulate samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Doherty, K. W.; Engstrom, I.; Shanahan, T.; Pachiadaki, M. G.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Honjo, S.

    2015-02-01

    Niskin bottle rosettes have for years been the workhorse technology for collection of water samples used in biological and chemical oceanography. Studies of marine microbiology and biogeochemical cycling that aim to analyze labile organic molecules including messenger RNA, must take into account factors associated with sampling methodology that obscure an accurate picture of in situ activities/processes. With Niskin sampling, the large and often variable times between sample collection and preservation on deck of a ship, and the sometimes significant physico-chemical changes (e.g., changes in pressure, light, temperature, redox state, etc.) that water samples and organisms are exposed to, are likely to introduce artifacts. These concerns are likely more significant when working with phototrophs, deep-sea microbes, and/or organisms inhabiting low-oxygen or anoxic environments. We report here the development of a new technology for the in situ collection and chemical preservation of particulate microbial samples for a variety of downstream analyses depending on preservative choice by the user. The Fixation Filter Unit, version 3 (FF3) permits filtration of water sample through 47 mm diameter filters of the user's choice and upon completion of filtration, chemically preserves the retained sample within 10's of seconds. The stand-alone devices can be adapted to hydrocasting or mooring-based platforms.

  2. Mechanical testing of a flexible fixation device for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Leahy, J C; Mathias, K J; Hukins, D W; Shepherd, D E; Deans, W F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test mechanically a new flexible fixation system for the lumbar spine. This device incorporates loops of polyester braid which are secured by a crimped titanium sleeve. In tensile tests, all loops failed, by slippage through the crimped sleeve, at 434 +/- 25 N (mean +/- standard deviation from five loops) for a single crimp and 415 +/- 15 N (from five loops) for two crimps. The intact system was then tested according to the ASTM standard. In a static test, all five specimens failed by slippage of the braid through the sleeve. Initial slippage occurred between 600 and 700 N, but the mean maximum load sustained was 1090 +/- 140 N. Dynamic tests were performed on ten constructs at a frequency of 5 Hz, under a range of loading conditions. The maximum load applied in any of the tests was 825 N. Two constructs did not complete the required 5 x 10(6) test cycles because of fracture of their spinous process hooks. However, other tests, under the same conditions, showed no signs of failure. Fracture occurred as a result of fretting damage from the recommended stainless steel roll pins.

  3. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  4. A Novel Technique Using Customized Headgear for Fixation of Rigid External Distraction Device in an Infant With Crouzon Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Firdaus; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Mahdah, Saridah; Mathaneswaran, Vickneswaran; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2015-11-01

    Rigid external distraction device is often indicated for superior midfacial advancement in pediatric syndromic craniosynostosis patients. Even though the technique is proven reliable to treat the functional issues related to the craniofacial deformity, major complications associated with its fixation, such as intracranial pin perforation and migration have been reported. We report a novel technique of using a customized headgear to prevent intracranial pin perforation over a very thin temporal bone region in an 8-month-old infant with Crouzon syndrome who underwent monobloc Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis using a combination of bilateral internal and a rigid external distraction device. The customized headgear provides a protective platform at the temporal region thus preventing intracranial pin perforation and allows stable fixation during the early phase of consolidation period to prevent central component relapse. The headgear can be used short term when rigid external distractor is indicated in infant patient but requires close monitoring because of risks of skin necrosis and temporal region indentation.

  5. Composites of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calcium carbonate: in vitro evaluation for use in orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Nicholas J; Egan, Melissa J; Brunelle, John E

    2008-04-01

    Biodegradable materials utilized in current orthopedic sports medicine fixation devices are required to maintain mechanical properties for at least 12 weeks to facilitate tissue healing and then ideally degrade with eventual replacement by surrounding tissue (bone). Current materials exhibit excessive longevity, which limit the potential for bone replacement, an ideal outcome in clinical procedures where revisions are a possibility. This study investigates material property modification of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) by calcium carbonate. Modification of the degradation rate of PLGA by calcium carbonate (16, 36, 51% w/w) was demonstrated and the percentage of calcium carbonate within the polymer optimized at 36% (w/w). The optimized formulation was molded into a fixation screw and in vitro degradation demonstrated a gradual loss in molecular weight but with a pull-out strength retention beyond 12 weeks. Significant mass loss then occurred after 26 weeks. Physical testing, insertion torque, and failure torque indicated that this composite also had sufficient initial mechanical properties required for screw in type fixation devices. The combination of mechanical properties and degradation behavior suggests that this material may have potential to be utilized in orthopedic fixation devices that are placed in bone.

  6. Operative Cost Comparison: Plating Versus Intramedullary Fixation for Clavicle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Murphy, Timothy R; Bal, George K; McDonough, E Barry

    2016-09-01

    Although clavicle fractures often heal well with nonoperative management, current literature has shown improved outcomes with operative intervention for specific fracture patterns in specific patient types. The 2 most common methods of midshaft clavicle fracture fixation are intramedullary and plate devices. Through retrospective analysis, this study performed a direct cost comparison of these 2 types of fixation at a single institution over a 5-year period. Outcome measures included operative costs for initial surgery and any hardware removal surgeries. This study reviewed 154 patients (157 fractures), and of these, 99 had intramedullary fixation and 58 had plate fixation. A total of 80% (79 of 99) of intramedullary devices and 3% (2 of 58) of plates were removed. Average cost for initial intramedullary placement was $2955 (US dollars) less than that for initial plate placement (P<.001); average cost for removal was $1874 less than that for plate removal surgery (P=.2). Average total cost for all intramedullary surgeries was $1392 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries (P<.001). Average cost for all intramedullary surgeries requiring plate placement and removal was $653 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries that involved only placement (P=.04). Intramedullary fixation of clavicle fractures resulted in a statistically significant cost reduction compared with plate fixation, despite the incidence of more frequent removal surgeries. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e877-e882.].

  7. The future of academic innovation in the field of medical devices: is innovation still possible in orthopedics?

    PubMed

    Courvoisier, Aurélien

    2016-09-01

    Academic research is essential to bring disruptive innovation on medical devices market because the risk-taking is too high for companies and their investors. Performing clinical trials is essential to technical files but no one wants to accept responsibility for implanted off-label devices. The paper explains the academic process for innovation. We see that academic research depends, at the end, on the motivation of companies to develop a product. The key to innovation stands in the early collaboration between the surgeons, the research teams and the companies in a project. Innovation is a good idea supported by the expertise of the right people at the right moment. In orthopaedics, we need, more than ever, to stay focused on the patient benefits.

  8. Greening of orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rushyuan J; Mears, Simon C

    2012-06-01

    Every year, 4 billion pounds of waste are produced by health care facilities, and the amount continues to increase annually. In response, a movement toward greening health care has been building, with a particular focus on the operating room. Between 20% and 70% of health care waste originates from a hospital's operating room, and up to 90% of operating room waste is improperly sorted and sent for costly and unneeded hazardous waste processing. Recent successful changes include segregation of hospital waste, substitution of the ubiquitous polypropylene plastic wrap used for the sterilization and handling of surgical equipment with metal cases, and the reintroduction of reusable surgical gowns. Orthopedic-related changes include the successful reprocessing and reuse of external fixators, shavers, blades, burs, and tourniquets. These changes have been shown to be environmentally and economically beneficial. Early review indicates that these changes are feasible, but a need exists for further evaluation of the effect on the operating room and flow of the surgical procedure and of the risks to the surgeons and operating room staff. Other key considerations are the effects of reprocessed and reused equipment on patient care and outcome and the role of surgeons in helping patients make informed decisions regarding surgical care. The goals of this study were to summarize the amount and types of waste produced in hospitals and operating rooms, highlight the methods of disposal used, review disposal methods that have been developed to reduce waste and improve recycling, and explore future developments in greening health care.

  9. Cost effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: comparison of devices with differing bearing surfaces and modes of fixation.

    PubMed

    Pulikottil-Jacob, R; Connock, M; Kandala, N-B; Mistry, H; Grove, A; Freeman, K; Costa, M; Sutcliffe, P; Clarke, A

    2015-04-01

    Many different designs of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with varying performance and cost are available. The identification of those which are the most cost-effective could allow significant cost-savings. We used an established Markov model to examine the cost effectiveness of five frequently used categories of THA which differed according to bearing surface and mode of fixation, using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Kaplan-Meier analyses of rates of revision for men and women were modelled with parametric distributions. Costs of devices were provided by the NHS Supply Chain and associated costs were taken from existing studies. Lifetime costs, lifetime quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and the probability of a device being cost effective at a willingness to pay £20 000/QALY were included in the models. The differences in QALYs between different categories of implant were extremely small (< 0.0039 QALYs for men or women over the patient's lifetime) and differences in cost were also marginal (£2500 to £3000 in the same time period). As a result, the probability of any particular device being the most cost effective was very sensitive to small, plausible changes in quality of life estimates and cost. Our results suggest that available evidence does not support recommending a particular device on cost effectiveness grounds alone. We would recommend that the choice of prosthesis should be determined by the rate of revision, local costs and the preferences of the surgeon and patient.

  10. Carbon nanostructures for orthopedic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures (including carbon nanofibers, nanostructured diamond, fullerene materials and so forth) possess extraordinary physiochemical, mechanical and electrical properties attractive to bioengineers and medical researchers. In the past decade, numerous developments towards the fabrication and biological studies of carbon nanostructures have provided opportunities to improve orthopedic applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review on carbon nanostructure advances in orthopedic research. Orthopedic medical device applications of carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers and nanostructured diamond (including particulate nanodiamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings) are emphasized here along with other carbon nanostructures that have promising potential. In addition, widely used fabrication techniques for producing carbon nanostructures in both the laboratory and in industry are briefly introduced. In conclusion, carbon nanostructures have demonstrated tremendous promise for orthopedic medical device applications to date, and although some safety, reliability and durability issues related to the manufacturing and implantation of carbon nanomaterials remain, their future is bright.

  11. Influence of stability and mechanical properties of a spinal fixation device on production of wear debris particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Y; Bauer, T W; Nitto, H; Kambic, H E; Muschler, G F

    2000-01-01

    A prospective and quantitative animal study was performed to evaluate the production of wear particles from a spinal fixation device, and to test the hypothesis that the concentration of wear debris particles adjacent to spinal fixation hardware is correlated with the stiffness of the spinal fusion construct and local bone formation at the fusion site. An established canine segmental spinal fusion model with three interfacet fusions was used in this study. Several bone substitute materials were grafted to the area of the interfacet fusion. Internal fixation was performed on both sides of the spinous processes at each site using a stainless steel plate system in 19 dogs. After 12 weeks, spinal segments were excised, then 3-dimensional computerized tomography was used to measure bone volume and bone area of the individual fusion sites. The stiffness of each segment was tested using a servohydraulic materials testing machine. Biopsies were obtained from the soft tissues immediately around the plate system, and wear particles were collected and characterized using an electrical resistance particle analyzer, light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Biopsies from para-spinal tissue from adjacent, unoperated spinal levels served as negative controls. Histologically, 24 of 57 specimens (42.1%) showed only fibrous tissue with no recognizable macrophages, inflammation, or debris. Fourteen of 57 specimens (24.6%), however, contained many particles that were composed of Fe, Cr, and Ni, corresponding to elements found in the fixation hardware. Another 19 specimens showed only occasional particles. The mean concentration of particles from the tissue around the plate system was 2.8 x 10(9) per gram dry tissue weight, compared to 0.5 x 10(9) particles per gram for controls (p < 0.05). Statistical analyses showed significant inverse correlation between the log particle number and stiffness (r = -0.41, p < 0.01), bone volume (r

  12. Self-dissolution assisted coating on magnesium metal for biodegradable bone fixation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Hadis; Walter, Rhys; Gordon, Timothy; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    An attempt was made to develop a self-dissolution assisted coating on a pure magnesium metal for potential bone fixation implants. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) was coated successfully on the magnesium metal in ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution. The in vitro degradation behaviour of the MPC coated metal was evaluated using electrochemical techniques. The MPC coating increased the polarisation resistance (RP) of the metal by ˜150% after 2 h immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and reduced the corrosion current density (icorr) by ˜80%. The RP of the MPC coated metal remained relatively high even after 8 h immersion period. However, post-degradation analysis of the MPC coated metal revealed localized attack. Hence, the study suggests that MPC coating alone may not be beneficial, but this novel coating could provide additional protection if used as a precursor for other potential coatings such as biodegradable polymers or calcium phosphates.

  13. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  14. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a polylactic acid-bioactive glass composite for bone fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Vergnol, Gwenaelle; Ginsac, Nathalie; Rivory, Pascaline; Meille, Sylvain; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Balvay, Sandra; Chevalier, Jérôme; Hartmann, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) is nowadays among the most used bioabsorbable materials for medical devices. To promote bone growth on the material surface and increase the degradation rate of the polymer, research is currently focused on organic-inorganic composites by adding a bioactive mineral to the polymer matrix. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of a poly(L,DL-lactide)-Bioglass® (P(L,DL)LA-Bioglass(®) 45S5) composite to be used as a bone fixation device. In vitro cell viability testing of P(l,dl)LA based composites containing different amounts of Bioglass(®) 45S5 particles was investigated. According to the degradation rate of the P(L,DL)LA matrix and the cytocompatibility experiments, the composite with 30 wt % of Bioglass® particles seemed to be the best candidate for further investigation. To study its behavior after immersion in simulated physiological conditions, the degradation of the composite was analyzed by measuring its weight loss and mechanical properties and by proceeding with X-ray tomography. We demonstrated that the presence of the bioactive glass significantly accelerated the in vitro degradation of the polymer. A preliminary in vivo investigation on rabbits shows that the addition of 30 wt % of Bioglass(®) in the P(L,DL)LA matrix seems to trigger bone osseointegration especially during the first month of implantation. This composite has thus strong potential interest for health applications.

  16. Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE): a novel, cost-effective yet simple device for ophthalmic wet-lab training.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Seema; Baskaran, Prabu; Fazal, Romana; Sulaiman, Syed Mohammad; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Venkatesh, Rengaraj

    2016-10-01

    Achieving a formed and firm eyeball which is stably fixed in a holding device is a major challenge of surgical wet-lab training. Our innovation, the 'Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE)' is a robust, simple and economical device to solve this problem. It consists of a hollow iron cylinder to which a spring-action syringe is attached. The spring-action syringe generates vacuum and enables reliable fixation of a human or animal cadaveric eye on the iron cylinder. The rise in intraocular pressure due to vacuum fixation can be varied as per need or nature of surgery being practised. A mask-fixed version of this device is also designed to train surgeons for appropriate hand positioning. An experienced surgeon performed various surgeries including manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), phacoemulsification, laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), femtosecond LASIK docking, Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty, deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, penetrating keratoplasty and trabeculectomy on this device, while a trainee surgeon practised MSICS and wound suturing. Skill-appropriate comfort level was much higher with SAFE than with conventional globe holders for both surgeons. Due to its stability, pressure adjustability, portability, cost-efficiency and simplicity, we recommend SAFE as the basic equipment for every wet lab.

  17. Nanotechnology in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Roja; Eltorai, Adam E M

    2017-03-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized science and consumer products for several decades. Most recently, its applications to the fields of medicine and biology have improved drug delivery, medical diagnostics, and manufacturing. Recent research of this modern technology has demonstrated its potential with novel forms of disease detection and intervention, particularly within orthopedics. Nanomedicine has transformed orthopedics through recent advances in bone tissue engineering, implantable materials, diagnosis and therapeutics, and surface adhesives. The potential for nanotechnology within the field of orthopedics is vast and much of it appears to be untapped, though not without accompanying obstacles.

  18. Rabbit orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rich, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery in rabbits poses several unique parameters for the veterinary surgeon. It is imperative for the veterinarian to be knowledgeable about the anatomic features of the surgical repair site and to become familiar with a rabbit's pain and discomfort often associated with orthopedic injuries. Handling the perioperative and postoperative pain and potential GI disturbances are crucial for a successful outcome of the surgical case. This article is designed to help the veterinary surgeon prepare for the orthopedic surgical procedure and the peripheral physiologic needs of the rabbit from presentation through recovery.

  19. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  20. [Thermoformed orthopedic splints].

    PubMed

    Amoric, M

    1990-12-01

    Initially used to make simple splints, thermoforming has led to the development of a new means of application of orthopedic forces. Here we have presented splints which allow the treatment of Class III, Class II and cases of endomaxillitis.

  1. The role of ring external fixation in Charcot foot arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, Michael S

    2006-12-01

    These two morbidly obese patients with severe Charcot foot arthropathy were treated successfully with percutaneous correction of their deformity followed by a stepwise application of a pre-assembled neutrally aligned multiplane ring external fixator. This technique transfers well to the trauma environment in which alignment can be maintained without further violation within the zone of injury. The application of the fine wire ring external fixation has been used for many years to accomplished leg lengthening and correction of deformity. Historically it has required a great deal of experience to apply to complex frames and implement the required daily adjustments. The patient experience often has been an unpleasant ordeal with a high potential for associated morbidity. This negative exposure has prompted practicing orthopedic surgeons to avoid this technique, feeling that it best be left to those in tertiary care setting who are equipped to handle the morbidity and complications. Taking this technology from the domain of the deformity surgeon to the general orthopedic community will require the suppression of bad memories from residency. Using the device solely as a method of maintaining alignment eliminates many of the dynamic attributes that contributes to pain and morbidity. The bone and soft tissues are not stretched, eliminating much of the pain and decreasing the rate of traction-associated pin tract morbidity. Because there is no dynamic of the treatment, the simplified frame can be pre-assembled and have no adjustable components. The experience derived from this application has the potential of expanding the role of ring external fixation. Where the ring has been used previously as method of both obtaining and maintaining alignment, this application uses a simplified neutral version of a complex device to simply maintain alignment in a high risk patient population. Correction of deformity and achieving alignment/reduction of fractures is well within the

  2. Resorbable bone fixation alloys, forming, and post-fabrication treatments.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hamdy; Esfahani, Sajedeh Nasr; Poorganji, Behrang; Dean, David; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Metallic alloys have been introduced as biodegradable metals for various biomedical applications over the last decade owing to their gradual corrosion in the body, biocompatibility and superior strength compared to biodegradable polymers. Mg alloys possess advantageous properties that make them the most extensively studied biodegradable metallic material for orthopedic applications such as their low density, modulus of elasticity, close to that of the bone, and resorbability. Early resorption (i.e., <3months) and relatively inadequate strength are the main challenges that hinder the use of Mg alloys for bone fixation applications. The development of resorbable Mg-based bone fixation hardware with superior mechanical and corrosion performance requires a thorough understanding of the physical and mechanical properties of Mg alloys. This paper discusses the characteristics of successful Mg-based skeletal fixation hardware and the possible ways to improve its properties using different methods such as mechanical and heat treatment processes. We also review the most recent work pertaining to Mg alloys and surface coatings. To this end, this paper covers (i) the properties and development of Mg alloys and coatings with an emphasis on the Mg-Zn-Ca-based alloys; (ii) Mg alloys fabrication techniques; and (iii) strategies towards achieving Mg-based, resorbable, skeletal fixation devices.

  3. Lasers in orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherk, Henry H.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedic Surgery is that surgical discipline which deals with the musculoskeletal system. Orthopedists therefore operate on joints, the spine and long bones and engage in such subsecialities as sports medicine, hand surgery, trauma surgery, and joint replacements. Since they must cut and shape bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament, orthopedists have developed a number of mechanical techniques to achieve these ends and surgical lasers have found few applications in orthopedics because until now they have not been useful for cutting bone. In the past several years, however, there has been considerable interest in several areas within the field of orthopedic surgery that do not entail actual bone surgery and it is expected that as newer and more powerful lasers become available laser osteotomy may become feasible and even routine.

  4. Orthopedic management in myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Karol, L A

    1995-04-01

    Paralysis, muscle imbalance, and spasticity resulting from myelomeningocele produce orthopedic deformities that often require surgical correction. Spinal deformities in myelomeningocele are nearly universal, and are difficult to treat because of the absence of posterior elements. Hip dislocations frequently occur, but rarely require treatment. Severe foot deformities are seen in up to 80% of children.

  5. A controlled antibiotic release system to prevent orthopedic-implant associated infections: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Pérez, Marta; Giorello, Antonella; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    A new device for local delivery of antibiotics is presented, with potential use as a drug-eluting fixation pin for orthopedic applications. The implant consists of a stainless steel hollow tubular reservoir packed with the desired antibiotic. Release takes place through several orifices previously drilled in the reservoir wall, a process that does not compromise the mechanical properties required for the implant. Depending on the antibiotic chosen and the number of orifices, the release profile can be tailored from a rapid release of the load (ca. 20 h) to a combination of rapid initial release and slower, sustained release for a longer period of time (ca. 200 h). An excellent bactericidal action is obtained, with 4-log reductions achieved in as little as 2 h, and total bacterial eradication in 8 h using 6-pinholed implants filled with cefazolin. PMID:26297104

  6. A controlled antibiotic release system to prevent orthopedic-implant associated infections: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Pérez, Marta; Giorello, Antonella; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría, Jesús; Arruebo, Manuel; Luján, Lluís

    2015-10-01

    A new device for local delivery of antibiotics is presented, with potential use as a drug-eluting fixation pin for orthopedic applications. The implant consists of a stainless steel hollow tubular reservoir packed with the desired antibiotic. Release takes place through several orifices previously drilled in the reservoir wall, a process that does not compromise the mechanical properties required for the implant. Depending on the antibiotic chosen and the number of orifices, the release profile can be tailored from a rapid release of the load (ca. 20h) to a combination of rapid initial release and slower, sustained release for a longer period of time (ca. 200h). An excellent bactericidal action is obtained, with 4-log reductions achieved in as little as 2h, and total bacterial eradication in 8h using 6-pinholed implants filled with cefazolin.

  7. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  8. An antibacterial and absorbable silk-based fixation material with impressive mechanical properties and biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chenglong; Pu, Xiaobing; Zheng, Guan; Feng, Xinglong; Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Baoliang; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Qingshui; Xia, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Implant-associated infections and non-absorbing materials are two important reasons for a second surgical procedure to remove internal fixation devices after an orthopedic internal fixation surgery. The objective of this study was to produce an antibacterial and absorbable fixation screw by adding gentamicin to silk-based materials. The antibacterial activity was assessed against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vitro by plate cultivation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also investigated the properties, such as the mechanical features, swelling properties, biocompatibility and degradation, of gentamicin-loaded silk-based screws (GSS) in vitro. The GSS showed significant bactericidal effects against S. aureus and E. coli. The antibacterial activity remained high even after 4 weeks of immersion in protease solution. In addition, the GSS maintained the remarkable mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility of pure silk-based screws (PSS). Interestingly, after gentamicin incorporation, the degradation rate and water-absorbing capacity increased and decreased, respectively. These GSS provide both impressive material properties and antibacterial activity and have great potential for use in orthopedic implants to reduce the incidence of second surgeries. PMID:27869175

  9. An antibacterial and absorbable silk-based fixation material with impressive mechanical properties and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chenglong; Pu, Xiaobing; Zheng, Guan; Feng, Xinglong; Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Baoliang; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Qingshui; Xia, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Implant-associated infections and non-absorbing materials are two important reasons for a second surgical procedure to remove internal fixation devices after an orthopedic internal fixation surgery. The objective of this study was to produce an antibacterial and absorbable fixation screw by adding gentamicin to silk-based materials. The antibacterial activity was assessed against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in vitro by plate cultivation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also investigated the properties, such as the mechanical features, swelling properties, biocompatibility and degradation, of gentamicin-loaded silk-based screws (GSS) in vitro. The GSS showed significant bactericidal effects against S. aureus and E. coli. The antibacterial activity remained high even after 4 weeks of immersion in protease solution. In addition, the GSS maintained the remarkable mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility of pure silk-based screws (PSS). Interestingly, after gentamicin incorporation, the degradation rate and water-absorbing capacity increased and decreased, respectively. These GSS provide both impressive material properties and antibacterial activity and have great potential for use in orthopedic implants to reduce the incidence of second surgeries.

  10. Homo quintadus, computers and ROOMS (repetitive ocular orthopedic motion stress).

    PubMed

    Grant, A H

    1990-04-01

    Inherent conflict exists between computer systems and ocular physiology of Homo quintadus. Adverse ocular side effects of excessive saccades, excyclotorsion, supraduction, excessive field-of-fixation usage, capitas extension, astigmatic changes, otostatic reflex mismatching, and needless orthopedic malfunctions are imposed upon computer operators. Although the orthopedic dysfunctions are commonly grouped under the heading of Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI), the inextricable linkage to poor ocular-neurological function argues for postulation of a broader schema entitled Repetitive Ocular Orthopedic Motion Stress (ROOMS). Concepts of good tool usage, total tactile familiarity, total proprioceptive familiarity, and visual cone-of-comfort clash with the installed-equipment base and indicate need for an integrated computer work station to facilitate near covisualization of screen/keyboard and to afford freedom-of-choice for optimal hand/eye synchronicity. The advocacy of computer operators' needs by user-welfare groups, universities, labor unions, and government agencies are portents for achieving genuine improvements.

  11. In vitro characterization and mechanical properties of β-calcium silicate/POC composite as a bone fixation device.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, F S; Moghaddam, E; Mehrali, M; Oshkour, A A; Metselaar, H S C; Kadri, N A; Zandi, K; Abu, N A

    2014-11-01

    Calcium silicate (CS, CaSiO3 ) is a bioactive, degradable, and biocompatible ceramic and has been considered for its potential in the field of orthopedic surgery. The objective of this study is the fabrication and characterization of the β-CS/poly(1.8-octanediol citrate) (POC) biocomposite, with the goals of controlling its weight loss and improving its biological and mechanical properties. POC is one of the most biocompatible polymers, and it is widely used in biomedical engineering applications. The degradation and bioactivity of the composites were determined by soaking the composites in phosphate-buffered saline and simulated body fluid, respectively. Human osteoblast cells were cultured on the composites to determine their cell proliferation and adhesion. The results illustrated that the flexural and compressive strengths were significantly enhanced by a modification of 40% POC. It was also concluded that the degradation bioactivity and amelioration of cell proliferation increased significantly with an increasing β-CS content.

  12. Orthopedic trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pratik; Suk, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Trauma sustained during pregnancy can trigger uncertainty and anxiety for patient and orthopedic surgeon alike. In particular, orthopedic-related injuries raise concerns about preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. In this article, we review common concerns about radiation exposure, leukemia, pain management, anticoagulation, and anesthesia. One finding is that radiation risk is minimal when obtaining x-rays for operative planning, provided that the cumulative dose is within 5 rad. We also address safety concerns about patient positioning and staff radiation exposure. In addition, we found that most anesthetics used in pregnancy are category C (ie, safe). Perioperative opioid use for pain management is recommended with little risk. Regarding anticoagulation, low-molecular-weight heparin and fondaparinux are the safest choices. Last, pregnancy is not a contraindication to operative management of pelvic and acetabular fractures.

  13. Sarcopenia in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly that is an independent risk factor for falls, disability, postoperative complications, and mortality. Although its cause is not completely understood, sarcopenia generally results from a complex bone-muscle interaction in the setting of chronic disease and aging. Sarcopenia cannot be diagnosed by muscle mass alone. Diagnosis requires 2 of the following 3 criteria: low skeletal muscle mass, inadequate muscle strength, and inadequate physical performance. Forty-four percent of elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% of all patients 65 to 70 years old are sarcopenic. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis may be used to measure sarcopenia and are relatively inexpensive and accessible, they are generally considered less specific for sarcopenia compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcopenia has been shown to predict poor outcomes within the medical and surgical populations and has been directly correlated with increases in taxpayer costs. Strengthening therapy and nutritional supplementation have become the mainstays of sarcopenia treatment. Specifically, the American Medical Directors Association has released guidelines for nutritional supplementation. Although sarcopenia frequently occurs with osteoporosis, it is an independent predictor of fragility fractures. Initiatives to diagnose, treat, and prevent sarcopenia in orthopedic patients are needed. Further investigation must also explore sarcopenia as a predictor of surgical outcomes in orthopedic patients.

  14. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  15. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  16. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  18. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  19. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  20. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.].

  1. [Current trends and problems in the measurement of limb loading parameters during transosseous osteosynthesis using external fixation devices].

    PubMed

    Shuts, S A; Dzhafarova, O A; Shuts, B S

    1999-01-01

    The problem in question is whether it is reasonable to equip a conventional limb external fixation apparatus with means for the diagnosis of loading parameters: the forces and displacement of the opposite supporting elements of the apparatus. It is assumed that during distraction osteogenesis it is expedient to apply load to the limb by the load rate only at the initial stage of callus regeneration (the plastic or slightly elastic mechanical state) while the most effective way to do so is to act force at later stages. A number of functions derived from the modified parameters which might aid a physician to choose the optimum limb loading parameters at different stages of treatment were considered by using as example a hypothetical ring-type apparatus equipped with means for continuous measurement of current forces applied to the apparatus and current displacements of opposite ring blocks. Specifications for the measuring system of loading parameters were defined by using an Ilizarov apparatus as an example and why possible rough measurement errors may occur is revealed. The paper shows it necessary to develop methods for calculation of parasitic deformations, i.e. those of the loaded elements of the apparatus for the evaluation of the reciprocal displacement of bone fragments.

  2. Orthopedic Injury in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Gilad A; George, James W

    2016-09-01

    There are many reasons why a woman's pregnancy can put her at risk for orthopedic pain and injury. Given the high percentage of pregnant patients experiencing some degree of musculoskeletal pain, it is surprising that this is not an area of wider study. This chapter takes an evidence based approach to help the reader understand the implications of the numerous anatomic and physiologic changes associated with the gravid state, and how they act to promote both discomfort and injury. One-third of pregnant women in America are obese, further increasing risk. Exercise in most pregnancies is recommended and regarded as safe and thus obstetric care providers need to understand risk, diagnostic techniques and treatments.

  3. Residual position errors of lymph node surrogates in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: Comparison of two arm fixation devices and the effect of arm position correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapanen, Mika; Laaksomaa, Marko; Skyttä, Tanja; Haltamo, Mikko; Pehkonen, Jani; Lehtonen, Turkka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Hyödynmaa, Simo

    2016-04-01

    Residual position errors of the lymph node (LN) surrogates and humeral head (HH) were determined for 2 different arm fixation devices in radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer: a standard wrist-hold (WH) and a house-made rod-hold (RH). The effect of arm position correction (APC) based on setup images was also investigated. A total of 113 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer with LN irradiation were retrospectively analyzed (53 and 60 using the WH and RH, respectively). Residual position errors of the LN surrogates (Th1-2 and clavicle) and the HH were investigated to compare the 2 fixation devices. The position errors and setup margins were determined before and after the APC to investigate the efficacy of the APC in the treatment situation. A threshold of 5 mm was used for the residual errors of the clavicle and Th1-2 to perform the APC, and a threshold of 7 mm was used for the HH. The setup margins were calculated with the van Herk formula. Irradiated volumes of the HH were determined from RT treatment plans. With the WH and the RH, setup margins up to 8.1 and 6.7 mm should be used for the LN surrogates, and margins up to 4.6 and 3.6 mm should be used to spare the HH, respectively, without the APC. After the APC, the margins of the LN surrogates were equal to or less than 7.5/6.0 mm with the WH/RH, but margins up to 4.2/2.9 mm were required for the HH. The APC was needed at least once with both the devices for approximately 60% of the patients. With the RH, irradiated volume of the HH was approximately 2 times more than with the WH, without any dose constraints. Use of the RH together with the APC resulted in minimal residual position errors and setup margins for all the investigated bony landmarks. Based on the obtained results, we prefer the house-made RH. However, more attention should be given to minimize the irradiation of the HH with the RH than with the WH.

  4. Dealing with innovation and costs in orthopedics: a conversation with Dane Miller. Interview by Lawton R Burns.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dane

    2006-01-01

    Rob Burns talks with Dane Miller, former CEO of Biomet, about challenges posed by new technology in the orthopedic devices area. One key challenge is the rising cost and use of orthopedic devices at a time when providers are facing decreased profitability and reimbursement for orthopedic services. Another challenge is the long-term time horizon needed to gauge product success that contrasts with payers' and providers' short-term horizon. A third challenge is heightened governmental scrutiny of device makers' relationships with orthopedic surgeons. This interview was conducted before Miller left Biomet in March 2006.

  5. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in…

  6. Feasibility study of a non-invasive eye fixation and monitoring device using a right-angle prism mirror for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Uemoto, Kenji; Hashida, Noriyasu

    2016-11-03

    We aimed to describe the feasibility and efficacy of a novel non-invasive fixation and monitoring (F-M) device for the eyeballs (which uses a right-angle prism mirror as the optic axis guide) in three consecutive patients with choroidal melanoma who were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The device consists of an immobilization shell, a right-angle prism mirror, a high magnification optical zoom video camera, a guide lamp, a digital voice recorder, a personal computer, and a National Television System Committee standard analog video cable. Using the right-angle prism mirror, the antero-posterior axis was determined coincident with the optic axis connecting the centers of the cornea and pupil. The axis was then connected to the guide light and video camera installed on the couch top on the distal side. Repositioning accuracy improved using this method. Furthermore, the positional error of the lens was markedly reduced from ±1.16, ±1.68 and ±1.11 mm to ±0.23, ±0.58 and ±0.26 mm in the horizontal direction, and from ±1.50, ±1.03 and ±0.48 mm to ±0.29, ±0.30 and ±0.24 mm in the vertical direction (Patient #1, #2 and #3, respectively). Accordingly, the F-M device method decreased the planning target volume size and improved the dose-volume histogram parameters of the organ-at-risk via IMRT inverse planning. Importantly, the treatment method was well tolerated.

  7. Conversion from temporary external fixation to definitive fixation: shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Paul J; Silverton, Craig; Yeni, Yener; Tashman, Scott; Weir, Robb

    2006-01-01

    Temporary external fixation is the most common method of initial stabilization of diaphyseal fractures in forward surgical hospitals. Once the patient arrives at a stable environment, usually the United States, the fracture is managed with intramedullary nailing, small-pin external fixation, or a modified external fixator. Future research should be directed toward improving methods of care. It is not precisely known when is the best time to convert to definitive fixation without increasing the risk of infection. The risk factors leading to infection and nonunion are not well-established, making that determination even more difficult. Clinical studies of a suitable size should provide insight into these problems. Although temporary external fixation is commonly used, an optimal construct has not been determined. Data from studies of in vivo fracture-site motion after application of the temporary external fixator should be compared with biomechanical testing of similar constructs. These data could be used to recommend optimal temporary external fixation constructs of tibia, femur, and humerus fractures using currently available devices as well as to provide groundwork for the next generation of fixators.

  8. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  9. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  10. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges.

  11. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of oxygen-modified β-type Ti-Cr alloys for spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Narita, Kengo; Şen, Mustafa; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, various amounts of oxygen were added to Ti-10Cr (mass%) alloys. It is expected that a large changeable Young's modulus, caused by a deformation-induced ω-phase transformation, can be achieved in Ti-10Cr-O alloys by the appropriate oxygen addition. This "changeable Young's modulus" property can satisfy the otherwise conflicting requirements for use in spinal implant rods: high and low moduli are preferred by surgeons and patients, respectively. The influence of oxygen on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the alloys was examined, as well as the bending springback and cytocompatibility of the optimized alloy. Among the Ti-10Cr-O alloys, Ti-10Cr-0.2O (mass%) alloy shows the largest changeable Young's modulus following cold rolling for a constant reduction ratio. This is the result of two competing factors: increased apparent β-lattice stability and decreased amounts of athermal ω phase, both of which are caused by oxygen addition. The most favorable balance of these factors for the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation occurred at an oxygen concentration of 0.2mass%. Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy not only exhibits high tensile strength and acceptable elongation, but also possesses a good combination of high bending strength, acceptable bending springback and great cytocompatibility. Therefore, Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy is a potential material for use in spinal fixture devices.

  12. Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying bla NDM-1 gene in orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Varsha; Bansal, Neha; Gupta, Ravi; Chander, Jagdish

    2014-09-01

    Emergence and spread of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae is a cause of concern worldwide, the latest threat being New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1). This report is of an orthopedic case with fracture femur managed with internal fixation and bone grafting, who subsequently developed secondary infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring bla NDM-1 gene. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was ≥8 μg/ml by E-test, suggestive of carbapenemase production. Phenotypic and further genotypic detection confirmed the presence of bla NDM-1 gene. The isolate remained susceptible only to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B.

  13. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result.

  14. Prevention of VTE in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.; Johanson, Norman A.; Curley, Catherine; Dahl, Ola E.; Schulman, Sam; Ortel, Thomas L.; Pauker, Stephen G.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a serious, but decreasing complication following major orthopedic surgery. This guideline focuses on optimal prophylaxis to reduce postoperative pulmonary embolism and DVT. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, we recommend the use of one of the following rather than no antithrombotic prophylaxis: low-molecular-weight heparin; fondaparinux; dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban (total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty but not hip fracture surgery); low-dose unfractionated heparin; adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist; aspirin (all Grade 1B); or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD) (Grade 1C) for a minimum of 10 to 14 days. We suggest the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in preference to the other agents we have recommended as alternatives (Grade 2C/2B), and in patients receiving pharmacologic prophylaxis, we suggest adding an IPCD during the hospital stay (Grade 2C). We suggest extending thromboprophylaxis for up to 35 days (Grade 2B). In patients at increased bleeding risk, we suggest an IPCD or no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). In patients who decline injections, we recommend using apixaban or dabigatran (all Grade 1B). We suggest against using inferior vena cava filter placement for primary prevention in patients with contraindications to both pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). We recommend against Doppler (or duplex) ultrasonography screening before hospital discharge (Grade 1B). For patients with isolated lower-extremity injuries requiring leg immobilization, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing knee arthroscopy without a history

  15. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  16. Treatment of severe orthopedic infections.

    PubMed

    Dernell, W S

    1999-09-01

    Severe infections are uncommon following orthopedic surgery, yet they can be frustrating for the veterinarian and owner to treat and can result in devastating consequences for the patient. This article reviews the common causes for postoperative infection, reviews established treatment, and introduces newer methods for treatment and control. A thorough understanding of the pathogenesis, application of appropriate diagnostic procedures, the institution of aggressive treatment regimens, with adherence to established principles, will often result in satisfactory outcomes even with severe orthopedic infections. For those more refractory to treatment, the use of newer treatment methods, specifically locally implantable materials for sustained release of antimicrobials can improve success in the treatment of these more difficult cases.

  17. Decision making in ruminant orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, J F; Adams, S B

    1996-03-01

    Decision making in ruminant orthopedics is determined by many factors, the most of important of which is age, size, and value of the patient, the nature of the injury, the prognosis for effective treatment and satisfactory healing, the intentions of the client, and the experiences of the veterinarian. Ruminant orthopedics currently is expanding to include the treatment of llamas and small ruminants as companion animals in addition to the treatment of valuable livestock. The future promises increasing sophistication in treatments and an ever higher quality of patient care.

  18. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  19. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  20. Internal fixation: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Robert M; Johnson, Adam R; Joseph, Alison

    2011-08-01

    Internal fixation has become a pillar of surgical specialties, yet the evolution of these devices has been relatively short. The first known description of medical management of a fracture was found in the Edwin Smith Papyrus of Ancient Egypt (circa 2600 bc). The first description of internal fixation in the medical literature was in the 18th century. The advancement of techniques and technology over the last 150 years has helped to preserve both life and function. The pace of advancement continues to accelerate as surgeons continue to seek new technology for osseous fixation. The authors present a thorough review of the history of internal fixation and the transformation into a multibillion dollar industry.

  1. [Meaning of living with external fixation for grade III open fracture of lower limbs: patient view].

    PubMed

    Lopez, Catia Cristina Gomes; Gamba, Mônica Antar; Matheus, Maria Clara Cassuli

    2013-06-01

    The present study is aimed to understand the meaning of living with an external fixation device for grade III open fractures of the lower limbs from the perspective of the patient. The data were collected with six young adults who were undergoing outpatient orthopedic treatment in a public hospital in the city of São Paulo, through semi-structured interviews with open questions, between June and August 2010. Seeking to understand the meaning of this experience, we have maintained a phenomenological attitude during the analysis, which made it possible to reveal the phenomenon "try to live in spite of feeling trapped in a cage." Patients said that their personal desire and support from others helped them reorganize their lives, despite the several challenges they had to overcome to adapt to the fastener attached to their body and the fear of the future and doubts about the success of treatment.

  2. The use of a circular external skeletal fixation device for the management of long bone osteotomies in large ruminants: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aithal, H P; Singh, G R; Hoque, M; Maiti, S K; Kinjavdekar, P; Pawde, A M; Setia, H C

    2004-08-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of a simple, inexpensive model of circular external fixator (CEF) for use in large ruminants. A simple model of CEF frames consisting of four full rings (13-19 cm diameter, 4 cm wide and 4 mm thick with 18-24 holes) connected by threaded rods (8 mm diameter, 10-15 cm long) and nuts was developed using mild (low carbon) steel and were nickel-plated. In the first phase of the study, three male cow calves were utilized to study the feasibility of application of the fixators in the metatarsus, tibia and radius, in reference of adaptation and tolerance by animals. In the second phase, the fixators were tested in osteotomized bones. Six bull calves of 1.5-2 years of age weighing about 200-250 kg were utilized for this purpose. After preparing the area for aseptic surgery, under xylazine (at 0.1 mg/kg, i.m.)-ketamine (i.v. till effect) general anaesthesia, the test bone (metatarsus, radius and tibia in two animals each) was approached through the medial surface and an osteotomy was created with a saw and chisel at the mid-diaphysis. The pre-constructed 4-ring CEF was mounted on the limb around the test bone in such a way that it formed a cylinder with the axis of the limb at the centre. Each ring was then fixed to the bone with a pair of beaded wires (316 SS) of 3.5 mm diameter. During the post-operative period, the animals were observed for any change in behaviour, tolerance of the fixators, the weight bearing on the test limb, the status of the fixator, and the level of reduction of the osteotomy, alignment and healing at different intervals. The fixation of CEF was easier in the metatarsus and radius than in the tibia. The inner ring diameters found adequate for metatarsus, radius and tibia were 13-15 cm, 15-17 cm and 17-19 cm, respectively. The fixators applied to different bones were well-tolerated, and the animals could lay down, stand and walk freely with the fixator without any problems. All the animals showed

  3. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    PubMed

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  4. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  5. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  6. Erythromycin Seromadesis in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Martin; Fernández, Felipe; Avilés, Carolina; Cordova, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of postoperative seromadesis is common, corresponding to the presence of serum in the subcutaneous tissue post a surgical event. Erythromycin has been reported as sclerosing, although not in orthopedic surgery. We report a case of erythromycin seromadesis in orthopedic surgery. Case Presentation: We present a case of a 63-year-old woman having undergone femoral prosthesis surgery and total hip replacement with a subfacial seroma without findings of infection, refractory to standard treatment of compression bandages, massage and cleaning surgery in two oportunities. A literature review was undertaken to obtain the therapeutic alternatives where erythromycin seromadesis is chosen with excellent response. Conclusion: Erythromycin sclerotherapy should be considered as an effective and safe option in the treatment of seroma in general surgery and traumatology. More studies are necessary to get a better evidence. We believe that this is the first study of use of erythromycin as sclerotherapy in a traumatology case. PMID:27703947

  7. Orthopedic aspects of competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A B

    1987-07-01

    Orthopedic problems related to competitive swimming are rarely disabling, but can be problematic in preventing training and competition. Most problems are related to the shoulder and knee. Treatment is primarily nonsurgical and directed at relieving symptoms and allowing the athlete to continue with swimming practice. Treatment aids such as ice packing, anti-inflammatory medications, muscle stimulation and electrogalvanic stimulation, strengthening exercises, and static stretching are encouraged; upper arm bands and patellar-stabilizing supports can be adapted to training routines.

  8. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced, preclinical stage. Other potential uses include the treatment of Mendelian diseases and orthopedic tumors, as well as the repair and regeneration of cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Many of these goals should be achievable with existing technologies. The main barriers to clinical application are funding and regulatory issues, which in turn reflect major safety concerns and the opinion, in some quarters, that gene therapy should not be applied to nonlethal, nongenetic diseases. For some indications, advances in nongenetic treatments have also diminished enthusiasm. Nevertheless, the preclinical and early clinical data are impressive and provide considerable optimism that gene therapy will provide straightforward, effective solutions to the clinical management of several common debilitating disorders that are otherwise difficult and expensive to treat. PMID:19066598

  9. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  10. Principles of intramedullary pin and wire fixation.

    PubMed

    Howard, P E

    1991-02-01

    Knowledge and experience in the proper use of IM pins, K-wires, and orthopedic wire is a valuable asset to the veterinarian's ability to successfully repair a variety of long bone fractures. Most long bone fractures are amenable to repair with this form of fixation. When the principles of application are violated or the implants are used when contraindicated, complications often occur. Proper use of these implants results in the successful management of complex fractures to the satisfaction of both the animal owner and the veterinarian (Fig 10).

  11. Diagnosis and management of reptile orthopedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    As veterinarians expand their understanding of the specific husbandry requirements for captive reptiles, nutritionally associated orthopedic injuries should decrease. Orthopedic injuries in wild reptiles, however, will continue to increase as new infrastructure encroaches on the habitats of these animals. Research should be pursued that focuses on improving our understanding of pain management in reptiles, on developing techniques to expedite bone healing, and on creating new orthopedic techniques that provide rigid stabilization without the use of temperature-sensitive materials.

  12. The dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    The development and implementation of a dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room (OTOR) that is used for the treatment of orthopedic trauma patients has changed and improved the practice of orthopedic trauma surgery. Advantages noted with OTOR implementation include improvements in morbidity and complication rates, enhancements in the professional and personal lifestyles of the on-call surgeon, and increased physician recruitment and retention in orthopedic traumatology. However, the inappropriate use of the OTOR, which can waste valuable resources and delay the treatment of emergent cases, must be monitored and avoided.

  13. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management. PMID:28149067

  14. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.].

  15. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  16. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  17. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  18. Strategies for achieving orthopedic service line success.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stacey; Powers, Kristi

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare finance leaders can work with orthopedic surgeons to support better outcomes, clinically and financially, by: Establishing innovative partnerships among hospital leaders, orthopedic surgeons, and implant vendors. Developing and enforcing expectations around contracting and vendor behavior. Establishing a forum for open communication. Building a bundled payment structure. Finding ways to differentiate from the competition.

  19. Sawbones laboratory in orthopedic surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Hetaimish, Bandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Sawbones are artificial bones designed to simulate the bone architecture, as well as the bone’s physical properties. The incorporation of sawbones simulation laboratories in many orthopedic training programs has provided the residents with flexibility in learning and scheduling that align with their working hour limitations. This review paper deliberates the organization of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical training to enhance trainee’s future learning. In addition, it explores the implications of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical teaching and evaluation. It scrutinizes the suitability of practicing on sawbones at the simulation laboratory to improve orthopedic trainee’s learning. This will be followed with recommendations for future enhancement of sawbones simulation-based learning in orthopedic surgical training. PMID:27052276

  20. A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system.

    PubMed

    Kong, M; Du, Z; Sun, L; Fu, L; Jia, Z; Wu, D

    2005-01-01

    A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system, named HIT-RAOTS, has been developed according to Chinese conventional operation method. Its main function includes obtaining images with information of position and orientation of fracture, providing fracture information for doctors, assisting the doctors to complete the reposition of fracture and locking operation of intramedullary nail. In this system, a 6-dof force-reflecting master device, with a pantographic parallelogram mechanisms driven by harmonic DC servomotors, is used to control the slave manipulator movement and to translate the force from the operating room to the surgeon console; A slave robot system integrated a 6-dof force sensor, with a parallel manipulator actuated by six AC servomotors, is applied for the accurate repositioning; A virtual simulation system and human-machine interface are also developed. PI controller based on local network is used to realize the teleoperation. Only little irradiation is issued during the reposition. It can assist surgeons to perform bone-setting more safely by reducing irradiation damage to both surgeries and patients, more easily by releasing the surgeons from the heavy operation and more perfect by improving accuracy of reposition.

  1. Tissue engineering strategies for the regeneration of orthopedic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Helen H; Subramony, Siddarth D; Boushell, Margaret K; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-06-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), necessitates a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone, or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality.

  2. Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Orthopedic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Olga D; Bolia, Ioanna K; Chloros, George D; Goumenos, Stavros D; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Galanis, Evanthia C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-09-01

    Nanomedicine is based on the fact that biological molecules behave similarly to nanomolecules, which have a size of less than 100 nm, and is now affecting most areas of orthopedics. In orthopedic oncology, most of the in vitro and in vivo studies have used osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma cell lineages. In this article, tumor imaging and treatment nanotechnology applications, including nanostructure delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, gene therapy, and the role of nano-selenium-coated implants, are outlined. Finally, the potential role of nanotechnology in addressing the challenges of drug and radiotherapy resistance is discussed. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):280-286.].

  3. 3D scaffold alters cellular response to graphene in a polymer composite for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Azam, Dilkash; Raj, Shammy; Kolanthai, Elayaraja; Vasu, K S; Sood, A K; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-05-01

    Graphene-based polymer nanocomposites are being studied for biomedical applications. Polymer nanocomposites can be processed differently to generate planar two-dimensional (2D) substrates and porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. The objective of this work was to investigate potential differences in biological response to graphene in polymer composites in the form of 2D substrates and 3D scaffolds. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating 1% of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). GO increased modulus and strength of PCL by 44 and 22% respectively, whereas RGO increased modulus and strength by 22 and 16%, respectively. RGO increased the water contact angle of PCL from 81° to 87° whereas GO decreased it to 77°. In 2D, osteoblast proliferated 15% more on GO composites than on PCL whereas RGO composite showed 17% decrease in cell proliferation, which may be attributed to differences in water wettability. In 3D, initial cell proliferation was markedly retarded in both GO (36% lower) and RGO (55% lower) composites owing to increased roughness due to the presence of the protruding nanoparticles. Cells organized into aggregates in 3D in contrast to spread and randomly distributed cells on 2D discs due to the macro-porous architecture of the scaffolds. Increased cell-cell contact and altered cellular morphology led to significantly higher mineralization in 3D. This study demonstrates that the cellular response to nanoparticles in composites can change markedly by varying the processing route and has implications for designing orthopedic implants such as resorbable fracture fixation devices and tissue scaffolds using such nanocomposites.

  4. Standards of external fixation in prolonged applications to allow safe conversion to definitive extremity surgery: the Aachen algorithm for acute ex fix conversion.

    PubMed

    Horst, Klemens; Andruszkow, Hagen; Weber, Christian; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Hildebrand, Frank; Tarkin, Ivan; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-09-01

    External fixation has become an important tool in orthopedic surgery. Technology has improved the design and material as well as the construct of the fixator. As most patients are converted from external fixation to definite stabilization during later clinical course, prevention of complications such as infection is of high importance. Based on the current literature, principles of temporary external fixation were summarized. We focused on minimizing the risk of infection and introduce a standardized algorithm how to proceed when converting from external to internal fixation, which also was examined for effectiveness.

  5. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam Em; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-06-18

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions.

  6. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  7. Arthroscopic Control for Safe and Secure Seating of Suspensory Devices for Femoral Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Three Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seo Goo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our technique that allows direct visualization of seating of suspensory devices in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods Three different suspensory devices (TightRope RT, RetroButton, and EndoButton) were used in ACL reconstruction using 3 different techniques (outside-in, anteromedial [AM] portal, and transtibial techniques). Positioning of a guiding material and seating pattern of the suspensory devices were evaluated according to the surgical technique and suspensory device used. Results On the transtibial technique, 21 of total 26 cases (81%) of single bundle reconstructions and 22 of total 22 cases (100%) of double bundle reconstructions required superolateral capsulotomy where buttons were found in 21 of total 21 cases (100%) and 17 of 22 cases (77%), respectively. On the AM portal technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in only 18 of total 32 cases (56%) even after capsulotomy. On the outside-in technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in 86 of total 86 cases (100%). Conclusions Our technique for direct visualization of seating of the suspensory devices was more effective in outside-in and single bundle transtibial ACL reconstruction. However, it was less effective in double bundle transtibial and AM portal ACL reconstructions. PMID:28231646

  8. Development of thermo-mechanical processing for fabricating highly durable β-type Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr rod for use in spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kengo; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Oribe, Kazuya

    2012-05-01

    The mechanical strength of a beta titanium alloy such as Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloy (TNTZ) can be improved significantly by thermo-mechanical treatment. In this study, TNTZ was subjected to solution treatment, cold caliber rolling, and cold swaging before aging treatment to form a rod for spinal fixation. The {110}(β) are aligned parallel to the cross-section with two strong peaks approximately 180° apart, facing one another, in the TNTZ rods subjected to cold caliber rolling and six strong peaks at approximately 60° intervals, facing one another, in the TNTZ rods subjected to cold swaging. Therefore, the TNTZ rods subjected to cold swaging have a more uniform structure than those subjected to cold caliber rolling. The orientation relationship between the α and β phases is different. A [110](β)//[121](α), (112)(β)//(210)(α) orientation relationship is observed in the TNTZ rods subjected to aging treatment at 723 K after solution treatment and cold caliber rolling. On the other hand, a [110](β)//[001](α), (112)(β)//(200)(α) orientation relationship is observed in TNTZ rod subjected to aging treatment at 723 K after cold swaging. A high 0.2% proof stress of about 1200 MPa, high elongation of 18%, and high fatigue strength of 950 MPa indicate that aging treatment at 723 K after cold swaging is the optimal thermo-mechanical process for a TNTZ rod.

  9. Failure Analysis of Some Orthopedic Implants (Analyse de Rupture de Quelques Protheses Orthopediques)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Osteosynthesefragen (AO) plate, used to correct a subtrochanteric fracture of the femur. The part was removed because it fractured in service only 4...Failures in Orthopedic Surgery, Biomat. Med. Devices Art. Org., 1979, 7 (2), 243-255. -48- 217 Hemminger, W. and Lange, G. - Osteotomy Plates which

  10. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  11. When femoral fracture fixation fails: salvage options.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Most hip fractures treated with modern internal fixation techniques will heal. However, failures occasionally occur and require revision procedures. Salvage strategies employed during revision are based on whether the fixation failure occurs in the femoral neck, or in the intertrochanteric region. Patient age and remaining bone stock also influence decision making. For fractures in young patients, efforts are generally focused on preserving the native femoral head via osteotomies and repeat internal fixation. For failures in older patients, some kind of hip replacement is usually selected. Disuse osteopenia, deformity, bone loss, and stress-risers from previous internal fixation devices all pose technical challenges to successful reconstruction. Attention to detail is important in order to minimise complications. In the majority of cases, good outcomes have been reported for the various salvage strategies.

  12. Mouse tissue fixation.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    One of the primary goals of fixation is to stop postmortem changes that degrade the tissue and allow optimal preservation of morphologic and cytological detail as well as nucleic acid integrity. Following death, tissues soon undergo autolysis, and if organisms from the gastrointestinal, urinary, or respiratory tracts are present, their colonization can soon cause putrefaction. Time is of the essence because warmer temperatures accelerate both types of degradation. Placing the tissue into a fixative stops the postmortem changes. Fixatives have their effect on tissue by cross-linking, coagulation, or a combination of both. This article outlines the basic tissue fixation procedure and offers guidance on choosing an appropriate fixative, the timing and duration of fixation, sample storage, and quality issues.

  13. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  14. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room.

  15. Blood utilization in orthopedic and trauma practice

    PubMed Central

    Tayara, Bader Kamal; Al-Faraidy, Moaad Hatim; Al-Sayel, Faisal Abdullah; Al-Omran, Abdallah S; Sadat-Ali, Mir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Very little is known about blood utilization in orthopedic and trauma surgery and there is no definite policy in this regard. Our objective is to perform an audit on our practice of blood utilization in the orthopedic department. Methods: We have retrospectively analyzed the data of patients who were admitted between January 2011 and December 2012 to the orthopedic male, female and pediatric wards for which blood products were requested. Results: Three hundred and eight patients were admitted for surgery during the study period. The average age was 35.12 ± 20.4 years and postsurgery they stayed in the hospital for 25.60 ± 10.5 days. Blood products were requested for 223 trauma surgeries. In elective orthopedic procedures, only 42.78% of the blood requested was utilized while in trauma patients it was 55.25%. Conclusions: A substantial amount of blood and its product was used in trauma and elective orthopedic surgeries. There was a major discrepancy between the blood requested and utilized and secondly in the majority single unit transfusion was utilized, which is not within the fundamentals of blood transfusion. PMID:26097818

  16. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  17. Limits of internal fixation in long-bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, H; Baroan, C

    2017-02-01

    Alternatives to internal fixation of long-bone fracture comprise, depending on location, external fixation or joint replacement. Limitations comprise risk of infection and functional outcome quality, which vary according to technique. The present study examines these limitations, based on comparative or large-scale studies from which certain significant results emerge. Four main questions are dealt with: (1) the present role of locking plates; (2) conditions for intramedullary nailing in Gustilo grade IIIb open fracture; (3) the limitations of conversion from external fixation to intramedullary nailing in open lower leg fracture; (4) and the limitations of definitive anterograde femoral nailing in multiple trauma. Locking plate fixation has yet to prove clinical superiority in any of the anatomic sites for which good-quality comparative analyses are available. Infection risk in Gustilo grade IIIb open lower leg fracture is equivalent when treated by intramedullary nailing or external fixation, if wound care and debridement are effective, antibiotherapy is initiated rapidly and skin cover is restored within 7days. Conversion from primary external fixation to intramedullary nailing is possible if the external fixator was fitted less than 28days previously and skin cover was restored within 7days. The pulmonary and systemic impact of peripheral lesions or definitive anterograde intramedullary nailing of femoral fracture in multiple trauma calls for caution and what is known as "damage-control orthopedics" (DCO), a term covering the general consequences of both the initial trauma and its treatment. Femoral intramedullary nailing is thus contraindicated in case of hemorrhagic shock (blood pressure<90mmHg), hypothermia (<33°C), coagulation disorder (platelet count<90,000) or peripheral lesions such as multiple long-bone fractures, crushed limb or primary pulmonary contusion. In such cases, external fixation or retrograde nailing with a small-diameter nail and without

  18. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AMONG THE ELDERLY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sitta, Maria do Carmo; Toledo, Manuella; da Silva Henriques, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Care for elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, particularly for those requiring emergency surgery, needs to take into account an analysis of physical capacity and risks specific to elderly individuals, in an attempt to reduce the risks. Nevertheless, these remain high in this group. Despite the risks, procedures developed promptly have a positive effect on these patients’ evolution. Coordinated care, composed of teams of specialists within clinical medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics, anesthesiology and critical care, along with other healthcare professionals, may be highly beneficial for this group of patients. PMID:27027017

  19. [The metal tantalum in orthopedic applications].

    PubMed

    Deng, Juncai; Wang, Yue

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the biological characteristics of the metal tantalum (Ts) and the application status of tantalum in artificial joints, bone necrosis, spine, defects of bone and other aspects of bone. The early clinical application results of tantalum in bone diseases were satisfactory, but it is necessary to do further study of tantalum in a deep going way, and further detailed comparison between the tantalum with other metals as orthopedics implants. The advantage of tantalum materials as orthopedic implants still needs to be verified by a great deal of clinical cases for a long period of time.

  20. Injectable biodegradable materials for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-12-01

    The large number of orthopedic procedures performed each year, including many performed arthroscopically, have led to great interest in injectable biodegradable materials for regeneration of bone and cartilage. A variety of materials have been developed for these applications, including ceramics, naturally derived substances and synthetic polymers. These materials demonstrate overall biocompatibility and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as promote tissue formation, thus providing an important step towards minimally invasive orthopedic procedures. This review provides a comparison of these materials based on mechanical properties, biocompatibility and regeneration efficacy. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are explained and design criteria for injectable biodegradable systems are provided.

  1. Awareness campaign. Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma launches awareness campaign.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    The Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma is a 25-bed inpatient and outpatient center with one focus: Orthopedics. To acquaint people with its services and build brand awareness to drive market share, the hospital launched a print campaign featuring actual patients.

  2. An Overview of the History of Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Ishaan; O'Donnell, Joseph F

    Orthopedic surgery has a long and rich history. While the modern term orthopedics was coined in the 1700s, orthopedic principles were beginning to be developed and used during primitive times. The Egyptians continued these practices, and described ways to recognize and manage common orthopedic conditions. The Greeks and Romans subsequently began to study medicine in a systematic manner, and greatly improved our understanding of orthopedic anatomy and surgical technique. After a period of little progress during the Middle Ages, rapid advancement was noted during the Renaissance, including the description of various injuries, improvements in surgical technique, and development of orthopedic hospitals. Collectively, these advances provided the foundation for modern orthopedics. Currently, orthopedic surgery is a rapidly developing field that has benefited from the works of numerous scholars and surgeons. It is important to recognize the successes and failures of the past, in order to advance research and practice as well as improve patient care and clinical outcomes.

  3. Guide to radiation fixatives

    SciTech Connect

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.

    1983-11-01

    This report identifies and then characterizes a variety of substances available in the market place for potential effectiveness as a fixative on radiologically contaminated surfaces. The substances include both generic chemicals and proprietary products. In selecting a fixative for a particular application, several attributes of the fixative may be relevant to the choice. These attributes include: toxicity, durability, and cleanliness and removability. In addition to the attributes of the fixative, one should also take into account certain characteristics of the site to be treated. These characteristics relate to climate, nature of the surface, use to which the treated surface will be put, subsequent cleanup operations, and type of neighboring surfaces. Finally, costs and potential environmental effects may influence the decision. A variety of fixatives are evaluated with respect to these various attributes and summarized in a reference table.

  4. Cell fixatives for immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Fixation is one of the most critical steps in immunostaining. The object of fixation is to achieve good morphological preservation, while at the same time preserving antigenicity. Tissue blocks, sections, cell cultures or smears are usually immersed in a fixative solution, while in other situations, whole body perfusion of experimental animals is preferable. Fixation can be accomplished by either chemical or physical methods. The chemical methods include cross-linking agents such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and succinimide esters as well as solvents such as acetone and methanol, which precipitate proteins. Of the physical methods, freezing tissue and air drying are most widely used. This chapter deals with the chemical fixation methods most commonly used for light microscopy.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3020 - Intramedullary fixation rod.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. An intramedullary fixation rod is a device intended to be implanted that consists of a rod made of alloys such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum and stainless steel. It is inserted into the...

  10. Orthopedic Injuries and Their Treatment in Children During Earthquakes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Ilaria; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Bortolin, Michelangelo

    2015-10-01

    Orthopedic injuries commonly affect children during earthquakes, but reports about them are rare. This setting may lead to different standards of care, but guidelines are still missing in this field. A systematic review was performed to: (1) assess type and body distribution of pediatric earthquake-related injuries, treatment performed, length of stay, and complications; and (2) identify starting points to define standards of care. PubMed database was researched for papers (1999-2014 period) in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. Inclusion criteria were: English, French, Spanish, or Italian language and data reported about orthopedic lesions in children (≤18 years old). Reviews, letters, commentaries, editorials, and single case reports were excluded. Two independent reviewers selected articles after abstract and full-text reading. Traumatic injuries caused child hospital admissions ranging from 46.9% to 100.0%; 16% to 53% suffered fractures. Lower limbs mostly were involved. Soft-tissue injuries affected 55% of patients. Debridement and external fixation (EF) were the most frequent surgical treatments. Amputation rates varied from 5% to 11%. This study revealed that field hospitals should be prepared to: (1) treat mainly lower extremities fractures in children; and (2) use especially EF techniques. The presence of orthopedic surgeons familiar with pediatric traumatology should be considered.

  11. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  12. Massive subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice bodies secondary to an orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Urruela, Adriana M; Rapp, Timothy B; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    Both early and late complications following open reduction and internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures have been reported extensively in the literature. Although orthopedic implants are known to cause irritation and inflammation, to our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe a patient with rice bodies secondary to an orthopedic implant. Although the etiology of rice bodies is unclear, histological studies reveal that they are composed of an inner amorphous core surrounded by collagen and fibrin. The differential diagnosis in this case included synovial chondromatosis, infection, and the formation of a malignant tumor. Additional imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging, and more specific tests were necessary to differentiate the rice bodies due to bursitis versus neoplasm, prior to excision. The patient presented 5 years following open reduction and internal fixation of a displaced proximal humerus fracture, with swelling in the area of the previous surgical site. Examination revealed a large, painless tumor-like mass on the anterior aspect of the shoulder. The patient's chief concern was the unpleasant aesthetic of the mass; no pain was reported. Upon excision of the mass, the patient's full, painless range of motion returned.

  13. Billing and coding knowledge: a comparative survey of professional coders, practicing orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kevin F; Yousuf, Tariq; Pasque, Charles B; Yousuf, Khalid

    2014-06-01

    Medical knowledge and surgical skills are necessary to become an effective orthopedic surgeon. To run an efficient practice, the surgeon must also possess a basic understanding of medical business practices, including billing and coding. In this study, we surveyed and compared the level of billing and coding knowledge among current orthopedic residents PGY3 and higher, academic and private practice attending orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic coding professionals. According to the survey results, residents and fellows have a similar knowledge of coding and billing, regardless of their level of training or type of business education received in residency. Most residents would like formal training in coding, billing, and practice management didactics; this is consistent with data from previous studies.

  14. Medical and orthopedic conditions and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Diokno, Eugene; Rowe, Dale

    2010-06-01

    The presence of certain medical or orthopedic conditions need not preclude adolescents from being physically active and participating in sports. The benefits of continued physical activity far outweigh any concerns for potential complications for most such conditions. This article reviews sport participation guidelines for adolescents with conditions that include juvenile chronic arthritis, eye injures, solitary kidney, skin conditions, scoliosis, and spondylolysis.

  15. Orthopedically Handicapped Children in Ohio Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Victor J.; Todd, Joseph H.

    The historical development of programs for orthopedically handicapped children, class units and hospital classes approved during 1967-68, and the number of therapy units established are presented. Tables give data on program population: enrollment for years 1962-68, percent of handicaps enrolled, and IQ distributions. Aspects of occupational…

  16. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  17. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  18. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  19. The halo fixator.

    PubMed

    Bono, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    The halo fixator may be used for the definitive treatment of cervical spine trauma, preoperative reduction in the patient with spinal deformity, and adjunctive postoperative stabilization following cervical spine surgery. Halo fixation decreases cervical motion by 30% to 96%. Absolute contraindications include cranial fracture, infection, and severe soft-tissue injury at the proposed pin sites. Relative contraindications include severe chest trauma, obesity, advanced age, and a barrel-shaped chest. In children, a computed tomography scan of the head should be obtained before pin placement to determine cranial bone thickness. Complications of halo fixation include pin loosening, pin site infection, and skin breakdown. A concerning rate of life-threatening complications, such as respiratory distress, has been reported in elderly patients. Despite a paucity of contemporary data, recent retrospective studies have demonstrated acceptable results for halo fixation in managing some upper and lower cervical spine injuries.

  20. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic fixatives are chemicals used to develop photographs. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing such chemicals. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an ...

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of the Pinless external fixator.

    PubMed

    Stene, G M; Frigg, R; Schlegel, U; Swiontkowski, M

    1992-01-01

    In open fractures especially in those with severe soft tissue damage, fracture stabilisation is best achieved by using external fixators. There are some intrinsic complications which occur during classical external pin fixation. To overcome the problem of pin track infection and vascular damage from drilling, the Pinless external fixator was developed. It is based on the idea of a forceps with trocar points, which only penetrate the bone cortex superficially. The function of the device was tested in two mechanical trials and two in vitro tests in which one pinless clamp was put under a controlled load of 50 N, 150 cycles/day and studied over a 5 week period in sheep. The loads and time range of the experiment were chosen to simulate a temporary fracture stabilisation in a patient not bearing weight. The main question to be answered was whether the Pinless external fixator would be able to maintain stable fixation. Furthermore, it was to determine the changes at the trocar-to-bone interface. The clamp was found to maintain 72% of the initially applied clamping force after 5 weeks of in vivo application and it was found to be tight at removal. Some decrease of clamping force was found during the first 20 days and then the force tended to level off. There was no slippage nor did the clamp penetrate the cortex. There were no obvious signs of infection around the trocar-holes and in the bacterial tests no pathological cultures were grown. Histology revealed very localised bone reactions, the indentation caused by the trocar tips being only 1.2 mm deep. The study concludes, as far as could be ascertained from these tests, that it is safe to use pinless external fixation for temporary fracture fixation.

  2. The Rotterdam Palatal Distractor: introduction of the new bone-borne device and report of the pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koudstaal, M J; van der Wal, K G H; Wolvius, E B; Schulten, A J M

    2006-01-01

    Transverse maxillary hypoplasia, in adolescents and adults, is frequently seen as an acquired deformity and in congenital deformities patients and can be corrected by means of surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Traditionally, the distractors for expansion are tooth-borne devices, i.e. hyrax appliances, which may have some serious disadvantages such as tooth tipping, cortical fenestration, skeletal relapse and loss of anchorage. In contrast, with bone-borne distractors most of the maxillary expansion is orthopedic and at a more mechanically desired level with less dental side effects. A new bone-borne palatal distractor has been developed. By activation the nails of the abutments plates automatically stabilizes the device and no screw fixation is necessary anymore. This new distractor is presented and the data of five acquired deformity and eight congenital deformity patients that were treated with this distractor are reported.

  3. Role of Suppressive Oral Antibiotics in Orthopedic Hardware Infections for Those Not Undergoing Two-Stage Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Sara C.; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Higgins, Yvonne; Piggott, Damani A.; Osgood, Greg; Auwaerter, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The use of suppressive antibiotics in treatment of orthopedic hardware infections (OHIs), including spinal hardware infections, prosthetic joint infections, and infections of internal fixation devices, is controversial. Methods. Over a 4-year period at 2 academic medical centers, patients with OHI who were treated with debridement and retention of hardware components, with single-stage exchange, or without surgery were studied to determine whether use of oral antibiotics for at least 6 months after diagnosis impacts successful treatment of the infection at 1 year after diagnosis. Results. Of 89 patients in the study, 42 (47.2%) were free of clinical infection 1 year after initial diagnosis. Suppressive antibiotics used for at least 6 months after diagnosis was not associated with being free of clinical infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], .74–37.80), but being on suppressive antibiotics at least 3 months after diagnosis was associated with being free of clinical infection (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.30–9.43). Causative organisms impacted the likelihood of success; patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as well as with Gram-negative rods were both less likely to have achieved clinical success at 1 year after surgery (aOR = 0.018, 95% CI = .0017–.19 and aOR = 0.20, 95% CI = .039–.99, respectively). Conclusions. Oral suppressive antibiotic therapy in treatment of OHI with retention of hardware for 3 months, but not 6 months, postdiagnosis increases the likelihood of treatment success. The organisms implicated in the infection directly impact the likelihood of treatment success. PMID:27747252

  4. An Overview of Internal Fixation Implant Metallurgy and Galvanic Corrosion Effects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Justin; Berger, Aaron; Benhaim, Prosper

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic and hand surgery implants for internal fixation of fractures have evolved substantially over the past 50 years. Newer metal compositions have been used, and new standards have been applied to older alloys, resulting in modern implants with unique physical properties and better clinical performances. Conventional wisdom has long dictated that implanting different metals should be avoided, but few guidelines exist regarding the safety of using in proximity implant systems of dissimilar metals. To better characterize the landscape of internal fixation implant metallurgy, we have compiled the recommendations and conclusions of the currently available and pertinent literature.

  5. [Orthopedic Problems in Overweight and Obese Children].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S; Stücker, R; Rupprecht, M

    2016-03-01

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents is a growing problem with an increasing number of patients presenting with comorbidities to pediatricians and orthopedic surgeons. This overview summarizes the most common orthopedic problems in overweight children and obesity and highlights the treatment options in addition to weight reduction and physiotherapy leaded activation. In early infancy a persitent genu varum may be seen as a sign of Blount disease. In the school ages flat feet or persistent knock-knees has a higher incidence in overweight children. The incidence for back pain and osteoporosis are related with overweight and obese. At puberty, the slipped capital epiphysis, which always needs a surgical management, is mostly related to overweight/obese. A symptomatic retroversion of the femur can cause discomfort and lead to a surgical therapy himself.

  6. Orthopedic problems in geriatric dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S

    2005-05-01

    Senior dogs and cats with orthopedic injuries and diseases often require a treatment plan that differs from that of younger patients. Injured bone and soft tissues tend to heal more slowly in the geriatric patient. The older animal is likely to have a less competent immune system and may have compromised metabolic and endocrine function. Pre-existing musculoskeletal problems may make ambulation difficult for an animal convalescing from a new orthopedic problem. Special attention is often needed when treating these patients for fractures, joint instability, infection, and neoplasia. In general, issues that should be addressed in the geriatric patient include reducing intraoperative and anesthesia time, enhancing bone and soft tissue healing, return to early function, control of postoperative pain, physical therapy, and proper nutrition.

  7. Orthopedic Implant Waste: Analysis and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Payne, Ashley; Slover, James; Inneh, Ifeoma; Hutzler, Lorraine; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The steadily increasing demand for orthopedic surgeries and declining rates of reimbursement by Medicare and other insurance providers have led many hospitals to look for ways to control the cost of these surgeries. We reviewed administrative records for a 1-year period and recorded total number of surgical cases, number of cases in which an implant was wasted, and cost of each wasted implant. We determined cost incurred because of implant waste, percentage of cases that involved waste, percentage of total implant cost wasted, and average cost of waste per case. We then analyzed the data to determine if case volume or years in surgical practice affected amount of implant waste. Results showed implant waste represents a significant cost for orthopedic procedures within all subspecialties and is an important factor to consider when developing cost-reduction strategies.

  8. Treatment Options for Orthopedic Device-related Infections.

    PubMed

    Toubes, Edna; Segreti, John

    2002-10-01

    Though uncommon, prosthetic joint infections are a devastating complication of total joint replacement surgeries and are a cause of significant morbidity. Although complete removal of all foreign material followed by a prolonged course of directed antibiotic therapy is the optimal treatment for such infections, many factors, such as patient health, cost, available bone stock, and timing of infection influence the type of treatment that is chosen. We review the different treatment options for prosthetic joint infections, including surgical modalities and antibiotic choice, duration, and suppression.

  9. Intrapelvic Protrusion of a Broken Guide Wire Fragment during Fixation of a Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2017-01-01

    During fixation of a femoral neck fracture in a 23-year-old male patient with cannulated screws, a broken guide wire fragment inadvertently advanced through the hip joint and protruded into the pelvis. A second surgical approach was needed to remove the broken fragment from the pelvis. Awareness of such a potentially devastating complication will make surgeons more cautious during implementation of orthopedic instruments and increases patient’s safety during surgery.

  10. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  11. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany – an analysis of orthopedic accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Peter; Maier, Werner; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the ‘official degree of care provision’. However, with geographic information systems (GIS), more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility) with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population) lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0), whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population) lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0). Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001) and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001) and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001). Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas. PMID:28178335

  12. [Orthopedics and patients under national socialism dictatorship].

    PubMed

    Thomann, K D; Rauschmann, M

    2001-10-01

    The 12-year dictatorship of National Socialism represents a decisive event in the history of orthopedics in Germany. Treatment and care was limited to those patients whose prognosis promised their reintegration into the work force. Those orthopedic patients with mental and psychological handicaps no longer came under the care of orthopedists and were potential candidates for annihilation. Despite concerted efforts to the contrary, as can be gleaned from the lists of topics at the annual meetings, the prevailing political circumstances encumbered scientific activities. The almost total isolation from international contacts had a negative effect. Orthopedists were hindered in their work by the law on sterilization, which provided for sterilization in cases of severe physical deformity. Some orthopedists even considered the presence of hip dysplasia to be an indication. The roles played by Georg Hohmann, Hellmut Eckhardt, Lothar Kreuz, and other leading orthopedists are described in detail. It can be regarded as certain that Hohmann and Eckhardt were able to prevent dire consequences for their orthopedic patients and the profession by cautious tactics. The ethnical problems of involvement with National Socialism are thoroughly discussed.

  13. Surgical Revision after Sacroiliac Joint Fixation or Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion has been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of SIJ dysfunction. Multiple devices are available to perform SIJ fixation or fusion. Surgical revision rates after these procedures have not been directly compared. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients in our practice who underwent SIJ fixation or fusion between 2003 and 2015. Using both chart review and focused contact with individual patients, we determined the likelihood of surgical revision. Revision rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Thirty-eight patients underwent SIJ fixation with screws and 274 patients underwent SIJ fusion using triangular titanium implants. Four-year cumulative revision rates were 30.8% for fixation and 5.7% for fusion. Conclusions In our study, SIJ fixation with screws had a much higher revision rate compared to SIJ fusion with triangular titanium implants designed for bone adherence.

  14. Intramedullary Tibial Nail Fixation of Simple Intraarticular Distal Tibia Fractures.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John A; Broghammer, Francis H; Donegan, Derek J

    2016-11-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for distal tibia fractures, especially those with intraarticular extension, remains controversial. Although open reduction and internal fixation with a plate and screw device is commonly performed for these injuries, the risk of soft tissue complications using this approach is significant. Staged treatment protocols and alternative means of fixation have been proposed to address these undesired events. Although potentially more technically demanding than fixation of diaphyseal or extraarticular tibial fractures, intramedullary nail (IMN) fixation of simple intraarticular distal tibia fractures is a viable treatment alternative with unique advantages. This article presents a review of the literature and rationale for intramedullary tibial nail fixation of simple intraarticular distal tibia fractures and a surgical approach commonly utilized for successful implementation.

  15. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that alternative pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials. PMID:22647231

  16. Intraoperative Hypothermia During Surgical Fixation of Hip Fractures.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Pepper, Andrew M; Jildeh, Toufic R; Shaw, Jonathan; Guthrie, Trent; Silverton, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Hip fractures are common orthopedic injuries and are associated with significant morbidity/mortality. Intraoperative normothermia is recommended by national guidelines to minimize additional morbidity/mortality, but limited evidence exists regarding hypothermia's effect on orthopedic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in patients with operatively treated hip fractures and evaluate its effect on complications and outcomes. Retrospective chart review was performed on clinical records from 1541 consecutive patients who sustained a hip fracture and underwent operative fixation at the authors' institution between January 2005 and October 2013. A total of 1525 patients were included for analysis, excluding those with injuries requiring additional surgical intervention. Patient demographic data, surgery-specific data, postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission were recorded. Patients with a mean intraoperative temperature less than 36°C were identified as hypothermic. Statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling evaluated associations with hypothermia and effect on complications/outcomes. The incidence of intraoperative hypothermia in operatively treated hip fractures was 17.0%. Hypothermia was associated with an increase in the rate of deep surgical-site infection (odds ratio, 3.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-9.14; P=.022). Lower body mass index and increasing age demonstrated increased association with hypothermia (P=.004 and P=.005, respectively). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first and largest study analyzing the effect of intraoperative hypothermia in orthopedic patients. In patients with hip fractures, the study's findings confirm evidence found in other surgical specialties that hypothermia may be associated with an increased risk of deep surgical-site infection and that lower body mass index and increasing age are risk factors

  17. [The clinical use of Hotz-type orthopedic plate].

    PubMed

    Kamegai, A; Matsuoka, Y; Shimamura, N; Muramatsu, Y; Tanabe, T; Kurenuma, S; Kimura, Y; Shibata, K; Naitoh, K; Kitajima, T

    1988-12-01

    In the present study a Hotz type orthopedic plate was used to improve feeding and physiological growth. In 2 patients with cleft lip it was used to improve feeding and swallowing. In 4 patients with cleft lip and palate it was used to normalize functions and aid physiological growth. The effects of the Hotz orthopedic plate were determined by recording body weight growth, milk volume per day, feeding time and comparison of the study model between before and after using Hotz orthopedic plate. Good physiological growth and improved feeding, were obtoincdinalmostall the patients who wore the Hotz type orthopedic plate correctly.

  18. Impact of a Musculoskeletal Clerkship on Orthopedic Surgery Applicant Diversity.

    PubMed

    London, Daniel A; Calfee, Ryan P; Boyer, Martin I

    Orthopedic surgery lacks racial and sexual diversity, which we hypothesized stems from absence of exposure to orthopedics during medical school. We conducted a study to determine whether diversity of matched orthopedic surgery residency applicants increased after introduction of a required third-year rotation. We compared 2 groups: precurriculum and postcurriculum. The postcurriculum group was exposed to a required 1-month musculoskeletal rotation during the third year of medical school. Comparisons were made of percentage of total students exposed to orthopedics, percentage who applied to and matched to orthopedic surgery, and proportion of women and underrepresented minorities. A prospective survey was used to determine when students chose orthopedics and what influenced their decisions. The required rotation increased the percentage of third-year students rotating on orthopedics (25%) with no change in application rate (6%). It also led to an 81% relative increase in the proportion of female applicants and a 101% relative increase in underrepresented minority applicants. According to survey data, 79% of students chose orthopedics during their third year, and 88% thought they were influenced by their rotation. A required third-year rotation exposes more medical students to orthopedics and increases the diversity of matching students.

  19. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  20. Orthopedic resident anatomy review course: a collaboration between anatomists and orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    DeFriez, Curtis B; Morton, David A; Horwitz, Daniel S; Eckel, Christine M; Foreman, K Bo; Albertine, Kurt H

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months for all of its residents. The primary purpose of the course is to renew competencies in basic science disciplines so that incoming residents more quickly reach a level of functional proficiency and to afford senior residents a platform to teach their junior colleagues. Before 2005, this course was conducted with minimal participation from anyone outside of the Department of Orthopaedics. Many of the residents voiced concerns that the educational benefits were not proportionate to the time invested. To improve the teaching of orthopedic-related anatomy, an educational collaboration between the Departments of Neurobiology and Anatomy and Orthopaedics was established in 2004 and continues to the present time. The major objectives of refining the course pedagogy, developing a Course Manual and Dissection Guide, and evaluating the results by administering a course survey questionnaire are described in this article. Implementation of all facets of the revised course has resulted in better participation by orthopedic faculty and more favorable reviews by the participating residents. Based on current levels of interest and positive comments from course participants, the Anatomy and Orthopedic faculty course directors plan to continue to develop course materials and pedagogy.

  1. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  2. Hunting stand-related injuries in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Lebus, George F; Krueger, Chad A; Stinner, Daniel J; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-09-01

    Hunting remains an extremely popular recreational activity, with nearly 15 million Americans receiving a hunting license annually. Precautions have helped decrease accidents, but hunting-related injuries remain relatively common. The majority of severe, hunting-related accidents involve either a fall from a hunting platform or an accidental shooting. Both of these mechanisms frequently result in orthopedic injuries, many of which require operative care. Although firearms-associated injury has seemingly decreased, hunting platform falls and their sequelae are increasing. Understanding the mechanisms of these injuries and increasing awareness of them may minimize their morbidity and mortality or help prevent them altogether.

  3. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  4. Mini-plate fixation versus suture suspensory fixation in cervical laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Ma, Lei; Huo, Li-Shuang; Cao, Yan-Xiang; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Both the mini-plate fixation and suture suspensory fixation techniques are extensively applied in cervical laminoplasty, but which technique is superior has not been ascertained. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the results between mini-plate fixation and suture suspensory fixation in cervical laminoplasty for the patients with multilevel cervical compressive myelopathy. Methods: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG were searched for studies that compared mini-plate fixation and suture suspensory fixation in cervical laminoplasty up to November 1, 2016. We calculated odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes. Review Manager 5.3 was used for the statistical analyses. Results: A total of 25 studies, involving 1603 participants, were included in this review. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that there were statistically significant differences in postoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores (MD = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.34–0.99, P < 0.001), JOA scores improvement rate (MD = 4.00, 95% CI: 2.51–5.50, P < 0.001), postoperative Visual Analogue Score (VAS) (MD = −0.81, 95% CI: −1.36 to −0.26, P = 0.004), postoperative range of motion (ROM) (MD = 4.15, 95% CI: 2.06–6.23, P < 0.001), postoperative cervical lordosis (MD = 3.1, 95% CI: 2.02–4.18, P < 0.001), postoperative anteroposterior diameter of the spinal canal (MD = 1.53, 95% CI: 0.11–2.95, P = 0.03), postoperative open angle (MD = 1.93, 95% CI: 0.14–3.71, P = 0.03), postoperative cross-sectional area of the spinal canal (MD = 37.10, 95% CI: 26.92–47.29, P < 0.001), axial symptoms (OR = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.20–0.37, P < 0.001), operation time (MD = 4.46, 95% CI: 0.74–8.19, P = 0.02), and blood loss (MD = 9.24, 95% CI: 6.86–11.62, P < 0.001). However

  5. Surface modification of magnesium alloys developed for bioabsorbable orthopedic implants: a general review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiali; Tang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yangde; Wang, Jue; Lai, Yuxiao; Qin, Ling

    2012-08-01

    As a bioabsorbable metal with mechanical properties close to bone, pure magnesium or its alloys have great potential to be developed as medical implants for clinical applications. However, great efforts should be made to avoid its fast degradation in vivo for orthopedic applications when used for fracture fixation. Therefore, how to decease degradation rate of pure magnesium or its alloys is one of the focuses in Research and Development (R&D) of medical implants. It has been recognized that surface modification is an effective method to prevent its initial degradation in vivo to maintain its desired mechanical strength. This article reviews the recent progress in surface modifications for prevention of fast degradation of magnesium or its alloys using in vitro testing model, a fast yet relevant model before moving towards time-consuming and expensive in vivo testing. Pros and cons of various surface modifications are also discussed for the goal to design available products to be applied in clinical trials.

  6. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races.

  7. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  8. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  9. Breastfeeding is early functional jaw orthopedics (an introduction).

    PubMed

    Page, D C

    2001-01-01

    Breastfeeding places beneficial orthopedic forces on the jaws, similar to the forces of Functional Jaw Orthopedics--the newest form of orthodontics. To date most breastfeeding benefits have been attributed to the content of mother's milk. The true orthopedic benefits of breastfeeding, suckling, deserve more definitive attention and research. Breastfeeding is early preventive Functional Jaw Orthopedics because breastfeeding forces impact the jaws during a very rapid period of infant jaw growth. Breast suckling aids proper development of the jaws which form the gateway to the human airway. Bottle, pacifier and digit sucking deform jaws and airways. Forward forces of suckling clearly oppose the backward forces of sucking. Dentists who understand the positive impact of forward orthopedic forces on the jaws should support and advocate exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  11. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  12. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  13. Distraction osteogenesis: application to dentofacial orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Yen, S L

    1997-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical-orthopedic method for lengthening bone by separating or distracting a fracture callus. This technique has a long history in limb lengthening and has recently been used to lengthen mandibles and maxillae in human patients. Distraction osteogenesis represents a powerful method of producing unlimited quantities of living bone which can be formed along any plane of space. Because this method uses local host tissue, it offers many advantages over bone grafting. In the author's experience, large (10-22 mm) antero-posterior and vertical corrections of mandibles can be achieved using this technique. The purpose of this article is to review its biological basis and discuss recent clinical applications. This article reviews the history, theory, current management, and limitations of distraction osteogenesis in treating craniofacial anomalies.

  14. Enhancing orthopedic implant bioactivity: refining the nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Moya, Sergio; Lu, ZuFu; Gregurec, Danijela; Zreiqat, Hala

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology open up new possibilities to produce biomimetic surfaces that resemble the cell in vivo growth environment at a nanoscale level. Nanotopographical changes of biomaterials surfaces can positively impact the bioactivity and ossointegration properties of orthopedic and dental implants. This review introduces nanofabrication techniques currently used or those with high potential for use as surface modification of biomedical implants. The interactions of nanotopography with water, proteins and cells are also discussed, as they largely determine the final success of the implants. Due to the well-documented effects of surface chemistry and microtopography on the bioactivity of the implant, we here elaborate on the ability of the nanofabrication techniques to combine the dual (multi) modification of surface chemistry and/or microtopography.

  15. Animal models of orthopedic implant infection.

    PubMed

    An, Y H; Friedman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Prosthetic infection following total joint replacement can have catastrophic results both physically and psychologically for patients, leading to complete failure of the arthroplasty, possible amputation, prolonged hospitalization, and even death. Although with the use of prophylactic antibiotics and greatly improved operating room techniques the infection rate has decreased markedly during the years, challenges still remain for better preventive and therapeutic measures. In this review the in vivo experimental methods for studies of prosthetic infection are discussed, concentrating on (1) the animal models that have been established and the use of these animal models for studies of pathogenesis of bacteria, behavior of biofilm, effect of biomaterials on prosthetic infection rate, and the effect of infection on biomaterial surfaces, and (2) how to design and conduct an animal model of orthopedic prosthetic infection including animal selection, implant fabrication, bacterial inoculation, surgical technique, and the methods for evaluating the results.

  16. Correct coding for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Malek, M Mike; Friedman, Melvin M; Beach, William

    2002-04-01

    Coding accurately is one of the main principles of a successful practice. Some changes that we will see shortly include deletion of the term "separate procedure," deletion of the term "with and/or without," deletion of the term "any method," revision of the criteria for choosing E/M levels, and 52 new and revised Hand Surgery codes. Some other changes to come will be category II and category III codes. More changes are occurring as this is written, and the best advice is to stay tuned. It is obvious to the authors that coding is mainly for reimbursement purposes. The orthopedic surgeon must remain vigilant and must not pass this task on to someone else. Ignorance of coding methods is not an excuse [2]. We must all watch carefully and speak up when necessary. In this day of decreasing reimbursement, we can all increase our revenue stream without working any harder if we code our work properly, completely, and promptly.

  17. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  18. The Use of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced (CFR) PEEK Material in Orthopedic Implants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan Silvia; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been successfully used in orthopedic implants. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the properties, technical data, and safety of CFR-PEEK biomaterial and to evaluate its potential for new innovation in the design of articulating medical devices. A comprehensive search in PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify articles relevant to the outcomes of CFR-PEEK orthopedic implants. The search was also expanded by reviewing the reference sections of selected papers and references and benchmark reports provided by content experts. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. There is limited literature available assessing the performance of CFR-PEEK, specifically as an implant material for arthroplasty systems. Nevertheless, available studies strongly support CFR-PEEK as a promising and suitable material for orthopedic implants because of its biocompatibility, material characteristics, and mechanical durability. Future studies should continue to investigate CFR-PEEK’s potential benefits. PMID:25780341

  19. Ilizarov hybrid external fixation for fractures of the distal radius: Part II. Internal fixation versus Ilizarov hybrid external fixation: Stability as assessed by cadaveric simulated motion testing.

    PubMed

    Dunning, C E; Lindsay, C S; Bicknell, R T; Johnson, J A; King, G J; Patterson, S D

    2001-03-01

    The in vitro stability of an Ilizarov hybrid external fixator was compared with that of a dorsal 3.5-mm AO T-plate in 8 unpaired, fresh-frozen upper extremities. A specially designed testing device that used computer-controlled pneumatic actuators was used to simulate active finger, wrist, and forearm motions by applying loads to relevant tendons. A comminuted extra-articular distal radius fracture was modelled using a dorsally based wedge osteotomy. Fracture stability was assessed using an electromagnetic tracking device to measure motion across the fracture site after randomized application of the plate and the hybrid fixator. During simulated finger and wrist motions with the forearm pronated or supinated, motion of the distal fragment with the hybrid fixator applied was comparable to or statistically less than with the AO plate applied. During simulated forearm rotation, the stability provided by the 2 fixation types was similar, although the plate allowed statistically less radial-ulnar deviation of the fragment. In this model of a 2-part extra-articular distal radius fracture, the clinically meaningful stability of the Ilizarov hybrid external fixator was comparable to that of the dorsal AO plate.

  20. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080 Section 888.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080 Section 888.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080 Section 888.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080 Section 888.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080 Section 888.3080 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body...

  5. Colored Indicator Undergloves Increase the Detection of Glove Perforations by Surgeons During Small Animal Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Oliver P.; Parsons, Kevin J.; Burton, Neil J.; Langley‐Hobbs, Sorrel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of colored indicator gloves affects perforation detection rate and to identify risk factors for glove perforation during veterinary orthopedic surgery. Study Design Prospective randomized controlled trial. Sample Population 574 double pairs of gloves worn during 300 orthopedic surgical procedures (2,296 gloves). Methods Primary and assistant surgeons double‐gloved for all orthopedic surgical procedures. Type of inner glove (standard or colored indicator) was randomized for the first 360 double pairs of gloves worn by surgeons during 180 procedures. Perforations detected by surgeons were recorded and gloves changed if requested. For a further 120 procedures, indicator gloves were used exclusively. All gloves were leak‐tested after surgery to identify perforations. Association between potential risk factors and perforation was explored using multivariate logistical regression analysis. Results Glove perforations occurred during 43% of surgeries with a mean of 2.3 holes/surgery. Inner gloves were intact in 63% of glove pairs where an outer perforation occurred. Intraoperative perforation detection was improved when colored indicator gloves were worn (83% sensitivity) vs. standard gloves (34% sensitivity; P<.001). Independent risk factors for perforation were placement of plates and/or screws (P=.001; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.0), placement of an external skeletal fixator (P=.002; OR=7.0; 95% CI, 2.1–23.8), use of orthopedic wire (P=.011; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.2–4.7), and primary surgeon being board‐certified (P=.016; OR=1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.1). Conclusion Increased surgeon recognition of glove perforations through use of colored indicator gloves enables prompt change of gloves if perforation occurs and may reduce potential contamination of the surgical site. PMID:27412490

  6. Comparison of polyvinyl alcohol fixative with three less hazardous fixatives for detection and identification of intestinal parasites.

    PubMed

    Jensen, B; Kepley, W; Guarner, J; Anderson, K; Anderson, D; Clairmont, J; De L'aune, W; Austin, E H; Austin, G E

    2000-04-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing the fixative mercuric chloride is considered the "gold standard" for the fixation of ova and parasites in the preparation of permanently stained smears of stool specimens. However, mercuric chloride is potentially hazardous to laboratory personnel and presents disposal problems. We compared three new alternative, nontoxic fixatives with PVA, analyzing ease of sample preparation and quality of smears. Sixty-eight fresh stool specimens were divided into aliquots and placed in each of four different fixatives: PARASAFE (PS) (Scientific Devices Laboratory, Inc., Des Plaines, Ill.), ECOFIX (EC) (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), Proto-Fix (PF) (Alpha-Tec Systems, Inc., Vancouver, Wash.), and low-viscosity PVA fixative (PVA) (Meridian). Specimens were processed and stained according to each manufacturer's directions. Parasites were found in 31 of 68 slide preparations with PVA, 31 with PF, 30 with EC, and 30 with PS. Blastocystis hominis and Iodamoeba bütschlii were preserved in a readily identifiable state by all methods of fixation. However, some parasites were more easily identified with some of the fixatives because of differences in parasite distortion. For example, Entamoeba histolytica (Entamoeba dispar) was detected in 13 stools fixed with PF, 7 with PVA, and 6 with EC but none with PS. Likewise, Chilomastix mesnili was identified in 13 specimens fixed with PF, 8 with EC, and 5 with PVA but only 1 with PS, while Entamoeba coli was seen much less frequently with PS than with the other three fixatives. A dirty background was observed in 41% of specimens prepared with PS, whereas background quality was acceptable with other fixatives. Sample preparation was most rapid with PS, although the EC method involved the fewest steps. In conclusion, PVA and PF produced the least parasite distortion, while PS proved unsatisfactory for the identification of E. histolytica, E. coli, and C. mesnili. Both PF and EC appear to be

  7. Comparison of Polyvinyl Alcohol Fixative with Three Less Hazardous Fixatives for Detection and Identification of Intestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, B.; Kepley, W.; Guarner, J.; Anderson, K.; Anderson, D.; Clairmont, J.; De l'aune, William; Austin, E. H.; Austin, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing the fixative mercuric chloride is considered the “gold standard” for the fixation of ova and parasites in the preparation of permanently stained smears of stool specimens. However, mercuric chloride is potentially hazardous to laboratory personnel and presents disposal problems. We compared three new alternative, nontoxic fixatives with PVA, analyzing ease of sample preparation and quality of smears. Sixty-eight fresh stool specimens were divided into aliquots and placed in each of four different fixatives: PARASAFE (PS) (Scientific Devices Laboratory, Inc., Des Plaines, Ill.), ECOFIX (EC) (Meridian Diagnostics, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), Proto-Fix (PF) (Alpha-Tec Systems, Inc., Vancouver, Wash.), and low-viscosity PVA fixative (PVA) (Meridian). Specimens were processed and stained according to each manufacturer's directions. Parasites were found in 31 of 68 slide preparations with PVA, 31 with PF, 30 with EC, and 30 with PS. Blastocystis hominis and Iodamoeba bütschlii were preserved in a readily identifiable state by all methods of fixation. However, some parasites were more easily identified with some of the fixatives because of differences in parasite distortion. For example, Entamoeba histolytica (Entamoeba dispar) was detected in 13 stools fixed with PF, 7 with PVA, and 6 with EC but none with PS. Likewise, Chilomastix mesnili was identified in 13 specimens fixed with PF, 8 with EC, and 5 with PVA but only 1 with PS, while Entamoeba coli was seen much less frequently with PS than with the other three fixatives. A dirty background was observed in 41% of specimens prepared with PS, whereas background quality was acceptable with other fixatives. Sample preparation was most rapid with PS, although the EC method involved the fewest steps. In conclusion, PVA and PF produced the least parasite distortion, while PS proved unsatisfactory for the identification of E. histolytica, E. coli, and C. mesnili. Both PF and EC appear to be

  8. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  9. The Sequoia circular fixator for limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J M; Tadlaoui, A; Wirotius, J M; Saleh, M

    1991-10-01

    With the Sequoia fixator, lengthenings can be achieved based on the clinical facts of the case. The device is a modular apparatus that can perform corrections in several planes, and, if necessary, in a septic environment. In our opinion, a "lengthener surgeon" is one who can foresee problems and take appropriate steps to prevent them. Likewise, the surgeon must act as the coordinator of an entire team. A successful lengthening is 5% surgery and 95% postoperative nursing and physiotherapy care. In the future, a number of changes will simplify postoperative management: 1. Composite carbon rings will make the frames radiolucent and one third lighter than those made of stainless steel. Automatic tensioners will help maintain steady tension on the wires. 2. Digital analysis of the callus will provide norms of consolidation, allowing faster fixator removal and conversion to an orthosis. 3. Incorporating the foot in the frame to overcome equinus will eliminate the need for tenotomy. We believe that monolateral and ring fixators can work together in certain locations. That is why we proposed, at the 18th Societé Internationale de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique meeting, a combined monolateral-ring construct that can be used for lengthening throughout the proximal femoral metaphysis.

  10. Orthopedic Health: Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know (quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Javascript on. How much do you know about osteoarthritis, its causes, and its therapies? Take this quiz ...

  11. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What's on the Horizon?

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future.

  12. Orthopedic surgery and its complication in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-systemic immune-complex mediated autoimmune condition which chiefly affects women during their prime year. While the management of the condition falls into the specialty of internal medicine, patients with SLE often present with signs and symptoms pertaining to the territory of orthopedic surgery such as tendon rupture, carpal tunnel syndrome, osteonecrosis, osteoporotic fracture and infection including septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. While these orthopedic-related conditions are often debilitating in patients with SLE which necessitate management by orthopedic specialists, a high index of suspicion is necessary in diagnosing these conditions early because lupus patients with potentially severe orthopedic conditions such as osteomyelitis frequently present with mild symptoms and subtle signs such as low grade fever, mild hip pain and back tenderness. Additionally, even if these orthopedic conditions can be recognized, complications as a result of surgical procedures are indeed not uncommon. SLE per se and its various associated pharmacological treatments may pose lupus patients to certain surgical risks if they are not properly attended to and managed prior to, during and after surgery. Concerted effort of management and effective communication among orthopedic specialists and rheumatologists play an integral part in enhancing favorable outcome and reduction in postoperative complications for patients with SLE through thorough pre-operative evaluation, careful peri-operative monitoring and treatment, as well as judicious postoperative care. PMID:24653977

  13. [Technical orthopedics. Importance in an increasingly operatively oriented faculty].

    PubMed

    Greitemann, B; Maronna, U

    2013-10-01

    The foundation of the German Society for Orthopedics in 1901 was due to a separation from the faculty of surgery because a surgical approach alone did not adequately deal with the symptoms. Orthopedists were initially considered as a fringe group. The conservative treatment approach was initially at the forefront and operative measures were a side line. The main aim was the rehabilitation of patients into a normal life as best as possible. In the conservative area treatment with orthopedic technical aids and appliances rapidly came to play an important role and a great multitude of technical appliances were developed with sometimes very different possible applications. Despite the clearly improved operative treatment approaches in orthopedics and trauma surgery, technical orthopedics still plays a substantial role even today. Healing and supportive aids and appliances are of decisive importance for the treatment of a multitude of diseases and handicaps. They stabilize and improve operative treatment results and often result in new approaches. This depends on cooperation between technicians, therapists and physicians in a team, even in the scientific field. Evidence-based studies on the effectiveness of technical aids are currently still uncommon but recently some clear evidence for effectiveness could be shown. Scientifically this is a very varied field of work. The demographic development presents new requirements which must be dealt with. Technical solutions are often very promising especially in this field. Technical orthopedics remains an important component of the specialty of orthopedics and trauma surgery and with an increasing tendency due to more recent research and development.

  14. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  15. Computer-assisted surgery in orthopedic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gerbers, Jasper G; Stevens, Martin; Ploegmakers, Joris JW; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Jutte, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — In orthopedic oncology, computer-assisted surgery (CAS) can be considered an alternative to fluoroscopy and direct measurement for orientation, planning, and margin control. However, only small case series reporting specific applications have been published. We therefore describe possible applications of CAS and report preliminary results in 130 procedures. Patients and methods — We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all oncological CAS procedures in a single institution from November 2006 to March 2013. Mean follow-up time was 32 months. We categorized and analyzed 130 procedures for clinical parameters. The categories were image-based intralesional treatment, image-based resection, image-based resection and reconstruction, and imageless resection and reconstruction. Results — Application to intralesional treatment showed 1 inadequate curettage and 1 (other) recurrence in 63 cases. Image-based resections in 42 cases showed 40 R0 margins; 16 in 17 pelvic resections. Image-based reconstruction facilitated graft creation with a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.9 mm in one case. Imageless CAS was helpful in resection planning and length- and joint line reconstruction for tumor prostheses. Interpretation — CAS is a promising new development. Preliminary results show a high number of R0 resections and low short-term recurrence rates for curettage. PMID:25140984

  16. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  1. Functionally graded materials for orthopedic applications - an update on design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Sola, Antonella; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are innovative materials whose composition and/or microstructure gradually vary in space according to a designed law. As a result, also the properties gradually vary in space, so as to meet specific non-homogeneous service requirements without any abrupt interface at the macroscale. FGMs are emerging materials for orthopedic prostheses, since the functional gradient can be adapted to reproduce the local properties of the original bone, which helps to minimize the stress shielding effect and, at the same time, to reduce the shear stress between the implant and the surrounding bone tissue, two critical prerequisites for a longer lifespan of the graft. After a brief introduction to the origin of the FGM concept, the review surveys some representative examples of graded systems which are present in nature and, in particular, in the human body, with a focus on bone tissue. Then the rationale for using FGMs in orthopedic devices is discussed more in detail, taking into account both biological and biomechanical requirements. The core of the paper is dedicated to two fundamental topics, which are essential to benefit from the use of FGMs for orthopedic applications, namely (1) the computational tools for materials design and geometry optimization, and (2) the manufacturing techniques currently available to produce FGM-based grafts. This second part, in its turn, is structured to consider the production of functionally graded coatings (FGCs), of functionally graded 3D parts, and of special devices with a gradient in porosity (functionally graded scaffolds). The inspection of the literature on the argument clearly shows that the integration of design and manufacturing remains a critical step to overpass in order to achieve effective FGM-based implants.

  2. Comparison of outcome of tibial plafond fractures managed by hybrid external fixation versus two-stage management with final plate fixation

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Gómez, Mireia; Alvarez, Carlos; Millán, Angélica; De Caso, Julio; Soria, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tibial platfond fractures are usually associated with massive swelling of the foot and ankle, as well as with open wounds. This swelling may cause significant decrease of the blood flow, so the state of the soft tissue is determinant for the surgical indication and the type of implant. This retrospective study compares the union times in cases of tibial plafond fractures managed with a hybrid external fixation as a definitive procedure versus those managed with a two stage strategy with final plate fixation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study in a polytrauma referral hospital was performed between 2005 and 2011. Patients with a tibial plafond fracture, managed with a hybrid external fixation as a definitive procedure or managed with a two stage strategy with the final plate fixation were included in the study. Postoperative radiographs were evaluated by two senior surgeons. Fracture healing was defined as callus bridging of one cortex, seen on both lateral and anteroposterior X-ray. The clinical outcome was evaluated by means of 11 points Numerical Rating Scale for pain and The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle score, assessed at the last followup visit. Thirteen patients had been managed with a hybrid external fixation and 18 with a two-stage strategy with the final plate fixation. There were 14 males and 17 females with a mean age of 48 years (range 19–82 years). The mean followup was 24 months (range 24–70 months). Results: The mean time from surgery to weight bearing was 7 ± 6.36 days for the hybrid fixation group and 57.43 ± 15.46 days for the plate fixation group (P < 0.0001); and the mean time from fracture to radiological union was 133.82 ± 37.83) and 152.8 ± 72.33 days respectively (P = 0.560). Conclusion: Besides the differences between groups regarding the baseline characteristics of patients, the results of this study suggest that in cases of tibial plafond fractures, the management with a hybrid external

  3. Neuronal control of fixation and fixational eye movements

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ocular fixation is a dynamic process that is actively controlled by many of the same brain structures involved in the control of eye movements, including the superior colliculus, cerebellum and reticular formation. In this article, we review several aspects of this active control. First, the decision to move the eyes not only depends on target-related signals from the peripheral visual field, but also on signals from the currently fixated target at the fovea, and involves mechanisms that are shared between saccades and smooth pursuit. Second, eye position during fixation is actively controlled and depends on bilateral activity in the superior colliculi and medio-posterior cerebellum; disruption of activity in these circuits causes systematic deviations in eye position during both fixation and smooth pursuit eye movements. Third, the eyes are not completely still during fixation but make continuous miniature movements, including ocular drift and microsaccades, which are controlled by the same neuronal mechanisms that generate larger saccades. Finally, fixational eye movements have large effects on visual perception. Ocular drift transforms the visual input in ways that increase spatial acuity; microsaccades not only improve vision by relocating the fovea but also cause momentary changes in vision analogous to those caused by larger saccades. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Movement suppression: brain mechanisms for stopping and stillness’. PMID:28242738

  4. The Current Perspectives of Stem Cell Therapy in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akpancar, Serkan; Tatar, Oner; Turgut, Hasan; Akyildiz, Faruk; Ekinci, Safak

    2016-01-01

    Context Musculoskeletal injuries may be painful, troublesome, life limiting and also one of the global health problems. There has been considerable amount of interest during the past two decades to stem cells and tissue engineering techniques in orthopedic surgery, especially to manage special and compulsive injuries within the musculoskeletal system. Evidence Acquisition The aim of this study was to present a literature review regarding the most recent progress in stem cell procedures and current indications in orthopedics clinical care practice. The Medline and PubMed library databases were searched for the articles related with stem cell procedures in the field of orthopedic surgery and additionally the reference list of each article was also included to provide a comprehensive evaluation. Results Various sources of stem cells have been studied for orthopedics clinical care practice. Stem cell therapy has successfully used for major orthopedic procedures in terms of bone-joint injuries (fractures-bone defects, nonunion, and spinal injuries), osteoarthritis-cartilage defects, ligament-tendon injuries, femoral head osteonecrosis and osteogenesis imperfecta. Stem cells have also used in bone tissue engineering in combining with the scaffolds and provided faster and better healing of tissues. Conclusions Large amounts of preclinical studies have been made of stem cells and there is an increasing interest to perform these studies within the human population but preclinical studies are insufficient; therefore, much more and efficient studies should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stem cells. PMID:28144608

  5. Orthostetrics: Management of Orthopedic Conditions in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leslie J; McConda, David B; Lalli, Trapper A J; Daffner, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    Managing orthopedic conditions in pregnant patients leads to challenges that must be carefully considered so that the safety of both the mother and the fetus is maintained. Both perioperative and intraoperative considerations must be made based on physiologic changes during pregnancy, risks of radiation, and recommendations for monitoring. Operative timing, imaging, and medication selection are also factors that may vary based on trimester and clinical scenario. Pregnancy introduces unique parameters that can result in undesirable outcomes for both mother and fetus if not handled appropriately. Ultimately, pregnant patients offer a distinct challenge to the orthopedic surgeon in that the well-being of 2 patients must be considered in all aspects of care. In addition, not only does pregnancy affect the management of orthopedic conditions but the pregnant state also causes physiologic changes that may actually induce various pathologies. These pregnancy-related orthopedic conditions can interfere with an otherwise healthy pregnancy and should be recognized as possible complications. Although the management of orthopedic conditions in pregnancy is often conservative, pregnancy does not necessarily preclude safely treating pathologies operatively. When surgery is considered, regional anesthesia provides less overall drug exposure to the fetus and less variability in fetal heart rate. Intraoperative fluoroscopy can be used when appropriate, with 360° fetal shielding if possible. Lateral decubitus positioning is ideal to prevent hypotension associated with compression of the inferior vena cava.

  6. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Harold A.; Finkler, Elissa S.; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P.; Nystrom, Lukas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. Methods We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution’s residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. Results The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. Conclusions The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population. PMID:27528831

  7. The effects of maitland orthopedic manual therapy on improving constipation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of interventions on constipation and to provide basic data for physical therapy in internal medicine. [Subjects and Methods] The colon transit times of 30 subjects were measured and after the interventions. Fifteen subjects were assigned to a Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group, and 15 subjects were assigned to a dietary fiber group. [Results] The analysis of changes in colon transit time showed statistically significant differences in left colon transit time, rectosigmoid colon transit time, and total colon transit time for the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group and statistically significant differences in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time for the dietary fiber group. An analysis of group differences in the effects of Maitland orthopedic manual therapy and dietary fiber showed that the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group achieved statistically significantly larger declines in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time compared with the dietary fiber group. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that Maitland orthopedic manual therapy can be an effective treatment method for internal conditions such as functional constipation by almost normalizing the colon transit time, not only by improving the symptoms of constipation but also by facilitating intestinal movements.

  8. Desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J. G.; McGowan, J. J.; Ricci, M. A.; McFarlane, G.

    1997-01-01

    Research has shown that diagnostic quality images for most teleradiology applications requires a sophisticated telemedicine system and access to a large amount of bandwidth. While the ideal standards have been set by those involved in evaluating teleradiology, these standards are impractical for many small rural health centers which deliver routine trauma care. While there is no disagreement about the ultimate need for this level of teleradiology support, the purpose of this research was to determine whether Orthopedists would be able to read plain radiographs of orthopedic trauma injuries using a desktop teleradiology system in support of rural trauma care. METHOD: Two radiology residents and two orthopedic residents viewed forty radiographs, twenty through a desktop teleradiology system and twenty in person. Diagnostic findings and certainty of diagnosis were recorded. FINDINGS: There was no statistically significant difference between modalities in orthopedic residents' ability to correctly diagnose orthopedic trauma injuries. Further, for those instances when the diagnosis was imprecise, the residents were aware of their inability to make an accurate diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Although the study was relatively limited and further research needs to be done, the use of desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma consultation is a promising alternative to the more expensive forms of telemedicine technology. PMID:9357657

  9. The effects of maitland orthopedic manual therapy on improving constipation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of interventions on constipation and to provide basic data for physical therapy in internal medicine. [Subjects and Methods] The colon transit times of 30 subjects were measured and after the interventions. Fifteen subjects were assigned to a Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group, and 15 subjects were assigned to a dietary fiber group. [Results] The analysis of changes in colon transit time showed statistically significant differences in left colon transit time, rectosigmoid colon transit time, and total colon transit time for the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group and statistically significant differences in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time for the dietary fiber group. An analysis of group differences in the effects of Maitland orthopedic manual therapy and dietary fiber showed that the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group achieved statistically significantly larger declines in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time compared with the dietary fiber group. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that Maitland orthopedic manual therapy can be an effective treatment method for internal conditions such as functional constipation by almost normalizing the colon transit time, not only by improving the symptoms of constipation but also by facilitating intestinal movements. PMID:27821950

  10. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  11. The pathologist's guide to fixatives.

    PubMed

    Qidwai, Kiran; Afkhami, Michelle; Day, Christina E

    2014-01-01

    Proper tissue fixation is essential to ensure the highest level of specimen evaluation. Pathologists and laboratory staff are frequently consulted by clinical counterparts regarding what fixative should be used for different tissues or to enable a diagnosis of a specific condition. It is vital for the patient that the pathologist provides accurate information to ensure proper fixation. Frequently, once a tissue has been fixed inadequately or inappropriately, remedial changes may no longer be possible. Most often formalin is an adequate choice, if not the optimal one; however, there are certain situations when placing the tissue in formalin may limit the ability to reach a definitive diagnosis. It is imperative for pathologists to have the knowledge to communicate which fixative is optimal. Furthermore, as we move into a world of personalized medicine, where ancillary testing has both diagnostic and specific therapeutic implications, knowledge about how different fixatives affect immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics, and molecular studies becomes even more significant. This chapter provides practical information regarding common fixatives, their mechanism of action and optimal uses.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Sacroiliac Joint Fixation under Compression Loads

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Rosso, Claire; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Bianco, Rohan-Jean; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Fradet, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a known chronic pain-generator. The last resort of treatment is the arthrodesis. Different implants allow fixation of the joint, but to date there is no tool to analyze their influence on the SIJ biomechanics under physiological loads. The objective was to develop a computational model to biomechanically analyze different parameters of the stable SIJ fixation instrumentation. Methods A comprehensive finite element model (FEM) of the pelvis was built with detailed SIJ representation. Bone and sacroiliac joint ligament material properties were calibrated against experimentally acquired load-displacement data of the SIJ. Model evaluation was performed with experimental load-displacement measurements of instrumented cadaveric SIJ. Then six fixation scenarios with one or two implants on one side with two different trajectories (proximal, distal) were simulated and assessed with the FEM under vertical compression loads. Results The simulated S1 endplate displacement reduction achieved with the fixation devices was within 3% of the experimentally measured data. Under compression loads, the uninstrumented sacrum exhibited mainly a rotation motion (nutation) of 1.38° and 2.80° respectively at 600 N and 1000 N, with a combined relative translation (0.3 mm). The instrumentation with one screw reduced the local displacement within the SIJ by up to 62.5% for the proximal trajectory vs. 15.6% for the distal trajectory. Adding a second implant had no significant additional effect. Conclusion A comprehensive finite element model was developed to assess the biomechanics of SIJ fixation. SIJ devices enable to reduce the motion, mainly rotational, between the sacrum and ilium. Positioning the implant farther from the SIJ instantaneous rotation center was an important factor to reduce the intra-articular displacement. Clinical relevance Knowledge provided by this biomechanical study enables improvement of SIJ fixation through optimal implant

  13. Biomechanics of external fixation and limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Younger, Alastair S E; Morrison, James; MacKenzie, William G

    2004-09-01

    Surgeons who use external fixators for foot and ankle conditions need to understand the biomechanical principles to ensure good outcomes. Fixators can be used for fracture fixation, correction of contractures, distraction osteogenesis, and distraction arthroplasty. A two-ring fixator with wire fixation remains the gold standard with which all other frames are compared. Small changes in mechanical characteristics can have major implications on new bone or cartilage formation.

  14. Computer assisted outcomes research in orthopedics: total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Arslanian, C; Bond, M

    1999-06-01

    Long-term studies are needed to determine clinically relevant outcomes within the practice of orthopedic surgery. Historically, the patient's subjective feelings of quality of life have been largely ignored. However, there has been a strong movement toward measuring perceived quality of life through such instruments as the SF-36. In a large database from an orthopedic practice results are presented. First, computerized data entry using touch screen technology is not only cost effective but user friendly. Second, patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty surgeries make statistically significant improvements in seven of the eight domains of the SF-36 in the first 3 months after surgery. Additional statistically significant improvements over the next 6 to 12 months are also seen. The data are presented here in detail to demonstrate the benefits of a patient outcomes program, to enhance the understanding and use of outcomes data and to encourage further work in outcomes measurement in orthopedics.

  15. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  16. Comparison of the biomechanics and histology of two soft-tissue fixators composed of bioabsorbable copolymers.

    PubMed

    Powers, D L; Sonawala, M; Woolf, S K; An, Y H; Hawkins, R; Pietrzak, W S

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the dynamic in vitro and in vivo characteristics of two different bioabsorbable copolymer soft-tissue fixation devices and to determine their efficacy in reattaching soft tissue to bone. Suretac fixators (Smith & Nephew/Acufex MicroSurgical Inc., Northwood, MA), made of polyglyconate (2:1 glycolic acid:trimethylene carbonate), and Pop Rivets (Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), made of LactoSorb (82% poly L-lactic acid, 18% polyglycolic acid), were anchored into synthetic bone, and their pull-out strengths were evaluated. The devices were also evaluated with the use of an in vivo goat model in which the medial collateral ligament (MCL) was elevated from the tibia and directly reattached. In the in vitro biomechanical study, the Suretac fixators had negligible strength remaining by four weeks, whereas the Pop Rivets retained 50% of their strength at 4 weeks, 20% at 8 weeks, and negligible strength at 12 weeks. The in vivo strength of MCL repairs affected by each implant was not statistically different at any of the time points. Histologically, both implants were absorbed by 52 weeks, and there was no appreciable adverse tissue response. In conclusion, both copolymer fixators were found to be biocompatible. The Pop Rivet fixators demonstrated in vivo performance comparable to the Suretac fixators, although the Pop Rivets retained strength longer in vitro. Our results suggest that both devices provide adequate strength of fixation before degrading to allow the healing soft tissues to reach or surpass their native strength.

  17. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  18. The practicing orthopedic surgeon's guide to managing long bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Felix H

    2014-01-01

    Long bone skeletal metastases are common in the United States, with more than 280,000 new cases every year. Most of these will be managed by the on-call orthopedic surgeon. A practical primer is offered for the evaluation and surgical management for the practicing orthopedist, including questions to ask during the history, pertinent physical examination findings, appropriate imaging requests, proper laboratory work, and biopsy options. Finally, 7 scenarios are presented to encompass most situations a practicing orthopedic surgeon will encounter, and guidelines for treatment and referral are offered.

  19. Novel nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating for dental and orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huinan; Jiang, Wenping; Malshe, Ajay

    2009-09-01

    A novel hybrid coating process, combining NanoSpray® (built on electrostatic spray coating) technology with microwave sintering process, was developed for synthesizing hydroxyapatite- (HA-) based nanostructured coating with favorable properties for dental and orthopedic implants. Specifically, HA nanoparticles were deposited on commercially pure titanium substrates using NanoSpray technique to produce the HA coating, which was then sintered in a microwave furnace under controlled conditions. The study showed that the use of NanoSpray followed by microwave sintering results in nanoscale HA coating for dental/orthopedic application.

  20. Orthopedic conditions of small ruminants. Llama, sheep, goat, and deer.

    PubMed

    Kaneps, A J

    1996-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the foot, infectious arthritis, angular limb deformities, patellar luxation, tendon contracture and injuries, and fractures encountered in sheep, goats, llamas, and deer are reviewed. These species share similar orthopedic problems to cattle, but management conditions, particularly for pet animals, may place special demands on the veterinarian treating these disease conditions. The mild temperament and relatively small body size of these animals make them excellent candidates for treatment of orthopedic problems often not amenable to practical treatment in larger or more fractious animals.

  1. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  2. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  3. Bisphosphonate-Based Strategies for Bone Tissue Engineering and Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Juan Pablo; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lucangioli, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a group of well-established drugs that are applied in the development of metabolic bone disorder-related therapies. There is increasing interest also in the application of BPs in the context of bone tissue engineering, which is the topic of this review, in which an extensive overview of published studies on the development and applications of BPs-based strategies for bone regeneration is provided with special focus on the rationale for the use of different BPs in three-dimensional (3D) bone tissue scaffolds. The different alternatives that are investigated to address the delivery and sustained release of these therapeutic drugs in the nearby tissues are comprehensively discussed, and the most significant published approaches on bisphosphonate-conjugated drugs in multifunctional 3D scaffolds as well as the role of BPs within coatings for the improved fixation of orthopedic implants are presented and critically evaluated. Finally, the authors' views regarding the remaining challenges in the fields and directions for future research efforts are highlighted. PMID:22440082

  4. Orthopedics nursing patients' profile of a public hospital in Salvador-Bahia

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Renata Reis Matutino; Ribeiro, Natália Fonseca; de Andrade, Aline Mendonça; Jaques, Bruno Dórea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profile of patients treated in the trauma and orthopedics nursing of a trauma care referral public hospital of in the state of Bahia. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in which data were collected from medical records of patients in the period from July to December 2008. RESULTS: The profile of the patients involved was formed by subjects mostly male young subjects, victims of trauma from accidents, especially those with motorcycles or car runover. On the other hand,the most frequent traumas associated with urban violence were perforations by gunshot and stab wounds. The primary injury presented by these individuals was exposed fracture of the femur and the most common treatment was external fixation. The most frequent in-hospital complication was wound infection, which required another surgical approach. Most inpatients were discharged and only one death was reported during this period. CONCLUSION: The results of this study corroborate those from other institutions in the country, which may contribute to elaborate public policies for accidents and violence prevention. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453666

  5. A biomechanical comparison of proximal femoral nails and locking proximal anatomic femoral plates in femoral fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Korhan; Türkmen, İsmail; Sahin, Adem; Yildiz, Yavuz; Erturk, Selim; Soylemez, Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of fractures in the trochanteric area has risen with the increasing numbers of elderly people with osteoporosis. Although dynamic hip screw fixation is the gold standard for the treatment of stable intertrochanteric femur fractures, treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures still remains controversial. Intramedullary devices such as Gamma nail or proximal femoral nail and proximal anatomic femur plates are in use for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. There are still many investigations to find the optimal implant to treat these fractures with minimum complications. For this reason, we aimed to perform a biomechanical comparison of the proximal femoral nail and the locking proximal anatomic femoral plate in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic, third generation human femur models, obtained for this purpose, were divided into two groups of 10 bones each. Femurs were provided as a standard representation of AO/Orthopedic Trauma Associationtype 31-A2 unstable fractures. Two types of implantations were inserted: the proximal femoral intramedullary nail in the first group and the locking anatomic femoral plate in the second group. Axial load was applied to the fracture models through the femoral head using a material testing machine, and the biomechanical properties of the implant types were compared. Result: Nail and plate models were locked distally at the same level. Axial steady load with a 5 mm/m velocity was applied through the mechanical axis of femur bone models. Axial loading in the proximal femoral intramedullary nail group was 1.78-fold greater compared to the plate group. All bones that had the plate applied were fractured in the portion containing the distal locking screw. Conclusion: The proximal femoral intramedullary nail provides more stability and allows for earlier weight bearing than the locking plate when used for the treatment of

  6. The Special Orthopedic Hospital—Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Harry

    1964-01-01

    Pioneer orthopedic institutions established in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and in the U.S.A. in the second half of the 19th and the first decade of the 20th century, can trace their ancestry in ideas back to the practice and teachings of Hippocrates. Experience in treatment of great numbers of injured soldiers in the First World War opened a new era in reconstructive surgery of the locomotor system. After the Second World War, in advanced nations the pattern of crippling diseases showed a spectacular change. Problems that justify the existence of large special orthopedic hospitals are, in children, the more complex congenital deformities, cerebral palsies, and the increasing number of injuries due to hazards of modern life; in the adult, the reconstructive surgery of trauma and of arthritis. In modern orthopedic hospitals physicians have joined orthopedic surgeons in the study of the natural history of the various forms of arthritis. These centres provide facilities for biomechanical research and postgraduate training which acute general hospitals cannot offer. PMID:14228224

  7. Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biastro, Leslie; Frank, Heather; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with identified orthopedic impairments are often less likely to participate in social activities outside of the school setting. However, the adolescents who are able to participate in activities have higher social skills, more academic successes, and show more satisfaction in their roles as family member or friend. The aim of this…

  8. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and...

  9. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....12 Section 1308.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and...

  10. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  11. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  12. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P; Baker, C

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  13. Two-Pin Fixation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Fusion for Hammertoe Correction.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Thompson, Jonathan C; Tabatt, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Single-pin external Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation has traditionally been a mainstay in proximal interphalangeal joint fusion for central hammertoe repair. Concerns over cosmesis, inconvenience, pin tract infection, hardware failure, nonunion, and early hardware removal have led to the development of implantable internal fixation devices. Although numerous implantable devices are now available and represent viable options for hammertoe repair, they are costly and often pose a challenge in the event removal becomes necessary. An alternative fixation option not typically used is a 2-pin K-wire fixation technique. The perceived advantage of obtaining 2 points of fixation compared with 1 across the fusion site is improved stability against the rotational and bending forces, thus decreasing the potential for pin-related complications. A retrospective assessment of 91 consecutive hammertoe repairs consisting of proximal interphalangeal joint fusion with 2-pin fixation in 60 patients was performed. The K-wires were removed at 6 weeks postoperatively, and the overall postoperative follow-up duration was 28.56 (range 1.40 to 86.83) months. Of the 91 digits, 89 (98%) did not encounter a complication postoperatively and 2 (2.20%) had sustained loosened or broken hardware. No postoperative infection was encountered. The low incidence of complications observed supports the 2-pin K-wire fixation technique as a low-cost and viable construct for proximal interphalangeal joint fusion hammertoe repair.

  14. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Orthopedic Handicaps. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Orthopedically Handicapped Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieran, Shari Stokes; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming preschoolers with orthopedic handicaps is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers, and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of…

  15. Spinal fixation. Part 3. Complications of spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Slone, R M; MacMillan, M; Montgomery, W J

    1993-07-01

    Spinal fixation devices can be used to form a rigid construct with the spine to replace bone, restore alignment, maintain position, and prevent motion in the treatment of fractures, degenerative disease, neoplasm, and congenital deformities. Because most spinal constructs will eventually fail if bone fusion does not occur, bone graft material is often used along with the implant to promote fusion. Conventional radiographs, obtained in two projections, remain the mainstay of implant evaluation, demonstrating the position of the spinal elements, hardware, graft material, and evidence of complication. Possible complications connected with use of fixation devices include intraoperative soft-tissue injuries, postoperative hematomas, and infection. The components (through incorrect use, malpositioning at surgery, and later dislodgment or fracture) may also contribute to complications such as instability; failure of fusion; or pain, with possible resultant neurologic damage. Bone graft material can migrate or hypertrophy, resulting in impingement on the spinal canal or neural foramen. Radiologists should be familiar with the various spinal fixation devices and techniques to better identify evolving complications.

  16. Mini external fixation in the hand.

    PubMed

    Ugwonali, Obinwanne Fidelis C; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2006-09-01

    External fixation is an effective means of addressing several pathologies of the hand. The advantages of its use include the ability to achieve stable fixation, minimize soft tissue trauma at the site of injury, and allow wound care and mobilization of adjacent joints. External fixators can be constructed from material readily available in the operating room or obtained from a commercial source. Sufficient rigidity can be achieved by any of these means. Improper placement, although achieving rigid fixation, may compromise motion and overall function if basic principles of external fixation are not followed or if the anatomy of the hand is not taken into consideration. The objective of this article is to describe the technique of application of mini external fixation, emphasizing the basic principles of external fixation as they relate to the specific anatomy of the hand. In addition to fracture fixation, various other uses are described including distraction lengthening, arthrodesis, treatment of nonunion, and infection.

  17. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  18. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  19. Successful treatment of nonunion with an Ilizarov ring fixator after ankle fracture for Charcot arthropathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus have long been recognized as a challenge to orthopedic surgeons. Nonunion and lengthy wound healing in high-risk patients with diabetes, particularly patients with peripheral arterial disease and renal failure, occur secondary to several clinical conditions and are often fraught with complications. Whether diabetic ankle fractures are best treated noninvasively or surgically is controversial. Case presentation A 53-year-old Japanese man fractured his right ankle. The fractured ankle was treated nonsurgically with a plaster cast. Although he remained non-weight-bearing for 3 months, radiography at 3 months showed nonunion. The nonunion was treated by Ilizarov external fixation of the ankle. The external fixator was removed 99 days postoperatively, at which time the patient exhibited anatomical and functional recovery and was able to walk without severe complications. Conclusion In patients with diabetes mellitus, severe nonunion of ankle fractures with Charcot arthropathy in which the fracture fragment diameter is very small and the use of internal fixation is difficult is a clinical challenge. Ilizarov external fixation allows suitable fixation to be achieved using multiple Ilizarov wires. PMID:25103697

  20. Transit Fixatives: An Innovative Study

    PubMed Central

    A, Ravi Prakash; G, Sreenath; JK, Sonia Bai; NDVN, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Universally accepted fixative is 10% formalin which has been used for preserving the tissues and their architecture. In certain conditions, formalin might not be readily available for immediate fixation. We here by explore more economical, eco-friendly and easily available solutions that can be used as transit media/ transporting media for tissue specimens. Materials and Methods: The study included commonly available solutions like Spirit, Saline, Betadine solution, Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Local anesthesia (L.A), Rose water, Coconut oil, Coconut water, Ice cold water, Honey and Milk while keeping formalin as control. The fresh tissue sample was cut into multiple bits and placed in different containers for a period of 8 hours before transferring to formalin solution. Conclusion: Transit fixatives are very important in certain situations where formalin is not readily available. These fixatives can be used to fix the tissues for a period of at least 8 hours without causing any damage or distortion before they are fixed in formalin solution. PMID:25954725

  1. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from

  2. Binocular Fixation Disparity in Single Word Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Kevin B.; Jordan, Timothy R.; Kurtev, Stoyan

    2009-01-01

    It has been claimed that the recognition of words displayed in isolation is affected by the precise location at which they are fixated. However, this putative role for fixation location has yet to be reconciled with the finding from reading research that binocular fixations are often misaligned and, therefore, more than 1 location in a word is…

  3. Tissue fixation and the effect of molecular fixatives on downstream staining procedures.

    PubMed

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Beverley A

    2014-11-01

    It is impossible to underplay the importance of fixation in histopathology. Whether the scientist is interested in the extraction of information on lipids, proteins, RNA or DNA, fixation is critical to this extraction. This review aims to give a brief overview of the current "state of play" in fixation and focus on the effect fixation, and particularly the effect of the newer brand of "molecular fixatives" have on morphology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and RNA/DNA analysis. A methodology incorporating the creation of a fixation tissue microarray for the study of the effect of fixation on histochemistry is detailed.

  4. Mechanical Comparison of Headless Screw Fixation and Locking Plate Fixation for Talar Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Hapa, Onur; Erduran, Mehmet; Dincer, Cemal; Cecen, Berivan; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    For talar neck fractures, open reduction and internal fixation have been thought to facilitate revascularization and prevent osteonecrosis. Newer screw systems allow for placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable pitch thread. The present study compared the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation and locking plate fixation. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in 14 fresh cadaver talar necks. Talar head fixation was then performed using 2 cannulated headless variable-pitch 4-mm/5-mm diameter (4/5) screws (Acutrak; Acumed, Hillsboro, OR) and locking plate fixation. Headless variable-pitch screw fixation had lower failure displacement than did locking plate fixation. No statistically significant differences were found in failure stiffness, yield stiffness (p = .655), yield load (p = .142), or ultimate load between the 2 fixation techniques. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation resulted in better failure displacement than locking plate fixation in a cadaveric talus model and could be considered a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screw fixation has inherent advantages compared with locking plate fixation, because it might cause less damage to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. Additionally, plate fixation can increase the risk of avascular necrosis owing to the wider incision and dissection of soft tissues.

  5. Hepatitis C virus infection: knowledge in the orthopedic community.

    PubMed

    Flowerdew, J M; McGrory, B J

    2000-04-01

    A survey with 14 questions pertaining to the natural history, infectiveness, and diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis C viral infection was given to all practicing orthopedic surgeons in Portland, Maine. Possible responses were "true," "false," or "don't know" to the 14 statements. A question regarding any interest in learning more about the hepatitis C virus was also posed. Most (82%, 23/28) surgeons completed the questionnaire. A total of 72% of the responses were either wrong or marked "don't know"; most (83%) of the respondents wanted to know more about the infection about hepatitis C viral infection. Not only are orthopedic surgeons at risk for exposure to this virus, but also they are often the first to notify a patient of a positive result after routine hepatitis C testing of autologous predonated blood. Education programs and journal reviews should be directed toward this goal.

  6. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopy during orthopedic surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, S.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has enabled orthopedic surgeons to become technically more proficient. In addition, these surgical procedures tend to have less associated patient morbidity by decreasing operative time and minimizing the area of the operative field. The trade-off, however, may be an increased risk of radiation exposure to the surgeon on an annual or lifetime basis. The current study was designed to determine the amount of radiation received by the primary surgeon and the first assistant during selected surgical procedures involving the use of fluoroscopy. Five body sites exposed to radiation were monitored for dosage. The results of this study indicate that with appropriate usage, (1) radiation exposure from fluoroscopy is relatively low; (2) the surgeon's dominant hand receives the most exposure per case; and (3) proper maintenance and calibration of fluoroscopic machines are important factors in reducing exposure risks. Therefore, with proper precautions, the use of fluoroscopy in orthopedic procedures can remain a safe practice.

  7. Potential utility of liposome bupivacaine in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lonner, Jess H; Scuderi, Giles R; Lieberman, Jay R

    2015-03-01

    Management of postsurgical analgesia is an important consideration in orthopedic procedures, including joint arthroplasty. Inadequate postsurgical analgesia is associated with increased hospital length of stay, delayed ambulation, and reduced exercise capacity. In this article, we review the potential contribution of a prolonged-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen after orthopedic surgery. Controlled studies across multiple surgical settings have demonstrated that, compared with placebo and bupivacaine HCl, liposome bupivacaine in a single administration provides postsurgical analgesia for up to 72 hours, delays use of rescue medication, and reduces postsurgical opioid consumption. Liposome bupivacaine has been well tolerated in clinical studies and has had a low rate of treatment-related adverse events. To date, there has been no signal of cardiac toxicity, chondrolysis, or delayed wound healing associated with liposome bupivacaine.

  8. Effect of induced aniseikonia on fixation performance.

    PubMed

    Remole, A

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine to what extent induced aniseikonia affects fixation performance. Aniseikonia was induced in the vertical meridian only, whereas fixation alignment was monitored in the horizontal meridian. A previously developed technique based on the dependency of border enhancement bandwidth on fixation eccentricity was used to monitor deviations from central fixation during fusion. Stress on the fusion mechanism was supplied by controlled increments of forced horizontal vergence. It was found that deviation from central fixation in the horizontal meridian generally increases with increasing amounts of vertical aniseikonia. The effect is particularly pronounced for small amounts of aniseikonia.

  9. Mending injured athletes: a track record of orthopedic advances.

    PubMed

    Schnirring, Lisa

    2003-09-01

    Physicians have long been closely allied with competitive sports. In 157 AD, Galen served as a physician to Greek gladiators.(1) Severe musculoskeletal trauma certainly shortened the careers of ancient pugilists who survived their matches. However, modern gladiators-from pick-up basketball players to football professionals-often get to "play another day" because of advances in orthopedic surgery, particularly those of the last 30 years.

  10. Business and Practice Management Knowledge Deficiencies in Graduating Orthopedic Residents.

    PubMed

    Miller, D Joshua; Throckmorton, Thomas W; Azar, Frederick M; Beaty, James H; Canale, S Terry; Richardson, David R

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a study to determine the general level of knowledge that orthopedic residents have on business and practice management topics at graduation and to evaluate the level of knowledge that practicing orthopedic surgeons need in order to function effectively in a medical practice. Residency graduates from a single training program were asked to complete a survey that gathered demographic information and had surgeons rate their understanding of 9 general business and practice management skills and the importance of these skills in their current practice situation. The amount of necessary business knowledge they lacked at graduation was defined as a functional knowledge deficiency (FKD) and was calculated as the difference between the reported importance of a topic in current practice and the level of understanding of that topic at graduation (larger FKD indicates greater deficiency). Those in physician-managed practices reported significantly higher levels of understanding of economic analytical tools than those in nonphysician-managed practices. There were no other statistically significant differences among groups. Hospital-employed physicians had the lowest overall FKD (4.0), followed by those in academic practices (5.1) and private practices (5.9). Graduating orthopedic surgeons appear to be inadequately prepared to effectively manage business issues in their practices, as evidenced by the low overall knowledge levels and high FKDs.

  11. Variability in Trauma Case Volume in Orthopedic Surgery Residents

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Travis D.; Gil, Joseph A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2017-01-01

    Orthopedic trauma surgery is a critical component of resident education. Surgical case logs obtained from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Students from 2009 to 2013 for orthopedic surgery residents were examined for variability between the 90th and 10th percentiles in regards to the volume of cases performed. There was an upward trend in the mean number of cases performed by senior residents from 484.4 in 2009 to 534.5 in 2013, representing a 10.3% increase. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of cases performed for humerus/elbow, forearm/wrist, and pelvis/hip during this period (P<0.05). Although the difference between the 10th and 90th percentile case volumes narrowed over the study period, the difference between these groups remained significant in 2013 (P=0.02). In 2013, all categories of trauma cases had a greater than 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentile of residents for numbers of trauma cases performed. Although case volume is not the sole determinant of residency education and competency, evidence suggests that case volume plays a crucial role in surgeon confidence and efficiency in performing surgery. Further studies are needed to better understand the effect of this variability seen among residents performing orthopedic trauma surgery. PMID:28286621

  12. Overview of ultrasound usage trends in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to examine current beliefs about the use, the clinical importance, the theoretical fundamentals and the utilization criteria of therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) among physical therapists on the clinical practice in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy in Brazil. Methods A brief survey was developed based on previous studies and was sent to 55 physical therapists with advanced competency in orthopedics and sports physiotherapy. The questions addressed general topics about the professional profile and ultrasound usage and dosage. Results Our data show the wide availability and frequent use of TUS in this sample of physical therapists. TUS is used in distinct musculoskeletal injuries and/or disorders in both acute and chronic conditions. Muscles, tendons and ligaments represented the major structures where TUS is used. Questions on the basic theory of TUS demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the ultrasound physiological effects as well as its interaction with biological tissues and TUS absolute contraindication. Conclusion A Brazilian profile about the US usage and dosage in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy is presented and highlights the need for a continuous upgrading process and further research into its effects. PMID:22871050

  13. Orthopedic cellular therapy: An overview with focus on clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors tried to evaluate the present state of cellular therapy in orthopedic field. The topics the authors try to cover include not only the clinical trials but the various research areas as well. Both the target diseases for cellular therapy and the target cells were reviewed. New methods to activate the cells were interesting to review. Most advanced clinical trials were also included because several of them have advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the orthopedic field, there are many diseases with a definite treatment gap at this time. Because cellular therapies can regenerate damaged tissues, there is a possibility for cellular therapies to become disease modifying drugs. It is not clear whether cellular therapies will become the standard of care in any of the orthopedic disorders, however the amount of research being performed and the number of clinical trials that are on-going make the authors believe that cellular therapies will become important treatment modalities within several years. PMID:26601056

  14. Tailor's bunion. Is fixation necessary?

    PubMed

    Pontious, J; Brook, J W; Hillstrom, H J

    1996-02-01

    Tailor's bunion or bunionette are terms that describe a pathologic enlargement occurring laterally on the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint. Regardless of the etiology that precipitates the deformity, the resulting abnormal protrusion of soft tissue or bone can result in pain for the patient. Symptoms can range from mild discomfort to severe, debilitating pain. The patient may present with pain dorsolaterally, laterally, or plantarly. The symptoms are mechanically induced, and are often associated with hyperkeratotic lesions and adventitious bursae. Patients complain most often that they cannot find comfortable shoes. The authors compare the effectiveness of fixated versus nonfixated distal osteotomies of the fifth metatarsal for the correction of tailor's bunion. This study shows that fixation can help control postoperative dorsal displacement of the fifth metatarsal capital fragment (p < 0.0001) and produce less shortening of the metatarsal resulting in fewer complications.

  15. Nitrogen fixation by marine cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zehr, Jonathan P

    2011-04-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of oceanic N(2) fixation and nitrogen (N) losses through denitrification have focused research on identifying N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria and quantifying cyanobacterial N(2) fixation. Previously unrecognized cultivated and uncultivated unicellular cyanobacteria have been discovered that are widely distributed, and some have very unusual properties. Uncultivated unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria (UCYN-A) lack major metabolic pathways including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxygen-evolving photosystem II. Genomes of the oceanic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are highly conserved at the DNA level, and genetic diversity is maintained by genome rearrangements. The major cyanobacterial groups have different physiological and ecological constraints that result in highly variable geographic distributions, with implications for the marine N-cycle budget.

  16. Treatment results of bicondylar tibial fractures using hybrid external fixator.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Soleymaopour, Jafar; Ansari, Maroof; Afaghi, Farhad; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-05-15

    Tibial condyle fractures affect knee stability and motion. Treatment of bicondylar type of tibial plateau fracture is a challenging problem. This study aimed at evaluating the application of hybrid external fixators with minimum deformation in these patients and the resulted outcomes. In this descriptive analytical study, 28 patients with bicondylar tibial plateau fractures treated by HEF device were evaluated. The surgeon used a semicircular and one circular wire instead of the one or two loop of conventional HEF device for a better range of motion of the knee joint. Treatment outcomes including quality of walking, union condition, knee range of motion, complications and the final outcome according to the knee score (rusmussen) were checked. Twenty-eight male patients, with the mean age of 40.54 +/- 13.83 years were enrolled in the study. Complications occurred in 8 (28.6%) patients; 7 cases with superficial infection and 1 patient with deep vein thrombosis. All complications were managed medically with no significant consequences left. All the patients were able to walk with no aid except in one case. In 96.4% and 89.3% of the cases, the clinical and radiological outcomes were good to excellent, respectively according to the knee score. In 85.7% of the patients, the knee range of motion was in normal limits. Application of hybrid external fixator using one and half ring instead of one or two fixator rings in treating bicondylar tibial fractures was associated with desired clinical and radiological results.

  17. Testing the feasibility and safety of the Nintendo Wii gaming console in orthopedic rehabilitation: a pilot randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, Jonas; Meissner, Kay Michael; Niethammer, Thomas; Lahner, Matthias; Wagenhäuser, Markus; Müller, Peter E.; Pietschmann, Matthias F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Nintendo Wii game console is already used as an additional training device for e.g. neurological wards. Still there are limited data available regarding orthopedic rehabilitation. The authors’ objective was to examine whether the Nintendo Wii is an appropriate and safe tool in rehabilitation after orthopedic knee surgery. Material and methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing standard physiotherapy vs. standard physiotherapy plus game console training (Wii group) in patients having anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair or knee arthroplasty was conducted. The subjects of the Wii group (n = 17; mean age: 54 ±19 years) performed simple knee exercises daily under the supervision of a physiotherapist in addition to the normal rehabilitation program. The patients of the control group (n = 13; 52 ±18 years) were treated with physiotherapy only. The participants of both groups completed a questionnaire including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, the Modified Cincinnati Rating System and the Tegner Lysholm Knee Score prior to the operation, before discharge from hospital and four weeks after treatment. Results There was no significant difference in the score results between the Wii and the control group (p > 0.05). Conclusions We demonstrated that physiotherapy using the Nintendo Wii gaming console after ACL reconstruction and knee arthroplasty does not negatively influence outcome. Because training with the Wii device was highly accepted by patients, we see an opportunity whereby additional training with a gaming console for a longer period of time could lead to even better results, regarding the training motivation and the outcome after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27904518

  18. [What do orthopedic surgeons need to know from radiologists?].

    PubMed

    Portabella, F; Pablos, O; Agulló, J L

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of tumors and pseudotumors depends on three pillars: the clinician, the radiologist, and the pathologist. The first two can establish a presumptive diagnosis on the basis of the clinical presentation and findings on complementary tests, whereas the pathologist will have to reach the definitive diagnosis after analyzing the biopsy specimens. Obviously, the clinician and radiologist should reach a consensus regarding the diagnostic orientation; however, for this to happen there must be a relationship between the two professionals and they must work together for the benefit of the patient. Orthopedic surgeons, like any other group of specialists, would like to have radiologists working in their own center who are dedicated to the organ/system they treat, in this case the locomotor apparatus, and who can provide them with their opinion about the different images obtained. This point is very important and especially so for tumors, because this type of disease is uncommon and few specialists are dedicated to it. For this reason, when faced with a lesion that has the characteristics of a tumor, orthopedic surgeons would like radiologists to give the most accurate description of the images as possible, defining the characteristics of benignity or malignancy of the process as well as indicating the risk of fracture in a metastatic lesion. On the other hand, orthopedic surgeons would ask for a clear and comprehensible description of the images obtained in complementary tests, because orthopedic surgeons have less experience in this type of images and they are often difficult to interpret. Another aspect that is often mentioned in discussions among orthopedic surgeons is the importance of having a radiology department that performs interventional procedures. Radiologists that perform interventional procedures can facilitate our work very much, both in the diagnosis and in the treatment of certain bone tumors. Finally, we would like to stress the importance of

  19. Smaller Fixation Target Size Is Associated with More Stable Fixation and Less Variance in Threshold Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kana; Koshiji, Risako; Funaki, Wakana; Shoji, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this randomized observational case control study were to quantify fixation behavior during standard automated perimetry (SAP) with different fixation targets and to evaluate the relationship between fixation behavior and threshold variability at each test point in healthy young participants experienced with perimetry. SAP was performed on the right eyes of 29 participants using the Octopus 900 perimeter, program 32, dynamic strategy. The fixation targets of Point, Cross, and Ring were used for SAP. Fixation behavior was recorded using a wearable eye-tracking glass. All participants underwent SAP twice with each fixation target in a random fashion. Fixation behavior was quantified by calculating the bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) and the frequency of deviation from the fixation target. The BCEAs (deg2) of Point, Cross, and Ring targets were 1.11, 1.46, and 2.02, respectively. In all cases, BCEA increased significantly with increasing fixation target size (p < 0.05). The logarithmic value of BCEA demonstrated the same tendency (p < 0.05). A positive correlation was identified between fixation behavior and threshold variability for the Point and Cross targets (ρ = 0.413–0.534, p < 0.05). Fixation behavior increased with increasing fixation target size. Moreover, a larger fixation behavior tended to be associated with a higher threshold variability. A small fixation target is recommended during the visual field test. PMID:27829030

  20. One size does not fit all: distal radioulnar joint dysfunction after volar locking plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lawson, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common injuries treated by orthopedic surgeons worldwide. Failure to restore distal radius alignment can lead to fracture malunion and poor clinical outcomes, including distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability and limitation of motion. Case Description We present a unique case of DRUJ dysfunction following volar plate fixation of bilateral distal radius fractures and analyze the biomechanical causes of this complication. As a result of a relatively excessive tilt of the precontoured locking plate (in comparison to the patient's particular anatomy), the fracture on one side was "over-reduced," disrupting the biomechanics of the DRUJ, causing a supination block. Clinical Relevance Volar locking plates are not a panacea to all distal radius fractures. Plate selection and fixation technique must include consideration of patient anatomy. Robust plates offer the advantage of providing rigid fixation but can be difficult to contour when reconstructing normal anatomy. Restoration of patient-specific anatomy is crucial to the management of distal radius fractures.

  1. Methods to shorten the duration of an external fixator in the management of tibial infections

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Khaled M; Ghafar, Khaled Abd Al; Al Kersh, Mohamed Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Massive segmental bone loss due to chronic osteomyelitis represents a considerable challenge to orthopedic surgeons and is a limb threatening condition. The only option available in such a clinical situation is segment transport using the Ilizarov technique of distraction osteogenesis; yet the most common problem in cases of bone transport with the Ilizarov technique in massive bone loss, is the long duration of the fixator. In addition to autologous bone grafting, several mechanical, biologic, and external physical treatment modalities may be employed to promote bone formation and maturation during segment transport in osteomyelitis patients. Mechanical approaches include compressive loading of the distraction regenerate, increased frequency of small increments of distraction, and compression-distraction. Intramedullary nailing and hemicorticotomy can reduce the time in external fixation; however, these techniques are associated with technical difficulties and complications. Exogenous application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound or pulsed electromagnetic fields may shorten the duration of external fixation. Other promising modalities include diphosphonates, physician-directed use (off-label use) of bone morphogenetic proteins, and local injection of bone marrow aspirate and platelet gel at the osteotomy site. Well-designed clinical studies are needed to establish safe and effective guidelines for various modalities to enhance new bone formation during distraction osteogenesis after segment transfer. PMID:22474640

  2. Fixation strategies for retinal immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Stradleigh, Tyler W; Ishida, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons.

  3. Fixation Strategies For Retinal Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and ex vivo anatomical studies have provided many glimpses of the variety, distribution, and signaling components of vertebrate retinal neurons. The beauty of numerous images published to date, and the qualitative and quantitative information they provide, indicate that these approaches are fundamentally useful. However, obtaining these images entailed tissue handling and exposure to chemical solutions that differ from normal extracellular fluid in composition, temperature, and osmolarity. Because the differences are large enough to alter intercellular and intracellular signaling in neurons, and because retinae are susceptible to crush, shear, and fray, it is natural to wonder if immunohistochemical and anatomical methods disturb or damage the cells they are designed to examine. Tissue fixation is typically incorporated to guard against this damage and is therefore critically important to the quality and significance of the harvested data. Here, we describe mechanisms of fixation; advantages and disadvantages of using formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde as fixatives during immunohistochemistry; and modifications of widely used protocols that have recently been found to improve cell shape preservation and immunostaining patterns, especially in proximal retinal neurons. PMID:25892361

  4. The role of AO external fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies in the pediatric neuromuscular population.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, John E; Weinberg, Jacob; Razi, Afshin; Mulley, Debra A

    2004-09-01

    Internal fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies using traditional devices may be sub-optimal in children with neuromuscular disorders who have small or osteopenic bone. In this population, between 1988 and 2000, we performed 36 proximal femoral varus osteotomies in 28 patients. These were controlled by the AO external fixator. The average age at surgery was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). A mean varus correction of 34 degrees (range, 15-90 degrees) was obtained. Complications consisted of one superficial pin tract infection, one skin breakdown, and one non-union. Other than the non-union, all osteotomies were stable at the time of the fixator removal. The AO external fixator is an effective alternative in maintaining corrective proximal femoral osteotomies in children with fragile bones.

  5. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Despres, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; Guise, Jacques A. de

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm{sup -1}) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 {mu}Gy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  6. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Després, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; de Guise, Jacques A

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm(-1)) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 microGy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  7. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor.

  8. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information.

  9. Proximal tibial fractures with impending compartment syndrome managed by fasciotomy and internal fixation: A retrospective analysis of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Singh, Varun; Agrawal, Ashish; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proximal tibia fractures with compartment syndrome present a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. More often than not these patients are subjected to multiple surgeries and are complicated by infection osteomyelitis and poor rehabilitation. There is no consensus in the management of these fractures. Most common mode is to do early fasciotomy with external fixation, followed by second stage definitive fixation. We performed a retrospective study of proximal tibia fractures with impending compartment syndrome treated by single stage fasciotomy and internal fixation. Results in terms of early fracture union, minimum complications and early patient mobilization were very good. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients who were operated between July 2011 and June 2012 were selected for the study. All documents from their admission until the last followup in December 2013 were reviewed, data regarding complications collected and results were evaluated using Oxford Knee scoring system. Results: At the final outcome, there was anatomical or near anatomical alignment with no postoperative problems with range of motion of near complete flexion (>120) in all patients within 3 months. 13 patients started full weight bearing walking at 3 months. Delayed union in two patients and skin necrosis in one patient was observed. Conclusions: Since the results are encouraging and the rehabilitation time is much less when compared to conventional approaches, it is recommended using this protocol to perform early fasciotomy with the definitive internal fixation as single stage surgery to obtain excellent followup results and to reduce rehabilitation time, secondary trauma, expense of treatment and infection rate. PMID:26538755

  10. Temporary Stabilization with External Fixator in ‘Tripolar’ Configuration in Two Steps Treatment of Tibial Pilon Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Daghino, Walter; Messina, Marco; Filipponi, Marco; Alessandro, Massè

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tibial pilon fractures represent a complex therapeutic problem for the orthopedic surgeon, given the frequent complications and outcomes disabling. The recent medical literature indicates that the best strategy to reduce amount of complications in tibial pilon fractures is two-stages procedure. We describe our experience in the primary stabilization of these fractures. Methods: We treated 36 cases with temporary external fixation in a simple configuration, called "tripolar": this is an essential structure (only three screws and three rods), that is possible to perform even without the availability of X-rays and with simple anesthesia or sedation. Results: We found a sufficient mechanical stability for the nursing post-operative, in absence of intraoperative and postoperative problems. The time between trauma and temporary stabilization ranged between 3 and 144 hours; surgical average time was 8.4 minutes. Definitive treatment was carried out with a delay of a minimum of 4 and a maximum of 15 days from the temporary stabilization, always without problems, both in case of ORIF (open reduction, internal fixation) or circular external fixation Conclusion: Temporary stabilization with external fixator in ‘tripolar’ configuration seems to be the most effective strategy in two steps treatment of tibial pilon fractures. These preliminary encouraging results must be confirmed by further studies with more cases. PMID:27123151

  11. The 50 Most Cited Articles in Orthopedic Cartilage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Siesener, Nathan J.; McAllister, David R.; Williams, Riley J.; Sherman, Seth L.; Jones, Kristofer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the 50 most cited articles in orthopedic cartilage surgery and their characteristics. Design A systematic review of the Science Citation Index Expanded was performed for articles related to cartilage surgery published in the 66 journals under the category “Orthopedics.” The 50 most cited articles were determined, and the following characteristics were analyzed for each article: authors, journal and year of publication, number of citations, geographic origin, article type (basic science or clinical), article subtype by study design, and level of evidence. Citation density (total number of citations/years since publication) was also computed. Results The 50 most cited articles ranged from 989 to 172 citations, with citation density ranging from 71.5 to 4.1. The publication years spanned from 1968 to 2008, with the 2000s accounting for half (25) of the articles and the highest mean citation density (14.6). The 50 most cited articles were published in 11 journals. The majority of the articles (29) were clinical, with level IV representing the most common level of evidence (10). The remaining basic science articles were most commonly animal in vivo studies (14). Stronger level of evidence was correlated with overall number of citations (P = 0.044), citation density (P < 0.001), and year of publication (P = 0.003). Conclusions Articles with stronger levels of evidence are more highly cited, with an increasing trend as evidence-based practice has been emphasized. This article list provides clinicians, researchers, and trainees with a group of “citation classics” in orthopedic cartilage surgery. PMID:27375839

  12. Minocycline-Induced Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation in an Orthopedic Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Yuri; Berbari, Elie F.; Steckelberg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and evaluate risk factors for development of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation in patients with orthopedic infections. Methods. Patients with orthopedic infections evaluated at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and treated with minocycline from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011 were retrospectively identified. Long-term minocycline suppression was defined as daily minocycline use for at least 3 months. A proportional hazards model was used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results. Of 291 patients receiving long-term minocycline suppression, 54% (156 of 291) developed hyperpigmentation after a mean follow-up of 4.8 years (range, 0.3–13.2 years); 88% involved blue-gray pigmentation of normal skin that appeared most commonly in the lower (75%) and upper extremities (44%). The mean duration of minocycline therapy before hyperpigmentation was 1.5 years (range, 0.1–9 years) with a mean cumulative dosage of 107.3 g (range, 8.6–657 g). Notable risk factors include a history of vitamin D deficiency (relative risk [RR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.91–15.27; P = .0052), presence of a shoulder prosthesis (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.23–6.56; P = .0062), noncirrhotic liver pathology (RR, 3.63; 95% CI, 1.11–8.75; P = .0359), and use of a concurrent medication also known to cause hyperpigmentation (RR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.83–10.1; P = .0029). Conclusions. Hyperpigmentation associated with the use of long-term minocycline suppression in patients with orthopedic infections is common. PMID:26835479

  13. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  14. Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development.

    PubMed

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2014-01-14

    Nitrogen (N) accumulation rates in peatland ecosystems indicate significant biological atmospheric N2 fixation associated with Sphagnum mosses. Here, we show that the linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N2 fixation may constitute an important mechanism in the rapid accumulation of N during the primary succession of peatlands. In our experimental stable isotope enrichment study, previously overlooked methane-induced N2 fixation explained more than one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland stages, where the highest N2 fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged moss vegetation.

  15. Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development

    PubMed Central

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) accumulation rates in peatland ecosystems indicate significant biological atmospheric N2 fixation associated with Sphagnum mosses. Here, we show that the linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N2 fixation may constitute an important mechanism in the rapid accumulation of N during the primary succession of peatlands. In our experimental stable isotope enrichment study, previously overlooked methane-induced N2 fixation explained more than one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland stages, where the highest N2 fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged moss vegetation. PMID:24379382

  16. A History of Orthopedics in San Francisco and the West

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Peter; Raih, Thomas; Taylor, Lloyd W.

    1976-01-01

    The unique development of early medical specialization in the West can be traced to California's geography and economic development. Such early specialization produced men with orthopedic inclinations. Early orthopedists founded the first medical school and the first modern teaching hospital, helped to found Stanford's Lane Medical Library and made the first use of x-rays in the West. In addition many of these orthopedists were prominent in the political and social activities of the time. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:795165

  17. Effect of social media in health care and orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Jenine; Robinson, Brooke S; Kugler, Nathan W; Illingworth, Kenneth D; Patel, Pranay; Saleh, Khaled J

    2012-04-01

    With the growth of social media platforms, their potential to affect health care, and orthopedics specifically, continues to expand. We reviewed the literature to obtain all pertinent information on social media in health care and examined its strengths and weaknesses from patient and physician perspectives. Health care professionals have slowly begun to use social media to stay connected with patients. The recent use of networking sites aims to improve education, provide a forum to discuss relevant medical topics, and allow for improved patient care. The use of social media, with the understanding of its limitations, may help promote patient happiness and safety and serve as an educational platform.

  18. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  19. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  20. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, H.L.

    1983-08-16

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

  1. Image recorder with microwave fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, N.; Isaka, K.

    1984-11-13

    The present invention is directed to improvement in an image recorder for recording developed images or toner images by microwave fixation. According to the invention there is used a novel thermoplastic developer comprising of two components. The first component contains a dielectric material which is able to absorb microwave and generate heat by dielectric loss. The second component contains magnetic loss exothermic material. The microwave absorbing power of the first component is improved by heating the first component with heat generated from the second component.

  2. Femoral neck fracture fixation: rigidity of five techniques compared.

    PubMed Central

    Mackechnie-Jarvis, A C

    1983-01-01

    Artificial cadaveric femoral neck fractures were internally fixed with five different devices and subjected to cyclical loading of 0-1.0 kilonewtons (approximately one body weight) whilst in an anatomical position. Displacement of the proximal fragment was detected by a transducer and charted. Bone strength was assessed by a preliminary control loading phase on the intact bone. Efficiency of each fracture fixator could then be directly compared by the relative movement in each case. Five specimens each were tested with Moore's Pins, Trifin Nail, Garden Screws and a sliding screw-plate (OEC Ltd). By the criteria of the experiment, which put a severe shearing load on the implant, none of these devices reliably bore the representative body weight. An extended barrel-plate, which supported the sliding screw almost up to the fracture line, was then made. This device, employing some of Charnley's concepts, tolerated body weight in four cases out of five. PMID:6887186

  3. Do Fixation Cues Ensure Fixation Accuracy in Split-Fovea Studies of Word Recognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We…

  4. A Novel Computer-Aided Approach for Parametric Investigation of Custom Design of Fracture Fixation Plates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The present study proposes an integrated computer-aided approach combining femur surface modeling, fracture evidence recover plate creation, and plate modification in order to conduct a parametric investigation of the design of custom plate for a specific patient. The study allows for improving the design efficiency of specific plates on the patients' femur parameters and the fracture information. Furthermore, the present approach will lead to exploration of plate modification and optimization. The three-dimensional (3D) surface model of a detailed femur and the corresponding fixation plate were represented with high-level feature parameters, and the shape of the specific plate was recursively modified in order to obtain the optimal plate for a specific patient. The proposed approach was tested and verified on a case study, and it could be helpful for orthopedic surgeons to design and modify the plate in order to fit the specific femur anatomy and the fracture information. PMID:28203270

  5. A Novel Computer-Aided Approach for Parametric Investigation of Custom Design of Fracture Fixation Plates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaozhong; He, Kunjin; Chen, Zhengming

    2017-01-01

    The present study proposes an integrated computer-aided approach combining femur surface modeling, fracture evidence recover plate creation, and plate modification in order to conduct a parametric investigation of the design of custom plate for a specific patient. The study allows for improving the design efficiency of specific plates on the patients' femur parameters and the fracture information. Furthermore, the present approach will lead to exploration of plate modification and optimization. The three-dimensional (3D) surface model of a detailed femur and the corresponding fixation plate were represented with high-level feature parameters, and the shape of the specific plate was recursively modified in order to obtain the optimal plate for a specific patient. The proposed approach was tested and verified on a case study, and it could be helpful for orthopedic surgeons to design and modify the plate in order to fit the specific femur anatomy and the fracture information.

  6. Ureteral penetration caused by drilling during internal pelvic bone fixation: delayed recognition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu Seob; Park, Jong Hyuk; Raheem, Omer A; Jeong, Young Beom; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Young Gon

    2013-06-01

    A 49-year-old man was referred to our department with profuse serous fluid discharge from a Penrose drain after undergoing internal fixation with metal screws for multiple pelvic bone fractures. A definite ureteral penetration was identified that was orientated from the lateral to the medial aspect of the right distal ureter. The patient was surgically treated with excision of the 2-cm injured ureteral segment, end-to-end ureteroureterostomy, and double J ureteral stent placement. To our knowledge, a penetrating ureteral injury caused by bone drilling has not been reported previously in the published literature. This case shows that surgeons who do pelvic surgery, including orthopedic surgeons, should be familiar with the anatomical relationship of the ureter and its potential injuries.

  7. The Early Years of Organized Chiropractic Orthopedics, 1954–1973: A Social History

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the origins and development of the organized chiropractic orthopedics movement in the United States from 1954–1973. Methods: Hand searches of early periodicals were performed and information was organized chronologically to create a timeline. Context for the timeline was provided by extracting pertinent information from audio recordings of interviews. Relevant background information was located using the cumulative index of the journal Chiropractic History and searching the MANTIS database. Historical Features: After World War I, The advent of third party reimbursement for health care created a new environment for health care practitioners. For doctors of chiropractic, this event provided the impetus to begin the postgraduate chiropractic orthopedics program over 50 years ago. In 1954, Alvin A. Hancock, DC and F. Maynard Lipe, DC successfully launched an active orthopedics movement after several earlier attempts failed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The movement generated from the desire to train and certify chiropractors to manage personal injury and workers’ compensation low back injuries. In addition to developing interdisciplinary educational programs, the chiropractic orthopedics group was responsible for producing a research agenda, some of the profession’s early orthopedic-focused research, and for starting the National Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics of the National Chiropractic Association, which later became the American Chiropractic Association Council on Orthopedics. These organizations produced thousands of specialists in chiropractic orthopedics, later known as Diplomates of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists. Conclusion: Several orthopedics interest groups were formed and credentialing processes were created to qualify doctors as recognized chiropractic orthopedics specialists. The popularity of this movement resulted in the inclusion of orthopedics into core chiropractic college curricula and

  8. Length of stay, wait time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures after the opening of a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michel; Hopman, Wilma; Yach, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background In September 2011, Kingston General Hospital (KGH) opened a dedicated orthopedic weekend trauma room. Previously, 1 weekend operating room (OR) was used by all surgical services. We assessed the impact this dedicated weekend trauma room had on hospital length of stay (LOS), time to surgery and 30-day mortality for patients with hip fractures. Methods Patients admitted between Oct. 1, 2009, and Sept. 30, 2012, were identified through our trauma registry, representing the 2 years before and 1 year after the opening of the orthopedic weekend trauma room. We documented type of fracture, mode of fixation, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, time to OR, LOS, discharge disposition and 30-day mortality. We excluded patients with multiple fractures, open fractures and those requiring trauma team activation. Results Our study included 609 patients (405 pre- and 204 post–trauma room opening). Mean LOS decreased from 11.6 to 9.4 days (p = 0.005) and there was a decreasing trend in mean time to OR from 31.5 to 28.5 hours (p = 0.16). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (p = 0.24). The LOS decreased by an average of 2 days following opening of the weekend trauma room (p = 0.031) and by an average of 2.2 additional days if the patient was admitted on the weekend versus during the week (p = 0.024). Conclusion The weekend trauma OR at KGH significantly decreased the LOS and appears to have decreased wait times to surgery. Further analysis is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the current strategy, the long-term outcome of this patient population and the impact the additional orthopedic weekend trauma room has had on other surgical services (i.e., general surgery) and their patients. PMID:27668332

  9. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery.

  10. Evidence for extended prophylaxis in the setting of orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dobesh, Paul P

    2004-07-01

    Patients undergoing orthopedic surgery represent one of the highest risk groups for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Evidence shows that this risk extends beyond the period in which the patient is hospitalized, especially for patients undergoing hip surgery. Clinical trials have shown that extended prophylaxis with the low-molecular-weight heparins is effective in reducing the rate of total VTE, and a meta-analysis demonstrated a reduction in symptomatic VTE with extended prophylaxis after total hip replacement surgery. Based on these results, the American College of Chest Physicians gives a grade 2A recommendation for the use of extended prophylaxis after orthopedic surgery. Until recently, data evaluating the role of prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery were limited. Subsequently, a novel anticoagulant, fondaparinux, demonstrated significant benefit in these patients and has become the first and only agent approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery Despite the limitations of the older trials, their findings supported the need to evaluate extended prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. In the first well-conducted trial of extended prophylaxis for hip fracture surgery, fondaparinux provided impressive results in reducing total and symptomatic VTE. The results of this trial have once again led to fondaparinux being the first and only agent to be granted FDA approval for the indication of extended prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

  11. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts’ process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts’ scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable. PMID:27414794

  12. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Dan; Amar, Eyal; Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts' process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts' scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable.

  13. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  14. Developments in ambulatory surgery in orthopedics in France in 2016.

    PubMed

    Hulet, C; Rochcongar, G; Court, C

    2017-02-01

    Under the new categorization introduced by the Health Authorities, ambulatory surgery (AS) in France now accounts for 50% of procedures, taking all surgical specialties together. The replacement of full hospital admission by AS is now well established and recognized. Health-care centers have learned, in coordination with the medico-surgical and paramedical teams, how to set up AS units and the corresponding clinical pathways. There is no single model handed down from above. The authorities have encouraged these developments, partly by regulations but also by means of financial incentives. Patient eligibility and psychosocial criteria are crucial determining factors for the success of the AS strategy. The surgeons involved are strongly committed. Feedback from many orthopedic subspecialties (shoulder, foot, knee, spine, hand, large joints, emergency and pediatric surgery) testify to the rise of AS, which now accounts for 41% of all orthopedic procedures. Questions remain, however, concerning the role of the GP in the continuity of care, the role of innovation and teaching, the creation of new jobs, and the attractiveness of AS for surgeons. More than ever, it is the patient who is "ambulatory", within an organized structure in which surgical technique and pain management are well controlled. Not all patients can be eligible, but the AS concept is becoming standard, and overnight stay will become a matter for medical and surgical prescription.

  15. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification.

  16. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-15

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  17. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors.

    PubMed

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Süsskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-12-01

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance.

  18. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  19. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  20. Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Robert S.; Fusco, Carol B.

    Guidelines are provided for the development of programs in South Carolina for orthopedically handicapped (OH) pupils. Basic information is given concerning the definition of orthopedic handicap, the legal mandates on the education of OH pupils, funding sources, authorized programs (whether self-contained programs, resource rooms, or itinerant…

  1. Interpretation by radiologists of orthopedic total joint radiographs: Is it necessary or cost-effective?

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, K. Naresh K.; Rorabeck, Cecil H.; Bourne, Robert B.; Mulliken, Brian; Robinson, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Objective To examine the necessity and cost-effectiveness of interpretation by radiologists of orthopedic radiographs obtained for patients who undergo total hip or knee replacement. Design A prospective study. Serial preoperative and postoperative x-ray films of the joint in patients scheduled to undergo total hip or knee joint replacement during one calendar year were interpreted by both radiology and orthopedic department staff and compared. Intraoperative findings were used to confirm the radiologic interpretation. The follow-up was 1 year. Setting A university teaching hospital. Interventions Primary or revision total hip or knee replacement. Main Outcome Measures Differences in interpretation of radiographs by radiologists and orthopedic surgeons for any of the four procedures. A change in orthopedic management. Results For preoperative radiographs, there were no discrepancies between the radiologists and orthopedic surgeons with respect to primary joint replacement. For 100 revision procedures there were 15 discrepancies, but in all cases the orthopedic surgeon’s interpretation proved to be correct. For the postoperative radiographs, there were no discrepancies in the group of revision hip replacements. For the other three groups there were a total of six discrepancies and in all cases the orthopedic surgeon’s interpretation was correct. In two cases conditions were present that were not recognized by staff from either the radiology department or orthopedic department. Conclusion Interpretation by radiologists of total joint radiographs in patients who undergo primary or revision total hip or knee replacement arthroplasty is not necessary or cost-effective. PMID:8857988

  2. A qualitative and quantitative needs assessment of pain management for hospitalized orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Cordts, Grace A; Grant, Marian S; Brandt, Lynsey E; Mears, Simon C

    2011-08-08

    Despite advances in pain management, little formal teaching is given to practitioners and nurses in its use for postoperative orthopedic patients. The goal of our study was to determine the educational needs for orthopedic pain management of our residents, nurses, and physical therapists using a quantitative and qualitative assessment. The needs analysis was conducted in a 10-bed orthopedic unit at a teaching hospital and included a survey given to 20 orthopedic residents, 9 nurses, and 6 physical therapists, followed by focus groups addressing barriers to pain control and knowledge of pain management. Key challenges for nurses included not always having breakthrough pain medication orders and the gap in pain management between cessation of patient-controlled analgesia and ordering and administering oral medications. Key challenges for orthopedic residents included treating pain in patients with a history of substance abuse, assessing pain, and determining when to use long-acting vs short-acting opioids. Focus group assessments revealed a lack of training in pain management and the need for better coordination of care between nurses and practitioners and improved education about special needs groups (the elderly and those with substance abuse issues). This needs assessment showed that orthopedic residents and nurses receive little formal education on pain management, despite having to address pain on a daily basis. This information will be used to develop an educational program to improve pain management for postoperative orthopedic patients. An integrated educational program with orthopedic residents, nurses, and physical therapists would promote understanding of issues for each discipline.

  3. Endovascular repair of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm after orthopedic surgery with balloon-expandable covered stents.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Mohammad H; Silvia, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    Arterial injury after orthopedic procedures is an uncommon complication that can present clinically in a variety of forms and has conventionally been repaired by open vascular surgery. The case and discussion in this article highlights the usefulness of endovascular repair following a delayed presentation of vascular injury from an orthopedic procedure.

  4. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  5. Do fixation cues ensure fixation accuracy in split-fovea studies of word recognition?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Timothy R; Paterson, Kevin B; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2009-07-01

    Many studies have claimed that hemispheric processing is split precisely at the foveal midline and so place great emphasis on the precise location at which words are fixated. These claims are based on experiments in which a variety of fixation procedures were used to ensure fixation accuracy but the effectiveness of these procedures is unclear. We investigated this issue using procedures matched to the original studies and an eye-tracker to monitor the locations actually fixated. Four common types of fixation cues were used: cross, two vertical gapped lines, two vertical gapped lines plus a secondary task in which a digit was presented at the designated fixation point, and a dot. Accurate fixations occurred on <35% of trials for all fixation conditions. Moreover, despite the usefulness often attributed to a secondary task, no increase in fixation accuracy was produced in this condition. The indications are that split-fovea theory should not assume that fixation of specified locations occurs in experiments without appropriate eye-tracking control or, indeed, that consistent fixation of specified locations is plausible under normal conditions of word recognition.

  6. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  7. Adjustable Stiffness, External Fixator for the Rat Femur Osteotomy and Segmental Bone Defect Models

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Vaida; Matthys, Romano

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical environment around the healing of broken bone is very important as it determines the way the fracture will heal. Over the past decade there has been great clinical interest in improving bone healing by altering the mechanical environment through the fixation stability around the lesion. One constraint of preclinical animal research in this area is the lack of experimental control over the local mechanical environment within a large segmental defect as well as osteotomies as they heal. In this paper we report on the design and use of an external fixator to study the healing of large segmental bone defects or osteotomies. This device not only allows for controlled axial stiffness on the bone lesion as it heals, but it also enables the change of stiffness during the healing process in vivo. The conducted experiments have shown that the fixators were able to maintain a 5 mm femoral defect gap in rats in vivo during unrestricted cage activity for at least 8 weeks. Likewise, we observed no distortion or infections, including pin infections during the entire healing period. These results demonstrate that our newly developed external fixator was able to achieve reproducible and standardized stabilization, and the alteration of the mechanical environment of in vivo rat large bone defects and various size osteotomies. This confirms that the external fixation device is well suited for preclinical research investigations using a rat model in the field of bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25350129

  8. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Methods Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. Results We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. Discussion This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity. PMID:26930079

  9. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire: an aid for facial bone fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Good; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Chang, Hak; Kwon, Sung-Tack; Baek, Rong-Min; Minn, Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    We have devised a new technique to improve stabilization of fractured facial bone fractures (frontal sinus fractures, zygomatic fractures, mandibular condyle fractures) by intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires (stainless steel wires through intermaxillary fixation screws). A retrospective study evaluating intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. We have used this technique for 3 cases of frontal sinus fractures, 9 cases of zygomatic fractures, and 7 cases of mandibular condyle fractures. After dissection of a fractured site, a hole is drilled on the fractured bone where it does not interfere with positioning the plate across the fracture line. After an intermaxillary fixation screw is inserted, a stainless steel wire is tied through a hole in the screw head. By the aid of wire for traction, the displaced fractured bone is easily aligned to the proper position. Plates and screws are applied readily on the predetermined area. A retrospective study on 19 patients using intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. The diagnoses and associated complications of the cases were recorded. No associated complication as a result of using this technique was identified. The use of intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire enhances stabilization and visualization without possible risk for surrounding soft tissue injury using, a sharp traction device like a bone hook. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire is an useful aid for visualization and stabilization during facial bone fracture reduction, particularly where exposure is difficult such as in the condylar region of the mandible. And unlike a classic traction wire, the intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire has almost no risk of having it loosened from the screw.

  10. Factors affecting interest in orthopedics among female medical students: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Namdari, Surena; Bowers, Andrea; Keenan, Mary Ann; Levin, L Scott; Ahn, Jaimo

    2011-12-06

    The field of orthopedics has a limited ability to recruit high-quality female applicants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early exposure to the field affects a woman's decision to pursue orthopedics. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study between academic years 2005 and 2009 and compared interest in orthopedic surgery among female (n=271) and male (n=71) medical students at 2 urban teaching institutions. Elective lectures and orthopedic literature were distributed via e-mail to the study participants. These materials included articles published in the medical literature, materials produced and distributed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and Web sites providing educational materials. The primary outcome was the likelihood of application for orthopedic residency. We studied the influence of demographics, exposure, and attitudes on interest in pursuing an orthopedic career. Men had a significantly higher baseline level of interest in orthopedic surgery than women (P=.005). Younger age (P<.001) and personal (P<.001), independent (P<.001), and school (P=.023) exposures to orthopedics were significantly related to interest among women. At final follow-up, total personal exposures (P=.003) and total independent exposures (P<.001) in the form of our literature and lectures were correlated with final interest in women. Female interest was decreased by the long hours, physical demands, and predominantly male nature of the field. Early exposure to orthopedic educational resources may be useful in generating female interest. Perceptions and attitudes regarding orthopedic surgery must to be changed to attract the best and brightest minds, regardless of sex.

  11. Dinitrogen fixation in aphotic oxygenated marine environments

    PubMed Central

    Rahav, Eyal; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Ohayon, Sarah; Elifantz, Hila; Belkin, Natalia; Herut, Barak; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    We measured N2 fixation rates from oceanic zones that have traditionally been ignored as sources of biological N2 fixation; the aphotic, fully oxygenated, nitrate (NO−3)-rich, waters of the oligotrophic Levantine Basin (LB) and the Gulf of Aqaba (GA). N2 fixation rates measured from pelagic aphotic waters to depths up to 720 m, during the mixed and stratified periods, ranged from 0.01 nmol N L−1 d−1 to 0.38 nmol N L−1 d−1. N2 fixation rates correlated significantly with bacterial productivity and heterotrophic diazotrophs were identified from aphotic as well as photic depths. Dissolved free amino acid amendments to whole water from the GA enhanced bacterial productivity by 2–3.5 fold and N2 fixation rates by ~2-fold in samples collected from aphotic depths while in amendments to water from photic depths bacterial productivity increased 2–6 fold while N2 fixation rates increased by a factor of 2 to 4 illustrating that both BP and heterotrophic N2 fixation were carbon limited. Experimental manipulations of aphotic waters from the LB demonstrated a significant positive correlation between transparent exopolymeric particle (TEP) concentrations and N2 fixation rates. This suggests that sinking organic material and high carbon (C): nitrogen (N) micro-environments (such as TEP-based aggregates or marine snow) could support high heterotrophic N2 fixation rates in oxygenated surface waters and in the aphotic zones. Indeed, our calculations show that aphotic N2 fixation accounted for 37 to 75% of the total daily integrated N2 fixation rates at both locations in the Mediterranean and Red Seas with rates equal or greater to those measured from the photic layers. Moreover, our results indicate that that while N2 fixation may be limited in the surface waters, aphotic, pelagic N2 fixation may contribute significantly to new N inputs in other oligotrophic basins, yet it is currently not included in regional or global N budgets. PMID:23986748

  12. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with. PMID:27027022

  13. Congenital and acquired orthopedic abnormalities in patients with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Westcott, M A; Dynes, M C; Remer, E M; Donaldson, J S; Dias, L S

    1992-11-01

    This article presents a radiologic review of the spectrum of acquired and congenital orthopedic abnormalities found in patients with myelomeningocele. These abnormalities are caused predominantly by muscle imbalance, paralysis, and decreased sensation in the lower extremity. Iatrogenic injury, such as a postoperative tethered cord, may also cause bone abnormalities. Selected images were obtained from more than 800 children. Important entities presented include spinal curvatures such as kyphosis, scoliosis, and lordosis; subluxation and dislocation of the hip, coxa valga, contractures of the hip, and femoral torsion; knee deformities; rotational abnormalities of the lower extremity and external and internal torsion; ankle and foot abnormalities such as ankle valgus, calcaneus foot, congenital vertical talus (rocker-bottom deformity), and talipes equinovarus; and metaphyseal, diaphyseal, and physeal fractures. Familiarity with congenital abnormalities and an understanding of the pathogenesis of acquired disorders in patients with myelomeningocele are essential for proper radiologic interpretation and timely therapy.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Nanotextured Titanium Orthopedic Screws for Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Stephane; Awitor, Komla O; Raspal, Vincent; Johnson, Matthew B; Bokalawela, Roshan S P; Larson, Preston R; Doiron, Curtis F

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we modified the topography of commercial titanium orthopedic screws using electrochemical anodization in a 0.4 wt% hydrofluoric acid solution to produce titanium dioxide nanotube layers. The morphology of the nanotube layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the nanotube layers were investigated by screwing and unscrewing an anodized screw into several different types of human bone while the torsional force applied to the screwdriver was measured using a torque screwdriver. The range of torsional force applied to the screwdriver was between 5 and [Formula: see text]. Independent assessment of the mechanical properties of the same surfaces was performed on simple anodized titanium foils using a triboindenter. Results showed that the fabricated nanotube layers can resist mechanical stresses close to those found in clinical situations.

  15. Barriers to the clinical translation of orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been the subject of increasingly intensive research for over 20 years, and there is concern in some quarters over the lack of clinically useful products despite the large sums of money invested. This review provides one perspective on orthopedic applications from a biologist working in academia. It is suggested that the delay in clinical application is not atypical of new, biologically based technologies. Some barriers to progress are acknowledged and discussed, but it is also noted that preclinical studies have identified several promising types of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenetic signals, which, although not optimal, are worth advancing toward human trials to establish a bridgehead in the clinic. Although this transitional technology will be replaced by more sophisticated, subsequent systems, it will perform valuable pioneering functions and facilitate the clinical development of the field. Some strategies for achieving this are suggested.

  16. Kennedy Space Center Fixation Tube (KFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E.; Levine, Howard G.; Romero, Vergel

    2016-01-01

    Experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS) frequently require the experimental organisms to be preserved until they can be returned to earth for analysis in the appropriate laboratory facility. The Kennedy Fixation Tube (KFT) was developed to allow astronauts to apply fixative, chemical compounds that are often toxic, to biological samples without the use of a glovebox while maintaining three levels of containment (Fig. 1). KFTs have been used over 200 times on-orbit with no leaks of chemical fixative. The KFT is composed of the following elements: a polycarbonate main tube where the fixative is loaded preflight, the sample tube where the plant or other biological specimens is placed during operations, the expansion plug, actuator, and base plug that provides fixative containment (Fig. 2). The main tube is pre-filled with 25 mL of fixative solution prior to flight. When actuated, the specimen contained within the sample tube is immersed with approximately 22 mL (+/- 2 mL) of the fixative solution. The KFT has been demonstrated to maintain its containment at ambient temperatures, 4degC refrigeration and -100 C freezing conditions.

  17. Orthopedic Correction of Growing Hyperdivergent, Retrognathic, Patients with Miniscrew Implants

    PubMed Central

    Buschang, Peter H.; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P. Emile

    2010-01-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do require long-term patient compliance. This paper introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIa) and growth to treat retrognathic hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (13.2 ±1.1 years of age) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ±0.3 years). Each patient had two MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a RPE, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Prior to treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z-score=−1.0), facial convexity (Z-score=0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z-score=1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced an average of 2.4 mm, the SNB angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individuals’ growth potential. PMID:21236539

  18. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Andreas; Klein, Anja; Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  19. Hydroxyapatite-nanotube composites and coatings for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Debrupa

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has received wide attention in orthopedics, due to its biocompatibility and osseointegration ability. Despite these advantages, the brittle nature and low fracture toughness of HA often results in rapid wear and premature fracture of implant. Hence, there is a need to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance of HA without compromising its biocompatibility. The aim of the current research is to explore the potential of nanotubes as reinforcement to HA for orthopedic implants. HA- 4 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and coatings are synthesized by spark plasma sintering and plasma spraying respectively, and investigated for their mechanical, tribological and biological behavior. CNT reinforcement improves the fracture toughness (>90%) and wear resistance (>66%) of HA for coating and free standing composites. CNTs have demonstrated a positive influence on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization activities of osteoblasts, during in-vitro biocompatibility studies. In-vivo exposure of HA-CNT coated titanium implant in animal model (rat) shows excellent histocompatibility and neobone integration on the implant surface. The improved osseointegration due to presence of CNTs in HA is quantified by the adhesion strength measurement of single osteoblast using nano-scratch technique. Considering the ongoing debate about cytotoxicity of CNTs in the literature, the present study also suggests boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) as an alternative reinforcement. BNNT with the similar elastic modulus and strength as CNT, were added to HA. The resulting composite having 4 wt.% BNNTs improved the fracture toughness (˜85%) and wear resistance (˜75%) of HA in the similar range as HA-CNT composites. BNNTs were found to be non-cytotoxic for osteoblasts and macrophages. In-vitro evaluation shows positive role of BNNT in osteoblast proliferation and viability. Apatite formability of BNNT surface in ˜4 days establishes its osseointegration

  20. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  1. Stress-riser fractures of the hip after sliding screw plate fixation.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, F R; Haher, T R; Splain, S H; Mani, V J

    1992-10-01

    Fractures occurring after fixation of intertrochanteric femur fractures have been described previously in the literature. Terms such as "stress-riser fracture" and "Young's modulus fracture" have been applied. The prevalence of these fracture types has increased, and so has use of the sliding screw plate device for fixation of intertrochanteric hip fractures. The object of this paper is to describe, by case examples, types of stress-related fractures of the proximal femur in association with the sliding screw plate and to define each biomechanical type in review.

  2. Absorbable fixation in forefoot surgery: a viable alternative to metallic hardware.

    PubMed

    Nielson, David L; Young, Nathan J; Zelen, Charles M

    2013-07-01

    After 4 to 8 weeks of normal primary bone healing, rigid internal fixation is no longer required. Newer generation absorbable implants have become reliable and cost-effective alternatives to metallic hardware. Modern implants are formulated to have increased strength and smoother resorption over the course of 18 to 24 months, which decreases the possibility of local inflammation. Historically, bioresorbable screws can be time consuming to insert, but newer devices are being developed that help ease their insertion. A case of a bunionectomy is presented with double osteotomy on a 40-year-old nurse fixated with polyglycolic acid and poly-l-lactic acid copolymer screws.

  3. Review of the regulations for the use of stainless steels for orthopedic implants in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Bernardo; Rivera, Graciela; Boeri, Roberto

    2007-11-01

    Motivated by the relatively high rate of failure of orthopedic implants in Argentina, the authors review the current normative regulating the use of stainless steels in the fabrication of these metallic parts in the country, and compare it with the regulations currently in use in other countries. The analysis shows that several standards in effect in the country do not comply with broadly recognized international standards. This situation is aggravated by a recent revision of the normative that failed to improve the quality standards to reach levels similar to those applied in developed countries or even in MERCOSUR associates. The national organization in charge of implant certification in Argentina, complying with the law, accepts the applicability of IRAM standards to certify stainless steels implants. In the opinion of the authors, the current practice used to certify implants does not guarantee the structural stability and biocompatibility of the devices, increasing the risk of failure in service, and escalating the cost of the public health care system.

  4. Photoactive TiO2 antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation. PMID:26005347

  5. Photoactive TiO₂ antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation.

  6. Ingenious method of external fixator use to maintain alignment for nailing a proximal tibial shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Kumar, Vishal; Kumar Meena, Umesh; Saibaba, Balaji

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the tibia are one of the most commonly seen orthopedic injuries. Most of them result from a high velocity trauma. While intramedullary nailing of tibial diaphyseal fractures is considered as the golden standard form of treatment for such cases, many metaphyseal and metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures can also be managed by nailing. Maintenance of alignment of such fractures during surgical procedure is often challenging as the pull of patellar tendon tends to extend the proximal fragment as soon as one flexes the knee for the surgical procedure. Numerous technical modifications have been described in the literature for successfully nailing such fractures including semi extended nailing, use of medial plates and external fixators among others. In this study, it was aimed to report two cases in which we used our ingenious method of applying external fixator for maintaining alignment of the fracture and aiding in the entire process of closed intramedullary nailing of metaphyseal tibial fractures by the conventional method. We were able to get good alignment during and after the closed surgery as observed on post-operative radiographs and believe that further evaluation of this technique may be of help to surgeons who want to avoid other techniques.

  7. Modeling and simulation of physical performance of a external unilateral mechatronic orthopaedic fixator - bone system.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, A; Choromanski, W; Deszczynski, J; Dobrzynski, G

    2006-01-01

    Restricted element study of the fracture healing by external fixation device was investigated. The analyses were performed under an axial and variable loaded boundary conditions. The effect of different fracture size and different distance between bone and the external fixator device on the stress distribution was investigated. The results show that stresses in the external fixator device are highest at the beginning of the fracture healing process, and are gradually decreasing with the time of the treatment. The analyses were carried out using the commercial package CATIA P3 V5R11. This allowed to build a three-dimensional model more similar to the geometrical architecture of the long bone as well as of the external fixator. Three-dimensional restricted element model also allowed a collection of more realistic results. However, the accuracy of the results depends not only on the quality of the model geometry but also on the material properties assigned to the model components. It also depends on the accuracy in the simulation of the finite element model and the optimized mesh generation.

  8. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (P<.025). When asked if student loan debt would influence the next step in their career, nonorthopedic residents were statistically more likely to respond "yes" compared with orthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.].

  9. Neural correlates of fixation duration in natural reading: Evidence from fixation-related fMRI.

    PubMed

    Henderson, John M; Choi, Wonil; Luke, Steven G; Desai, Rutvik H

    2015-10-01

    A key assumption of current theories of natural reading is that fixation duration reflects underlying attentional, language, and cognitive processes associated with text comprehension. The neurocognitive correlates of this relationship are currently unknown. To investigate this relationship, we compared neural activation associated with fixation duration in passage reading and a pseudo-reading control condition. The results showed that fixation duration was associated with activation in oculomotor and language areas during text reading. Fixation duration during pseudo-reading, on the other hand, showed greater involvement of frontal control regions, suggesting flexibility and task dependency of the eye movement network. Consistent with current models, these results provide support for the hypothesis that fixation duration in reading reflects attentional engagement and language processing. The results also demonstrate that fixation-related fMRI provides a method for investigating the neurocognitive bases of natural reading.

  10. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    PubMed Central

    Ellore, Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Taranatha, Mahantesha; Nara, Asha; Gunjalli, Gururaj; Bhat, Ashwin Devasya

    2012-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article. PMID:23293501

  11. Ocular Fixation Abnormality in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirama, Aya; Kanai, Chieko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-01-01

    We examined the factors that influence ocular fixation control in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including sensory information, individuals' motor characteristics, and inhibitory control. The ASD group showed difficulty in maintaining fixation especially when there was no fixation target. The fixational eye movement characteristics of…

  12. Preparation of three-dimensional braided carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK composites for potential load-bearing bone fixations. Part I. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Luo, Honglin; Xiong, Guangyao; Yang, Zhiwei; Raman, Sudha R; Li, Qiuping; Ma, Chunying; Li, Deying; Wang, Zheren; Wan, Yizao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we focused on fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (C3-D/PEEK) composites for orthopedic applications. We found that pre-heating of 3-D fabrics before hot-pressing could eliminate pores in the composites prepared by 3-D co-braiding and hot-pressing techniques. The manufacturing process and the processing variables were studied and optimum parameters were obtained. Moreover, the carbon fibers were surface treated by the anodic oxidization and its effect on mechanical properties of the composites was determined. Preliminary cell studies with mouse osteoblast cells were also performed to examine the cytocompatibility of the composites. Feasibility of the C3-D/PEEK composites as load-bearing bone fixation materials was evaluated. Results suggest that the C3-D/PEEK composites show good promising as load-bearing bone fixations.

  13. Methanotrophy Induces Nitrogen Fixation in Boreal Mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiirola, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many methanotrophic bacterial groups fix nitrogen in laboratory conditions. Furthermore, nitrogen (N) is a limiting nutrient in many environments where methane concentrations are highest. Despite these facts, methane-induced N fixation has previously been overlooked, possibly due to methodological problems. To study the possible link between methanotrophy and diazotrophy in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, we measured the co-occurrence of these two processes in boreal forest, peatland and stream mosses using a stable isotope labeling approach (15 N2 and 13 CH4 double labeling) and sequencing of the nifH gene marker. N fixation associated with forest mosses was dependent on the annual N deposition, whereas methane stimulate N fixation neither in high (>3 kg N ha -1 yr -1) nor low deposition areas, which was in accordance with the nifH gene sequencing showing that forest mosses (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens ) carried mainly cyanobacterial N fixers. On the other extreme, in stream mosses (Fontinalis sp.) methane was actively oxidized throughout the year, whereas N fixation showed seasonal fluctuation. The co-occurrence of the two processes in single cell level was proven by co-localizing both N and methane-carbon fixation with the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) approach. Methanotrophy and diazotrophy was also studied in peatlands of different primary successional stages in the land-uplift coast of Bothnian Bay, in the Siikajoki chronosequence, where N accumulation rates in peat profiles indicate significant N fixation. Based on experimental evidence it was counted that methane-induced N fixation explained over one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland successional stages, where the highest N fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged Sphagnum moss vegetation. The linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N fixation may therefore constitute an important mechanism in the rapid

  14. Effect of insulating layer material on RF-induced heating for external fixation system in 1.5 T MRI system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Kainz, Wolfgang; Qian, Songsong; Wu, Wen; Chen, Ji

    2014-09-01

    The radio frequency (RF)-induced heating is a major concern when patients with medical devices are placed inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In this article, numerical studies are applied to investigate the potentials of using insulated materials to reduce the RF heating for external fixation devices. It is found that by changing the dielectric constant of the insulation material, the RF-induced heating at the tips of devices can be altered. This study indicates a potential technique of developing external fixation device with low MRI RF heating.

  15. Development of Ti-Nb-Zr alloys with high elastic admissible strain for temporary orthopedic devices.

    PubMed

    Ozan, Sertan; Lin, Jixing; Li, Yuncang; Ipek, Rasim; Wen, Cuie

    2015-07-01

    A new series of beta Ti-Nb-Zr (TNZ) alloys with considerable plastic deformation ability during compression test, high elastic admissible strain, and excellent cytocompatibility have been developed for removable bone tissue implant applications. TNZ alloys with nominal compositions of Ti-34Nb-25Zr, Ti-30Nb-32Zr, Ti-28Nb-35.4Zr and Ti-24.8Nb-40.7Zr (wt.% hereafter) were fabricated using the cold-crucible levitation technique, and the effects of alloying element content on their microstructures, mechanical properties (tensile strength, yield strength, compressive yield strength, Young's modulus, elastic energy, toughness, and micro-hardness), and cytocompatibilities were investigated and compared. Microstructural examinations revealed that the TNZ alloys consisted of β phase. The alloy samples displayed excellent ductility with no cracking, or fracturing during compression tests. Their tensile strength, Young's modulus, elongation at rupture, and elastic admissible strain were measured in the ranges of 704-839 MPa, 62-65 GPa, 9.9-14.8% and 1.08-1.31%, respectively. The tensile strength, Young's modulus and elongation at rupture of the Ti-34Nb-25Zr alloy were measured as 839 ± 31.8 MPa, 62 ± 3.6 GPa, and 14.8 ± 1.6%, respectively; this alloy exhibited the elastic admissible strain of approximately 1.31%. Cytocompatibility tests indicated that the cell viability ratios (CVR) of the alloys are greater than those of the control group; thus the TNZ alloys possess excellent cytocompatibility.

  16. Iris fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Yazdani-Abyaneh, Alireza; Djalilian, Ali R; Fard, Masoud Aghsaei

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a technique for iris fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) in which most of the procedure is done outside the eye. This minimizes intraocular manipulation, maximizes corneal endothelial preservation, and avoids the risk for IOL drop into the vitreous cavity intraoperatively. The IOL is fixated to the most peripheral part of the iris, resulting in a rounder pupil. Sutures are placed at exact positions on the haptics, resulting in a well-centered IOL.

  17. Usefulness of a metal artifact reduction algorithm for orthopedic implants in abdominal CT: phantom and clinical study results.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seonji; Kim, Se Hyung; Hwang, Eui Jin; Shin, Cheong-Il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for orthopedic prostheses in phantom and clinical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An agar phantom with two sets of spinal screws was scanned at various tube voltage (80-140 kVp) and tube current-time (34-1032 mAs) settings. The orthopedic MAR algorithm was combined with filtered back projection (FBP) or iterative reconstruction. The mean SDs in three ROIs were compared among four datasets (FBP, iterative reconstruction, FBP with orthopedic MAR, and iterative reconstruction with orthopedic MAR). For the clinical study, the mean SDs of three ROIs and 4-point scaled image quality in 52 patients with metallic orthopedic prostheses were compared between CT images acquired with and without orthopedic MAR. The presence and type of image quality improvement with orthopedic MAR and the presence of orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were also analyzed. RESULTS. In the phantom study, the mean SD with orthopedic MAR was significantly lower than that without orthopedic MAR regardless of dose settings and reconstruction algorithms (FBP versus iterative reconstruction). The mean SD near the metallic prosthesis in 52 patients was significantly lower on CT images with orthopedic MAR (28.04 HU) than those without it (49.21 HU). Image quality regarding metallic artifact was significantly improved with orthopedic MAR (rating of 2.60 versus 1.04). Notable reduction of metallic artifacts and better depiction of abdominal organs were observed in 45 patients. Diagnostic benefit was achieved in six patients, but orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were seen in 30 patients. CONCLUSION. Use of the orthopedic MAR algorithm significantly reduces metal artifacts in CT of both phantoms and patients and has potential for improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artifacts.

  18. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  19. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhong-jun; Wang, Shao-bo; Pan, Sheng-fa; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Feng-shan; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although several studies report various treatment solutions for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy, long-term follow-up studies are very rare. None of the reported treatment solutions represent a gold standard for this disease owing to the small number of cases and lack of long-term follow-up. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy from a single center. This retrospective study included 15 patients (9 male patients and 6 female patients) with athetoid cerebral palsy who underwent laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy at our hospital between March 2006 and June 2010. Demographic variables, radiographic parameters, and pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes determined by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed. The mean follow-up time was 80.5 months. Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis (P = 0.02) and cervical lordosis (P = 0.04) were significantly correlated with lower preoperative modified JOA scores. The mean modified JOA scores increased from 7.97 preoperatively to 12.1 postoperatively (P < 0.01). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.30 to 3.13 (P < 0.01), and the mean NDI score decreased from 31.73 to 19.93 (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis and recovery rate of the modified JOA score (P = 0.01). Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis is significantly related to neurological function in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation is an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. PMID:27684879

  20. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  1. Coronary Sinus Lead Removal: A Comparison between Active and Passive Fixation Leads

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yalin; Gosau, Nils; Aydin, Ali; Willems, Stephan; Treede, Hendrik; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Hakmi, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Background Implantation of coronary sinus (CS) leads may be a difficult procedure due to different vein anatomies and a possible lead dislodgement. The mode of CS lead fixation has changed and developed in recent years. Objectives We compared the removal procedures of active and passive fixation leads. Methods Between January 2009 and January 2014, 22 patients at our centre underwent CS lead removal, 6 active and 16 passive fixation leads were attempted using simple traction or lead locking devices with or without laser extraction sheaths. Data on procedural variables and success rates were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Results The mean patient age was 67.2 ± 9.8 years, and 90.9% were male. The indication for lead removal was infection in all cases. All active fixation leads were Medtronic® Attain StarFix™ Model 4195 (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). The mean time from implantation for the active and passive fixation leads was 9.9 ± 11.7 months (range 1.0–30.1) and 48.7 ± 33.6 months (range 5.7–106.4), respectively (p = 0.012). Only 3 of 6 StarFix leads were successfully removed (50%) compared to 16 of 16 (100%) of the passive fixation CS leads (p = 0.013). No death or complications occurred during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusion According to our experience, removal of the Starfix active fixation CS leads had a higher procedural failure rate compared to passive. PMID:27119368

  2. Flexible fixation of syndesmotic diastasis using the assembled bolt-tightrope system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Syndesmotic diastasis is a common injury. Syndesmotic bolt and tightrope are two of the commonly used methods for the fixation of syndesmotic diastasis. Syndesmotic bolt can be used to reduce and maintain the syndesmosis. However, it cannot permit the normal range of motion of distal tibiofibular joint, especially the rotation of the fibula. Tightrope technique can be used to provide flexible fixation of the syndesmosis. However, it lacks the ability of reducing the syndesmotic diastasis. To combine the advantages of both syndemostic bolt and tightrope techniques and simultaneously avoid the potential disadvantages of both techniques, we designed the assembled bolt-tightrope system (ABTS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the primary effectiveness of ABTS in treating syndesmotic diastasis. Methods From October 2010 to June 2011, patients with syndesmotic diastasis met the inclusion criteria were enrolled into this study and treated with ABTS. Patients were followed up at 2, 6 weeks and 6, 12 months after operation. The functional outcomes were assessed according to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 12 months follow-up. Patients’ satisfaction was evaluated based upon short form-12 (SF-12) health survey questionnaire. The anteroposterior radiographs of the injured ankles were taken, and the medial clear space (MCS), tibiofibular overlap (TFOL), and tibiofibular clear space (TFCS) were measured. All hardwares were routinely removed at 12-month postoperatively. Follow-ups continued. The functional and radiographic assessments were done again at the latest follow-up. Results Twelve patients were enrolled into this study, including 8 males and 4 females with a mean age of 39.5 years (range, 26 to 56 years). All patients also sustained ankle fractures. At 12 months follow-up, the mean AOFAS score was 95.4 (range, 85 to 100), and all patients were satisfied with the functional recoveries. The radiographic MCS, TFOL

  3. Fixation of a Proximal Humeral Fracture Using a Novel Intramedullary Cage Construct following a Failed Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A majority of proximal humeral fractures are preferably treated conservatively. However, surgical management may be beneficial in proximal humeral fractures with significant displacement or angulation. Unfortunately, the complication rates associated with current surgical procedures for fracture fixation, ORIF and IM devices, can be unacceptably high. A new technology, termed the PH Cage, addresses the technical limitations associated with current technologies available for fixation of proximal humeral fractures. It allows for intramedullary fixation of a PH fracture and provides direct load bearing support to the articular surface and buttresses the medial column during healing. We are presenting our first experience with the PH Cage for the fixation of a PH fracture, which had previously failed conservative management. PMID:28255485

  4. Cost of external fixation vs external fixation then nailing in bone infection

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Khaled Mohamed; Diab, Ramy Ahmed; Ghafar, Khaled Abd EL

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the cost benefit of external fixation vs external fixation then nailing in treatment of bone infection by segment transfer. METHODS: Out of 71 patients with infected nonunion tibia treated between 2003 and 2006, 50 patients fitted the inclusion criteria (26 patients were treated by external fixation only, and 24 patients were treated by external fixation early removal after segment transfer and replacement by internal fixation). Cost of inpatient treatment, total cost of inpatient and outpatient treatment till full healing, and the weeks of absence from school or work were calculated and compared between both groups. RESULTS: The cost of hospital stay and surgery in the group of external fixation only was 22.6 ± 3.3 while the cost of hospital stay and surgery in the group of early external fixation removal and replacement by intramedullary nail was 26.0 ± 3.2. The difference was statistically significant regarding the cost of hospital stay and surgery in favor of the group of external fixation only. The total cost of medical care (surgery, hospital stay, treatment outside the hospital including medications, dressing, physical therapy, outpatient laboratory work, etc.) in group of external fixation only was 63.3 ± 15.1, and total absence from work was 38.6 ± 6.6 wk. While the group of early removal of external fixation and replacement by IM nail, total cost of medical care was 38.3 ± 6.4 and total absence from work or school was 22.7 ± 4.1. The difference was statistically significant regarding the total cost and absence from work in favor of the group of early removal and replacement by IM nail. CONCLUSION: Early removal of external fixation and replacement by intramedullary nail in treatment of infected nonunion showed more cost effectiveness. Orthopaedic society needs to show the cost effectiveness of different procedures to the community, insurance, and health authorities. PMID:25621219

  5. Characteristics of Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia: Limitations on Fixation Stability and Acuity?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Li, Roger W.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Persons with amblyopia, especially those with strabismus, are known to exhibit abnormal fixational eye movements. In this paper, we compared six characteristics of fixational eye movements among normal control eyes (n=16), the non-amblyopic fellow eyes and the amblyopic eyes of anisometropic (n=14) and strabismic amblyopes (n=14). These characteristics include the frequency, magnitude of landing errors, amplitude and speed of microsaccades, and the amplitude and speed of slow drifts. Fixational eye movements were recorded using retinal imaging while observers monocularly fixated a 1° cross. Eye position data were recovered using a cross-correlation procedure. We found that in general, the characteristics of fixational eye movements are not significantly different between the fellow eyes of amblyopes and controls, and that the strabismic amblyopic eyes are always different from the other groups. Next, we determined the primary factors that limit fixation stability and visual acuity in amblyopic eyes by examining the relative importance of the different oculomotor characteristics, adding acuity (for fixation stability) or fixation stability (for acuity), and the type of amblyopia, as predictive factors in a multiple linear regression model. We show for the first time that the error magnitude of microsaccades, acuity, amplitude and frequency of microsaccades are primary factors limiting fixation stability; while the error magnitude, fixation stability, amplitude of drifts and amplitude of microsaccades are the primary factors limiting acuity. A mediation analysis showed that the effects of error magnitude and amplitude of microsaccades on acuity could be explained, at least in part, by their effects on fixation stability. PMID:25668775

  6. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23987110

  7. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering.

  8. Validation of a finite element model of a unilateral external fixator in a rabbit tibia defect model.

    PubMed

    Karunratanakul, Kavin; Kerckhofs, Greet; Lammens, Johan; Vanlauwe, Johan; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2013-07-01

    In case of large segmental defects in load-bearing bones, an external fixator is used to provide mechanical stability to the defect site. The overall stiffness of the bone-fixator system is determined not only by the fixator design but also by the way the fixator is mounted to the bone. This stiffness is an important factor as it will influence the biomechanical environment to which tissue engineering scaffolds and regenerating tissues are exposed. A finite element (FE) model can be used to predict the system stiffness. The goal of this study is to develop and validate a 3D anatomical FE model of a bone-fixator system which includes a previously developed unilateral external fixator for a large segmental defect model in the rabbit tibia. It was hypothesized that the contact interfaces between bone and fixator screws play a major role for the prediction of the stiffness. In vitro mechanical testing was performed in order to measure the axial stiffness of cortical bone from mid-shaft rabbit tibiae and of the tibia-fixator system, as well as the bending stiffness of individual fixator screws, inserted in bone. μCT-based case-specific FE models of cortical bone and SCREW-BONE specimens were created to simulate the corresponding mechanical test set-ups. The Young's modulus of rabbit cortical bone as well as appropriate screw-bone contact settings were derived from those FE models. We then used the derived settings in an FE model of the tibia-fixator system. The difference between the FE predicted and measured axial stiffness of the tibia-fixator system was reduced from 117.93% to 7.85% by applying appropriate screw-bone contact settings. In conclusion, this study shows the importance of screw-bone contact settings for an accurate fixator stiffness prediction. The validated FE model can further be used as a tool for virtual mechanical testing in the design phase of new tissue engineering scaffolds and/or novel patient-specific external fixation devices.

  9. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  10. Bioactive ceramic coating on orthopedic implants for enhanced bone tissue integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniket

    Tissue integration between bone and orthopedic implant is essential for implant fixation and longevity. An immunological response leads to fibrous encapsulation of metallic implants leading to implant instability and failure. Bioactive ceramics have the ability to directly bond to bone; however, they have limited mechanical strength for load bearing applications. Coating bioactive ceramics on metallic implant offers the exciting opportunity to enhance bone formation without compromising the mechanical strength of the implant. In the present study, we have developed a novel bioactive silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC) coating on medical grade Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implant using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and evaluated bone tissue response to the coated implant at the cellular level. The effect of SCPC composition and suspending medium pH on the zeta potential of three different SCPC formulations; SCPC25, SCPC50 and SCPC75 were analyzed. The average zeta potential of SCPC50 in pure ethanol was more negative than that of SCPC25 or SCPC75; however the difference was not statistically significant. Ti-6Al-4V discs were passivated, coated with SCPC50 (200 nm - 10 mum) and thermally treated at 600 - 800 ºC to produce a coating thickness in the range of 43.1 +/- 5.7 to 30.1 +/- 4.6 μm. After treatment at 600, 700 and 800 ºC, the adhesion strength at the SCPC50/Ti-6Al-4V interface was 42.6 +/- 3.6, 44.7 +/- 8.7 and 47.2 +/- 4.3 MPa, respectively. XRD analyses of SCPC50 before and after EPD coating indicated no change in the crystallinity of the material. Fracture surface analyses showed that failure occurred within the ceramic layer or at the ceramic/polymer interface; however, the ceramic/metal interface was intact in all samples. The adhesion strength of SCPC50-coated substrates after immersion in PBS for 2 days (11.7 +/- 3.9 MPa) was higher than that measured on commercially available hydroxyapatite (HA) coated substrates (5.5 +/- 2.7 MPa), although the

  11. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  12. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future. PMID:25705632

  13. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Meza Reyes, Gilberto Eduardo; Esquivel Gómez, Ricardo; Martínez del Campo Sánchez, Antonio; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Martínez Guzmán, Miguel Ángel Enrique; Torres González, Rubén; de la Fuente Zuno, Juan Carlos; Méndez Huerta, Juan Vicente; Villalobos Garduño, Enrique; Cymet Ramírez, José; Ibarra Hirales, Efrén; Díaz Borjón, Efraín; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Valles Figueroa, Juan Francisco; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide public health problem, with an annual incidence of 1-2 cases/1,000 individuals in the general population and a 1-5% associated mortality. Orthopedic surgery is a major surgical risk factor for VTE, but the problem is more important for patients with hip and knee joint replacement, multiple traumatisms, severe damage to the spine, or large fractures. Thromboprophylaxis is defined as the strategy and actions necessary to diminish the risk of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery. Antithrombotics may prevent VTE. At the end of this paper, we describe a proposal of thromboprophylaxis actions for patients requiring high-risk orthopedic surgery, based on the opinion of specialists in Orthopedics and Traumatology who work with high-risk orthopedic surgery patients. A search for evidence about this kind of surgery was performed and a 100-item inquiring instrument was done in order to know the opinions of the participants. Then, recommendations and considerations were built. In conclusion, this document reviews the problem of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery patients and describes the position of the Colegio Mexicano de Ortopedia y Traumatología related to VTE prevention in this setting.

  14. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  15. Development of an orthopedic surgery trauma patient handover checklist

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Justin; Donnon, Tyrone; Hutchison, Carol; Duffy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgery, preoperative handover of surgical trauma patients is a process that must be made as safe as possible. We sought to determine vital clinical information to be transferred between patient care teams and to develop a standardized handover checklist. Methods We conducted standardized small-group interviews about trauma patient handover. Based on this information, we created a questionnaire to gather perspectives from all Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) members about which topics they felt would be most important on a handover checklist. We analyzed the responses to develop a standardized handover checklist. Results Of the 1106 COA members, 247 responded to the questionnaire. The top 7 topics felt to be most important for achieving patient safety in the handover were comorbidities, diagnosis, readiness for the operating room, stability, associated injuries, history/mechanism of injury and outstanding issues. The expert recommendations were to have handover completed the same way every day, all appropriate radiographs available, adequate time, all appropriate laboratory work and more time to spend with patients with more severe illness. Conclusion Our main recommendations for safe handover are to use standardized checklists specific to the patient and site needs. We provide an example of a standardized checklist that should be used for preoperative handovers. To our knowledge, this is the first checklist for handover developed by a group of experts in orthopedic surgery, which is both manageable in length and simple to use. PMID:24461220

  16. Snow Catastrophe Conditions: What is its Impact on Orthopedic Injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi-Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Kazemnejad, Ehsan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iran places sixth amongst high risk natural disaster countries and Guilan province of Iran shoulders a large amount of socio-economic burden due to snow catastrophes. The more knowledge of circumstances we have, the more efficient our future encounters will be. Methods: In this retrospective study, of all of the patients admitted to Poursina Hospital due to snow and ice related trauma in the first two weeks of February 2014, 306 cases were found eligible for entry into the present study. Results: Of the 306 eligible patients (383 injuries), there were 175 men (57.2%) and 131 women (42.8%). Most patients suffered from orthopedic injuries (81%) and the most common fractures were distal radius fractures in the upper extremities and hip fractures in the lower extremities. Slipping was the most common and motor vehicle accidents had the rarest injury mechanisms. It was shown that the frequency of injuries were higher on icy days (67.6%) than snowy days (32.4%). Conclusions: Snow crises may lead to increased risk of slipping and falling situations, especially on icy days. The peak of injury rates is a few days after snowfall with the most common injury being distal radius fracture. Providing essential instructions and supporting resource allocation to better handle such catastrophes may improve outcomes. PMID:25207329

  17. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  18. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations.

  19. Bioactive, mechanically favorable, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis of mechanically favorable, bioactive, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for potential bone applications. The nanocomposites consist of in situ polymerized biodegradable copolyester with hydroxyapatite (HA). Biodegradable copolyesters comprise carboxy terminated poly(propylene fumarate) (CT-PPF) and poly(trimethylol propane fumarate co mannitol sebacate) (TF-Co-MS). Raman spectral imaging clearly reveals a uniform homogenous distribution of HA in the copolymer matrix. The mechanical studies reveal that improved mechanical properties formed when crosslinked with methyl methacrylate (MMA) when compared to N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP). The SEM micrographs of the copolymer nanocomposites reveal a serrated structure reflecting higher mechanical strength, good dispersion, and good interfacial bonding of HA in the polymer matrix. In vitro degradation of the copolymer crosslinked with MMA is relatively more than that of NVP and the degradation decreases with an increase in the amount of the HA filler. The mechanically favorable and degradable MMA based nanocomposites also have favorable bioactivity, blood compatibility, cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. The present nanocomposite is a more promising material for orthopedic applications.

  20. Infection Mitigation Efficacy of Photoactive Titania on Orthopedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Hershey, Ryan; Aboelzahab, Asem; Goel, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    In order to impede infection and achieve accelerated wound healing in the postorthopaedic surgery patients, a simple and benign procedure for creating nanotubular or nanofibrillar structure of photoactive TiO2 on the surface of Ti plates and wires is described. The nanoscale TiO2 films on titanium were grown by hydrothermal processing in one case and by anodization in the presence of dilute mineral acids under mild and benign conditions in the other. Confocal microscopy results demonstrated at least 50% reduction in the population of E. coli colonies (concentration 2.15 × 107 cells/mL) on TiO2-coated implants upon an IR exposure of up to 30 s; it required ∼20 min of exposure to UV beam for the same effect. These findings suggest the probability of eliminating wound infection during and after orthopedic surgical procedures by brief illumination of photoactive titania films on the implants with an IR beam. PMID:21994891

  1. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Muller, T P

    1990-02-01

    An intraoral intermaxillary appliance has been developed for the treatment of Class III malocclusions that exhibit midface sagittal deficiency with or without mandibular excess. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III consists of upper and lower acrylic plates with a permanent magnet incorporated into each plate. The upper magnet is linked to a retraction screw. The upper magnet is retracted periodically (e.g., monthly) to stimulate maxillary advancement and mandibular retardation. The attractive mode neodymium magnets used in this study produced a horizontal force of 98 gm and a vertical force of 371 gm. Six female Macaca fascicularis monkeys were treated with FOMA IIIs. An additional three animals were treated with sham appliances. After 4 months of treatment, the following results were found: the growth pattern of the cranial base (saddle angle) was not altered; midfacial protraction did occur along a recumbent hyperbolic curve with a horizontal maxillary displacement and an anterosuperior premaxillary rotation; the cumulative protraction of the maxillary complex was initiated at the pterygomaxillary fissure with an additional contribution provided by other circummaxillary sutures (zygomaticomaxillary s., transverse s., premaxillary s.); and inhibition of mandibular length was minimal, but a tendency toward a vertical condylar growth pattern was observed. The interaction between sutural and condylar growth sites appeared biphasic, characterized by an immediate and rapid excitation of the circummaxillary sutures followed by a delayed and slow suppression of the condylar cartilage. Long-term animal and clinical FOMA III studies are recommended.

  2. Detecting fixation on a target using time-frequency distributions of a retinal birefringence scanning signal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The fovea, which is the most sensitive part of the retina, is known to have birefringent properties, i.e. it changes the polarization state of light upon reflection. Existing devices use this property to obtain information on the orientation of the fovea and the direction of gaze. Such devices employ specific frequency components that appear during moments of fixation on a target. To detect them, previous methods have used solely the power spectrum of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which, unfortunately, is an integral method, and does not give information as to where exactly the events of interest occur. With very young patients who are not cooperative enough, this presents a problem, because central fixation may be present only during very short-lasting episodes, and can easily be missed by the FFT. Method This paper presents a method for detecting short-lasting moments of central fixation in existing devices for retinal birefringence scanning, with the goal of a reliable detection of eye alignment. Signal analysis is based on the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT), which reliably localizes such events in the time-frequency plane. Even though the characteristic frequencies are not always strongly expressed due to possible artifacts, simple topological analysis of the time-frequency distribution can detect fixation reliably. Results In all six subjects tested, the CWT allowed precise identification of both frequency components. Moreover, in four of these subjects, episodes of intermittent but definitely present central fixation were detectable, similar to those in Figure 4. A simple FFT is likely to treat them as borderline cases, or entirely miss them, depending on the thresholds used. Conclusion Joint time-frequency analysis is a powerful tool in the detection of eye alignment, even in a noisy environment. The method is applicable to similar situations, where short-lasting diagnostic events need to be detected in time series acquired by means of

  3. Improving proximal fixation and seal with the HeliFx Aortic EndoAnchor.

    PubMed

    Deaton, David H

    2012-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) transformed the therapy for aortic aneurysms and introduced an era of widespread use for endovascular procedures in a variety of vascular beds. Although dramatic improvements in acute outcomes drove the early enthusiasm for EVAR, a realization that the long-term integrity of the endoprostheses used for EVAR were sometimes inferior to the results obtained with open surgical reconstruction dampened enthusiasm for their use in low-risk and younger patients who mandated long-term follow-up. While early EVAR failure modes are often related to technical aspects of the implantation, late failures are often related to the implant migrating from its original longitudinal position or losing wall apposition in the face of continued aneurysmal dilatation. Migration, or the failure of longitudinal fixation, results in gradual loss of aortic approximation and the eventual repressurization of the aneurysm sac with its attendant risks of growth and rupture. The inability of stent- and barb-based endovascular fixation to resist aortic dilatation at the site of fixation also represents a late failure mode that can result in aneurysm rupture. A variety of endostaples or endoanchors designed to replicate the function of an interrupted aortic suture have been proposed and tested to varying degrees over the years. The device designed and produced by Aptus EndoSystems, now called the HeliFx Aortic EndoAnchor is the only independent endovascular fixation device that has achieved significant clinical usage and Food and Drug Administration approval. The experience with this device is now more than 5 years and it is approved for use in the broad market across both Europe and the United States. This article will review the engineering and design concepts underlying the HeliFx device as well as the in vitro and in vivo results using this device. Finally, a discussion of the potential for technical, procedural, and endograft innovation based on the

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy of combined clarithromycin plus daptomycin against biofilms-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on titanium medical devices.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Sato, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Kawamura, Masato; Furukawa, Emiko; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-10-01

    In vitro efficacy of combined eradication therapy with clarithromycin and daptomycin against biofilm-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the orthopedic titanium devices was evaluated. The bactericidal effect of this antibiotic was investigated by a re-culture test, the scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy using a double-staining dyes. Clarithromycin decreased the amount to half in 24 h. Although MRSA biofilms were not eradicated with clarithromycin or daptomycin alone, clarithromycin combined with daptomycin was useful to sterilize titanium devices within 72 h. This in vitro study showed that combined treatment with clarithromycin plus daptomycin is useful to eradicate staphylococcal biofilms formed on orthopedic devices.

  5. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  6. Application of alternative fixatives to formalin in diagnostic pathology.

    PubMed

    Benerini Gatta, L; Cadei, M; Balzarini, P; Castriciano, S; Paroni, R; Verzeletti, A; Cortellini, V; De Ferrari, F; Grigolato, P

    2012-05-04

    Fixation is a critical step in the preparation of tissues for histopathology. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different fixatives vs formalin on proteins and DNA, and to evaluate alternative fixation for morphological diagnosis and nucleic acid preservation for molecular methods. Forty tissues were fixed for 24 h with six different fixatives: the gold standard fixative formalin, the historical fixatives Bouin and Hollande, and the alternative fixatives Greenfix, UPM and CyMol. Tissues were stained (Haematoxylin-Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Trichromic, Alcian-blue, High Iron Diamine), and their antigenicity was determined by immunohistochemistry (performed with PAN-CK, CD31, Ki-67, S100, CD68, AML antibodies). DNA extraction, KRAS sequencing, FISH for CEP-17, and flow cytometry analysis of nuclear DNA content were applied. For cell morphology the alternative fixatives (Greenfix, UPM, CyMol) were equivalent to formalin. As expected, Hollande proved the best fixative for morphology. The morphology obtained with Bouin was comparable to that with formalin. Hollande was the best fixative for histochemistry. Bouin proved equivalent to formalin. The alternative fixatives were equivalent to formalin, although with greater variability in haematoxylin-eosin staining. It proved possible to obtain immunohistochemical staining largely equivalent to that following formalin-fixation with the following fixatives: Greenfix, Hollande, UPM and CyMol. The tissues fixed in Bouin did not provide results comparable to those obtained with formalin. The DNA extracted from samples fixed with alternative fixatives was found to be suitable for molecular analysis.

  7. The fixation and saccade P3.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Sangita; Ding, Jian; Privitera, Claudio; Carney, Thom; Klein, Stanley A

    2012-01-01

    Although most instances of object recognition during natural viewing occur in the presence of saccades, the neural correlates of objection recognition have almost exclusively been examined during fixation. Recent studies have indicated that there are post-saccadic modulations of neural activity immediately following eye movement landing; however, whether post-saccadic modulations affect relatively late occurring cognitive components such as the P3 has not been explored. The P3 as conventionally measured at fixation is commonly used in brain computer interfaces, hence characterizing the post-saccadic P3 could aid in the development of improved brain computer interfaces that allow for eye movements. In this study, the P3 observed after saccadic landing was compared to the P3 measured at fixation. No significant differences in P3 start time, temporal persistence, or amplitude were found between fixation and saccade trials. Importantly, sensory neural responses canceled in the target minus distracter comparisons used to identify the P3. Our results indicate that relatively late occurring cognitive neural components such as the P3 are likely less sensitive to post saccadic modulations than sensory neural components and other neural activity occurring shortly after eye movement landing. Furthermore, due to the similarity of the fixation and saccade P3, we conclude that the P3 following saccadic landing could possibly be used as a viable signal in brain computer interfaces allowing for eye movements.

  8. [Joint position statement of the Mexican College of Orthopedics and Traumatology: prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Meza-Reyes, G E; Cymet-Ramírez, J; Esquivel-Gómez, R; del Campo-Sánchez, Martínez A; Martínez-Guzmán, M A E; Espinosa-Larrañaga, F; Majluf-Cruz, A; Torres-González, R; De la Fuente-Zuno, J C; Villalobos-Garduño, E; Méndez-Huerta, J V; Ibarra-Hirales, E; Valles-Figueroa, J F; Aguilera-Zepeda, J M; Díaz-Borjón, E

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) is a public health problem worldwide. In the United States it causes 2 million annual cases. Its annual incidence is 1-2 cases per 1,000 individuals in the general population. It is a disease frequently associated with life threatening complications and its mortality rate is 1-5% of cases. Due to its high complication rate, its slow recovery, and the need for prolonged disability, it is considered as a high-cost disease. VTED may occur in both surgical and medical patients; the known associated risk factors include prolonged rest, active cancer, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke, among the major medical conditions. Orthopedic surgery represents the main surgical risk factor for VTED, including mainly hip and knee replacements, as well as polytraumatized patients with severe spinal lesions, and major fractures. VTED may be prevented with the appropriate use of antithrombotics. The participants in this consensus defined thromboprophylaxis as the strategy and actions undertaken to reduce the risk of VTED in patients undergoing high risk orthopedic surgery. The position of the Mexican College of Orthopedics and Traumatology regarding the prevention of VTED in orthopedic surgery is described herein.

  9. Efficacy of a small cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite substitute on bone formation and implant fixation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Andreasen, Christina M; Dencker, Mads L; Jensen, Anders E; Theilgaard, Naseem; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-04-01

    Cylindrical critical size defects were created at the distal femoral condyles bilaterally of eight female adult sheep. Titanium implants with 2-mm concentric gaps were inserted and the gaps were filled with one of the four materials: allograft; a synthetic 15-amino acid cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite (ABM/P-15); hydroxyapatite + βtricalciumphosphate+ Poly-Lactic-Acid (HA/βTCP-PDLLA); or ABM/P-15+HA/βTCP-PDLLA. After nine weeks, bone-implant blocks were harvested and sectioned for micro-CT scanning, push-out test, and histomorphometry. Significant bone formation and implant fixation could be observed in all four groups. Interestingly, the microarchitecture of the ABM/P-15 group was significantly different from the control group. Tissue volume fraction and thickness were significantly greater in the ABM/P-15 group than in the allograft group. Bone formation and bone ingrowth to porous titanium implant were not significantly different among the four groups. The ABM/P-15 group had similar shear mechanical properties on implant fixation as the allograft group. Adding HA/βTCP-PDLLA to ABM/P-15 did not significantly change these parameters. This study revealed that ABM/P-15 had significantly bone formation in concentric gap, and its enhancements on bone formation and implant fixation were at least as good as allograft. It is suggested that ABM/P-15 might be a good alternative biomaterial for bone implant fixation in this well-validated critical-size defect gap model in sheep. Nevertheless, future clinical researches should focus on prospective, randomized, controlled trials in order to fully elucidate whether ABM/P-15 could be a feasible candidate for bone substitute material in orthopedic practices.

  10. Control and Functions of Fixational Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Michele; Poletti, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Humans and other species explore a visual scene by rapidly shifting their gaze 2-3 times every second. Although the eyes may appear immobile in the brief intervals in between saccades, microscopic (fixational) eye movements are always present, even when attending to a single point. These movements occur during the very periods in which visual information is acquired and processed and their functions have long been debated. Recent technical advances in controlling retinal stimulation during normal oculomotor activity have shed new light on the visual contributions of fixational eye movements and their degree of control. The emerging body of evidence, reviewed in this article, indicates that fixational eye movements are important components of the strategy by which the visual system processes fine spatial details, enabling both precise positioning of the stimulus on the retina and encoding of spatial information into the joint space-time domain. PMID:27795997

  11. Biometric recognition via fixation density maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Ioannis; Komogortsev, Oleg V.

    2014-05-01

    This work introduces and evaluates a novel eye movement-driven biometric approach that employs eye fixation density maps for person identification. The proposed feature offers a dynamic representation of the biometric identity, storing rich information regarding the behavioral and physical eye movement characteristics of the individuals. The innate ability of fixation density maps to capture the spatial layout of the eye movements in conjunction with their probabilistic nature makes them a particularly suitable option as an eye movement biometrical trait in cases when free-viewing stimuli is presented. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the method is evaluated on three different datasets containing a wide gamut of stimuli types, such as static images, video and text segments. The obtained results indicate a minimum EER (Equal Error Rate) of 18.3 %, revealing the perspectives on the utilization of fixation density maps as an enhancing biometrical cue during identification scenarios in dynamic visual environments.

  12. Fixation of tendo Achilles avulsion fracture.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2009-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures occur commonly in the midsubstance of the tendon, usually 2-6 cm proximal to the insertion to the calcaneus. Ruptures near its insertion into the calcaneus are less common and mostly found in hyperpronators with a heel spur (Haglund's deformity). Avulsion of the bony insertion of the Achilles tendon at the calcaneus is infrequent and is diagnosed by radiography. Open reduction and internal fixation is indicated to achieve bone to bone healing and restoration of the function and continuity of the triceps surae mechanism. Screw fixation is not effective to resist the pull out tension of the triceps surae. Moreover, the prominent screw head may cause skin impingement. More secure fixation method is necessary in order to allow early functional rehabilitation. We describe a technique to fix the avulsed fragment of Achilles tendon insertion with 2 suture anchors. This can neutralize the pull of the triceps surae and early post-operative rehabilitation programme is allowed.

  13. Improved diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infection by inoculation of sonication fluid into blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Portillo, María Eugenia; Salvadó, Margarita; Trampuz, Andrej; Siverio, Ana; Alier, Albert; Sorli, Lluisa; Martínez, Santos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Horcajada, Juan P; Puig-Verdie, Lluis

    2015-05-01

    Sonication improved the diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI). We investigated the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles in comparison with that of intraoperative tissue and sonication fluid cultures. Consecutive patients with removed orthopedic hardware were prospectively included and classified as having OIAI or aseptic failure (AF) according to standardized criteria. The diagnostic procedure included the collection of five intraoperative tissue cultures and sonication of the removed device, followed by conventional culture of the sonication fluid. Cultures were incubated for 7 days (aerobic) or 14 days (anaerobic). In addition, 10 ml of sonication fluid was inoculated into each aerobic and anaerobic BacT/Alert FAN blood culture bottle and incubated in the automated blood culture system for 5 days. Of 75 included patients, 39 had OIAI and 36 AF. The sensitivity of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles (100%) was higher than that of conventional sonication fluid (87%; P = 0.05) or intraoperative tissue cultures (59%; P < 0.01). Previous antibiotic therapy reduced the culture sensitivity of conventional sonication fluid to 77% and that of intraoperative tissue to 55%, while it remained 100% for blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid. The time to positivity was shorter in blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid, with detection of 72% of microorganisms after 1 day of incubation, than for intraoperative tissue and conventional sonication fluid cultures, with detection of 18% and 28% of microorganisms, respectively. In conclusion, compared to conventional sonication fluid and intraoperative tissue cultures, sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles improved the diagnosis of OIAI and considerably reduced the time to culture positivity.

  14. Methyl methacrylate levels in orthopedic surgery: comparison of two conventional vacuum mixing systems.

    PubMed

    Jelecevic, Jasmin; Maidanjuk, Stanislaw; Leithner, Andreas; Loewe, Kai; Kuehn, Klaus-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Poly-methyl methacrylate bone cements contain methyl methacrylate (MMA), which is known for its sensitizing and toxic properties. Therefore, in most European countries and in the USA, guidelines or regulations exist for occupational exposures. The use of vacuum mixing systems can significantly reduce airborne MMA concentrations during bone setting. Our goal was to test two commonly used vacuum mixing systems (Palamix(®) and Optivac(®)) using Palacos(®) R bone cement for their effectiveness at preventing MMA vapor release in a series of standardized trials in a laboratory as well as in an operating theatre. MMA was quantified every second over a period of 3 min using a photoionization detector (MiniRAE(®) 3000) device positioned in the breathing area of the user. Significant differences in MMA mean vapor concentrations over 180 s were observed in the two experimental spaces, with the highest mean concentrations (7.61 and 7.98 ppm for Palamix(®) and Optivac(®), respectively) observed in a laboratory with nine air changes per hour and the lowest average concentrations (1.06 and 1.12 ppm for Palamix(®) and Optivac(®), respectively) in an operating theatre with laminar flow ventilation and 22 air changes per hour. No significant differences in overall MMA concentrations were found between the two vacuum mixing systems in either location. Though, differences were found between both systems during single mixing phases. Thus, typical handling of MMA in orthopedic procedures must be seen as not harmful as concentrations do not reach the short-term exposure limit of 100 ppm. Additionally, laminar airflow seems to have an influence on lowering MMA concentrations in operation theatres.

  15. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation. PMID:28154552

  16. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  17. Biocompatibility evaluation of porous ceria foams for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jordan P; Mound, Brittnee A; Monsalve, Adam G; Nino, Juan C; Allen, Josephine B

    2015-01-01

    Ceria ceramics have the unique ability to protect cells from free radical-induced damage, making them materials of interest for biomedical applications. To expand upon the understanding of the potential of ceria as a biomaterial, porous ceria, fabricated via direct foaming, was investigated to assess its biocompatibility and its ability to scavenge free radicals. A mouse osteoblast (7F2) cell line was cultured with the ceria foams to determine the extent of the foams' toxicity. Toxicity assessments indicate that mouse osteoblasts cultured directly on the ceria scaffold for 72 h did not show a significant (p > 0.05) increase in toxicity, but rather show comparable toxicity to cells cultured on porous 45S5 Bioglass. The in vitro inflammatory response elicited from porous ceria foams was measured as a function of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secreted from a human monocytic leukemia cell line. Results indicate that the ceria foams do not cause a significant inflammatory response, eliciting a response of 27.1 ± 7.1 pg mL(-1) of TNF-α compared to 36.3 ± 5.8 pg mL(-1) from cells on Bioglass, and 20.1 ± 2.9 pg mL(-1) from untreated cells. Finally, we report cellular toxicity in response to free radicals from tert-butyl hydroperoxide with and without foamed ceria. Our preliminary results show that the foamed ceria is able to decrease the toxic effect of induced oxidative stress. Collectively, this study demonstrates that foamed ceria scaffolds do not activate an inflammatory response, and show potential free radical scavenging ability, thus they have promise as an orthopedic biomaterial.

  18. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous fixation of Bennett fractures.

    PubMed

    Culp, Randall W; Johnson, Jeff W

    2010-01-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation of Bennett-type fractures of the thumb metacarpal allow for the confirmation of reduction as well as the assessment of the degree of chondral damage. With use of a 1.9-mm arthroscope and a traction tower, direct visualization and reduction is possible. Traditional methods of fixation are used to secure the fracture fragment. Postoperative rehabilitation follows the usual protocol used in both open and percutaneous techniques. However, the potential to obtain and confirm a more accurate articular reduction may reduce the incidence of late arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal articulation.

  19. A noninvasive eye fixation monitoring system for CyberKnife radiotherapy of choroidal and orbital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, I. K.; Petti, P. L.; Larson, D. A.; O'Brien, J. M.; Phillips, T. L.

    2009-03-15

    A new noninvasive monitoring system for fixing the eye has been developed to treat orbital and choroidal tumors with CyberKnife-based radiotherapy. This device monitors the eye during CT/MRI scanning and during treatment. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of the fixation light system for CyberKnife-based treatments of orbital and choroidal tumors and supports the idea that larger choroidal melanomas and choroidal metastases could be treated with CyberKnife without implanting fiducial markers.

  20. [Dental orthopedic service for retirees from MD RF in medical institutions of state and municipal system of healthcare].

    PubMed

    Malykh, A B; Grebnev, G A; Butsenko, S A; Pastukhov, A G

    2012-04-01

    Financial feasibility study of dental orthopedic service for retirees of Ministry of Defence is analyzed, suggestions about the organization of dental orthopedic service for contingent in medical institution of state and municipal system of healthcare. Information about the number of retirees, index of needs in dental orthopedic service which was 40,29%, information about 2806 prosthodontics oders for retirees in military medical institution, data about the average price of production of dental in different subjects of Russian Federation is the basis of the given research. Algorithm of dental orthopedic service for retirees by stomatologies is suggested.

  1. A Novel Nonpedicular Screw-Based Fixation in Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The authors present the clinical results obtained in patients who underwent interspinous fusion device (IFD) implantation following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of this study is investigating the feasibility of IFD with PLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods. Between September 2013 and November 2014, 39 patients underwent PLIF and subsequent IFD (Romeo®2 PAD, Spineart, Geneva, Switzerland) implantation. Medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to collect relevant data such as blood loss, operative time, and length of hospital stay. Radiographs and clinical outcome were evaluated 6 weeks and 12 months after surgery. Results. All 39 patients were followed up for more than one year. There were no major complications such as dura tear, nerve injuries, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or deep infection. Both interbody and interspinous fusion could be observed on radiographs one year after surgery. However, there were 5 patients having early retropulsion of interbody fusion devices. Conclusion. The interspinous fusion device appears to achieve posterior fixation and facilitate lumbar fusion in selected patients. However, further study is mandatory for proposing a novel anatomic and radiological scoring system to identify patients suitable for this treatment modality and prevent postoperative complications. PMID:28164125

  2. Posterior fixation suture and convergence excess esotropia.

    PubMed

    Steffen; Auffarth; Kolling

    1998-09-01

    The present study investigates the results of Cuppers' 'Fadenoperation' in patients with non-accommodative convergence excess esotropia. Particular attention is given to postoperative eye alignment at distance fixation. Group 1 (n=96) included patients with a 'normal' convergence excess. The manifest near angles (mean ET 16.73 degrees +/- 6.33 degrees, range 4 degrees -33 degrees ) were roughly twice the size of the distance angles (mean ET 6.50 degrees +/- 3.62 degrees, range 0 degrees -14 degrees ). These patients were treated with a bilateral fadenoperation of the medial recti without additional eye muscle surgery. Three months after surgery, the mean postoperative angles were XT 0.5 degrees +/- 3.3 degrees (range XT 11 degrees -ET 5 degrees ) for distance fixation, and ET 2.7 degrees +/- 3.6 degrees (range XT 5 degrees -ET 14 degrees ) for near fixation, respectively. Postoperative convergent angles at near fixation >ET 10 degrees were present in two patients (1.9%). Group 2 (n=21) included patients with a mean preoperative distance angle of ET 9.2 degrees +/- 3.7 degrees (range 6 degrees -16 degrees ) and a mean preoperative near angle of ET 23.4 degrees +/- 3.1 degrees (range 16 degrees -31 degrees ). These patients were operated on with a bilateral fadenoperation of the medial recti and a simultaneous recession of one or both medial rectus muscles. Mean postoperative angles were XT 0.5 degrees +/- 4.6 degrees (range XT 12 degrees -ET 7 degrees ) for distance fixation and ET 1.4 degrees +/- 4.5 degrees (range XT 8 degrees -ET 13 degrees ) for near fixation, respectively. In this group, 2 patients (10.6%) had a postoperative exotropia >XT 5 degrees at distance fixation, and two patients had residual esotropia>ET 10 degrees at near fixation. Group 3 (n=17) included patients with a pronounced non-accommodative convergence excess. Near angle values (mean of 17.8 degrees +/- 5.3 degrees, range ET 7 degrees -26 degrees ) were several times higher than the distance

  3. Fixation of osteochondral fragments in the human knee using Meniscus Arrows.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diederick B; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; de Hosson, Jeff T M; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the hold in bone of Meniscus Arrows and Smart Nails, followed by the report of the results of the clinical application of Meniscus Arrows as fixation devices. First, pull-out tests were performed to analyse the holdfast of both nails in bone. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference; therefore, the thinner Meniscus Arrow was chosen as fixation device in the patient series of two patients with a symptomatic Osteochondritis dissecans fragment and three patients with an osteochondral fracture of a femur condyle. The cartilage margins were glued with Tissuecoll. All fragments consolidated. Second look arthroscopy in three patients showed fixed fragments with stable, congruent cartilage edges. At an average follow-up period of 5 years no pain, effusion, locking, restricted range of motion or signs of osteoarthritis were reported. Based on the results of the pull-out tests and available clinical studies, Meniscus Arrows and Smart Nails are both likely to perform adequately as fixation devices in the treatment of Osteochondritis dissecans and osteochondral fractures in the knee. They both provide the advantage of one stage surgery. However, based on their smaller diameter, the Meniscus Arrows should be preferred for this indication.

  4. [Hopes for future practice of junior orthopedic surgeons in France: a sociological study].

    PubMed

    Grégory, T; Gaillard, R; Grenier, A

    2007-09-01

    Medical demographics have become a major public health issue in France since the publication of the Berlan report in 2002 which announced an upcoming shortage in the next 20 years. But demographic projections cannot be limited to an accounting of training and retirement figures. Other factors such as demographic distribution, changing societal aspirations (free time), modes and sites of occupational activities, the influence of feminization, and initial training and its effects on professional practice must be taken into consideration. The purpose of this work was to study these parameters in orthopedic and traumatology surgery. This was a sociological study designed to ascertain the aspirations of junior orthopedic surgeons. Forty-seven interns in orthopedic surgery in the Paris area were invited to complete a questionnaire in March 2003. Forty-two responded. The choice of orthopedics was an intellectual choice. The attractiveness of the specialty was particularly important during the final years of medical school. Fewer junior surgeons would rather practice in a university hospital setting, more preferring a mixed setting with a private (fees) and a public (salary) component. The desire for "free time" was particularly important. Fewer juniors wanted to practice in general hospitals. For orthopedic surgeons, private practice and payment by fees are the cornerstones of medical practice.

  5. OrthoEvidence™: A Clinical Resource for Evidence-Based Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Sheila; Smith, Chris; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal issues in clinical practice, and the limited focus placed upon musculoskeletal conditions by current electronic summary resources, highlights the need for a resource that provides access to simple and concise summaries of top-quality orthopedic literature for orthopedic surgeons and allied healthcare professionals. OrthoEvidence™ is an online clinical resource that addresses the paucity of adequate evidence-based summary tools in the field of orthopedic surgery. OrthoEvidence™ uses a rigorous, transparent, and unique process to review, evaluate, and summarize high quality research studies and their implications for orthopedic clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are identified and reviewed by an expert medical writing team, who prepare Advanced Clinical Evidence (ACETM) reports: one or two detailed pages including critical appraisals and synopses of key research. These timely and targeted reports provide a clear understanding about the quality of evidence associated with each summarized study, and can be organized by users to identify trending information. OrthoEvidence™ allows members to use their time efficiently and to stay current by having access to a breadth of timely, high-quality research output. OrthoEvidence™ is easily accessible through the internet and is available at the point-of-care, which allows treating orthopedic surgeons and allied health professionals to easily practice the principles of evidence-based medicine within their clinical practices.. PMID:26330990

  6. Orthopedic Management of Patients with Pompe Disease: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Forst, Jürgen; Forst, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pompe disease (PD), a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. Patients and Methods. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Results. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Conclusion. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD. PMID:24523658

  7. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist.

  8. Trichodesmium and nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the Kuroshio influences nitrogen balance in the North Pacific Ocean. The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as a major diazotroph in the Kuroshio. Although its abundance is higher in the Kuroshio than in adjacent waters, the reason for this difference remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate, whose availabilities potentially control diazotrophy, in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, and the abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. We used a numerical model to simulate the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the islands situated along the Kuroshio is potentially important for determining diazotrophy in this region.

  9. Treating Somatic Fixation: A Biopsychosocial Approach

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Campbell, Thomas; Seaburn, David

    1991-01-01

    Somatic fixation occurs when the patient or physician focuses exclusively on the biomedical aspects of a complex illness. Individual, family, and cultural factors promote the expression of emotional experience through physical symptoms. The physician or treatment team establishes a collaborative relationship with the patient and family, integrating biomedical and psychosocial evaluations and respecting the patient's defenses. PMID:21228995

  10. Synthetic biology for CO2 fixation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fuyu; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Recycling of carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals is a potential approach to reduce CO2 emission and fossil-fuel consumption. Autotrophic microbes can utilize energy from light, hydrogen, or sulfur to assimilate atmospheric CO2 into organic compounds at ambient temperature and pressure. This provides a feasible way for biological production of fuels and chemicals from CO2 under normal conditions. Recently great progress has been made in this research area, and dozens of CO2-derived fuels and chemicals have been reported to be synthesized by autotrophic microbes. This is accompanied by investigations into natural CO2-fixation pathways and the rapid development of new technologies in synthetic biology. This review first summarizes the six natural CO2-fixation pathways reported to date, followed by an overview of recent progress in the design and engineering of CO2-fixation pathways as well as energy supply patterns using the concept and tools of synthetic biology. Finally, we will discuss future prospects in biological fixation of CO2.

  11. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement.

  12. Binocular Fixation in the Newborn Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan M.; Findlay, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments are reported in which 15 babies were presented with visual stimuli which varied in shape and distance from the eye. Results indicated that the majority of subjects binocularly fixated all three stimuli and it was concluded that the newborn baby has the basic requirements for binocular vision. (Author/GO)

  13. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Stutzmann, J J; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Petrovic, A G

    1989-05-01

    A new functional appliance (FA) to correct Class II dentoskeletal malocclusions is introduced. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II uses upper and lower attracting magnetic means (Nd2Fe14B) to constrain the lower jaw in an advanced sagittal posture. In vitro, a special gauge transducer measured the magnetic attractive path and forces. In vivo, 13 prepubertal female Macaca fascicularis monkeys received facial implants and were treated for 4 months with the following appliances: conventional FA (four subjects), FOMA II (five subjects), a combined FOMA II + FA (two subjects), and sham (control) appliance (two subjects). The in vitro results showed the following: vertico-sagitally displaced upper and lower magnets attracted ultimately along an oblique line with a terminal horizonal slide to become fully superimposed; the functional performance improved when the magnetic interface acted as a magnetic inclined plane; and the magnetic force was able to guide and constrain the mandible toward the constructive protrusive closure position (CPCP) (1.2 mm, F = 570 gm) from levels below the habitual rest position (3 mm, F = 219 gm) and the electromyographic (EMG) relaxed position (8.5 mm, F = 45 gm). The in vivo results demonstrated the following: functional performance increased in FOMA II (22%) and in the combined FOMA II + FA (28%) over the conventional FA; mandibular length increased significantly in the treated animals (means = 2.83 +/- 0.70 mm) over the control animals (means = 0.43 +/- 0.08 mm); incisor proclination was lower in magnetic appliances (means = 4.57 +/- 1.76 degrees) than in the conventional FA (means = 8.75 +/- 1.85 degrees); mandibular elongation and condylar posterior inclination resulted from posterosuperior endochondral growth (increased cell proliferation and/or hyperplasia of functional chondroblasts) and by bony remodeling of the condylar neck (apposition posterior border, resorption anterior border), respectively; virtually no

  14. Systematic comparison of tissue fixation with alternative fixatives to conventional tissue fixation with buffered formalin in a xenograft-based model.

    PubMed

    Nietner, Thorben; Jarutat, Tiantom; Mertens, Alfred

    2012-09-01

    In our study we systematically compared the alternative fixatives acidified formal alcohol (AFA), PAXgene®, HOPE®, and combinations of AFA or formalin with ultrasound treatment to standard (buffered) formalin fixation. We examined general morphology and detectability of protein structures by immunohistochemistry of the membrane receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), and phosphorylated human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (phospho-HER2). In order to allow for stringent comparability of different fixation techniques, we used matched mouse xenograft tumor samples from three different human cancer cell lines (colon, ovarian, and non-small cell lung cancer), either fixed conventionally with formalin or an alternative fixative. Tissue morphology after fixation with AFA and PAXgene® was comparable to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) morphology. Ultrasound fixations resulted in slightly inferior morphology and HOPE® fixation preserved morphology only poorly compared to FFPET in this system. None of the tested alternative fixatives enabled immunohistochemical detectability of all three targets in the same manner as FFPET. Pronounced staining was possible for EGFR and IGF-1R with all alternative fixatives but HOPE®, and phospho-HER2 staining was only noteworthy with formalin-ultrasound-fixed tissue. Therefore, the use of alternative fixatives comes with the need for careful validation of obtained IHC results individually for each target.

  15. Assessment of fixatives, fixation, and tissue processing on morphology and RNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Cox, Melissa L; Schray, Carrie L; Luster, Chandra N; Stewart, Zachary S; Korytko, Peter J; M Khan, Kanwar Nasir; Paulauskis, Joseph D; Dunstan, Robert W

    2006-04-01

    Molecular characterization of morphologic change requires exquisite tissue morphology and RNA preservation; however, traditional fixatives usually result in fragmented RNA. To optimize molecular analyses on fixed tissues, we assessed morphologic and RNA integrity in rat liver when sections were fixed in 70% neutral-buffered formalin, modified Davidson's II, 70% ethanol, UMFIX, modified Carnoy's, modified methacarn, Bouin's, phosphate-buffered saline, or 30% sucrose. Each sample was subjected to standard or microwave fixation and standard or microwave processing, and sections were evaluated microscopically. RNA was extracted and assessed for preservation of quality and quantity. Modified methacarn, 70% ethanol, and modified Carnoy's solution each resulted in tissue morphology representing a reasonable alternative to formalin. Modified methacarn and UMFIX best preserved RNA quality. Neither microwave fixation nor processing affected RNA integrity relative to standard methods, although morphology was modestly improved. We conclude that modified methacarn, 70% ethanol, and modified Carnoy's solution provided acceptable preservation of tissue morphology and RNA quality using both standard and microwave fixation and processing methods. Of these three fixatives, modified methacarn provided the best results and can be considered a fixative of choice where tissue morphology and RNA integrity are being assessed in the same specimens.

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection: review and implications for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    McGrory, B J; Kilby, A E

    2000-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus identified in 1989, is estimated to have infected 1%-2% of the United States population. The incidence of HCV in patients requiring orthopedic surgery may be as high as 5%. Surgeons and operating room personnel are at risk for blood-borne diseases transmitted during surgery. The orthopedic surgeon must be aware of viral infection with this pathogen for the safety of the entire operating room team. Further, screening for HCV is routinely done when a patient donates autologous blood prior to elective surgery, and the orthopedic surgeon is often the first or only physician informed of a positive result. The surgeon should know how to interpret the result, advise the patient, and incorporate the diagnosis of HCV into the plan for the proposed surgery. We will review the natural history, transmission, evaluation of, and current treatment for infection with this blood-borne virus.

  17. The education, role, distribution, and compensation of physician assistants in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-05-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) have worked alongside surgeons since the 1970s, yet little is known about their postgraduate education, roles, distribution, and compensation. In 2015, an estimated 8,900 PAs were employed in orthopedics (9.4% of all clinically active PAs in the United States). This study analyzed surveys undertaken by Physician Assistants in Orthopaedic Surgery (PAOS) from 2009 to 2015 and found that most PAs working in orthopedics (85%) reported regularly assisting in surgery. Demand for PAs in orthopedics is expected to grow because of population growth, increasing incidence of musculoskeletal conditions, shortages of surgeons, and changing technology. Improved data acquisition and more detailed analyses are needed to better understand the nature of this specialized workforce.

  18. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  19. Improved eye-fixation detection using polarization-modulated retinal birefringence scanning, immune to corneal birefringence.

    PubMed

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved method for remote eye-fixation detection, using a polarization-modulated approach to retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), without the need for individual calibration or separate background measurements and essentially independent of corneal birefringence. Polarization-modulated RBS detects polarization changes generated in modulated polarized light passing through a unique pattern of nerve fibers identifying and defining the retinal region where fixation occurs (the fovea). A proof-of-concept demonstration in human eyes suggests that polarization-modulated RBS has the potential to reliably detect true foveal fixation on a specified point with an accuracy of at least ± 0.75°, and that it can be applied to the general population, including individuals with sub-optimal eyes and young children, where early diagnosis of visual problems can be critical. As could be employed in an eye-controlled display or in other devices, polarization-modulated RBS also enables and paves the way for new and reliable eye-fixation-evoked human-machine interfaces.

  20. Does Weather Matter? The Effect of Weather Patterns and Temporal Factors on Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Volume

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Kristin S.; Miller, Patricia E.; Lierhaus, Anneliese; Matheney, Travis H.; Mahan, Susan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Orthopaedists often speculate how weather and school schedule may influence pediatric orthopedic trauma volume, but few studies have examined this. This study aims to determine: how do weather patterns, day, month, season and public school schedule influence the daily frequency of pediatric orthopedic trauma consults and admissions? Methods: With IRB approval, orthopedic trauma data from a level 1 pediatric trauma center, including number of daily orthopedic trauma consults and admissions, were collected from July 2009 to March 2012. Historical weather data (high temperatures, precipitation and hours of daylight), along with local public school schedule data were collected for the same time period. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to show the average number of orthopedic trauma consults and admissions as a function of weather and temporal variables. Results: High temperature, precipitation, month and day of the week significantly affected the number of daily consults and admissions. The number of consults and admissions increased by 1% for each degree increase in temperature (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), and decreased by 21% for each inch of precipitation (p<0.001, p=0.006). Daily consults on snowy days decreased by an additional 16% compared to days with no precipitation. November had the lowest daily consult and admission rate, while September had the highest. Daily consult rate was lowest on Wednesdays and highest on Saturdays. Holiday schedule was not independently significant. Conclusion: Pediatric orthopedic trauma consultations and admissions are highly linked to temperature and precipitation, as well as day of the week and time of year. PMID:27990193

  1. Arthroscopic-Assisted Fixation of Tibial Plateau Fractures: Patient-Reported Postoperative Activity Levels.

    PubMed

    Kampa, John; Dunlay, Ryan; Sikka, Robby; Swiontkowski, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Tibial plateau fractures may result in significant limitations postoperatively. Studies have described outcomes of arthroscopic-assisted percutaneous fixation (AAPF) of these injuries but have rarely reported postoperative activity levels. Between 2009 and 2013, patients who sustained a lateral split, split depression, or pure depression type tibial plateau fracture (Schatzker types I-III fractures) and underwent outpatient AAPF were eligible for the study. Outcomes were assessed using Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, Lysholm score, and Marx activity score. Twenty-five consecutive patients were eligible for the study, and 22 (88%) were included in the final analysis, with average follow-up of 2.5 years (range, 1-5.2 years). Thirteen women and 9 men with an average age of 48.3 years (range, 23-65 years) comprised the study population. Average number of screws used for fixation was 2 (range, 1-4). The average depression was 8 mm preoperatively and 0.9 mm (range, 0-3 mm) postoperatively. Four patients (18%) had complications: 2 with hardware removal and 2 with postoperative deep venous thrombosis. Average postoperative Marx activity score was 5.7. Average postoperative KOOS Symptoms, Sports, and Quality of Life scores were 88 (range, 68-100), 85 (range, 45-100), and 77 (range, 50-100), respectively. Average IKDC and Lysholm scores were 81 (range, 55-97) and 87 (range, 54-100), respectively. The AAPF surgical technique, which was performed in an outpatient setting, facilitated excellent postoperative range of motion, outcomes, and activity scores with minimal complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e486-e491.].

  2. [Is there still a place for bone allografts in orthopedic surgery in 2011?].

    PubMed

    Delloye, C

    2011-01-01

    The place of bone allograft in contemporary orthopaedic surgery is discussed. Bone allograft can be prepared from retrieved femoral heads for fracture or osteoarthritis and are used as a filling material. Demineralized bone matrix is a cortical bone that has been exposed to a demineralizing solution. Doing so, the growth factors of the bone are exposed and will be able to induce the formation of new bone cells from the host. This osteoinductive capacity makes the graft more active in the process of its incorporation and has been successfully used in the conservative treatment of aneurismal bone cysts. Massive bone allografts can be used as a full segment of a long bone to reconstruct part of the skeleton either alone with fixation or with a prosthetic device. Except demineralized bone, any other types of bone allograft serve as a biologic passive support for the migrating cells from the host. Cellular therapy is another approach that allows, considering the extensive use of in vitro expanded bone, forming cells originating either from the bone marrow or the fat tissue of the patient. However, this approach needs further clinical validation before being fully considered in patient.

  3. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  4. Temporomandibular joint orthopedics with anterior repositioning appliance therapy and therapeutic injections.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Clifton

    2014-08-01

    TMD orthopedics is the assessment, diagnosis and management of orthopedic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Anterior repositioning appliance (ARA) therapy for TMJ internal derangements is successful in long-term recapturing of disks in reducing and nonreducing joints at a rate of 64 percent and in regenerating degenerated condyles in some cases. ARA therapy for TMJ internal derangements is subjectively successful in relieving symptoms in reducing and nonreducing disk displacement TMJs in this study at an average rate of 94.5 percent.

  5. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  6. Dark Carbon Fixation: An Important Process in Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Ana Lúcia; Bastviken, David; Gudasz, Cristian; Tranvik, Lars; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Close to redox boundaries, dark carbon fixation by chemoautotrophic bacteria may be a large contributor to overall carbon fixation. Still, little is known about the relative importance of this process in lake systems, in spite the potentially high chemoautotrophic potential of lake sediments. We compared rates of dark carbon fixation, bacterial production and oxygen consumption in sediments from four Swedish boreal and seven tropical Brazilian lakes. Rates were highly variable and dark carbon fixation amounted up to 80% of the total heterotrophic bacterial production. The results indicate that non-photosynthetic carbon fixation can represent a substantial contribution to bacterial biomass production, especially in sediments with low organic matter content. PMID:23776549

  7. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  8. A bioabsorbable fixation implant for use in proximal interphalangeal joint (hammer toe) arthrodesis: Biomechanical testing in a synthetic bone substrate.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, William S; Lessek, Timothy P; Perns, Stephen V

    2006-01-01

    The surgical correction of hammer toe deformity of the lesser toes is one of the most commonly performed forefoot procedures. In general, percutaneous Kirschner wires are used to provide fixation to the resected proximal interphalangeal joint. Although these wires are effective, issues such as pin tract infections as well as difficult postoperative management by patients make alternative fixation methods desirable. This study biomechanically compared a threaded/barbed bioabsorbable fixation implant made of a copolymer of 82% poly-L-lactic acid and 18% polyglycolic acid with a 1.57-mm Kirschner wire using the devices to fix 2 synthetic bone blocks together. Constructs were evaluated by applying a cantilever load, which simulated a plantar force on the middle phalanx. In all cases, the failure mode was bending of the implant, with no devices fracturing. The stiffness (approximately 6-9 N/mm) and peak load (approximately 8-9 N) of the constructs using the 2 systems were equivalent. Accelerated aging at elevated temperature (47 degrees C) in a buffer solution showed that there was no reduction in mechanical properties of the bioabsorbable system after the equivalent of nearly 6 weeks in a simulated in vivo (37 degrees C) environment. These results suggest that the bioabsorbable implant would be a suitable fixation device for the hammer toe procedure.

  9. Southwick Osteotomy Stabilised with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Mitkovic, Milorad; Grubor, Milan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Epiphysiolysis of the femoral head is the most common accident occurring towards the end of pre-puberty and puberty growth. Case report: The author describes the experience in the treatment of chronic epiphysiolysis in two patients treated by Southwick osteotomy. The site is accessed by way of a 15-cm long lateral skin incision and the trochanteric region is reached through the layers. The osteotomy angles prepared beforehand on a thin aluminium model are used to mark the Southwick osteotomy site on the anterior and lateral sides at the level of the lesser trochanter. Before performing the trochanteric osteotomy, two Mitković convergent pins type M20 are applied distally and proximally, above the planned osteotomy site. A tenotomy of the iliopsas muscle is performed, and then the previously marked bone triangle is redissected up to three quarters of the width of the femur. The distal part of the femur is rotated inwards, so that the patella is turned towards the ceiling. The osteotomised fragments of the femur are adapted, repositioned and fixated by installing an external fixator on the previously placed pins. Two more pins are placed, one proximally and one distally, with a view to adequately stabilising the femur. The patient was mobile from day two after the surgery. If, after the surgery, the lead surgeon realises that there is a requirement to make a correction of 5, 10 and 15 degrees of the valgus, varus, anteversion or retroversion deformity, the correction shall be performed without surgically opening the patient, using the fixator pins. Conclusion: After performing a Southwick osteotomy it is easier to adapt, reposition and fixate the osteotomised fragments of the femur using a fixator type M20. Adequate stability allows regaining mobility quickly, which in turn is the best prevention of chondrolysis of the hip. It is possible to make post-operative valgus, varus, anteversion and retroversion corrections of 5, 10 and 15 degrees

  10. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society.

  11. MRI analysis of the ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs: a comparison with rigid internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we analyzed the efficacy of the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system for the dynamic fixation of intervertebral discs, with particular emphasis on its effects on degenerative intervertebral disc disease. Methods We retrospectively compared the MRIs of 54 patients who had previously undergone either rigid internal fixation of the lumbar spine or ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients had received preoperative and 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI scans of the lumbar spine with acquisition of both routine and diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The upper-segment discs of the fusion were subjected to Pfirrmann grading, and the lumbar intervertebral discs in the DWI sagittal plane were manually drawn; the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. Results ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group measured at the 6-, 12-, and 24-month postoperative MRI studies were increased compared to the preoperative ADC values. The ADC values in the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group at 24 months postoperatively were significantly different from the preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 24 months, the postoperative ADC values were significantly different between the rigid fixation group and the ISOBAR TTL dynamic fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI imaging findings indicated that the posterior approach lumbar ISOBAR TTL internal fixation system can prevent or delay the degeneration of intervertebral discs. PMID:24898377

  12. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Goonhee

    control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100°C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  13. Application of alternative fixatives to formalin in diagnostic pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, L. Benerini; Cadei, M.; Balzarini, P.; Castriciano, S.; Paroni, R.; Verzeletti, A.; Cortellini, V.; De Ferrari, F.; Grigolato, P.

    2012-01-01

    Fixation is a critical step in the preparation of tissues for histopathology. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different fixatives vs formalin on proteins and DNA, and to evaluate alternative fixation for morphological diagnosis and nucleic acid preservation for molecular methods. Forty tissues were fixed for 24 h with six different fixatives: the gold standard fixative formalin, the historical fixatives Bouin and Hollande, and the alternative fixatives Greenfix, UPM and CyMol. Tissues were stained (Haematoxylin-Eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, Trichromic, Alcian-blue, High Iron Diamine stainings), and their antigenicity was determined by immunohistochemistry (performed with PAN-CK, CD31, Ki-67, S100, CD68, AML antibodies). DNA extraction, KRAS sequencing, FISH for CEP-17, and flow cytometry analysis of nuclear DNA content were applied. For cell morphology the alternative fixatives (Greenfix, UPM, CyMol) were equivalent to formalin. As expected, Hollande proved to be the best fixative for morphology. The morphology obtained with Bouin was comparable to the one with formalin. Hollande was the best fixative for histochemistry. Bouin proved to be equivalent to formalin. The alternative fixatives were equivalent to formalin, although with greater variability in haematoxylin-eosin staining. It proved the possibility to obtain immunohistochemical staining largely equivalent to that following formalin-fixation with the following fixatives: Greenfix, Hollande, UPM and CyMol. The tissues fixed in Bouin did not provide results comparable to those obtained with formalin. The DNA extracted from samples fixed with alternative fixatives was found to be suitable for molecular analysis. PMID:22688293

  14. Biofilms in device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Khardori, N; Yassien, M

    1995-09-01

    The use of various medical devices including indwelling vascular catheters, cardiac pacemakers, prosthetic heart valves, chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheters and prosthetic joints has greatly facilitated the management of serious medical and surgical illness. However, the successful development of synthetic materials and introduction of these artificial devices into various body systems has been accompanied by the ability of microorganism to adhere to these devices in the environment of biofilms that protect them from the activity of antimicrobial agents and from host defense mechanisms. A number of host, biomaterial and microbial factors are unique to the initiation, persistence and treatment failures of device-related infections. Intravascular catheters are the most common devices used in clinical practice and interactions associated with these devices are the leading cause of nosocomial bacteremias. The infections associated with these devices include insertion site infection, septic thrombophlebitis, septicemia, endocarditis and metastatic abscesses. Other important device-related infections include infections of vascular prostheses, intracardiac prostheses, total artificial hearts, indwelling urinary catheters, orthopedic prostheses, endotracheal tubes and extended wear lenses. The diagnosis and management of biofilm-associated infections remain difficult but critical issues. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is often not effective in eradicating these infections and the removal of the device becomes necessary. Several improved diagnostic and therapeutic modalities have been reported in recent experimental studies. The clinical usefulness of these strategies remains to be determined.

  15. Extra Corporeal Fixation of Fractured Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy K, Vandana; Kengagsubbiah, Srivatsa; V, Sathyabhama; Priya, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Condylar fracture is the second most common site in the mandibular fractures. Motor vehicle accident and fall are the major causes of such fractures. Because of the anatomical weakness of the condyle and the shape of the condylar head the antero-medial dislocation of the condyle is common. Open reduction and closed reduction is always debatable. The open reduction will bring back the normal function much earlier than closed reduction. Medially dislocated condylar fracture fragments are always managed with open method. In superior or high condylar fractures,exact reduction with conventional open reduction can be difficult due to the limited surgical and visual fields. In such cases extracorporeal fixation of condyle using vertical ramus osteotomy may be better choice to achieve perfect alignment and absolute maintaince of vertical height of the ramus and facial symmetry. We here present a case of extracorporeal fixation of unilateral left high condylar fracture. PMID:25386546

  16. The penny drops: change blindness at fixation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tim J; Lamont, Peter; Henderson, John M

    2012-01-01

    Our perception of the visual world is fallible. Unattended objects may change without us noticing as long as the change does not capture attention (change blindness). However, it is often assumed that changes to a fixated object will be noticed if it is attended. In this experiment we demonstrate that participants fail to detect a change in identity of a coin during a magic trick even though eyetracking indicates that the coin is tracked by the eyes throughout the trick. The change is subsequently detected when participants are instructed to look for it. These results suggest that during naturalistic viewing, attention can be focused on an object at fixation without including all of its features.

  17. [Complications of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Yuan, Z Z; Ma, J X; Ma, X L

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To make a systematic assessment of the complications of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures. Method: A computer-based online search of PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, BIOSIS, Springer and Cochrane Library were performed.The randomized and controlled trials of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures were collected.The included trials were screened out strictly based on the criterion of inclusion and exclusion.The quality of included trials was evaluated.RevMan 5.0 was used for data analysis. Result: A total of 17 studies involving 1 402 patients were included.There were 687 patients with open reduction and internal fixation and 715 with external fixation.The results of Meta-analysis indicated that there were statistically significant differences with regard to the postoperatively total complications, infection, malunion, tendon rupture (I(2)=8%, RR=0.77(95%CI 0.65-0.91, Z=3.10, P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between two approaches with respect to nounion, re-operation, complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, neurapraxia, tendonitis, painful hardware, scar(P>0.05). Conclusion: Postoperative complications are present in both open reduction and internal fixation and external fixation.Compared with external fixation, open reduction and internal fixation is lower in total complications postoperatively, infection and malunion, but external fixation has lower tendon rupture incidence.

  18. Minimally-invasive internal fixation of extra-articular distal femur fractures using a locking plate: tricks of the trade.

    PubMed

    Ehlinger, M; Adam, P; Abane, L; Arlettaz, Y; Bonnomet, F

    2011-04-01

    Fractures of the distal femur are rare and occur in two distinct population categories: young patients after high energy traumas and elderly patients who fall from their full height, and often carry severe co-morbidities making especially difficult to manage theses complex injuries. In elderly patients the potential complications are numerous including infection, non-union and frequent function deterioration. We present a technique of minimally invasive internal fixation of the distal extra-articular femur using a locking plate and present the tricks of the trade to obtain successful reduction and achieve union. The hardware used includes plate fixation with a large fragment locking screw. This minimally invasive surgery combines stability of the internal fixation device with the principles of closed surgery, allowing early mobilization and immediate weight bearing to warrant good functional recovery.

  19. Scapular thickness--implications for fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Charity S; Roberts, Craig S; Nyland, John A; Radmacher, Paula G; Acland, Robert D; Voor, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and map scapula osseous thickness to identify the optimal areas for internal fixation. Eighteen (9 pairs) scapulae from 2 female and 7 male cadavers were used. After harvest and removal of all soft tissues, standardized measurement lines were made based on anatomic landmarks. For consistency among scapulae, measurements were taken at standard percentage intervals along each line approximating the distance between two consecutive reconstruction plate screw holes. Two-mm-diameter drill holes were made at each point, and a standard depth gauge was used to measure thickness. The glenoid fossa (25 mm) displayed the greatest mean osseous thickness, followed by the lateral scapular border (9.7 mm), the scapula spine (8.3 mm), and the central portion of the body of the scapula (3.0 mm). To optimize screw purchase and internal fixation strength, the lateral border, the lateral aspect of the base of the scapula spine, and the scapula spine itself should be used for anatomic sites of internal fixation of scapula fractures.

  20. Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications) while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium). In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

  1. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  2. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  3. An Evaluation Design for the Educational Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Programs for the Handicapped.

    The booklet provides forms for the teacher of the orthopedically handicapped to use in systematically collecting data and designing an appropriate educational blueprint for each student. Pupil development assessment sheets include columns for recording assessment date, date of mastery, level of achievement, and comments for each behavioral…

  4. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N.; Forsythe, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice. PMID:27240129

  5. Stem Cells in Orthopedics: A Comprehensive Guide for the General Orthopedist.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Weber, Alexander E; Yanke, Adam; Nho, Shane J

    2016-01-01

    The use of biologic adjuvants in the treatment of operative and nonoperative orthopedic injuries continues to expand in concert with our understanding of the acute and chronic healing process of musculoskeletal injuries. Stem cell treatments in orthopedics are among the most commonly explored options, and have found varying levels of success in promoting osseous and soft tissue healing. Basic science and translational studies have demonstrated the potential for broad application of stem cells in the treatment of a growing number of musculoskeletal injuries. Emerging clinical studies have also provided promising results, although the vast majority of studies have featured small sample sizes and limited duration of follow-up. In addition, a number of important questions remain regarding the clinical safety, treatment delivery, and overall efficacy of stem cell augmentation of injured tissue in orthopedics. The objective of the current review is to present a broad overview of the current state of stem cell treatments in orthopedic surgery, with an emphasis on soft tissue healing. This review of stem cell treatment covers the basic science behind biologic augmentation, advantages of the various stem cell sources, preclinical results, and current and future clinical applications.

  6. The Effect of Orthopedic Advertising and Self-Promotion on a Naïve Population.

    PubMed

    Mohney, Stephen; Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2016-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the number of physicians marketing themselves directly to patients and consumers. However, it is unclear how different promotional styles affect patients' perceptions of their physicians. We hypothesized that self-promoting orthopedic surgeons enjoy a more positive impact on nonphysician patients as compared to non-self-promoting surgeons, as well as a corresponding negative impact on their peer-surgeons. Surgeon websites were selected from the 5 largest population centers in the United States. Subjects with varying degrees of familiarity with orthopedic surgery evaluated Internet profiles of surgeons on a forced choice Likert scale to measure the amount of self-promotion. The naïve subjects judged self-promoting surgeons more favorably than the orthopedic surgeons. In contrast, board-certified orthopedic surgeons viewed self-promoting surgeons more negatively than did their nonphysician counterparts. In summary, the present study revealed that the potential for self-promotion to unduly influence potential patients is real and should be a considerable concern to surgeons, patients, and the profession.

  7. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; D'Angio, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120 cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.

  8. Value of 3-D CT in classifying acetabular fractures during orthopedic residency training.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jeffrey; Halvorson, Jason; Carroll, Eben; Webb, Lawrence X

    2012-05-01

    The complex anatomy of the pelvis and acetabulum have historically made classification and interpretation of acetabular fractures difficult for orthopedic trainees. The addition of 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) scan has gained popularity in preoperative planning, identification, and education of acetabular fractures given their complexity. Therefore, the authors examined the value of 3-D CT compared with conventional radiography in classifying acetabular fractures at different levels of orthopedic training. Their hypothesis was that 3-D CT would improve correct identification of acetabular fractures compared with conventional radiography.The classic Letournel fracture pattern classification system was presented in quiz format to 57 orthopedic residents and 20 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists. A case consisted of (1) plain radiographs and 2-dimensional axial CT scans or (2) 3-D CT scans. All levels of training showed significant improvement in classifying acetabular fractures with 3-D vs 2-D CT, with the greatest benefit from 3-D CT found in junior residents (postgraduate years 1-3).Three-dimensional CT scans can be an effective educational tool for understanding the complex spatial anatomy of the pelvis, learning acetabular fracture patterns, and correctly applying a widely accepted fracture classification system.

  9. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  10. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,…

  11. [Lack of new trainees in trauma surgery and orthopedics. An approach to a solution].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; Matziolis, D; Perka, C

    2010-12-01

    The reasons for a shortage of young people in trauma surgery and orthopedics have often been discussed. Atypical progression of medical operating levels, antisocial working hours and an inadequate financial compensation for on-call duties have been given as the reasons for a lack of interest in the discipline. Additionally a progressive feminization of the medical profession and rejection of surgical disciplines because of a mismatch with family interests and the demands of advanced surgical training have also been named. Surveys on the choice of medical specialization reveal that experiences during the course of studying have a great influence on future prospects and are immensely important for the further focusing on the future as a medical doctor. In order to increase the attractiveness of the specialization, programs for students were initiated by the heads of the Conventions of Higher Education Lecturers for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery and the management of the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery. Due to the enormous popularity auxiliary projects were demanded. Consequently a "Trauma Surgery and Orthopedic Day for Students" was organized on 16th February 2010 in the Musculoskeletal Centre of the Charité in Berlin. The aim was to convey practical skills and to inspire the choice of this specialization in the future.

  12. Analyses and comparison of a novel, hybrid, multifunctional orthopedic composite and implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicicco, Michael

    In the orthopedic/medical device industry, 2, 2' -bis-(4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)- and diurethanedimethacrylate (DUDMA)-based polymeric biomaterials have become well-known substitutes for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)- and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)-based biomaterials, respectively. The development of these polymeric biomaterials cannot continue without direct comparison studies against currently marketed materials. The initiative for this research stems wholly from developing analytical methodologies that assist in qualifying novel biomaterials under development, by evaluating their chemical properties, performance, and safety. The goals of this research were: (i) Characterize the assay/quality of every resin component and quantify elution of extractable monomers from novel, DUDMA-based RHAKOSS(TM) implant, (ii) Determine degree of conversion (alpha) and rate of polymerization (Rp) for novel, Bis-GMA-based CORTOSS(TM) composite, (iii) Assess risk for radical-induced post-surgical cytotoxicity for CORTOSS, (iv) Determine if surface radical chemistries occur for sterilized RHAKOSS and assess its oxidative stability, and (v) Quantify antibiotic elution from antibiotic-impregnated CORTOSS and identify factors that control elution. The phenomena studied necessitated the utilization of several analytical spectroscopic techniques; fluorometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS), attenuated total reflectance---Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A battery of lateral chemical techniques were employed as well; including molecular derivatization/tagging, phase partitioning, spin-trapping, and thermal annealing. Results demonstrated that RHAKOSS monomer percent compositions were prepared according to formulations and monomer elution was virtually undetectable, serving as an empirical gauge to

  13. Improving Distal Fixation with Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in Cases of Severe Humeral Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Amanda; Stroud, Nick; Roche, Christopher P

    2015-12-01

    The usage of and indications for total shoulder arthroplasty have grown in recent years. Certain aspects of these arthroplasty procedures can be very complex, especially in revision and fracture cases, often leading to proximal humerus bone loss. For cases with significant bone loss, there is a need for improved devices with additional options to treat a wider range of deformities while also mitigating existing complications and rates, such as poor distal fixation, inadequate soft tissue reattachment options, and joint instability. To that end, a fatigue and torsional test was conducted on two different devices to assess the ability of each to survive an extreme fatigue and torsional load when assembled in worst-case configurations. Evaluation of the Equinoxe® humeral reconstruction prosthesis demonstrated superior fixation in both the fatigue loading scenario and also the torsional loading scenario as compared to the 8 mm x 215 mm cemented humeral long stem, where each had only 80 mm of cemented fixation. The results of the fatigue test demonstrated that despite the humeral reconstruction prosthesis being subjected to a 960 N force and 45 Nm bending moment (which was significantly more challenging than the 576 N force and 24.2 Nm bending moment subjected to the cemented humeral long stem), the humeral reconstruction prosthesis completed 1 M cycles without fracture or failure. Additionally, the Equinoxe® humeral reconstruction prosthesis was associated with a significantly greater torsional resistance in both the torque to initial slip (29.4 Nm versus 8.2 Nm; p = 0.0002) and also the maximum torque to failure (44.3 Nm versus 12.1 Nm; p < 0.0001). These significant improvements in fixation are at least partially attributed to the application of a novel distal fixation ring, which is press fit around the diaphysis of the humerus to supplement the cemented fixation of the distal stem. These fatigue and torsional test results paired with several novel features of fer

  14. Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Fixation and Volar Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2007-01-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius. PMID:18780085

  15. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Elissa S.; Fogel, Harold A.; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M.; Schiff, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. Objective This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. Design An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. Setting An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Participants Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Results An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as ‘average’ submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’, p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Conclusion Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process

  16. Better osteoblast adhesion on nanoparticulate selenium- A promising orthopedic implant material.

    PubMed

    Perla, Venu; Webster, Thomas J

    2005-11-01

    Apart from problems such as poor osseointegration, stress shielding, and wear debris-associated bone cell death, a major concern of metallic orthopedic implants is that they slowly corrode under in vivo environments. It is possible that continuous tissue exposure to metallic corrosion products limits orthopedic implant efficacy; this is especially true for patients receiving implants due to bone cancer. To date, there is no metallic orthopedic implant available in the market that specifically deals with the prevention and/or recurring cancer that may happen in these patients. The objective of this study was to deal with these problems in an integrated way by introducing a new biomaterial to the orthopedic community with anticancer chemistry: selenium (Se). In this study, six types of Se compacts were tested for bone cell (osteoblast) adhesion under in vitro conditions. Two types of cylindrical compacts were made with conventional Se metal particles in the micron (6.539 +/- 1.364-microm diameter) and submicron (0.963 +/- 0.139-microm diameter) range. These two types of compacts were chemically etched with different concentrations of NaOH to create two additional types of Se particles in each category: conventional size particles with nanosurface roughness and nanometer particles (0.204- to 0.264-microm diameter). Results showed for the first time, enhanced osteoblast adhesion on particulate surfaces of the compacts made from conventional Se compared with reference nonparticulate wrought titanium sheets. More importantly, this study provided the first evidence that osteoblast density was further increased on the surfaces of the Se compacts with nanometer particles. These initial findings indicate that there may be a promising future for nanoparticulate Se as an anticancer biocompatible orthopedic material.

  17. Developing a Minimum Data Set of the Information Management System for Orthopedic Injuries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert’s opinions and test-retest method, respectively. Results: An MDS of orthopedic injuries were assigned to two categories: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. Conclusions: This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country’s MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems. PMID:25237576

  18. Transmaxillary osteogenesis distraction combined with orthopedics and orthodontics in the correction of a severe retrusion of the upper maxilla.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Inés Ulfe; Dogliotti, Pedro Luis

    2004-09-01

    A patient having adequate records and diagnosed as having Binder syndrome is presented. Nasomaxillary hypoplasia requires a definitive treatment, use of bone grafts, upper maxillary osteotomies, and advancement or a combination of both. Bone grafts can be reabsorbed, and complete maxillary advance modifies normal occlusion in a certain way, because the posterior sector is not compromised. The aim of this case treatment is to create a new osseous surface that makes the eruption of the permanent dental pieces easier and gives the correct skeletal position to the upper maxilla with distraction osteogenesis combined with an orthopedic appliance, transmaxillary segment osteotomy, and subsequent orthodontics. The absence of the osseous surface in the upper maxilla and the presence of supernumeraries in the anterior region determined the permanence of most of the temporary dental pieces, resulting in the impossibility of making the exchange to permanent dental pieces. The technique and the devices are simple and easy to manipulate. After the treatment, an adequate dental relation is restored as well as effective advance of the upper maxillary bone; thus, an excellent functional and stable esthetic result is achieved, avoiding any complication of velopharingeal incompetence.

  19. An intelligibility assessment of toddlers with cleft lip and palate who received and did not receive presurgical infant orthopedic treatment.

    PubMed

    Konst, E M; Weersink-Braks, H; Rietveld, T; Peters, H

    2000-01-01

    A randomized, prospective, clinical study was performed investigating the effects of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). The influence of PIO on speech intelligibility was evaluated with two groups, each consisting of 10 children with UCLP. One group used PIO during the first year of life, whereas the other group did not use the device. Eight children without cleft served as a second control group. Intelligibility was assessed by lay listeners using two methods: transcription and listener rating. The ratings proved to be reliable and to have sufficient validity, but they did not completely reflect intelligibility defined as the proportion of words understood by the listener. Children in the treatment group were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility than those in the nontreatment group. However, data obtained by means of transcriptions indicated that, in fact, there were no group differences in actual intelligibility. Only in comparison with their noncleft peers were the children with cleft lip and palate significantly less well understood.

  20. Tribo-mechanical properties of thin boron coatings deposited on polished cobalt alloy surfaces for orthopedic applications

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, C. C.; Williams, J. M.; Truhan, J.J.; Qu, J.; Riester, L.; Hazelton, R. C.; Moschella, J.J.; Blau, P.J.; Anderson, J.P.; Popoola, O.O.; Keitz, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents experimental evidence that thin (<∼200 nm) boron coatings, deposited with a (vacuum) cathodic arc technique on pre-polished Co-Cr-Mo surfaces, could potentially extend the life of metal-on-polymer orthopedic devices using cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy for the metal component. The primary tribological test used a linear, reciprocating pin-on-disc arrangement, with pins made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. The disks were cast Co-Cr-Mo samples that were metallographically polished and then coated with boron at a substrate bias of 500 V and at about 100 °C. The wear tests were carried out in a saline solution to simulate the biological environment. The improvements were manifested by the absence of a detectable wear track scar on the coated metal component, while significant polymer transfer film was detected on the uncoated (control) samples tested under the same conditions. The polymer transfer track was characterized with both profilometry and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Mechanical characterization of the thin films included nano-indentation, as well as additional pin-on-disk tests with a steel ball to demonstrate adhesion, using ultra-high frequency acoustic microscopy to probe for any void occurrence at the coating-substrate interface. PMID:19340285

  1. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance on Trunk and Upper Limb Muscle Activation during Maximum Isometric Contraction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Chull; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the muscle activities of the trunk muscles and upper limb muscles during maximum isometric contraction when temporomandibular joint alignment was achieved with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance in order provide basic data on the effects of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on the entire body. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with healthy Korean adults in their 20s (males=10, females=10). [Methods] An 8 channel surface electromyography system was used to measure the muscle activities of the upper limb muscles and neck muscles of the subjects during maximum isometric contraction with and without use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Results] The maximum isometric contractions of the trunk and upper limb muscles when mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance were used were compared with those when no mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance was used. The results showed that the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical and lumbar erector spinae, upper trapezius, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis and internal oblique and external oblique muscles all showed significant increases in maximum isometric contractions with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Conclusion] The use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance is considered to be a method for normal adults to improve the stability of the entire body with the improvement of the stability of the TMJ. The proximal improvement in stability improves of the proximal thereby improving not only muscle strength with increased muscle activation but also stability during exercises.

  2. The Highest-Impact Combat Orthopedic and Extremity Injury Articles in the Past 70 Years: A Citation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jason; Do, Woo S; Stinner, Daniel J; Wenke, Joseph C; Orman, Jean A; Kragh, John F

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the most-cited peer-reviewed combat orthopedic and extremity injury articles published during the past 70 years. Orthopedic trauma presents ongoing challenges to both US civilian and military healthcare personnel. Improvements in combat trauma and extremity injury survival and quality of life are the result of advances in orthopedic trauma research. The Web of Science (including Science Citation Index) was searched for the most cited articles related to combat orthopedic trauma, published from 1940 to 2013. The most-cited article was by Owens et al. (Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 2007; 137 citations). Between the 1990s and 2000s, there was a 256% increase in the number of highly cited publications. A total of 69% of the articles were on the topics of comorbid vascular trauma (25%), epidemiology (23%), or orthopedic trauma (21%). This study identifies some of the most important contributions to combat orthopedic trauma and research and the areas of greatest scientific interest to the specialty during the past seven decades and highlights key research that has contributed to the evolution of modern combat orthopedic traumatology.

  3. Individual Objective and Subjective Fixation Disparity in Near Vision

    PubMed Central

    Jaschinski, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Binocular vision refers to the integration of images in the two eyes for improved visual performance and depth perception. One aspect of binocular vision is the fixation disparity, which is a suboptimal condition in individuals with respect to binocular eye movement control and subsequent neural processing. The objective fixation disparity refers to the vergence angle between the visual axes, which is measured with eye trackers. Subjective fixation disparity is tested with two monocular nonius lines which indicate the physical nonius separation required for perceived alignment. Subjective and objective fixation disparity represent the different physiological mechanisms of motor and sensory fusion, but the precise relation between these two is still unclear. This study measures both types of fixation disparity at viewing distances of 40, 30, and 24 cm while observers fixated a central stationary fusion target. 20 young adult subjects with normal binocular vision were tested repeatedly to investigate individual differences. For heterophoria and subjective fixation disparity, this study replicated that the binocular system does not properly adjust to near targets: outward (exo) deviations typically increase as the viewing distance is shortened. This exo proximity effect—however—was not found for objective fixation disparity, which–on the average–was zero. But individuals can have reliable outward (exo) or inward (eso) vergence errors. Cases with eso objective fixation disparity tend to have less exo states of subjective fixation disparity and heterophoria. In summary, the two types of fixation disparity seem to respond in a different way when the viewing distance is shortened. Motor and sensory fusion–as reflected by objective and subjective fixation disparity–exhibit complex interactions that may differ between individuals (eso versus exo) and vary with viewing distance (far versus near vision). PMID:28135308

  4. Determination of protein loss during aqueous and phase partition fixation using formalin and glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, E.T.; Feldhoff, R.C.; Nettleton, G.S.

    1984-10-01

    In phase partition fixation tissue is immersed in an organic solvent at equilibrium with an aqueous phase containing a fixing agent. By using radioisotope labeling techniques the effects of phase partition fixation on protein retention during fixation of tissue with formalin and glutaraldehyde have been determined and compared with those of standard aqueous fixation using these fixatives. It has been shown that retention of protein in tissue during phase partition fixation was as good or better than during aqueous fixation. Improved retention provides further evidence that phase partition fixation may be a useful alternative to aqueous fixation.

  5. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured. PMID:27648028

  6. Carbon dioxide fixation in green sulphur bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sirevåg, Reidun; Ormerod, J. G.

    1970-01-01

    1. About one-third of the CO2 fixed during photosynthesis by washed suspensions of Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum strain 8346 gave rise to α-oxoglutarate and branched-chain oxo acids, mainly β-methyl-α-oxovalerate. Another one-third to one-half gave rise to a polyglucose. 2. The fixation of CO2 was inhibited by fluoroacetate, increasing concentrations up to 1mm stimulating the accumulation of α-oxoglutarate and causing a decrease in the formation of the branched-chain oxo acids and polyglucose. 3. Acetate was converted into the same products as was CO2. 4. Fluoroacetate (1mm) had a negligible effect on the formation of polyglucose from acetate and caused a slight inhibition of the formation of the branched-chain oxo acids and increased accumulation of α-oxoglutarate. 5. Iodoacetate (1mm) strongly inhibited polyglucose formation from acetate and caused accumulation of pyruvate. The formation of the branched-chain oxo acids from acetate was only slightly affected by this inhibitor. 6. Pyruvate can be metabolized by this organism in the presence of a suitable electron donor whether CO2 is present or not. In the absence of CO2 pyruvate is converted into polyglucose. 7. The accumulation of oxo acids during CO2 fixation is completely inhibited by NH4+ ions. The formation of the branched-chain oxo acids is considerably decreased by the presence of isoleucine, leucine or valine, or a mixture of these. 8. CO2 fixation in two other strains of Chlorobium appears to exhibit a similar pattern to that in C. thiosulfatophilum strain 8346. 9. It is concluded that in washed suspensions, CO2 is fixed mainly by a mechanism involving the reductive carboxylic acid cycle. Acetate, the product of the cycle, is converted into polyglucose via pyruvate synthase and a reversal of glycolysis or into branched-chain oxo acids by an unknown mechanism. PMID:5493862

  7. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, H M

    1994-01-01

    This review presents a comparison between the complex genetic regulatory networks that control nitrogen fixation in three representative rhizobial species, Rhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and Azorhizobium caulinodans. Transcription of nitrogen fixation genes (nif and fix genes) in these bacteria is induced primarily by low-oxygen conditions. Low-oxygen sensing and transmission of this signal to the level of nif and fix gene expression involve at least five regulatory proteins, FixL, FixJ, FixK, NifA, and RpoN (sigma 54). The characteristic features of these proteins and their functions within species-specific regulatory pathways are described. Oxygen interferes with the activities of two transcriptional activators, FixJ and NifA. FixJ activity is modulated via phosphorylation-dephosphorylation by the cognate sensor hemoprotein FixL. In addition to the oxygen responsiveness of the NifA protein, synthesis of NifA is oxygen regulated at the level of transcription. This type of control includes FixLJ in R. meliloti and FixLJ-FixK in A. caulinodans or is brought about by autoregulation in B. japonicum. NifA, in concert with sigma 54 RNA polymerase, activates transcription from -24/-12-type promoters associated with nif and fix genes and additional genes that are not directly involved in nitrogen fixation. The FixK proteins constitute a subgroup of the Crp-Fnr family of bacterial regulators. Although the involvement of FixLJ and FixK in nifA regulation is remarkably different in the three rhizobial species discussed here, they constitute a regulatory cascade that uniformly controls the expression of genes (fixNOQP) encoding a distinct cytochrome oxidase complex probably required for bacterial respiration under low-oxygen conditions. In B. japonicum, the FixLJ-FixK cascade also controls genes for nitrate respiration and for one of two sigma 54 proteins. Images PMID:7968919

  8. Alcohol-based solutions for bovine testicular tissue fixation.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Nelson C; Espinoza, Jorge R; Vargas-Jentzsch, Paul; Sandoval, Patricio; Ramos, Luis A; Aponte, Pedro M

    2017-01-01

    Tissue fixation, a central element in histotechnology, is currently performed with chemical compounds potentially harmful for human health and the environment. Therefore, alternative fixatives are being developed, including alcohol-based solutions. We evaluated several ethanol-based mixtures with additives to study fixative penetration rate, tissue volume changes, and morphologic effects in the bovine testis. Fixatives used were Bouin solution, 4% formaldehyde (F4), 70% ethanol (E70), E70 with 1.5% glycerol (E70G), E70 with 5% acetic acid (E70A), E70 with 1.5% glycerol and 5% acetic acid (E70AG), and E70 with 1.5% glycerol, 5% acetic acid, and 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; E70AGD). Five-millimeter bovine testicular tissue cubes could be completely penetrated by ethanol-based fixatives and Bouin solution in 2-3 h, whereas F4 required 21 h. Bouin solution produced general tissue shrinkage, whereas the other fixatives (alcohol-based and F4) caused tissue volume expansion. Although Bouin solution is an excellent fixative for testicular tissue, ethanol-based fixatives showed good penetration rates, low tissue shrinkage, and preserved sufficient morphology to allow identification of the stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle, therefore representing a valid alternative for histotechnology laboratories. Common additives such as acetic acid, glycerol, and DMSO offered marginal benefits for the process of fixation; E70AG showed the best preservation of morphology with excellent nuclear detail, close to that of Bouin solution.

  9. Bone Plug Versus Suture-Only Fixation of Meniscal Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Gee, Albert O.; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Stoner, Kirsten; Warren, Russell F.; Chen, Tony O.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) is primarily undertaken to relieve the symptoms associated with meniscal deficiencies. However, its ability to restore normal knee joint contact mechanics under physiological loads is still unclear. Purpose To quantify the dynamic contact mechanics associated with 2 commonly used fixation techniques in MAT of the medial compartment: transosseous suture fixation via bone plugs and suture-only fixation at the horns. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Physiological loads to mimic gait were applied across 7 human cadaveric knees on a simulator. A sensor placed on the medial tibial plateau recorded dynamic contact stresses under the following conditions: (1) intact meniscus, (2) MAT using transosseous suture fixation via bone plugs at the anterior and posterior horns, (3) MAT using suture-only fixation, and (4) total medial meniscectomy. A “remove-replace” procedure was performed to place the same autograft for both MAT conditions to minimize the variability in graft size, geometry, and material property and to isolate the effects of the fixation technique. Contact stress, contact area, and weighted center of contact stress (WCoCS) were quantified on the medial plateau throughout the stance phase. Results Knee joint contact mechanics were sensitive to the meniscal condition primarily during the first half of the gait cycle. After meniscectomy, the mean peak contact stress increased from 4.2 ± 1.2 MPa to 6.2 ± 1.0 MPa (P = .04), and the mean contact area decreased from 546 ± 132 mm2 to 192 ± 122 mm2 (P = .01) compared with the intact meniscus during early stance (14% of the gait cycle). After MAT, the mean contact stress significantly decreased with bone plug fixation (5.0 ± 0.7 MPa) but not with suture-only fixation (5.9 ± 0.7 MPa). Both fixation techniques partially restored the contact area, but bone plug fixation restored it closer to the intact condition. The location of WCoCS in the

  10. Endotracheal tube fixation methods for optimal stability: a comparison of adhesive tape, suture, and tape-suture fixation.

    PubMed

    Farbod, Frank; Tuli, Puneet; Robertson, Bernard F; Jackson, Ian T

    2010-07-01

    Accidental extubation of an intubated patient is a serious consideration in the surgical patient. Adequate fixation in the intubated patient is essential to prevent potentially life-threatening complications. Several methods of endotracheal tube fixation have been described in the literature. In this study, we examine 3 common methods of fixation: adhesive tape alone, suture, and tape-suture. Testing occurred in a laboratory setting with 2 fresh cadavers. Endotracheal tubes were inserted, using the methods of fixation in question. We subjected each fixation technique to progressively increasing weight to determine which technique is most resistant to accidental removal. We found that fixation of the tube by combining tape around the tube with a suture through the tape is the best noninvasive technique of the 3 methods evaluated in cases where movement of the head is anticipated.

  11. [The experimental investigations upon the influence of ocular fixation on habituation of postural reflexes in pigeon].

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, H

    1994-01-01

    The subject of investigation was the influence of ocular fixation on acquisition of habituation in experimental rotatory test in pigeons. The habituation training was performed in the three difference conditions: with full ocular fixation, fixation partly reduced and fixation excluded. Author confirmed that habituation with fixation excluded gave the best results of habituation of postural reflexes and head nystagmus in pigeons in rotatory training.

  12. Effects of Right Lower Limb Orthopedic Immobilization on Braking Function: An On-The-Road Experimental Study With Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jean-Christophe; Tremblay, Marc-André; Corriveau, Hélène; Hamel, Mathieu; Cabana, François

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how immobilization of the right lower limb might affect driving. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 2 types of immobilization on the emergency braking time of healthy subjects during actual driving conditions. The emergency braking times of 14 healthy volunteers were assessed in a closed circuit under 3 conditions: wearing running shoes, wearing an Aircast Walker(®), or wearing a walking cast on their right lower limb. An instrumented car was used to measure the emergency braking times during braking tests with and without a distractor. The foot movement times were significantly increased with both immobilization devices compared with the running shoe (p < .01). The median total braking time with the running shoe during emergency braking without a distractor was 0.452 (interquartile range, 25th to 75th [IQR], 0.413 to 0.472) second. The results obtained with the Aircast Walker(®) or the walking cast were significantly longer (p < .01), at 0.480 (IQR, 0.431 to 0.537) second and 0.512 (IQR, 0.451 to 0.535) second, respectively. When a distractor was added, the total braking time with the running shoe, Aircast Walker(®), and walking cast was 0.489 (IQR, 0.429 to 0.575), 0.516 (IQR, 0.459 to 0.586), and 0.510 (IQR, 0.469 to 0.570) second, respectively, with no statistically significant differences among these 3 conditions. Wearing an immobilization device on the right lower limb minimally lengthens the emergency braking time in healthy drivers under actual driving conditions. Clinicians must nonetheless exercise caution when advising a driver wearing an orthopedic immobilization, because driving a motor vehicle is a complex psychomotor task that goes well beyond the emergency braking time.

  13. Randomized Prospective Study of Totally Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair: Fixation Versus No Fixation of Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Cody A.; Greenlee, Susan M.; Larson, Dirk R.; Harrington, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Fixation of the mesh during laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair is thought to be necessary to prevent recurrence. However, mesh fixation may increase postoperative pain and lead to an increased risk of complications. We questioned whether elimination of fixation of the mesh during TEP inguinal hernia repair leads to decreased postoperative pain or complications, or both, without an increased rate of recurrence. Methods: A randomized prospective single-blinded study was carried out in 40 patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair with (Group A=20) or without (Group B=20) fixation of the mesh. Results: Patients in whom the mesh was not fixed had shorter hospital length of stay (8.3 vs 16.0 hours, P=0.01), were less likely to be admitted to the hospital (P=0.001), used less postoperative narcotic analgesia in the PACU (P=0.01), and were less likely to develop urinary retention (P=0.04). No significant differences occurred in the level of pain, time to return to normal activity, or the difficulty of the operation between the 2 groups. No hernia recurrences were observed in either group (follow-up range, 6 to 30 months, median=19). Conclusions: Elimination of tack fixation of mesh during laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair significantly reduces the use of postoperative narcotic analgesia, hospital length of stay, and the development of postoperative urinary retention but does not lead to a significant reduction in postoperative pain. Eliminating tacks does not lead to an increased rate of recurrence. PMID:17575757

  14. Comparison of screw fixation with elastic fixation methods in the treatment of syndesmosis injuries in ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Mustafa; Donmez, Ferdi; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Cakmak, Selami; Mutlu, Serhat; Guler, Olcay

    2015-07-01

    17 patients with ankle syndesmosic injury were treated with a 4.5mm single cortical screw fixation (passage of screw 4 cortices) and 15 patients were treated with single-level elastic fixation material. All patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS ankle and posterior foot scale at the third, sixth and twelfth months after the fixation. The ankle range of movement was recorded together with the healthy side. The Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons. No statistical significant difference was observed between the AOFAS scores (p>0.05). The range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion motion of the elastic fixation group at the 6th and 12th months were significantly better compared to the screw fixation group (p<0.01). Elastic fixation is as functional as screw fixation in the treatment of ankle syndesmosis injuries. The unnecessary need of a second surgical intervention for removal of the fixation material is another advantageous aspect of this method of fixation.

  15. Analysis of Bone Fixation Methods in Digital Replantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Jin Soo; Roh, Si Young; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Adequate fixation of replanted digits is essential not only for short-term healing but for long-term function. Various bony fixation methods using Kirschner (K-) and intraosseous wire are available in replantation. We examined clinical and radiographic outcomes of fixation methods on bone union after digital replantation. Methods A single institutional retrospective review identified 992 patients who had undergone 1,247 successful replantations between July 2009 and September 2015. Exclusion criteria included amputations of the distal phalanx, comminuted fractures, and intra-articular fractures. Patients were classified according to 5 categories of fixation methods: single K-wire, double longitudinal K-wires, cross K-wires, wire with, and wire without K-wire support. Bone union was evaluated by 5-month postoperative X-ray and fixation outcomes were compared across the 5 groups. Results The exclusion criteria were applied, and 88 patients with 103 replanted digits remained for analysis. Single K-wire fixation was used in 40 digits, double longitudinal K-wires in 30, and cross fixation in 14. Wire with and without K-wire support was required in 15 and 4 digits. Nonunion was observed in 32 digits (31.1%), of which 13 required additional operations such as bone graft or corrective osteotomy. The highest percent of nonunion was observed after cross fixation (35.7%) and the lowest after wire alone (25.0%). Conclusions In this study, contrary to general knowledge, we found that single K-wire fixation was not associated with poorer outcomes. Successful bone union outcomes may be achieved by careful selection of bone fixation methods. This study provides useful information for planning bone fixation in digital replantation. PMID:28194348

  16. Outcome and complications of treatment of ankle diastasis with tightrope fixation.

    PubMed

    Willmott, H J S; Singh, B; David, L A

    2009-11-01

    Fixation of ankle syndesmosis injury with a fibre-wire tightrope has previously been reported. Early clinical results indicate that it can remain in situ indefinitely without complications. We are the first to report complications with the use of this device. Six patients were treated for ankle diastasis using the tightrope. These included four Weber C fractures, one Maisonneuve fracture and one isolated diastasis without fracture. Fractures were treated according to AO-ASIF principles and the tightrope applied through a plate in three cases and directly through the fibula in three cases. In two cases the device caused soft-tissue irritation with granuloma formation, necessitating subsequent removal, one after six months, and the other after ten months. Histological examination revealed refractile material within giant cells, suggestive of foreign-body reaction. Average time to weightbearing was six weeks (range 4-8). In all cases the syndesmosis was reduced and held, even after device removal. Functional outcome was good and patients were satisfied. This series shows that there is a significant incidence of soft-tissue complications with the use of tightrope fixation and subsequent need for removal. Patients should be warned of this.

  17. Surgical anatomy for pelvic external fixation.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L B; Pohl, A P; Chehade, M J; Malcolm, A M; Howie, D W; Henneberg, M

    2008-10-01

    Pelvic external fixators have a high rate of reported complications, most of which relate to pin placement. In this descriptive study, we analyzed the morphology of the ilium in cadaveric specimens and compared these with the measures obtained from normal human pelvic computer tomograph scans, and how these related to each of the three basic configurations of pin positioning for the external fixation of a pelvis: anterosuperior (Slätis type), anteroinferior (supra-acetabular), and subcristal. The irregular shape and size of the iliac wing and the abdominal wall overlying the pin's insertion site could hinder accurate placement of anterosuperior pins. Potential disadvantages of the use of anteroinferior pins was found related to the deep location of the anterior inferior iliac spine, interference with the hip flexion area, risk of hip joint penetration, and the variable obliquity of the ilium. As subcristal pins are positioned between two superficial bony landmarks of the iliac crest, our findings suggest that they are more likely to have a correct placement and avoid complications.

  18. Versatile microfluidic complement fixation test for disease biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Shi, ZhuanZhuan; Fang, Can; Gao, AnXiu; Li, Chang Ming; Yu, Ling

    2016-04-15

    The complement fixation test (CFT) is a serological test that can be used to detect the presence of specific antibodies or antigens to diagnose infections, particularly diseases caused by microbes that are not easily detected by standard culture methods. We report here, for the first time, a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)/glass slide hybrid microfluidic device that was used to manipulate the solution compartment and communication within the microchannel to establish sampler and indicator systems of CFT. Two types of on-chip CFT, solution-based and solid phase agar-based assays, were successfully demonstrated for biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and recombinant avian influenza A (rH7N9) virus protein detection. In addition, the feasibility of the on-chip CFT in assaying real biopsy was successfully demonstrated by specifically detecting rH7N9 and CEA in human serum. The results demonstrated that the miniaturized assay format significantly reduced the assay time and sample consumption. Exemption from protein immobilization, blocking, complicated washing steps and expensive enzyme/fluorescein conjugates highlights the merits of on-chip CFT over ELISA. Most attractively, the on-chip agar-based CFT results can be imaged and analysed by smartphone, strengthening its point-of-care application potential. We anticipate that the on-chip CFT reported herein will be a useful supplemental or back-up tool for on-chip immunoassays such as ELISA for disease diagnosis and food inspection.

  19. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  20. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.