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Sample records for orthopedic procedures

  1. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopy during orthopedic surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, S.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The use of fluoroscopy has enabled orthopedic surgeons to become technically more proficient. In addition, these surgical procedures tend to have less associated patient morbidity by decreasing operative time and minimizing the area of the operative field. The trade-off, however, may be an increased risk of radiation exposure to the surgeon on an annual or lifetime basis. The current study was designed to determine the amount of radiation received by the primary surgeon and the first assistant during selected surgical procedures involving the use of fluoroscopy. Five body sites exposed to radiation were monitored for dosage. The results of this study indicate that with appropriate usage, (1) radiation exposure from fluoroscopy is relatively low; (2) the surgeon's dominant hand receives the most exposure per case; and (3) proper maintenance and calibration of fluoroscopic machines are important factors in reducing exposure risks. Therefore, with proper precautions, the use of fluoroscopy in orthopedic procedures can remain a safe practice.

  2. Concurrent orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures in pediatric patients with spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Mooney, James F; Glazier, Stephen S; Barfield, William R

    2012-11-01

    The management of pediatric patients with complex spinal deformity often requires both an orthopedic and a neurosurgical intervention. The reasons for multiple subspecialty involvement include, but are not limited to, the presence of a tethered cord requiring release or a syrinx requiring decompression. It has been common practice to perform these procedures in a staged manner, although there is little evidence in the literature to support separate interventions. We reviewed a series of consecutive patients who underwent spinal deformity correction and a neurosurgical intervention concurrently in an attempt to assess the safety, efficacy, and possible complications associated with such an approach. Eleven patients were reviewed who underwent concurrent orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures. Data were collected for patient demographics, preoperative diagnosis, procedures performed, intraoperative and perioperative complications, as well as any unexpected return to the operating room for any reason. Operative notes and anesthesia records were reviewed to determine estimated blood loss, surgical time, and the use of intraoperative neurological monitoring. Patient diagnoses included myelodysplasia (N=6), congenital scoliosis and/or kyphosis (N=4), and scoliosis associated with Noonan syndrome (N=1). Age at the time of surgery averaged 9 years 2 months (range=14 months to 17 years 2 months). Estimated blood loss averaged 605 ml (range=50-3000 ml). The operative time averaged 313 min (range=157-477 min). There were no intraoperative complications, including incidental dural tears or deterioration in preoperative neurological status. One patient developed a sore associated with postoperative cast immobilization that led to a deep wound infection. It appears that concurrent orthopedic and neurosurgical procedures in pediatric patients with significant spinal deformities can be performed safely and with minimal intraoperative and postoperative complications when utilizing

  3. Locus of pain control associated with medication adherence behaviors among patients after an orthopedic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Thaisy Mendes; Machado, Daniele Caferatti; Martins, Rafael Olívio; Galato, Dayani; Piovezan, Anna Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background Locus of pain control (LPC) is characterized by the behavior of people coping with their health problems, as a result of their own actions (internal control) or external factors or other people (external control). This parameter can be associated with medication adherence, in addition to other psychosocial factors that may also influence this behavior. This study was performed to investigate the influence of the LPC on medication adherence in patients undergoing an orthopedic procedure. Subjects and methods We conducted a prospective cohort study on patients who attended an orthopedic clinic for arthroscopy treatment. The patients’ LPC and pain intensity data were obtained on the day of admission through the use of the LPC scale and the visual analog scale (VAS), respectively, both being validated tools. After arthroscopic surgery, the patients received drug prescriptions and were reassessed after 15 days regarding treatment adherence, using the Morisky test. A P-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We assessed 79 individuals from both the internal LPC group (n=35) and external LPC group (n=44) and found that there were no group differences in sex, affected limb, cause of injury, repetitive strain injury, duration of pain, or pain intensity. However, there was a higher proportion of patients in the external LPC group that adhered to the prescribed medication compared with the internal LPC group (P<0.01). Conclusion The results showed that among patients who underwent an orthopedic procedure, there was a higher adherence rate to prescribed medication in the external LPC group compared with the internal LPC group. PMID:25075178

  4. Patient-controlled sedation in orthopedic surgery under regional anesthesia: a new approach in procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Abdulselam; Donmez, Ferah; Taspinar, Vildan; Dikmen, Bayazit

    2013-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is a commonly used technique in orthopedic procedures. Sedation should reduce the patient's anxiety and fear while increasing regional anesthesia quality. This study evaluated the hemodynamic changes, level of sedation, both patients' and surgeons' levels of satisfaction and potential side effects in patient-controlled sedation using propofol. This randomized clinical trial studied sixty ASA physical class I-III patients scheduled for total knee replacement surgery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group P (n = 30) received propofol via a patient-controlled analgesia device with the following settings: intravenous propofol bolus dose 400 μg.kg(-1), 5-minute lockout interval and no basal infusion. In Group S, we infused saline 150 using the same settings. To determine the level of sedation, we used BIS and Observer's Assessment of Alertness/ Sedation Scale. For all patients, we recorded the number of requests. As the fi nal evaluation, we scored surgeons' and patients' satisfaction on 4-point scales. Both BIS values and OAA/S scores were lower in Group P than in Group S. Patients' satisfaction was higher in Group P, although there was no significant difference with respect to surgeons' satisfaction between the groups. The number of requests for sedation was significantly higher in Group S. However, most requests were considered unsuccessful. This study suggests that patient-controlled sedation with propofol can be used efficiently in orthopedic procedures.

  5. Analysis of patient flows for orthopedic procedures using small area analysis in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Matter-Walstra, Klazien; Widmer, Marcel; Busato, André

    2006-01-01

    Background In general cantons regulate and control the Swiss health service system; patient flows within and between cantons are thereby partially disregarded. This paper develops an alternative spatial model, based upon the construction of orthopedic hospital service areas (HSAOs), and introduces indices for the analysis of patient streams in order to identify areas, irrespective of canton, with diverse characteristics, importance, needs, or demands. Methods HSAOs were constructed using orthopedic discharge data. Patient streams between the HSAOs were analysed by calculating three indices: the localization index (% local residents discharged locally), the netindex (the ratio of discharges of nonlocal incoming residents to outgoing local residents), and the market share index (% of local resident discharges of all discharges in local hospitals). Results The 85 orthopedic HSAOs show a median localization index of 60.8%, a market share index of 75.1%, and 30% of HSAOs have a positive netindex. Insurance class of bed, admission type, and patient age are partially but significantly associated with those indicators. A trend to more centrally provided health services can be observed not only in large urban HSAOs such as Geneva, Bern, Basel, and Zurich, but also in HSAOs in mountain sport areas such as Sion, Davos, or St.Moritz. Furthermore, elderly and emergency patients are more frequently treated locally than younger people or those having elective procedures. Conclusion The division of Switzerland into HSAOs provides an alternative spatial model for analysing and describing patient streams for health service utilization. Because this small area model allows more in-depth analysis of patient streams both within and between cantons, it may improve support and planning of resource allocation of in-patient care in the Swiss healthcare system. PMID:16978404

  6. [Interpersonal competence in orthopedics and traumatology : Why technical and procedural skills alone are not sufficient].

    PubMed

    Seemann, R; Münzberg, M; Stange, R; Rüsseler, M; Egerth, M; Bouillon, B; Hoffmann, R; Mutschler, M

    2016-10-01

    Patient safety has increasingly gained significance as criterion which clinics and doctors will be measured against in terms of ethics and finances. The "human factor" moved into focus regarding the question of how to reduce treatment errors in clinical daily routine. Nevertheless, systematic mediation of interpersonal competences only plays a minor role in the catalogue of requirements for medical specialization and professional training. This is the case not only in orthopedics and traumatology, but in other medical fields as well. At the insistence of DGOU and in cooperation with Lufthansa Flight Training, a training model was initiated, comparable to training models used in aviation. In aviation, apart from the training of procedural and technical abilities, regular soft skills training has become standard in the training of all Lufthansa staff. Several studies confirm that by improving communication, interaction, and teamwork skills not only a reduction of intolerable incidents is observed, but also a positive economic effect. Interpersonal competences should be firmly anchored in orthopedics and traumatology and thus be implemented as third post in specialist training.

  7. [Importance of computer-based procedures. Planning and documentation in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Basad, E

    1999-03-01

    The demand for efficiency in OR management and increase in the necessity of surgical documentation require the use of software applications in hospitals. A client-server based OP-planning and documentation system has been in use in the department of orthopedic surgery in Giessen University since 1992 and is being continuously further developed. Aside from the lawful requirements, the demands of clinical doctors have been especially considered. The main functions are management of non medical patient data, scheduling and documentation of operations with coding of diagnoses and therapy, tissue banking, implant inventory, on call scheduling, storage of medical video images, clinical word processing and e-mail. With an integrated web-server, MedXS has the capabilities to offer functions accessible over any webbrowser (Netscape, Internet-Explorer) in the internet or intranet. Through the usage of this application clinical procedures could be more efficiently realized and better agreeing positions with the insurance companies could be reached.

  8. Contact Dermatitis Reaction to 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate Following 3 Orthopedic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lake, Nicholas H; Barlow, Brian T; Toledano, James E; Valentine, Johannah; McDonald, Lucas S

    2017-09-21

    Two-octyl cyanoacrylate is a popular skin adhesive used for closing surgical incisions. Since Food and Drug Administration approval in 1998, the few reports of adverse reactions following its use have primarily been limited to the nonorthopedic literature. The authors present a case series of contact dermatitis associated with 2-octyl cyanoacrylate following orthopedic surgery and a review of the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of this complication. All 3 patients presented with blistering around their incisions within 2 weeks of surgery and responded to treatment involving removal of the offending agent and use of oral diphenhydramine and hydroxyzine and topical triamcinolone. One case was complicated by a draining hematoma, requiring irrigation and debridement. Complete resolution occurred in all cases. This case series is intended to increase awareness in the orthopedic community of allergic contact dermatitis to 2-octyl cyanoacrylate and its appropriate treatment. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert F; Mooney, James F

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biologic devices or products used in orthopedic surgery to augment or enhance bone formation. The use of orthobiologics in pediatric orthopedics is less frequent than in other orthopedic subspecialties, mainly due to the naturally abundant healing potential and bone formation in children compared with adults. However, orthobiologics are used in certain situations in pediatric orthopedics, particularly in spine and foot surgery. Other uses have been reported in conjunction with specific procedures involving the tibia and pelvis. The use of bioabsorable implants to stabilize children's fractures is an emerging concept but has limited supporting data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Procedural sedation combined with locoregional anesthesia for orthopedic surgery of the pelvic limb in 10 dogs: case series.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Luis; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Ludders, John W; Gleed, Robin D

    2012-07-01

    Ten dogs weighing 36 (21.4-75) kg [median (min-max)] and aged 3 (1-9) years scheduled for orthopedic surgery involving the stifle and structures distal to it. Patients were classified as ASA I or II based on physical examination and basic hematology and biochemistry. Each dog was managed using combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks and procedural sedation with an intravenous infusion of propofol (0.07-0.15 mg kg(-1) minute(-1)) and dexmedetomidine (1 μg kg(-1) hour(-1)). None of the patients required conversion to general anesthesia as a result of response to surgical stimulation. The level of sedation was considered adequate in all patients and was characterized by occasional head lifting, thoracic limb stretching, yawning, lingual movements and swallowing. The eye position ranged from central to partial ventromedial rotation and was accompanied by spontaneous blinking. Intra-operative cardiovascular and ventilatory variables were considered within acceptable limits. Muscle relaxation at the surgical field was adequate and surgical conditions were indistinguishable from those produced by general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, no additional analgesics were considered necessary. The quality of the recoveries was considered excellent in all cases. No additional pain relief was required in any of the dogs within the 10 hours following blockade. All dogs ate 5.5 (3.5-12) hours after recovery. Ambulation occurred at 4 (2-6) hours. No evidence of esophagitis or aspiration pneumonitis has been reported during a period of 1 year after the procedures in any of the dogs. When combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks, procedural sedation has the potential of being an alternative to general anesthesia for orthopedic surgery involving the stifle and structures distal to it in the dog. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  11. Regional anesthesia or patient-controlled analgesia and compartment syndrome in orthopedic surgical procedures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Elizabeth BS; Maleki, Ana Hosseinzadeh; Jahromi, Leila; Hermecz, Brittany Nelson; Nelson, Lauren E; Vetter, Imelda L; Evenhuis, Spencer; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature on the use of regional anesthesia (RA) and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was conducted in patients who require orthopedic extremity procedures to determine whether either analgesic technique contributes to a delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome (CS). A total of 34 relevant articles (28 case reports and six research articles) were identified. Of all case report articles published after 2009, the majority (75%) concluded that RA does not put the patient at an increased risk of a delayed diagnosis of CS. Of these, only two relevant prospective research studies focusing on RA or PCA and their relationship to CS were identified. Neither study resulted in any cases of CS. However, both had relatively small sample sizes. Given the lack of evidence identified in this systematic review, prospective studies or large-scale retrospective data reviews are needed to more strongly advocate the use of one modality of analgesia over the other in this patient population. PMID:27785097

  12. Rabbit orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rich, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery in rabbits poses several unique parameters for the veterinary surgeon. It is imperative for the veterinarian to be knowledgeable about the anatomic features of the surgical repair site and to become familiar with a rabbit's pain and discomfort often associated with orthopedic injuries. Handling the perioperative and postoperative pain and potential GI disturbances are crucial for a successful outcome of the surgical case. This article is designed to help the veterinary surgeon prepare for the orthopedic surgical procedure and the peripheral physiologic needs of the rabbit from presentation through recovery.

  13. Anesthetic and recovery profiles of lidocaine versus mepivacaine for spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing outpatient orthopedic arthroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Julius; Orr, Kevin; Kim, Ku-Mie; Pappas, Ana Lucia; Sukhani, Radha; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-03-01

    To compare isobaric lidocaine and mepivacaine in outpatient arthroscopic surgery. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Ambulatory surgery center affiliated with an academic tertiary-care hospital. 84 adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 ambulatory patients, age 18-70 years, undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. Patients were randomized to receive a combination spinal-epidural anesthetic using 80 mg of either isobaric 2% mepivacaine or isobaric 2% lidocaine. Patients also received a femoral 3-in-1 block with 0.5% bupivacaine applied to the affected extremity. Demographic data and level and duration of the block were recorded. The use of supplemental epidural anesthesia was noted along with frequency of bradycardia, hypotension, and episodes of nausea and vomiting. Duration of block and times to ambulation and voiding were recorded. Delayed variables, including fatigue, difficulty urinating, back pain, and transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) were obtained. No demographic differences were noted between groups, and surgical duration was similar. Satisfactory anesthesia was achieved in all cases, with no differences noted in hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, or vomiting. Onset of sensory and motor block was similar. Duration of block before epidural supplementation was 94 ± 21 minutes with lidocaine versus 122 ± 23 minutes for mepivacaine (P < 0.011). Times to ambulation and voiding were longer in patients receiving mepivacaine but did not affect PACU stay. Twenty-four and 48-hour recovery was similar with no TNS symptoms reported. No major differences were noted between lidocaine and mepivacaine spinal anesthesia. Time to ambulation and voiding were longer in patients who received mepivacaine as was time to first dose of epidural catheter. Neither group had TNS symptoms. Lidocaine and mepivacaine are both appropriate spinal anesthetics for ambulatory orthopedic lower extremity procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Orthopedic evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, T.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical performance of the Lixiscope in orthopedics was compared with routine radiography. Portability and size were the major advantages of the Lixiscope. The main disadvantage at this point in time was the Lixiscope's inability to study large areas.

  15. Orthopedic services

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Orthopedic services URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  16. Evaluation of platelet function using PFA-100® in patients treated with Acetylsalicylic acid and qualified for Trauma and Orthopedic surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Kurak, J; Zając, P; Czyżewski, D; Kucharski, R; Grzanka, R; Kasperska-Zajac, A; Koczy, B

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenon of high on-acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment platelet (PLT) reactivity - HATPR - and its clinical implications have not been fully understood. Little data is available on assessing PLT activity based on the severity of intra- and postoperative bleeding in a population of orthopedic patients with normal closure time (CT) measured by a PLT function analyzer PFA-100®, despite being given long-term ASA therapy. The aim is to assess PLT function using PFA-100® in patients with ASA therapy and qualified for trauma and orthopedic surgery procedures. The retrospective analysis covered 384 patients whose PLT reactivity was assessed using PFA-100®. Out of those, 198 had been taking ASA with a 75 mg dose until hospital admission. In addition, a group of 70 patients with a proximal femoral fracture surgically treated using the dynamic hip screw (DHS) was selected, in whom severity of bleeding was assessed by HIP ASA (+). The reference group comprised 52 patients (without ASA therapy) who were operated on due to the same indications. Normal CT was found in 37% of ASA-receiving patients. Patients with normal CT, despite ASA therapy, exhibited significantly more intense bleeding after DHS surgery. A similar number of patients required red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion in HIP ASA (+) and HIP ASA (-). Increased risk of complications in HIP ASA (+) group was not found.

  17. Effect of a heat and moisture exchanger on heat loss in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing single-limb orthopedic procedures.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Brainard, Benjamin M; Braun, Christina; Figueiredo, Juliana P

    2011-12-15

    To determine whether a heat and moisture exchange device (HME) prevents a decrease in body temperature in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs undergoing orthopedic procedures. Blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. 60 privately owned dogs weighing at least 15 kg (33 lb). Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (n = 20/group): HME placed immediately after anesthetic induction with isoflurane, after transfer to the operating room, or not at all. The device consisted of a hygroscopic filter placed between the endotracheal tube and the Y piece of the anesthesia circuit. Each dog was positioned on a circulating warm water blanket and had a forced-air warming blanket placed over its body. Body temperature was monitored after transfer to the operating room with a probe placed in the thoracic aspect of the esophagus. Study groups did not differ significantly with respect to body weight, body condition score, reproductive status, breed, surgical procedure, preoperative sedative and opioid administration, anesthetic induction drug, local nerve block technique, or operating room assignment. There were no significant differences among groups in esophageal temperature variables, interval between anesthetic induction and surgery, surgery duration, anesthesia duration, or oxygen flow rate. However, the relationship between temperature delta and body weight was significant and relevant (R(2) = 0.23), as was the association between temperature nadir and body weight (R(2)= 0.10). As body weight increased, the temperature delta decreased and temperature nadir increased. No other significant relationships were identified. Inclusion of an HME in healthy dogs undergoing anesthesia for an elective orthopedic surgery did not facilitate maintenance of body temperature throughout the procedure.

  18. Assessment of cleft lip and palate patients treated with presurgical orthopedic correction and either primary bone grafts, gingivoperiosteoplasty, or without alveolar grafting procedures.

    PubMed

    Grisius, Thomas M; Spolyar, John; Jackson, Ian T; Bello-Rojas, Gustavo; Dajani, Khaled

    2006-05-01

    The effects of alveolar grafting on the development of the craniofacial complex have been reported by numerous investigators. The reported results vary in the literature from significant to very little impediment of maxillary growth. The present work evaluates and compares facial form at age six years in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate patients treated with presurgical orthopedic correction and primary reconstruction with (1) primary bone grafts (n = 14), (2) gingivoperiosteoplasty (n = II), or (3) without alveolar grafting procedures at the time of lip repair (n = 13). The cohort groups were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOV A). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the three groups for only one of the 12 parameters analyzed. The primary bone grafted group demonstrated less vertical descent-of the anterior maxilla compared to the gingivoperiosteoplasty and non-grafted groups (P = .0027).

  19. Patient out-of-pocket expenses in major orthopedic procedures: total hip arthroplasty as a case study.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Daniel E; Mauerhan, David R; Masonis, John L; Heath, Jessica

    2008-06-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful procedure for improving quality of life. There are few publications regarding out-of-pocket expenses incurred by individuals undergoing uncomplicated THA. Detailed billing and record reviews and patient phone surveys were conducted on 34 Medicare patients identifying charges and reimbursements recorded by the health care system and all out-of-pocket expenses incurred by patients undergoing uncomplicated THA (diagnostic related group [DRG] 209/current procedural terminology [CPT] 27130). Mean THA total billed charges were $46378, 89% of that from inpatient hospitalization and 5% incurred preoperatively and 7% postoperatively. Medicare reimbursement was $14647, supplemental reimbursement was $744, and patients paid a mean out-of-pocket expense of $758 (95% CI, 614-904; range, 102-1889). Our study supports the policy that THA remains an excellent value to both the patient and society.

  20. Treatment of severe orthopedic infections.

    PubMed

    Dernell, W S

    1999-09-01

    Severe infections are uncommon following orthopedic surgery, yet they can be frustrating for the veterinarian and owner to treat and can result in devastating consequences for the patient. This article reviews the common causes for postoperative infection, reviews established treatment, and introduces newer methods for treatment and control. A thorough understanding of the pathogenesis, application of appropriate diagnostic procedures, the institution of aggressive treatment regimens, with adherence to established principles, will often result in satisfactory outcomes even with severe orthopedic infections. For those more refractory to treatment, the use of newer treatment methods, specifically locally implantable materials for sustained release of antimicrobials can improve success in the treatment of these more difficult cases.

  1. Damage Control Orthopedics Management as Vital Procedure in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fractures Complicated with Chronic Renal Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenhui; Wang, Yunjiao; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Siyu; Du, Quanyin; Wang, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes to hip fractures in elderly patients, with high subsequent mortality. Selection and timing of the surgical procedure of such patients is a serious challenge. Many clinicians believe in earlier surgery as preferable and providing better outcomes. Damage control orthopedics (DCO) aids to adjust and optimize the overall condition of patients. Methods In 32 patients with femoral neck fractures complicated with CRF, we evaluated how the timing of the surgery determines the mortality rates if the DCO approach is applied. Preoperative ASA grading, POSSUM score, P-POSSUM score and DCO were carried out. Based on the assessment, timing of the surgery was ascertained. Results Of a total of 32 patients, twenty-nine patients were accepted for either early (< 48 hours; n = 18) or delayed (3–10 days; n = 10) surgery. Hip arthroplasty (total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty) was the principal surgery option. All patients survived operation and were followed up postoperatively with the average time of 30 days. Postoperative complications tended to occur at higher rates in the early vs. delayed surgery group (7/18 vs. 5/10). During follow up, a total of 3 patients died in both groups (2/18 in the early surgery and 1/10 in the delayed surgery group), mostly from multi-organ failures and acute respiratory distress syndrome. There was no significant difference in complication rates and Harris hip score between both groups. Conclusion In patients with femoral neck fracture complicated with CRF, delaying the surgery for several days does not increase the incidence of postoperative adverse events. PMID:27149117

  2. [Psychosomatic aspects in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Köllner, V; Rupp, S

    2012-02-01

    Psychosomatic disease patterns are a common differential diagnosis for orthopedic symptoms. Furthermore, mental factors, such as the method of disease processing or mental comorbidities, such as depression or somatization disorders have a great influence on the chronification of orthopedic complaints and the outcome following orthopedic interventions. The aim of this article is to present the psychosomatic pathomechanisms and disease patterns relevant for orthopedics and to derive recommendations for physician-patient communication, diagnostics, therapy and assessment.

  3. Advances in regenerative orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2013-11-01

    Orthopedic injuries are common and a source of much misery and economic stress. Several relevant tissues, such as cartilage, meniscus, and intra-articular ligaments, do not heal. And even bone, which normally regenerates spontaneously, can fail to mend. The regeneration of orthopedic tissues requires 4 key components: cells, morphogenetic signals, scaffolds, and an appropriate mechanical environment. Although differentiated cells from the tissue in question can be used, most cellular research focuses on the use of mesenchymal stem cells. These can be retrieved from many different tissues, and one unresolved question is the degree to which the origin of the cells matters. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are also under investigation. Morphogenetic signals are most frequently supplied by individual recombinant growth factors or native mixtures provided by, for example, platelet-rich plasma; mesenchymal stem cells are also a rich source of trophic factors. Obstacles to the sustained delivery of individual growth factors can be addressed by gene transfer or smart scaffolds, but we still lack detailed, necessary information on which delivery profiles are needed. Scaffolds may be based on natural products, synthetic materials, or devitalized extracellular matrix. Strategies to combine these components to regenerate tissue can follow traditional tissue engineering practices, but these are costly, cumbersome, and not well suited to treating large numbers of individuals. More expeditious approaches make full use of intrinsic biological processes in vivo to avoid the need for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells and multiple procedures. Clinical translation remains a bottleneck. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Injectable biodegradable materials for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-12-01

    The large number of orthopedic procedures performed each year, including many performed arthroscopically, have led to great interest in injectable biodegradable materials for regeneration of bone and cartilage. A variety of materials have been developed for these applications, including ceramics, naturally derived substances and synthetic polymers. These materials demonstrate overall biocompatibility and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as promote tissue formation, thus providing an important step towards minimally invasive orthopedic procedures. This review provides a comparison of these materials based on mechanical properties, biocompatibility and regeneration efficacy. Advantages and disadvantages of each material are explained and design criteria for injectable biodegradable systems are provided.

  5. Greening of orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rushyuan J; Mears, Simon C

    2012-06-01

    Every year, 4 billion pounds of waste are produced by health care facilities, and the amount continues to increase annually. In response, a movement toward greening health care has been building, with a particular focus on the operating room. Between 20% and 70% of health care waste originates from a hospital's operating room, and up to 90% of operating room waste is improperly sorted and sent for costly and unneeded hazardous waste processing. Recent successful changes include segregation of hospital waste, substitution of the ubiquitous polypropylene plastic wrap used for the sterilization and handling of surgical equipment with metal cases, and the reintroduction of reusable surgical gowns. Orthopedic-related changes include the successful reprocessing and reuse of external fixators, shavers, blades, burs, and tourniquets. These changes have been shown to be environmentally and economically beneficial. Early review indicates that these changes are feasible, but a need exists for further evaluation of the effect on the operating room and flow of the surgical procedure and of the risks to the surgeons and operating room staff. Other key considerations are the effects of reprocessed and reused equipment on patient care and outcome and the role of surgeons in helping patients make informed decisions regarding surgical care. The goals of this study were to summarize the amount and types of waste produced in hospitals and operating rooms, highlight the methods of disposal used, review disposal methods that have been developed to reduce waste and improve recycling, and explore future developments in greening health care.

  6. Nanotechnology in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Roja; Eltorai, Adam E M

    2017-03-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized science and consumer products for several decades. Most recently, its applications to the fields of medicine and biology have improved drug delivery, medical diagnostics, and manufacturing. Recent research of this modern technology has demonstrated its potential with novel forms of disease detection and intervention, particularly within orthopedics. Nanomedicine has transformed orthopedics through recent advances in bone tissue engineering, implantable materials, diagnosis and therapeutics, and surface adhesives. The potential for nanotechnology within the field of orthopedics is vast and much of it appears to be untapped, though not without accompanying obstacles.

  7. [Thermoformed orthopedic splints].

    PubMed

    Amoric, M

    1990-12-01

    Initially used to make simple splints, thermoforming has led to the development of a new means of application of orthopedic forces. Here we have presented splints which allow the treatment of Class III, Class II and cases of endomaxillitis.

  8. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Diagnosis and Orthopedic Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Matthew G.; Meaike, Jesse D.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic hardware infections are much feared and costly complications that can occur when these devices are implemented both in traumatic cases as well as in joint replacement surgery. Because these infections can lead to great morbidity, it is important to understand their pathophysiology as well as the principles behind their diagnosis and initial treatment. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted as part of a multidisciplinary team to provide stable soft tissue coverage of the associated defects that result from these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify the potential causes of these infections, to provide established diagnostic criteria guidelines, and to explain how these prosthetic infections are managed from an orthopedic surgery perspective prior to consulting the plastic surgery team. PMID:27152098

  9. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Influence of orthopedic reinforced gloves versus double standard gloves on contamination events during small animal orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Galina; Singh, Ameet; Gibson, Tom; Moens, Noel; Oblak, Michelle; Ogilvie, Adam; Reynolds, Debbie

    2017-07-08

    To determine the influence of orthopedic reinforced gloves on contamination events during small animal orthopedic surgery. Prospective randomized controlled trial SAMPLE POPULATION: Two hundred and thirty-seven pairs of orthopedic gloves (474 gloves) and 203 pairs of double standard gloves (812 gloves) worn during 193 orthopedic procedures. Primary and assistant surgeons were randomized to wear either orthopedic reinforced gloves or double gloves. Gloves were leak tested to identify perforations at the end of procedures. Perforations detected intraoperatively or postoperatively were recorded. A contamination event was defined as at least one perforation on either hand for orthopedic reinforced gloves, or a perforation of both the inner and outer glove on the same hand for double gloves. Baseline characteristics between the 2 intervention groups were similar. There was no difference in contamination events between the double-gloved and orthopedic gloved groups (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.49-1.87, P = .89). The same percentage of contamination events (8% glove pairs used) occurred in the double gloved group (17 contamination events) and in the orthopedic gloved group (19 contamination events). The odds of a contamination event increased by 1.02 (95% CI 1.01-1.03, P < .001) with each additional minute of surgery. Orthopedic reinforced gloves and double standard gloving were equally effective at preventing contamination events in small animal orthopedic procedures. Surgeons reluctant to double glove due to perceptions of decreased dexterity and discomfort may safely opt for wearing orthopedic gloves, which may improve their compliance. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AMONG THE ELDERLY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sitta, Maria do Carmo; Toledo, Manuella; da Silva Henriques, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Care for elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, particularly for those requiring emergency surgery, needs to take into account an analysis of physical capacity and risks specific to elderly individuals, in an attempt to reduce the risks. Nevertheless, these remain high in this group. Despite the risks, procedures developed promptly have a positive effect on these patients’ evolution. Coordinated care, composed of teams of specialists within clinical medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics, anesthesiology and critical care, along with other healthcare professionals, may be highly beneficial for this group of patients. PMID:27027017

  12. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  13. Blood utilization in orthopedic and trauma practice

    PubMed Central

    Tayara, Bader Kamal; Al-Faraidy, Moaad Hatim; Al-Sayel, Faisal Abdullah; Al-Omran, Abdallah S; Sadat-Ali, Mir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Very little is known about blood utilization in orthopedic and trauma surgery and there is no definite policy in this regard. Our objective is to perform an audit on our practice of blood utilization in the orthopedic department. Methods: We have retrospectively analyzed the data of patients who were admitted between January 2011 and December 2012 to the orthopedic male, female and pediatric wards for which blood products were requested. Results: Three hundred and eight patients were admitted for surgery during the study period. The average age was 35.12 ± 20.4 years and postsurgery they stayed in the hospital for 25.60 ± 10.5 days. Blood products were requested for 223 trauma surgeries. In elective orthopedic procedures, only 42.78% of the blood requested was utilized while in trauma patients it was 55.25%. Conclusions: A substantial amount of blood and its product was used in trauma and elective orthopedic surgeries. There was a major discrepancy between the blood requested and utilized and secondly in the majority single unit transfusion was utilized, which is not within the fundamentals of blood transfusion. PMID:26097818

  14. Lasers in orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherk, Henry H.; Rhodes, Anthony L.; Meller, Menachem M.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedic Surgery is that surgical discipline which deals with the musculoskeletal system. Orthopedists therefore operate on joints, the spine and long bones and engage in such subsecialities as sports medicine, hand surgery, trauma surgery, and joint replacements. Since they must cut and shape bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament, orthopedists have developed a number of mechanical techniques to achieve these ends and surgical lasers have found few applications in orthopedics because until now they have not been useful for cutting bone. In the past several years, however, there has been considerable interest in several areas within the field of orthopedic surgery that do not entail actual bone surgery and it is expected that as newer and more powerful lasers become available laser osteotomy may become feasible and even routine.

  15. Orthopedic management in myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Karol, L A

    1995-04-01

    Paralysis, muscle imbalance, and spasticity resulting from myelomeningocele produce orthopedic deformities that often require surgical correction. Spinal deformities in myelomeningocele are nearly universal, and are difficult to treat because of the absence of posterior elements. Hip dislocations frequently occur, but rarely require treatment. Severe foot deformities are seen in up to 80% of children.

  16. Medical Issues: Orthopedics

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us News Facebook Twitter YouTube Learn About SMA About SMA Types of SMA Causes & Diagnosis Genetics Testing Carriers What Diagnosis Means ... Care Packages Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily ...

  17. Economic analysis of athletic team coverage by an orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Nicholas; Freedman, Kevin; Tucker, Brad; Austin, Luke; Eck, Brandon; Pepe, Matt; Tjoumakaris, Fotios

    2015-11-01

    Coverage of high school football by orthopedic sports medicine specialists is considered standard of care in many localities. Determining the economic viability of this endeavor has never been investigated. The primary purpose of the present investigation was to perform an economic analysis of local high school sports coverage by an orthopedic sports medicine practice. From January 2010 to June 2012, a prospective injury report database was used to collect sports injuries from five high school athletic programs covered by a single, private orthopedic sports medicine practice. Patients referred for orthopedic care were then tracked to determine expected cost of care (potential revenue). Evaluation and management codes and current procedure terminology codes were obtained to determine the value of physician visits and surgical care rendered. Overhead costs were calculated based on historical rates within our practice and incorporated to determine estimated profit. 19,165 athletic trainer contacts with athletes playing all sports, including both those 'on-field' and in the training room, resulted in 473 (2.5%) physician referrals. The covering orthopedic practice handled 89 (27.9%) of the orthopedic referrals. Of orthopedic physician referrals, 26 (5.4%) required orthopedic surgical treatment. The covering team practice handled 17/26 (65%) surgical cases. The total revenue collected by the covering team practice was $26,226.14. The overhead cost of treatment was $9441.41. Overall estimated profit of orthopedic visits and treatment during this period for the covering practice was $16,784.73. The covering team practice handled 28% of the orthopedic referrals, 65% of the surgical cases and captured 59% of the potential profit. An increase in physician referrals could increase the benefit for orthopedic surgeons.

  18. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction.

  19. Orthopedic trauma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pratik; Suk, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Trauma sustained during pregnancy can trigger uncertainty and anxiety for patient and orthopedic surgeon alike. In particular, orthopedic-related injuries raise concerns about preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative care. In this article, we review common concerns about radiation exposure, leukemia, pain management, anticoagulation, and anesthesia. One finding is that radiation risk is minimal when obtaining x-rays for operative planning, provided that the cumulative dose is within 5 rad. We also address safety concerns about patient positioning and staff radiation exposure. In addition, we found that most anesthetics used in pregnancy are category C (ie, safe). Perioperative opioid use for pain management is recommended with little risk. Regarding anticoagulation, low-molecular-weight heparin and fondaparinux are the safest choices. Last, pregnancy is not a contraindication to operative management of pelvic and acetabular fractures.

  20. Imaging near orthopedic hardware.

    PubMed

    Koff, Matthew F; Burge, Alissa J; Koch, Kevin M; Potter, Hollis G

    2017-07-01

    Over one million total joint replacement surgeries were performed in the US in 2013 alone, and this number is expected to more than double by 2030. Traditional imaging techniques for postoperative evaluation of implanted devices, such as radiography, computerized tomography, or ultrasound, utilize ionizing radiation, suffer from beam hardening artifact, or lack the inherent high contrast necessary to adequately evaluate soft tissues around the implants, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to its ability to generate multiplanar, high-contrast images without the use of ionizing radiation is ideal for evaluating periprosthetic soft tissues but has traditionally suffered from in-plane and through-plane data misregistration due to the magnetic susceptibility of implanted materials. A recent renaissance in the interest of imaging near arthroplasty and implanted orthopedic hardware has led to the development of new techniques that help to mitigate the effects of magnetic susceptibility. This article describes the challenges of performing imaging near implanted orthopedic hardware, how to generate clinically interpretable images when imaging near implanted devices, and how the images may be interpreted for clinical use. We will also describe current developments of utilizing MRI to evaluate implanted orthopedic hardware. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:24-39. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Engineering Orthopedic Tissue Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    While a wide variety of approaches to engineering orthopedic tissues have been proposed, less attention has been paid to the interfaces, the specialized areas that connect two tissues of different biochemical and mechanical properties. The interface tissue plays an important role in transitioning mechanical load between disparate tissues. Thus, the relatively new field of interfacial tissue engineering presents new challenges—to not only consider the regeneration of individual orthopedic tissues, but also to design the biochemical and cellular composition of the linking tissue. Approaches to interfacial tissue engineering may be distinguished based on if the goal is to recreate the interface itself, or generate an entire integrated tissue unit (such as an osteochondral plug). As background for future efforts in engineering orthopedic interfaces, a brief review of the biology and mechanics of each interface (cartilage–bone, ligament–bone, meniscus–bone, and muscle–tendon) is presented, followed by an overview of the state-of-the-art in engineering each tissue, including advances and challenges specific to regenerating the interfaces. PMID:19231983

  2. Sarcopenia in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bokshan, Steven L; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly that is an independent risk factor for falls, disability, postoperative complications, and mortality. Although its cause is not completely understood, sarcopenia generally results from a complex bone-muscle interaction in the setting of chronic disease and aging. Sarcopenia cannot be diagnosed by muscle mass alone. Diagnosis requires 2 of the following 3 criteria: low skeletal muscle mass, inadequate muscle strength, and inadequate physical performance. Forty-four percent of elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% of all patients 65 to 70 years old are sarcopenic. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis may be used to measure sarcopenia and are relatively inexpensive and accessible, they are generally considered less specific for sarcopenia compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcopenia has been shown to predict poor outcomes within the medical and surgical populations and has been directly correlated with increases in taxpayer costs. Strengthening therapy and nutritional supplementation have become the mainstays of sarcopenia treatment. Specifically, the American Medical Directors Association has released guidelines for nutritional supplementation. Although sarcopenia frequently occurs with osteoporosis, it is an independent predictor of fragility fractures. Initiatives to diagnose, treat, and prevent sarcopenia in orthopedic patients are needed. Further investigation must also explore sarcopenia as a predictor of surgical outcomes in orthopedic patients.

  3. Endovascular repair of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm after orthopedic surgery with balloon-expandable covered stents.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Mohammad H; Silvia, Brian A

    2008-01-01

    Arterial injury after orthopedic procedures is an uncommon complication that can present clinically in a variety of forms and has conventionally been repaired by open vascular surgery. The case and discussion in this article highlights the usefulness of endovascular repair following a delayed presentation of vascular injury from an orthopedic procedure.

  4. Orthopedic Implant Waste: Analysis and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Payne, Ashley; Slover, James; Inneh, Ifeoma; Hutzler, Lorraine; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The steadily increasing demand for orthopedic surgeries and declining rates of reimbursement by Medicare and other insurance providers have led many hospitals to look for ways to control the cost of these surgeries. We reviewed administrative records for a 1-year period and recorded total number of surgical cases, number of cases in which an implant was wasted, and cost of each wasted implant. We determined cost incurred because of implant waste, percentage of cases that involved waste, percentage of total implant cost wasted, and average cost of waste per case. We then analyzed the data to determine if case volume or years in surgical practice affected amount of implant waste. Results showed implant waste represents a significant cost for orthopedic procedures within all subspecialties and is an important factor to consider when developing cost-reduction strategies.

  5. Radiology of orthopedic procedures, problems and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Gelman, M.I.; Saunders, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work is volume 24 in a series on clinical radiology. Eight sections cover fractures in general, thoracolumbar spine, upper extremities, hand and wrist, trauma to pelvis, hip and femur, knee and lower leg, and ankle and foot. These sections vary from 15 to 36 pages and contain adequate text, 18 to 54 x-ray films per section, and appropriate references (306 in sum). There are 275 radiographs, most of which are well printed, some with accompanying line sketches.

  6. Orthopedic Injury in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Gilad A; George, James W

    2016-09-01

    There are many reasons why a woman's pregnancy can put her at risk for orthopedic pain and injury. Given the high percentage of pregnant patients experiencing some degree of musculoskeletal pain, it is surprising that this is not an area of wider study. This chapter takes an evidence based approach to help the reader understand the implications of the numerous anatomic and physiologic changes associated with the gravid state, and how they act to promote both discomfort and injury. One-third of pregnant women in America are obese, further increasing risk. Exercise in most pregnancies is recommended and regarded as safe and thus obstetric care providers need to understand risk, diagnostic techniques and treatments.

  7. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  8. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  9. The Current Perspectives of Stem Cell Therapy in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akpancar, Serkan; Tatar, Oner; Turgut, Hasan; Akyildiz, Faruk; Ekinci, Safak

    2016-01-01

    Context Musculoskeletal injuries may be painful, troublesome, life limiting and also one of the global health problems. There has been considerable amount of interest during the past two decades to stem cells and tissue engineering techniques in orthopedic surgery, especially to manage special and compulsive injuries within the musculoskeletal system. Evidence Acquisition The aim of this study was to present a literature review regarding the most recent progress in stem cell procedures and current indications in orthopedics clinical care practice. The Medline and PubMed library databases were searched for the articles related with stem cell procedures in the field of orthopedic surgery and additionally the reference list of each article was also included to provide a comprehensive evaluation. Results Various sources of stem cells have been studied for orthopedics clinical care practice. Stem cell therapy has successfully used for major orthopedic procedures in terms of bone-joint injuries (fractures-bone defects, nonunion, and spinal injuries), osteoarthritis-cartilage defects, ligament-tendon injuries, femoral head osteonecrosis and osteogenesis imperfecta. Stem cells have also used in bone tissue engineering in combining with the scaffolds and provided faster and better healing of tissues. Conclusions Large amounts of preclinical studies have been made of stem cells and there is an increasing interest to perform these studies within the human population but preclinical studies are insufficient; therefore, much more and efficient studies should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stem cells. PMID:28144608

  10. Orthopedic surgery and its complication in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-systemic immune-complex mediated autoimmune condition which chiefly affects women during their prime year. While the management of the condition falls into the specialty of internal medicine, patients with SLE often present with signs and symptoms pertaining to the territory of orthopedic surgery such as tendon rupture, carpal tunnel syndrome, osteonecrosis, osteoporotic fracture and infection including septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and spondylodiscitis. While these orthopedic-related conditions are often debilitating in patients with SLE which necessitate management by orthopedic specialists, a high index of suspicion is necessary in diagnosing these conditions early because lupus patients with potentially severe orthopedic conditions such as osteomyelitis frequently present with mild symptoms and subtle signs such as low grade fever, mild hip pain and back tenderness. Additionally, even if these orthopedic conditions can be recognized, complications as a result of surgical procedures are indeed not uncommon. SLE per se and its various associated pharmacological treatments may pose lupus patients to certain surgical risks if they are not properly attended to and managed prior to, during and after surgery. Concerted effort of management and effective communication among orthopedic specialists and rheumatologists play an integral part in enhancing favorable outcome and reduction in postoperative complications for patients with SLE through thorough pre-operative evaluation, careful peri-operative monitoring and treatment, as well as judicious postoperative care. PMID:24653977

  11. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  12. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. Purpose This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Methods Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. Results In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Conclusions Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established. PMID:24708703

  13. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Metin; Bülbül, Murat; Toker, Serdar; Beksaç, Burak; Kara, Adnan

    2014-04-05

    Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established.

  14. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result.

  15. Interpretation by radiologists of orthopedic total joint radiographs: Is it necessary or cost-effective?

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, K. Naresh K.; Rorabeck, Cecil H.; Bourne, Robert B.; Mulliken, Brian; Robinson, Eric

    1996-01-01

    Objective To examine the necessity and cost-effectiveness of interpretation by radiologists of orthopedic radiographs obtained for patients who undergo total hip or knee replacement. Design A prospective study. Serial preoperative and postoperative x-ray films of the joint in patients scheduled to undergo total hip or knee joint replacement during one calendar year were interpreted by both radiology and orthopedic department staff and compared. Intraoperative findings were used to confirm the radiologic interpretation. The follow-up was 1 year. Setting A university teaching hospital. Interventions Primary or revision total hip or knee replacement. Main Outcome Measures Differences in interpretation of radiographs by radiologists and orthopedic surgeons for any of the four procedures. A change in orthopedic management. Results For preoperative radiographs, there were no discrepancies between the radiologists and orthopedic surgeons with respect to primary joint replacement. For 100 revision procedures there were 15 discrepancies, but in all cases the orthopedic surgeon’s interpretation proved to be correct. For the postoperative radiographs, there were no discrepancies in the group of revision hip replacements. For the other three groups there were a total of six discrepancies and in all cases the orthopedic surgeon’s interpretation was correct. In two cases conditions were present that were not recognized by staff from either the radiology department or orthopedic department. Conclusion Interpretation by radiologists of total joint radiographs in patients who undergo primary or revision total hip or knee replacement arthroplasty is not necessary or cost-effective. PMID:8857988

  16. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  17. [Orthopedic aspects of Rett syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, A

    1993-04-01

    Rett syndrome is a degenerative neurological disorder with onset between 6 and 18 months of age. Severity of motor impairment is variable; some patients lose the ability to walk whereas others walk nearly normally. Orthopedic problems, which mainly involve the lower limbs and spine, can increase functional impairment and cause discomfort. Abnormal joint alignment in the lower limbs due to muscle contractures requires physiotherapy and orthopedic appliances. Surgery may be necessary, in particular to prevent dislocation of the hip or to correct talipes equinus. Scoliosis is common and unresponsive to conservative therapy and should be treated surgically if severe.

  18. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN OPHTHALMOLOGY AND ORTHOPEDICS.

    PubMed

    Cazac, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Although orthopedics and ophthalmology seem to be two different medical specialties, numerous studies that have been conducted in the past 35 years have shown a tight connection between several ocular pathologies and an increased risk of hip fractures due to falling. This article aims to review the ocular pathologies that have been proven to be associated with an increased risk of falling, to integrate the results of several studies showing a direct relationship between ocular pathologies and an increased risk of falling and finally to suggest ways in which the incidence of traumatic orthopedic injuries can be reduced by applying ophthalmologic principles.

  19. Decision making in ruminant orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Fessler, J F; Adams, S B

    1996-03-01

    Decision making in ruminant orthopedics is determined by many factors, the most of important of which is age, size, and value of the patient, the nature of the injury, the prognosis for effective treatment and satisfactory healing, the intentions of the client, and the experiences of the veterinarian. Ruminant orthopedics currently is expanding to include the treatment of llamas and small ruminants as companion animals in addition to the treatment of valuable livestock. The future promises increasing sophistication in treatments and an ever higher quality of patient care.

  20. Metal Hypersensitivity and Orthopedic Implants: Survey of Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Katherine; Vaughn, Natalie H; Juliano, Paul; Marks, James G

    There is no clear consensus among orthopedic surgeons concerning metal hypersensitivity screening and orthopedic implants. This study investigated practices and opinions about metal hypersensitivity and orthopedic implants via a survey administered to practicing orthopedists. A questionnaire was sent to members of the Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Society electronically. Respondents were asked about preoperative and postoperative screening habits concerning metal hypersensitivity and implants. Forty-four physicians completed the survey. Only 11% of respondents reported that they always or often screen patients for metal hypersensitivity. Fifty percent of respondents stated that they only rarely refer patients for patch testing (and the remainder never do). If, however, patients were found to have a positive patch test, most providers were very likely to use a different implant. Other respondents were skeptical of the relationship between metal hypersensitivity and implant failure. Dermatitis, pain, and loosening were common reasons for postoperative testing. Seventy percent of respondents said that patch testing rarely or never changed their decision making. This study is reflective of the lack of consensus between orthopedists regarding patch testing. It demonstrates the diversity of opinions among orthopedists, the need for additional dialogue between orthopedic and dermatology specialties, and the need for larger studies investigating outcomes and metal hypersensitivity.

  1. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  2. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  3. Correct coding for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Malek, M Mike; Friedman, Melvin M; Beach, William

    2002-04-01

    Coding accurately is one of the main principles of a successful practice. Some changes that we will see shortly include deletion of the term "separate procedure," deletion of the term "with and/or without," deletion of the term "any method," revision of the criteria for choosing E/M levels, and 52 new and revised Hand Surgery codes. Some other changes to come will be category II and category III codes. More changes are occurring as this is written, and the best advice is to stay tuned. It is obvious to the authors that coding is mainly for reimbursement purposes. The orthopedic surgeon must remain vigilant and must not pass this task on to someone else. Ignorance of coding methods is not an excuse [2]. We must all watch carefully and speak up when necessary. In this day of decreasing reimbursement, we can all increase our revenue stream without working any harder if we code our work properly, completely, and promptly.

  4. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  5. A Comprehensive, High-Quality Orthopedic Intern Surgical Skills Program.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel E; Patt, Joshua C; Scannell, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    To design and implement a month-long, low-cost, comprehensive surgical skills curriculum built to address the needs of orthopedic surgery interns with high satisfaction among both interns and faculty. The study design was retrospective and descriptive. The study was conducted at tertiary care referral center with a medium sized orthopedic residency surgery program (5 residents/year). Totally 5 orthopedic surgery residents and 16 orthopedic surgery faculty participated. A general mission was established-to orient the resident to the postgraduate year 1 and prepare them for success in residency. The basic tenets of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons surgical skills program framework were built. Curricular additions included anatomic study, surgical approaches, joint-specific physical examination, radiographic interpretation, preoperative planning, reduction techniques, basic emergency and operating room procedures, cadaveric procedure practice, and introduction to arthroplasty. The program was held in August during protected time for intern participants. In total, 16 orthopedic surgeons instructed 85% of the educational sessions. One faculty member did most of the preparation and organization to facilitate the program. The program ran for a cumulative 89 hours, including 14.5 hours working with cadaveric specimens. The program cost a total of $8100. The average module received a 4.15 rating on a 5-point scale, with 4 representing "good" and 5 representing "excellent." The program was appropriately timed and addressed topics relevant to the intern without sacrificing clinical experience or burdening inpatient services with interns' absence. The program received high satisfaction ratings from both the interns as well as the faculty. Additionally, the program fostered early relationships between interns and faculty-an unforeseen benefit. In the future, our program plans to better integrate validated learning metrics and improve instruction pertaining to both

  6. Erythromycin Seromadesis in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Martin; Fernández, Felipe; Avilés, Carolina; Cordova, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of postoperative seromadesis is common, corresponding to the presence of serum in the subcutaneous tissue post a surgical event. Erythromycin has been reported as sclerosing, although not in orthopedic surgery. We report a case of erythromycin seromadesis in orthopedic surgery. Case Presentation: We present a case of a 63-year-old woman having undergone femoral prosthesis surgery and total hip replacement with a subfacial seroma without findings of infection, refractory to standard treatment of compression bandages, massage and cleaning surgery in two oportunities. A literature review was undertaken to obtain the therapeutic alternatives where erythromycin seromadesis is chosen with excellent response. Conclusion: Erythromycin sclerotherapy should be considered as an effective and safe option in the treatment of seroma in general surgery and traumatology. More studies are necessary to get a better evidence. We believe that this is the first study of use of erythromycin as sclerotherapy in a traumatology case. PMID:27703947

  7. Orthopedics coding and funding.

    PubMed

    Baron, S; Duclos, C; Thoreux, P

    2014-02-01

    The French tarification à l'activité (T2A) prospective payment system is a financial system in which a health-care institution's resources are based on performed activity. Activity is described via the PMSI medical information system (programme de médicalisation du système d'information). The PMSI classifies hospital cases by clinical and economic categories known as diagnosis-related groups (DRG), each with an associated price tag. Coding a hospital case involves giving as realistic a description as possible so as to categorize it in the right DRG and thus ensure appropriate payment. For this, it is essential to understand what determines the pricing of inpatient stay: namely, the code for the surgical procedure, the patient's principal diagnosis (reason for admission), codes for comorbidities (everything that adds to management burden), and the management of the length of inpatient stay. The PMSI is used to analyze the institution's activity and dynamism: change on previous year, relation to target, and comparison with competing institutions based on indicators such as the mean length of stay performance indicator (MLS PI). The T2A system improves overall care efficiency. Quality of care, however, is not presently taken account of in the payment made to the institution, as there are no indicators for this; work needs to be done on this topic. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Orthopedic aspects of competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A B

    1987-07-01

    Orthopedic problems related to competitive swimming are rarely disabling, but can be problematic in preventing training and competition. Most problems are related to the shoulder and knee. Treatment is primarily nonsurgical and directed at relieving symptoms and allowing the athlete to continue with swimming practice. Treatment aids such as ice packing, anti-inflammatory medications, muscle stimulation and electrogalvanic stimulation, strengthening exercises, and static stretching are encouraged; upper arm bands and patellar-stabilizing supports can be adapted to training routines.

  9. Orthopedic Gene Therapy in 2008

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H; Ghivizzani, Steven C; Robbins, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Orthopedic disorders, although rarely fatal, are the leading cause of morbidity and impose a huge socioeconomic burden. Their prevalence will increase dramatically as populations age and gain weight. Many orthopedic conditions are difficult to treat by conventional means; however, they are good candidates for gene therapy. Clinical trials have already been initiated for arthritis and the aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints, and the development of bone-healing applications is at an advanced, preclinical stage. Other potential uses include the treatment of Mendelian diseases and orthopedic tumors, as well as the repair and regeneration of cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Many of these goals should be achievable with existing technologies. The main barriers to clinical application are funding and regulatory issues, which in turn reflect major safety concerns and the opinion, in some quarters, that gene therapy should not be applied to nonlethal, nongenetic diseases. For some indications, advances in nongenetic treatments have also diminished enthusiasm. Nevertheless, the preclinical and early clinical data are impressive and provide considerable optimism that gene therapy will provide straightforward, effective solutions to the clinical management of several common debilitating disorders that are otherwise difficult and expensive to treat. PMID:19066598

  10. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  11. Computer-assisted surgery in orthopedic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gerbers, Jasper G; Stevens, Martin; Ploegmakers, Joris JW; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Jutte, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — In orthopedic oncology, computer-assisted surgery (CAS) can be considered an alternative to fluoroscopy and direct measurement for orientation, planning, and margin control. However, only small case series reporting specific applications have been published. We therefore describe possible applications of CAS and report preliminary results in 130 procedures. Patients and methods — We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all oncological CAS procedures in a single institution from November 2006 to March 2013. Mean follow-up time was 32 months. We categorized and analyzed 130 procedures for clinical parameters. The categories were image-based intralesional treatment, image-based resection, image-based resection and reconstruction, and imageless resection and reconstruction. Results — Application to intralesional treatment showed 1 inadequate curettage and 1 (other) recurrence in 63 cases. Image-based resections in 42 cases showed 40 R0 margins; 16 in 17 pelvic resections. Image-based reconstruction facilitated graft creation with a mean reconstruction accuracy of 0.9 mm in one case. Imageless CAS was helpful in resection planning and length- and joint line reconstruction for tumor prostheses. Interpretation — CAS is a promising new development. Preliminary results show a high number of R0 resections and low short-term recurrence rates for curettage. PMID:25140984

  12. Orthopedic conditions of the avian head.

    PubMed

    Wheler, Colette L

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic problems of the avian head generally fall into two main categories: congenital and traumatic. Congenital lesions of the beak are not uncommon in psittacine birds but are extremely rare in raptors. Trauma accounts for most of the remaining orthopedic problems seen in the area of the body. This article discusses the most common conditions and injuries causing orthopedic problems of the beak, eye, and skull of avian patients.

  13. Diagnosis and management of reptile orthopedic injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    As veterinarians expand their understanding of the specific husbandry requirements for captive reptiles, nutritionally associated orthopedic injuries should decrease. Orthopedic injuries in wild reptiles, however, will continue to increase as new infrastructure encroaches on the habitats of these animals. Research should be pursued that focuses on improving our understanding of pain management in reptiles, on developing techniques to expedite bone healing, and on creating new orthopedic techniques that provide rigid stabilization without the use of temperature-sensitive materials.

  14. Orthopedic surgery core curriculum hip and knee reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wadey, Veronica M R; Maloney, William J; Dev, Parvati; Walker, Decker

    2008-04-01

    To develop a core curriculum for orthopedic surgery and to conduct a national survey to assess the importance of 281 curriculum items. Attention was focused on 55 topics pertaining to hip and knee reconstruction. A 281-item curriculum was developed. We completed a content review and cross-sectional survey of a random selection of orthopedic surgeons whose primary affiliation was nonuniversity. We analyzed the data descriptively and quantitatively, using histograms, a modified Hotelling's T2 statistic with the p value determined by a permutation test, and the Benjamini- Hochberg/Yekutieli procedure. Our analyses assumed that each respondent answered questions independently of the answers of any other respondent but that the answers to different questions by the same respondent might be dependent. Of 156 orthopedic surgeons, 131 (84%) participated in this study. Of 55 items ranked by all respondents, 42 received an average mean score greater than 3.5/4.0, and 51 received an average mean score equal to or greater than 3.0/40 (the standard deviation for each item ranged from 0.00 to 0.08), suggesting that 92.7% of the items are important or probably important to know by the end of residency. This study demonstrates agreement that it is important to include 92.7% of the items that pertain to hip and knee reconstruction in a core curriculum for orthopedic surgery. Residency training programs may need to ensure that appropriate educational opportunities focusing on complex primary and revision surgery are available to meet the future needs of orthopedic surgeons whose primary affiliation is nonuniversity.

  15. The dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Wolinsky, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    The development and implementation of a dedicated orthopedic trauma operating room (OTOR) that is used for the treatment of orthopedic trauma patients has changed and improved the practice of orthopedic trauma surgery. Advantages noted with OTOR implementation include improvements in morbidity and complication rates, enhancements in the professional and personal lifestyles of the on-call surgeon, and increased physician recruitment and retention in orthopedic traumatology. However, the inappropriate use of the OTOR, which can waste valuable resources and delay the treatment of emergent cases, must be monitored and avoided.

  16. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management. PMID:28149067

  17. EVALUATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE ON COST OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS AMONG ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Batista, Alysson Ferreira; Astur, Diego Costa; Falotico, Guilherme Guadagnini; Cohen, Moises

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic surgical devices used in surgical implants. Methods: A questionnaire was applied to Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons during the 46th Brazilian Congress on Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: Two hundred and one Orthopedic Surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire. The difference between the average prices estimated by the surgeons and the average prices provided by the supplier companies was 47.1%. No differences were found between the orthopedic specialists and other subspecialties on the prices indicated for specific orthopedic implants. However, differences were found among orthopedic surgeons who received visits from representatives of implant companies and those who did not receive those visits on prices indicated for shaver and radiofrequency device. Correlation was found between length of orthopedic experience and prices indicated for shaver and interference screw, and higher the experience time the lower the price indicated by Surgeons for these materials. Conclusion: The knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic implants is precarious. Reduction of cost of orthopedics materials depends on a more effective communication and interaction between doctors, hospitals and supplier companies with solid orientation programs and awareness for physicians about their importance in this scenario.Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:28243178

  18. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.].

  19. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  20. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    I-Lechao, J.; Epps, C. H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A locking mechanism for orthopedic braces is described which automatically prevents or permits the relative pivotable movement between a lower brace member and an upper brace member. The upper and lower brace members are provided with drilled bores within which a slidable pin is disposed, and depending upon the inclination of the brace members with respect to a vertical plane, the slidable pin will be interposed between both brace members. The secondary or auxiliary latching device includes a spring biased, manually operable lever bar arrangement which is manually unlatched and automatically latched under the influence of the spring.

  1. Ambulatory surgery in orthopedics: experience of over 10,000 patients.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ferrero, M A; Faour-Martín, O; Simon-Perez, C; Pérez-Herrero, M; de Pedro-Moro, J A

    2014-03-01

    The concept of day surgery is becoming an increasingly important part of elective surgery worldwide. Relentless pressure to cut costs may constrain clinical judgment regarding the most appropriate location for a patient's surgical care. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and quality indicators relating to our experience in orthopedic day durgery, mainly in relation to unplanned overnight admission and readmission rates. Additionally, we focused on describing the main characteristics of the patients that experienced complications, and compared the patient satisfaction rates following ambulatory and non-ambulatory procedures. We evaluated 10,032 patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures according to the protocols of our Ambulatory Surgery Unit. All complications that occurred were noted. A quality-of-life assessment (SF-36 test) was carried out both pre- and postoperatively. Ambulatory substitution rates and quality indicators for orthopedic procedures were also determined. The major complication rate was minimal, with no mortal cases, and there was a high rate of ambulatory substitution for the procedures studied. Outcomes of the SF-36 questionnaire showed significant improvement postoperatively. An unplanned overnight admission rate of 0.14 % was achieved. Our institution has shown that it is possible to provide good-quality ambulatory orthopedic surgery. There still appears to be the potential to increase the proportion of these procedures. Surgeons and anesthesiologists must strongly adhere to strict patient selection criteria for ambulatory orthopedic surgery in order to reduce complications in the immediate postoperative term.

  2. Orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.J.; Tilley, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a method of assessing a variety of entities with pathologic impact on the skeleton. The book covers 97 skeletal abnormalities or diseases. Each case is presented as a question (consisting of a radiography followed by a short clinical history and a query such as What is the abnormality '') followed by an answer (consisting of additional radiographs, an explanation of the radiographic abnormality and causative disease process, and one or two references).

  3. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education.

    PubMed

    Karam, Matthew D; Thomas, Geb W; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education. There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the present and future paradigm of orthopedic surgical

  4. Value Added: the Case for Point-of-View Camera use in Orthopedic Surgical Education

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Geb W.; Taylor, Leah; Liu, Xiaoxing; Anthony, Chris A.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Orthopedic surgical education is evolving as educators search for new ways to enhance surgical skills training. Orthopedic educators should seek new methods and technologies to augment and add value to real-time orthopedic surgical experience. This paper describes a protocol whereby we have started to capture and evaluate specific orthopedic milestone procedures with a GoPro® point-of-view video camera and a dedicated video reviewing website as a way of supplementing the current paradigm in surgical skills training. We report our experience regarding the details and feasibility of this protocol. Methods Upon identification of a patient undergoing surgical fixation of a hip or ankle fracture, an orthopedic resident places a GoPro® point-of-view camera on his or her forehead. All fluoroscopic images acquired during the case are saved and later incorporated into a video on the reviewing website. Surgical videos are uploaded to a secure server and are accessible for later review and assessment via a custom-built website. An electronic survey of resident participants was performed utilizing Qualtrics software. Results are reported using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 51 surgical videos involving 23 different residents have been captured to date. This includes 20 intertrochanteric hip fracture cases and 31 ankle fracture cases. The average duration of each surgical video was 1 hour and 16 minutes (range 40 minutes to 2 hours and 19 minutes). Of 24 orthopedic resident surgeons surveyed, 88% thought capturing a video portfolio of orthopedic milestones would benefit their education Conclusions There is a growing demand in orthopedic surgical education to extract more value from each surgical experience. While further work in development and refinement of such assessments is necessary, we feel that intraoperative video, particularly when captured and presented in a non-threatening, user friendly manner, can add significant value to the

  5. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined. PMID:26779486

  6. Computer-Assisted Orthopedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz P

    2015-01-01

    Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  7. Potential utility of liposome bupivacaine in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lonner, Jess H; Scuderi, Giles R; Lieberman, Jay R

    2015-03-01

    Management of postsurgical analgesia is an important consideration in orthopedic procedures, including joint arthroplasty. Inadequate postsurgical analgesia is associated with increased hospital length of stay, delayed ambulation, and reduced exercise capacity. In this article, we review the potential contribution of a prolonged-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen after orthopedic surgery. Controlled studies across multiple surgical settings have demonstrated that, compared with placebo and bupivacaine HCl, liposome bupivacaine in a single administration provides postsurgical analgesia for up to 72 hours, delays use of rescue medication, and reduces postsurgical opioid consumption. Liposome bupivacaine has been well tolerated in clinical studies and has had a low rate of treatment-related adverse events. To date, there has been no signal of cardiac toxicity, chondrolysis, or delayed wound healing associated with liposome bupivacaine.

  8. Strategies for achieving orthopedic service line success.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stacey; Powers, Kristi

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare finance leaders can work with orthopedic surgeons to support better outcomes, clinically and financially, by: Establishing innovative partnerships among hospital leaders, orthopedic surgeons, and implant vendors. Developing and enforcing expectations around contracting and vendor behavior. Establishing a forum for open communication. Building a bundled payment structure. Finding ways to differentiate from the competition.

  9. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  10. ORTHOPEDICALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN IN OHIO PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MENAPACE, HERMAN N.; AND OTHERS

    THE HISTORY OF PROGRAMS FOR ORTHOPEDICALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN IS REVIEWED, INCLUDING KINDS AND EXTENT OF SERVICES. GUIDELINES FOR ESTABLISHING AN ORTHOPEDIC PROGRAM ARE GIVEN AND THE TEAM APPROACH IS DISCUSSED. CHANGES IN THE HANDICAPPED POPULATION AND IN THE NEEDS FOR APPROPRIATE SERVICES ARE NOTED. THE APPENDIXES INCLUDE INFORMATION ABOUT…

  11. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  12. Sawbones laboratory in orthopedic surgical training

    PubMed Central

    Hetaimish, Bandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Sawbones are artificial bones designed to simulate the bone architecture, as well as the bone’s physical properties. The incorporation of sawbones simulation laboratories in many orthopedic training programs has provided the residents with flexibility in learning and scheduling that align with their working hour limitations. This review paper deliberates the organization of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical training to enhance trainee’s future learning. In addition, it explores the implications of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical teaching and evaluation. It scrutinizes the suitability of practicing on sawbones at the simulation laboratory to improve orthopedic trainee’s learning. This will be followed with recommendations for future enhancement of sawbones simulation-based learning in orthopedic surgical training. PMID:27052276

  13. II Italian intersociety consensus statement on antithrombotic prophylaxis in orthopedics and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, G; Danelli, G; Randelli, F; Romanini, E; Biggi, F; Laurora, N R; Imberti, D; Palaretti, G; Prisco, D

    2013-07-01

    Pharmacological prophylaxis for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide established procedure in hip and knee replacement surgery, as well as in the treatment of femoral neck fractures, but few data exist to its regard in other fields of orthopedics and traumatology. Indeed, no guidelines or recommendations are available in the literature, except for a limited number of weak statements about knee arthroscopy and lower limb fractures. The present paper represents the first multidisciplinary effort to provide suggestions on the prophylaxis of VTE in the remaining fields of orthopedic surgery (minor orthopedic surgery and orthopedic trauma). The Italian Society for Studies on Hemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET), the Italian Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (SIOT) and the association of Orthopedic Traumatology of Italian Hospitals (OTODI) together with the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) and the Italian Society of General Medicine (SIMG) have set down quick and easy suggestions for VTE prophylaxis in a number of surgical conditions for which only scarce evidence is available. This inter-society consensus statement aims at simplifying the approach to VTE prophylaxis in the single patient with the goal of improving its clinical application.

  14. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  15. Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience in Orthopedic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Savvidou, Olga D; Bolia, Ioanna K; Chloros, George D; Goumenos, Stavros D; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Galanis, Evanthia C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-09-01

    Nanomedicine is based on the fact that biological molecules behave similarly to nanomolecules, which have a size of less than 100 nm, and is now affecting most areas of orthopedics. In orthopedic oncology, most of the in vitro and in vivo studies have used osteosarcoma or Ewing sarcoma cell lineages. In this article, tumor imaging and treatment nanotechnology applications, including nanostructure delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, gene therapy, and the role of nano-selenium-coated implants, are outlined. Finally, the potential role of nanotechnology in addressing the challenges of drug and radiotherapy resistance is discussed. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):280-286.].

  16. [What do orthopedic surgeons need to know from radiologists?].

    PubMed

    Portabella, F; Pablos, O; Agulló, J L

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of tumors and pseudotumors depends on three pillars: the clinician, the radiologist, and the pathologist. The first two can establish a presumptive diagnosis on the basis of the clinical presentation and findings on complementary tests, whereas the pathologist will have to reach the definitive diagnosis after analyzing the biopsy specimens. Obviously, the clinician and radiologist should reach a consensus regarding the diagnostic orientation; however, for this to happen there must be a relationship between the two professionals and they must work together for the benefit of the patient. Orthopedic surgeons, like any other group of specialists, would like to have radiologists working in their own center who are dedicated to the organ/system they treat, in this case the locomotor apparatus, and who can provide them with their opinion about the different images obtained. This point is very important and especially so for tumors, because this type of disease is uncommon and few specialists are dedicated to it. For this reason, when faced with a lesion that has the characteristics of a tumor, orthopedic surgeons would like radiologists to give the most accurate description of the images as possible, defining the characteristics of benignity or malignancy of the process as well as indicating the risk of fracture in a metastatic lesion. On the other hand, orthopedic surgeons would ask for a clear and comprehensible description of the images obtained in complementary tests, because orthopedic surgeons have less experience in this type of images and they are often difficult to interpret. Another aspect that is often mentioned in discussions among orthopedic surgeons is the importance of having a radiology department that performs interventional procedures. Radiologists that perform interventional procedures can facilitate our work very much, both in the diagnosis and in the treatment of certain bone tumors. Finally, we would like to stress the importance of

  17. Carbon nanostructures for orthopedic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures (including carbon nanofibers, nanostructured diamond, fullerene materials and so forth) possess extraordinary physiochemical, mechanical and electrical properties attractive to bioengineers and medical researchers. In the past decade, numerous developments towards the fabrication and biological studies of carbon nanostructures have provided opportunities to improve orthopedic applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review on carbon nanostructure advances in orthopedic research. Orthopedic medical device applications of carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers and nanostructured diamond (including particulate nanodiamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings) are emphasized here along with other carbon nanostructures that have promising potential. In addition, widely used fabrication techniques for producing carbon nanostructures in both the laboratory and in industry are briefly introduced. In conclusion, carbon nanostructures have demonstrated tremendous promise for orthopedic medical device applications to date, and although some safety, reliability and durability issues related to the manufacturing and implantation of carbon nanomaterials remain, their future is bright.

  18. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  19. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam Em; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-06-18

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions.

  20. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  1. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  2. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (P<.001), knot tying (P=.017), casting and splinting (P<.001), arthrocentesis (P=.01), basics of internal fixation (P<.001), and compartment syndrome evaluation (P=.004). After the camp, PGY-1 and -2 scores in task-specific measures were not significantly different. A 3-month simulation-based boot camp instituted early in orthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Statistical fallacies in orthopedic research.

    PubMed

    Indrayan, Abhaya

    2007-01-01

    A large number of statistical fallacies occur in medical research literature. These are mostly inadvertent and occur due to lack of understanding of the statistical concepts and terminologies. Many researchers do not fully appreciate the consequence of such fallacies on the credibility of their report. This article provides a general review of the issues that could give rise to statistical fallacies with focus on orthopedic research. Some of this is based on real-life literature and some is based on the actual experiences of the author in dealing with medical research over the past three decades. The text is in teaching mode rather than research mode. Statistical fallacies occur due to inadequate sample that is used for generalized conclusion; incomparable groups presented as comparable; mixing of two or more distinct groups that in fact require separate consideration; misuse of percentages, means and graphs; incomplete reporting that suppresses facts; ignoring reality and depending instead on oversimplification; forgetting baseline values that affect the outcome; misuse of computer packages and use of black-box approach; misuse of P-values that compromises conclusions; confusing correlation with cause-effect; and interpreting statistical significance as medical significance. Mere awareness of the situations where statistical fallacies can occur may be adequate for researchers to sit up and take note while trying to provide a credible report.

  4. Developments in ambulatory surgery in orthopedics in France in 2016.

    PubMed

    Hulet, C; Rochcongar, G; Court, C

    2017-02-01

    Under the new categorization introduced by the Health Authorities, ambulatory surgery (AS) in France now accounts for 50% of procedures, taking all surgical specialties together. The replacement of full hospital admission by AS is now well established and recognized. Health-care centers have learned, in coordination with the medico-surgical and paramedical teams, how to set up AS units and the corresponding clinical pathways. There is no single model handed down from above. The authorities have encouraged these developments, partly by regulations but also by means of financial incentives. Patient eligibility and psychosocial criteria are crucial determining factors for the success of the AS strategy. The surgeons involved are strongly committed. Feedback from many orthopedic subspecialties (shoulder, foot, knee, spine, hand, large joints, emergency and pediatric surgery) testify to the rise of AS, which now accounts for 41% of all orthopedic procedures. Questions remain, however, concerning the role of the GP in the continuity of care, the role of innovation and teaching, the creation of new jobs, and the attractiveness of AS for surgeons. More than ever, it is the patient who is "ambulatory", within an organized structure in which surgical technique and pain management are well controlled. Not all patients can be eligible, but the AS concept is becoming standard, and overnight stay will become a matter for medical and surgical prescription.

  5. Artificial intelligence for analyzing orthopedic trauma radiographs.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Jakub; Fahlberg, Niklas; Maki, Atsuto; Razavian, Ali Sharif; Jilert, Anthony; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof; Gordon, Max

    2017-07-06

    Background and purpose - Recent advances in artificial intelligence (deep learning) have shown remarkable performance in classifying non-medical images, and the technology is believed to be the next technological revolution. So far it has never been applied in an orthopedic setting, and in this study we sought to determine the feasibility of using deep learning for skeletal radiographs. Methods - We extracted 256,000 wrist, hand, and ankle radiographs from Danderyd's Hospital and identified 4 classes: fracture, laterality, body part, and exam view. We then selected 5 openly available deep learning networks that were adapted for these images. The most accurate network was benchmarked against a gold standard for fractures. We furthermore compared the network's performance with 2 senior orthopedic surgeons who reviewed images at the same resolution as the network. Results - All networks exhibited an accuracy of at least 90% when identifying laterality, body part, and exam view. The final accuracy for fractures was estimated at 83% for the best performing network. The network performed similarly to senior orthopedic surgeons when presented with images at the same resolution as the network. The 2 reviewer Cohen's kappa under these conditions was 0.76. Interpretation - This study supports the use for orthopedic radiographs of artificial intelligence, which can perform at a human level. While current implementation lacks important features that surgeons require, e.g. risk of dislocation, classifications, measurements, and combining multiple exam views, these problems have technical solutions that are waiting to be implemented for orthopedics.

  6. Bibliometric analysis of the orthopedic literature.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhaoyang; Yi, Zhongmei; Peng, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Bibliometric indicators are used to assess research performance. The goal of this study was to explore publication output to construct a picture of orthopedics that may be beneficial to researchers and orthopedic specialists. All orthopedics articles published in 61 journals from 2000 to 2011 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded database. The numbers of articles, citations, authors, institutions, and journals were analyzed and subjected to quantitative and qualitative comparisons. The number of published orthopedics articles increased between 2000 and 2011. Articles published by authors from the United States always ranked first in number, although the United States' share is decreasing in the world literature. Authors from the United States published the most-cited articles and the most articles in journals with top-10 impact factors; moreover, the United States also had the greatest share of experts and highly ranked institutions. The United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan were always within the world's top 4 in terms of numbers of articles and citations. The shares of Germany, South Korea, and China among total orthopedics articles increased, especially that of China. In 2011, China ranked the fifth in the world, with its world share increasing from 0.64% in 2000 to 5.05% in 2011. However, China lags behind in average citations per article, top research institutions, and most prolific authors. According to the total citations per article, the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard University, and the Hospital for Special Surgery were the most prolific institutions. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  8. [Application and research advances of metabolomics in the field of orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhijian; Qiu, Guixing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is a subject of systematic, qualitative and quantitative analysis of all metabolites in all organisms, which is applied to finding biomarkers and studying pathogenesis of diseases. Study procedures of metabolomics include data acquisition by spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques, multivariate statistical analysis and projection of the acquired metabolomic information. In recent years, metabolomics have gained popularity in orthopedic field. Metabolomic study of osteoarthritis was firstly conducted and widely developed. Metabolite profiles of different samples, including serum/plasma, urine, synovial fluid and synovial tissue, were studied and dozens of differential metabolites and several disturbed metabolic pathways were found. In addition, metabolomic studies of osteoporosis, ankylosing spondylitis and bone tumors were also conducted, which identified many potential biomarkers and made further understanding of pathogenesis of corresponding disease. However, metabolomic studies in orthopedic field just begin. More orthopedic diseases will be researched thank to the satisfactory results of previous reports.

  9. [The metal tantalum in orthopedic applications].

    PubMed

    Deng, Juncai; Wang, Yue

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the biological characteristics of the metal tantalum (Ts) and the application status of tantalum in artificial joints, bone necrosis, spine, defects of bone and other aspects of bone. The early clinical application results of tantalum in bone diseases were satisfactory, but it is necessary to do further study of tantalum in a deep going way, and further detailed comparison between the tantalum with other metals as orthopedics implants. The advantage of tantalum materials as orthopedic implants still needs to be verified by a great deal of clinical cases for a long period of time.

  10. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  11. An Overview of the History of Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Ishaan; O'Donnell, Joseph F

    Orthopedic surgery has a long and rich history. While the modern term orthopedics was coined in the 1700s, orthopedic principles were beginning to be developed and used during primitive times. The Egyptians continued these practices, and described ways to recognize and manage common orthopedic conditions. The Greeks and Romans subsequently began to study medicine in a systematic manner, and greatly improved our understanding of orthopedic anatomy and surgical technique. After a period of little progress during the Middle Ages, rapid advancement was noted during the Renaissance, including the description of various injuries, improvements in surgical technique, and development of orthopedic hospitals. Collectively, these advances provided the foundation for modern orthopedics. Currently, orthopedic surgery is a rapidly developing field that has benefited from the works of numerous scholars and surgeons. It is important to recognize the successes and failures of the past, in order to advance research and practice as well as improve patient care and clinical outcomes.

  12. Awareness campaign. Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma launches awareness campaign.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    The Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma is a 25-bed inpatient and outpatient center with one focus: Orthopedics. To acquaint people with its services and build brand awareness to drive market share, the hospital launched a print campaign featuring actual patients.

  13. Concepts of orthopedic disorders in Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2011-03-01

    This manuscript offers a brief review of the orthopedic subjects in the Canon of Medicine. Highlights include, but are not limited to, the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system, fractures and dislocations, nerve and tendon injuries, different types of wounds and ulcers, and bone infections. Some of the concepts regarding musculoskeletal disorders remain relevant to current orthopedic knowledge. Reviewing the orthopedic subjects in the Canon of Medicine reveals that Avicenna has made a significant contribution to the evolution of orthopedic knowledge.

  14. Billing and coding knowledge: a comparative survey of professional coders, practicing orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kevin F; Yousuf, Tariq; Pasque, Charles B; Yousuf, Khalid

    2014-06-01

    Medical knowledge and surgical skills are necessary to become an effective orthopedic surgeon. To run an efficient practice, the surgeon must also possess a basic understanding of medical business practices, including billing and coding. In this study, we surveyed and compared the level of billing and coding knowledge among current orthopedic residents PGY3 and higher, academic and private practice attending orthopedic surgeons, and orthopedic coding professionals. According to the survey results, residents and fellows have a similar knowledge of coding and billing, regardless of their level of training or type of business education received in residency. Most residents would like formal training in coding, billing, and practice management didactics; this is consistent with data from previous studies.

  15. Orthopedically Handicapped Children in Ohio Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naples, Victor J.; Todd, Joseph H.

    The historical development of programs for orthopedically handicapped children, class units and hospital classes approved during 1967-68, and the number of therapy units established are presented. Tables give data on program population: enrollment for years 1962-68, percent of handicaps enrolled, and IQ distributions. Aspects of occupational…

  16. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  17. Program Guidelines for Severely Orthopedically Impaired Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmann, Winnie

    This document contains California's guidelines for serving students with severe orthopedic impairments in the public schools. Elements characteristic of well-designed programs are described in the guide's three chapters, and each description is followed by a series of questions for program evaluation. The first chapter addresses approaches to…

  18. Medical and orthopedic conditions and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Diokno, Eugene; Rowe, Dale

    2010-06-01

    The presence of certain medical or orthopedic conditions need not preclude adolescents from being physically active and participating in sports. The benefits of continued physical activity far outweigh any concerns for potential complications for most such conditions. This article reviews sport participation guidelines for adolescents with conditions that include juvenile chronic arthritis, eye injures, solitary kidney, skin conditions, scoliosis, and spondylolysis.

  19. Painful pes planovalgus: an uncommon pediatric orthopedic presentation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Hoellwarth, Jason S; Mahan, Susan T; Spencer, Samantha A

    2012-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited progressive neurologic disorder often diagnosed by the characteristic cavovarus feet. In the pediatric population, the presentation is often more variable and age dependent. Pediatric orthopedic surgeons may be referred patients for the evaluation of musculoskeletal symptoms that may be consistent with early CMT, but because of the lack of the surgeon's familiarity, the diagnosis may be delayed or missed. We present three patients with pes planovalgus who were found to have CMT and review the recent literature relevant to the pediatric orthopedic surgeon. The clinical summary is given for three patients who presented to the orthopedic surgery department for lower extremity symptoms and were eventually diagnosed with CMT. A literature search was performed and information valuable for a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to consider is summarized. Foot morphology in most young children with CMT initially is pes planovalgus, with the minority being pes cavovarus. As the child grows, the proportion changes to become nearly entirely cavus or cavovarus, with very few remaining planovalgus or planus. Unexplained regional pain may also be suggestive of CMT. Whereas CMT often presents initially in adolescent or adult patients with cavovarus feet, thin calves, or a high-stepping gait, pediatric presentation is not so consistent. Young children with CMT often have pes planovalgus. There are even some variants of CMT where patients still may present with severe pes planovalgus into late adolescence. We recommend that pediatric orthopedic surgeons consider CMT even in patients who do not have cavus or cavovarus feet, especially in the context of unexplained regional pain of the lower extremities. Patients should be referred to a pediatric neurologist for definitive diagnosis and management, with the orthopedic surgeon remaining involved for specific procedures.

  20. Regional anesthesia for children undergoing orthopedic ambulatory surgeries in the United States, 1996-2006.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Cassie; Edwards, Alison; Mazumdar, Madhu; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2012-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate national trends in regional anesthetic techniques among children undergoing ambulatory orthopedic procedures. We aimed to determine whether an increase in regional anesthetics was primarily driven by an increase in the number of peripheral nerve blocks performed rather than an increase in neuraxial techniques. We further aimed to determine whether the proportion of peripheral nerve blocks performed in conjunction with general anesthesia has increased over time. Our study sample included any pediatric patient (i.e., <18 years old) who underwent an orthopedic ambulatory procedure in 1996 and 2006. We obtained data on ambulatory surgical procedures by accessing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery. Patient demographics (age, gender), procedure information, and anesthesia-related variables were analyzed for each year. The proportion of peripheral nerve blocks performed for ambulatory surgery more than doubled from 1996 (4.4 %) to 2006 (8.1 %). A significantly larger proportion of orthopedic procedures were being performed with a combination of peripheral nerve blocks and general anesthesia (1.2 % in 1996 and 43 % 2006). The use of neuraxial anesthesia for lower extremity surgeries decreased over the 10-year period (1.1 and 0.4 % in 1996 and 2006, respectively). There was a significant increase in the use of peripheral nerve blocks for children undergoing ambulatory orthopedic procedures in the USA, while neuraxial techniques became less common over the 10-year period. The peripheral nerve blocks were frequently performed in conjunction with general anesthesia.

  1. Orthopedic surgery at a MASH deployed to the former Yugoslavia in support of the United Nations Protection Force.

    PubMed

    Hrutkay, J M; Hirsch, E; Hockenbury, T

    1995-04-01

    From November 1992 to April 1993, the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) was deployed from Germany to Zagreb, Croatia, to provide medical support for the United Nations Protection Force serving in the former Yugoslavia. A 60-bed deployable medical systems hospital was established. The usual MASH 72-hour evacuation policy was extended to 30 days; the orthopedic equipment inventory and surgical capability were increased significantly. Eighty-three orthopedic surgical procedures were performed during a 5-month period on soldiers from 14 nations. Sixty-two (75%) of these procedures were non-emergent, including internal fixation of fractures, bone and skin grafting, and arthroscopy. There were no documented early infections; the complication rate was acceptable. Orthopedic aftercare was supplemented by physical therapy and the capability of prosthetic fitting for amputees. The majority of soldiers (60%) received definitive orthopedic surgical care in theater. The feasibility of performing non-emergent orthopedic procedures in a field environment was demonstrated. Expanded medical support for other similar missions may be required in the future.

  2. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  3. Bone drilling haptic interaction for orthopedic surgical simulator.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Dar; Hsieh, Ming-Shium; Tsai, Chiung-Hsin

    2007-12-01

    Drilling procedure is widely used in orthopedic surgery to position reduced fractured bones and prosthetic components. However, successful execution of bone drilling requires a high level of dexterity and experience, because the drilling resistance is large and sometimes vibrates violently to difficultly grasp the hand-piece or even break the slender drill. This paper introduces haptic functions that are added to a volume based surgical simulator to simulate the drilling process. These haptic functions compute drilling forces and torques based on reliable metal removing theorem. Therefore, accurate prediction for the drilling process can be obtained to provide effective surgery training and rehearsal. A simulation example of screw and plate surgery for positioning the hip trochanter fracture illustrates the practicality and versatility of the proposed method.

  4. [Orthopedic Problems in Overweight and Obese Children].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S; Stücker, R; Rupprecht, M

    2016-03-01

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents is a growing problem with an increasing number of patients presenting with comorbidities to pediatricians and orthopedic surgeons. This overview summarizes the most common orthopedic problems in overweight children and obesity and highlights the treatment options in addition to weight reduction and physiotherapy leaded activation. In early infancy a persitent genu varum may be seen as a sign of Blount disease. In the school ages flat feet or persistent knock-knees has a higher incidence in overweight children. The incidence for back pain and osteoporosis are related with overweight and obese. At puberty, the slipped capital epiphysis, which always needs a surgical management, is mostly related to overweight/obese. A symptomatic retroversion of the femur can cause discomfort and lead to a surgical therapy himself.

  5. Occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem M.; Alatassi, Raheef; Altamimi, Saad M.; Alqarni, Mahdi M.; Alfayez, Saud M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed all pediatric orthopedic surgeons in Saudi Arabia using an anonymous electronic questionnaire composed of 23 items to identify the rate of occupational injuries and obtain other relevant information. Thirty-nine participants completed the questionnaire (response rate: 83%). Participants who sustained occupational injuries throughout their careers represented 82.5%. The most injured areas were the hands, eyes, and back by 54.5%, 24.2%, and 15.2%, respectively. Approximately 11.1% were injured while operating on infected patients. Approximately 30.3% reported their injuries to their institution. We concluded that the rate of occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons is very high and underreported. PMID:28640103

  6. Orthopedic problems in geriatric dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Beale, Brian S

    2005-05-01

    Senior dogs and cats with orthopedic injuries and diseases often require a treatment plan that differs from that of younger patients. Injured bone and soft tissues tend to heal more slowly in the geriatric patient. The older animal is likely to have a less competent immune system and may have compromised metabolic and endocrine function. Pre-existing musculoskeletal problems may make ambulation difficult for an animal convalescing from a new orthopedic problem. Special attention is often needed when treating these patients for fractures, joint instability, infection, and neoplasia. In general, issues that should be addressed in the geriatric patient include reducing intraoperative and anesthesia time, enhancing bone and soft tissue healing, return to early function, control of postoperative pain, physical therapy, and proper nutrition.

  7. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions.

  8. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany – an analysis of orthopedic accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Peter; Maier, Werner; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the ‘official degree of care provision’. However, with geographic information systems (GIS), more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility) with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population) lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0), whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population) lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0). Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001) and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001) and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001). Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas. PMID:28178335

  9. Orthopedic disability, conformity, and social support.

    PubMed

    Orr, E; Thein, R D; Aronson, E

    1995-03-01

    The relation between physical disability, social support, and conformist behavior was tested in two studies. The first compared the conforming responses of persons who had orthopedic disabilities with those of able-bodied individuals and correlated perceived social support of those with the disability with their tendency to conform. The second was an experimental study in which university students made choices between actors who had disabilities and actors who were able bodied; orthopedic disability was signified by a person sitting in a wheelchair and social support by the choice of a teammate. Results showed that persons with disabilities (compared with those who were able bodied) reported a significantly higher tendency to conform and that this tendency was negatively related to reported levels of perceived social support. In the experimental study, conforming behaviors of both disabled and able-bodied actors elicited more social support than did assertive behaviors. The actors who had "disabilities" received less social support than those who were "able bodied," but the former were considered more original when they did not conform. The findings imply that individuals with orthopedic disabilities are expected to conform but, although their conforming behavior elicits social support within specific encounters, it does not affect overall social support across encounters.

  10. [Orthopedics and patients under national socialism dictatorship].

    PubMed

    Thomann, K D; Rauschmann, M

    2001-10-01

    The 12-year dictatorship of National Socialism represents a decisive event in the history of orthopedics in Germany. Treatment and care was limited to those patients whose prognosis promised their reintegration into the work force. Those orthopedic patients with mental and psychological handicaps no longer came under the care of orthopedists and were potential candidates for annihilation. Despite concerted efforts to the contrary, as can be gleaned from the lists of topics at the annual meetings, the prevailing political circumstances encumbered scientific activities. The almost total isolation from international contacts had a negative effect. Orthopedists were hindered in their work by the law on sterilization, which provided for sterilization in cases of severe physical deformity. Some orthopedists even considered the presence of hip dysplasia to be an indication. The roles played by Georg Hohmann, Hellmut Eckhardt, Lothar Kreuz, and other leading orthopedists are described in detail. It can be regarded as certain that Hohmann and Eckhardt were able to prevent dire consequences for their orthopedic patients and the profession by cautious tactics. The ethnical problems of involvement with National Socialism are thoroughly discussed.

  11. Orthopedic gene therapy--lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Evans, C H; Ghivizzani, S C; Robbins, P D

    2012-02-01

    Orthopedic gene therapy has been the topic of considerable research for two decades. The preclinical data are impressive and many orthopedic conditions are well suited to genetic therapies. But there have been few clinical trials and no FDA-approved product exists. This paper examines why this is so. The reasons are multifactorial. Clinical translation is expensive and difficult to fund by traditional academic routes. Because gene therapy is viewed as unsafe and risky, it does not attract major funding from the pharmaceutical industry. Start-up companies are burdened by the complex intellectual property environment and difficulties in dealing with the technology transfer offices of major universities. Successful translation requires close interactions between scientists, clinicians and experts in regulatory and compliance issues. It is difficult to create such a favorable translational environment. Other promising fields of biological therapy have contemplated similar frustrations approximately 20 years after their founding, so there seem to be more general constraints on translation that are difficult to define. Gene therapy has noted some major clinical successes in recent years, and a sense of optimism is returning to the field. We hope that orthopedic applications will benefit collaterally from this upswing and move expeditiously into advanced clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [On uniform social medical evaluation of performance capacity in orthopedic rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Gebauer, D; Daalmann, H H; Hopke, F R; Kasprowski, D; Lausch, H L; Lux, A; Schlicht, F; Schöttler, M; Struck, M J; Tittor, W

    2006-12-01

    The need for standardized and unified performance capacity assessment in orthopedic rehabilitation has led to the attempt to use an existing standardized procedure. Graduated disease features have been defined which are relevant for work and their effects on performance capacity been formulated as rules. In this way so-called disease-conditioned performance capacities are obtained which help to identify problems in carrying out various activities. These activities can be directly assessed using tests. Appropriate tests are listed in a table.

  13. Tilt table recovery of horses after orthopedic surgery: fifty-four cases (1994-2005).

    PubMed

    Elmas, Colette R; Cruz, Antonio M; Kerr, Carolyn L

    2007-04-01

    To describe an assisted anesthetic recovery technique using a tilt table for horses after high-risk orthopedic-related procedures and to evaluate outcome. Retrospective study. Anesthetic recoveries (n=54) for 36 horses. Medical records (April 1994-October 2005) for horses that had high-risk orthopedic surgery and recovery from general anesthesia on a tilt table were reviewed. Information about the surgical procedure, anesthetic and recovery period was analyzed. Of 54 anesthetic recoveries, 1 horse (1.9%) had complete failure of internal fixation during recovery and was euthanatized. Six (11% recoveries) horses failed to adapt to the tilt table system, which necessitated transfer to a conventional recovery room. Complications without important consequences for clinical outcome (skin abrasions, myositis, cast breakage, partial implant failure) occurred during 8 (15%) recoveries. A tilt table recovery system was associated with minimal incidence of serious complications. Potential disadvantages of the system are the number of personnel required, longer recovery time, and the need for a specialized table. A tilt table is a useful system for recovering horses believed to be at increased risk of injury during anesthetic recovery after high-risk orthopedic-related procedures.

  14. Clinical and Cost Implications of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Orthopedic Surgeries: A Systematic Review of the Published Literature.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Dennis C; Li, Chuan Silvia; Sprague, Sheila; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-12-28

    The number of outpatient orthopedic surgeries performed within North America continues to increase. The impact of this change in services on patient outcomes is largely unknown. The objective of this review is to compare patient outcomes and associated costs for outpatient orthopedic surgeries traditionally performed in hospital to inpatient surgeries, as well as to summarize the eligibility and preoperative education requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery in North America. We performed a systematic review of Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases for articles comparing the clinical and economic impact of outpatient orthopedic surgical procedures versus inpatient procedures in North America. We reported on requirements for inpatient versus outpatient care, preoperative education requirements, complications and patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and when available total mean costs. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Eligibility requirements for outpatient orthopedic surgery within the included studies varied, but generally included: patient consent, a caregiver at home following surgery, close proximity to an outpatient center, and no history of serious medical problems. Preoperative education programs were not always compulsory and practices varied between outpatient centers. All of the reviewed studies reported that outpatient surgeries had similar or improved level of pain and rates of nausea. Outpatients reported increased satisfaction with the care they received. As expected, outpatient procedures were less expensive than inpatient procedures. This review found that outpatient procedures in North America appear to be less expensive and safe alternatives to inpatient care for patients who are at lower risk for complications and procedures that do not necessarily require close hospital level care monitoring following same day surgery.

  15. Impact of a Musculoskeletal Clerkship on Orthopedic Surgery Applicant Diversity.

    PubMed

    London, Daniel A; Calfee, Ryan P; Boyer, Martin I

    Orthopedic surgery lacks racial and sexual diversity, which we hypothesized stems from absence of exposure to orthopedics during medical school. We conducted a study to determine whether diversity of matched orthopedic surgery residency applicants increased after introduction of a required third-year rotation. We compared 2 groups: precurriculum and postcurriculum. The postcurriculum group was exposed to a required 1-month musculoskeletal rotation during the third year of medical school. Comparisons were made of percentage of total students exposed to orthopedics, percentage who applied to and matched to orthopedic surgery, and proportion of women and underrepresented minorities. A prospective survey was used to determine when students chose orthopedics and what influenced their decisions. The required rotation increased the percentage of third-year students rotating on orthopedics (25%) with no change in application rate (6%). It also led to an 81% relative increase in the proportion of female applicants and a 101% relative increase in underrepresented minority applicants. According to survey data, 79% of students chose orthopedics during their third year, and 88% thought they were influenced by their rotation. A required third-year rotation exposes more medical students to orthopedics and increases the diversity of matching students.

  16. [The clinical use of Hotz-type orthopedic plate].

    PubMed

    Kamegai, A; Matsuoka, Y; Shimamura, N; Muramatsu, Y; Tanabe, T; Kurenuma, S; Kimura, Y; Shibata, K; Naitoh, K; Kitajima, T

    1988-12-01

    In the present study a Hotz type orthopedic plate was used to improve feeding and physiological growth. In 2 patients with cleft lip it was used to improve feeding and swallowing. In 4 patients with cleft lip and palate it was used to normalize functions and aid physiological growth. The effects of the Hotz orthopedic plate were determined by recording body weight growth, milk volume per day, feeding time and comparison of the study model between before and after using Hotz orthopedic plate. Good physiological growth and improved feeding, were obtoincdinalmostall the patients who wore the Hotz type orthopedic plate correctly.

  17. [Study on the application of Aconitum in clinical orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Ting; Shen, Yan; Xiao, Lu-Wei; Tong, Pei-Jian

    2008-12-01

    Aconitum is important in clinical orthopedics. From ancient times to the present day,there were many famous doctors who used this herb to cure many diseases in orthopedics. However, the toxicity always connect with its effect. This will limit its application in clinics. So now the important thing is how to use this herb correctly. This article will give some suggestions about how to use aconitum in orthopedics and to make sure it can be used correctly in future. It has four parts: application in orthopedics, pharmacology, factors related to toxicity and the prospect of the use of aconitum.

  18. ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS AFTER ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Mariana de Queiroz Leite; Costa, Ana Maria Magalhães; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros; Gomes, Saint Clair

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To describe the rate of surgical site infections in children undergoing orthopedic surgery in centers of excellence and analyze the patients’ profiles. Methods: Medical records of pediatric patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the Jamil Haddad National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed and monitored for one year. Patients diagnosed with surgical site infection were matched with patients without infection by age, date of admission, field of orthopedic surgery and type of surgical procedure. Patient, surgical and follow-up variables were examined. Descriptive, bivariate and correspondence analyses were performed to evaluate the patients’ profiles. Results: 347 surgeries and 10 surgical site infections (2.88%) were identified. There was association of infections with age - odds ratio (OR) 11.5 (confidence interval - 95%CI 1.41-94.9) -, implant - OR 7.3 (95%CI 1.46-36.3) -, preoperative period - OR 9.8 (95%CI 1.83-53.0), and length of hospitalization - OR 20.6 (95%CI 3.7-114.2). The correspondence analysis correlated the infection and preoperative period, weight, weight Z-score, age, implant, type of surgical procedure, and length of hospitalization. Average time to diagnosis of infection occurred 26.5±111.46 days after surgery. Conclusions: The rate of surgical site infection was 2.88%, while higher in children over 24 months of age who underwent surgical implant procedures and had longer preoperative periods and lengths of hospitalization. This study identified variables for the epidemiological surveillance of these events in children. Available databases and appropriate analysis methods are essential to monitor and improve the quality of care offered to the pediatric population.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the orthodontic and orthopedic effects of maxillary traction.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Isaacson, R J; West, E E; Molthen, R

    1983-11-01

    This article analyzes differences in displacement of ANS and of the upper first molar when different vectors of force are delivered to the maxilla in non-full-banded Phase I mixed-dentition treatment of Class II malocclusion. The sample is identical to that for which we have previously reported differences in change in several key measures of mandibular and facial shape. It includes a cervical-traction group, a high-pull-to-upper-molar group, a modified-activator group, and an untreated Class II control group. Using newly developed computer-conducted procedures, which are described, we have been able to partition the orthodontic and orthopedic components of upper molar displacement and also to isolate treatment effects from those attributable to spontaneous growth and development. In the region of ANS, small but statistically significant and clinically meaningful differences were noted between treatments. When the intercurrent effects of growth and development had been factored out (Table III), orthopedic distal displacement of ANS was significantly greater in the high-pull and cervical groups than in the activator group. Orthopedic downward displacement of ANS was seen to be significantly greater in the cervical group than in the high-pull and activator groups. In the region of the first molar cusp, mean distal displacement of the tooth as an orthopedic effect was found to be almost identical in the cervical and high-pull groups (although variability was greater in the cervical group), but the mean orthodontic effect was significantly greater in the high-pull group than in the cervical group. In the cervical group, where relatively light forces were used for relatively long treatment periods on average, more of the total distal displacement of the upper molar was of an orthopedic character than of an orthodontic character. Conversely, in the high-pull group, in which relatively heavier forces tended to be used for briefer treatment periods, most of the distal

  20. Diabetic foot: the orthopedic surgery angle.

    PubMed

    Besse, J-L; Leemrijse, T; Deleu, P-A

    2011-05-01

    As diabetes takes on pandemic proportions, it is crucial for the orthopedic surgeon to be aware of the issues involved in diabetic foot. Ulceration is related to neuropathy and to arterial disease, a vital prognostic factor for healing; infection plays an aggravating role, increasing the risk of amputation. At-risk feet need to be screened for. Ulcer classification is essential, to set treatment strategy and determine prognosis. Before any treatment is decided on, neuropathy, vascular insufficiency and infection should individually be assessed by clinical examination and appropriate additional work-up. Despite the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot recommendations, management of diabetic foot in Europe still varies greatly from country to country, very few of which have established reference centers. Management of diabetic foot remains multidisciplinary; but it has been shown that the orthopedic surgeon should play a central role, providing a biomechanical perspective so as to avoid complications recurrence. Strategy notably includes prevention of at-risk foot, revascularization surgery (which should systematically precede orthopedic surgery in case of critical vascular insufficiency), and treatment of ulcers, whether these latter are associated with osteitis or not. Indications for "minor" amputation should be adequate, and meticulously implemented. "Acute foot" is a medical emergency, entailing massive empirically selected I.V. antibiotics to "cool" the lesion. Prophylactic surgery to limit further risks of ulceration is to be indicated with caution and only when clearly justified. France urgently requires accredited specialized multidisciplinary centers to manage severe lesions: deep and infected ulceration, advanced arteriopathy, and Charcot foot arthropathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevention of VTE in Orthopedic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.; Johanson, Norman A.; Curley, Catherine; Dahl, Ola E.; Schulman, Sam; Ortel, Thomas L.; Pauker, Stephen G.; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a serious, but decreasing complication following major orthopedic surgery. This guideline focuses on optimal prophylaxis to reduce postoperative pulmonary embolism and DVT. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: In patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, we recommend the use of one of the following rather than no antithrombotic prophylaxis: low-molecular-weight heparin; fondaparinux; dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban (total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty but not hip fracture surgery); low-dose unfractionated heparin; adjusted-dose vitamin K antagonist; aspirin (all Grade 1B); or an intermittent pneumatic compression device (IPCD) (Grade 1C) for a minimum of 10 to 14 days. We suggest the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in preference to the other agents we have recommended as alternatives (Grade 2C/2B), and in patients receiving pharmacologic prophylaxis, we suggest adding an IPCD during the hospital stay (Grade 2C). We suggest extending thromboprophylaxis for up to 35 days (Grade 2B). In patients at increased bleeding risk, we suggest an IPCD or no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). In patients who decline injections, we recommend using apixaban or dabigatran (all Grade 1B). We suggest against using inferior vena cava filter placement for primary prevention in patients with contraindications to both pharmacologic and mechanical thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2C). We recommend against Doppler (or duplex) ultrasonography screening before hospital discharge (Grade 1B). For patients with isolated lower-extremity injuries requiring leg immobilization, we suggest no thromboprophylaxis (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing knee arthroscopy without a history

  2. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  3. Orthopedic resident anatomy review course: a collaboration between anatomists and orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    DeFriez, Curtis B; Morton, David A; Horwitz, Daniel S; Eckel, Christine M; Foreman, K Bo; Albertine, Kurt H

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months for all of its residents. The primary purpose of the course is to renew competencies in basic science disciplines so that incoming residents more quickly reach a level of functional proficiency and to afford senior residents a platform to teach their junior colleagues. Before 2005, this course was conducted with minimal participation from anyone outside of the Department of Orthopaedics. Many of the residents voiced concerns that the educational benefits were not proportionate to the time invested. To improve the teaching of orthopedic-related anatomy, an educational collaboration between the Departments of Neurobiology and Anatomy and Orthopaedics was established in 2004 and continues to the present time. The major objectives of refining the course pedagogy, developing a Course Manual and Dissection Guide, and evaluating the results by administering a course survey questionnaire are described in this article. Implementation of all facets of the revised course has resulted in better participation by orthopedic faculty and more favorable reviews by the participating residents. Based on current levels of interest and positive comments from course participants, the Anatomy and Orthopedic faculty course directors plan to continue to develop course materials and pedagogy.

  4. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  5. Hunting stand-related injuries in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Lebus, George F; Krueger, Chad A; Stinner, Daniel J; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-09-01

    Hunting remains an extremely popular recreational activity, with nearly 15 million Americans receiving a hunting license annually. Precautions have helped decrease accidents, but hunting-related injuries remain relatively common. The majority of severe, hunting-related accidents involve either a fall from a hunting platform or an accidental shooting. Both of these mechanisms frequently result in orthopedic injuries, many of which require operative care. Although firearms-associated injury has seemingly decreased, hunting platform falls and their sequelae are increasing. Understanding the mechanisms of these injuries and increasing awareness of them may minimize their morbidity and mortality or help prevent them altogether.

  6. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  7. The efficient delivery of elective orthopedic care.

    PubMed

    Jacofsky, David; Lyman, Jeff

    2007-10-01

    The reality of the modern orthopedic practice is that rising fixed business costs, rising malpractice premiums, and decreasing reimbursement make efficiency not just a matter of prosperity, but in some markets, one of practice survival. As physicians, we have been trained to deliver medical advice to our patients and offer plans of care catered to the patient's specific needs, goals, and lifestyle. Terms such as practice efficiency may initially seem to conflict with the concept of optimizing patient outcomes. This article introduces some of the strategies that can be integrated into a practice model to increase volumes, productivity, and efficiency while simultaneously controlling costs and improving patient outcomes.

  8. No evidence for race and socioeconomic status as independent predictors of 30-day readmission rates following orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tracey; Yoon, Richard S; Hutzler, Lorraine; Band, Philip; Liublinksa, Victoria; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services considers readmissions within 30 days of discharge to be a quality indicator. Hospitals' and eventually physicians' readmission rates will be used to determine payment for services. It is imperative that health care providers understand which patients are at risk for readmission so that they can apply the appropriate preventive interventions. The research team analyzed all orthopedic admissions and readmissions at their institution from September 2008 to April 2011 in this study. Preparing for the next stage in health care reform, identifying any preoperative factors that may place certain patients into a "high-risk" category for readmission following an orthopedic procedure is of paramount importance. This data analysis of more than 13 000 patients noted that race-based and income-based risk factors did not translate into significant risk factors or predictors of 30-day readmission following orthopedic admission.

  9. Factors Contributing to Satisfaction with Changes in Physical Function after Orthopedic Surgery for Musculoskeletal Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Matsuo, Atsushi; Takaki, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The recognition of required treatments for cerebral palsy (CP) patients, including orthopedic surgery, differs according to region. This study was performed to identify factors associated with satisfactory changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. Methods 358 patients were selected for the questionnaire survey. The following information was collected: gender, primary disease, age of initial surgery, total procedural count, operated sites, satisfaction of postoperative rehabilitation frequency, ideal amount of postoperative rehabilitation sessions per week, frequency of voluntary home training per week, satisfaction of the timing of surgery and the current satisfaction with the changes in physical function after the orthopedic surgery. We classified the patients into the satisfied and dissatisfied group according to satisfactory changes in physical function after the surgery. We performed unpaired t-tests and chi-square tests to determine the variables that differed significantly between the groups. Variables with a p value of <0.2 were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The logistic model was revised and summed up to two potential predictors of postsurgical satisfaction with physical function: satisfaction with the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation sessions and the orthopedic surgery of the hip (distinction hit ratio, 75.4%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation and history of hip surgery seemed to be related to the satisfaction with the changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27135609

  10. Institution of The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgical Protocol reduced orthopedic surgical site infections (SSI) rates.

    PubMed

    Watson, Paul A; Watson, Luke; Torress-Cook, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Control of surgical site infections (SSI) is imperative for the safety of our patients. As orthopedic surgeons we strive to have the lowest infection rate possible for all our surgical procedures. this study evaluates the effects of a simple outpatient peri-operative patient cleaning protocol (The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol) on SSI rates. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital's infection rate database for all procedures from July 2005 until February 2011 performed by one general orthopedic surgeon (PAW) within one hospital system. The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol was instituted on January 1(st), 2009. We calculated and compared the deep and superficial SSI rate for orthopedic surgeries performed before and after the Outpatient Protocol was instituted. All patients had a minimum of one-year follow-up data. Lowest previously published estimated costs for SSI were used for a cost analysis ($17,708). The July 1(st), 2005 through December 31(st), 2008 SSI rate was 1.0% (13/1292). From January 1(st), 2009 through February 28(th), 2011 the SSI rate was zero (0/875). the SSI rates decreased 100%. Due to the reduction in SSI, the hospital saved a minimum of $154,059 over a two year period. In this retrospective review, the Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol dramatically reduced the overall SSI rate to zero and saved money. We believe this is a simple, effective protocol that can be used for all orthopedic surgical procedures.

  11. Disaster Victim Identification using Orthopedic Implants in the 2011 East-Japan Earthquake and Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Numata, Norio; Makinae, Haruka; Yoshida, Wataru; Daimon, Masao; Murakami, Hideki

    2017-03-01

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake (magnitude 9.0) devastated Japan's east coast, and the associated tsunami resulted in social and mechanical destruction. Search for the missing people is still ongoing. Surgical implants are common in the general population. Medical implants usually have lot numbers, and their forensic use is common for victim identification. This investigation was conducted mainly in the cities of Kamaishi and Otsuchi, both of which were affected by the tsunami disaster in 2011. We visited 6 mortuaries with the police between March 20 (9 days after the tsunami) and April 20 (40 days after the tsunami) to examine the presence of surgical scars and related information. Unidentified human remains were investigated by visual and tactile examination. We also visited temples where the ashes were preserved. If implants were found, their lot numbers and estimated surgical procedures were recorded to determine positive identification. Ten of 233 sets of unidentified human remains before cremation displayed characteristics of a potential past surgical history. However, only 2 of these 233 sets had orthopedic implants. Instead, non-combustible orthopedic implants were found and recognized in 8 of the 331 sets of unidentified human ashes in the temples after cremation; the lot numbers were fully legible in 2 of the 8 sets. We estimated the surgical procedures, which led to positive identification. In conclusion, lot numbers and the surgical knowledge of orthopedic surgeons could assist with the positive identification of disaster victims. However, the relevant information can be erased after cremation.

  12. Surgical Management and Reconstruction Training (SMART) Course for International Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao-Hua; Patel, Kushal R; Caldwell, Amber M; Coughlin, R Richard; Hansen, Scott L; Carey, Joseph N

    The burden of complex orthopedic trauma in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is exacerbated by soft-tissue injuries, which can often lead to amputations. This study's purpose was to create and evaluate the Surgical Management and Reconstruction Training (SMART) course to help orthopedic surgeons from LMICs manage soft-tissue defects and reduce the rate of amputations. In this prospective observational study, orthopedic surgeons from LMICs were recruited to attend a 2-day SMART course taught by plastic surgery faculty in San Francisco. Before the course, participants were asked to assess the burden of soft-tissue injury and amputation encountered at their respective sites of practice. A survey was then given immediately and 1-year postcourse to evaluate the quality of instructional materials and the course's effect in reducing the burden of amputation, respectively. Fifty-one practicing orthopedic surgeons from 25 countries attended the course. No participant reported previously attempting a flap reconstruction procedure to treat a soft-tissue defect. Before the course, participants cumulatively reported 580-970 amputations performed annually as a result of soft-tissue defects. Immediately after the course, participants rated the quality and effectiveness of training materials to be a mean of ≥4.4 on a Likert scale of 5 (Excellent) in all 14 instructional criteria. Of the 34 (66.7%) orthopedic surgeons who completed the 1-year postcourse survey, 34 (100%, P < 0.01) reported performing flaps learned at the course to treat soft-tissue defects. Flap procedures prevented 116 patients from undergoing amputation; 554 (93.3%) of the cumulative 594 flaps performed by participants 1 year after the course were reported to be successful. Ninety-seven percent of course participants taught flap reconstruction techniques to colleagues or residents, and a self-reported estimate of 28 other surgeons undertook flap reconstruction as a result of information dissemination by

  13. Infection Mitigation Efficacy of Photoactive Titania on Orthopedic Implant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Hershey, Ryan; Aboelzahab, Asem; Goel, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    In order to impede infection and achieve accelerated wound healing in the postorthopaedic surgery patients, a simple and benign procedure for creating nanotubular or nanofibrillar structure of photoactive TiO2 on the surface of Ti plates and wires is described. The nanoscale TiO2 films on titanium were grown by hydrothermal processing in one case and by anodization in the presence of dilute mineral acids under mild and benign conditions in the other. Confocal microscopy results demonstrated at least 50% reduction in the population of E. coli colonies (concentration 2.15 × 107 cells/mL) on TiO2-coated implants upon an IR exposure of up to 30 s; it required ∼20 min of exposure to UV beam for the same effect. These findings suggest the probability of eliminating wound infection during and after orthopedic surgical procedures by brief illumination of photoactive titania films on the implants with an IR beam. PMID:21994891

  14. Blog and Podcast Watch: Orthopedic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Grock, Andrew; Rezaie, Salim; Swaminathan, Anand; Min, Alice; Shah, Kaushal H; Lin, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight AIR board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM) score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. A total of 87 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the three AIR posts and the 14 honorable mentions are summarized. The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on orthopedic emergencies.

  15. RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Carlos; Reis, Joana; Potes, José Alberto Caeiro; Fonseca, Fernando Manuel Ferreira; Simões, José Antonio Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time. PMID:27004181

  16. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races.

  17. Piriformis fossa - an anatomical and orthopedics consideration.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, O P; Mittal, P S; Naik, D C

    2014-03-01

    Piriformis fossa is an important anatomical landmark having significant clinical value in orthopedic surgery; but its location and anatomical relationship with surrounding structures are not clearly defined. Hence it is necessary to clearly describe it in respect to anatomical and orthopedic aspect. Fifty Cadaveric dry femoral bones and Dissection of the four hip specimens were used to study the Piriformis fossa in respect to location and its relationship with surrounding structures. Clinical importance of piriformis fossa was determined in reference to antegrade femoral nail insertion. Piriformis muscle and so called piriformis fossa are unrelated entities. Piriformis fossa is anatomical site of insertion of obturator externus. In dry cadaveric femora; fossa was not always located in the direction of femoral shaft. It was located in the direction of femoral shaft in 24% cases only. In 68% cases femoral canal was aligned lateral and in 8% cases, it lies medial to the fossa. Piriformis fossa should be named as Trorchanteric fossa or Obturator fossa for better anatomical description. So called Piriformis fossa does not found to be universally corresponding to femoral shaft hence selection of entry site should be based on variable proximal femur and area on femur which corresponds to femoral shaft.

  18. Sonographic assessment of orthopedic hardware impingement on soft tissues of the limbs.

    PubMed

    Guillin, R; Bianchi, S

    2012-02-01

    Ultrasonography allows high-resolution imaging with real-time correlation to patients' pain, and it is an indispensable tool for assessing disorders associated with soft tissue impingement by orthopedic hardware. The sonographic examination in these cases begins with static studies, and images are then obtained during active and passive joint mobilization designed to reproduce the conflict with the orthopedic hardware. Ultrasonography is particularly useful for documenting hardware-induced injury to tendons and synovial bursae, but also those of muscles and vascular structures. The frequency of hardware-soft tissue conflict varies with the site and type of surgical procedure, but in all cases ultrasonography plays an essential role in identifying this type of conflict and assessing the soft tissue lesions it causes.

  19. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration. PMID:26392807

  20. Strategies for reducing the complication of orthopedic pain perioperatively.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Laurie R

    2008-12-01

    Equine orthopedic pain management has become a growing area of interest. Its importance has been emphasized in many studies showing that better pain management results in decreased postoperative complications such as chronic pain, support-limb laminitis, gastric ulceration, and gastrointestinal disease. This review is meant for the surgeon managing orthopedic pain pre-, peri-, and postoperatively.

  1. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  2. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  3. Young Children's Attitudes toward Orthopedic and Sensory Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGrella, Lanier H.; Green, Virginia P.

    1984-01-01

    Attitudes of 64 nondisabled children (three to seven years old) toward orthopedic and sensory disabilities were examined via the Test of Early Attitudes toward Disability. Responses indicated that bias against orthopedic and sensory disabilities increases with age but is not present among three-year-olds. (Author/CL)

  4. Delay to orthopedic consultation for isolated limb injury

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Dominique M.; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Parent, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe referral mechanisms for referral to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries in a public health care system and to identify factors affecting access. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING Orthopedic surgery service in a level 1 trauma centre in Montreal, Que. PARTICIPANTS We conducted a prospective study of 166 consecutive adults (mean age 48 years) referred to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries during a 4-month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported data on the nature of the trauma, the elapsed time between injury and orthopedic consultation, the number and type of previous primary care consultations, sociodemographic characteristics, and the level of satisfaction with care. RESULTS Average time between the injury and orthopedic consultation was 89 hours (range 3 to 642), with an average of 68 hours (range 0 to 642) for delay between primary care consultation and orthopedic consultation. A total of 36% of patients with time-sensitive diagnoses had unacceptable delays to orthopedic consultation according to the Quebec Orthopaedic Association guidelines. Lower limb injury, consulting first at another hospital, living far from the trauma centre, patient perception of low severity, and having a soft tissue injury were associated with longer delays. CONCLUSION Identifying gaps and risk factors for slower access might help improve referral mechanisms for orthopedic consultation. PMID:19826162

  5. Trends in Treatment, Outcomes, and Incidence of Orthopedic Surgery in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Observational Cohort Study Using the Japanese National Database of Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Nishino, Jinju; Izawa, Naohiro; Naito, Masashi; Hirose, Jun; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasui, Testuro; Saisho, Koichiro; Tohma, Shigeto

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the changes in clinical outcome, treatment, and incidence of orthopedic surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from 2004 to 2014. Data were studied from the Japanese nationwide cohort database, NinJa (National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan), from 2004 to 2014. The time trends in the incidence of orthopedic procedures were analyzed using linear regression analysis. The cross-sectional annual data were compared between 2004 and 2014 to analyze the changes in clinical outcome and treatment. The incidence of orthopedic surgeries in patients with RA consistently decreased from 72.2 procedures per 1000 patients in 2004 to 51.5 procedures per 1000 patients in 2014 (regression coefficient = -0.0028, 95% CI -0.0038 to -0.0019, p < 0.001). The greatest reduction was found in total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty. Disease activity and functional disability improved significantly over this decade. The proportions of patients receiving methotrexate and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs significantly increased from 39.6% and 1.7% in 2004 to 63.8% and 27.4% in 2014, respectively. The overall incidence of orthopedic surgeries in patients with RA significantly decreased, accompanied by improved clinical outcomes because of the expanded use of effective drugs; however, the declining trend differed between procedures or locations. The results from the present study suggest that there might be a change in supply and demand for orthopedic surgeries.

  6. Breastfeeding is early functional jaw orthopedics (an introduction).

    PubMed

    Page, D C

    2001-01-01

    Breastfeeding places beneficial orthopedic forces on the jaws, similar to the forces of Functional Jaw Orthopedics--the newest form of orthodontics. To date most breastfeeding benefits have been attributed to the content of mother's milk. The true orthopedic benefits of breastfeeding, suckling, deserve more definitive attention and research. Breastfeeding is early preventive Functional Jaw Orthopedics because breastfeeding forces impact the jaws during a very rapid period of infant jaw growth. Breast suckling aids proper development of the jaws which form the gateway to the human airway. Bottle, pacifier and digit sucking deform jaws and airways. Forward forces of suckling clearly oppose the backward forces of sucking. Dentists who understand the positive impact of forward orthopedic forces on the jaws should support and advocate exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months.

  7. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  8. Primary Payer Status is Associated with the Use of Nerve Block Placement for Ambulatory Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick J.; Brennan, Meghan; Moser, M.; Boezaart, Andre P.; Bihorac, Azra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although more than 30 million patients in the United States undergo ambulatory surgery each year, it remains unclear what percentage of these patients receive a perioperative nerve block. We reviewed data from the 2006 National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS) to determine the demographic, socioeconomic, geographic, and clinical factors associated with the likelihood of nerve block placement for ambulatory orthopedic surgery. The primary outcome of interest was the association between primary method of payment and likelihood of nerve block placement. Additionally, we examined the association between type of surgical procedures, patient demographics, and hospital characteristics with the likelihood of receiving a nerve block. Methods This cross-sectional study reviewed 6,000 orthopedic anesthetics from the 2006 NSAS dataset, which accounted for over 3.9 million orthopedic anesthetics when weighted. The primary outcome of this study addressed the likelihood of receiving a nerve block for orthopedic ambulatory surgery according to the patient’s primary method of payment. Secondary endpoints included differences in demographics, surgical procedures, side effects, complications, recovery profile, anesthesia staffing model, and total perioperative charges in those with and without nerve block. Results Overall, 14.9% of anesthetics in this sample involved a peripheral nerve block. Length of time in postoperative recovery, total perioperative time, and total charges were less for those receiving nerve blocks. Patients were more likely to receive a nerve block if their procedures were performed in metropolitan service areas (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.19-2.91, p=0.007) or freestanding surgical facilities (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.74-2.96, p<0.0001), and if payment for their surgery was supported by government programs (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.01-6.21, p=0.048) or private insurance (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.12-6.13, p=0.03) versus self-pay or charity care. Conclusion For patients

  9. Orthopedic applications of silicon nitride ceramics.

    PubMed

    Bal, B S; Rahaman, M N

    2012-08-01

    Silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) is a ceramic material developed for industrial applications that demand high strength and fracture resistance under extreme operating conditions. Recently, Si(3)N(4) has been used as an orthopedic biomaterial, to promote bone fusion in spinal surgery and to develop bearings that can improve the wear and longevity of prosthetic hip and knee joints. Si(3)N(4) has been implanted in human patients for over 3 years now, and clinical trials with Si(3)N(4) femoral heads in prosthetic hip replacement are contemplated. This review will provide background information and data relating to Si(3)N(4) ceramics that will be of interest to engineering and medical professionals. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Animal models of orthopedic implant infection.

    PubMed

    An, Y H; Friedman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Prosthetic infection following total joint replacement can have catastrophic results both physically and psychologically for patients, leading to complete failure of the arthroplasty, possible amputation, prolonged hospitalization, and even death. Although with the use of prophylactic antibiotics and greatly improved operating room techniques the infection rate has decreased markedly during the years, challenges still remain for better preventive and therapeutic measures. In this review the in vivo experimental methods for studies of prosthetic infection are discussed, concentrating on (1) the animal models that have been established and the use of these animal models for studies of pathogenesis of bacteria, behavior of biofilm, effect of biomaterials on prosthetic infection rate, and the effect of infection on biomaterial surfaces, and (2) how to design and conduct an animal model of orthopedic prosthetic infection including animal selection, implant fabrication, bacterial inoculation, surgical technique, and the methods for evaluating the results.

  11. Enhancing orthopedic implant bioactivity: refining the nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Moya, Sergio; Lu, ZuFu; Gregurec, Danijela; Zreiqat, Hala

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology open up new possibilities to produce biomimetic surfaces that resemble the cell in vivo growth environment at a nanoscale level. Nanotopographical changes of biomaterials surfaces can positively impact the bioactivity and ossointegration properties of orthopedic and dental implants. This review introduces nanofabrication techniques currently used or those with high potential for use as surface modification of biomedical implants. The interactions of nanotopography with water, proteins and cells are also discussed, as they largely determine the final success of the implants. Due to the well-documented effects of surface chemistry and microtopography on the bioactivity of the implant, we here elaborate on the ability of the nanofabrication techniques to combine the dual (multi) modification of surface chemistry and/or microtopography.

  12. Distraction osteogenesis: application to dentofacial orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Yen, S L

    1997-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical-orthopedic method for lengthening bone by separating or distracting a fracture callus. This technique has a long history in limb lengthening and has recently been used to lengthen mandibles and maxillae in human patients. Distraction osteogenesis represents a powerful method of producing unlimited quantities of living bone which can be formed along any plane of space. Because this method uses local host tissue, it offers many advantages over bone grafting. In the author's experience, large (10-22 mm) antero-posterior and vertical corrections of mandibles can be achieved using this technique. The purpose of this article is to review its biological basis and discuss recent clinical applications. This article reviews the history, theory, current management, and limitations of distraction osteogenesis in treating craniofacial anomalies.

  13. Nanotechnology and orthopedics: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Laurencin, Cato T; Kumbar, Sangamesh G; Nukavarapu, Syam Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Bone is a nanocomposite material comprised of hierarchically arranged collagen fibrils, hydroxyapatite and proteoglycans in the nanometer scale. Cells are accustomed to interact with nanostructures, thus providing the cells with a natural bone-like environment that potentially enhance bone tissue regeneration/repair. In this direction, nanotechnology provides opportunities to fabricate as well as explore novel properties and phenomena of functional materials, devices, and systems at the nanometer-length scale. Recent studies have provided significant insights into the influence of topographical features in regulating cell behavior. Topographical features provide essential chemical and physical cues that cells can recognize and elicit desired cellular functions including preferential adhesion, migration, proliferation, and expression of specific cell phenotype to bring desired effects. The current article will address some of the nanotechnology implications in addressing issues related to orthopedic implants performance and tissue engineering approach to bone repair/regeneration.

  14. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  15. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  16. Blog and Podcast Watch: Orthopedic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Rezaie, Salim; Swaminathan, Anand; Min, Alice; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lin, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. Methods The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight AIR board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM) score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27–29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. Results A total of 87 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the three AIR posts and the 14 honorable mentions are summarized. Conclusion The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on orthopedic emergencies. PMID:28435507

  17. The orthopedic diseases of ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Klaus O; Hamoud, Heshem; Allam, Adel H; Grossmann, Alexander; Nur El-Din, Abdel-Halim; Abdel-Maksoud, Gomaa; Soliman, Muhammad Al-Tohamy; Badr, Ibrahim; Sutherland, James D; Sutherland, M Linda; Akl, Mahmoud; Finch, Caleb E; Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C

    2015-06-01

    CT scanning of ancient human remains has the potential to provide insights into health and diseases. While Egyptian mummies have undergone CT scans in prior studies, a systematic survey of the orthopedic conditions afflicting a group of these ancient individuals has never been carried out. We performed whole body CT scanning on 52 ancient Egyptian mummies using technique comparable to that of medical imaging. All of the large joints and the spine were systematically examined and osteoarthritic (OA) changes were scored 0-4 using Kellgren and Lawrence classification. The cruciate ligaments and menisci could be identified frequently. There were much more frequent OA changes in the spine (25 mummies) than in the large joints (15 cases of acromioclavicular and/or glenohumeral joint OA changes, five involvement of the ankle, one in the elbow, four in the knee, and one in the hip). There were six cases of scoliosis. Individual mummies had the following conditions: juvenile aseptic necrosis of the hip (Perthes disease), stage 4 osteochondritis dissecans of the knee, vertebral compression fracture, lateral patella-femoral joint hyper-compression syndrome, severe rotator cuff arthropathy, rotator cuff impingement, hip pincer impingement, and combined fracture of the greater trochantor and vertebral bodies indicating obvious traumatic injury. This report includes the most ancient discovery of several of these syndromes. Ancient Egyptians often suffered painful orthopedic conditions. The high frequency of scoliosis merits further study. The pattern of degenerative changes in the spine and joints may offer insights into activity levels of these people. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.].

  19. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  20. Noticeable Variations in the Educational Exposure During Residency in Danish Orthopedic Departments.

    PubMed

    Brand, Eske; Fridberg, Marie; Knudsen, Ulrik Kragegaard; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    The objective of the study was to examine the educational exposure during residency in Danish orthopedic departments. Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Data were gathered from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014 through a nationwide web-based questionnaire containing 15 questions within the areas of workload, surgical procedures, outpatient clinic, and research activities. The residents targeted worked at small-to-large hospitals and in tertiary care centers. Every resident in Denmark (n = 163) with at least 3 active months at a department was included. Questionnaires with less than 80% completion were excluded. In total, 152 entries were registered. Among those, 27 did not meet the inclusion criteria and 29 were excluded, leaving 96 participants, representing 22 of 26 departments, for further analysis. The average number of operative procedures as primary surgeon was 16 (range: 8-35) per month. In all, 18 of 22 (81%) departments offered the possibility to participate in research facilitated by the department and 38 of 96 (40%) worked for free (an average of 10h a month [range: 3-60]) to increase the amount of surgical procedures. A large variation in the educational exposure was found among the Danish orthopedic departments. Numbers indicate that Danish residents, compared with their US counterparts, operate considerably less during residency. Most residents work overtime and many of them work for free to participate in more surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of Hardware Battery Drill in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Satish, Bhava R J; Shahdi, Masood; Ramarao, Duddupudi; Ranganadham, Atmakuri V; Kalamegam, Sundaresan

    2017-03-01

    Among the power drills (Electrical/Pneumatic/Battery) used in Orthopedic surgery, battery drill has got several advantages. Surgeons in low resource settings could not routinely use Orthopedic battery drills (OBD) due to the prohibitive cost of good drills or poor quality of other drills. "Hardware" or Engineering battery drill (HBD) is a viable alternative to OBD. HBD is easy to procure, rugged in nature, easy to maintain, durable, easily serviceable and 70 to 75 times cheaper than the standard high end OBD. We consider HBD as one of the cost effective equipment in Orthopedic operation theatres.

  2. Insights into Avicenna's knowledge of the science of orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Dalfardi, Behnam; Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Meibodi, Mohammad Kalantari

    2014-01-18

    The art of orthopedics traces its history back to ancient civilizations like those of the Egyptians. The evolution of this branch of medicine is indebted to investigations of many scientists, including Greek, Roman and Persian scholars. The Persian physician Avicenna (980-1037 AD) is one such scientist who investigated different aspects of orthopedics. It is possible to analyze Avicenna's knowledge of orthopedics and his contributions to this branch of medicine by an examination of his epic encyclopedia of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine).

  3. [Orthopedic shoes: Still in touch with the times?].

    PubMed

    Greitemann, B

    2015-11-01

    Deformities of the foot due to rheumatic disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, occur in 85-95% of patients during the course of their disease. This study investigates whether treatment with orthopedic shoes still has a place in modern therapies. Foot orthotics and technical orthopedic shoes can play an important role in purely conservative treatment as well as postoperative therapy. Due to a lack of knowledge concerning modern orthopedic shoe techniques, this treatment option has slipped out of focus--in part because of its association with the old-fashioned unshapely black orthopedic shoes. Nevertheless, these shoes can contribute significantly to maintenance of patient mobility; a factor of extreme importance to the individuals who already suffer considerably from the disease per se.

  4. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Orthopedic Health Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prevention Regular exercise, a balanced diet, and a healthful ...

  5. Orthopedic Health: Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know (quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Javascript on. How much do you know about osteoarthritis, its causes, and its therapies? Take this quiz ...

  6. The Effects of Standardized Feedback on Orthopedic Patient Evaluation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study examined whether there are performance differences between surgery clerks provided corrective reinforcement on orthopedic history and physical examination write-ups and those assessed by traditional feedback means when both groups are exposed to the feedback instrument. (MLW)

  7. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and is... gross motor activities, or to perform self-help skills and by adversely affected educational performance...

  8. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and is... gross motor activities, or to perform self-help skills and by adversely affected educational performance...

  9. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and is... gross motor activities, or to perform self-help skills and by adversely affected educational performance...

  10. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and is... gross motor activities, or to perform self-help skills and by adversely affected educational performance...

  11. 45 CFR 1308.12 - Eligibility criteria: Orthopedic impairment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... affect a child's learning. An orthopedic impairment involves muscles, bones, or joints and is... gross motor activities, or to perform self-help skills and by adversely affected educational performance...

  12. Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 4. Musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, D L; Oh, T H; Lim, P A; Brander, V A; Biundo, J J

    2000-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights assessment and therapeutic options in the rehabilitation of patients with orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. It is part of the chapter on rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article discusses new advances in such topics as idiopathic scoliosis, nontraumatic shoulder pain, rotator cuff tendinitis, and Dupuytren's disease.

  13. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0138 TITLE: Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...September 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome 5b. GRANT NUMBER...of immune cells isolated during a typical blood draw (6 regular blood draw tubes totaling 60mL) from soldiers exposed to metals in battle and

  14. Orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 intern curriculum improves initial orthopedic in-training examination performance.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Craig S; Nyland, John; Broome, Brandon

    2012-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of an educational curriculum designed for orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) interns to improve initial Orthopedic In-Training Examination (OITE) performance. A retrospective cohort study was performed that evaluated the PGY-1 intern OITE performance of one residency training program (n = 55) during 7-year periods before (1996-2002) and after structured curriculum implementation (2003-2009). Linear regression analysis revealed insignificant changes in median PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank during the precurriculum period (R = 0.08, P = 0.53). Postcurriculum period comparisons revealed significantly improving PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank (R = 0.46, P = 0.048). Pre- and postcurriculum median US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step I scores did not display statistically significant differences (218.2 ± 6.6 vs 229.1 ± 13.8, Mann-Whitney U test, z = -1.5, P = 0.10). Spearman rho correlations revealed a moderate relation (r = 0.61) between postcurriculum PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank and USMLE Step I score, but not during the precurriculum period. A moderate relation (r = 0.50) also was observed between postcurriculum USMLE Step I score and average OITE percentile rank during the 5-year residency program, but not during the precurriculum period. PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank improved significantly with the addition of a specially designed educational curriculum. The stronger USMLE Step I score and PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank relation observed during the postcurriculum period suggests that interns who participated in the educational curriculum were better prepared to translate general medical and patient care knowledge into orthopedic surgery knowledge.

  15. The 50 most cited articles in pediatric orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith D; Kovatch, Kevin; Namdari, Surena; Sankar, Wudbhuv; Flynn, John M; Dormans, John P

    2012-09-01

    Quantity of citation is often used as a surrogate measurement of an article's importance or relevance in a given field. To date, there has been no study on citation quantity or density in pediatric orthopedics. We present such an analysis. We reviewed all articles in the ISI web of science under the subheading 'orthopedics' to find articles of relevance to pediatric orthopedic surgeons. We subsequently analyzed the characteristics of the most cited articles in terms of the level of evidence, journal of publication, and subcategory of pediatric orthopedics. The majority of the top 50 articles in pediatric orthopedics were from the 1970s and 1980s. All the articles were in English. Uncontrolled case series comprised the largest single level of evidence (level IV). We describe the top 50 articles in pediatric orthopedics by citation and citation density. The level of evidence for highly cited papers was low. Although many of these articles were written by the great thinkers of our field, a need exists for more rigorous methodology.

  16. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What's on the Horizon?

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future.

  17. [Technical orthopedics. Importance in an increasingly operatively oriented faculty].

    PubMed

    Greitemann, B; Maronna, U

    2013-10-01

    The foundation of the German Society for Orthopedics in 1901 was due to a separation from the faculty of surgery because a surgical approach alone did not adequately deal with the symptoms. Orthopedists were initially considered as a fringe group. The conservative treatment approach was initially at the forefront and operative measures were a side line. The main aim was the rehabilitation of patients into a normal life as best as possible. In the conservative area treatment with orthopedic technical aids and appliances rapidly came to play an important role and a great multitude of technical appliances were developed with sometimes very different possible applications. Despite the clearly improved operative treatment approaches in orthopedics and trauma surgery, technical orthopedics still plays a substantial role even today. Healing and supportive aids and appliances are of decisive importance for the treatment of a multitude of diseases and handicaps. They stabilize and improve operative treatment results and often result in new approaches. This depends on cooperation between technicians, therapists and physicians in a team, even in the scientific field. Evidence-based studies on the effectiveness of technical aids are currently still uncommon but recently some clear evidence for effectiveness could be shown. Scientifically this is a very varied field of work. The demographic development presents new requirements which must be dealt with. Technical solutions are often very promising especially in this field. Technical orthopedics remains an important component of the specialty of orthopedics and trauma surgery and with an increasing tendency due to more recent research and development.

  18. Preferred use of polyhexanide in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Jörn B; Hoff, Paula; Pfitzner, Tilman; Preininger, Bernd; Andreas, Kristin; Buttgereit, Frank; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-10-05

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, the most frequently used antiseptic is polyhexanide. Its favored application is based on prepossessing tissue compatibility in contrast to various antiseptics and a high antimicrobiological effect. Recent studies showed toxic effects of this antiseptic on human chondrocytes. The aim of this study was to further analyze the toxic and apoptotic effects of polyhexanide on primary human chondrocytes. The hypothesis of this study was that polyhexanide induces apoptosis on human chondrocytes. Primary human chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from human donors with osteoarthritis of the knee who underwent total arthroplasty and had no indication of infection. Polyhexanide at a standard concentration of 0.04% was added to the monolayer cultures. Early and late apoptotic cells were analyzed by flow cytometric detection of annexin V, active caspases, and 7AAD, and by fluorescence microscopy using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increase of annexin V and active caspases expression of human chondrocytes after incubation with polyhexanide. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated a high number of annexin V positive and propidium iodide negative early apoptotic cells. The data show that polyhexanide promotes apoptosis on primary human chondrocytes in vitro, which may indicate the use of polyhexanide in septic joint surgery. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    PubMed

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  20. A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system.

    PubMed

    Kong, M; Du, Z; Sun, L; Fu, L; Jia, Z; Wu, D

    2005-01-01

    A robot-assisted orthopedic telesurgery system, named HIT-RAOTS, has been developed according to Chinese conventional operation method. Its main function includes obtaining images with information of position and orientation of fracture, providing fracture information for doctors, assisting the doctors to complete the reposition of fracture and locking operation of intramedullary nail. In this system, a 6-dof force-reflecting master device, with a pantographic parallelogram mechanisms driven by harmonic DC servomotors, is used to control the slave manipulator movement and to translate the force from the operating room to the surgeon console; A slave robot system integrated a 6-dof force sensor, with a parallel manipulator actuated by six AC servomotors, is applied for the accurate repositioning; A virtual simulation system and human-machine interface are also developed. PI controller based on local network is used to realize the teleoperation. Only little irradiation is issued during the reposition. It can assist surgeons to perform bone-setting more safely by reducing irradiation damage to both surgeries and patients, more easily by releasing the surgeons from the heavy operation and more perfect by improving accuracy of reposition.

  1. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    SciTech Connect

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  2. History of computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Douglas W; Simon, Timothy M

    2008-06-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery and navigation applications have a history rooted in the desire to link imaging technology with real-time anatomic landmarks. Although applications are still evolving in the clinical and research setting, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery has already demonstrated in certain procedures its potential for improving the surgeon's accuracy, reproducibility (once past the learning curve), and in reducing outlier outcomes. It is also being used as an educational tool to assist less experienced surgeons in interpreting measurements and precision placements related to well defined anatomic landmarks. It also can assist experienced surgeons, in real-time, plan their bony cuts, tunnel placement, and with ligament balancing. Presently, the additional time, the expense to acquire the needed software and hardware, and restricted reimbursement have slowed the widespread use of navigation. Its current applications have been primarily in joint replacement surgery, spine surgery, and trauma. It has not been widely used in the clinical setting for sports medicine procedures. Sports medicine applications such as individualizing tunnel placement in ligament surgery, opening wedge osteotomy with and without accompanying ligament reconstruction, and balancing and tensioning of the ligaments during the procedure (allowing real-time corrections if necessary) are currently being evaluated and being used on a limited clinical basis.

  3. Patient refusal for regional anesthesia in elderly orthopedic population: A cross-sectional survey at a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Asma Abdus; Afshan, Gauhar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of orthopedic surgeries, for example, total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. Although there are a number of treatment options for postoperative pain, a gold standard has not been established. In our institution, both general anesthesia and regional anesthesia (RA), are being offered to the elderly orthopedic population but RA is not frequently accepted by elderly population. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of various reasons for refusal of RA in elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries. Material and Methods: A prospective study conducted over a period of 1 year, had 549 patients with ages above 60 years who underwent different types of elective orthopedic procedures 182 patients who refused RA were interviewed according to a structured questionnaire designed to assess the reasons of refusal. Results: Most common reason for the refusal of RA was surgeon's choice (38.5%), whereas 20.3% of the patients were unaware about the RA. There was a significant association between female gender and refusing RA due to backache (17.2%) and fear of being awake during the operation (24.1%) respectively. Conclusion: This survey showed that the main reasons among elderly female population were the fear of remaining awake and backache. However, overall it was the surgeon's choice which made patients refuse RA, and the anesthesiologists were the main source of information. PMID:27006550

  4. High early post-operative complication rate after elective aseptic orthopedic implant removal of upper and lower limb.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Heilgeist, Eva; Tinelli, Marco; Bischel, Oliver E

    2017-09-01

    The necessity of orthopedic implant removal is under intense discussion and even if it is performed as an elective procedure, the risk of complications is present. Aim of the study was to identify parameters responsible for an increased risk of early post-operative complications after elective aseptic orthopedic implant removal. We reviewed 1545 cases of aseptic and elective orthopedic implant removal between 2009 and 2011. The patient's demographic data, time and duration of operation, patient's comorbidities and presence of complications in the first four weeks after implant removal were evaluated. Patients with signs of infection at the time of the surgical procedure were excluded from this study. 579 women and 966 men who underwent elective aseptic orthopedic implant removal were identified. Mean age at implant removal was 42 years and mean duration of the surgical procedure was 37 minutes. In this cohort, 70 patients (4.5%) underwent elective aseptic implant removal after 6pm. 52 patients (3.37%) operated on during daytime suffered from complications postoperatively and 5 patients (0.3%) who were operated on during the night experienced complications. The parameters age, sex, BMI and surgeon showed no statistically significant differences for the risk of postoperative complications. Patients' comorbidities such as diabetes seem to have influence but were not statistically significant either. Patients with revision surgery since their first operation, nocturnal surgery and longer duration of the procedure showed a statistically significant higher risk for complications, especially in the lower leg. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevention and management of postoperative delirium among older patients on an orthopedic surgical unit: a best practice implementation project.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Pamela K

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is an acute state of confusion that is often seen in older patients after major orthopedic surgical procedures. It is associated with increased costs of care, morbidity, delayed functional recovery, and prolonged hospital stay. Identification of predictive risk factors, early diagnosis and treatment, and implementation of environmental controls can minimize the impact of postoperative delirium. This project measured pre- and post intervention compliance with best practice in the prevention and management of postoperative delirium.

  6. Colored Indicator Undergloves Increase the Detection of Glove Perforations by Surgeons During Small Animal Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Oliver P.; Parsons, Kevin J.; Burton, Neil J.; Langley‐Hobbs, Sorrel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of colored indicator gloves affects perforation detection rate and to identify risk factors for glove perforation during veterinary orthopedic surgery. Study Design Prospective randomized controlled trial. Sample Population 574 double pairs of gloves worn during 300 orthopedic surgical procedures (2,296 gloves). Methods Primary and assistant surgeons double‐gloved for all orthopedic surgical procedures. Type of inner glove (standard or colored indicator) was randomized for the first 360 double pairs of gloves worn by surgeons during 180 procedures. Perforations detected by surgeons were recorded and gloves changed if requested. For a further 120 procedures, indicator gloves were used exclusively. All gloves were leak‐tested after surgery to identify perforations. Association between potential risk factors and perforation was explored using multivariate logistical regression analysis. Results Glove perforations occurred during 43% of surgeries with a mean of 2.3 holes/surgery. Inner gloves were intact in 63% of glove pairs where an outer perforation occurred. Intraoperative perforation detection was improved when colored indicator gloves were worn (83% sensitivity) vs. standard gloves (34% sensitivity; P<.001). Independent risk factors for perforation were placement of plates and/or screws (P=.001; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.0), placement of an external skeletal fixator (P=.002; OR=7.0; 95% CI, 2.1–23.8), use of orthopedic wire (P=.011; OR=2.4; 95% CI, 1.2–4.7), and primary surgeon being board‐certified (P=.016; OR=1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.1). Conclusion Increased surgeon recognition of glove perforations through use of colored indicator gloves enables prompt change of gloves if perforation occurs and may reduce potential contamination of the surgical site. PMID:27412490

  7. The Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology: A Model for Academic Collaboration in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Conway, Devin James; Coughlin, Richard; Caldwell, Amber; Shearer, David

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established the Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology (IGOT), an initiative within the department of orthopedic surgery. The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. IGOT currently has relationships with teaching hospitals in Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Nicaragua, and Nepal. The organizational structure of IGOT is built on four pillars: Global Surgical Education (GSE), Global Knowledge Exchange (GKE), Global Research Initiative (GRI), and Global Leadership and Advocacy. GSE focuses on increasing surgical knowledge and technical proficiency through hands-on educational courses. The GKE facilitates the mutual exchange of surgeons and trainees among IGOT and its partners. This includes a global resident elective that allows UCSF residents to complete an international rotation at one of IGOT's partner sites. The GRI strives to build research capacity and sponsor high-quality clinical research projects that address questions relevant to local partners. The fourth pillar, Global Leadership and Advocacy aims to increase awareness of the global impact of musculoskeletal injury through national and international courses and events, such as the Bay Area Global Health Film Festival. At the core of each tenet is the collaboration among IGOT and its international partners. Over the last decade, IGOT has experienced tremendous growth and maturation in its partnership model based on cumulative experience and the needs of its partners.

  8. The Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology: A Model for Academic Collaboration in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Devin James; Coughlin, Richard; Caldwell, Amber; Shearer, David

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established the Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology (IGOT), an initiative within the department of orthopedic surgery. The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. IGOT currently has relationships with teaching hospitals in Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Nicaragua, and Nepal. The organizational structure of IGOT is built on four pillars: Global Surgical Education (GSE), Global Knowledge Exchange (GKE), Global Research Initiative (GRI), and Global Leadership and Advocacy. GSE focuses on increasing surgical knowledge and technical proficiency through hands-on educational courses. The GKE facilitates the mutual exchange of surgeons and trainees among IGOT and its partners. This includes a global resident elective that allows UCSF residents to complete an international rotation at one of IGOT’s partner sites. The GRI strives to build research capacity and sponsor high-quality clinical research projects that address questions relevant to local partners. The fourth pillar, Global Leadership and Advocacy aims to increase awareness of the global impact of musculoskeletal injury through national and international courses and events, such as the Bay Area Global Health Film Festival. At the core of each tenet is the collaboration among IGOT and its international partners. Over the last decade, IGOT has experienced tremendous growth and maturation in its partnership model based on cumulative experience and the needs of its partners. PMID:28713803

  9. Assessing the Value of Work Done by an Orthopedic Resident During Call

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. Benjamin; Huntington, William P.; Frick, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medicare funding for graduate medical education may be cut in the next federal budget. Objective We quantified the value of work that 1 orthopedic surgery resident performs on call and compare it to Medicare educational funding received by the hospital for each resident. Methods A single orthopedic resident's on-call emergency department and inpatient consults were collected during a 2-year call period at a large, tertiary, level-1 trauma center. Patient charts were reviewed; ICD-9 codes, evaluation and management, and procedural treatment were recorded. Codes were converted into work relative value units. The number of work relative value units was multiplied by the 2012 Medicare rate of $34.03 per relative value units to calculate the monetary value of resident work. Results Of 120 resident call shifts, 115 call sheets (95.8%) were available for review, and 1160 patients were seen (average  =  10.09 consults/call). A total of 4688 work relative value units were generated (average  =  40.76 per night), and the total dollar value generated was $159,561 ($1,387 per call) during the 2 years of call (average  =  $79,780 annually). Evaluation and management codes generated 2340 work relative value units, with a calculated dollar amount of $79,648, and procedural codes generated 2348 work relative value units, with a calculated dollar amount of $79,913. Conclusions Our institution estimated Medicare direct medical education support per resident at $40,000/y, and total funding was $130,000/resident. At our tertiary care institution, the unbilled work of 1 orthopedic resident on call amounts to more than 60% of Medicare direct medical education and indirect medical education funding annually. PMID:26279786

  10. [Postoperative fever in orthopedic and urologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Federico; Myburg, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Marisa B; Urtasun, Martin; De Oca, Luis Montes; Silberman, Andres; Lambierto, Alberto; Gnocchi, Cesar A

    2008-01-01

    Post-operative fever incidence varies widely. In clean and clean-contaminated surgery the non-infectious fever is more frequent than the infectious fever. We performed a prospective study including 303 patients who underwent orthopedic and urologic elective surgery. The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of post-operative fever, its etiology, the relationship between time of onset and the etiology, and the usefulness of extensive fever work-up to determine post-operative infection. The incidence of post-operative fever was 14% (42/303) of which 81% (34/42) was noninfectious and 19% (8/42) was infectious. The etiology of the fever in the first 48 hours after surgery was always non-infectious (p < 0.001). An extensive fever work-up was performed in patients who presented fever only after the initial 48 hours of surgery with normal physical examination (n = 19) consisting of chest x-ray, blood (2) and urine cultures. The chest x-ray was normal in all the patients, the urine cultures were positive in four cases (21%, IC 95%: 6-45) and the blood cultures in only one case (5%, IC 95%: 0.1-26). Seven patients had post-operative infections without fever as a clinical sign. The most frequently observed etiology of post-operative fever was non-infectious, related to the normal inflammatory host response to surgery. Based on the present results, the extensive fever work-up performed to investigate post-operative infection does not seem to be a useful tool. The diagnosis of post-operative infection was based on clinical follow up and the correct interpretation of the patient's symptoms and signs.

  11. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  12. Use of a Tilting Orthopedic Fracture Table to Facilitate Proper Patient Positioning During Intrathecal Neurolysis With Hyperbaric Phenol: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Loo, Nathaniel H; Matchett, Gerald

    2017-05-17

    We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with metastatic cervical cancer and a large mass eroding into the pelvis and left lumbosacral plexus. The patient had intractable left lower extremity pain refractory to standard therapies, and she elected to undergo intrathecal neurolysis. A diagnostic intrathecal block was performed at the T11-12 interspace followed by intrathecal neurolysis with 6% phenol in glycerin on a subsequent date. During both procedures, we used a tilting radiolucent orthopedic fracture table to maintain strict left lateral-supine positioning. A tilting orthopedic fracture table may be a valuable adjunct to ensure positional stability during intrathecal neurolysis.

  13. Managing orthopedics and neurosciences costs through standard treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, E S; Pluth, T E

    1994-06-01

    High-cost, high-volume specialty programs such as orthopedics and neurosciences find themselves in a position of evaluating the costs and in some cases the appropriateness of medical practices in response to payer scrutiny and provider selection processes. Orthopedics and neurosciences programs are at a stage of development analogous to that of cardiovascular care several years ago. Many of the same trends have come into play, such as payer "carve-outs" for orthopedic services, payer selection of centers of excellence based on cost and quality, reduction of Medicare reimbursement, greater use of high-cost technology, the decline of profitability due to "older, sicker, and tougher" patients, and the recent emergence of national orthopedic specialty networks oriented to national contracts for care. In an era in which payers demand value on both sides of the cost-plus-quality equation, programs are challenged to maximize the return on a patient population rife with "no-win" situations. In the orthopedic service line these include a high proportion of Medicare patients and chronic conditions such as workers' compensation medical back cases or repetitive motion injuries, which can be elusive to diagnose and expensive to treat. Many hospitals continue to lose money on joint replacement surgeries, the largest-volume orthopedic inpatient service, primarily because of the high Medicare population and the cost of implants. Neuroservices, while still relatively well reimbursed, face a rising proportion of Medicare payments as patients live longer and develop chronic, degenerative conditions. Inpatient days are decreasing due to payer pressures to limit hospital stays and to shift inpatient care to outpatient services. Some hospitals "have lost interest in (the orthopedic) service line during the last five years because of recent trends in orthopedic-related inpatient volume and payment." But by managing costs strategically, both the neurosciences and orthopedics service lines

  14. Computer assisted 3D pre-operative planning tool for femur fracture orthopedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Pavan; Xie, Sheng Quan; Delmas, Patrice; Xu, Wei Liang

    2010-02-01

    Femur shaft fractures are caused by high impact injuries and can affect gait functionality if not treated correctly. Until recently, the pre-operative planning for femur fractures has relied on two-dimensional (2D) radiographs, light boxes, tracing paper, and transparent bone templates. The recent availability of digital radiographic equipment has to some extent improved the workflow for preoperative planning. Nevertheless, imaging is still in 2D X-rays and planning/simulation tools to support fragment manipulation and implant selection are still not available. Direct three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) are also still restricted to a minority of complex orthopedic procedures. This paper proposes a software tool which allows orthopedic surgeons to visualize, diagnose, plan and simulate femur shaft fracture reduction procedures in 3D. The tool utilizes frontal and lateral 2D radiographs to model the fracture surface, separate a generic bone into the two fractured fragments, identify the pose of each fragment, and automatically customize the shape of the bone. The use of 3D imaging allows full spatial inspection of the fracture providing different views through the manipulation of the interactively reconstructed 3D model, and ultimately better pre-operative planning.

  15. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Harold A; Finkler, Elissa S; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P; Nystrom, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution's residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population.

  16. Orthopedic injury in electric bicycle-related collisions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Yun, Zhe; Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yucai; Yang, Tongtao; Zheng, Lianhe; Qian, Jixian

    2017-05-19

    Although electric bicycle-related injuries have become the most common reason for hospitalization due to a road crash in China, no study has comprehensively investigated electric bicycle collisions and their impact on orthopedic injuries; such a study may provide evidence to support a new road safety policy. A retrospective review of orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle collisions was performed in an urban trauma center. We collected variables including age, gender, location of fracture, presence of open or closed fractures, concomitant vascular, and neurologic injuries. A total of 2,044 cases were involved in electric bicycle collisions. The orthopedic injury victims were predominantly male and middle aged. The most common orthopedic injury was a femur fracture. Open fractures frequently involved the forearm and tibia/fibula. Male patients were more likely to suffer from multiple fractures and associated injuries than female patients. Fewer patients age 60 years old or older wore helmets at the time of the accident compared to those in other age groups. Orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle-related accidents cause patients substantial suffering that could lead to serious social consequences. Helmet use and protective clothing or similar safety gear, especially for electric bicycle users, should be required to provide greater protection.

  17. Desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J. G.; McGowan, J. J.; Ricci, M. A.; McFarlane, G.

    1997-01-01

    Research has shown that diagnostic quality images for most teleradiology applications requires a sophisticated telemedicine system and access to a large amount of bandwidth. While the ideal standards have been set by those involved in evaluating teleradiology, these standards are impractical for many small rural health centers which deliver routine trauma care. While there is no disagreement about the ultimate need for this level of teleradiology support, the purpose of this research was to determine whether Orthopedists would be able to read plain radiographs of orthopedic trauma injuries using a desktop teleradiology system in support of rural trauma care. METHOD: Two radiology residents and two orthopedic residents viewed forty radiographs, twenty through a desktop teleradiology system and twenty in person. Diagnostic findings and certainty of diagnosis were recorded. FINDINGS: There was no statistically significant difference between modalities in orthopedic residents' ability to correctly diagnose orthopedic trauma injuries. Further, for those instances when the diagnosis was imprecise, the residents were aware of their inability to make an accurate diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Although the study was relatively limited and further research needs to be done, the use of desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma consultation is a promising alternative to the more expensive forms of telemedicine technology. PMID:9357657

  18. The effects of maitland orthopedic manual therapy on improving constipation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of interventions on constipation and to provide basic data for physical therapy in internal medicine. [Subjects and Methods] The colon transit times of 30 subjects were measured and after the interventions. Fifteen subjects were assigned to a Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group, and 15 subjects were assigned to a dietary fiber group. [Results] The analysis of changes in colon transit time showed statistically significant differences in left colon transit time, rectosigmoid colon transit time, and total colon transit time for the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group and statistically significant differences in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time for the dietary fiber group. An analysis of group differences in the effects of Maitland orthopedic manual therapy and dietary fiber showed that the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group achieved statistically significantly larger declines in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time compared with the dietary fiber group. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that Maitland orthopedic manual therapy can be an effective treatment method for internal conditions such as functional constipation by almost normalizing the colon transit time, not only by improving the symptoms of constipation but also by facilitating intestinal movements. PMID:27821950

  19. The effects of maitland orthopedic manual therapy on improving constipation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of interventions on constipation and to provide basic data for physical therapy in internal medicine. [Subjects and Methods] The colon transit times of 30 subjects were measured and after the interventions. Fifteen subjects were assigned to a Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group, and 15 subjects were assigned to a dietary fiber group. [Results] The analysis of changes in colon transit time showed statistically significant differences in left colon transit time, rectosigmoid colon transit time, and total colon transit time for the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group and statistically significant differences in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time for the dietary fiber group. An analysis of group differences in the effects of Maitland orthopedic manual therapy and dietary fiber showed that the Maitland orthopedic manual therapy group achieved statistically significantly larger declines in rectosigmoid colon transit time and total colon transit time compared with the dietary fiber group. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that Maitland orthopedic manual therapy can be an effective treatment method for internal conditions such as functional constipation by almost normalizing the colon transit time, not only by improving the symptoms of constipation but also by facilitating intestinal movements.

  20. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Harold A.; Finkler, Elissa S.; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P.; Nystrom, Lukas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. Methods We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution’s residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. Results The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. Conclusions The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population. PMID:27528831

  1. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?*,**

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Evrim Eylem; Hosgün, Derya; Akan, Burak; Ates, Can; Gülhan, Meral

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair) between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the study. The incidences of PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) were evaluated, as were the factors influencing their development, such as type of operation, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 1,306 patients. The proportions of knee arthroplasty, hip arthroplasty, and femur fracture repair were 63.4%, 29.9%, and 6.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of PE and DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery was 1.99% and 2.22%, respectively. Most of the patients presented with PE and DVT (61.5% and 72.4%, respectively) within the first 72 h after surgery. Patients undergoing femur fracture repair, those aged ≥ 65 years, and bedridden patients were at a higher risk for developing VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that VTE was a significant complication of major orthopedic surgery, despite the use of thromboprophylaxis. Clinicians should be aware of VTE, especially during the perioperative period and in bedridden, elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age). PMID:23857692

  2. Orthostetrics: Management of Orthopedic Conditions in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leslie J; McConda, David B; Lalli, Trapper A J; Daffner, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    Managing orthopedic conditions in pregnant patients leads to challenges that must be carefully considered so that the safety of both the mother and the fetus is maintained. Both perioperative and intraoperative considerations must be made based on physiologic changes during pregnancy, risks of radiation, and recommendations for monitoring. Operative timing, imaging, and medication selection are also factors that may vary based on trimester and clinical scenario. Pregnancy introduces unique parameters that can result in undesirable outcomes for both mother and fetus if not handled appropriately. Ultimately, pregnant patients offer a distinct challenge to the orthopedic surgeon in that the well-being of 2 patients must be considered in all aspects of care. In addition, not only does pregnancy affect the management of orthopedic conditions but the pregnant state also causes physiologic changes that may actually induce various pathologies. These pregnancy-related orthopedic conditions can interfere with an otherwise healthy pregnancy and should be recognized as possible complications. Although the management of orthopedic conditions in pregnancy is often conservative, pregnancy does not necessarily preclude safely treating pathologies operatively. When surgery is considered, regional anesthesia provides less overall drug exposure to the fetus and less variability in fetal heart rate. Intraoperative fluoroscopy can be used when appropriate, with 360° fetal shielding if possible. Lateral decubitus positioning is ideal to prevent hypotension associated with compression of the inferior vena cava.

  3. [Reduction of blood transfusion need with aprotinin in orthopedic surgery. Spanish Study Group on the Use of Aprotinin in Hip Arthroplasty (GEEEAAC)].

    PubMed

    Llau Pitarch, J V; Díaz Alvarez, A; Polonio Enríquez, F; Castro Santamaría, M; Ruiz Moyano, J; García Enguita, M A

    2000-01-01

    Aprotinin is a protease inhibitor of interest for its antifibrinolytic effect of reducing perioperative bleeding in certain types of surgery, with wide use in heart surgery, liver transplantation and vascular surgery. The application of aprotinin during orthopedic surgery has recently been suggested. Such use is controversial, as there is lack of consensus as to the type of patient for whom aprotinin administration would be indicated, the surgical procedure during which it would be most effective (hip or knee arthroplasty, spinal arthrodesis, major tumor or septic surgery), the doses to administer, its safety and its real efficacy for conserving homologous blood. That is to say, there is no agreement as to the cost/benefit relation of aprotinin for the various types of orthopedic surgery. This critical review of the literature leads to the conclusion that aprotinin is a promising drug for use in orthopedic surgery, given that published studies have established the benefit in blood product savings and decreased blood loss during surgery.

  4. Is orthopedics more competitive today than when my attending matched? An analysis of National Resident Matching Program data for orthopedic PGY1 applicants from 1984 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Karnes, Jonathan M; Mayerson, Joel L; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated supply and demand trends for orthopedic postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) positions from 1984 to 2011 for the purpose of estimating national intercandidate competition over time. National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) data for orthopedic surgery from 1984 to 2011 were collected. Proxy variables including (total number of orthopedic applicants/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US senior applicants to orthopedics/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US seniors matching into orthopedics/number of US senior orthopedic applicants), (total number of matched orthopedic applicants/total number of orthopedic applicants), and (total number of US applicants who fail to match into orthopedics/total number of US senior applicants into orthopedics) as well as average United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores were used to gauge the level of competition between candidates and were compared over time. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Medical professors and medical students. The NRMP data suggested that the number of positions per applicant decreased or remained stable since 1984 and that the percentage of applicants who did not match was no higher now than in the past. This finding was primarily because of the relative decrease in the ratio of applicants to available PGY1 positions, which stems from the number of positions increasing more rapidly than the number of applicants. The NRMP data from 1984 to 2011 supported our hypothesis that intercandidate competition intensity for orthopedic PGY1 positions has not increased over time. The misconception that orthopedics is becoming more competitive likely arises from the increased number of applications submitted per candidate and the resulting relative importance placed on objective criteria such as United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores when programs select interview cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in horses: useful beyond orthopedic injuries?

    PubMed

    De Schauwer, Catharina; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Van Soom, Ann; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-12-01

    In the past decade, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have received much attention in equine veterinary medicine. The first therapeutic use of equine MSC was reported in 2003. Since then, the clinical application of MSC has been exploding with thousands of horses now treated worldwide. At present, MSC are mainly used in veterinary medicine to treat musculoskeletal diseases based on their ability to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. This is in marked contrast to human medicine, where MSC therapies are primarily focused on immune-mediated, inflammatory, and ischemic diseases. In this review, both orthopedic as well as non-orthopedic clinical applications of equine MSC are discussed. A brief overview is provided on the potential of MSC for non-orthopedic injuries with emphasis on those diseases, which occur in both humans and horses.

  6. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  7. Homo quintadus, computers and ROOMS (repetitive ocular orthopedic motion stress).

    PubMed

    Grant, A H

    1990-04-01

    Inherent conflict exists between computer systems and ocular physiology of Homo quintadus. Adverse ocular side effects of excessive saccades, excyclotorsion, supraduction, excessive field-of-fixation usage, capitas extension, astigmatic changes, otostatic reflex mismatching, and needless orthopedic malfunctions are imposed upon computer operators. Although the orthopedic dysfunctions are commonly grouped under the heading of Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI), the inextricable linkage to poor ocular-neurological function argues for postulation of a broader schema entitled Repetitive Ocular Orthopedic Motion Stress (ROOMS). Concepts of good tool usage, total tactile familiarity, total proprioceptive familiarity, and visual cone-of-comfort clash with the installed-equipment base and indicate need for an integrated computer work station to facilitate near covisualization of screen/keyboard and to afford freedom-of-choice for optimal hand/eye synchronicity. The advocacy of computer operators' needs by user-welfare groups, universities, labor unions, and government agencies are portents for achieving genuine improvements.

  8. Computer assisted outcomes research in orthopedics: total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Arslanian, C; Bond, M

    1999-06-01

    Long-term studies are needed to determine clinically relevant outcomes within the practice of orthopedic surgery. Historically, the patient's subjective feelings of quality of life have been largely ignored. However, there has been a strong movement toward measuring perceived quality of life through such instruments as the SF-36. In a large database from an orthopedic practice results are presented. First, computerized data entry using touch screen technology is not only cost effective but user friendly. Second, patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty surgeries make statistically significant improvements in seven of the eight domains of the SF-36 in the first 3 months after surgery. Additional statistically significant improvements over the next 6 to 12 months are also seen. The data are presented here in detail to demonstrate the benefits of a patient outcomes program, to enhance the understanding and use of outcomes data and to encourage further work in outcomes measurement in orthopedics.

  9. Evolving trauma and orthopedics training in the UK.

    PubMed

    Inaparthy, Praveen K; Sayana, Murali K; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing population of the UK has resulted in increasing demands on its healthcare service. Changes have been introduced in the UK medical training system to avoid loss of training time and make it more focused and productive. Modernizing medical careers (MMC) was introduced in 2005. This promised to reduce the training period for a safe trauma specialist, in trauma and orthopedics, to 10 years. At around the same time, the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) was introduced to reduce the working hours for junior doctors in training, to improve patient safety and also work-life balance of junior doctors. Introduction of the assessment tools from Orthopedic Competency assessment project (OCAP) will help tailor the training according to the needs of the trainee. The aim of this article is to review the changes in the UK orthopedic surgical training over the past two decades. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Antitumor Necrosis Factor Alfa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Bernardo Matos; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. International guidelines recommend interruption of anti-TNF medications in the perioperative period, but there are no randomized trials to support such recommendation. Objectives. To study literature evidence assessing the risk of surgical site infections in orthopedic surgery patients with RA using anti-TNF drugs, compared to untreated patients or those using conventional DMARD. Methods. Systematic review of cohort studies is concerning surgical site infections in orthopedic procedures in patients with RA. Results. Three studies were selected. Only one was considered of high-quality, albeit with low statistical power. The review resulted in inconclusive data, since the best quality study showed no significant differences between groups, while others showed increased risk of infections in patients using anti-TNF medications. Conclusion. It is unclear whether patients with RA using anti-TNF medications are at increased risk of surgical site infections. Randomized controlled trials or new high quality observational studies are needed to clarify the issue. PMID:22500176

  11. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  12. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges.

  13. The practicing orthopedic surgeon's guide to managing long bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Felix H

    2014-01-01

    Long bone skeletal metastases are common in the United States, with more than 280,000 new cases every year. Most of these will be managed by the on-call orthopedic surgeon. A practical primer is offered for the evaluation and surgical management for the practicing orthopedist, including questions to ask during the history, pertinent physical examination findings, appropriate imaging requests, proper laboratory work, and biopsy options. Finally, 7 scenarios are presented to encompass most situations a practicing orthopedic surgeon will encounter, and guidelines for treatment and referral are offered.

  14. Orthopedic conditions of small ruminants. Llama, sheep, goat, and deer.

    PubMed

    Kaneps, A J

    1996-03-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the foot, infectious arthritis, angular limb deformities, patellar luxation, tendon contracture and injuries, and fractures encountered in sheep, goats, llamas, and deer are reviewed. These species share similar orthopedic problems to cattle, but management conditions, particularly for pet animals, may place special demands on the veterinarian treating these disease conditions. The mild temperament and relatively small body size of these animals make them excellent candidates for treatment of orthopedic problems often not amenable to practical treatment in larger or more fractious animals.

  15. Novel nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating for dental and orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huinan; Jiang, Wenping; Malshe, Ajay

    2009-09-01

    A novel hybrid coating process, combining NanoSpray® (built on electrostatic spray coating) technology with microwave sintering process, was developed for synthesizing hydroxyapatite- (HA-) based nanostructured coating with favorable properties for dental and orthopedic implants. Specifically, HA nanoparticles were deposited on commercially pure titanium substrates using NanoSpray technique to produce the HA coating, which was then sintered in a microwave furnace under controlled conditions. The study showed that the use of NanoSpray followed by microwave sintering results in nanoscale HA coating for dental/orthopedic application.

  16. Shoulder ultrasonography performed by orthopedic surgeons increases efficiency in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Chen, Poyu; Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Hsu, Kuo-Yao; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Yeung-Jen

    2017-04-20

    Rotator cuff tears are very common and their incidence increases with age. Shoulder ultrasonography has recently gained popularity in detecting rotator cuff tears because of its efficiency, cost-effectiveness, time-saving, and real-time nature of the procedure. Well-trained orthopedic surgeons may utilize shoulder ultrasonography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. The wait time of patients planned to have shoulder MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to rule in rotator cuff tears may decrease after orthopedic surgeon start doing shoulder ultrasonography as a screening tool for that. Patients with rotator cuff tears may be detected earlier by ultrasonography and have expedited surgical repair. The efficacy in determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from January 2007 to December 2012. They were divided into 2 groups: Ultrasound (-) group and the Ultrasound (+) group. Age, gender, wait time from outpatient department (OPD) visit to MRI exam, MRI exam to operation (OP), and OPD visit to OP, patient number for MRI exam, and number of patients who finally had rotator cuff repair within two groups were compared. The wait time of OPD visit to OP and MRI to OP in patients who received shoulder ultrasonography was significantly less than that in patients did not receive shoulder ultrasonography screening. Only 23.8% of the patients with a suspected rotator cuff injury undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair before ultrasonography was applied as a screening tool. The percentage increased to 53.6% after orthopedic surgeon started using ultrasonography as a screening tool for rotator cuff tears. Office-based shoulder ultrasound examination can reduce the wait time for a shoulder MRI. The efficacy of determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase after the introduction of shoulder ultrasonography.

  17. The Use of Finite Element Analysis to Enhance Research and Clinical Practice in Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-02-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a very powerful tool for the evaluation of biomechanics in orthopedics. Finite element (FE) simulations can effectively and efficiently evaluate thousands of variables (such as implant variation, surgical techniques, and various pathologies) to optimize design, screening, prediction, and treatment in orthopedics. Additionally, FEA can be used to retrospectively evaluate and troubleshoot complications or failures to prevent similar future occurrences. Finally, FE simulations are used to evaluate implants, procedures, and techniques in a time- and cost-effective manner. In this work, an overview of the development of FE models is provided and an example application is presented to simulate knee biomechanics for a specimen with medial meniscus insufficiency. FE models require the development of the geometry of interest, determination of the material properties of the tissues simulated, and an accurate application of a numerical solver to produce an accurate solution and representation of the field variables. The objectives of this work are to introduce the reader to the application of FEA in orthopedic analysis of the knee joint. A brief description of the model development process as well as a specific application to the investigation of knee joint stability in geometries with normal or compromised medial meniscal attachment is included. Significant increases in stretch of the anterior cruciate ligament were predicted in specimens with medial meniscus insufficiency (such behavior was confirmed in corresponding biomechanical testing). It can be concluded from this work that FE analysis of the knee can provide significant new information with which more effective clinical decisions can be made.

  18. Experience with a propofol-ketamine mixture for sedation during pediatric orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, Andrew; Venclovas, Rasa

    2010-11-01

    Various combinations of propofol and ketofol have been described for the provision of procedural sedation in both adults and children. Utilization of 'ketofol' for deep sedation during prolonged pediatric orthopedic procedures has not previously been described. During an orthopedic aid trip, a 1:1 mixture of propofol and ketamine (200 mg of each drawn up to 22 ml) was utilized to provide deep sedation or general anesthesia as an adjunct to regional analgesia for lower limb surgery. Details for 18 patients having a total of 19 procedures were recorded with a record of intraoperative and postoperative parameters including initial bolus doses and infusion rates of ketofol required to produce deep sedation. Mean operating time was 153.7 min (range 64-241 min). The mean initial bolus dose of ketofol was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) (range 0.1-0.5 ml·kg(-1) ) or 1.7 mg·kg(-1) each of propofol and ketamine (range 0.9-4.5 mg·kg(-1) ). The mean upper limit of the infusion rate required to maintain deep sedation was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.07-0.26 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) or 1.7 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.6-2.4 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) and the mean lower limit of the infusion rate was 0.08 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.02-0.13 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) or 0.7 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.2-1.2 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ). The mean initial bolus dose of ketofol was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) (range 0.1-0.5 ml·kg(-1) ). There were no episodes of hypo- or hypertension or of desaturation. Mean time to eye opening after infusion cessation was 5.1 min (median 2 min; range 0-17 min). Ketofol successfully produced deep sedation for prolonged pediatric orthopedic procedures in conjunction with regional analgesia. Further research to confirm its safety and applicability to a wider range of settings is required. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  20. 21 CFR 888.5850 - Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpowered orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. 888.5850 Section 888.5850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... orthopedic traction apparatus and accessories. (a) Identification. A nonpowered orthopedic traction...

  1. Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biastro, Leslie; Frank, Heather; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with identified orthopedic impairments are often less likely to participate in social activities outside of the school setting. However, the adolescents who are able to participate in activities have higher social skills, more academic successes, and show more satisfaction in their roles as family member or friend. The aim of this…

  2. The Special Orthopedic Hospital—Past and Present

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Harry

    1964-01-01

    Pioneer orthopedic institutions established in Europe in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and in the U.S.A. in the second half of the 19th and the first decade of the 20th century, can trace their ancestry in ideas back to the practice and teachings of Hippocrates. Experience in treatment of great numbers of injured soldiers in the First World War opened a new era in reconstructive surgery of the locomotor system. After the Second World War, in advanced nations the pattern of crippling diseases showed a spectacular change. Problems that justify the existence of large special orthopedic hospitals are, in children, the more complex congenital deformities, cerebral palsies, and the increasing number of injuries due to hazards of modern life; in the adult, the reconstructive surgery of trauma and of arthritis. In modern orthopedic hospitals physicians have joined orthopedic surgeons in the study of the natural history of the various forms of arthritis. These centres provide facilities for biomechanical research and postgraduate training which acute general hospitals cannot offer. PMID:14228224

  3. [Application of platelet-rich plasma in clinical orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Fu, Weili; Li, Qi; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the application status and progress of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in clinical orthopedics. The recent related literature concerning the application of PRP in clinical orthopedics was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Recently, a large number of clinical studies on PRP have been carried out, which are applied in bone defects or nonunion, spinal fusion, osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries, ligament reconstruction, muscle strain, tendon terminal diseases, and a variety of acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Some results show certain effectiveness, while others demonstrate invalid. Easily drawing, achieving autologous transplantation, and the biological repair potential of the musculoskeletal tissues make PRP to be widely used in clinical orthopedics. However, there are still no uniform standards accepted and reliable clinical guidelines about the application of PRP. Furthermore, a variety of PRP products and their respective indications are also different. The clinical evidences with the greater sample size and higher quality are still needed to further support the safety and effectiveness of PRP in clinical orthopedics.

  4. Supporting the Educational Needs of Students with Orthopedic Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Swinehart-Jones, Dawn

    2003-01-01

    This article provides information on orthopedic impairments and the unique knowledge and skills required to provide these students with an appropriate education. Information on current practice is provided, as well as training and technical assistance models that can be used to help provide teachers with the necessary training. (Contains…

  5. Higher Education and Students with Orthopedic Disabilities: A Survey Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Delar K.

    A survey instrument is presented that was used in a national survey of 160 colleges and universities to explore facilities and services to students with orthopedic disabilities. The survey contains 33 items that focus on the following areas: structural accessibility, academic accessibility, dorm-living, and recreational opportunities. The total…

  6. Orthopedic resident's learning curve for arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: short-term clinical and radiographic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Visonà, E; Vio, S; Franceschi, G; Maron, A; Corona, K; Cerciello, S; Merolla, G; Berizzi, A; Aldegheri, R

    2017-07-29

    Arthroscopic subscapularis (SSC) repair is a technically demanding procedure with a long learning curve. As effective completion of resident's practical experience remains controversial, a prospective clinical study was performed to assess the functional and anatomical outcomes of subscapularis (SSC) arthroscopic repair by orthopedic residents. The pathological anatomy of the tears, the surgical approach and the difficulties encountered at the beginning of the learning curve were reported. Between June 2009 and June 2010, 30 patients with rotator cuff tear were preoperatively evaluated with clinical exam, Constant and UCLA scores. Surgery was performed under arthroscopy by a team of three orthopedic surgeons in training. A SSC tear, if present, was recorded and treated. The same clinical exam and functional scores were repeated at minimum 6 months of follow-up. Subscapularis strength recovery and tendon healing were investigated with arthromagnetic resonance imaging. A SSC tear was observed in 11 cases out of 30 and treated arthroscopically. The clinical scores improved in all patients: the average Constant score increased from 34 ± 14 to 77 ± 11 and the UCLA score from 11 ± 5 to 29 ± 3. The SSC tests were negative in all patients with the exception of one. Tendon healing was observed in 10 out of 11 cases. Arthroscopic SSC repair performed by educated residents is possible and leads to good clinical and anatomical results. Surgery duration progressively improved as the learning curve advanced. Level 2.

  7. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Palácio, Evandro Pereira; Ribeiro, André Araújo; Gavassi, Bruno Moreira; Di Stasi, Gabriel Guimarães; Galbiatti, José Antônio; Junior, Alcides Durigam; Mizobuchi, Roberto Ryuiti

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation. Methods the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3) was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron). This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO). Results the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33). The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25). There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members’ backs. Conclusions the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team. PMID:26229805

  8. The performance and usefulness of nerve conduction studies in the orthopedic office.

    PubMed

    Feierstein, M S

    1988-10-01

    The ability to determine conduction velocity in peripheral nerves provides the orthopedic surgeon with valuable information, aiding assessment of patients with perplexing problems and atypical clinical findings. Use of the study transcends the evaluation of patients with compression neuropathies. The clinician can more effectively grade and follow the clinical course of nerve injuries, evaluate anomalies of innervation, and graphically confirm the results of nerve repairs and nerve grafts. The digital electroneurometer provides a simple, painless, and inexpensive means for determination of distal motor latency in peripheral nerves. Its advantages relate to its small size, accessibility, and simplicity of operation. The digital electroneurometer does not replace standard testing procedures. The muscle action potential is not visualized; amplitude and duration cannot be measured. Sensory latency determinations cannot be performed. Though its limitations are clear, the digital electroneurometer can provide valuable information to the orthopedic surgeon in his office. Further clinical trials are necessary to confirm the material in this limited study and to investigate its application to a broader range of clinical problems.

  9. Early bone grafting in complete cleft lip and palate cases following maxillofacial orthopedics. II. The soft tissue development from seven to thirteen years of age.

    PubMed

    Larson, O; Nordin, K E; Nylén, B; Eklund, G

    1983-01-01

    The subsequent effect of preoperative maxillofacial orthopedics and early bone grafting on the development of the soft tissue profile of the face was studied with roentgencephalometric analysis on cleft patients between 7 and 13 years of age. They were divided into two unilateral and one bilateral complete-cleft group, all having been bone grafted early with the "four-flap" technique. The two unilateral groups were one group of 39 children operated on between 1960 and 1965 without preoperative orthopedics and one group of 46 children operated on between 1965 and 1972 after preoperative orthopedics ("T-traction"). The bilateral group comprised 19 children operated on between 1960 and 1972 after premaxillary retropositioning pressure, combined when necessary, with outward rotation of the lateral maxillary segments. Comparisons of facial growth were made with U.S. non-grafted clefts and with nonclefts. The effect of the preoperative orthopedic management facilitated the subsequent surgical procedure by a narrowing of the cleft and replacement of the deviated maxillary and nasal structures. The results were within limits of the non-grafted cases, with the exception of the soft tissue overlying the subnasal region. The reduced prominence of that region was explained by the primary surgical procedure, which made the lip adherent to the alveolar crest. In comparison with nonclefts, all parameters indicated a reduced growth capacity.

  10. The Orthopedic Trauma Symposium: improving care of orthopedic injuries in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Normore, Ryan; Greene, Helena; DeLong, Allison; Furey, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although single-trip volunteer medical teams can provide much-needed acute trauma care following natural disasters, their ability to leave a legacy of improved care in the region is often limited. One way to improve treatment of traumatic injuries is through conference-based teaching, such as the Orthopedic Trauma Symposium (OTS), which took place in Haiti in 2014. However, there is little research evaluating the effectiveness of such teaching tools. We evaluated the OTS and the potential benefits of future iterations of the course. A survey consisting of 5-point Likert scale questions as well as qualitative open feedback assessed respondents' opinions regarding the value, content and delivery of the OTS. Respondents were classified dichotomously in terms of their role in the OTS (instructor v. participant) to measure any meaningful difference in feedback. In total, 84% of all participants agreed that course content was clearly communicated, and 98% agreed that instructors were knowledgeable in the topics covered. Moreover, 87% of all participants responded that they would apply the training in their medical practices going forward. Haitian physicians, residents and medical students responded favourably to the OTS. Open-ended questions offered concise, attainable improvements for future iterations of the course. Organizations committed to improving medical care in low- and middle-income countries should take note of these findings while continuing to develop the OTS and similar initiatives globally.

  11. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Orthopedic Handicaps. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Orthopedically Handicapped Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieran, Shari Stokes; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming preschoolers with orthopedic handicaps is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers, and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of…

  12. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Orthopedic Handicaps. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Orthopedically Handicapped Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieran, Shari Stokes; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming preschoolers with orthopedic handicaps is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers, and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of…

  13. Recent advances in standing equine orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas; Hunt, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    In all surgeries with the patient standing under chemical and physical restraint, patient compliance is of the utmost importance. All fractures of the third metacarpal or metatarsal condyles and sagittal fracture of the first phalanx are not amenable to internal fixation with the horse standing, and young unhandled horses may not have a suitable disposition for standing surgical treatment of septic pedal osteitis, or implantation and removal of transphyseal screws. Previous operator experience in performing the procedure or technique under general anesthesia is beneficial. Appreciation of appropriate topographic anatomic landmarks is important, and intraoperative radiographic control is useful. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristics of Orthopedic Publications in High-Impact General Medical Journals.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Lehman, Jason D; Lyman, Stephen; Marx, Robert G

    2017-05-01

    Orthopedic studies are occasionally published in high-impact general medical journals; these studies are often given high visibility and have significant potential to impact health care policy and inform clinical decision-making. The purpose of this review was to investigate the characteristics of operative orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals. The number of orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals is relatively low; however, these studies demonstrate methodological characteristics that may bias toward nonoperative treatment. Careful analysis and interpretation of orthopedic studies published in these journals is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e405-e412.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Control of an outbreak due to orthopedic infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae producing IMP-4 or IMP-8 carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Pang, F; Jia, X-Q; Wang, B; Li, Y-H; Zhao, Q-G

    2014-06-01

    To investigate control of an outbreak due to orthopedic infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae producing IMP carbapenemases. The sporadic orthopedic infections with Enterobacteriaceae producing carbapenemase (CPE) were retrospectively analyzed in a Chinese tertiary care hospital from November 2010 to September 2012. The CPE were isolated from four distinct orthopedic patients, three patients infected with Enterobacter cloacae while the other with Klebsiella oxytoca. All strains were resistant to almost all the conventional antimicrobial. The strains produced IMP-4 type detected in the two early patients, while other strains could produce IMP-8 type. All of the four patients had ever undergoing invasive surgical procedure, and three of them were given fluoroquinolones for anti-infection treatment while the other patients was treated with meropenem. Ultimately, all patients were cured and discharged, without outbreak of nosocomial infection caused by CPE. Our study shows that strict infection control plays an important role in limiting dissemination of Enterobacteriaceae producing IMP carbapenemase. In addition, reasonable supporting treatment and disinfection protection seems to be more effective for the infection of strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Orthopedic surgery in the developing world: workforce and operative volumes in Ghana compared to those in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Mark A; Kaiser, Scott P; Konadu, Peter; Kumah-Ametepey, Raphael A; Aidoo, Alfred J; Coughlin, Richard C

    2014-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disease is a growing burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet little research exists to describe the problem. The purposes of this study were to characterize orthopedic surgery in an LMIC and compare the findings to those from a developed country. The study location was the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana. Orthopedic surgeon, resident, and postgraduate training program numbers were compared to analogous data from a developed nation, the United States. Annual surgical volumes were compared to those at a level I trauma center in the United States, the San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). There were 24 surgeons in Ghana compared to 23,956 in the United States. There were 7 orthopedic residents and 1 residency program in Ghana versus 3,371 residents and 155 residencies in the United States. Annual case volume was 2,161 at KATH and 2,132 at SFGH. Trauma accounted for 95 % of operations at KATH compared to 65 % at SFGH. The proportion of surgeries devoted to severe fractures was 29 % at KATH compared to 12 % at SFGH. Infections comprised 15 % of procedures at KATH and 5 % at SFGH. Annual case volume at a referral hospital in an LMIC is equivalent to that of a level I trauma center in an industrialized country. Total case volume is similar, but the LMIC institution manages a disproportionately large number of trauma cases, severe fractures, and infections. There is a large burden of orthopedic disease in the developing nation, and there are too few providers and training programs to address these conditions.

  17. The Need for a Step-up in Postoperative Medical Care is Predictable in Orthopedic Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael K; Mangini-Vendel, Michele; Lyman, Stephen; Pan, Ting Jung; Magid, Steven K

    2016-02-01

    The goal of elective orthopedic surgery is to return patients to their expected level of activity without an increased incidence of postoperative complications. The first step is identifying patient and/or surgical characteristics responsible for these complications. This study sought to identify predictors of a step-up in medical care after non-ambulatory elective orthopedic surgery. At a single specialty orthopedic hospital, we identified all in-hospital postoperative patients who were transferred to a higher level of medical care ((PACU) post-anesthesia care unit). The characteristics of both transferred and non-transferred patients were compared. A model was built which incorporated predictors of return to a higher level of care. During a 1-year period, 155 of 7967 patients (1.95%) required transfer to the PACU within 5 days of surgery. Cardiac complications were the major reason for transfer (50.3%), followed by pulmonary (11.0%) and neurological complications (9.7%). Patients who returned to the PACU were older, had more Exlihauser comorbidities, and had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In a model adjusting for all patient characteristics: age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status, congestive heart failure (CHF), the Charlson comorbidity index and OSA predicted return to the PACU. In an elderly population with multiple comorbidities undergoing elective common major orthopedic procedures, approximately 2% of patients required readmission to the PACU. The most common problems requiring this step-up in care were cardiac and pulmonary, which resulted in an increased length of hospital stay. Patients with OSA and multiple comorbidities undergoing total knee arthroplasty carry an increased risk for postoperative complications.

  18. Attitudes toward chiropractic: a survey of North American orthopedic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Busse, Jason W; Jacobs, Craig; Ngo, Trung; Rodine, Robert; Torrance, David; Jim, Janey; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Petrisor, Brad; Drew, Brian; Bhandari, Mohit

    2009-12-01

    Questionnaire survey. To elicit orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic. Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors often attend to similar patient populations, but little is known about the attitudes of orthopedic surgeons toward chiropractic. We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their knowledge and use of chiropractic. Imbedded in our survey was a 20-item chiropractic attitude questionnaire (CAQ). 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate, 49%). North American orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic were diverse, with 44.5% endorsing a negative impression, 29.4% holding favorable views, and 26.1% being neutral. Approximately half of respondents referred patients for chiropractic care each year, mainly due to patient request.The majority of surgeons believed that chiropractors provide effective therapy for some musculoskeletal complaints (81.8%), and disagreed that chiropractors could provide effective relief for nonmusculoskeletal conditions (89.5%). The majority endorsed that chiropractors provide unnecessary treatment (72.7%), engage in overly-aggressive marketing (63.1%) and breed dependency in patients on short-term symptomatic relief (52.3%). In our adjusted generalized linear model, older age (-2.62 points on the CAQ for each 10 year increment; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -3.74 to -1.50), clinical interest in foot and ankle (-2.77; 95% CI = -5.43 to -0.10), and endorsement of the research literature (-4.20; 95% CI = -6.29 to -2.11), the media (-3.05; 95% CI = -5.92 to -0.19), medical school (-7.42; 95% CI = -10.60 to -4.25), or 'other' (-4.99; 95% CI = -8.81 to -1.17) as a source of information regarding chiropractic were associated with more negative attitudes; endorsing a relationship with a specific chiropractor (5.05; 95% CI = 3.00 to 7.10) or residency (3.79;95% CI = 0.17 to 7.41) as sources of information regarding

  19. Biomarkers of Brain Damage and Postoperative Cognitive Disorders in Orthopedic Patients: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in orthopedic patients varies from 16% to 45%, although it can be as high as 72%. As a consequence, the hospitalization time of patients who developed POCD was longer, the outcome and quality of life were worsened, and prolonged medical and social assistance were necessary. In this review the short description of such biomarkers of brain damage as the S100B protein, NSE, GFAP, Tau protein, metalloproteinases, ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase, microtubule-associated protein, myelin basic protein, α-II spectrin breakdown products, and microRNA was made. The role of thromboembolic material in the development of cognitive decline was also discussed. Special attention was paid to optimization of surgical and anesthetic procedures in the prevention of postoperative cognitive decline. PMID:26417595

  20. [Medical controlling as medical economical service center. Successful concept for orthopedics and trauma surgery centers?].

    PubMed

    Auhuber, T C; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients from administrative admission through the orthopedic-surgical treatment to completion of the billing is complex. Additional challenges originate from the necessity to treat patients in both outpatient and inpatient departments and in more than one medical sector. A superior coordination is essential for a successful cooperation of the various procedures of controlling. The model of a medical controlling department as a service center with effective competence in the management of service and cost, functions as a successful solution to the problem. Central elements of a successful medical economical case management are a well-defined assignment of tasks and definitions of intersections, the integration of health professionals and administrative employees, the utilization of software for process control and the implementation of inlier controlling.

  1. [Identification of risk factors for subsequent legal claims in orthopedic and trauma surgery].

    PubMed

    Biberthaler, P; Seifert, J; Post, M; Smektala, R; Ottmann, K; Braun, A; Siebert, H; Stengel, D

    2011-09-01

    In Germany, orthopedic and trauma surgery rank first in the number of alleged malpractice claims amongst all medical disciplines. Thus, the German Association of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, together with the Bavarian Chamber of Physicians, set out to identify potential predictors of approved malpractice claims to improve process quality. In a case-control study, 164 cases of approved malpractice claims were matched according to age and gender to 336 controls of rejected claims, based on the 2004 to 2006 dataset of the Bavarian Chamber of Physicians. Potential predictors of acceptance of an alleged incident were modeled by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The final model explained 71% of the probability of acceptance of an asserted claim. It contained three medical consequences (i.e. delayed healing, reoperation, and loss of motion), one specific entity (i.e. fracture) and one socio-demographic variable (i.e. professional driver) as independent predictors of acceptance. Insufficient or lacking explanation of the planned procedure to patients or relatives and / or lacking informed consent (odds ratio [OR] 2.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]1.23-4.43), as well as inappropriate, low-quality, or erroneously interpreted imaging (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.06-3.41) independently contributed to the likelihood of acceptance of a legal claim. Strict adherence to the principles of surgical quality assurance in terms of transparent patient information and joint informed consent procedures, as well as intransigent radiological imaging are mandatory to foster surgeon-patients-relationships and to avoid later legal claims.

  2. Survey of Intraoperative Bacterial Contamination in Dogs Undergoing Elective Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natalia; Schmiedt, Chad W; Cornell, Karen; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Heidingsfelder, Lauren; Clarke, Kevin; Hurley, David J; Hinson, Whitney D

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the frequency, source, and risk factors of intraoperative (IO) surgeon and patient bacterial contamination during clean orthopedic surgeries, and to investigate the relationship between IO contamination and surgical site infection (SSI) in dogs. Prospective clinical study. Client-owned dogs undergoing stifle surgery (n = 100). IO cultures were taken in each case from surgical foot wrap, peri-incisional skin, surgical gloves, and the surgical team's hands. The environment (operating room [OR] lights, computers, scrub sink faucet, anesthesia gurney, and radiology table) was sampled every 5 months. Bacteria were identified and the contamination of each case was categorized. All gloves from the surgical team were collected and tested for perforations using a water infusion test. Cases were followed for at least 8 weeks to determine the presence or absence of SSI. Perioperative variables were evaluated for association with IO contamination and SSI. Bacterial isolates were yielded from 81% of procedures from 1 or more sources; 58% had positive hand cultures, 46% had positive glove cultures, 23% had positive patient skin cultures, and 12% had positive foot wrap cultures. Staphylococcus spp. was the most commonly recovered bacteria. There was no apparent association between IO contamination and SSI. The highest level of environmental contamination was associated with the scrub sink faucet, followed by the radiology table, anesthesia gurney, and OR computers. The IO glove perforation rate was 18%. Clean orthopedic procedures commonly had clinically insignificant bacterial contamination. In our study, bacteria responsible for SSI did not appear to colonize the patient in the OR. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection: knowledge in the orthopedic community.

    PubMed

    Flowerdew, J M; McGrory, B J

    2000-04-01

    A survey with 14 questions pertaining to the natural history, infectiveness, and diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis C viral infection was given to all practicing orthopedic surgeons in Portland, Maine. Possible responses were "true," "false," or "don't know" to the 14 statements. A question regarding any interest in learning more about the hepatitis C virus was also posed. Most (82%, 23/28) surgeons completed the questionnaire. A total of 72% of the responses were either wrong or marked "don't know"; most (83%) of the respondents wanted to know more about the infection about hepatitis C viral infection. Not only are orthopedic surgeons at risk for exposure to this virus, but also they are often the first to notify a patient of a positive result after routine hepatitis C testing of autologous predonated blood. Education programs and journal reviews should be directed toward this goal.

  4. [Hypersensitivity to metals in patients with orthopedic implants].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Olivas, Manuel Anastacio; Valencia Zavala, Martha Patricia; Sánchez Olivas, Jesús Alberto; Sepúlveda Velázquez, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    All metals in contact with biological systems suffer corrosion, which is an electrochemical process that causes metallic ions formation, known as haptens, which link with endogenous or exogenous proteins, therefore inducing an immune response. A hypersensitivity response to an implanted material should be suspected when cutaneous lesions or inflammatory reactions occur proximal to or surrounding the site of the metallic orthopedic implant. At present there is no a reliable diagnostic test for the determination of hypersensitivity to implanted metallic devices. It has been shown that the products of corrosive degradation are associated with dermatitis, urticaria and vasculitis. Cutaneous lesions in patients with unsuccessful metallic implants are more frequent than in non-rejected implants or the general population. Although the cellular and humoral hypersensitivity response in metallic orthopedic implants has been clearly identified, the risk is very low. Nowadays the importance of hypersensitivity to metals as a contributing factor in the failure of implants is unknown.

  5. Immobilized antibiotics to prevent orthopedic implant infections

    PubMed Central

    Hickok, Noreen J.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2012-01-01

    Many surgical procedures require the placement of an inert or tissue-derived implant deep within the body cavity. While the majority of these implants do not become colonized by bacteria, a small percentage develops a biofilm layer that harbors invasive microorganisms. In orthopaedic surgery, unresolved periprosthetic infections can lead to implant loosening, arthrodeses, amputations and sometimes death. The focus of this review is to describe development of an implant in which an antibiotic tethered to the metal surface is used to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Building on well-established chemical syntheses, studies show that antibiotics can be linked to titanium through a self-assembled monolayer of siloxy amines. The stable metal-antibiotic construct resists bacterial colonization and biofilm formation while remaining amenable to osteoblastic cell adhesion and maturation. In an animal model, the antibiotic modified implant resists challenges by bacteria that are commonly present in periprosthetic infections. While the long-term efficacy and stability is still to be established, ongoing studies support the view that this novel type of bioactive surface has a real potential to mitigate or prevent the devastating consequences of orthopaedic infection. PMID:22512927

  6. Mending injured athletes: a track record of orthopedic advances.

    PubMed

    Schnirring, Lisa

    2003-09-01

    Physicians have long been closely allied with competitive sports. In 157 AD, Galen served as a physician to Greek gladiators.(1) Severe musculoskeletal trauma certainly shortened the careers of ancient pugilists who survived their matches. However, modern gladiators-from pick-up basketball players to football professionals-often get to "play another day" because of advances in orthopedic surgery, particularly those of the last 30 years.

  7. Assessment of coagulation utilizing thromboelastometry in dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Barbara; Maurella, Cristiana; Falco, Sara; Tarducci, Alberto; Zanatta, Renato; Gianella, Paola; D'Angelo, Antonio; Piras, Lisa; Di Bella, Andrea; Borrelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate blood coagulation using thromboelastometry in dogs following orthopedic surgery. Longitudinal observational study. University veterinary teaching hospital. Thirty-four adult client-owned dogs. Dogs undergoing elective or emergency orthopedic surgery had whole blood collected before (T0), at 24 hours (T1), and 1 week (T2) after surgery. Whole blood from each dog was collected by jugular venipuncture using a 20-Ga needle and minimum venous stasis. The blood was placed into tubes containing 3.8% trisodium citrate (1 part citrate: 9 parts blood) and rested at 37°C. Coagulation was evaluated by means of thromboelastometry using the in-TEM, ex-TEM, and fib-TEM assays. Statistically significant increases (P < 0.05) in maximum clot firmness (MCF) from T0 to T1 in the in-TEM and fib-TEM profiles (both P = 0.0001), from T0 to T2 in the in-TEM, ex-TEM, and fib-TEM profiles (P = 0.012, P = 0.037, and P = 0.0001, respectively), and from T1 to T2 in the fib-TEM profile (P = 0.039) were noted. The α angle increased from T0 to T2 in the in-TEM and ex-TEM profiles (P = 0.019 and P = 0.036, respectively). All results were, however, within the institutional reference ranges. In this study, unlike the hypercoagulability observed in human orthopedic patients, a hypercoagulable state as measured by thromboelastometry did not develop in dogs following orthopedic surgery. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  8. Current state and use of biological adhesives in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil V; Meislin, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bone and tissue adhesives are common and beneficial supplements to standard methods of musculoskeletal tissue suture repair. Knowledge and development of biologically derived or inspired adhesives useful in orthopedic surgery are rapidly advancing. Recent literature demonstrates the increased adjunct or primary use of biological adhesives in the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, chondral fractures, and osteochondral fractures. Adhesives offer more benefits and enhancements to tissue healing than current fixation methods afford, including improved biocompatibility, resorbability, and non-immunogenicity. Further investigation is required to determine the extent of the role that these bioadhesives can play in orthopedic surgery. The largest group of biologically derived adhesives and sealants is fibrin sealants, which include first- and second-generation commercially available fibrin sealants, autologous fibrin sealants, and variants. Other groups include gelatin-resorcin aldehydes, protein-aldehyde systems, collagen-based adhesives, polysaccharide- based adhesives, mussel adhesive proteins, and various biologically inspired or biomimetic glues. Potential uses include applications in orthopedic-related blood conservation, arthroplasty, articular cartilage disorders, sports medicine, spine surgery, trauma, and tumors. The development of an adhesive with universal application is likely unfeasible, given the unique characteristics of various musculoskeletal tissues. However, the literature demonstrates the overall underuse of adhesives and indicates the rising probability of the development of a successful variety of bioadhesives for use in orthopedic surgery. As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the difference between adhesives and sealants. 2. Recognize fibrin adhesives commonly used in practice today and identify other biological adhesives with rising potential. 3. Analyze how fibrin sealants work relative to fibrin and

  9. Blood conservation strategies in orthopedic surgeries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Balaji; Batra, Sahil; Gupta, Rajat; Agrawal, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    In orthopedics management of surgical blood loss is an important aspect which has evolved along with modern surgeries. Replacement of lost blood by transfusion alone is not the answer as was considered earlier. Complications like infection and immune reaction due to blood transfusion are a major concern. Today numerous techniques are available in place of allogenic blood transfusion which can be employed safely and effectively. In this article we have reviewed these techniques, their merits and demerits. PMID:26403876

  10. What factors influence follow-up in orthopedic trauma surgery?

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul S; Greenberg, Sarah E; Thakore, Rachel V; Alamanda, Vignesh K; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Obremskey, William T; Jahangir, Alex; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-03-01

    Among surgical patients, follow-up visits are essential for monitoring post-operative recovery and determining ongoing treatment plans. Non-adherence to clinic follow-up appointments has been associated with poorer outcomes in many different patient populations. We sought to identify factors associated with non-attendance at follow-up appointments for orthopedic trauma patients. A retrospective chart review at a level I trauma center identified 2,165 patients who underwent orthopedic trauma surgery from 2008 to 2009. Demographic data including age, sex, race, tobacco use, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score, insurance status, distance from the hospital, and follow-up time were collected. Injury characteristics including fracture type, anatomic location of the operation, length of hospital stay, living situation and employment status were recorded. Attendance at the first scheduled follow-up visit was recorded. Multivariable log-binomial regression analyses were used with statistical significance maintained at p < 0.05. Of the 2,165 patients included in the analysis, 1,449 (66.9 %) attended their first scheduled post-operative clinic visit. 33.1 % (717) were not compliant with keeping their first clinic appointment after surgery. Patients who used tobacco, lived more than 100 miles from the clinic site, did not have private insurance, had an ASA score >2, or had a fracture of the hip or pelvis were significantly less likely to follow-up. Age, sex, and race were not significantly associated with failure to follow-up. Follow-up appointments are essential for preventing complications among orthopedic trauma patients. By identifying patients at risk of failure to follow-up, orthopedic surgeons can appropriately design and implement long-term treatment plans specifically targeted for high-risk patients.

  11. [History of orthopedics in Germany 1945-1990].

    PubMed

    Holfelder, G

    2001-10-01

    Presentation of a brief history of the scientific society from the end of World War II until the fall of the Iron Curtain, taking into consideration the milieu inside and outside the field of orthopedics. Throughout, the intention was to provide facts and sufficient references for further reading, with special emphasis on the biographies of the public figures mentioned. Attention should be directed in particular to the history of the society published in 1963.

  12. Pediatric orthopedic surgical simulation at Boston Children's Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2016-07-01

    Orthopedic surgical simulation has become an increasing valuable means for optimizing patient care, promoting patient safety, improving education, and fostering clinical research. The purpose of this review was to discuss the rationale for simulation training, describe current simulation efforts within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Children's Hospital, and provide an example of how these simulation efforts touch both patient care and clinical research.

  13. Variability in Trauma Case Volume in Orthopedic Surgery Residents

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Travis D.; Gil, Joseph A.; Born, Christopher T.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2017-01-01

    Orthopedic trauma surgery is a critical component of resident education. Surgical case logs obtained from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Students from 2009 to 2013 for orthopedic surgery residents were examined for variability between the 90th and 10th percentiles in regards to the volume of cases performed. There was an upward trend in the mean number of cases performed by senior residents from 484.4 in 2009 to 534.5 in 2013, representing a 10.3% increase. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of cases performed for humerus/elbow, forearm/wrist, and pelvis/hip during this period (P<0.05). Although the difference between the 10th and 90th percentile case volumes narrowed over the study period, the difference between these groups remained significant in 2013 (P=0.02). In 2013, all categories of trauma cases had a greater than 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentile of residents for numbers of trauma cases performed. Although case volume is not the sole determinant of residency education and competency, evidence suggests that case volume plays a crucial role in surgeon confidence and efficiency in performing surgery. Further studies are needed to better understand the effect of this variability seen among residents performing orthopedic trauma surgery. PMID:28286621

  14. Orthopedic cellular therapy: An overview with focus on clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Moon Jong; Lee, Kwan Hee

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors tried to evaluate the present state of cellular therapy in orthopedic field. The topics the authors try to cover include not only the clinical trials but the various research areas as well. Both the target diseases for cellular therapy and the target cells were reviewed. New methods to activate the cells were interesting to review. Most advanced clinical trials were also included because several of them have advanced to phase III clinical trials. In the orthopedic field, there are many diseases with a definite treatment gap at this time. Because cellular therapies can regenerate damaged tissues, there is a possibility for cellular therapies to become disease modifying drugs. It is not clear whether cellular therapies will become the standard of care in any of the orthopedic disorders, however the amount of research being performed and the number of clinical trials that are on-going make the authors believe that cellular therapies will become important treatment modalities within several years. PMID:26601056

  15. Questionable Word Choice in Scientific Writing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Casey M; Menendez, Mariano E; Hughes, Kevin; Ring, David

    2017-07-01

    Given the strong influence of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors on musculoskeletal symptoms and limitations it's important that both scientific and lay writing use the most positive, hopeful, and adaptive words and concepts consistent with medical evidence. The use of words that might reinforce misconceptions about preference-sensitive conditions (particularly those associated with age) could increase symptoms and limitations and might also distract patients from the treatment preferences they would select when informed and at ease. We reviewed 100 consecutive papers published in 2014 and 2015 in 6 orthopedic surgery scientific journals. We counted the number and proportion of journal articles with questionable use of one or more of the following words: tear, aggressive, required, and fail. For each word, we counted the rate of misuse per journal and the number of specific terms misused per article per journal. Eighty percent of all orthopedic scientific articles reviewed had questionable use of at least one term. Tear was most questionably used with respect to rotator cuff pathology. The words fail and require were the most common questionably used terms overall. The use of questionable words and concepts is common in scientific writing in orthopedic surgery. It's worth considering whether traditional ways or referring to musculoskeletal illness merit rephrasing.

  16. Questionable Word Choice in Scientific Writing in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey M.; Menendez, Mariano E.; Hughes, Kevin; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Given the strong influence of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors on musculoskeletal symptoms and limitations it’s important that both scientific and lay writing use the most positive, hopeful, and adaptive words and concepts consistent with medical evidence. The use of words that might reinforce misconceptions about preference-sensitive conditions (particularly those associated with age) could increase symptoms and limitations and might also distract patients from the treatment preferences they would select when informed and at ease. Methods: We reviewed 100 consecutive papers published in 2014 and 2015 in 6 orthopedic surgery scientific journals. We counted the number and proportion of journal articles with questionable use of one or more of the following words: tear, aggressive, required, and fail. For each word, we counted the rate of misuse per journal and the number of specific terms misused per article per journal Results: Eighty percent of all orthopedic scientific articles reviewed had questionable use of at least one term. Tear was most questionably used with respect to rotator cuff pathology. The words fail and require were the most common questionably used terms overall. Conclusion: The use of questionable words and concepts is common in scientific writing in orthopedic surgery. It’s worth considering whether traditional ways or referring to musculoskeletal illness merit rephrasing.

  17. Role of single dose antibiotic prophylaxis in clean orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ali, Maratib; Raza, Aamir

    2006-01-01

    To compare the proportion of early postoperative infection in clean orthopedic surgery after single dose of prophylactic antibiotic and multiple doses of prophylactic antibiotic. Interventional quasi-experimental study. Department of Orthopedics, Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi from April 2004 to March 2005. Two hundred patients of either age and gender, undergoing clean orthopedic surgery were equally divided into two groups A and B. Group A was given single dose of prophylactic antibiotic, while group B was given multiple doses of prophylactic antibiotic. Follow-up period was 28 days. All cases were evaluated for postoperative wound infection. Sampling technique was non-probability convenience. Mean age was 35.51+/-20.79 years in group A and 26.17+/-19.79 years in group B. However, there was a significantly higher proportion of male patients in group B than in group A (p=0.006). Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the proportion of early postoperative infection cases between the two groups(p=0.270). Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest organism cultured from the wound discharge in our study followed by E. coli. Eight of our cases having postoperative wound infection showed no growth, out of which 7 were superficial and 1 was deep. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding mean operating time and duration of stay in hospital. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early postoperative infection cases between the two groups.

  18. Overview of ultrasound usage trends in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to examine current beliefs about the use, the clinical importance, the theoretical fundamentals and the utilization criteria of therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) among physical therapists on the clinical practice in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy in Brazil. Methods A brief survey was developed based on previous studies and was sent to 55 physical therapists with advanced competency in orthopedics and sports physiotherapy. The questions addressed general topics about the professional profile and ultrasound usage and dosage. Results Our data show the wide availability and frequent use of TUS in this sample of physical therapists. TUS is used in distinct musculoskeletal injuries and/or disorders in both acute and chronic conditions. Muscles, tendons and ligaments represented the major structures where TUS is used. Questions on the basic theory of TUS demonstrated a lack of knowledge of the ultrasound physiological effects as well as its interaction with biological tissues and TUS absolute contraindication. Conclusion A Brazilian profile about the US usage and dosage in orthopedic and sports physiotherapy is presented and highlights the need for a continuous upgrading process and further research into its effects. PMID:22871050

  19. Use of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Fraser, Dave; Glatt, Vaida; Hohmann, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the growth of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics over a 12-month period and to investigate global patterns. Data was prospectively acquired from June 2013 to June 2014. Google Scholar queries specific to orthopedic surgery were performed at 90-day intervals. Demographic aspects of each user were also compiled, including gender, current location, and primary interests. To determine differences between the growth of Google Scholar public profile registrations and citation counts, as well as differences in growth in different regions, repeated measures of analysis of variance (RMANOVA) were used. RMANOVA revealed statistically significant differences ( p = 0.0001) for regional growth. The largest growth was observed in the United Kingdom ( p = 0.009, 289%), followed by the Asia-Pacific region ( p = 0.004, 177%) and "Other" ( p = 0.006, 172%). The mean growth per 90-day interval is 19.9% ( p = 0.003) and the mean 12-month growth is 107% ( p = 0.05). Statistically significant differences between gender (male vs. female) and basic and clinical sciences ( χ(2) = 22.4, p = 0.0001) were observed. This study suggests an exponential growth in the number of authors in the field of orthopedic surgery creating a Google Scholar public profile, and at the current rate participation doubles every 10.6 months.

  20. Business and Practice Management Knowledge Deficiencies in Graduating Orthopedic Residents.

    PubMed

    Miller, D Joshua; Throckmorton, Thomas W; Azar, Frederick M; Beaty, James H; Canale, S Terry; Richardson, David R

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a study to determine the general level of knowledge that orthopedic residents have on business and practice management topics at graduation and to evaluate the level of knowledge that practicing orthopedic surgeons need in order to function effectively in a medical practice. Residency graduates from a single training program were asked to complete a survey that gathered demographic information and had surgeons rate their understanding of 9 general business and practice management skills and the importance of these skills in their current practice situation. The amount of necessary business knowledge they lacked at graduation was defined as a functional knowledge deficiency (FKD) and was calculated as the difference between the reported importance of a topic in current practice and the level of understanding of that topic at graduation (larger FKD indicates greater deficiency). Those in physician-managed practices reported significantly higher levels of understanding of economic analytical tools than those in nonphysician-managed practices. There were no other statistically significant differences among groups. Hospital-employed physicians had the lowest overall FKD (4.0), followed by those in academic practices (5.1) and private practices (5.9). Graduating orthopedic surgeons appear to be inadequately prepared to effectively manage business issues in their practices, as evidenced by the low overall knowledge levels and high FKDs.

  1. Orthopedics management of acromicric dysplasia: follow up of nine patients.

    PubMed

    Klein, Céline; Le Goff, Carine; Topouchian, Vicken; Odent, Sylvie; Violas, Philippe; Glorion, Christophe; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2014-02-01

    Acromicric dysplasia (AD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, short extremities, stiff joint and skeleton features including brachymetacarpia, cone-shaped epiphyses, internal notch of the femoral head, and delayed bone age. Recently, we identified fibrillin 1 (FBN1) as the disease gene of AD. The aim of our study was to further describe the long-term follow up of AD patients with an emphasis on orthopedic management. Nine patients with FBN1 mutations were included in the study ranging in age from 5.5 to 64 years. For all, detailed clinical and radiological data were available. Birth parameters were always normal and patients progressively developed short stature <-3 SD. Carpal tunnel syndrome was observed in four patients. We found discrepancy between the carpal bone age and the radius and ulna epiphysis bone ages, a variable severity of hip dysplasia with acetabular dysplasia, epiphyseal and metaphyseal femoral dysplasia resembling Legg-Perthes-Calvé disease and variable pelvic anteversion and hyperlordosis. Orthopedic surgery was required in two patients for hip dysplasia, in one for limb lengthening and in three for carpal tunnel syndrome. Our observations expand the AD phenotype and emphasize the importance of regular orthopedic survey. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical conundrums and challenges during geriatric orthopedic emergency surgeries.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Despite so many advancements and innovations in anesthetic techniques, expectations and challenges have also grown in plenty. Cardiac, pediatric, obstetric and neuro-anesthesia have perfectly developed to fulfill the desired needs of respective patient population. However, geriatric anesthesia has been shown a lesser interest in teaching and clinical practices over the years as compared with other anesthetic sub-specialties. The large growing geriatric population globally is also associated with an increase number of elderly patients presenting for orthopedic emergency surgeries. Orthopedic emergency surgery in geriatric population is not only a daunting clinical challenge but also has numerous socio-behavioral and economic ramifications. Decision making in anesthesia is largely influenced by the presence of co-morbidities, neuro-cognitive functions and the current socio-behavioral status. Pre-anesthetic evaluation and optimization are extremely important for a better surgical outcome but is limited by time constraints during emergency surgery. The current review aims to highlight comprehensively the various clinical, social, behavioral and psychological aspects during pre-anesthetic evaluation associated with emergency orthopedic surgery in geriatric population.

  3. Risk factors for surgical site infection and delayed wound healing after orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasutaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Harada, Ryozo; Machida, Takahiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of surgical-site infection (SSI) and delayed wound healing (DWH) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) underwent orthopedic surgery. We reviewed the records of 1036 elective orthopedic procedures undertaken in RA patients. Risk factors for SSI and DWH were assessed by logistic regression analysis using age, body mass index, disease duration, pre-operative laboratory data, surgical procedure, corticosteroid use, co-morbidity, and use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) as variables. SSI and DWH were identified in 19 cases and 15 cases, respectively. One case of SSI and three cases of DWH were recorded among 196 procedures in patients using bDMARDs. Foot and ankle surgery was associated with an increased risk of SSI (odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.256-7.986; p = 0.015). Total knee arthroplasty (TKA; OR, 4.044; 95% CI, 1.436-11.389; p = 0.008) and disease duration (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000-1.007; p = 0.029) were associated with an increased risk of DWH. Our results indicated foot and ankle surgery, and TKA and disease duration as risk factors for SSI and DWH, respectively. bDMARDs was not associated with an increased risk of SSI and DWH.

  4. Improving Orthopedic Resident Knowledge of Documentation, Coding, and Medicare Fraud.

    PubMed

    Varacallo, Matthew A; Wolf, Michael; Herman, Martin J

    Most residency programs still lack formal education and training on the basic clinical documentation and coding principles. Today's physicians are continuously being held to increasing standards for correct coding and documentation, yet little has changed in the residency training curricula to keep pace with these increasing standards. Although there are many barriers to implementing these topics formally, the main concern has been the lack of time and resources. Thus, simple models may have the best chance for success at widespread implementation. The first goal of the study was to assess a group of orthopedic residents' fund of knowledge regarding basic clinical documentation guidelines, coding principles, and their ability to appropriately identify cases of Medicare fraud. The second goal was to analyze a single, high-yield educational session's effect on overall resident knowledge acquisition and awareness of these concepts. Orthopedic residents belonging to 1 of 2 separate residency programs voluntarily and anonymously participated. All were asked to complete a baseline assessment examination, followed by attending a 45-minute lecture given by the same orthopedic faculty member who remained blinded to the test questions. Each resident then completed a postsession examination. Each resident was also asked to self-rate his or her documentation and coding level of comfort on a Likert scale (1-5). Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. A total of 32 orthopedic residents were participated. Increasing postgraduate year-level of training correlated with higher Likert-scale ratings for self-perceived comfort levels with documentation and coding. However, the baseline examination scores were no different between senior and junior residents (p > 0.20). The high-yield teaching session significantly improved the average total examination scores at both sites (p < 0.01), with overall improvement being similar between the 2 groups (p > 0.10). The current healthcare

  5. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  6. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as

  7. Hospital Cost of Staphylococcal Infection after Cardiothoracic or Orthopedic Operations in France: A Retrospective Database Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aurélie; Bénard, Stève; Cyr, Sonya

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcal infections (SI) after cardiothoracic (CT) or orthopedic (OP) surgery are associated with extended length of stay (LOS), a considerable mortality rate, and high cost. No data on these consequences have been published in France. Therefore, a study was conducted to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and economic outcomes of SI following these operations in France based on a hospital discharge database. Patients who underwent the most common types of CT or OP operations in 2009 were identified and followed for one year. Staphylococcal infections occurring in the three following months were identified. In 2009, 21,543 patients underwent one of the selected CT procedures (62% coronary artery bypass grafting; 38% cardiac valve replacement) and 175,518 patients underwent one of the selected OP procedures (64% hip arthroplasty; 36% knee arthroplasty). Among the patients, 4.4% (n=955) and 0.9% (n=1,515) developed SI after CT and OP surgery, respectively. Staphylococcal infection led to approximately 1.0 and 1.4 additional hospitalizations per patient, 22.1 and 24.1 additional hospital days, and an excess cost of €15,475 and €13,389 after an CT or OP procedure, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.6 times and 6 times greater in infected patients than in non-infected patients for CT and OP. Hospital cost reached €505 million for these two CT procedures and €1.9 billion for the two OP procedures, of which €15 million and €20 million were related directly to patients having developed SI. Staphylococcal infections after common CT or OP operations were associated with greater mortality rates and hospital costs secondary to the additional procedures and greater LOS.

  8. Hospital Cost of Staphylococcal Infection after Cardiothoracic or Orthopedic Operations in France: A Retrospective Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Stève; Cyr, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Staphylococcal infections (SI) after cardiothoracic (CT) or orthopedic (OP) surgery are associated with extended length of stay (LOS), a considerable mortality rate, and high cost. No data on these consequences have been published in France. Therefore, a study was conducted to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and economic outcomes of SI following these operations in France based on a hospital discharge database. Methods: Patients who underwent the most common types of CT or OP operations in 2009 were identified and followed for one year. Staphylococcal infections occurring in the three following months were identified. Results: In 2009, 21,543 patients underwent one of the selected CT procedures (62% coronary artery bypass grafting; 38% cardiac valve replacement) and 175,518 patients underwent one of the selected OP procedures (64% hip arthroplasty; 36% knee arthroplasty). Among the patients, 4.4% (n=955) and 0.9% (n=1,515) developed SI after CT and OP surgery, respectively. Staphylococcal infection led to approximately 1.0 and 1.4 additional hospitalizations per patient, 22.1 and 24.1 additional hospital days, and an excess cost of €15,475 and €13,389 after an CT or OP procedure, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.6 times and 6 times greater in infected patients than in non-infected patients for CT and OP. Hospital cost reached €505 million for these two CT procedures and €1.9 billion for the two OP procedures, of which €15 million and €20 million were related directly to patients having developed SI. Conclusions: Staphylococcal infections after common CT or OP operations were associated with greater mortality rates and hospital costs secondary to the additional procedures and greater LOS. PMID:26207403

  9. [Evaluation of surgical skills of French ophthalmology, orthopedic and gastrointestinal surgery residents: Current status and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tranchart, H; Aurégan, J C; Gaillard, M; Giocanti-Aurégan, A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the need for nationwide assessment of surgical skills during residency, and to define ideal methods for assessment in three surgical disciplines: ophthalmology, orthopedics and gastrointestinal surgery. Three online questionnaires were sent by e-mail to 784 residents, fellows and hospital practitioners, and 119 university hospital physican-professors. Questionnaires focused on current assessment methods at the regional level, the roles of the surveyed population in these evaluations, potential obstacles to their development and the most relevant methods for practical evaluations. Nine hundred and three questionnaires were sent; 355 participants replied (response rate: 39%). The establishment of systematic assessment seemed necessary to over 90% of the survey population, and this opinion was equitably distributed among all three specialties. Over 60% of respondents felt that current assessment procedures were not satisfactory. In all three specialties, the ideal evaluation method proposed was a real patient procedure. This "in vivo" evaluation was considered applicable in 80% of cases, potential barriers to its development being the resident's anxiety, medical-legal reasons and the lack of objective criteria. The ideal timing of these assessments was bi-annual. Implementation of surgical skills assessment during residency seems necessary. The survey population appears dissatisfied with current arrangements. A step-by-step evaluation combining surgical simulations, animal training and live patient procedures may be appropriate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Orthopedic devices for footwear in flatness of the anterior part of the foot].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtsev, V A; Kiselev, A L; Kozlov, D I; Kaluzhskaia, M O; Matveeva, E G

    1991-09-01

    The work is dedicated to the problem of orthopedic supply of patients with flatness of the anterior part of foot. There is proposed a number of footwear orthopedic devices made of foam rubber. There is described the technology of their production with application of modern polymeric materials. There has been studied prosthetics of 50 patients with flatness of foot and revealed the positive result of application of footwear orthopedic devices made of foam rubber.

  11. Open access of evidence-based publications: the case of the orthopedic and musculoskeletal literature.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2015-11-01

    The open access model, where researchers can publish their work and make it freely available to the whole medical community, is gaining ground over the traditional type of publication. However, fees are to be paid by either the authors or their institutions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the proportion and type of open access evidence-based articles in the form of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the field of musculoskeletal disorders and orthopedic surgery. PubMed database was searched and the results showed a maximal number of hits for low back pain and total hip arthroplasty. We demonstrated that despite a 10-fold increase in the number of evidence-based publications in the past 10 years, the rate of free systematic reviews in the general biomedical literature did not change for the last two decades. In addition, the average percentage of free open access systematic reviews and meta-analyses for the commonest painful musculoskeletal conditions and orthopedic procedures was 20% and 18%, respectively. Those results were significantly lower than those of the systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the remaining biomedical research. Such findings could indicate a divergence between the efforts engaged at promoting evidence-based principles and those at disseminating evidence-based findings in the field of musculoskeletal disease and trauma. The high processing fee is thought to be a major limitation when considering open access model for publication. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Surgical site infection in orthopedic trauma: A case–control study evaluating risk factors and cost

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Rachel V.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; Shi, Hanyuan; Foxx, Alexandra M.; Francois, Elvis L.; Prablek, Marc A.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Archer, Kristin R.; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M.; Obremskey, William T.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2015-01-01

    Background With the shift of our healthcare system toward a value-based system of reimbursement, complications such as surgical site infections (SSI) may not be reimbursed. The purpose of our study was to investigate the costs and risk factors of SSI for orthopedic trauma patients. Methods Through retrospective analysis, 1819 patients with isolated fractures were identified. Of those, 78 patients who developed SSIs were compared to 78 uninfected control patients. Patients were matched by fracture location, type of fracture, duration of surgery, and as close as possible to age, year of surgery, and type of procedure. Costs for treatment during primary hospitalization and initial readmission were determined and potential risk factors were collected from patient charts. A Wilcoxon test was used to compare the overall costs of treatment for case and control patients. Costs were further broken down into professional fees and technical charges for analysis. Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed through a chi-squared analysis. Results Median cost for treatment for patients with SSIs was $108,782 compared to $57,418 for uninfected patients (p < 0.001). Professional fees and technical charges were found to be significantly higher for infected patients. No significant risk factors for SSIs were determined. Conclusions Our findings indicate the potential for financial losses in our new healthcare system due to uncompensated care. SSIs nearly double the cost of treatment for orthopedic trauma patients. There is no single driver of these costs. Reducing postoperative stay may be one method for reducing the cost of treating SSIs, whereas quality management programs may decrease risk of infection. PMID:26566333

  13. [Surgical management of orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Selim; Kocaoğlu, Bariş; Berker, Nadire; Erol, Bülent

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the results of surgical treatment for orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy. Nine adult patients with cerebral palsy (4 females, 5 males; mean age 22 years; range 19 to 29 years) were managed surgically to lessen pain, correct deformities and contractures, and enhance their mobilization potential. Seven patients underwent bilateral multiple-level tendinous and/or musculotendinous release procedures involving the lower extremities, of whom two patients underwent additional triple arthrodesis, and one patient underwent extension osteotomy in the knee. One patient was treated with proximal femoral and distal tibial derotation osteotomies and bilateral hamstring release for knee flexion contractures. Finally, one patient was treated with posterior fusion with instrumentation for thoracolumbar scoliosis. Before surgery, four patients were community ambulators, and one patient could walk only with the aid of bilateral crutches. Four patients with total body involvement could not walk, but they could sit without support except for one patient with scoliosis. The mean follow-up was 25 months (range 8 to 49 months). On final evaluations, eight patients could walk without support, and one patient who could not sit preoperatively managed to sit without support. Three patients developed bilateral, five patients developed unilateral superficial skin wounds at the back of the heels associated with cast/brace use, and deep wound infection was encountered in the patient with scoliosis. All the wounds healed with early debridements and antibiotic therapy, together with the modifications made in cast/brace applications, without the need for implant removal. Surgical treatment of orthopedic problems in adult patients with cerebral palsy is of substantial importance in enhancing their sitting and walking capacities, and in restoring their community-based relations and activities.

  14. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Despres, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; Guise, Jacques A. de

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm{sup -1}) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 {mu}Gy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  15. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Després, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; de Guise, Jacques A

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm(-1)) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 microGy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  16. [Financing of inpatient orthopedics and trauma surgery in the G-DRG system 2010].

    PubMed

    Franz, D; Schemmann, F; Roeder, N; Mahlke, L

    2010-08-01

    The German DRG (diagnosis-related groups) system forms the basis for billing inpatient hospital services. It includes not only the case groups (G-DRGs), but also additional and innovation payments. This paper analyzes and evaluates the relevant developments of the G-DRG System 2010 for orthopedics and traumatology from the medical and classification perspectives. Analyses of relevant diagnoses, medical procedures and G-DRGs in the versions 2009 and 2010 based on the publications of the German DRG institute (InEK) and the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) were carried out. The DRG catalog is has grown from 8 to 1,200 G-DRGs. A number of codes for surgical measures have been newly established or modified. Here, the identification and the correct and performance-based mapping of complex and elaborate scenarios was again the focus of the restructuring of the G-DRG system. The G-DRG structure in orthopedics and traumatology has been changed, especially in the areas of spinal surgery and surgery of the upper and lower extremities. The actual impact of the changes may vary depending on the individual hospital services. For the first time since the introduction of the G-DRG system, the pure numerical changes at the level of DRGs themselves are so marginal that only part of the DRG users in the hospitals will register them. The changes implemented not only a high selectivity between complex and less complex scenarios, but partly also unintended and unjustified revaluation of less complex measures. The G-DRG system has gained complexity again. Especially the G-DRG allocation of spinal surgery and multiple surgical interventions of the upper and/or lower extremities have reached such a complexity that only a few DRG users can follow them.

  17. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor.

  18. Early Total Care versus Damage Control: Current Concepts in the Orthopedic Care of Polytrauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Ratto

    2013-01-01

    The management of the polytraumatized orthopedic patient remains a challenging issue. In recent years many efforts have been made to develop rescue techniques and to promote guidelines for the management of these patients. Currently controversies persist between two orthopedic approaches: the Early Total Care and the Damage Control Orthopedics. An overview of the current literature on the orthopedic management of polytrauma patient is provided. Subsequently, femoral shaft fractures, representing extremely common lesions, and pelvic ring injuries, that are associated with a high mortality rate, are analyzed in detail.

  19. The Application of Telemedicine in Orthopedic Surgery in Singapore: A Pilot Study on a Secure, Mobile Telehealth Application and Messaging Platform

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keng Lin; Thambiah, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    , clinical outreach in the setting of trauma, supervision in the operating room or watching procedures being performed remotely, providing both patient and parent reassurance in pediatric orthopedic patients, and finally in the setting of outpatient clinics. With our pilot study having excellent results in terms of acceptance and satisfaction, the integration of a secure, mobile telehealth application, and messaging platform, not only in the orthopedic department but also the hospital in general, has an exciting and limitless potential. More so in this era where downsizing hospital costs is beneficial, doing so may also be mandatory in order to comply with the soon to be introduced personal data protection act. PMID:25100283

  20. The organizational and financial viability of an orthopedic trauma service.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mitchel B; Cayen, Barry

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of establishing an Orthopedic Trauma Service (OTS) on departmental revenue within an academic orthopedic department. The effect of the OTS on physician and resident perceptions of job satisfaction, education, and quality of patient care were also evaluated. A proforma financial analysis was undertaken using an optimization model to predict the potential financial performance of an OTS before its implementation. Financial data were then collected prospectively for the first year of the OTS and compared with the preceding year's financial data. All residents and faculty in the department completed visual analog scale surveys after the formation of the service. While maintaining a fixed amount of work production (work relative value units [WRVUs]) per year, our model predicted an $111,000 increase in departmental charges as a result of a shift in the elective case mix. After implementation of the OTS, elective charges/WRVU increased by 7.4% while trauma charges/WRVU increased by 2.6%. This, combined with a minor increase in departmental work volume (115,661 WRVUs pre-OTS vs. 117,577 WRVUs post-OTS) and an improvement in collections/charge (47-48%), yielded a departmental collection increase of 11% ($1.1 million). Resident and faculty job satisfaction improved, as did the perception of the quality of trauma care that was being provided. The organization and implementation of an OTS within an academic orthopedic department can lead to an improved professional experience for residents and faculty, the perception of improved patient care for the trauma patient, and an increase in departmental revenue.

  1. The 50 Most Cited Articles in Orthopedic Cartilage Surgery.

    PubMed

    Arshi, Armin; Siesener, Nathan J; McAllister, David R; Williams, Riley J; Sherman, Seth L; Jones, Kristofer J

    2016-07-01

    To determine the 50 most cited articles in orthopedic cartilage surgery and their characteristics. A systematic review of the Science Citation Index Expanded was performed for articles related to cartilage surgery published in the 66 journals under the category "Orthopedics." The 50 most cited articles were determined, and the following characteristics were analyzed for each article: authors, journal and year of publication, number of citations, geographic origin, article type (basic science or clinical), article subtype by study design, and level of evidence. Citation density (total number of citations/years since publication) was also computed. The 50 most cited articles ranged from 989 to 172 citations, with citation density ranging from 71.5 to 4.1. The publication years spanned from 1968 to 2008, with the 2000s accounting for half (25) of the articles and the highest mean citation density (14.6). The 50 most cited articles were published in 11 journals. The majority of the articles (29) were clinical, with level IV representing the most common level of evidence (10). The remaining basic science articles were most commonly animal in vivo studies (14). Stronger level of evidence was correlated with overall number of citations (P = 0.044), citation density (P < 0.001), and year of publication (P = 0.003). Articles with stronger levels of evidence are more highly cited, with an increasing trend as evidence-based practice has been emphasized. This article list provides clinicians, researchers, and trainees with a group of "citation classics" in orthopedic cartilage surgery.

  2. Minocycline-Induced Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation in an Orthopedic Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, Yuri; Berbari, Elie F.; Steckelberg, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and evaluate risk factors for development of minocycline-induced cutaneous hyperpigmentation in patients with orthopedic infections. Methods. Patients with orthopedic infections evaluated at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and treated with minocycline from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011 were retrospectively identified. Long-term minocycline suppression was defined as daily minocycline use for at least 3 months. A proportional hazards model was used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results. Of 291 patients receiving long-term minocycline suppression, 54% (156 of 291) developed hyperpigmentation after a mean follow-up of 4.8 years (range, 0.3–13.2 years); 88% involved blue-gray pigmentation of normal skin that appeared most commonly in the lower (75%) and upper extremities (44%). The mean duration of minocycline therapy before hyperpigmentation was 1.5 years (range, 0.1–9 years) with a mean cumulative dosage of 107.3 g (range, 8.6–657 g). Notable risk factors include a history of vitamin D deficiency (relative risk [RR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.91–15.27; P = .0052), presence of a shoulder prosthesis (RR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.23–6.56; P = .0062), noncirrhotic liver pathology (RR, 3.63; 95% CI, 1.11–8.75; P = .0359), and use of a concurrent medication also known to cause hyperpigmentation (RR, 4.75; 95% CI, 1.83–10.1; P = .0029). Conclusions. Hyperpigmentation associated with the use of long-term minocycline suppression in patients with orthopedic infections is common. PMID:26835479

  3. The 50 Most Cited Articles in Orthopedic Cartilage Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arshi, Armin; Siesener, Nathan J.; McAllister, David R.; Williams, Riley J.; Sherman, Seth L.; Jones, Kristofer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the 50 most cited articles in orthopedic cartilage surgery and their characteristics. Design A systematic review of the Science Citation Index Expanded was performed for articles related to cartilage surgery published in the 66 journals under the category “Orthopedics.” The 50 most cited articles were determined, and the following characteristics were analyzed for each article: authors, journal and year of publication, number of citations, geographic origin, article type (basic science or clinical), article subtype by study design, and level of evidence. Citation density (total number of citations/years since publication) was also computed. Results The 50 most cited articles ranged from 989 to 172 citations, with citation density ranging from 71.5 to 4.1. The publication years spanned from 1968 to 2008, with the 2000s accounting for half (25) of the articles and the highest mean citation density (14.6). The 50 most cited articles were published in 11 journals. The majority of the articles (29) were clinical, with level IV representing the most common level of evidence (10). The remaining basic science articles were most commonly animal in vivo studies (14). Stronger level of evidence was correlated with overall number of citations (P = 0.044), citation density (P < 0.001), and year of publication (P = 0.003). Conclusions Articles with stronger levels of evidence are more highly cited, with an increasing trend as evidence-based practice has been emphasized. This article list provides clinicians, researchers, and trainees with a group of “citation classics” in orthopedic cartilage surgery. PMID:27375839

  4. [Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms encountered in orthopedics and traumatology].

    PubMed

    Raherinantenaina, F; Rajaonanahary, T M A; Rakoto Ratsimba, H N

    2015-12-01

    Most published articles regarding orthopedic- and trauma-related femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) are case reports in English. Reported cases are often associated with a literature review but actually provide little robust data. We wanted to summarize the current knowledge on diagnostic and therapeutic features of these FAPs. A new case of superficial FAP is described followed by a review of the literature. A bibliographic search was performed online (PubMed, ScinceDirect) from 1964 to 2015 using the descriptors "traumatic femoral pseudoaneurysm, orthopedic surgery, osteochondroma". A total of 64 cases of FAPs was analyzed. There were 50 men with an average age of 40.72±26.45 years old. The most common clinical presentation was painful swelling (34%). Arteriography was the commonest radiological investigation used (63%). The main etiologies were orthopedic injuries (47%), surgery of the upper thigh (30%) and femoral osteochondromas (23%). Arterial injuries included superficial femoral (47%) and profunda femoris artery (50%). The treatment was open surgery (56%) or endovascular repair (36%). Deep femoral artery and its branches were embolized (47%) or ligated (38%). Endovascular stenting was performed in 30% of posttraumatic FAPs. All FAPs relating to osteochondromas were repaired surgically. Postoperative courses were uneventful in 95% of patients. Endovascular embolization is preferred in management of postsurgical FAPs which have usually involved the deep femoral artery. Endovascular stenting graft may be proposed for posttraumatic FAPs, for which the superficial femoral trunk is the most often involved vessel. Surgical repair should be performed when endovascular stenting graft is not feasible. Surgical repair is mandatory for all FAPs secondary to traumatic exostoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. ATTITUDES OF ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS TOWARD EFFECTS OF MEDICAL DEVICE PURCHASING.

    PubMed

    Lingg, Myriam; Merida-Herrera, Everth; Wyss, Kaspar; Durán-Arenas, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess viewpoints of end-users concerning the purchasing process of high-risk medical devices and to discuss the relevance of health technology assessments (HTAs) at the hospital level and other potential areas for improvement of purchasing processes. We used a cross-sectional study and assessed the attitudes and thoughts of orthopedic specialists. The study took place between June and October 2015 in Mexico. We collected data from 187 orthopedic surgeons. Involvement of orthopedic specialists in purchasing was reported by 86 percent. However, clinical practice was perceived as negatively influenced by purchasing outcomes by 92 percent. The problems were described as: material failure; effectiveness of medical devices; obsolete medical device technology; incomplete provision of implant / instrument sets; delayed provision of implants and instruments. To prevent sub-standard outcomes of purchasing decisions, this study and the current literature suggest that technologies should be assessed during the purchasing process, end-users should be adequately involved, and decisions should be based on multiple criteria including clinical impact in the short-term (e.g., primary stability of implant) and long-term (e.g., survival of implant). The focus on Mexico is particularly novel and provides insights into a health system where HTA is mainly present at the macro level and can be used for the listing of medical device technologies in the standard list. This study concludes that Mexican stakeholders of the purchasing process underestimate the contribution of HTAs at the level of purchasing decisions. HTA in Mexico has improved over the past years but still requires more advancement.

  6. Effect of social media in health care and orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Jenine; Robinson, Brooke S; Kugler, Nathan W; Illingworth, Kenneth D; Patel, Pranay; Saleh, Khaled J

    2012-04-01

    With the growth of social media platforms, their potential to affect health care, and orthopedics specifically, continues to expand. We reviewed the literature to obtain all pertinent information on social media in health care and examined its strengths and weaknesses from patient and physician perspectives. Health care professionals have slowly begun to use social media to stay connected with patients. The recent use of networking sites aims to improve education, provide a forum to discuss relevant medical topics, and allow for improved patient care. The use of social media, with the understanding of its limitations, may help promote patient happiness and safety and serve as an educational platform.

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying bla NDM-1 gene in orthopedic practice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Varsha; Bansal, Neha; Gupta, Ravi; Chander, Jagdish

    2014-09-01

    Emergence and spread of carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae is a cause of concern worldwide, the latest threat being New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1). This report is of an orthopedic case with fracture femur managed with internal fixation and bone grafting, who subsequently developed secondary infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring bla NDM-1 gene. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of imipenem was ≥8 μg/ml by E-test, suggestive of carbapenemase production. Phenotypic and further genotypic detection confirmed the presence of bla NDM-1 gene. The isolate remained susceptible only to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B.

  8. Rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders. 3. Degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Brander, V A; Kaelin, D L; Oh, T H; Lim, P A

    2000-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights assessment and therapeutic options in the rehabilitation of patients with osteoarthritis. It is part of the chapter on rehabilitation of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. New advances covered in this article include updates on conservative and operative treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis and pediatric hip diseases, prophylactic therapy for thromboembolic disease after lower limb joint replacement, new therapies for osteoarthritis, and the impact of exercise on outcome following hip replacement in active persons.

  9. The future of medical reimbursement for orthopedic surgery in Japan from the viewpoint of the health economy.

    PubMed

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Miki, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The financial burden of medical insurance on the government of Japan has recently become severe, which has led to the control of outpatient orthopedic reimbursements for common procedures. On the other hand, the overall disease burden for total hip or knee arthroplasty, decompression for cervical myelopathy or lumbar spinal canal stenosis, and new surgical technologies to treat other painful conditions and the post-surgical care related to these procedures has been reduced. Medical insurance systems in Japan are generally influenced by budget-balancing action. Consequently, the further development of interventional evaluation methods should be promoted. From the viewpoint of health economics, the value (meaning) of medical intervention can partly be explained by its cost-effectiveness. In order for appropriate medical reimbursement levels to be set for orthopedic surgery, the financial status of medical institutions needs to be concurrently reviewed. In particular, the relationship between the expense structure and medical reimbursement must be discussed to evaluate its role in community medicine system. Over the past 10 years, medical expenditures have increased by 9.6% in all fields, whereas the monthly medical reimbursements per patient have dropped by an average of 17.5%. Remarkably, surgery-related costs have increased by 36.5%, while other medical costs have decreased by 19.8%. There are a few reports of cost-utility analyses which investigate interventions such as total hip arthroplasty for hip osteoarthritis patients (US$ 4,600-70,500/QALY) and laminectomy for patients with spinal canal stenosis. Interventions may be an inevitable part of relative expense control under the current trend; however, there has been a slight increase in other parameters in response to changes in medical reimbursement evaluations - specifically, in the total income of medical institutions. If medical professionals such as orthopedic surgeons contribute to the economic value of

  10. The Early Years of Organized Chiropractic Orthopedics, 1954–1973: A Social History

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the origins and development of the organized chiropractic orthopedics movement in the United States from 1954–1973. Methods: Hand searches of early periodicals were performed and information was organized chronologically to create a timeline. Context for the timeline was provided by extracting pertinent information from audio recordings of interviews. Relevant background information was located using the cumulative index of the journal Chiropractic History and searching the MANTIS database. Historical Features: After World War I, The advent of third party reimbursement for health care created a new environment for health care practitioners. For doctors of chiropractic, this event provided the impetus to begin the postgraduate chiropractic orthopedics program over 50 years ago. In 1954, Alvin A. Hancock, DC and F. Maynard Lipe, DC successfully launched an active orthopedics movement after several earlier attempts failed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The movement generated from the desire to train and certify chiropractors to manage personal injury and workers’ compensation low back injuries. In addition to developing interdisciplinary educational programs, the chiropractic orthopedics group was responsible for producing a research agenda, some of the profession’s early orthopedic-focused research, and for starting the National Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics of the National Chiropractic Association, which later became the American Chiropractic Association Council on Orthopedics. These organizations produced thousands of specialists in chiropractic orthopedics, later known as Diplomates of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists. Conclusion: Several orthopedics interest groups were formed and credentialing processes were created to qualify doctors as recognized chiropractic orthopedics specialists. The popularity of this movement resulted in the inclusion of orthopedics into core chiropractic college curricula and

  11. Impact of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program in orthopedics and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Mabit, C; Marcheix, P S; Mounier, M; Dijoux, P; Pestourie, N; Bonnevialle, P; Bonnomet, F

    2012-10-01

    Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) is a priority. One of the fundamental principles for the surveillance of SSI is based on receiving effective field feedback (retro-information). The aim of this study was to report the results of a program of SSI surveillance and validate the hypothesis that there is a correlation between creating a SSI surveillance program and a reduction in SSI. The protocol was based on the weekly collection of surveillance data obtained directly from the different information systems in different departments. A delay of 3 months was established before extraction and analysis of data and information from the surgical teams. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System) developed by the American surveillance system and the reduction of length of hospital stay index Journées d'hospitalisation évitées (JHE). Since the end of 2009, 7156 surgical procedures were evaluated (rate of inclusion 97.3%), and 84 SSI were registered with a significant decrease over time from 1.86% to 0.66%. A total of 418 days of hospitalization have been saved since the beginning of the surveillance system. Our surveillance system has three strong points: follow-up is continuous, specifically adapted to orthopedic traumatology and nearly exhaustive. The extraction of data directly from hospital information systems effectively improves the collection of data on surgical procedures. The implementation of a SSI surveillance protocol reduces SSI. Level III. Prospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Monan, Wang

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable.

  13. Publication rates of papers presented at the Brazilian Orthopedic Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Gomes, Guilherme Sevá; de Oliveira, Rafael Garcia; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the publication rates of the papers presented at the 2007 Brazilian Orthopedics Meeting (Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia - CBOT). METHODS: Evaluation of the proportion of abstracts submitted by the various orthopedic subspecialties and according to the Brazilian states. Then, a Lilacs and PubMed search was performed in order to determine which presentations generated national or international published papers. RESULTS: São Paulo and the Southeast region were responsible for the greatest number of presentations at the congress (54.1% and 68.3% respectively). Shoulder and Elbow were the subspecialty responsible for more presentations (13.8%). Among the 653 studies presented at the congress, 174 (26.6%) were published. Oral presentations obtained a publication rate 3.58 times higher than posters. CONCLUSION: The CBOT publication rate is lower than 30%. Many of the papers presented at the CBOT does not pass the scrutiny of scientific journals and therefore should not be the only source of scientific update of the participants: Descriptive Epidemiologic. PMID:24453684

  14. Publication rates of papers presented at the Brazilian Orthopedic Meeting.

    PubMed

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Gomes, Guilherme Sevá; de Oliveira, Rafael Garcia; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    To quantify the publication rates of the papers presented at the 2007 Brazilian Orthopedics Meeting (Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia - CBOT). Evaluation of the proportion of abstracts submitted by the various orthopedic subspecialties and according to the Brazilian states. Then, a Lilacs and PubMed search was performed in order to determine which presentations generated national or international published papers. São Paulo and the Southeast region were responsible for the greatest number of presentations at the congress (54.1% and 68.3% respectively). Shoulder and Elbow were the subspecialty responsible for more presentations (13.8%). Among the 653 studies presented at the congress, 174 (26.6%) were published. Oral presentations obtained a publication rate 3.58 times higher than posters. The CBOT publication rate is lower than 30%. Many of the papers presented at the CBOT does not pass the scrutiny of scientific journals and therefore should not be the only source of scientific update of the participants: Descriptive Epidemiologic.

  15. Laser-deposited Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta orthopedic alloys.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Nag, S; Samuel, S; Fraser, H L

    2006-08-01

    The complex quaternary Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta orthopedic alloy has been successfully deposited from a powder feedstock consisting of a blend of elemental titanium, niobium, zirconium, and tantalum powders, using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENStrade mark) process. In the as laser-deposited form, these alloys exhibit a substantially higher tensile strength as compared with more conventionally processed counterparts of similar composition, while maintaining excellent ductility and a low modulus. Furthermore, the as-deposited alloys appear to exhibit a <001> texture, with a substantially large number of grains of the beta phase aligning one of their <001> axes nearly normal to the substrate or parallel to the growth direction. The microstructure of the as-deposited as well as tensile-tested alloys have been characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation microscopy (OM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation of a high density of shear bands, possibly arising from slip localization due to precipitates of the omega phase in the beta matrix, is clearly evident in the tensile-tested sample. The enhanced tensile strength and low modulus in these laser-deposited alloys coupled with the ability to form near-net shape components makes LENS an attractive processing technology for orthopedic implants.

  16. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  17. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  18. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts’ process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts’ scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable. PMID:27414794

  19. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Dan; Amar, Eyal; Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts' process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts' scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable.

  20. Evidence for extended prophylaxis in the setting of orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dobesh, Paul P

    2004-07-01

    Patients undergoing orthopedic surgery represent one of the highest risk groups for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Evidence shows that this risk extends beyond the period in which the patient is hospitalized, especially for patients undergoing hip surgery. Clinical trials have shown that extended prophylaxis with the low-molecular-weight heparins is effective in reducing the rate of total VTE, and a meta-analysis demonstrated a reduction in symptomatic VTE with extended prophylaxis after total hip replacement surgery. Based on these results, the American College of Chest Physicians gives a grade 2A recommendation for the use of extended prophylaxis after orthopedic surgery. Until recently, data evaluating the role of prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery were limited. Subsequently, a novel anticoagulant, fondaparinux, demonstrated significant benefit in these patients and has become the first and only agent approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery Despite the limitations of the older trials, their findings supported the need to evaluate extended prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. In the first well-conducted trial of extended prophylaxis for hip fracture surgery, fondaparinux provided impressive results in reducing total and symptomatic VTE. The results of this trial have once again led to fondaparinux being the first and only agent to be granted FDA approval for the indication of extended prophylaxis in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

  1. Breed susceptibility for developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Elizabeth; Breur, Gert J; Austin, Connie C

    2002-01-01

    A large-scale epidemiological study was conducted to determine breeds at risk for 12 developmental orthopedic diseases (DODs). Developmental orthopedic diseases investigated included canine hip dysplasia (CHD); craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO); fragmented coronoid process; hypertrophic osteodystrophy; Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease; osteochondrosis of the medial humeral condyle, caudal humeral head, femoral condyles, and talar trochlear ridges; panosteitis; patella luxation; and ununited anconeal process. Dogs that were diagnosed with any one of the diseases of interest at any of 10 veterinary teaching hospitals participating in the Veterinary Medical Database from 1986 to 1995 were included as cases. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine risk. Frequency of diagnosis during the 10-year period ranged from 35 cases (CMO) to 10,637 cases (CHD). The number of breeds at increased risk for a disease ranged from one (CMO) to 35 (CHD). Breed susceptibility for a DOD may suggest a genetic component in the disease etiology. The results of this study serve to increase veterinarians' awareness of breeds susceptible to DODs and may facilitate the control of such diseases by identifying breeds that might benefit from breeding programs or environmental intervention such as dietary modification.

  2. The development of thyroid storm in a child with McCune-Albright syndrome after orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawless, S T; Reeves, G; Bowen, J R

    1992-09-01

    To report a case of thyroid storm that developed in a child with McCune-Albright syndrome after orthopedic surgery. The development of thyroid storm has not previously been described after surgery in a child. Descriptive case report. Pediatric intensive care unit. Patient with McCune-Albright syndrome who developed thyroid storm. SELECTION PROCEDURES AND INTERVENTIONS: Clinical features and treatment of thyroid storm are described. A highly sensitive immunochemiluminometric thyroid-stimulating hormone assay to help diagnose hyperthyroid states is also described. Before all operative procedures, children at high risk for thyroid dysfunction, including patients with McCune-Albright syndrome, should be screened and observed closely for the development of thyroid storm.

  3. Postoperative respiratory failure necessitating transfer to the intensive care unit in orthopedic surgery patients: risk factors, costs, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Roman; Boland, Lori L; Normington, James P; Prenevost, Rebecca M; Hur, Lindsay Y; Maynard, Leslie F; McNaughton, Molly A; Kinzy, Tyler G; Masood, Adnan; Dastrange, Mehdi; Huguelet, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications in orthopedic surgery patients have been associated with worse clinical outcomes. Identifying patients with respiratory risk factors requiring enhanced monitoring and management modifications is an important part of postoperative care. Patients with unanticipated respiratory decompensation requiring transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) have not been studied in sufficient detail. A retrospective case-control study of elective orthopedic surgery patients (knee, hip, shoulder, or spine, n = 51) who developed unanticipated respiratory failure (RF) necessitating transfer to the ICU over a 3-year period was conducted. Controls (n = 153) were frequency matched to cases by gender, age, and surgical procedure. Patient and perioperative care factors, clinical outcomes, and cost of care were examined. Transfer to the ICU occurred within 48 h of surgery in 73 % of the cases, 31 % required non-invasive ventilation, and 18 % required mechanical ventilation. Cases had a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and regular psychotropic medication use than controls. Cases received more intravenous opioids during the first 24 postoperative hours, were hospitalized 4 days longer, had higher in-hospital mortality, and had excess hospitalization costs of US$26,571. COPD, OSA, preoperative psychotropic medications, and anesthesia time were associated with risk of RF in a multivariate analysis. Unanticipated RF after orthopedic surgery is associated with extended hospitalization, increased mortality, and higher cost of care. Hospital protocols that include risk factor assessment, enhanced monitoring, and a cautious approach to opioid use in high-risk patients may reduce the frequency of this complication.

  4. Hemodynamic and oxidative mechanisms of tourniquet-induced muscle injury: near-infrared spectroscopy for the orthopedics setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Reid, W. Darlene; Harris, R. Luke; Jafari, Siavash; Powers, Scott K.; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2012-08-01

    During orthopedic procedures, the tourniquets used to maintain bloodless surgical fields cause ischemia and then reperfusion (I/R), leading to oxidative muscle injury. Established methods exist neither for monitoring orthopedic I/R nor for predicting the extent of tourniquet-associated oxidative injury. To develop a predictive model for tourniquet-associated oxidative muscle injury, this study combined real-time near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) monitoring of I/R with Western blotting (WB) for oxidized proteins. We hypothesized strong correlations between NIRS-derived I/R indices and muscle protein oxidation. In 17 patients undergoing ankle fracture repair, a thigh tourniquet was inflated on the injured limb (300 mmHg). Using a continuous-wave (CW) NIRS setup, oxygenated (O2Hb), deoxygenated (HHb), and total (tHb) hemoglobin were monitored bilaterally (tourniquet versus control) in leg muscles. Leg muscle biopsies were collected unilaterally (tourniquet side) immediately after tourniquet inflation (pre) and before deflation (post). Average ischemia duration was 43.2±14.6 min. In post-compared to pre-biopsies, muscle protein oxidation (quantified using WB) increased 172.3%±145.7% (P<0.0005). Changes in O2Hb and tHb were negatively correlated with protein oxidation (respectively: P=0.040, R2=0.25 and P=0.003, R2=0.58). Reoxygenation rate was positively correlated with protein oxidation (P=0.041, R2=0.25). These data indicate that using CW NIRS, it is possible to predict orthopedic tourniquet-associated muscle oxidative injury noninvasively.

  5. Evaluation of Quantitative Analysis of Cultures from Sonicated Retrieved Orthopedic Implants in Diagnosis of Orthopedic Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Jaime; Gomez-Barrena, Enrique; Cordero, Jose; Martín-de-Hijas, Nieves Zamora; Kinnari, Teemu J.; Fernandez-Roblas, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    To improve the microbiological diagnosis of device-related osteoarticular infections, we have developed a protocol based on the sonication of device samples, followed by concentration and inoculation of the sonicate in a broad variety of media in a quantitative manner. Sixty-six samples from 31 patients were included in the study (17 of them with clinical diagnosis of infection). The sonication procedure had a sensitivity of 94.1%, which is better than that of conventional cultures (88.2%). One case of contamination and six cases of unexpected positive cultures were detected (specificity of 42.8%): two of these were considered to represent true infection, while the other four were considered to be nonsignificant (corrected specificity of 50%), although the clinical importance of these isolates is questionable. When we analyzed the number of CFU, no breakpoint between significant and nonsignificant isolates could be established. Based on our results, the procedure of sonication of retrieved implants is better than conventional cultures for the diagnosis of device-related infections. The significance of some isolates in patients without clinical infection remains uncertain. However, they may become pathogens and cannot be routinely considered to be contamination. PMID:18077647

  6. A qualitative and quantitative needs assessment of pain management for hospitalized orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Cordts, Grace A; Grant, Marian S; Brandt, Lynsey E; Mears, Simon C

    2011-08-08

    Despite advances in pain management, little formal teaching is given to practitioners and nurses in its use for postoperative orthopedic patients. The goal of our study was to determine the educational needs for orthopedic pain management of our residents, nurses, and physical therapists using a quantitative and qualitative assessment. The needs analysis was conducted in a 10-bed orthopedic unit at a teaching hospital and included a survey given to 20 orthopedic residents, 9 nurses, and 6 physical therapists, followed by focus groups addressing barriers to pain control and knowledge of pain management. Key challenges for nurses included not always having breakthrough pain medication orders and the gap in pain management between cessation of patient-controlled analgesia and ordering and administering oral medications. Key challenges for orthopedic residents included treating pain in patients with a history of substance abuse, assessing pain, and determining when to use long-acting vs short-acting opioids. Focus group assessments revealed a lack of training in pain management and the need for better coordination of care between nurses and practitioners and improved education about special needs groups (the elderly and those with substance abuse issues). This needs assessment showed that orthopedic residents and nurses receive little formal education on pain management, despite having to address pain on a daily basis. This information will be used to develop an educational program to improve pain management for postoperative orthopedic patients. An integrated educational program with orthopedic residents, nurses, and physical therapists would promote understanding of issues for each discipline.

  7. Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Robert S.; Fusco, Carol B.

    Guidelines are provided for the development of programs in South Carolina for orthopedically handicapped (OH) pupils. Basic information is given concerning the definition of orthopedic handicap, the legal mandates on the education of OH pupils, funding sources, authorized programs (whether self-contained programs, resource rooms, or itinerant…

  8. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in…

  9. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  10. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  11. Age, Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, Body Composition, and Incidence of Orthopedic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Effects of age, physical activity, physical fitness, and body mass index (BMI) on the occurrence of orthopedic problems were examined. For men, physical fitness, BMI, and physical activity were associated with orthopedic problems; for women, physical activity was the main predictor. Age was not a factor for either gender. (JD)

  12. Principles for awarding and fitting orthopedic devices and current views on terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, A

    2000-12-30

    This article presents excerpts from statues and regulations governing the legal aspects of providing orthopedic devices. The author suggests that the rules of the Committee on Prosthetics and Orthotics of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons be applied for the classification and terminology of orthopedic devices.

  13. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  14. Surgical site infection rates and risk factors in orthopedic pediatric patients in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Viqueira, Almudena Quintás; Caravaca, Gil Rodríguez; Quesada Rubio, José Antonio; Francés, Victoria Soler

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study is to study surgical site infection (SSI) rates and risk factors in a pediatric population. We conducted a prospective cohort study to estimate the SSI rate at a national pediatric referral center, covering all patients managed at the Orthopedic Surgery Department of the Niño Jesús Children's University Teaching Hospital from January 2010 through December 2012. Risk factors and antibiotic prophylaxis were monitored. A comparison between Spanish and US data was performed, with a breakdown by National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk indices. We also conducted a comparative study of SSI rates from 2010 to 2012 to assess the impact of the epidemiologic surveillance system. The study population of 1079 patients had a SSI rate of 2.8%. SSI rates were calculated for spinal fusion and other musculoskeletal procedures according to the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index. In the case of other musculoskeletal procedures, our SSI rates were 0.8 times lower than the overall Spanish rate, but higher than US rates for all risk categories. For spinal fusion procedures, our SSI rates were 1.2 times higher than the Spanish rates and 3.5 times higher than National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance rates. This latter finding should be interpreted with caution because it was based on a small sample. The multivariate analysis indicated that the only predictive factors of SSI were American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. The surveillance program showed that for clean procedures, SSI incidence decreased from 4% in 2010 to 3.2% in 2011 and to 2.4% in 2012.

  15. Implementation of an Integrated Orthopedic Curriculum to Increase Clinical and Procedural Competency amongst Pediatric Residents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-05

    Research Division inay pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We cannot pay for...59 MOW CRD Graduate Heallh Sciences Education (GHSE) (SGS O&MJ: SGS R&D: Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research...This should be accomplished no la tor than 30 days before final clearance Is required to publish/present your materials. II you have any questions or

  16. Factors affecting interest in orthopedics among female medical students: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Keith; Namdari, Surena; Bowers, Andrea; Keenan, Mary Ann; Levin, L Scott; Ahn, Jaimo

    2011-12-06

    The field of orthopedics has a limited ability to recruit high-quality female applicants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early exposure to the field affects a woman's decision to pursue orthopedics. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study between academic years 2005 and 2009 and compared interest in orthopedic surgery among female (n=271) and male (n=71) medical students at 2 urban teaching institutions. Elective lectures and orthopedic literature were distributed via e-mail to the study participants. These materials included articles published in the medical literature, materials produced and distributed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and Web sites providing educational materials. The primary outcome was the likelihood of application for orthopedic residency. We studied the influence of demographics, exposure, and attitudes on interest in pursuing an orthopedic career. Men had a significantly higher baseline level of interest in orthopedic surgery than women (P=.005). Younger age (P<.001) and personal (P<.001), independent (P<.001), and school (P=.023) exposures to orthopedics were significantly related to interest among women. At final follow-up, total personal exposures (P=.003) and total independent exposures (P<.001) in the form of our literature and lectures were correlated with final interest in women. Female interest was decreased by the long hours, physical demands, and predominantly male nature of the field. Early exposure to orthopedic educational resources may be useful in generating female interest. Perceptions and attitudes regarding orthopedic surgery must to be changed to attract the best and brightest minds, regardless of sex.

  17. Composites of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calcium carbonate: in vitro evaluation for use in orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Nicholas J; Egan, Melissa J; Brunelle, John E

    2008-04-01

    Biodegradable materials utilized in current orthopedic sports medicine fixation devices are required to maintain mechanical properties for at least 12 weeks to facilitate tissue healing and then ideally degrade with eventual replacement by surrounding tissue (bone). Current materials exhibit excessive longevity, which limit the potential for bone replacement, an ideal outcome in clinical procedures where revisions are a possibility. This study investigates material property modification of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) by calcium carbonate. Modification of the degradation rate of PLGA by calcium carbonate (16, 36, 51% w/w) was demonstrated and the percentage of calcium carbonate within the polymer optimized at 36% (w/w). The optimized formulation was molded into a fixation screw and in vitro degradation demonstrated a gradual loss in molecular weight but with a pull-out strength retention beyond 12 weeks. Significant mass loss then occurred after 26 weeks. Physical testing, insertion torque, and failure torque indicated that this composite also had sufficient initial mechanical properties required for screw in type fixation devices. The combination of mechanical properties and degradation behavior suggests that this material may have potential to be utilized in orthopedic fixation devices that are placed in bone.

  18. Peer-assisted teaching student tutors as examiners in an orthopedic surgery OSCE station – pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Melcher, Peter; Zajonz, Dirk; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Ghanem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: The OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) is composed of oral and practical examination in order to examine students’ abilities to imply clinical examination techniques and to interact with patients. The examiners for this procedure can be either lecturers or peers. The aim of this work is to evaluate the peer-assisted teaching student tutors as examiners in an orthopedic surgery OSCE station. Methods: We analyzed the OSCE data from 2013 to 2015. During this period over 300 medical students were examined each year. An evaluation was conducted at an orthopedic station and examined by peer students to assess the advantages and disadvantages of peer-assisted teaching student tutors as examiners. Results: We have noticed that student peers are more flexible regarding their schedule and they have been well trained for OSCE. Concerning the economic aspects, student peers are clearly of major economic advantage. Disadvantages were not reported in our study probably because peers were well trained and the checklists are monitored regularly. Conclusion: Student peers in OSCE are of major advantage due to their flexible time schedule and relatively low costs. They must be well trained and the checklists are to be monitored regularly. Our study shows that peer tutor examiners conducted the examination as competent as lecture examiners. However, legal restrictions on the employment of students should be considered. PMID:27500078

  19. The Use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression in Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Postoperative Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Sandra; Bashar, Khalid; Broderick, Barry J; Sheehan, James; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Walsh, Stewart R; ÓLaighin, Gearoid; Quinlan, Leo R

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to carry out an up-to-date evaluation on the use of compression devices as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis methods in orthopedic and neurological patients. There is an increased risk of DVT with surgery, particularly in patients who are not expected to mobilize soon after their procedures, such as orthopedic and neurosurgical patients. Compression devices are often employed for DVT prophylaxis in these patients. However, the true efficacy of these devices and the standardization of use with these devices are yet to be established. Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane library electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials and observational studies reporting on the use of compression devices for DVT prevention. Nine studies were included for review and meta-analysis. Use of an intermittent pneumatic compression device alone is neither superior nor inferior to chemoprophylaxis. In the absence of large randomized multicenter trials comparing the use of intermittent pneumatic compression or chemoprophylaxis alone to a combination of both treatments, the current evidence supports the use of a combined approach in high-risk surgical patients.

  20. Impact of biologics on the prevalence of orthopedic surgery in the National Database of Rheumatic Diseases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Tetsuro; Nishino, Jinju; Kadono, Yuho; Matsui, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae; Tohma, Shigeto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the treatment strategy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the prevalence of RA-related surgeries after approval of biologics in Japan and to analyze the impact of biologics on the incidence of orthopedic surgeries using a nationwide observational cohort database of rheumatic diseases [National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan (NinJa)]. The proportion of patients using biologics linearly increased from 2004 (1.8%) to 2007 (10.0%), but neither the number nor type of RA-related surgery significantly changed during this period. Patients treated with biologics exhibited relatively more severe disease activity and lower physical function. Among patients using biologics, those who underwent RA-related surgeries exhibited background characteristics of longer disease duration and worse physical function, while disease activity was not different from patients without surgery. These results suggest that the potential value of biologics in avoiding surgical procedure is limited in patients with severe functional disorders caused by long disease duration. Further investigation with a longer observation period is required to obtain more definite conclusions as to the impact of biologics usage on orthopedic surgeries.

  1. Dominance of foreign citations in Brazilian orthopedics journals.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Rosa, Rita de Cássia Rodrigues; de Barros, Rui Sergio Monteiro; Botelho, Nara Macedo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether there is any preference for citing journals from other countries to the detriment of Brazilian journals, in three Brazilian orthopedics journals. All the references of articles published in 2011 by the journals Acta Ortopédica Brasileira, Coluna/Columna and Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia were evaluated to as certain how many of these came from Brazilian journals and how many from foreign journals. 3813 references distributed among 187 articles were analyzed. Out of this total, 306 (8.02%) were from Brazilian journals. There was no difference between the three journals analyzed. There were 76 articles (40.64%) without any citations of articles in Brazilian journals and only two articles (1%) cited more Brazilian articles than articles published elsewhere. There is a need for Brazilian researchers to cite articles from Brazilian journals more often.

  2. Barriers to the clinical translation of orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher H

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been the subject of increasingly intensive research for over 20 years, and there is concern in some quarters over the lack of clinically useful products despite the large sums of money invested. This review provides one perspective on orthopedic applications from a biologist working in academia. It is suggested that the delay in clinical application is not atypical of new, biologically based technologies. Some barriers to progress are acknowledged and discussed, but it is also noted that preclinical studies have identified several promising types of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenetic signals, which, although not optimal, are worth advancing toward human trials to establish a bridgehead in the clinic. Although this transitional technology will be replaced by more sophisticated, subsequent systems, it will perform valuable pioneering functions and facilitate the clinical development of the field. Some strategies for achieving this are suggested. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  3. Cultural Nuance in Orthopedic Foreign Aid: Differences in Patient Concerns.

    PubMed

    Kavolus, Joseph J; Ritter, Merrill A; Claverie, J Guillermo; Salas, Marcos D; Kavolus, Christopher H; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic aid to developing nations is expanding and becoming a unique facet of the specialty. This investigation seeks to compare patient impressions and concerns regarding the care patients receive as part of an itinerant surgical aid trip in 2 nations. In 2013 and 2014, patients from 2 separate nations completed a Likert scale survey assessing impressions of the care they received at the hands of a surgical team from abroad. Mean response scores were calculated and compared using a t test. This is the first investigation to compare patient concerns across 2 nations in a surgical aid trip setting. The results highlight the importance of culture in understanding patients and the impressions of the care they receive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Nanotextured Titanium Orthopedic Screws for Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Stephane; Awitor, Komla O; Raspal, Vincent; Johnson, Matthew B; Bokalawela, Roshan S P; Larson, Preston R; Doiron, Curtis F

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we modified the topography of commercial titanium orthopedic screws using electrochemical anodization in a 0.4 wt% hydrofluoric acid solution to produce titanium dioxide nanotube layers. The morphology of the nanotube layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the nanotube layers were investigated by screwing and unscrewing an anodized screw into several different types of human bone while the torsional force applied to the screwdriver was measured using a torque screwdriver. The range of torsional force applied to the screwdriver was between 5 and [Formula: see text]. Independent assessment of the mechanical properties of the same surfaces was performed on simple anodized titanium foils using a triboindenter. Results showed that the fabricated nanotube layers can resist mechanical stresses close to those found in clinical situations.

  5. Regulatory perspective on characterization and testing of orthopedic bone cements.

    PubMed

    Demian, H W; McDermott, K

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a general regulatory background of acrylic bone cements, chemical composition information on several commercially available bone cements, physical and chemical methods of analyses, mechanical test methods, and risks and failure mechanisms of acrylic bone cements. Suggestions and recommendations presented in Tables 2 and 3 are not mandatory requirements but reflect data and methodologies which the FDA's Orthopedic Devices Branch (ORDB) believes to be acceptable to evaluate most pre-clinical data. FDA may require information in addition to that contained in this paper. In some instances, a sponsor may be able to sufficiently justify the omission of some tests. Although this paper describes certain administrative requirements, it does not take the place of the requirements contained in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) Parts 801, 807, 812, and 814 or those found in the statute.

  6. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with. PMID:27027022

  7. Antibiotic-Loaded Cement in Orthopedic Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bistolfi, Alessandro; Massazza, Giuseppe; Verné, Enrica; Massè, Alessandro; Deledda, Davide; Ferraris, Sara; Miola, Marta; Galetto, Fabrizio; Crova, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Infections in orthopaedic surgery are a serious issue. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement was developed for the treatment of infected joint arthroplasties and for prophylaxes in total joint replacement in selected cases. Despite the widespread use of the antibiotic-loaded bone cement in orthopedics, many issues are still unclear or controversial: bacterial adhesion and antibiotic resistance, modification of mechanical properties which follows the addition of the antibiotic, factors influencing the release of the antibiotic from the cement and the role of the surface, the method for mixing the cement and the antibiotic, the choice and the effectiveness of the antibiotic, the combination of two or more antibiotics, and the toxicity. This review discusses all these topics, focusing on properties, merits, and defects of the antibiotic loaded cement. The final objective is to provide the orthopaedic surgeons clear and concise information for the correct choice of cement in their clinical practice. PMID:24977058

  8. Congenital and acquired orthopedic abnormalities in patients with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Westcott, M A; Dynes, M C; Remer, E M; Donaldson, J S; Dias, L S

    1992-11-01

    This article presents a radiologic review of the spectrum of acquired and congenital orthopedic abnormalities found in patients with myelomeningocele. These abnormalities are caused predominantly by muscle imbalance, paralysis, and decreased sensation in the lower extremity. Iatrogenic injury, such as a postoperative tethered cord, may also cause bone abnormalities. Selected images were obtained from more than 800 children. Important entities presented include spinal curvatures such as kyphosis, scoliosis, and lordosis; subluxation and dislocation of the hip, coxa valga, contractures of the hip, and femoral torsion; knee deformities; rotational abnormalities of the lower extremity and external and internal torsion; ankle and foot abnormalities such as ankle valgus, calcaneus foot, congenital vertical talus (rocker-bottom deformity), and talipes equinovarus; and metaphyseal, diaphyseal, and physeal fractures. Familiarity with congenital abnormalities and an understanding of the pathogenesis of acquired disorders in patients with myelomeningocele are essential for proper radiologic interpretation and timely therapy.

  9. Orthopedic specialty hospitals: centers of excellence or greed machines?

    PubMed

    Badlani, Neil; Boden, Scott; Phillips, Frank

    2012-03-07

    Orthopedic specialty hospitals have recently been the subject of debate. They are patient-centered, physician-friendly health care alternatives that take advantage of the economic efficiencies of specialization. Medically, they provide a higher quality of care and increase patient and physician satisfaction. Economically, they are more efficient and profitable than general hospitals. They also positively affect society through the taxes they pay and the beneficial aspects of the competition they provide to general hospitals. Their ability to provide a disruptive innovation to the existing hospital industry will lead to lower costs and greater access to health care. However, critics say that physician ownership presents potential conflicts of interest and leads to overuse of medical care. Some general hospitals are suffering as a result of unfair specialty hospital practices, and a few drastic medical complications have occurred at specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals have been scrutinized for increasing the inequality of health care and continue to be a target of government regulations. In this article, the pros and cons are examined, and the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital is analyzed as an example. Orthopedic specialty hospitals provide excellent care and are great assets to society. Competition between specialty and general hospitals has provided added value to patients and taxpayers. However, physicians must take more responsibility in their appropriate and ethical leadership. It is critical to recognize financial conflicts of interest, disclose ownership, and act ethically. Patient care cannot be compromised. With thoughtful and efficient leadership, specialty hospitals can be an integral part of improving health care in the long term. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  11. Hydroxyapatite-nanotube composites and coatings for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Debrupa

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has received wide attention in orthopedics, due to its biocompatibility and osseointegration ability. Despite these advantages, the brittle nature and low fracture toughness of HA often results in rapid wear and premature fracture of implant. Hence, there is a need to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance of HA without compromising its biocompatibility. The aim of the current research is to explore the potential of nanotubes as reinforcement to HA for orthopedic implants. HA- 4 wt.% carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and coatings are synthesized by spark plasma sintering and plasma spraying respectively, and investigated for their mechanical, tribological and biological behavior. CNT reinforcement improves the fracture toughness (>90%) and wear resistance (>66%) of HA for coating and free standing composites. CNTs have demonstrated a positive influence on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix mineralization activities of osteoblasts, during in-vitro biocompatibility studies. In-vivo exposure of HA-CNT coated titanium implant in animal model (rat) shows excellent histocompatibility and neobone integration on the implant surface. The improved osseointegration due to presence of CNTs in HA is quantified by the adhesion strength measurement of single osteoblast using nano-scratch technique. Considering the ongoing debate about cytotoxicity of CNTs in the literature, the present study also suggests boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) as an alternative reinforcement. BNNT with the similar elastic modulus and strength as CNT, were added to HA. The resulting composite having 4 wt.% BNNTs improved the fracture toughness (˜85%) and wear resistance (˜75%) of HA in the similar range as HA-CNT composites. BNNTs were found to be non-cytotoxic for osteoblasts and macrophages. In-vitro evaluation shows positive role of BNNT in osteoblast proliferation and viability. Apatite formability of BNNT surface in ˜4 days establishes its osseointegration

  12. Orthopedic Correction of Growing Hyperdivergent, Retrognathic, Patients with Miniscrew Implants

    PubMed Central

    Buschang, Peter H.; Carrillo, Roberto; Rossouw, P. Emile

    2010-01-01

    Traditional orthodontic treatments do not adequately address the skeletal problems of retrognathic, hyperdivergent, Class II adolescents; the few approaches that do require long-term patient compliance. This paper introduces a novel approach using miniscrew implants (MSIa) and growth to treat retrognathic hyperdivergent adolescents. Nine consecutive patients were evaluated at the start of treatment (13.2 ±1.1 years of age) and again at the end of the orthopedic phase (after 1.9 ±0.3 years). Each patient had two MSIs placed in either side of the palate. Coil springs (150 g) extended from the MSIs to a RPE, which served as a rigid segment for intruding the maxillary premolar and molars. Two additional MSIs were placed between the first mandibular molars and second premolars; coil spring (150 g) extended from the MSIs to hold or intrude the mandibular molars. Prior to treatment, the patients exhibited substantial and significant mandibular retrusion (Z-score=−1.0), facial convexity (Z-score=0.7), and hyperdivergence (Z-score=1.6). Treatment produced consistent and substantial orthopedic effects. The chin was advanced an average of 2.4 mm, the SNB angle increased by 2.1°, the mandibular plane angle decreased 3.9°, and facial convexity decreased by approximately 3.2°. Questionnaires showed that this treatment approach was not painful or uncomfortable; the majority of the patients indicated that they were very likely to recommend the treatment to others. Treatment was accomplished by titrating the amount of orthodontic intrusion performed based on the individuals’ growth potential. PMID:21236539

  13. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Andreas; Klein, Anja; Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  14. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  15. Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Usage in Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Emily; Nguyen, Joseph; Matzkin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (P<0.0001). Younger age was the biggest indicator predicting the use of social media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day’s travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals. PMID:25317312

  16. Emergency department orthopedics observation unit as an alternative to admission.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Amy A; Jones, Jaime; Weiss, Steven J; Silva, Otono

    2014-10-01

    Inclusion of select orthopedic problems in the orthopedics observation unit (OOU) may reduce hospital admissions. Our system allows OOU status for 24 hours, but the effect on admissions is unknown. Our primary hypothesis was that we could predict which OOU patients required admission based on the presence of uncontrolled pain. Data were prospectively collected for all OOU patients in this prospective observational study, including data on extremity cellulitis, fractures, and spine injuries awaiting brace placement.The primary outcome variable was admission to the hospital versus discharge home. The a priori hypotheses were that patients with more persistent or worsening pain would require admission more often and that the OOU would result in fewer patients needing a costlier inpatient admission to the hospital. An a priori power analysis showed adequate power of 80% to detect a difference between admitted and discharged patients. Data were prospectively collected from August 2011 to August 2012 for 199 consecutive OOU patients, 62% of whom were men. Diagnoses included infection (cellulitis or abscess of extremity) in 76%, fracture in 15% and other in 9% of the patients. Sixty-two patients (31%) were admitted and 7 patients (4%) made return visits for the same problem within a 30-day period. No significant relations existed between any of the independent variables and admission on bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression found no significant predictors of hospital admission. Logistic regression was not performed on 30-day returns because of the low event rate (4%). An OOU prevented 138 of 199 (69%) patients from being admitted to a hospital. There were no significant predictors of which patients would require admission. Pain was not a predictor of need for admission. The lack of significant predictors is important in suggesting that without the ability to predict which patients require admission, a system using an OOU can reduce admissions by more than

  17. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  18. Comparison of two analgesia protocols for the treatment of pediatric orthopedic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Andrea; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos; Portela, Janete L; Piva, Jefferson P; Garcia, João Pedro Tedesco; Santana, João Carlos B

    2015-08-01

    to compare the efficacy of two analgesia protocols (ketamine versus morphine) associated with midazolam for the reduction of dislocations or closed fractures in children. randomized clinical trial comparing morphine (0.1mg/kg; max 5mg) and ketamine (2.0mg/kg, max 70mg) associated with midazolam (0.2mg/kg; max 10mg) in the reduction of dislocations or closed fractures in children treated at the pediatrics emergency room (October 2010 and September 2011). The groups were compared in terms of the times to perform the procedures, analgesia, parent satisfaction and orthopedic team. 13 patients were allocated to ketamine and 12 to morphine, without differences in relation to age, weight, gender, type of injury, and pain scale before the intervention. There was no failure in any of the groups, no differences in time to start the intervention and overall procedure time. The average hospital stay time was similar (ketamine = 10.8+5.1h versus morphine = 12.3+4.4hs; p=0.447). The median pain (faces pain scale) scores after the procedure was 2 in both groups. Amnesia was noted in 92.3% (ketamine) and 83.3% (morphine) (p=0.904). Parents said they were very satisfied in relation to the analgesic intervention (84.6% in the ketamine group and 66.6% in the morphine group; p=0.296). The satisfaction of the orthopedist regarding the intervention was 92.3% in the ketamine group and 75% in the morphine group (p=0.222). by producing results similar to morphine, ketamine can be considered as an excellent option in pain management and helps in the reduction of dislocations and closed fractures in pediatric emergency rooms.

  19. Intramuscular Administration of Drotaverine Hydrochloride Decreases Both Incidence of Urinary Retention and Time to Micturition in Orthopedic Patients under Spinal Anesthesia: A Single Blinded Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Bałkota, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) increases the duration of hospitalization and frequency and risk of urinary bladder catheterization. The objective of this study was to analyze the efficacy of intramuscularly administered drotaverine hydrochloride in the prevention of POUR in orthopedic patients. Methods. Two hundred and thirty patients 17–40 years of age undergoing lower limb orthopedic procedures under spinal anesthesia were enrolled in the study. The study group received 40 mg of drotaverine hydrochloride intramuscularly; the second group was the control. The main outcome measure was (1) the time to micturition and (2) the incidence of urinary bladder catheterization and time to catheterization. Results. Two hundred and one patients of 230 enrolled participants completed the study. Compared to the control group, the male patients in study group exhibited a shorter time to spontaneous micturition (441 versus 563 minutes, 95% CI of the difference of means between 39 and 205 minutes) and a lower incidence of urinary bladder catheterization (4/75 versus 10/54) (RR 0.29, 95% CI: 0.1–0.87; P = 0.0175). Conclusions. Intramuscular administration of drotaverine hydrochloride decreased the time to spontaneous micturition and decreased the incidence of urinary bladder catheterization in male patients who underwent orthopedic surgery under spinal anesthesia. This trial is registered with NCT02026427. PMID:26185766

  20. Immediate effect of a single anteroposterior talus mobilization on dorsiflexion range of motion in participants with orthopedic dysfunction of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luciana Mundim; Pires, Tatiana; Silva, Rafael Duarte; de Resende, Marcos Antônio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of a single anteroposterior mobilization of the talus on the active dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) in participants with different orthopedic foot and ankle injuries. This study included 30 male and female participants aged 18 to 50 years with unilateral orthopedic foot and ankle dysfunction. All participants underwent 3 sets of active dorsiflexion ROM measurement in both ankles. Measurements included baseline, post-first treatment, and post-second treatment values. Participants received either joint mobilization or manual contact (control) on the affected ankle. Active dorsiflexion ROM was assessed using a biplanar goniometer with participants in the prone position and 90° of knee flexion. Both groups (joint mobilization and manual contact) showed increased active dorsiflexion ROM. However, the mean difference of dorsiflexion measurements before and after mobilization was greater than before and after control treatment. A single session of articular mobilization of the talus did not significantly increase dorsiflexion ROM in participants with orthopedic dysfunctions of the ankle and foot compared with a manual contact procedure. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (P<.025). When asked if student loan debt would influence the next step in their career, nonorthopedic residents were statistically more likely to respond "yes" compared with orthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.].

  2. Anatomy and physical examination of the knee menisci: a narrative review of the orthopedic literature

    PubMed Central

    Chivers, Michael D.; Howitt, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to review the physical examination tests available to a practitioner in order to arrive at a clinical diagnosis or suspicion of a meniscal lesion. Background: The menisci transmit weight bearing forces and increase stability of the knee. The menisci also facilitate nutrition, provide lubrication and shock absorption for the articular cartilage and promote knee proprioception. The combinations of torsional and axial loading appear to be the cause of most meniscal injuries. Diagnosis of acute knee injuries has long been a topic for discussion throughout the orthopedic literature. Many clinical tests and diagnostic studies have been developed to increase the clinician’s ability to accurately diagnose these types of disorders of the knee. Conclusion: The accuracy of all diagnostic tests is thought to be dependant upon the skill of the examiner, and the severity and location of the injury. The multitude of tests described to assess meniscal lesions suggests that none are consistently reliable. However, recent research has focused on a composite score to accurately predict meniscus lesions. The combination of a comprehensive history, multiple physical tests and diagnostic imaging for confirmation is typical for a clinical meniscal lesion diagnosis while the gold standard remains the arthroscopic procedure itself. PMID:20037697

  3. Novel approaches for treating musculoskeletal diseases: molecular orthopedics and systems medicine.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Kaveh; O'Brien, Margaret; Zugun-Eloae, Florin; Labusca, Luminita

    2013-01-01

    Molecular medicine uses knowledge about cell structure and function for disease, diagnostics, stage characterisation and treatment. The advent of genomic technologies is considerably leading to developments in the field of molecular medicine. The accumulation of detailed information about gene expression, epigenetic variability, protein transcription and functional modulation is contributing to a new era in medicine. Rapid and early diagnostic procedures, molecular characterisation of degenerative and proliferative diseases and personalized therapies are predicted to lead to advancements in health prevention and treatment of disease. Diagnostic tools and therapies based on local and /or general modulation of cellular processes for traumatic or degenerative musculoskeletal conditions are becoming available. A logical consequence of the information derived from extensive data gathering, systems biology and systemic medicine has lead to significant improvements in understanding biological structure and function in a simultaneous bottom top and integrative, holistic manner. The description of disease mechanism at an intimate, subcellular level has a dual benefit. A thorough understanding of the crosstalk involved in molecular pathways both in the normal and the diseased state are expanding scientific knowledge and simultaneously are enabling design cell-targeted and individualized therapies. This paper presents a brief overview of current molecular based treatments available to the orthopedic surgeon and introduces the concept of systemic medicine from the perspective of musculoskeletal pathology.

  4. Hospital market concentration, pricing, and profitability in orthopedic surgery and interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2011-06-01

    To examine the association between hospital market concentration and pricing. Hospitals have been merging into systems that potentially wield bargaining power over private health insurers. Concern is growing among policy makers that these systems may respond to provisions of the 2010 health reform legislation by further increasing consolidation and prices. Multivariate statistical methods were used to evaluate the association between hospital market concentration, prices, and profits (contribution margins) for commercially insured patients admitted for any of 6 major cardiac and orthopedic surgery procedures, adjusting for characteristics of the patient (diagnoses, comorbidities,complications) and of the hospital (size, patient volume, teaching status). Data were obtained on 11,330 patients treated in 61 hospitals in 27 markets across 8 states in 2008. Hospital prices for patients in concentrated markets were higher than hospital prices for otherwise-comparable patients in competitive markets by 25.1% for coronary angioplasty, 13.0%for cardiac rhythm management (CRM) device insertion, 19.2% for total knee replacement, 24.1%for total hip replacement, 19.3% for lumbar spine fusion, and 22.7% for cervical spine fusion (P <.05). Contribution margins were higher in concentrated than in competitive hospital markets by $5259 for angioplasty, $3417 for CRM device insertion, $4123 for total knee replacement, $5889 for total hip replacement, $7931 for lumbar spine fusion, and $4663 for cervical spine fusion (P <.05). Hospitals in concentrated markets charge significantly higher prices and earn significantly higher margins from private insurers than do hospitals in competitive markets.

  5. Control of methyl methacrylate during the preparation of orthopedic bone cements.

    PubMed

    Ungers, Leslie J; Vendrely, Timothy G; Barnes, C Lowry

    2007-04-01

    The use of methyl methacrylate (MMA) bone cement during orthopedic procedures has been seen as a potential exposure hazard to health care professionals. However, that assessment is based on a number of investigations with problems in experimental design, analysis, and data interpretation. The current investigation quantified differences in MMA vapors produced during the preparation of competing bone cements using various methods of preparation. Unlike previous investigations, this effort employs modern validated sampling and analytical methods, and considers the affect of censored results. Measurements of sufficient quality and number were collected to allow for a statistical treatment of the data. The ability of two controlled preparation techniques to reduce MMA emissions were compared with a traditional open container. The results confirmed that the preparation of bone cement releases MMA vapors into the breathing zone of the preparer. One preparation technique (Stryker Bowl) controlled emissions during mixing and curing and affected a 73% reduction in measured MMA concentrations. In addition to mixing and curing, the second technique (UltraMix System) also controlled the MMA during pouring of the monomer and affected a 90% reduction in MMA concentrations. An ANOVA test of interaction indicates that the reductions are attributable to the preparation technique regardless of the type of cement being used. Both a Fisher's PLSD and Games/Howell post hoc test of the results indicate that the mean differences between the uncontrolled open container and the controlled preparation techniques are significant (p < 0.05).

  6. Insights into Avicenna’s knowledge of the science of orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Dalfardi, Behnam; Yarmohammadi, Hassan; Meibodi, Mohammad Kalantari

    2014-01-01

    The art of orthopedics traces its history back to ancient civilizations like those of the Egyptians. The evolution of this branch of medicine is indebted to investigations of many scientists, including Greek, Roman and Persian scholars. The Persian physician Avicenna (980-1037 AD) is one such scientist who investigated different aspects of orthopedics. It is possible to analyze Avicenna’s knowledge of orthopedics and his contributions to this branch of medicine by an examination of his epic encyclopedia of medicine, Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). PMID:24649417

  7. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    PubMed Central

    Ellore, Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Taranatha, Mahantesha; Nara, Asha; Gunjalli, Gururaj; Bhat, Ashwin Devasya

    2012-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article. PMID:23293501

  8. Cefepime versus Ceftriaxone for perioperative systemic antibiotic prophylaxis in elective orthopedic surgery at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza, Tanzania: a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Marwa, Joel M; Ngayomela, Isidor H; Seni, Jeremiah; Mshana, Stephen E

    2015-12-23

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the incidence of postoperative wound infections especially among patients undergoing orthopedics surgery. However, there is dearth of information on the clinical effectiveness, spectrum limitations and practical contextual information on third and fourth generation cephalosporins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cefepime and ceftriaxone as peri-operative systemic antimicrobial prophylaxis in elective orthopedic surgery in our center. This study was a prospective, randomized, open label comparative clinical study of patients undergoing elective orthopedic procedures at the Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) between June 2014 and February 2015. Two hundred thirty participants were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned into Ceftriaxone regimen (group A) or Cefepime regimen (group B). Participants in ceftriaxone or cefepime group received 50 mg/kg up to 2 g single dose perioperative intravenous infusion at least 30 min before incision. Both groups were followed for 30 days using a Center for Disease Control superficial surgical site infection criterion for the outcome. A two-tailed margin of equivalence was set at 5% analyzed on the intent to treat. All 230 participants were subjected to final analysis with no patient being lost to follow-up. Superficial surgical site infection occurred in 5 out of 117 (4.3%, 0.6 to 7.9 at 95% CI) patients receiving cefepime compared to 3 out of 113 (2.7%, 0.3 to 5.6 at 95% CI) among patients receiving ceftriaxone regimen. The absolute difference of 1.6% (95% Confidence Interval: -6.3 to 3.1), equivocally lies outside the 5% statistically significant margin of presumed clinical equivalence. The difference between cefepime and ceftriaxone in preventing SSIs following elective clean orthopedic surgery was not statistically significant. Pan African Clinical Trial Registry: PACTR201406000803420.

  9. Usefulness of a metal artifact reduction algorithm for orthopedic implants in abdominal CT: phantom and clinical study results.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seonji; Kim, Se Hyung; Hwang, Eui Jin; Shin, Cheong-Il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for orthopedic prostheses in phantom and clinical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An agar phantom with two sets of spinal screws was scanned at various tube voltage (80-140 kVp) and tube current-time (34-1032 mAs) settings. The orthopedic MAR algorithm was combined with filtered back projection (FBP) or iterative reconstruction. The mean SDs in three ROIs were compared among four datasets (FBP, iterative reconstruction, FBP with orthopedic MAR, and iterative reconstruction with orthopedic MAR). For the clinical study, the mean SDs of three ROIs and 4-point scaled image quality in 52 patients with metallic orthopedic prostheses were compared between CT images acquired with and without orthopedic MAR. The presence and type of image quality improvement with orthopedic MAR and the presence of orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were also analyzed. RESULTS. In the phantom study, the mean SD with orthopedic MAR was significantly lower than that without orthopedic MAR regardless of dose settings and reconstruction algorithms (FBP versus iterative reconstruction). The mean SD near the metallic prosthesis in 52 patients was significantly lower on CT images with orthopedic MAR (28.04 HU) than those without it (49.21 HU). Image quality regarding metallic artifact was significantly improved with orthopedic MAR (rating of 2.60 versus 1.04). Notable reduction of metallic artifacts and better depiction of abdominal organs were observed in 45 patients. Diagnostic benefit was achieved in six patients, but orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were seen in 30 patients. CONCLUSION. Use of the orthopedic MAR algorithm significantly reduces metal artifacts in CT of both phantoms and patients and has potential for improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artifacts.

  10. Surgical specialty procedures in rural surgery practices: implications for rural surgery training.

    PubMed

    Sticca, Robert P; Mullin, Brady C; Harris, Joel D; Hosford, Clint C

    2012-12-01

    Specialty procedures constitute one eighth of rural surgery practice. Currently, general surgeons intending to practice in rural hospitals may not get adequate training for specialty procedures, which they will be expected to perform. Better definition of these procedures will help guide rural surgery training. Current Procedural Terminology codes for all surgical procedures for 81% of North Dakota and South Dakota rural surgeons were entered into the Dakota Database for Rural Surgery. Specialty procedures were analyzed and compared with the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum to determine whether general surgery training is adequate preparation for rural surgery practice. The Dakota Database for Rural Surgery included 46,052 procedures, of which 5,666 (12.3%) were specialty procedures. Highest volume specialty categories included vascular, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, cardiothoracic, urology, and otolaryngology. Common procedures in cardiothoracic and vascular surgery are taught in general surgical residency, while common procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology are usually not taught in general surgery training. Optimal training for rural surgery practice should include experience in specialty procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The pathogenetic basis for and clinical use of systemic enzyme therapy in traumatology and orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Neverov, V A; Klimov, A V

    1999-01-01

    The authors have generalized their experiences with using "Wobenzym" in 140 patients. Schemes of the effective systemic enzyme therapy are proposed for patients of the orthopedic-traumatological profile.

  12. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  13. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering. PMID:23987110

  14. Treatment of an infant with a rare cleft resolved with use of an orthopedic appliance.

    PubMed

    Romero, Martín; Latham, Ralph; Romance, Ana; Salvan, Rafael

    2003-11-01

    Cases of bilateral complete clefts of the primary palate and unaffected secondary palate are very rare. One of these cases as well as a new method of presurgical orthopedics to solve the protruding premaxilla protrusion is presented.

  15. University of Washington orthopedic resident experience and interest in developing an international humanitarian rotation.

    PubMed

    Jense, Ryan J; Howe, Christopher R; Bransford, Richard J; Wagner, Theodore A; Dunbar, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    An academic orthopedic residency program can have a significant impact on the burden of musculoskeletal disease in low- and middle-income countries. Such an exposure may also enhance the education of a resident. A 17-question electronic survey was developed to quantify the interest of orthopedic residents in pursuing an elective international rotation. The survey, which gathered resident demographic data and interest in pursuing an elective international orthopedic rotation, was sent to (and completed by) all 38 University of Washington orthopedic residents during academic year 2007-2008. More than 60% (23/38) of residents indicated they would be willing to commit to an international rotation; an additional 24% (9/38) indicated they would be very interested. Almost 40% of residents had participated in international medical volunteerism before entering residency. Among residents, there is a clear interest in pursuing an international rotation to complement their education in the United States.

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Gaiduk, A A; Korostovtsev, D D; Gaiduk, Yu V; Ageeva, L Ya

    2013-01-01

    To study characteristics of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents and to develop treatment approaches, we examined 116 patients aged from 5 to 17 years. Headache of tension was found in 89 (77%) and chronic headache in 27 (23%) patients. Along with clinical/neurological and orthopedic examination, all patients were studied using a special device that allowed to quantitatively measure the bearing (in three dimensions) and biomechanic body balance. Electroencephalography, Doppler ultrasound and transcranial tests of neck vessels and ophthalmological examination were carried out. Based on the features of headache characteristic of some groups of patients, the authors suggest using a multidiscipline approach including the day-to-day interaction between neurologist and orthopedist, pharmacological therapy, therapeutic physical training, specific orthopedic inner sole and other rehabilitation methods. This treatment has led to better recovery of patients compared to the treatment using only neurological or orthopedic techniques.

  17. Rational design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing; Xie, Jingwei; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D; Bartlett, David E

    2013-09-01

    This article reviews recent significant advances in the design of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It begins with a brief introduction on the limitations of current approaches for orthopedic tissue repair and regeneration. It then illustrates that rationally designed scaffolds made up of electrospun nanofibers could be a promising solution to overcome the problems that current approaches encounter. The article also discusses the intriguing properties of electrospun nanofibers, including control of composition, structures, orders, alignments and mechanical properties, use as carriers for topical drug and/or gene sustained delivery, and serving as substrates for the regulation of cell behaviors, which could benefit musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration. It further highlights a few of the many recent applications of electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in repairing and regenerating various orthopedic tissues. Finally, the article concludes with perspectives on the challenges and future directions for better design, fabrication and utilization of nanofiber scaffolds for orthopedic tissue engineering.

  18. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  19. [Daily routine in orthopedics and traumatology - results of a nationwide survey of residents].

    PubMed

    Merschin, D; Münzberg, M; Stange, R; Schüttrumpf, J P; Perl, M; Mutschler, M

    2014-10-01

    The subject orthopedics and traumatology suffers by a loss of attractiveness which results in a lack of young blood. The aim of this study of the Youth Forum of the German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU) is to register the working conditions of residents in orthopedics. In the months September and October 2013 we performed a survey on members of the following German societies: German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU), German Society of Traumatology (DGU) and the German Society of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (DGOOC), (age < 40). Our questionnaire includes 15 questions. We achieved 28,9 % (n = 331) answered questionnaires. The mean working time per week is 55 hours. 73 % of all participants do more than 5 emergency services per month. 52 % are more than 3 times on duty for 24 hours. Only 13 % of all residents have well ordered working hours. Normally working time is divided into three parts: one third for bureaucracy, one for operation theatre and the last for other activities (e.g. ward round). 35,6 % do only one surgery per week, 12 % do not perform any surgeries. An annual report is performed only in 45 %. A structured concept of training only exists in 16 % of all hospitals. In addition to clinical work 45 % are involved in scientific projects, mostly in their spare-time. Finally 58 % of all surgeons would still recommend orthopedics and traumatology. In order to maintain orthopedics and traumatology as an attractive it is necessary to implement flexible working time models and to reorganize and improve training-concepts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  1. [Sawing and welding with ultrasonics. Experimental investigation to test the applicability of an apparatus for sawing and welding bone tissue with ultrasonics in orthopedics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Picht, U; Schumpe, G; Milachowski, K

    1977-02-01

    An experimental investigation of a procedure for sawing and welding of bone tissue with ultrasonics in the area of orthopedics was reported. The welding of bone with ultrasonic waves, bone meal and a plastic adhesive did not product satisfactory results in terms of stability and tissue reaction. The applicability of the ultrasonic saw is limited by the thickness of the bone on which the osteotomy is to be performed. We saw no advantages over against the oscillating saws which were available to us. In our opinion, an indication for the application of the ultrasonic apparatus could be the removal of inflammatory, tumerous or necrotic bone processes.

  2. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  3. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Meza Reyes, Gilberto Eduardo; Esquivel Gómez, Ricardo; Martínez del Campo Sánchez, Antonio; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Martínez Guzmán, Miguel Ángel Enrique; Torres González, Rubén; de la Fuente Zuno, Juan Carlos; Méndez Huerta, Juan Vicente; Villalobos Garduño, Enrique; Cymet Ramírez, José; Ibarra Hirales, Efrén; Díaz Borjón, Efraín; Aguilera Zepeda, José Manuel; Valles Figueroa, Juan Francisco; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide public health problem, with an annual incidence of 1-2 cases/1,000 individuals in the general population and a 1-5% associated mortality. Orthopedic surgery is a major surgical risk factor for VTE, but the problem is more important for patients with hip and knee joint replacement, multiple traumatisms, severe damage to the spine, or large fractures. Thromboprophylaxis is defined as the strategy and actions necessary to diminish the risk of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery. Antithrombotics may prevent VTE. At the end of this paper, we describe a proposal of thromboprophylaxis actions for patients requiring high-risk orthopedic surgery, based on the opinion of specialists in Orthopedics and Traumatology who work with high-risk orthopedic surgery patients. A search for evidence about this kind of surgery was performed and a 100-item inquiring instrument was done in order to know the opinions of the participants. Then, recommendations and considerations were built. In conclusion, this document reviews the problem of VTE in high-risk orthopedic surgery patients and describes the position of the Colegio Mexicano de Ortopedia y Traumatología related to VTE prevention in this setting.

  4. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future. PMID:25705632

  5. The Mini C-arm Adds Quality and Efficiency to the Pediatric Orthopedic Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Matthew G; Hennrikus, William L; Slough Hill, Jennifer M; Armstrong, Douglas G; King, Steven H

    2016-11-01

    The mini C-arm has become increasingly popular in the practice of orthopedics. To the authors' knowledge, its use in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practice efficiency and radiation exposure to the patient when the mini C-arm was used in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic. One hundred consecutive midshaft and distal forearm fractures were evaluated by one orthopedic surgeon in follow-up using a mini C-arm. For each case, the radiation physicist calculated the amount of skin exposure in milligray (mGy). The average skin exposure to the patient from the mini C-arm was 0.58 mGy, compared with 0.2 mGy for anteroposterior view and lateral view radiographs. Use of the mini C-arm, in place of plain radiographs obtained in the radiology department, decreased time waiting during clinic visits by 23 minutes. This study reports 2 important findings. First, surprisingly, the mini C-arm used a slightly higher radiation dose than standard imaging with plain radiographs. Second, use of the mini C-arm saved time and improved the efficiency of the clinic visit. Overall, the mini C-arm improves quality and efficiency in the pediatric orthopedic outpatient clinic. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1097-e1099.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Greater osteoblast functions on multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown from anodized nanotubular titanium for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Yao, Chang; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2007-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is the most widely implanted orthopedic material. However, current formulations of Ti have an average orthopedic implant functional lifetime of only 10-15 years. While there are many reasons why orthopedic implants fail, one is a lack of initial and sustained integration into juxtaposed bone. To improve the cytocompatibility properties of Ti for orthopedic applications, parallel multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown from the pores of anodized nanotubular Ti by a chemical vapor deposition process in the present study. The results of this study provided evidence, for the first time, that osteoblast (bone forming cell) functions (specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition) were significantly greater on CNTs grown from anodized Ti than on anodized Ti without CNTs and currently-used Ti in orthopedics for up to 21 days. In summary, this study showed that bone growth could possibly be enhanced on currently-used Ti implants with protruding CNTs and, thus, they should be further studied for orthopedic applications.

  7. Why medical students choose orthopedic surgery as a specialty?

    PubMed Central

    Erraji, Moncef; Kharraji, Abdessamad; Abbasi, Najib; Najib, Abdeljawad; Yacoubi, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Before the crisis announced the Moroccan surgery, the objectives of this study were to analyze the choice of specialties newly appointed to the internal review and the guidance of medical students and to determine the factors influencing this choice. Data on specialty choice students were analyzed and a questionnaire was offered to students of Morocco at the beginning of academic year 2013-20014 The form consisted of questions on the year of study. sex, professional guidelines and reasons for choice. candidates were male, the average age of our residents was 28 years. We also noted the importance of the passage as well as external service trauma. Care provided to patients, lifestyle and income reported by 85% of respondents to be the most important factors to pursue orthopedics as a career. The TR-Orth is now a specialty that responds to a positive choice. The choice of TR-Orth by students at the end of medical school curriculum is reinforced by teaching and practicing the specialty during the internship. The overall training is unsatisfactory overall. Students would deepen in some areas. This study confirms that there is currently a shift in trauma surgery, mostly induced by an a priori negative for particular workloads. PMID:26185556

  8. Development of an orthopedic surgery trauma patient handover checklist

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Justin; Donnon, Tyrone; Hutchison, Carol; Duffy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgery, preoperative handover of surgical trauma patients is a process that must be made as safe as possible. We sought to determine vital clinical information to be transferred between patient care teams and to develop a standardized handover checklist. Methods We conducted standardized small-group interviews about trauma patient handover. Based on this information, we created a questionnaire to gather perspectives from all Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) members about which topics they felt would be most important on a handover checklist. We analyzed the responses to develop a standardized handover checklist. Results Of the 1106 COA members, 247 responded to the questionnaire. The top 7 topics felt to be most important for achieving patient safety in the handover were comorbidities, diagnosis, readiness for the operating room, stability, associated injuries, history/mechanism of injury and outstanding issues. The expert recommendations were to have handover completed the same way every day, all appropriate radiographs available, adequate time, all appropriate laboratory work and more time to spend with patients with more severe illness. Conclusion Our main recommendations for safe handover are to use standardized checklists specific to the patient and site needs. We provide an example of a standardized checklist that should be used for preoperative handovers. To our knowledge, this is the first checklist for handover developed by a group of experts in orthopedic surgery, which is both manageable in length and simple to use. PMID:24461220

  9. Tissue engineering strategies for the regeneration of orthopedic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Helen H; Subramony, Siddarth D; Boushell, Margaret K; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-06-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical structure-function relationship of the native soft tissue-to-bone interface. The integration of distinct tissue types (e.g. bone and soft tissues such as cartilage, ligaments, or tendons), necessitates a multi-phased or stratified scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions accompanied by a gradient of mechanical properties. This review discusses tissue engineering strategies for regenerating common tissue-to-tissue interfaces (ligament-to-bone, tendon-to-bone, or cartilage-to-bone), and the strategic biomimicry implemented in stratified scaffold design for multi-tissue regeneration. Potential challenges and future directions in this emerging field will also be presented. It is anticipated that interface tissue engineering will enable integrative soft tissue repair, and will be instrumental for the development of complex musculoskeletal tissue systems with biomimetic complexity and functionality.

  10. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Muller, T P

    1990-02-01

    An intraoral intermaxillary appliance has been developed for the treatment of Class III malocclusions that exhibit midface sagittal deficiency with or without mandibular excess. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) III consists of upper and lower acrylic plates with a permanent magnet incorporated into each plate. The upper magnet is linked to a retraction screw. The upper magnet is retracted periodically (e.g., monthly) to stimulate maxillary advancement and mandibular retardation. The attractive mode neodymium magnets used in this study produced a horizontal force of 98 gm and a vertical force of 371 gm. Six female Macaca fascicularis monkeys were treated with FOMA IIIs. An additional three animals were treated with sham appliances. After 4 months of treatment, the following results were found: the growth pattern of the cranial base (saddle angle) was not altered; midfacial protraction did occur along a recumbent hyperbolic curve with a horizontal maxillary displacement and an anterosuperior premaxillary rotation; the cumulative protraction of the maxillary complex was initiated at the pterygomaxillary fissure with an additional contribution provided by other circummaxillary sutures (zygomaticomaxillary s., transverse s., premaxillary s.); and inhibition of mandibular length was minimal, but a tendency toward a vertical condylar growth pattern was observed. The interaction between sutural and condylar growth sites appeared biphasic, characterized by an immediate and rapid excitation of the circummaxillary sutures followed by a delayed and slow suppression of the condylar cartilage. Long-term animal and clinical FOMA III studies are recommended.

  11. Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cement for orthopedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    Amino acid containing glass-ionomer cements were synthesized, formulated, and evaluated for orthopedic application. The formulation of different amino acid containing glass-ionomer bone cements was optimized, and conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements were compared. Properties of interest included handling characteristics, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical strength of the bone cement. The study was based on the synthesis of different vinyl containing amino acids, different polyelectrolytes containing these amino acid residues, and different resin-modified polyelectrolytes, as well as formulation and evaluation of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer bone cements using these polyelectrolytes. Systematic preparation of polyelectrolytes and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cements were essential features of this work, since we anticipated that the mechanical properties of the glass-ionomer bone cements could be strongly affected by the nature of the polyelectrolytes and formulation. Mechanical properties were evaluated in a screw driven mechanical testing machine, and structure-property relationships were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation of the fracture surface of the specimens. How the structure of polyelectrolytes, such as different amino acid residues, molecular weight, different modifying resin, and formulation of glass-ionomer bone cement, affected the mechanical properties was also studied.

  12. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations.

  13. Snow Catastrophe Conditions: What is its Impact on Orthopedic Injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Karimi-Mobarakeh, Mahmoud; Kazemnejad, Ehsan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iran places sixth amongst high risk natural disaster countries and Guilan province of Iran shoulders a large amount of socio-economic burden due to snow catastrophes. The more knowledge of circumstances we have, the more efficient our future encounters will be. Methods: In this retrospective study, of all of the patients admitted to Poursina Hospital due to snow and ice related trauma in the first two weeks of February 2014, 306 cases were found eligible for entry into the present study. Results: Of the 306 eligible patients (383 injuries), there were 175 men (57.2%) and 131 women (42.8%). Most patients suffered from orthopedic injuries (81%) and the most common fractures were distal radius fractures in the upper extremities and hip fractures in the lower extremities. Slipping was the most common and motor vehicle accidents had the rarest injury mechanisms. It was shown that the frequency of injuries were higher on icy days (67.6%) than snowy days (32.4%). Conclusions: Snow crises may lead to increased risk of slipping and falling situations, especially on icy days. The peak of injury rates is a few days after snowfall with the most common injury being distal radius fracture. Providing essential instructions and supporting resource allocation to better handle such catastrophes may improve outcomes. PMID:25207329

  14. Bioactive, mechanically favorable, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Victor, Sunita Prem; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis of mechanically favorable, bioactive, and biodegradable copolymer nanocomposites for potential bone applications. The nanocomposites consist of in situ polymerized biodegradable copolyester with hydroxyapatite (HA). Biodegradable copolyesters comprise carboxy terminated poly(propylene fumarate) (CT-PPF) and poly(trimethylol propane fumarate co mannitol sebacate) (TF-Co-MS). Raman spectral imaging clearly reveals a uniform homogenous distribution of HA in the copolymer matrix. The mechanical studies reveal that improved mechanical properties formed when crosslinked with methyl methacrylate (MMA) when compared to N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP). The SEM micrographs of the copolymer nanocomposites reveal a serrated structure reflecting higher mechanical strength, good dispersion, and good interfacial bonding of HA in the polymer matrix. In vitro degradation of the copolymer crosslinked with MMA is relatively more than that of NVP and the degradation decreases with an increase in the amount of the HA filler. The mechanically favorable and degradable MMA based nanocomposites also have favorable bioactivity, blood compatibility, cytocompatibility and cell adhesion. The present nanocomposite is a more promising material for orthopedic applications.

  15. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  16. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  17. [Joint position statement of the Mexican College of Orthopedics and Traumatology: prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in high-risk orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Meza-Reyes, G E; Cymet-Ramírez, J; Esquivel-Gómez, R; del Campo-Sánchez, Martínez A; Martínez-Guzmán, M A E; Espinosa-Larrañaga, F; Majluf-Cruz, A; Torres-González, R; De la Fuente-Zuno, J C; Villalobos-Garduño, E; Méndez-Huerta, J V; Ibarra-Hirales, E; Valles-Figueroa, J F; Aguilera-Zepeda, J M; Díaz-Borjón, E

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) is a public health problem worldwide. In the United States it causes 2 million annual cases. Its annual incidence is 1-2 cases per 1,000 individuals in the general population. It is a disease frequently associated with life threatening complications and its mortality rate is 1-5% of cases. Due to its high complication rate, its slow recovery, and the need for prolonged disability, it is considered as a high-cost disease. VTED may occur in both surgical and medical patients; the known associated risk factors include prolonged rest, active cancer, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke, among the major medical conditions. Orthopedic surgery represents the main surgical risk factor for VTED, including mainly hip and knee replacements, as well as polytraumatized patients with severe spinal lesions, and major fractures. VTED may be prevented with the appropriate use of antithrombotics. The participants in this consensus defined thromboprophylaxis as the strategy and actions undertaken to reduce the risk of VTED in patients undergoing high risk orthopedic surgery. The position of the Mexican College of Orthopedics and Traumatology regarding the prevention of VTED in orthopedic surgery is described herein.

  18. How international are the leading orthopedic journals: a look at the composition of the editorial board members of the top orthopedic journals.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Chowdhury, Buddhadev

    2014-05-01

    Researches from the developing world contribute only a limited proportion to the total research output published in leading orthopedics journals. Some of them believe that there is substantial editorial bias against their work. We assessed the composition of the editorial boards of leading orthopedic journals. The editorial boards of 18 leading orthopedic journals according to their impact factor were retrieved from their website. We evaluated in which countries the editorial board members were based and classified these countries using the World Bank income criteria. Individuals from number of countries can be found on the editorial boards of the investigated journals, but most of them are based in high-income countries. While 1,302 of the 1,401 editorial board members are based in countries with a high income according to the World Bank criteria, 37 are based in an upper middle income, 2 in lower middle income and none in a low-income economy. The percentage of editorial board members in leading orthopedic journals is dominated by high-income countries with serious underrepresentation from low-income countries.

  19. Rapid Web-Based Platform for Assessment of Orthopedic Surgery Patient Care Milestones: A 2-Year Validation.

    PubMed

    Gundle, Kenneth R; Mickelson, Dayne T; Cherones, Arien; Black, Jason; Hanel, Doug P

    2017-05-18

    To determine the validity, feasibility, and responsiveness of a new web-based platform for rapid milestone-based evaluations of orthopedic surgery residents. Single academic medical center, including a trauma center and pediatrics tertiary hospital. Forty residents (PG1-5) in an orthopedic residency program and their faculty evaluators. Residents and faculty were trained and supported in the use of a novel trainee-initiated web-based evaluation system. Residents were encouraged to use the system to track progress on patient care subcompetencies. Two years of prospectively collected data were reviewed from residents at an academic program. The primary outcome was Spearman's rank correlation between postgraduate year (PGY) and competency level achieved as a measure of validity. Secondary outcomes assessed feasibility, resident self-evaluation versus faculty evaluation, the distributions among subcompetencies, and responsiveness over time. Between February 2014 and February 2016, 856 orthopedic surgery patient care subcompetency evaluations were completed (1.2 evaluations per day). Residents promptly requested feedback after a procedure (median = 0 days, interquartile range: 0-2), and faculty responded within 2 days in 51% (median = 2 days, interquartile range: 0-13). Primary outcome showed a correlation between PGY and competency level (r = 0.78, p < 0.001), with significant differences in competency among PGYs (p < 0.001 by Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test). Self-evaluations by residents substantially agreed with faculty-assigned competency level (weighted Cohen's κ = 0.72, p < 0.001). Resident classes beginning the study as PGY1, 2, and 3 separately demonstrated gains in competency over time (Spearman's rank correlation 0.39, 0.60, 0.59, respectively, each p < 0.001). There was significant variance in the number of evaluations submitted per subcompetency (median = 43, range: 6-113) and competency level assigned (p < 0.01). Rapid tracking of trainee competency with

  20. ANALYSIS OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, ORTHOPEDICS AND THORACIC SURGERY JOURNALS.

    PubMed

    Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    To perform an extensive analysis of journals in Medicine III - CAPES, and specifically those in the areas of Otorhinolaryngology, Orthopedics and Traumatology and Chest Surgery. An active search for the impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports, Scimago, their indexation in Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus and Google Scholar, and their stratification in WebQualis was done. Forty-four journals with measured impact factors ranging from 3.006 to 0.128 were detected in the area of Otorhinolaryngology; however, only 26 of them (60%) had a Qualis measured by CAPES; in the stratification, no journal was detected in A1, three were A2 and nine B1. Three journals were located for Chest Surgery, with only one of them having a measured Qualis (A2) with a mean of 3.61. Sixty-seven journals were detected for Orthopedics and Traumatology, with an impact factor ranging from 4.699 to 0.156; Qualis was measured in only 38 of them (60%); there were three journal stratified as A1, seven as A2 and 25 as B1. The search for journals of higher impact induces authors to not publish in journals related to their area and facing more difficulties than investigators from other areas. Realizar análise ampla dos periódicos da Medicina III - CAPES e, especificamente, os pertencentes à Otorrinolaringologia, Ortopedia e Traumatologia, e Cirurgia Torácica. Busca ativa do fator de impacto dos periódicos das áreas citadas no Journal Citation Report e Scimago, sua indexação no Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus, Google Scholar e sua estratificação no WebQualis. Para a Otorrinolaringologia foram encontrados 44 periódicos, cujo fator de impacto variou de 3.006 a 0.128; entretanto, apenas 26 deles (60%) tinham Qualis medido pela CAPES; nas estratificações encontrou-se nenhuma revista em A1, três em A2 e nove em B1. Para a Cirurgia Torácica foram localizados três periódicos, sendo que apenas um tinha Qualis medido (A2) com média de 3.61. Os resultados da busca para a Ortopedia e Traumatologia permitiu

  1. Chitosan for gene delivery and orthopedic tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-05-15

    Gene therapy involves the introduction of foreign genetic material into cells in order exert a therapeutic effect. The application of gene therapy to the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is extremely promising as the controlled release of therapeutic proteins such as bone morphogenetic proteins have been shown to stimulate bone repair. However, there are a number of drawbacks associated with viral and synthetic non-viral gene delivery approaches. One natural polymer which has generated interest as a gene delivery vector is chitosan. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Much of the appeal of chitosan is due to the presence of primary amine groups in its repeating units which become protonated in acidic conditions. This property makes it a promising candidate for non-viral gene delivery. Chitosan-based vectors have been shown to transfect a number of cell types including human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Aside from its use in gene delivery, chitosan possesses a range of properties that show promise in tissue engineering applications; it is biodegradable, biocompatible, has anti-bacterial activity, and, its cationic nature allows for electrostatic interaction with glycosaminoglycans and other proteoglycans. It can be used to make nano- and microparticles, sponges, gels, membranes and porous scaffolds. Chitosan has also been shown to enhance mineral deposition during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss the use of chitosan as a gene delivery vector with emphasis on its application in orthopedic tissue engineering.

  2. A simple strategy to reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Everlyne; Wright, James G

    2014-04-01

    Stereotype threat, defined as the predicament felt by people in either positive or negative learning experiences where they could conform to negative stereotypes associated with their own group membership, can interfere with learning. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple orientation session could reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents. The intervention group received an orientation on 2 occasions focusing on their possible responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds and the operating room (OR). Participants completed a survey with 7 questions typical for stereotype threat evaluating responses to their experiences. The questions had 7 response options with a maximum total score of 49, where higher scores indicated greater degree of experiences typical of stereotype threat. Of the 84 eligible residents, 49 participated: 22 in the nonintervention and 27 in the intervention group. The overall scores were 29 and 29.4, and 26.2 and 25.8 in the nonintervention and intervention groups for their survey responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds (p = 0.85) and the OR (p = 0.84), respectively. Overall, responses typical of stereotype threat were greater for perceived poor performance at teaching rounds than in the OR (p = 0.001). Residents experience low self-esteem following perceived poor performance, particularly at rounds. A simple orientation designed to reduce stereotype threat was unsuccessful in reducing this threat overall. Future research will need to consider longer-term intervention as possible strategies to reduce perceived poor performance at teaching rounds and in the OR.

  3. A pilot orthopedic trauma registry in Ugandan district hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kisitu, Dan K; Eyler, Lauren E; Kajja, I; Waiswa, G; Beyeza, T; Feldhaus, Isabelle; Juillard, Catherine; Dicker, Rochelle A

    2016-05-15

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a major public health problem in low-income countries like Uganda. Patterns of musculoskeletal injuries presenting to district hospitals are unknown. Our pilot orthopedic trauma registry establishes a framework for broader district hospital injury surveillance. We interviewed and examined patients presenting to Mityana, Entebbe, and Nakaseke hospitals with musculoskeletal injuries from October 2013 to January 2014. We compared patient and Demographic and Health Survey population demographics and determined predictors of delayed presentation for care. Men, adults, and individuals with postsecondary education were more common among patients than in the Demographic and Health Survey population. Common causes included road traffic injuries (48.5%) and falls (25.1%). Closed, simple fractures comprised 70% of injuries. Compared to the self-employed, subsistence farmers (odds ratio [OR] = 2.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15-7.91), motorcycle taxi drivers (OR = 10.50, 95% CI = 1.92-64.57), and preschool children (OR = 4.24, 95% CI = 1.05-17.39) were significantly more likely to be delayed to care after adjustment for covariates. Subsistence farmers were more likely than other occupations to seek care from traditional bonesetters (23% versus 7%, P = 0.001). All patients who visited bonesetters were delayed to hospital care. Policies for trauma systems strengthening must address the needs of underserved groups and involve all stakeholders, including bonesetters. Research should address reasons for delayed care among subsistence farmers, motorcycle taxi drivers, and preschool children. Injury surveillance at district hospitals facilitates evidence-based resource allocation and should continue in the form of an Ugandan national trauma registry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Accuracy study of new computer-assisted orthopedic surgery software.

    PubMed

    Sidon, Eli; Steinberg, Ely L

    2012-12-01

    The new computerized system is based on image analysis and designed to aid in orthopedic surgeries by virtual trajectory of the guide wire, intra-operative planning and various measurements. Validation of the accuracy and safety of any computer-aided surgery system is essential before implementing it clinically. We examined the accuracy of guide-wire length and angle measurements and fusion of multiple adjacent images (panoramic view image, PVI(®)) of the new software. This is a 2-part study. Part I: twenty guide wires were drilled to various depths in a synthetic femur model and the results obtained by the software measurements were compared with manual measurements by a caliper and a depth gauge. Part II: a sawbone femur shaft was osteotomized and various inclinations of > 10° to the varus or valgus angles were tested. The manually obtained measurements of angles and lengths were compared to the new computerized system software PVI. There was a significant positive linear correlation between all groups of the computerized length and the control measurements (r>0.983, p<0.01). There was no significant difference among different distances, angles or positions from the image intensifier. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the angle and length measurement on the PVI and the control measurement (r>0.993, p<0.01). The new computerized software has high reliability in performing measurements of length using an aiming, positioning and referring device intra-operatively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun; Jin, Dong San; Suh, Hyunseok; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Won, Ye-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity among patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS). A total of 222 patients were reviewed immediately after or prior to OS. In the control group, 364 patients from outpatient departments (OPDs) who did not have any OS were enrolled. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to analyze body composition. Skeletal muscle mass was adjusted for height squared, total body weight, and height and fat mass (residuals). Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) > 25.0 kg/m(2). The prevalence of sarcopenia in the OS group was 25.7%, 44.1%, and 26.6%, respectively, according to the 3 different criteria. The prevalence was significantly lower in the OPD group (6.0%, 33.1%, and 14.8%, respectively). The highest rates of sarcopenia with height-adjusted definition were seen in patients with a femoral neck fracture. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, older age, and lower BMI (odds ratio [OR]: 28.38, 1.03, and 1.83, respectively) when muscle mass was adjusted for height, whereas male gender, older age, and higher BMI were associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.04, 2.57, and 1.83, respectively) when adjusted for weight. When residuals were used as a cutoff, decreased BMI and total hip bone mineral density (0.1 g/cm(2)) were independent risk factors associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.09 and 1.05). The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity ranged from 1.8% to 21.2%. Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among OS patients.

  6. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation. PMID:28154552

  7. Biocompatibility evaluation of porous ceria foams for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jordan P; Mound, Brittnee A; Monsalve, Adam G; Nino, Juan C; Allen, Josephine B

    2015-01-01

    Ceria ceramics have the unique ability to protect cells from free radical-induced damage, making them materials of interest for biomedical applications. To expand upon the understanding of the potential of ceria as a biomaterial, porous ceria, fabricated via direct foaming, was investigated to assess its biocompatibility and its ability to scavenge free radicals. A mouse osteoblast (7F2) cell line was cultured with the ceria foams to determine the extent of the foams' toxicity. Toxicity assessments indicate that mouse osteoblasts cultured directly on the ceria scaffold for 72 h did not show a significant (p > 0.05) increase in toxicity, but rather show comparable toxicity to cells cultured on porous 45S5 Bioglass. The in vitro inflammatory response elicited from porous ceria foams was measured as a function of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secreted from a human monocytic leukemia cell line. Results indicate that the ceria foams do not cause a significant inflammatory response, eliciting a response of 27.1 ± 7.1 pg mL(-1) of TNF-α compared to 36.3 ± 5.8 pg mL(-1) from cells on Bioglass, and 20.1 ± 2.9 pg mL(-1) from untreated cells. Finally, we report cellular toxicity in response to free radicals from tert-butyl hydroperoxide with and without foamed ceria. Our preliminary results show that the foamed ceria is able to decrease the toxic effect of induced oxidative stress. Collectively, this study demonstrates that foamed ceria scaffolds do not activate an inflammatory response, and show potential free radical scavenging ability, thus they have promise as an orthopedic biomaterial.

  8. Force relaxation and sprinback of novel elastic orthopedic cables.

    PubMed

    Canet, Fanny; Baril, Yannick; Brailovski, Vladimir; Petit, Yvan; Bissonnette, Guillaume; Laflamme, G-Yves

    2011-01-01

    Cerclage cables have proven to be very useful in the orthopedic field for bones stabilization and plate fixation but the initial enthusiasm for metallic cables has declined with their high complication rates. Metal materials provide limited elastic deformation compromising their ability to maintain compression. This study compares the mechanical properties of new elastic cables with cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel cables. Stainless-steel, cobalt-chrome, nylon and nickel-titanium cables were first loaded up to 356 N, then elongation was maintained for 12 hours, next unloaded and finally reloaded to failure. Initial elongation (%), Relative force relaxation (% loss of initial load after a 12h), elastic springback (%) and force to failure (N) were extracted from force-elongation curves. Initial elongation was the highest for nylon cables (9%), followed by the nickel-titanium (4%) and both metallic cables (0.3%). During 12 hours, no relaxation was observed for the nickel-titanium and the cobalt-chrome cables, whereas 28 and 45% of the tension was lost respectively for the stainless-steel and the nylon cables. The elastic springback of the nickel-titanium and nylon cables (4.4 and 4.7% respectively) was 20 times higher than that of the stainless-steel and cobalt-chrome cables (0.12 and 0.16% respectively). The force to failure of the stainless steel and cobalt-chrome cables was twice that of the nickel-titanium cables. Multi-braided stainless-steel and cobalt-chrome cables have a high-stiffness with limited ability to tolerate displacement, leading to early cable loosening. Novel low-stiffness cables made of nylon or nickel-titanium offer significant elastic springback improving binding stability.

  9. A simple strategy to reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Everlyne; Wright, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Stereotype threat, defined as the predicament felt by people in either positive or negative learning experiences where they could conform to negative stereotypes associated with their own group membership, can interfere with learning. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple orientation session could reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents. Methods The intervention group received an orientation on 2 occasions focusing on their possible responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds and the operating room (OR). Participants completed a survey with 7 questions typical for stereotype threat evaluating responses to their experiences. The questions had 7 response options with a maximum total score of 49, where higher scores indicated greater degree of experiences typical of stereotype threat. Results Of the 84 eligible residents, 49 participated: 22 in the nonintervention and 27 in the intervention group. The overall scores were 29 and 29.4, and 26.2 and 25.8 in the nonintervention and intervention groups for their survey responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds (p = 0.85) and the OR (p = 0.84), respectively. Overall, responses typical of stereotype threat were greater for perceived poor performance at teaching rounds than in the OR (p = 0.001). Conclusion Residents experience low self-esteem following perceived poor performance, particularly at rounds. A simple orientation designed to reduce stereotype threat was unsuccessful in reducing this threat overall. Future research will need to consider longer-term intervention as possible strategies to reduce perceived poor performance at teaching rounds and in the OR. PMID:24666454

  10. Incidence and predictive risk factors of postoperative sepsis in orthopedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Lakomkin, Nikita; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Wick, Brandon; Shen, Michelle S; Jahangir, A Alex; Mir, Hassan; Obremskey, William T; Dodd, Ashley C; Sethi, Manish K

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative sepsis is associated with high mortality and the national costs of septicemia exceed those of any other diagnosis. While numerous studies in the basic orthopedic science literature suggest that traumatic injuries facilitate the development of sepsis, it is currently unclear whether orthopedic trauma patients are at increased risk. The purpose of this study was thus to assess the incidence of sepsis and determine the risk factors that significantly predicted septicemia following orthopedic trauma surgery. 56,336 orthopedic trauma patients treated between 2006 and 2013 were identified in the ACS-NSQIP database. Documentation of postoperative sepsis/septic shock, demographics, surgical variables, and preoperative comorbidities was collected. Chi-squared analyses were used to assess differences in the rates of sepsis between trauma and nontrauma groups. Binary multivariable regressions identified risk factors that significantly predicted the development of postoperative septicemia in orthopedic trauma patients. There was a significant difference in the overall rates of both sepsis and septic shock between orthopedic trauma (1.6%) and nontrauma (0.5%) patients (p < 0.001). For orthopedic trauma patients, ventilator use (OR = 15.1, p = 0.002), history of pain at rest (OR = 2.8, p = 0.036), and prior sepsis (OR = 2.6, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with septicemia. Statistically predictive, modifiable comorbidities included hypertension (OR = 2.1, p = 0.003) and the use of corticosteroids (OR = 2.1, p = 0.016). There is a significantly greater incidence of postoperative sepsis in the trauma cohort. Clinicians should be aware of these predictive characteristics, may seek to counsel at-risk patients, and should consider addressing modifiable risk factors such as hypertension and corticosteroid use preoperatively. Level of evidence Level III.

  11. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bianca; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; Giugliani, Roberto; Wraith, James Edmond; Guffon, Nathalie; Eich, Elke; Beck, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome) is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS). The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years) and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years). Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle). Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required. PMID:21808707

  12. Traffic flow in the operating room: an explorative and descriptive study on air quality during orthopedic trauma implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annette Erichsen; Bergh, Ingrid; Karlsson, Jón; Eriksson, Bengt I; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the protective potential of operating room (OR) ventilation under different conditions is crucial to optimizing the surgical environment. This study investigated the air quality, expressed as colony-forming units (CFU)/m(3), during orthopedic trauma surgery in a displacement-ventilated OR; explored how traffic flow and the number of persons present in the OR affects the air contamination rate in the vicinity of surgical wounds; and identified reasons for door openings in the OR. Data collection, consisting of active air sampling and observations, was performed during 30 orthopedic procedures. In 52 of the 91 air samples collected (57%), the CFU/m(3) values exceeded the recommended level of <10 CFU/m(3). In addition, the data showed a strongly positive correlation between the total CFU/m(3) per operation and total traffic flow per operation (r = 0.74; P = .001; n = 24), after controlling for duration of surgery. A weaker, yet still positive correlation between CFU/m(3) and the number of persons present in the OR (r = 0.22; P = .04; n = 82) was also found. Traffic flow, number of persons present, and duration of surgery explained 68% of the variance in total CFU/m(3) (P = .001). Traffic flow has a strong negative impact on the OR environment. The results of this study support interventions aimed at preventing surgical site infections by reducing traffic flow in the OR. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transformation of anesthesia for ambulatory orthopedic surgery: A mixed-methods study of a diffusion of innovation in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Leggott, Kyle T; Martin, Matthew; Sklar, David; Helitzer, Deborah; Rosett, Randy; Crandall, Cameron; Vagh, Firoz; Mercer, Deana

    2016-09-01

    To provide insight into how an innovation in healthcare is implemented and diffused, we studied the transition from routine use of general anesthesia to peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) for ambulatory orthopedic extremity surgery. Rogers' diffusion of innovations (DOI) theory was used as our theoretical framework. We identified themes that would be helpful for others attempting to diffuse innovations into healthcare settings. A mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology was used. We retrospectively reviewed operative and anesthesia records of patients who underwent ambulatory repair of distal radius fractures or arthroscopic knee meniscus procedures from 1998 to 2012 to identify whether general anesthetics or PNBs were used and the time course of the innovation. We interviewed orthopedic surgeons, anesthesiologists, and a nursing administrator working in the ambulatory surgery unit during the innovation to identify key themes associated with the adoption of PNBs. From 2003 to 2012, use of PNBs increased from less than 10% to 70% of cases studied. The adoption timeframe followed an S-shaped curve. Key themes included improved safety, quality, efficiency, physician leadership and trust, organizational structure, and technological change. The innovation involved an optional decision-making process and took root in a satellite facility and generally fit with Rogers DOI theory. The adoption and diffusion of PNBs provides a useful model for understanding innovations with optional decision-making in healthcare. Critical elements in our case were the characteristics of the innovation, which facilitated the decision-making process, and the positioning of the innovation in a peripheral structure away from core clinical facilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infection by inoculation of sonication fluid into blood culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Portillo, María Eugenia; Salvadó, Margarita; Trampuz, Andrej; Siverio, Ana; Alier, Albert; Sorli, Lluisa; Martínez, Santos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Horcajada, Juan P; Puig-Verdie, Lluis

    2015-05-01

    Sonication improved the diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI). We investigated the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles in comparison with that of intraoperative tissue and sonication fluid cultures. Consecutive patients with removed orthopedic hardware were prospectively included and classified as having OIAI or aseptic failure (AF) according to standardized criteria. The diagnostic procedure included the collection of five intraoperative tissue cultures and sonication of the removed device, followed by conventional culture of the sonication fluid. Cultures were incubated for 7 days (aerobic) or 14 days (anaerobic). In addition, 10 ml of sonication fluid was inoculated into each aerobic and anaerobic BacT/Alert FAN blood culture bottle and incubated in the automated blood culture system for 5 days. Of 75 included patients, 39 had OIAI and 36 AF. The sensitivity of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles (100%) was higher than that of conventional sonication fluid (87%; P = 0.05) or intraoperative tissue cultures (59%; P < 0.01). Previous antibiotic therapy reduced the culture sensitivity of conventional sonication fluid to 77% and that of intraoperative tissue to 55%, while it remained 100% for blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid. The time to positivity was shorter in blood culture-inoculated sonication fluid, with detection of 72% of microorganisms after 1 day of incubation, than for intraoperative tissue and conventional sonication fluid cultures, with detection of 18% and 28% of microorganisms, respectively. In conclusion, compared to conventional sonication fluid and intraoperative tissue cultures, sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles improved the diagnosis of OIAI and considerably reduced the time to culture positivity.

  15. Methyl methacrylate levels in orthopedic surgery: comparison of two conventional vacuum mixing systems.

    PubMed

    Jelecevic, Jasmin; Maidanjuk, Stanislaw; Leithner, Andreas; Loewe, Kai; Kuehn, Klaus-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Poly-methyl methacrylate bone cements contain methyl methacrylate (MMA), which is known for its sensitizing and toxic properties. Therefore, in most European countries and in the USA, guidelines or regulations exist for occupational exposures. The use of vacuum mixing systems can significantly reduce airborne MMA concentrations during bone setting. Our goal was to test two commonly used vacuum mixing systems (Palamix(®) and Optivac(®)) using Palacos(®) R bone cement for their effectiveness at preventing MMA vapor release in a series of standardized trials in a laboratory as well as in an operating theatre. MMA was quantified every second over a period of 3 min using a photoionization detector (MiniRAE(®) 3000) device positioned in the breathing area of the user. Significant differences in MMA mean vapor concentrations over 180 s were observed in the two experimental spaces, with the highest mean concentrations (7.61 and 7.98 ppm for Palamix(®) and Optivac(®), respectively) observed in a laboratory with nine air changes per hour and the lowest average concentrations (1.06 and 1.12 ppm for Palamix(®) and Optivac(®), respectively) in an operating theatre with laminar flow ventilation and 22 air changes per hour. No significant differences in overall MMA concentrations were found between the two vacuum mixing systems in either location. Though, differences were found between both systems during single mixing phases. Thus, typical handling of MMA in orthopedic procedures must be seen as not harmful as concentrations do not reach the short-term exposure limit of 100 ppm. Additionally, laminar airflow seems to have an influence on lowering MMA concentrations in operation theatres.

  16. Dealing with innovation and costs in orthopedics: a conversation with Dane Miller. Interview by Lawton R Burns.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dane

    2006-01-01

    Rob Burns talks with Dane Miller, former CEO of Biomet, about challenges posed by new technology in the orthopedic devices area. One key challenge is the rising cost and use of orthopedic devices at a time when providers are facing decreased profitability and reimbursement for orthopedic services. Another challenge is the long-term time horizon needed to gauge product success that contrasts with payers' and providers' short-term horizon. A third challenge is heightened governmental scrutiny of device makers' relationships with orthopedic surgeons. This interview was conducted before Miller left Biomet in March 2006.

  17. [Dental orthopedic service for retirees from MD RF in medical institutions of state and municipal system of healthcare].

    PubMed

    Malykh, A B; Grebnev, G A; Butsenko, S A; Pastukhov, A G

    2012-04-01

    Financial feasibility study of dental orthopedic service for retirees of Ministry of Defence is analyzed, suggestions about the organization of dental orthopedic service for contingent in medical institution of state and municipal system of healthcare. Information about the number of retirees, index of needs in dental orthopedic service which was 40,29%, information about 2806 prosthodontics oders for retirees in military medical institution, data about the average price of production of dental in different subjects of Russian Federation is the basis of the given research. Algorithm of dental orthopedic service for retirees by stomatologies is suggested.

  18. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  19. Orthopedic Management of Patients with Pompe Disease: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Forst, Jürgen; Forst, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pompe disease (PD), a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. Patients and Methods. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Results. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Conclusion. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD. PMID:24523658

  20. [Hopes for future practice of junior orthopedic surgeons in France: a sociological study].

    PubMed

    Grégory, T; Gaillard, R; Grenier, A

    2007-09-01

    Medical demographics have become a major public health issue in France since the publication of the Berlan report in 2002 which announced an upcoming shortage in the next 20 years. But demographic projections cannot be limited to an accounting of training and retirement figures. Other factors such as demographic distribution, changing societal aspirations (free time), modes and sites of occupational activities, the influence of feminization, and initial training and its effects on professional practice must be taken into consideration. The purpose of this work was to study these parameters in orthopedic and traumatology surgery. This was a sociological study designed to ascertain the aspirations of junior orthopedic surgeons. Forty-seven interns in orthopedic surgery in the Paris area were invited to complete a questionnaire in March 2003. Forty-two responded. The choice of orthopedics was an intellectual choice. The attractiveness of the specialty was particularly important during the final years of medical school. Fewer junior surgeons would rather practice in a university hospital setting, more preferring a mixed setting with a private (fees) and a public (salary) component. The desire for "free time" was particularly important. Fewer juniors wanted to practice in general hospitals. For orthopedic surgeons, private practice and payment by fees are the cornerstones of medical practice.

  1. OrthoEvidence™: A Clinical Resource for Evidence-Based Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Sheila; Smith, Chris; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of musculoskeletal issues in clinical practice, and the limited focus placed upon musculoskeletal conditions by current electronic summary resources, highlights the need for a resource that provides access to simple and concise summaries of top-quality orthopedic literature for orthopedic surgeons and allied healthcare professionals. OrthoEvidence™ is an online clinical resource that addresses the paucity of adequate evidence-based summary tools in the field of orthopedic surgery. OrthoEvidence™ uses a rigorous, transparent, and unique process to review, evaluate, and summarize high quality research studies and their implications for orthopedic clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are identified and reviewed by an expert medical writing team, who prepare Advanced Clinical Evidence (ACETM) reports: one or two detailed pages including critical appraisals and synopses of key research. These timely and targeted reports provide a clear understanding about the quality of evidence associated with each summarized study, and can be organized by users to identify trending information. OrthoEvidence™ allows members to use their time efficiently and to stay current by having access to a breadth of timely, high-quality research output. OrthoEvidence™ is easily accessible through the internet and is available at the point-of-care, which allows treating orthopedic surgeons and allied health professionals to easily practice the principles of evidence-based medicine within their clinical practices.. PMID:26330990

  2. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The Holy Grail of Orthopedic Surgery: Mesenchymal Stem Cells—Their Current Uses and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berebichez-Fridman, Roberto; Gómez-García, Ricardo; Berebichez-Fastlicht, Enrique; Olivos-Meza, Anell; Granados, Julio; Velasquillo, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Only select tissues and organs are able to spontaneously regenerate after disease or trauma, and this regenerative capacity diminishes over time. Human stem cell research explores therapeutic regenerative approaches to treat various conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are derived from adult stem cells; they are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesenchyme, for example, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, fibroblasts, tenocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and sarcomere muscular cells. MSCs are easily obtained and can be cultivated and expanded in vitro; thus, they represent a promising and encouraging treatment approach in orthopedic surgery. Here, we review the application of MSCs to various orthopedic conditions, namely, orthopedic trauma; muscle injury; articular cartilage defects and osteoarthritis; meniscal injuries; bone disease; nerve, tendon, and ligament injuries; spinal cord injuries; intervertebral disc problems; pediatrics; and rotator cuff repair. The use of MSCs in orthopedics may transition the practice in the field from predominately surgical replacement and reconstruction to bioregeneration and prevention. However, additional research is necessary to explore the safety and effectiveness of MSC treatment in orthopedics, as well as applications in other medical specialties. PMID:28698718

  4. Collaborative multicenter trials in Latin America: challenges and opportunities in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Vinicius Ynoe de; Belloti, Joao Carlos; Faloppa, Flavio; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Orthopedic research agendas should be considered from a worldwide perspective. Efforts should be planned as the means for obtaining evidence that is valid for health promotion with global outreach. DESIGN AND SETTING Exploratory study conducted at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, Brazil, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. METHODS We identified and analyzed collaborative and multicenter research in Latin America, taking into account American and Canadian efforts as the reference points. We explored aspects of the data available from official sources and used data from traffic accidents as a model for discussing collaborative research in these countries. RESULTS The evaluation showed that the proportion of collaborative and multicenter studies in our setting is small. A brief analysis showed that the death rate due to traffic accidents is very high. Thus, it seems clear to us that initiatives involving collaborative studies are important for defining and better understanding the patterns of injuries resulting from orthopedic trauma and the forms of treatment. Orthopedic research may be an important tool for bringing together orthopedic surgeons, researchers and medical societies for joint action. CONCLUSIONS We have indicated some practical guidelines for initiatives in collaborative research and have proposed some solutions with a summarized plan of action for conducting evidence-based research involving orthopedic trauma.

  5. Parametric study of orthopedic insole of valgus foot on partial foot amputation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Du, Cheng-Fei; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic insole was important for partial foot amputation (PFA) to achieve foot balance and avoid foot deformity. The inapposite insole orthosis was thought to be one of the risk factors of reamputation for foot valgus patient, but biomechanical effects of internal tissues on valgus foot had not been clearly addressed. In this study, plantar pressure on heel and metatarsal regions of PFA was measured using F-Scan. The three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of partial foot evaluated different medial wedge angles (MWAs) (0.0°-10.0°) of orthopedic insole on valgus foot. The effect of orthopedic insole on the internal bone stress, the medial ligament tension of ankle, plantar fascia tension, and plantar pressure was investigated. Plantar pressure on medial heel region was about 2.5 times higher than that of lateral region based on the F-Scan measurements. FE-predicted results showed that the tension of medial ankle ligaments was the lowest, and the plantar pressure was redistributed around the heel, the first metatarsal, and the lateral longitudinal arch regions when MWA of orthopedic insole ranged from 7.5° to 8.0°. The plantar fascias maintained about 3.5% of the total load bearing on foot. However, the internal stresses from foot bones increased. The simulation in this study would provide the suggestion of guiding optimal design of orthopedic insole and therapeutic planning to pedorthist.

  6. Orthopedic management of patients with Pompe disease: a retrospective case series of 8 patients.

    PubMed

    Haaker, Gerrit; Forst, Jürgen; Forst, Raimund; Fujak, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD), a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD.

  7. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    PubMed

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II--modus operandi.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Stutzmann, J J; Graber, T M; Voss, L R; Petrovic, A G

    1989-05-01

    A new functional appliance (FA) to correct Class II dentoskeletal malocclusions is introduced. The functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA) II uses upper and lower attracting magnetic means (Nd2Fe14B) to constrain the lower jaw in an advanced sagittal posture. In vitro, a special gauge transducer measured the magnetic attractive path and forces. In vivo, 13 prepubertal female Macaca fascicularis monkeys received facial implants and were treated for 4 months with the following appliances: conventional FA (four subjects), FOMA II (five subjects), a combined FOMA II + FA (two subjects), and sham (control) appliance (two subjects). The in vitro results showed the following: vertico-sagitally displaced upper and lower magnets attracted ultimately along an oblique line with a terminal horizonal slide to become fully superimposed; the functional performance improved when the magnetic interface acted as a magnetic inclined plane; and the magnetic force was able to guide and constrain the mandible toward the constructive protrusive closure position (CPCP) (1.2 mm, F = 570 gm) from levels below the habitual rest position (3 mm, F = 219 gm) and the electromyographic (EMG) relaxed position (8.5 mm, F = 45 gm). The in vivo results demonstrated the following: functional performance increased in FOMA II (22%) and in the combined FOMA II + FA (28%) over the conventional FA; mandibular length increased significantly in the treated animals (means = 2.83 +/- 0.70 mm) over the control animals (means = 0.43 +/- 0.08 mm); incisor proclination was lower in magnetic appliances (means = 4.57 +/- 1.76 degrees) than in the conventional FA (means = 8.75 +/- 1.85 degrees); mandibular elongation and condylar posterior inclination resulted from posterosuperior endochondral growth (increased cell proliferation and/or hyperplasia of functional chondroblasts) and by bony remodeling of the condylar neck (apposition posterior border, resorption anterior border), respectively; virtually no

  9. Compliance of patients wearing an orthotic device or orthopedic shoes: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Eva; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Alongside the positive effects of use of orthotic devices for the lower extremities (ODLE) and orthopedic shoes, complaints and criticism by users possibly lead to non-compliance. The purpose is to determine the compliance of patients wearing an ODLE or orthopedic shoes and to describe the main reasons for using and not using. Different online databases were searched for articles about patients' compliance with regard to an ODLE or orthopedic shoes. A methodological quality control was conducted. Ten studies (1576 patients) were included. The data revealed between 6 and 80% not users. Several reasons for not using the orthotic device were described (e.g. pain, discomfort and cosmetically unacceptable). The high percentage of patients who are not wearing the prescribed orthotic devices leads to a high financial loss for society and a waste of therapeutic effort. These results should be taken into account during the design, construction and selection process of orthotic devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatitis C virus infection: review and implications for the orthopedic surgeon.

    PubMed

    McGrory, B J; Kilby, A E

    2000-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus identified in 1989, is estimated to have infected 1%-2% of the United States population. The incidence of HCV in patients requiring orthopedic surgery may be as high as 5%. Surgeons and operating room personnel are at risk for blood-borne diseases transmitted during surgery. The orthopedic surgeon must be aware of viral infection with this pathogen for the safety of the entire operating room team. Further, screening for HCV is routinely done when a patient donates autologous blood prior to elective surgery, and the orthopedic surgeon is often the first or only physician informed of a positive result. The surgeon should know how to interpret the result, advise the patient, and incorporate the diagnosis of HCV into the plan for the proposed surgery. We will review the natural history, transmission, evaluation of, and current treatment for infection with this blood-borne virus.

  11. The education, role, distribution, and compensation of physician assistants in orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-05-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) have worked alongside surgeons since the 1970s, yet little is known about their postgraduate education, roles, distribution, and compensation. In 2015, an estimated 8,900 PAs were employed in orthopedics (9.4% of all clinically active PAs in the United States). This study analyzed surveys undertaken by Physician Assistants in Orthopaedic Surgery (PAOS) from 2009 to 2015 and found that most PAs working in orthopedics (85%) reported regularly assisting in surgery. Demand for PAs in orthopedics is expected to grow because of population growth, increasing incidence of musculoskeletal conditions, shortages of surgeons, and changing technology. Improved data acquisition and more detailed analyses are needed to better understand the nature of this specialized workforce.

  12. [Further training in the faculty of orthopedics and trauma surgery. Outstanding, average or insufficient?].

    PubMed

    Perl, M; Stange, R; Niethard, M; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    A well structured and executed and practical residency program is important to secure a sufficient number of well trained orthopedic surgeons in the future. Some of the residents, however, see substantial shortcomings here. Additionally, orthopedic residency programs struggle to be a valid alternative for graduated medical students when comparing them to residency programs in other medical specialities or alternative job options. In improving the current situation program directors as well as residents must play a key role. A rapid improvement of structural shortcomings of German residency programs does not only provide an advantage in recruiting new residents now, but may also help to maintain the high quality in orthopedic health care in the future.

  13. [How many generalists and how many specialists does orthopedics and traumatology need?].

    PubMed

    Achatz, G; Perl, M; Stange, R; Mutschler, M; Jarvers, J S; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    The training in orthopedic and trauma surgery has changed significantly with the introduction of the new residency program. The contents taught have already been reduced in breadth and the current developments in the outpatient and particularly in the clinical landscape also contribute to increasing specialization. This trend favors structures in which comprehensive medical care for the population in Germany in orthopedic and trauma surgery appears to be endangered and in which the future efforts for e.g. polytraumatised patients need to be questioned. The Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics and Traumatology actively accompanies a discussion about the necessity and value of generalists to ensure the level of care in Germany in addition to the specialists.

  14. Current use of autologous adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Park, Moonhee; Kang, Lin-Woo; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-31

    Autologous adipose stromal vascular fractions (SVFs) containing adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are currently being used in clinical settings for various orthopedic applications for human patients. Due to its potential capability of regenerating cartilage, bone, and tendons, autologous adipose SVFs are being tried in treating patients with osteoarthritis (OA), chondromalacia, meniscus tear, osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and tendon injuries. Here, we have reviewed available human clinical studies with regard to patient applications of autologous adipose SVF containing ASCs, specifically assessing effectiveness and safety in the field of orthopedic disorders. All studies reviewed in this article presents potential benefits of autologous adipose SVF in various orthopedic applications without any serious side effects.

  15. Predictive value of orthopedic evaluation and injury history at the NFL combine.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Robert H; Chehab, Eric L; Barnes, Ronnie P; Lyman, Stephen; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F

    2008-08-01

    The National Football League (NFL) holds an annual combine to evaluate college football athletes likely to be drafted for physical skills, to review their medical history, and to perform a physical examination. The athletes receive an orthopedic grade on their ability to participate in the NFL. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that this orthopedic rating at the combine predicts the percent of athletes who play in the NFL and the length of their careers. A database for all athletes reviewed at the combine by the medical staff of one team from 1987 to 2000 was created and linked to a data set containing the number of seasons and the games played in the NFL for each athlete. Players were grouped by orthopedic grade: high, low, and orthopedic failure. The percent of players who played in the NFL and the mean length of their careers was calculated and compared for these groups. The orthopedic grade assigned at the NFL combine correlated with the probability of playing in the league. Whereas 58% of athletes with a high grade and 55% of athletes with a low grade played at least one game, only 36% of athletes given a failing grade did so (P < 0.001). Players with a high grade had a mean career of 41.5 games compared with 34.2 games for players with a low grade and 19.0 games for orthopedic failures. This is the first study to report on the predictive value of a grading system for college athletes before participation in professional sports. Other professional sports may benefit from using a similar grading system for the evaluation of potential players.

  16. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Transfusion of Allogeneic Blood in Orthopedics Patients With Intraoperative Blood Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Hua; Lyu, Yi; Cheng, Li-Ming; Li, Ying-Chuan; Gou, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors affecting the postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing orthopedics surgery with intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). A retrospective study of 279 patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries with IBS from May 2013 to May 2015 was enrolled. The binary logistic regression was used to find out the risk factors associated with postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedics patients with IBS, and then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the optimal threshold of the regression model. Single factor analysis showed that age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative hemoglobin, operation time, received autologous blood, the laying time of autologous blood, bleeding volume, and postoperative drainage volume had significant effects on postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In binary logistic regression analysis, the independent factors predicting orthopedic patients with IBS need to transfuse allogeneic blood after surgeries were age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.415, P = 0.006), ASA grade (OR = 2.393, P = 0.035), preoperative hemoglobin (OR = 0.532, P = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volume (OR = 4.279, P = 0.000). The area under ROC curve was 0.79 and the predicted accuracy rate of the model was 81.58%. After operation, the orthopedic patients with IBS still have a high allogeneic blood transfusion rate, and IBS is not a perfect blood protection method. The logistic regression model of our study provides a reliable prediction for postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedic patients with IBS, which have a certain reference value. PMID:26937919

  17. Does Weather Matter? The Effect of Weather Patterns and Temporal Factors on Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Volume

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Kristin S.; Miller, Patricia E.; Lierhaus, Anneliese; Matheney, Travis H.; Mahan, Susan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Orthopaedists often speculate how weather and school schedule may influence pediatric orthopedic trauma volume, but few studies have examined this. This study aims to determine: how do weather patterns, day, month, season and public school schedule influence the daily frequency of pediatric orthopedic trauma consults and admissions? Methods: With IRB approval, orthopedic trauma data from a level 1 pediatric trauma center, including number of daily orthopedic trauma consults and admissions, were collected from July 2009 to March 2012. Historical weather data (high temperatures, precipitation and hours of daylight), along with local public school schedule data were collected for the same time period. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to show the average number of orthopedic trauma consults and admissions as a function of weather and temporal variables. Results: High temperature, precipitation, month and day of the week significantly affected the number of daily consults and admissions. The number of consults and admissions increased by 1% for each degree increase in temperature (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), and decreased by 21% for each inch of precipitation (p<0.001, p=0.006). Daily consults on snowy days decreased by an additional 16% compared to days with no precipitation. November had the lowest daily consult and admission rate, while September had the highest. Daily consult rate was lowest on Wednesdays and highest on Saturdays. Holiday schedule was not independently significant. Conclusion: Pediatric orthopedic trauma consultations and admissions are highly linked to temperature and precipitation, as well as day of the week and time of year. PMID:27990193

  18. Thirty-day readmission rates in orthopedics: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernatz, James T; Tueting, Jonathan L; Anderson, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Hospital readmission rates are being used to evaluate performance. A survey of the present rates is needed before policies can be developed to decrease incidence of readmission. We address three questions: What is the present rate of 30-day readmission in orthopedics? How do factors such as orthopedic specialty, data source, patient insurance, and time of data collection affect the 30-day readmission rate? What are the causes and risk factors for 30-day readmissions? A review was first registered with Prospero (CRD42014010293, 6/17/2014) and a meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in orthopedics. Studies published after 2006 were retrieved, and 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rate was extrapolated from each study along with the orthopedic subspecialty, data source, patient insurance, time of collection, patient demographics, and cause of readmission. A sensitivity analysis was completed on the stratified groups. The overall 30-day readmission rate across all orthopedics was 5.4 percent (95% confidence interval: 4.8,6.0). There was no significant difference between subspecialties. Studies that retrieved data from a multicenter registry had a lower 30-day readmission rate than those reporting data from a single hospital or a large national database. Patient populations that only included Medicare patients had a higher 30-day readmission rate than populations of all insurance. The 30-day readmission rate has decreased in the past ten years. Age, length of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, increased BMI, ASA score greater than 3, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance showed statistically positive correlation with increased 30-day readmissions in greater than 75 percent of studies. Surgical site complications accounted for 46 percent of 30-day readmissions. This meta-analysis shows the present rate of 30-day readmissions in orthopedics. Demonstrable heterogeneity between studies underlines the

  19. Thirty-Day Readmission Rates in Orthopedics: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bernatz, James T.; Tueting, Jonathan L.; Anderson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission rates are being used to evaluate performance. A survey of the present rates is needed before policies can be developed to decrease incidence of readmission. We address three questions: What is the present rate of 30-day readmission in orthopedics? How do factors such as orthopedic specialty, data source, patient insurance, and time of data collection affect the 30-day readmission rate? What are the causes and risk factors for 30-day readmissions? Methods/Findings A review was first registered with Prospero (CRD42014010293, 6/17/2014) and a meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in orthopedics. Studies published after 2006 were retrieved, and 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rate was extrapolated from each study along with the orthopedic subspecialty, data source, patient insurance, time of collection, patient demographics, and cause of readmission. A sensitivity analysis was completed on the stratified groups. The overall 30-day readmission rate across all orthopedics was 5.4 percent (95% confidence interval: 4.8,6.0). There was no significant difference between subspecialties. Studies that retrieved data from a multicenter registry had a lower 30-day readmission rate than those reporting data from a single hospital or a large national database. Patient populations that only included Medicare patients had a higher 30-day readmission rate than populations of all insurance. The 30-day readmission rate has decreased in the past ten years. Age, length of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, increased BMI, ASA score greater than 3, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance showed statistically positive correlation with increased 30-day readmissions in greater than 75 percent of studies. Surgical site complications accounted for 46 percent of 30-day readmissions. Conclusions This meta-analysis shows the present rate of 30-day readmissions in orthopedics. Demonstrable

  20. [SGTB orthopedic regime to correct protrusive skeletal anomalies: a developmental path through evolution, renovation and innovation].

    PubMed

    Shen, Gang

    2015-10-01

    Sagittal-guidance Twin-block appliance (SGTB), an orthopedic therapy that has been widely implemented in orthodontic practice since it was introduced by the author a decade ago. This overview was aimed to clarify the fundamental mechanism of SGTB in correction of skeletal malocclusions, i.e., retraction of the maxilla triggered by the muscular force generated from mandibular forward positioning. This overview was also designed to summarize the evolutionary pathway through which SGTB regime originated and developed from removable, bonded and to the latest form of clear aligner SGTB. It was concluded that SGTB promised to be an efficient orthopedic approach to manage complicated and severe dentofacial anomalies with skeletal element.

  1. Temporomandibular joint orthopedics with anterior repositioning appliance therapy and therapeutic injections.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Clifton

    2014-08-01

    TMD orthopedics is the assessment, diagnosis and management of orthopedic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Anterior repositioning appliance (ARA) therapy for TMJ internal derangements is successful in long-term recapturing of disks in reducing and nonreducing joints at a rate of 64 percent and in regenerating degenerated condyles in some cases. ARA therapy for TMJ internal derangements is subjectively successful in relieving symptoms in reducing and nonreducing disk displacement TMJs in this study at an average rate of 94.5 percent.

  2. [Often an orthopedic problem can manifest as chest pain. Cervical vertebrae syndrome mimics myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Fromm, B

    2002-04-25

    Up to 20% of all patients with pectoral symptoms have an underlying orthopedic problem. The most common orthopedic conditions that may mimic chest pain radiating into the left arm include slipped disc, cervicothoracic tension syndrome, blockage of intervertebral or rib joints, and intercostal neuralgia. Less common causes of such pain are arthrosis of the shoulder, spondylocystitis, osteoporotic fractures or tumors of the bone. Management is oriented to the underlying cause, and treatment extends from physiotherapeutic measures (rest, heat treatment) via medication (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myotonolytic agents) to operative interventions.

  3. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  4. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  5. Orthopedic surgery residents and the CDC and AAOS HIV precautionary measures.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, S G; Delene, L M; Hutchinson, M R; Halpern, A A

    1996-03-01

    A randomized national survey of orthopedic surgery residents concerning their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of the Centers for Disease Control's and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' (AAOS) universal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) precautionary measures was conducted. The residents' basic knowledge about the HIV precautionary measures was, in general, poor. Thirty-seven percent indicated that they were "uncertain" or "would not" care for HIV positive patients. Further, the residents' practice behaviors in many instances did not fulfill prescribed universal precautions. Sound educational and professional programs, such as those initiated by the AAOS, are needed to increase the knowledge and improve the practice behaviors of orthopedic residents.

  6. Costs and utilities of manual therapy and orthopedic standard care for low-prioritized orthopedic outpatients of working age: a cost consequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Lilje, Stina C; Persson, Ulf B; Tangen, Stine T; Kåsamoen, Stine; Skillgate, Eva

    2014-08-01

    Treatment for musculoskeletal disorders in primary care in Sweden is generally initiated with advice and medication. Second-line therapy is physiotherapy and/or injection and radiography; third-line therapy is referral to an orthopedist. Manual therapy is not routine. It is a challenge to identify patients who benefit from treatment by different specialists. The current referral strategy probably contributes to long waiting lists in orthopedic departments, which is costly and implies prolonged suffering for the patients. The aim of this health economic evaluation was to compare costs and outcomes from naprapathic manual therapy (NMT) with orthopedic standard care for common, low-prioritized, nonsurgical musculoskeletal disorders, after second-line treatment. Diagnose Related Groups were used to define the costs, and the SF-36 was encoded to evaluate the outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years gained. Results from a 12 months' follow-up showed significantly larger improvement for the NMT than for orthopedic standard care, significantly lower mean cost per patient; 5427 SEK (*Price level 2009; 1 Euro=106,213 SEK; 1 US Dollar=76,457 SEK) (95% confidence interval, 3693-7161) compared to14298 SEK (95% confidence interval, 8322-20,274), and more gains in outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years per patient (0.066 compared with 0.026). Thus the result is "dominant." It is plausible that improved outcomes and reasonable cost savings for low-prioritized nonsurgical outpatients would be attainable if NMT were available as an additional standard care option in orthopedic outpatient clinics.

  7. The beneficial relationship of the colocation of orthopedics and physical therapy in a deployed setting: Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    Davis, Susan; Machen, Michael S; Chang, Laurette

    2006-03-01

    In a deployment setting, orthopedic and musculoskeletal injuries represent the majority of both combat-related and noncombat-related injuries. To expeditiously and efficiently manage the large influx of patients, our experience revealed the tremendous benefits of having physical therapy colocated with an orthopedic surgeon in a level III combat support hospital. A physical therapist, working in a physician extender role, can treat the majority of nonsurgical orthopedic patients, thus allowing the orthopedic surgeon to focus his or her skills and time on surgical interventions. This physician extender role, although often overlooked during peacetime, becomes essential during wartime, when critically injured patients are abundant and physicians are in short supply. The lessons learned support the continued colocation of physical therapy and orthopedics in a deployment setting and recognize the need to have more physical therapists placed at level I and II echelons of care.

  8. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    PubMed

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society.

  9. Epidemiological study of orthopedic injuries in hemodialysis patients in Taiwan: a fixed cohort survey, 2004-2008.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nien-Tzu; Lee, Yi-Hui; Hsu, Jiin-Chyr; Chan, Chien-Lung; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Renn, Jenn-Huei; Yang, Nan-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern worldwide. The prevalence of hemodialysis in Taiwan is the highest in the world, and this may increase the prevalence of orthopedic fractures. The aim of this study was to explore the incidences of various orthopedic injuries and the related risk factors. A nationwide prospective study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset was conducted during 2004-2008. A total of 82,491 CKD patients were selected as the fixed cohort population. The International Classification of Diseases 9-CM diagnosis codes and treatment codes were identified as the inclusion criteria for orthopedic injury. A total of 82,491 Taiwanese people with CKD were identified in 2004, and 4915 orthopedic injuries occurred during the 5-year follow-up period. The cumulative incidences of orthopedic injuries were 42.56‰ for lower limb fractures, and 12.93‰, 3.27‰, and 1.64‰ for upper limb fractures, vertebrae fractures, and joint dislocations, respectively. All three types of orthopedic fractures were more common in the oldest age stratum (≥65 years old). In the CKD patients, the risk ratio of osteoporosis was 3.47 (95% confidence interval, 3.10-3.89) for all orthopedic injuries. Patients of advanced age, the female gender, and those with high comorbidity were also at significant risk of sustaining orthopedic fractures. The results from this Taiwanese CKD cohort support the strong influence of aging and osteoporosis on all kinds of orthopedic injuries. The postponing of osteoporosis may need to be taken into consideration for the prevention of orthopedic injury among CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  10. High energy devices versus low energy devices in orthopedics treatment modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheiss, Reiner

    2003-10-01

    The orthopedic consensus group defined in 1997 the 42 most likely relevant parameters of orthopedic shock wave devices. The idea of this approach was to correlate the different clinical outcomes with the physical properties of the different devices with respect to their acoustical waves. Several changes in the hypothesis of the dose effect relationship have been noticed since the first orthopedic treatments. The relation started with the maximum pressure p+, followed by the total energy, the energy density; and finally the single treatment approach using high, and then the multiple treatment method using low energy. Motivated by the reimbursement situation in Germany some manufacturers began to redefine high and low energy devices independent of the treatment modality. The OssaTron as a high energy, single treatment electro hydraulic device gained FDA approval as the first orthopedic ESWT device for plantar fasciitis and, more recently, for lateral epicondylitis. Two low energy devices have now also gained FDA approval based upon a single treatment. Comparing the acoustic data, differences between the OssaTron and the other devices are obvious and will be elaborated upon. Cluster analysis of the outcomes and the acoustical data are presented and new concepts will be suggested.

  11. The impact of a hospitalist on role boundaries in an orthopedic environment.

    PubMed

    Webster, Fiona; Bremner, Samantha; Jackson, Megan; Bansal, Vikas; Sale, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalists specialize in the management of hospitalized patients. They work with several health care professionals to provide patient care. There has been little research examining the perceived impact of the hospitalist's role on staff working in an orthopedic environment. This study examined the experiences of staff across several professional backgrounds in working with a hospitalist in an orthopedic environment. A qualitative descriptive approach was taken to investigate the experience of staff working with a hospitalist at a specialized orthopedic hospital. Purposive sampling was used to recruit interview participants including nurses, internists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, anesthetists, senior administration, and orthopedic surgeons to the point of theoretical saturation, which occurred after 12 interviews. Interviews were coded, and these codes were combined into categories and predominant themes were identified. Overall, staff believed that the hospitalist role was a positive addition to the facility. The role benefitted patients and supported the clinical well-being and education of staff. Many staff felt the hospitalist had no impact on their workload, but others reported that their work had decreased or increased. Several described the potential for role overlap between the hospitalist and other physicians. The importance of interprofessional collaboration in the implementation of the hospitalist role was a recurring theme in our analysis. This study demonstrates the importance of educating staff about the hospitalist role boundaries prior to implementing hospitalist care.

  12. The impact of a hospitalist on role boundaries in an orthopedic environment

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Fiona; Bremner, Samantha; Jackson, Megan; Bansal, Vikas; Sale, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Hospitalists specialize in the management of hospitalized patients. They work with several health care professionals to provide patient care. There has been little research examining the perceived impact of the hospitalist’s role on staff working in an orthopedic environment. This study examined the experiences of staff across several professional backgrounds in working with a hospitalist in an orthopedic environment. Participants and methods A qualitative descriptive approach was taken to investigate the experience of staff working with a hospitalist at a specialized orthopedic hospital. Purposive sampling was used to recruit interview participants including nurses, internists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, anesthetists, senior administration, and orthopedic surgeons to the point of theoretical saturation, which occurred after 12 interviews. Interviews were coded, and these codes were combined into categories and predominant themes were identified. Findings Overall, staff believed that the hospitalist role was a positive addition to the facility. The role benefitted patients and supported the clinical well-being and education of staff. Many staff felt the hospitalist had no impact on their workload, but others reported that their work had decreased or increased. Several described the potential for role overlap between the hospitalist and other physicians. Conclusion The importance of interprofessional collaboration in the implementation of the hospitalist role was a recurring theme in our analysis. This study demonstrates the importance of educating staff about the hospitalist role boundaries prior to implementing hospitalist care. PMID:23055744

  13. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  14. Value of 3-D CT in classifying acetabular fractures during orthopedic residency training.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jeffrey; Halvorson, Jason; Carroll, Eben; Webb, Lawrence X

    2012-05-01

    The complex anatomy of the pelvis and acetabulum have historically made classification and interpretation of acetabular fractures difficult for orthopedic trainees. The addition of 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) scan has gained popularity in preoperative planning, identification, and education of acetabular fractures given their complexity. Therefore, the authors examined the value of 3-D CT compared with conventional radiography in classifying acetabular fractures at different levels of orthopedic training. Their hypothesis was that 3-D CT would improve correct identification of acetabular fractures compared with conventional radiography.The classic Letournel fracture pattern classification system was presented in quiz format to 57 orthopedic residents and 20 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists. A case consisted of (1) plain radiographs and 2-dimensional axial CT scans or (2) 3-D CT scans. All levels of training showed significant improvement in classifying acetabular fractures with 3-D vs 2-D CT, with the greatest benefit from 3-D CT found in junior residents (postgraduate years 1-3).Three-dimensional CT scans can be an effective educational tool for understanding the complex spatial anatomy of the pelvis, learning acetabular fracture patterns, and correctly applying a widely accepted fracture classification system.

  15. An Evaluation Design for the Educational Programs for Pupils Who Are Orthopedically Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Programs for the Handicapped.

    The booklet provides forms for the teacher of the orthopedically handicapped to use in systematically collecting data and designing an appropriate educational blueprint for each student. Pupil development assessment sheets include columns for recording assessment date, date of mastery, level of achievement, and comments for each behavioral…

  16. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  17. The Effect of Orthopedic Advertising and Self-Promotion on a Naïve Population.

    PubMed

    Mohney, Stephen; Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2016-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the number of physicians marketing themselves directly to patients and consumers. However, it is unclear how different promotional styles affect patients' perceptions of their physicians. We hypothesized that self-promoting orthopedic surgeons enjoy a more positive impact on nonphysician patients as compared to non-self-promoting surgeons, as well as a corresponding negative impact on their peer-surgeons. Surgeon websites were selected from the 5 largest population centers in the United States. Subjects with varying degrees of familiarity with orthopedic surgery evaluated Internet profiles of surgeons on a forced choice Likert scale to measure the amount of self-promotion. The naïve subjects judged self-promoting surgeons more favorably than the orthopedic surgeons. In contrast, board-certified orthopedic surgeons viewed self-promoting surgeons more negatively than did their nonphysician counterparts. In summary, the present study revealed that the potential for self-promotion to unduly influence potential patients is real and should be a considerable concern to surgeons, patients, and the profession.

  18. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N.; Forsythe, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice. PMID:27240129

  19. Computer-assisted total hip arthroplasty: coding the next generation of navigation systems for orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Tobias; Tingart, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Sendtner, Ernst; Kalteis, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    This article outlines the scientific basis and a state-of-the-art application of computer-assisted orthopedic surgery in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and provides a future perspective on this technology. Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery in primary THA has the potential to couple 3D simulations with real-time evaluations of surgical performance, which has brought these developments from the research laboratory all the way to clinical use. Nonimage- or imageless-based navigation systems without the need for additional pre- or intra-operative image acquisition have stood the test to significantly reduce the variability in positioning the acetabular component and have shown precise measurement of leg length and offset changes during THA. More recently, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery systems have opened a new frontier for accurate surgical practice in minimally invasive, tissue-preserving THA. The future generation of imageless navigation systems will switch from simple measurement tasks to real navigation tools. These software algorithms will consider the cup and stem as components of a coupled biomechanical system, navigating the orthopedic surgeon to find an optimized complementary component orientation rather than target values intraoperatively, and are expected to have a high impact on clinical practice and postoperative functionality in modern THA.

  20. A Review of the Design Process for Implantable Orthopedic Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, G.A; Hukins, D.W.L; Parry, J.J; Shepherd, D.E.T; Trotman, S.G

    2009-01-01

    The design process for medical devices is highly regulated to ensure the safety of patients. This paper will present a review of the design process for implantable orthopedic medical devices. It will cover the main stages of feasibility, design reviews, design, design verification, manufacture, design validation, design transfer and design changes. PMID:19662153

  1. The Physical Fitness of Sensory and Orthopedically Impaired Youth: Project UNIQUE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X.

    The report summarizes findings from an examination of the physical fitness of orthopedically and sensory impaired students (10-17 years old). Physical fitness was hypothesized to include six areas: body composition, muscular strength/endurance, speed, agility, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. A chapter on methods details subject…

  2. Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications) while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium). In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

  3. Failure Analysis of Some Orthopedic Implants (Analyse de Rupture de Quelques Protheses Orthopediques)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Osteosynthesefragen (AO) plate, used to correct a subtrochanteric fracture of the femur. The part was removed because it fractured in service only 4...Failures in Orthopedic Surgery, Biomat. Med. Devices Art. Org., 1979, 7 (2), 243-255. -48- 217 Hemminger, W. and Lange, G. - Osteotomy Plates which

  4. The orthopedic gender gap: trends in authorship and editorial board representation over the past 4 decades.

    PubMed

    Okike, Kanu; Liu, Bella; Lin, Yijie Brittany; Torpey, Jennifer L; Kocher, Mininder S; Mehlman, Charles T; Bhandari, Mohit; Biermann, J Sybil

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the representation of women among the authors and editorial board members of prominent general orthopedics journals and to determine how these proportions have changed over time. Gender was determined for the authors of all original research studies, case reports, and review articles published in 2 prominent general orthopedics journals in 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007. Gender was also determined for each individual serving on the editorial boards of these journals during these years. Between 1970 and 2007, the representation of women increased from 0.8% to 6.5% among first authors (P<.001), from 0.0% to 4.3% among last authors (P = .015), and from 1.6% to 5.4% among editorial board members (P = .16). However, the rates of increase observed in orthopedics were lower than those observed in other fields (P<.05). Between 1970 and 2007, female representation increased significantly among physicians publishing in 2 prominent general orthopedics journals, but these rates of increase were lower than those observed in other fields of medicine.

  5. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  6. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  7. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research.

    PubMed

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N; Forsythe, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice.

  8. Franciszek Neugebauer's Ichnograms as a Pioneering Diagnostic Method in Orthopedics in the 19th Century.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska-Zamachowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an original orthopedic diagnostic method from the late 19th century developed by Franciszek Neugebauer, a distinguished Polish physician. His technique of detecting skeletal abnormalities was an excellent coping method in the time before the first diagnostic imaging method - x-ray imaging - had been invented.

  9. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  10. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; D'Angio, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120 cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.

  11. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  12. Stem Cells in Orthopedics: A Comprehensive Guide for the General Orthopedist.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Weber, Alexander E; Yanke, Adam; Nho, Shane J

    2016-01-01

    The use of biologic adjuvants in the treatment of operative and nonoperative orthopedic injuries continues to expand in concert with our understanding of the acute and chronic healing process of musculoskeletal injuries. Stem cell treatments in orthopedics are among the most commonly explored options, and have found varying levels of success in promoting osseous and soft tissue healing. Basic science and translational studies have demonstrated the potential for broad application of stem cells in the treatment of a growing number of musculoskeletal injuries. Emerging clinical studies have also provided promising results, although the vast majority of studies have featured small sample sizes and limited duration of follow-up. In addition, a number of important questions remain regarding the clinical safety, treatment delivery, and overall efficacy of stem cell augmentation of injured tissue in orthopedics. The objective of the current review is to present a broad overview of the current state of stem cell treatments in orthopedic surgery, with an emphasis on soft tissue healing. This review of stem cell treatment covers the basic science behind biologic augmentation, advantages of the various stem cell sources, preclinical results, and current and future clinical applications.

  13. [Lack of new trainees in trauma surgery and orthopedics. An approach to a solution].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; Matziolis, D; Perka, C

    2010-12-01

    The reasons for a shortage of young people in trauma surgery and orthopedics have often been discussed. Atypical progression of medical operating levels, antisocial working hours and an inadequate financial compensation for on-call duties have been given as the reasons for a lack of interest in the discipline. Additionally a progressive feminization of the medical profession and rejection of surgical disciplines because of a mismatch with family interests and the demands of advanced surgical training have also been named. Surveys on the choice of medical specialization reveal that experiences during the course of studying have a great influence on future prospects and are immensely important for the further focusing on the future as a medical doctor. In order to increase the attractiveness of the specialization, programs for students were initiated by the heads of the Conventions of Higher Education Lecturers for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery and the management of the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery. Due to the enormous popularity auxiliary projects were demanded. Consequently a "Trauma Surgery and Orthopedic Day for Students" was organized on 16th February 2010 in the Musculoskeletal Centre of the Charité in Berlin. The aim was to convey practical skills and to inspire the choice of this specialization in the future.

  14. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,…

  15. Variation in Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria Between Neurosurgery and Orthopedic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Hijji, Fady Y; Narain, Ankur S; Haws, Brittany E; Witiw, Christopher D; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Yom, Kelly H; Deutsch, Harel; Singh, Kern

    2017-09-22

    A cross-sectional survey study. The objective of this study is to determine if there are any differences in spine surgeon selection criteria between neurosurgery patients and orthopedic patients. The evolution of the health care delivery system has allowed for increased patient autonomy in provider selection. However, the process and criteria by which patients choose particular spine surgeons is not well understood. Furthermore, differences in physician selection criteria used by patients who present either to a neurosurgery or orthopedic spine surgeon has not been previously established. An anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions was administered to 644 patients seeking treatment from either a single neurosurgery-trained or orthopedics-trained spine surgeon at an urban institution. Four questions pertained to demographic variables. Sixteen questions asked patients to rate specific spine surgeon selection criteria in terms of importance (scale, 1-10). Six questions were multiple choice, asking patients to select their preferences towards aspects of a spine surgeon. Patient responses were compared using χ analysis or Fisher exact test for categorical variables. The 3 most important factors for selecting a spine surgeon were the same for neurosurgery and orthopedic surgery patients: board certification (neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery) (9.07±2.35, 9.22±1.79), in-network provider status (8.01±3.15, 8.09±3.03), and surgeon bedside manner (7.88±2.52, 8.07±2.29). When listing their preference regarding surgeon specialty training, 82.74% of neurosurgery patients and 48.81% of orthopedic surgery patients preferred a surgeon who was trained in neurosurgery. The growth in patient autonomy within the current health care system has emphasized the importance of identifying patient preferences in the physician selection process.Board certification, in-network insurance status, and bedside manner may be the most influential factors for patients in spine surgeon

  16. Factors influencing unexpected disposition after orthopedic ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Ma, Yan; Swamidoss, Cephas P; Edwards, Alison M; Mazumdar, Madhu; Liguori, Gregory A

    2012-03-01

    To analyze whether patient characteristics, ambulatory facility type, anesthesia provider and technique, procedure type, and temporal factors impact the outcome of unexpected disposition after ambulatory knee and shoulder surgery. Retrospective analysis of a national database. Freestanding and hospital-based ambulatory surgery facilities. Ambulatory knee and shoulder surgery cases from 1996 and 2006 were identified through the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery. The incidence of unexpected disposition status was determined and risk factors for such outcome were analyzed. Factors independently increasing the risk for unexpected disposition included procedures performed in hospital-based versus freestanding facilities [odds ratio (OR) 6.83 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.34; 10.75)], shoulder versus knee procedures [OR 3.84 (CI 2.55; 5.77)], anesthesia provided by nonanesthesiology professionals and certified registered nurse-anesthetists versus anesthesiologists [OR 7.33 (CI 4.18; 12.84) and OR 1.80 (CI 1.09; 2.99), respectively]. Decreased risk for unexpected disposition was for procedures performed in 2006 versus 1996 [OR 0.15 (CI 0.10; 0.24)] and the use of anesthesia other than regional or general [OR 0.34 (CI 0.18; 0.68)]. The decreased risk for unexpected disposition associated with more recent data and with freestanding versus hospital-based facilities may represent improvements in efficiency, while the decreased odds for such disposition status associated with the use of other than general or regional anesthesia may be related to a lower invasiveness of cases. We found an increased risk of adverse disposition in cases where the anesthesia provider was a nonanesthesiology professional. No difference in this outcome was noted when an anesthesia care team provided care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Better osteoblast adhesion on nanoparticulate selenium- A promising orthopedic implant material.

    PubMed

    Perla, Venu; Webster, Thomas J

    2005-11-01

    Apart from problems such as poor osseointegration, stress shielding, and wear debris-associated bone cell death, a major concern of metallic orthopedic implants is that they slowly corrode under in vivo environments. It is possible that continuous tissue exposure to metallic corrosion products limits orthopedic implant efficacy; this is especially true for patients receiving implants due to bone cancer. To date, there is no metallic orthopedic implant available in the market that specifically deals with the prevention and/or recurring cancer that may happen in these patients. The objective of this study was to deal with these problems in an integrated way by introducing a new biomaterial to the orthopedic community with anticancer chemistry: selenium (Se). In this study, six types of Se compacts were tested for bone cell (osteoblast) adhesion under in vitro conditions. Two types of cylindrical compacts were made with conventional Se metal particles in the micron (6.539 +/- 1.364-microm diameter) and submicron (0.963 +/- 0.139-microm diameter) range. These two types of compacts were chemically etched with different concentrations of NaOH to create two additional types of Se particles in each category: conventional size particles with nanosurface roughness and nanometer particles (0.204- to 0.264-microm diameter). Results showed for the first time, enhanced osteoblast adhesion on particulate surfaces of the compacts made from conventional Se compared with reference nonparticulate wrought titanium sheets. More importantly, this study provided the first evidence that osteoblast density was further increased on the surfaces of the Se compacts with nanometer particles. These initial findings indicate that there may be a promising future for nanoparticulate Se as an anticancer biocompatible orthopedic material.

  18. Developing a Minimum Data Set of the Information Management System for Orthopedic Injuries in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert’s opinions and test-retest method, respectively. Results: An MDS of orthopedic injuries were assigned to two categories: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. Conclusions: This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country’s MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems. PMID:25237576

  19. Orthopedic surgeons' attitudes to osteoporosis investigation and management after minimal trauma fracture (MTF).

    PubMed

    Anderson-Wurf, Jane; McGirr, Joe; Seal, Alexa; Harding, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    A study of orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis found they believe follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important; responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management lies with primary health care and current communication systems are poor. The investigation and treatment of osteoporosis after minimal trauma fracture (MTF) is regarded as sub-optimal. There is strong evidence of the benefit of identifying and treating osteoporosis after MTF, and there has been discussion of the possible role that orthopedic surgeons might play in the management of osteoporosis after MTF. The study surveyed orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine their attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis, the role health professionals should play, and the communication and co-ordination of follow-up care. A survey was developed and piloted prior to being posted to 69 orthopedic surgeons asking for their opinions about the general management of osteoporosis, and the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in dealing with osteoporosis following an MTF. Responses were received from 42 participants (60.8%) with the majority of respondents agreeing that it is important to treat osteoporosis following MTF. Less than 15% of respondents felt that it was their responsibility to initiate discussion or treatment or investigation after MTF. No respondent felt that the coordination of osteoporosis care was good and 45% stated it was poor. Communication after discharge is mostly left to the hospital (30%), while 20% stated they did not follow up at all. This study shows that many rural orthopedic surgeons believe that follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important, that responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management of osteoporosis lies with primary health care and the current communication systems are poor.

  20. Implementation of an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) into orthopedic surgery residency training.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael J; Beran, Matthew C; Flanigan, David C; Quackenbush, Michael; Van Hoff, Corey; Bishop, Julie Y

    2012-01-01

    While the musculoskeletal (MSK) physical examination (PE) is an essential part of a patient encounter, we believe it is an underemphasized component of orthopedic residency education and that resident PE skills may be lacking. The purpose of this investigation was to (1) assess the attitudes regarding PE teaching in orthopedic residencies today; (2) develop an MSK objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess the MSK PE knowledge and skills of our orthopedic residents. Prospective, uncontrolled, observational. A major Midwestern tertiary referral center and academic medical center. The orthopedic surgery residents in our program. Twenty-two of 24 completed the OSCE. Surveys showed that residents agreed that although learning the PE is important, there is not enough time in clinic to actually observe and critique a resident examining a patient. For the 22 residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 2-5) who participated in the OSCE, the overall score was 66%. Scores were significantly better for the trauma scenario (78%; p < 0.05) than for the shoulder (67%), spine (64%), and knee (59%) encounters. The overall scores for each component of the OSCE were: (1) history 53%; (2) PE 60%; (3) 5-question posttest 64%; and (4) communication skills 90%. We have exposed a deficiency in the PE knowledge and skills of our residents. Clinic time alone may be insufficient to both teach and learn the MSK PE. The use of a MSK OSCE, while novel in orthopedics, will allow more direct observation of our residents MSK PE skills and also allow us to follow resident skills longitudinally through their training. We hope that our efforts will encourage other programs to assess their PE curriculum and perhaps prompt change. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Developing a minimum data set of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-07-01

    Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert's opinions and test-retest method, respectively. AN MDS OF ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES WERE ASSIGNED TO TWO CATEGORIES: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country's MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems.

  2. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs.

    PubMed

    Finkler, Elissa S; Fogel, Harold A; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M; Schiff, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as 'average' submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either 'good' or 'outstanding', p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process.

  3. The Internet as a communication tool for orthopedic spine fellowships in the United States.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Overley, Samuel C; Cho, Samuel K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C

    2015-04-01

    Orthopedic residents seeking additional training in spine surgery commonly use the Internet to manage their fellowship applications. Although studies have assessed the accessibility and content of Web sites in other medical specialties, none have looked at orthopedic spine fellowship Web sites (SFWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility of information from commonly used databases and assess the content of SFWs. This was a Web site accessibility and content evaluation study. A comprehensive list of available orthopedic spine fellowship programs was compiled by accessing program lists from the SF Match, North American Spine Society, Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), and Orthopaedicsone.com (Ortho1). These databases were assessed for accessibility of information including viable links to SFWs and responsive program contacts. A Google search was used to identify SFWs not readily available on these national databases. SFWs were evaluated based on online education and recruitment content. Evaluators found 45 SFWs of 63 active programs (71%). Available SFWs were often not readily accessible from national program lists, and no program afforded a direct link to their SFW from SF Match. Approximately half of all programs responded via e-mail. Although many programs described surgical experience (91%) and research requirements (87%) during the fellowship, less than half mentioned didactic instruction (46%), journal clubs (41%), and national meetings or courses attended (28%). Evaluators found an average 45% of fellow recruitment content. Comparison of SFWs by program characteristics revealed three significant differences. Programs with greater than one fellowship position had greater online education content than programs with a single fellow (p=.022). Spine fellowships affiliated with an orthopedic residency program maintained greater education (p=.006) and recruitment (p=.046) content on their SFWs. Most orthopedic

  4. Exploring the reasons for orthopedic implant failure in traumatic fractures of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Yusof-Sani, Mohammad Reza; Amel-Farzad, Hossein

    2013-08-01

    A damaged orthopedic implant in the body can cause problems for the patient and disrupt the therapeutic process. This study investigates various factors for orthopedic implant failures in patients with traumatic lower limb fractures who referred to a trauma center in Mashhad, Iran. This was a prospective study of 23 patients referred to Kamyab University Hospital with failed orthopedic implants in 2009. We included any patient with an orthopedic device previously implanted secondary to a traumatic lower limb fracture who later presented to Kamyab University Hospital because of a failed implant. For all patients, a thorough history was taken and the necessary investigations that included radiographic studies were performed. We investigated the quality of the failed devices by chemical analysis, metal hardness testing and metallography. The results were statistically analyzed.  The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 19 years. There were 19 (82.5%) male and 4 (17.4%) female patients. In 14 (60.9%) cases, there were failed femoral implants and 9 (39.1%) cases had failed implants for tibial fractures. We compared the implants against ASTM standards. According to chemical analysis, all internally produced devices and one of the leading international brands were within the expected standard. However, in 3 cases chemical analysis showed a deviation from the standards. These were manufactured by "miscellaneous" companies. In one (4.3%) case the device failure was iatrogenic, in 14 (60.9%) it was due to faulty implants and in 8 (34.8%) cases, the patients were non-compliant with instructions. Hardness testing was satisfactory in all cases and metallographic studies showed good quality for the leading international brands, satisfactory quality for the internally produced devices and poor quality for the miscellaneous devices. The implants classified as miscellaneous were of poor quality. Thus, we cannot recommend their use in orthopedic surgeries. We recommend using credible

  5. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Elissa S.; Fogel, Harold A.; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M.; Schiff, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. Objective This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. Design An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. Setting An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Participants Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Results An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as ‘average’ submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’, p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Conclusion Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process

  6. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs.

    PubMed

    Finkler, Elissa S; Fogel, Harold A; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M; Schiff, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. Objective This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. Design An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. Setting An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Participants Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Results An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as 'average' submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either 'good' or 'outstanding', p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Conclusion Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process.

  7. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance on Trunk and Upper Limb Muscle Activation during Maximum Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Chull; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the muscle activities of the trunk muscles and upper limb muscles during maximum isometric contraction when temporomandibular joint alignment was achieved with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance in order provide basic data on the effects of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on the entire body. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with healthy Korean adults in their 20s (males=10, females=10). [Methods] An 8 channel surface electromyography system was used to measure the muscle activities of the upper limb muscles and neck muscles of the subjects during maximum isometric contraction with and without use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Results] The maximum isometric contractions of the trunk and upper limb muscles when mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance were used were compared with those when no mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance was used. The results showed that the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical and lumbar erector spinae, upper trapezius, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis and internal oblique and external oblique muscles all showed significant increases in maximum isometric contractions with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Conclusion] The use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance is considered to be a method for normal adults to improve the stability of the entire body with the improvement of the stability of the TMJ. The proximal improvement in stability improves of the proximal thereby improving not only muscle strength with increased muscle activation but also stability during exercises. PMID:24396194

  8. The Highest-Impact Combat Orthopedic and Extremity Injury Articles in the Past 70 Years: A Citation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jason; Do, Woo S; Stinner, Daniel J; Wenke, Joseph C; Orman, Jean A; Kragh, John F

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the most-cited peer-reviewed combat orthopedic and extremity injury articles published during the past 70 years. Orthopedic trauma presents ongoing challenges to both US civilian and military healthcare personnel. Improvements in combat trauma and extremity injury survival and quality of life are the result of advances in orthopedic trauma research. The Web of Science (including Science Citation Index) was searched for the most cited articles related to combat orthopedic trauma, published from 1940 to 2013. The most-cited article was by Owens et al. (Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 2007; 137 citations). Between the 1990s and 2000s, there was a 256% increase in the number of highly cited publications. A total of 69% of the articles were on the topics of comorbid vascular trauma (25%), epidemiology (23%), or orthopedic trauma (21%). This study identifies some of the most important contributions to combat orthopedic trauma and research and the areas of greatest scientific interest to the specialty during the past seven decades and highlights key research that has contributed to the evolution of modern combat orthopedic traumatology.

  9. Comparative study of scientific publications in orthopedics journals originating from USA, Japan and China (2000-2012).

    PubMed

    Lao, Li-Feng; Daubs, Michael David; Phan, Kevin H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    To compare orthopedics publications from USA, Japan and China. Scientific papers belong to ''Orthopedics'' category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were retrieved from the "PubMed'' and ''Web of Knowledge'' online databases. In the field of orthopedics, the annual number increased significantly from 2000 to 2012 in the three countries (p<0.001). The share of articles increased significantly in China, but decreased significantly in Japan and USA (p<0.05). In 2012, USA contributed 35.3% of the total world output in orthopedics field and ranked 1st; Japan contributed 5.9% and ranked 4th; China contributed 5.2% and ranked 5th. Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA > Japan > China, p<0.001). Average IF from USA was much higher than Japan and China (p<0.001). USA published the most articles in the top ten orthopedics journals (USA (14355) > Japan (1702) > China (487), p<0.01). Although China has undergone significant increase in annual number and percentage of scientific publication in orthopedics journals, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of orthopedics in terms of quantity and quality.

  10. Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)

    PubMed Central

    TOBASE, P.; LANE, H.; SIDDIQI, A.-E-A.; INGRAM-RICH, R.; WARD, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent joint hemarthroses due to hemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency) often lead to invasive orthopedic interventions to decrease frequency of bleeding and/or to alleviate pain associated with end-stage hemophilic arthropathy. Aim Identify trends in invasive orthopedic interventions among people with hemophilia who were enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) program during the period 2000–2010. Methods Data were collected from 130 hemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually during the period 2000–2010, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of visits in which an invasive orthopedic intervention was reported was expressed as a proportion of the total visits in each year of the program. Invasive orthopedic interventions consisted of arthroplasty, arthrodesis, and synovectomy. Joints included in this study were the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Results A 5.6% decrease in all invasive orthopedic interventions in all joints of people with hemophilia enrolled in the UDC program over the 11-year study period was observed. Conclusions These data reflect a declining trend in invasive orthopedic interventions in people with hemophilia. Further research is needed to understand the characteristics that may influence invasive orthopedic interventions. PMID:27030396

  11. Misrepresentation of research publications among orthopedic surgery fellowship applicants: a comparison with documented misrepresentations in other fields.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish V; Pradhan, Ben B; Meals, Roy A

    2003-04-01

    A retrospective study was used to review fellowship applications over 3 years. To assess the prevalence of research misrepresentation in orthopedic fellowship applications, and to compare such activity between subspecialties (e.g., spine, sports, hand). Competition for orthopedic surgery fellowships is intense. The applicant pool includes orthopedic, plastic, and general surgeons, as well as neurosurgeons. Residency and fellowship training programs in other disciplines have documented shocking levels of misrepresentation in the curriculum vitae of prospective applicants. However, no study has looked at orthopedic residents applying for subspecialty fellowship programs. A retrospective analysis investigated 280 applications for fellowship positions in the department of orthopedic surgery at the authors' academic institution from 1996 to 1998 inclusively. To allow for press and publication delays, a minimum 24-month follow-up period was instituted. The listings of applicants' research publications were analyzed for evidence of misrepresentation through an exhaustive literature search. Only the most obvious confirmable discrepancies were labeled as misrepresentations. The results then were compared with those found in studies conducted in other fields: gastroenterology fellowship, emergency medicine residency, pediatric residency, dermatology residency, orthopedic residency, and medical faculty applications. Among 280 (54%) applicants for orthopedic surgery fellowships, 151 claimed journal publications. It was found that 16 (10.6%) of these 151 applicants had misrepresented their citations. This rate was highest in spine fellowship applicants (20%). However, considering the numbers available, this was not significantly different among the various subspecialty fellowship applicants (P > 0.1). In addition, various demographic data did not correlate with the rate of misrepresentation (P > 0.1). These results are comparable with those reported in other medical fields (P

  12. Adipose-Derived Cells (Stromal Vascular Fraction) Transplanted for Orthopedical or Neurological Purposes: Are They Safe Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Zolocinska, Aleksandra; Stepien, Karolina; Lubina-Dabrowska, Natalia; Maciagowska, Marzena; Mazur, Slawomir; Zdanowicz, Urszula; Smigielski, Robert; Stepien, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells are used in numerous clinical trials, the safety of their application is still a matter of concern. We have analysed the clinical results of the autologous adipose-derived stem cell treatment (stromal vascular fraction (SVF) containing adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitors, and blood mononuclear cells) for orthopedic (cartilage, bone, tendon, or combined joint injuries) and neurologic (multiple sclerosis) diseases. Methods of adipose tissue collection, cell isolation and purification, and resulting cell numbers, viability, and morphology were considered, and patient's age, sex, disease type, and method of cell administration (cell numbers per single application, treatment numbers and frequency, and methods of cell implantation) were analysed and searched for the unwanted clinical effects. Results of cellular therapy were compared retrospectively to those obtained with conventional medication without SVF application. SVF transplantation was always the accessory treatment of patients receiving “standard routine” therapies of their diseases. Clinical experiments were approved by the Bioethical Medical Committees supervising the centers where patients were hospitalised. The conclusion of the study is that none of the treated patients developed any serious adverse event, and autologous mesenchymal stem (stromal) cell clinical application is a safe procedure resulting in some beneficial clinical effects (not analysed in this study). PMID:27698672

  13. The promising application of graphene oxide as coating materials in orthopedic implants: preparation, characterization and cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changhong; Lu, Xiuzhen; Zanden, Carl; Liu, Johan

    2015-02-10

    To investigate the potential application of graphene oxide (GO) in bone repair, this study is focused on the preparation, characterization and cell behavior of graphene oxide coatings on quartz substrata. GO coatings were prepared on the substrata using a modified dip-coating procedure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy results demonstrated that the as-prepared coatings in this study were homogeneous and had an average thickness of ~67 nm. The rapid formation of a hydroxyapatite (HA) layer in the simulated body fluid (SBF) on GO coated substrata at day 14, as proved by SEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD), strongly indicated the bioactivity of coated substrata. In addition, MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the coated substrata to evaluate cellular activities. Compared with the non-coated substrata and tissue culture plates, no significant difference was observed on the coated substrata in terms of cytotoxicity, viability, proliferation and apoptosis. However, interestingly, higher levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OC) secretion were observed on the coated substrata, indicating that GO coatings enhanced cell differentiation compared with non-coated substrata and tissue culture plates. This study suggests that GO coatings had excellent biocompatibility and more importantly promoted MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation and might be a good candidate as a coating material for orthopedic implants.

  14. Evaluating surgical resident selection procedures.

    PubMed

    Gilbart, M K; Cusimano, M D; Regehr, G

    2001-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop and assess a rating form for selection of surgical residents, determine the criteria most important in selection, determine the reliability of the assessment form and process both within and across sites, and document differences in procedure and structure of resident selection processes across Canada. Twelve of 13 English-speaking orthopedic surgery training programs in Canada participated during the 1999 selection year. The critical incident technique was utilized to determine the criteria most important in selection. From these criteria a 10-item rating form was developed with each item on a 5-point scale. Sixty-six candidates were invited for interviews across the country. Each interviewer completed one assessment form for each candidate, and independently ranked all candidates at the conclusion of all interviews. Consensus final rank orders were then created for each residency program. Across all programs, pairwise program-by-program correlations for each assessment parameter were made. The internal consistency of assessment form ratings for each interviewer was moderately high (mean Cronbach's alpha = 0.71). A correlation between each item and the final rank order for each program revealed that the items work ethic, interpersonal qualities, orthopedic experience, and enthusiasm correlated most highly with final candidate rank orders (r = 0.5, 0.48, 0.48, 0.45, respectively). The interrater reliabilities (within panels) and interpanel reliabilities (within programs) for the rank orders were 0.67 and 0.63, respectively. Using the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula, it was found that two panels with two interviewers on each panel are required to obtain a stable measure of a given candidate (reliabilities of 0.80). The average pairwise program-by-program correlations were low for the final candidate rank orders (0.14). A method was introduced to develop a standard, reliable candidate assessment form to evaluate residency

  15. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  16. The Influence of an Orthopedic, Manual Therapy Residency Program on Improved Knowledge, Psychomotor Skills, and Clinical Reasoning in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Shala; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency program in Kenya on the development of physical therapists' (PTs) knowledge and clinical reasoning related to the performance of a musculoskeletal examination and evaluation as compared to an experience-matched control group of PTs waiting to enter the program. A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. The assessment utilized was based on the tasks, procedures, and knowledge areas identified as important to advanced clinicians in the US as outlined by the Orthopaedic Description of Specialty Practice. Inclusion criteria included participation in or acceptance to the residency program, practice as a PT between 3 and 25 years, and 50% of workday being involved in direct patient care. Overall pass rates were analyzed using the Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to determine if the graduating residents achieved significantly higher scores than experience-matched controls consisting of PTs entering the residency program. PTs completing a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency in Nairobi, Kenya, achieved higher scores and passing rates compared to their colleagues who had not completed a residency program as determined by a live-patient practical examination. Graduating residents demonstrated statistically significant higher scores in the categories of examination, evaluation, and diagnosis. The average live-patient practical examination score for PTs without residency training was 38.2%, and their pass rate was 0.0%. The average live-patient practical examination score for residency-trained PTs was 83.4%, and their pass rate was 92.3%. These findings are statistically significant (p

  17. Factors Related to Acute Anxiety and Depression in Inpatients with Accidental Orthopedic Injuries

    PubMed Central

    WU, Hui; ZHANG, Fang; CHENG, Wenhong; LIN, Ying; WANG, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background Those injured in accidents commonly have strong emotional reactions to their situation. However, despite the large number of patients who are admitted to general hospitals each year for orthopedic injuries due to an accident, research focusing on psychological disorders due to these injuries is lacking. Objective To investigate the presentation and factors related to depression and acute anxiety among inpatients being treated for injury on a Trauma Orthopedics Unit. Methods 323 patients with orthopedic trauma were evaluated using the Injury Severity Score (ISS), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD). Results In this study, a total of 323 inpatients (213 males and 110 females) had a mean (sd) age of 44.3 (13.2) years old. Mean (sd) time in the hospital was 11.1 (5.7) days with a range of 2 to 40 days. Among these patients, 299 had mild trauma, 20 had moderate trauma, and 4 had severe trauma. Patients had a mean (sd) score of 8.1 (4.9) with a range of 1 to 38. The top three most reported symptoms from the HAMA were sleep disorder, gastrointestinal symptoms and anxiety. The top three most reported symptoms from the HAMD were sleep disorder, depression and anxiety. Non-conditional logistic regression analysis showed that being female (anxiety: OR=2.738, 95%CI=1.511-4.962; depression: OR=2.622, 95%CI=1.504-4.570) and duration of hospitalization (anxiety: OR=1.091, 95%CI=1.040-1.145; depression: OR=1.093, 95%CI=1.044-1.144) were risk factors for anxiety and depression among these orthopedic trauma patients. Conclusion The main acute symptoms of anxiety and depression in these orthopedic trauma inpatients were sleep disorder, gastrointestinal symptoms, anxious mood and depressed mood. Female patients had stronger emotional reactions to injuries than males. Persistent anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with the duration of hospitalization. All these suggest the need for early psychological assessment and intervention for

  18. A prospective evaluation of patients with isolated orthopedic injuries transferred to a level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Charles A; Borrelli, Joseph; Lu, Michael; Ricci, William M

    2006-10-01

    To assess the indications for, the demographics of, and the appropriateness of patient transfers for orthopedic injuries to a level I trauma center. All patients with isolated orthopedic trauma transferred to our level I trauma center (N = 128) by means of a physician-to-physician referral line during the call period of two surgeons were prospectively evaluated between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. The specific indication for transfer, the specialty of the referring physician, the patient diagnosis, the perceived need for tertiary care referral (as assessed by a visual analog scale [VAS] based on the phone conversation with the transferring physician), and patient insurance status were obtained before the transfer. On patient arrival, each of these factors was reassessed for later comparison. The transferring physician was an emergency department physician in 88 cases (69%), an orthopedic surgeon in 32 cases (25%), and an internist in the other eight cases (6%). In the 77 cases in which we could confirm the presence of an on-call orthopedist, the patient was examined by the orthopedic surgeon before being transferred in only 32 (42%) cases. In 98 cases (76%), the stated indication for transfer was that the case was too complex for care at the referring hospital or that there was a need for a subspecialist. There was no significant difference in pre- versus post-transfer case complexity as assessed by the VAS (P > 0.05). Although the reported insurance data before transfer was inaccurate in 34 patients (27%), the overall payer mixes reported before and after transfers were similar (23% Medicare, 20% HMO/PPO, 14% workers' compensation, 12% uninsured, 5% Medicaid). The insurance type for the transferred patients as a whole was not significantly different from the non-transferred patients treated by our orthopedic trauma service during the same time period (P > 0.05). Twenty transferred patients had a low VAS complexity score (<5), suggesting that their

  19. Current Concepts in Orthopedic Management of Multiple Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kucukdurmaz, Fatih; Alijanipour, Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trauma patients frequently present challenging clinical scenarios with musculoskeletal injuries being the most common indications for surgical procedures in these patients. Despite our substantial knowledge, a universally approved objective definition for “multiple trauma” is yet to be delineated. Several controversial aspects of economics, pathophysiology, animal models, diagnosis, management and outcome of patients with multiple trauma have recently been explored and although some progress has been made, it seems that the available evidence is still inconclusive in some occasions. This manuscript revisits several current concepts of multiple trauma that have been the focus of recent investigation. We aim to provide the reader with an updated perspective based on the most recently published literature in the field of multiple trauma. PMID:26312111

  20. Grievance Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhower, R. Warren

    Because grievances are unavoidable, it is essential for organizations, such as the schools, to utilize an efficient, effective procedure to handle friction between employers and employees. Through successive steps, representatives of labor and management attempt to resolve the grievance, first with meetings of lower level representatives (such as…