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  1. Intraoperative BiPAP in OSA Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhavna P

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway obstructions during sleep. Severe OSA presents with a number of challenges to the anesthesiologist, the most life threatening being loss of the airway. We are reporting a case where we successfully used intraoperative bi level positive pressure ventilation (BiPAP) with moderate sedation and a regional technique in a patient with severe OSA posted for total knee replacement (TKR). A 55-year-old lady with osteoarthritis of right knee joint was posted for total knee replacement. She had severe OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index of 35. She also had moderate pulmonary hypertension due to her long standing OSA. We successfully used in her a combined spinal epidural technique with intraoperative BiPAP and sedation. She had no complications intraoperatively or post operatively and was discharged on day 5. Patients with OSA are vulnerable to sedatives, anaesthesia and analgesia which even in small doses can cause complete airway collapse. The problem, with regional techniques is that it requires excellent patient cooperation. We decided to put our patient on intraoperative BiPAP hoping that this would allow us to sedate her adequately for the surgery. As it happened we were able to successfully sedate her with slightly lesser doses of the commonly used sedatives without any episodes of desaturation, snoring or exacerbation of pulmonary hypertension. Many more trials are required before we can conclusively say that intraoperative BiPAP allows us to safely sedate OSA patients but we hope that our case report draws light on this possibility. Planning ahead and having a BiPAP machine available inside the operating may allow us to use sedatives in these patients to keep them comfortable under regional anaesthesia. PMID:26023625

  2. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  3. Ensuring a Future for Marine Corps Operational Support Airlift (OSA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-29

    purchase of the C-12 in the 1980’s. The C- 12, which is a military version of the Beech Craft ‘ King Air’ was subsequently used by the Marine Corps...MAGTF. The C-12 (Figure 2) is the military version of the Beechcraft King Air. It is often referred to as the ‘workhorse’ of OSA. There are...during major exercises such as Cobra Gold. 39 This would also allow the aircraft to 20 normalize operations in the region, which would better

  4. Mathematical Objects through the Lens of Two Different Theoretical Perspectives: APOS and OSA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Font Moll, Vicenç; Trigueros, María; Badillo, Edelmira; Rubio, Norma

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a networking of two theories, the APOS Theory and the ontosemiotic approach (OSA), to compare and contrast how they conceptualize the notion of a mathematical object. As context of reflection, we designed an APOS genetic decomposition for the derivative and analyzed it from the point of view of OSA. Results of this study show…

  5. The WOPR Domain Protein OsaA Orchestrates Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Alkahyyat, Fahad; Ni, Min; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Orchestration of cellular growth and development occurs during the life cycle of Aspergillus nidulans. A multi-copy genetic screen intended to unveil novel regulators of development identified the AN6578 locus predicted to encode a protein with the WOPR domain, which is a broadly present fungi-specific DNA-binding motif. Multi-copy of AN6578 disrupted the normal life cycle of the fungus leading to enhanced proliferation of vegetative cells, whereas the deletion resulted in hyper-active sexual fruiting with reduced asexual development (conidiation), thus named as osaA (Orchestrator of Sex and Asex). Further genetic studies indicate that OsaA balances development mainly by repressing sexual development downstream of the velvet regulator VeA. The absence of osaA is sufficient to suppress the veA1 allele leading to the sporulation levels comparable to veA+ wild type (WT). Genome-wide transcriptomic analyses of WT, veA1, and ΔosaA veA1 strains by RNA-Seq further corroborate that OsaA functions in repressing sexual development downstream of VeA. However, OsaA also plays additional roles in controlling development, as the ΔosaA veA1 mutant exhibits precocious and enhanced formation of Hülle cells compared to WT. The OsaA orthologue of Aspergillus flavus is able to complement the osaA null phenotype in A. nidulans, suggesting a conserved role of this group of WOPR domain proteins. In summary, OsaA is an upstream orchestrator of morphological and chemical development in Aspergillus that functions downstream of VeA. PMID:26359867

  6. Comparative Emulsifying Properties of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA)-Modified Starch: Granular Form vs Dissolved State

    PubMed Central

    Marefati, Ali; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying ability of OSA-modified and native starch in the granular form, in the dissolved state and a combination of both was compared. This study aims to understand mixed systems of particles and dissolved starch with respect to what species dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by addition of one of the species to already formed emulsions. It was possible to create emulsions with OSA-modified starch isolated from Quinoa as sole emulsifier. Similar droplet sizes were obtained with emulsions prepared at 7% (w/w) oil content using OSA-modified starch in the granular form or molecularly dissolved but large differences were observed regarding stability. Pickering emulsions kept their droplet size constant after one month while emulsions formulated with OSA-modified starch dissolved exhibited coalescence. All emulsions stabilized combining OSA-modified starch in granular form and in solution showed larger mean droplet sizes with no significant differences with respect to the order of addition. These emulsions were unstable due to coalescence regarding presence of free oil. Similar results were obtained when emulsions were prepared by combining OSA-modified granules with native starch in solution. The degree of surface coverage of starch granules was much lower in presence of starch in solution which indicates that OSA-starch is more surface active in the dissolved state than in granular form, although it led to unstable systems compared to starch granule stabilized Pickering emulsions, which demonstrated to be extremely stable. PMID:27479315

  7. Driving Simulator Performance Remains Impaired In Patients With Severe OSA after CPAP Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vakulin, Andrew; Baulk, Stuart D.; Catcheside, Peter G.; Antic, Nick A.; van den Heuvel, Cameron J.; Dorrian, Jillian; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in improving 90-minute driving simulator performance in severe OSA patients compared to age/gender matched controls. Design: Driving simulator performance was assessed at baseline and 3 months later, with OSA patients treated with CPAP during the interval. Setting: University Teaching Hospital. Participants: Patients with severe OSA (n = 11) and control subjects without OSA (n = 9). Interventions: CPAP Measurements and Results: Simulator driving parameters of steering deviation, braking reaction time and crashes were measured at baseline and ∼3 months follow-up. At baseline, OSA subjects demonstrated significantly greater steering deviation compared to controls (mean [95% CI], OSA group, 49.9 cm [43.7 to 56.0 cm] vs control group, 34.9 cm [28.1 to 41.7 cm], p = 0.003). Following ∼3 months of CPAP treatment (mean ± SD 6.0 ± 1.4 h/night), steering deviation in OSA subjects improved by an average of 3.1 cm (CI, 1.4 to 4.9), p < 0.001, while no significant steering changes were observed in the control group. Despite the improvement, steering deviation in the OSA group remained significantly higher than in controls (OSA group, 46.7 cm [CI, 40.6 to 52.8 cm] vs control group, 36.1 cm [CI, 29.3 to 42.9 cm], p = 0.025). Conclusions: While driving simulator performance improved after ∼3 months of CPAP treatment with high adherence in patients with severe OSA, performance remained impaired compared to control subjects. These results add to the growing body of evidence that some neurobehavioral deficits in patients with severe OSA are not fully reversed by treatment. Further studies are needed to assess causes of residual driving simulator impairment and to determine whether this is associated with persistent elevated real-life accident risk. Trial Registration: Data presented in this manuscript was collected as part of a clinical trial “Experimental Investigations of Driving Impairment in Obstructive

  8. Executive Dysfunction in OSA Before and After Treatment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Olaithe, Michelle; Bucks, Romola S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent and often underdiagnosed condition that is associated with upper airway collapse, oxygen desaturation, and sleep fragmentation leading to cognitive dysfunction. There is meta-analytic evidence that subdomains of attention and memory are affected by OSA. However, a thorough investigation of the impact of OSA on different subdomains of executive function is yet to be conducted. This report investigates the impact of OSA and its treatment, in adult patients, on 5 theorized subdomains of executive function. Design: An extensive literature search was conducted of published and unpublished materials, returning 35 studies that matched selection criteria. Meta-analysis was used to synthesize the results from studies examining the impact of OSA on executive functioning compared to controls (21 studies), and before and after treatment (19 studies); 5 studies met inclusion in both categories. Measurements: Research papers were selected which assessed 5 subdomains of executive function: Shifting, Updating, Inhibition, Generativity, and Fluid Reasoning. Results: All 5 domains of executive function demonstrated medium to very large impairments in OSA independent of age and disease severity. Furthermore, all subdomains of executive function demonstrated small to medium improvements with CPAP treatment. Discussion: Executive function is impaired across all five domains in OSA; these difficulties improved with CPAP treatment. Age and disease severity did not moderate the effects found; however, further studies are needed to explore the extent of primary and secondary effects, and the impact of age and premorbid intellectual ability (cognitive reserve). Citation: Olaithe M; Bucks RS. Executive dysfunction in OSA before and after treatment: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1297-1305. PMID:23997362

  9. Characterization of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSA) population by means of cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Lacedonia, Donato; Carpagnano, Giovanna Elisiana; Sabato, Roberto; Storto, Maria Maddalena Lo; Palmiotti, Giuseppe Antonio; Capozzi, Vito; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Gallo, Crescenzio

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSA) is being identified increasingly as an important health issue. It is typified by repeated episodes of upper airway collapse during sleep leading to occasional hypoxaemia, sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality. OSA is also being considered as an independent risk factor for hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, leading to increased multi-morbidity and mortality. Cluster analysis, a powerful statistical set of techniques, may help in investigating and classifying homogeneous groups of patients with similar OSA characteristics. This study aims to investigate the (possible) different groups of patients in an OSA population, and to analyse the relationships among the main clinical variables in each group to better understand the impact of OSA on patients. Starting from a well-characterized OSA population of 198 subjects afferent to our sleep centre, we identified three different communities of OSA patients. The first has a very severe disease [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) = 65.91 ± 22.47] and sleep disorder has a strong impact on daily life: a low level of diurnal partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 ) (77.39 ± 11.64 mmHg) and a high prevalence of hypertension (64%); the second, with less severe disease (AHI = 28.88 ± 17.13), in which sleep disorders seem to be less important for diurnal PaO2 and have a minimum impact on comorbidity; and the last with very severe OSA (AHI = 57.26 ± 15.09) but with a low risk of nocturnal hypoxaemia (T90 = 11.58 ± 8.54) and less sleepy (Epworth Sleepiness Scale 10.00 ± 4.77).

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) Increases Pedestrian Injury Risk in Children

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Kristin T.; Gamble, Karen L.; Schwebel, David C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate pedestrian behavior, including reaction time, impulsivity, risk-taking, attention, and decision-making, in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) compared with healthy controls. Study design Using a case control design, sixty 8- to 16-year-olds with newly diagnosed and untreated OSAS engaged in a virtual reality pedestrian environment. Sixty-one healthy children matched using a yoke-control procedure by age, race, gender and household income served as controls. Results Children with OSAS were riskier pedestrians than healthy children of the same age, race, and sex. Children with OSAS waited less time to cross (p<.01). The groups did not differ in looking at oncoming traffic or taking longer to decide to cross. Conclusions Results suggest OSAS may have significant consequences on children’s daytime functioning in a critical domain of personal safety, pedestrian skills. Children with OSAS appeared to have greater impulsivity when crossing streets. Results highlight the need for heightened awareness of the consequences of untreated sleep disorders and identify a possible target for pediatric injury prevention. PMID:25444002

  11. Effect of CPAP Therapy in Improving Daytime Sleepiness in Indian Patients with Moderate and Severe OSA

    PubMed Central

    Battan, Gulshan; Panwar, Ajay; Atam, Virendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Gangwar, Anil; Roy, Ujjawal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disease and a major public health issue in India. Excessive daytime sleepiness is an almost ubiquitous symptom of OSA. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score is a validated objective score to measure the degree of daytime sleepiness. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy has been established as the gold standard treatment modality for OSA patients. A few Indian studies have reported the effectiveness of CPAP therapy in improving ESS scores after 1st month of CPAP use. Aim To observe both, short-term (one month) and long-term (three month) effects of CPAP therapy on ESS scores in moderate to severe OSA patients. Materials and Methods The patients complaining of excessive day-time sleepiness, snoring and choking episodes during sleep, consecutively presenting to medicine OPD over a period of 2 years, were subjected to Polysomnography (PSG). Seventy-three patients with apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 were categorised as having moderate to severe forms of OSA (moderate OSA with AHI=15-30 and severe OSA with AHI >30), and were scheduled for an initial trial of CPAP therapy. Forty-seven patients reported good tolerance to CPAP therapy after a trial period of 2 weeks and comprised the final study group. ESS scores in these patients were recorded at the baseline, and after 1st and 3rd month of CPAP therapy, and statistically analysed for significance. Results Mean ESS score at the baseline among moderate and severe OSA patients were 13.67±2.29 and 16.56 ±1.87, respectively. ESS score in both these subgroups improved significantly to 11.63±3.79, p=0.022, CI (0.3293-4.0106)} and 14.13 ±3.74, p < 0.001, CI (1.2991-4.5408), respectively after one month of CPAP therapy. Likewise, mean ESS scores among moderate and severe OSA patients improved significantly to 9.84 ±2.97, p = 0.022, CI (0.3293-4.0106) and 12.29 ±3.97, p <0.001, CI (2.9414-6.1385), respectively after three months of CPAP therapy

  12. Blood Pressure Increases in OSA due to Maintained Neurovascular Sympathetic Transduction: Impact of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tamisier, Renaud; Tan, Can Ozan; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Levy, Patrick; Taylor, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that greater resting sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome would not induce a lesser sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Design: Case-controlled cohort study. Participants: 33 patients with newly diagnosed OSA without comorbidities and 14 healthy controls. Interventions: 6 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for OSA patients and follow-up for 9 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: We assessed resting sympathetic outflow and sympathetic neurovascular transduction. Sympathetic activity was directly measured (microneurography) at rest and in response to sustained isometric handgrip exercise. Neurovascular transduction was derived from the relationship of sympathetic activity and blood pressure to leg blood flow during exercise. Despite an elevated sympathetic activity of ∼50% in OSA compared to controls, neurovascular transduction was not different (i.e., absence of tachyphylaxis). After six months of CPAP, there were significant declines in diastolic pressure, averaging ∼4 mm Hg, and in sympathetic activity, averaging ∼20% with no change in transduction. Conclusions: Greater sympathetic activity in obstructive sleep apnea does not appear to be associated with lesser neurovascular transduction. Hence, elevated sympathetic outflow without lesser transduction may underlie the prevalent development of hypertension in this population that is well controlled by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Citation: Tamisier R, Tan CO, Pepin JL, Levy P, Taylor JA. Blood pressure increases in OSA due to maintained neurovascular sympathetic transduction: impact of CPAP. SLEEP 2015;38(12):1973–1980. PMID:26039959

  13. Performance analysis and overload control of an open service access (OSA) architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jens K.; Nyberg, Christian; Kihl, Maria

    2003-08-01

    The trend of the service architectures developed in telecommunications today is that they should be open in the sense that they can communicate over the borders of different networks. Instead of each network having their own service architecture with their own applications, all networks should be able to use the same applications. 3GPP, the organization developing specifications for the 3G networks has specified the standard Open Service Access (OSA), as a part of the 3G specification. OSA offers different Application Protocol Interfaces that enable an application that resides outside a network to use the capabilities of the network. This paper analyses the performance of an OSA gateway. It is examined how the overload control can be dealt with in a way to best satisfy the operators and the 3'rd parties. There are some guiding principles in the specifications, but a lot of decisions have to be made by the implementors of application servers and OSA gateways. Proposals of different requirements for an OSA architecture exist such as, minimum amount of accepted calls per second and time constraint for the maximal total delay for an application. Maximal and fair throughput have to be prioritized from the 3'rd parties view, but profit is the main interest from the operators point of view. Therefore this paper examines a priority based proposal of an overload control mechanism taking these aspects and requirements into account.

  14. MR image analytics to characterize upper airway architecture in children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms leading to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) in obese children are not well understood. We previously analyzed polysomnographic and demographic data to study the anatomical characteristics of the upper airway and body composition in two groups of obese children with and without OSAS, where object volume was evaluated. In this paper, in order to better understand the disease we expand the analysis considering a variety of features that include object-specific features such as size, surface area, sphericity, and image intensity properties of fourteen objects in the vicinity of the upper airway, as well as inter-object relationships such as distance between objects. Our preliminary results indicate several interesting phenomena: volumes and surface areas of adenoid and tonsils increase statistically significantly in OSAS. Standardized T2-weighted MR image intensities differ statistically significantly between the two groups, implying that perhaps intrinsic tissue composition undergoes changes in OSAS. Inter-object distances are significantly different between the two groups for object pairs (skin, oropharynx), (skin, fat pad), (skin, soft palate), (mandible, tongue), (oropharynx, soft palate), (left tonsil, oropharynx), (left tonsil, fat pad) and (left tonsil, right tonsil). We conclude that treatment methods for OSAS such as adenotonsillectomy should respect proportional object size relationships and spatial arrangement of objects as they exist in control subjects.

  15. Italian recommendations on dental support in the treatment of adult obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Sacchi, Franco; Milano, Francesca; Polimeni, Antonella; Cozza, Paolo; Bernkopf, Edoardo; Segù, Marzia; Zucconi, Marco; Vicini, Claudio; Brunello, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of the present article is to present a set of proposed clinical recommendations aimed at Italian dentists involved in the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or snoring. Methods With the purpose of creating a study group, some of the most important Italian scientific societies operating in fields relevant to the issue of sleep medicine in dentistry were asked to appoint a representative. Each member of the study group was required to answer questions regarding the clinical management of OSAS and snoring. Results Oral appliances can be used to treat: - simple snoring, in patients who do not respond to, or do not appear to be suitable candidates for behavioral measures such as weight loss or positional therapy; - mild or moderate OSAS, in patients who prefer OAs to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or who are not suitable candidates for CPAP, because of its failure or failure of behavioral approaches like weight loss or positional therapy; - severe OSAS, in patients who do not respond to or do not tolerate CPAP and in whom no indication for either maxillofacial or ENT surgery appears applicable. Conclusions The application of oral appliances is highly desirable in cases of simple snoring or mild to moderate OSAS, whereas considerable caution is warranted when treating severe OSAS. It is fundamental to ensure that the patient understands his problem and, at the same time, to present all the various treatment options. PMID:26941893

  16. Applying time, frequency and nonlinear features from nocturnal oximetry to OSA diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto; Victor Marcos, J; Del Campo, Felix; Zamarron, Carlos; Lopez, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    This study is aimed to improve the diagnostic ability of blood oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) detection. We studied 74 patients suspected of suffering from OSA. Ten characteristics were derived from each SaO2 recording: arithmetic mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis from both time and frequency domains, central tendency measure and Lempel-Ziv complexity. The diagnostic ability of each feature was assessed by means of a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Additionally, forward stepwise logistic regression (LR) was applied. The kurtosis in the time domain and the nonlinear measure of complexity were automatically selected. This methodology reached 93.2% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity and 87.8% accuracy, improving the results from each feature individually. Our study showed that common statistics in the time and frequency domains and nonlinear features could provide additional and complementary information to help in OSA diagnosis.

  17. Effects of hydrothermal pretreatment on subsequent octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) modification of cornstarch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; He, Xiaowei; Huang, Qiang

    2014-01-30

    Cornstarch granules were hydrothermally pretreated and then esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA). The physicochemical properties of cornstarch and hydrothermally pretreated OS-starch (H-OS-starch) were investigated. Results showed that hydrothermal pretreatments significantly increased the degree of substitution (DS) and reaction efficiency (RE) of H-OS-starch compared with the control. The higher the pretreatment temperature was, the more the OSA could go deep into the internal starch granules. The optimal pretreatment temperature for the OSA modification was 60°C. In addition, the OS groups appeared to be distributed throughout the OS-starch granules, especially on the surface, as shown by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). H-OS-starch had a slightly higher peak viscosity (Pv) and break down (BD) values, but lower pasting temperature (Tp) compared with the control OS-starch.

  18. Blood pressure effects of CPAP in nonresistant and resistant hypertension associated with OSA: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a rather common chronic disorder, associated with increased prevalence of hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms for hypertension in OSA are at least in part linked to intermittent hypoxia developed during nightly hypopneas and apneas. Hypoxemia stimulates sympathetic overactivity, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. However, it appears that intermittent hypoxemia is not the only factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. Supplemental oxygen therapy that improved oxyhemoglobin saturation to similar levels to those achieved with CPAP treatment did not reduce BP. In this scenario, it could be proposed that hypoxemia acts as a trigger of sympathetic overdrive, which when set is the main factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. This review appraises evidence provided by randomized controlled trials on the BP-lowering effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA patients with nonresistant and resistant hypertension. It suggests that CPAP treatment is more effective in treating resistant hypertension than nonresistant hypertension. A possible explanation is that sympathetic overactivity and altered vascular reactivity in OSA could be more severe in resistant hypertension than in nonresistant hypertension. An intricate interaction among compliance, adherence, and their interaction with demographic characteristics, genetic factors, and comorbidities of the population included might explain the differences found between trials on their influence over the antihypertensive effectiveness of CPAP. Further long-term trials are needed in hypertensive OSA patients to assess whether CPAP treatment in OSA patients consistently restores physiological nocturnal BP fall and adjusts resting and circadian heart rate.

  19. Is There a Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Selami; Turan, Mahfuz; Arısoy, Ahmet; Gunbatar, Hulya; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Asker, Selvi; Yıldız, Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 2–5%. Its main clinical features are loud snoring and breathing stoppage during sleep. Ischemia could be a consequence of noise-induced hearing loss because cochlear oxygen tension is reduced during and after noise exposure. In this study, we evaluated auditory function in patients affected by OSA and simple snoring. Material/Methods A total of 66 participants (male to female ratio: 40:26) were included in the study, of which 21 were in the control group, 18 were in the simple snoring group, and 27 were in the OSA patient group. Polysomnography and audiometric examination were performed in all participants. Results The mean ages of the participants in the control, simple snoring, and OSA groups were 39.14±9.9, 37.28±8.2, and 41.56±8.99 years, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences among groups regarding age or sex; however, there were statistically significant differences among groups in body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index scores, mean saturation, and duration under 90% saturation. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the patient group and the control and simple snoring groups concerning the mean saturation, duration under 90% saturation, and the extended high frequency of hearing. Conclusions These data show that snoring may cause hearing loss at extended high frequencies. PMID:27588548

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila moira and osa genes by the DREF pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumi; Ida, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-07-01

    The DNA replication-related element binding factor (DREF) plays an important role in regulation of cell proliferation in Drosophila, binding to DRE and activating transcription of genes carrying this element in their promoter regions. Overexpression of DREF in eye imaginal discs induces a rough eye phenotype in adults, which can be suppressed by half dose reduction of the osa or moira (mor) genes encoding subunits of the BRM complex. This ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex is known to control gene expression and the cell cycle. In the 5' flanking regions of the osa and mor genes, DRE and DRE-like sequences exist which contribute to their promoter activities. Expression levels and promoter activities of osa and mor are decreased in DREF knockdown cells and our results in vitro and in cultured cells indicate that transcription of osa and mor is regulated by the DRE/DREF regulatory pathway. In addition, mRNA levels of other BRM complex subunits and a target gene, string/cdc25, were found to be decreased by knockdown of DREF. These results indicate that DREF is involved in regulation of the BRM complex and thereby the cell cycle.

  1. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  2. The USC-OSA Student Chapter: goals and benefits for the optics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Gargallo, Ana; González Núñez, Héctor; Delgado-García, Tamara; Almaguer-Gómez, Citlalli; Cambronero-López, F.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter has been constituted in March 2013 by members of the University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) in Spain and sponsored by The Optical Society of America (OSA). It is formed by five graduate and one undergraduate students with the common interest in Optics and Photonics research and a professor of the USC is also involved as a faculty advisor. We decided to start this group with the aim of involving kids, precollege and undergraduate students in the world of Optics and Photonics. The activities that the USC-OSA Student Chapter members intend to realize are mainly educational tasks for the spreading of knowledge in Photonics by means of basic experiments, demonstrations and lectures by leading researchers and teachers. Most of the needed resources to accomplish these activities are provided by the OSA, such as educational posters and a portable kit for demonstrating Optics to students. At this moment the USC-OSA Student Chapter is carrying out several activities, as educational journeys at the Santiago de Compostela University Hospital Complex (CHUS), where hospitalized children can approach to Optics through some simple experiments and games. A teaching program is also being organized in collaboration with Galician secondary schools in order to show students the importance and uses of Optics and Photonics and to arouse their interest in this field, as well as encouraging them to develop their scientific thinking. Another activity will take place in November during the Science Week, which includes a program of lectures targeted to undergraduate students and an exposition of several demonstrations

  3. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity.

  4. Effects of simultaneous palatal expansion and mandibular advancement in a child suffering from OSA.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, A; Festa, P; Pavone, M; De Vincentiis, G C

    2016-08-01

    This clinical report describes a child suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and class II skeletal malocclusion with maxillary contraction and anterior open bite. He presented moderate obstructive sleep apnoea with large impact on quality of life of patient and parents. He was treated using an innovative orthodontic device (Sleep Apnea Twin Expander) to simultaneously carry out palatal expansion and mandibular advancement. After orthodontic therapy, the OSA-18 questionnaire demonstrated an improvement of the main respiratory symptoms, while cardiorespiratory sleep study revealed a reduction in obstructive sleep apnoea events. Post-treatment, clinical assessment and cephalometric analysis showed a reduction of sagittal maxillary discrepancy and an extension of upper airway space. In conclusion, this case report suggests that orthodontic treatment might be a valuable alternative treatment in children with obstructive sleep apnoea related to craniofacial anomalies.

  5. [Specific features of wounds with a self-defense traumatic weapon "Osa"].

    PubMed

    Khodov, A M; Zolotov, A S; Filipchenkov, L S

    2012-01-01

    Specific features and outcomes of wounds with a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" were analyzed in 24 patients. Mean age of the wounded was from 21 to76 years. In 20 patients there was a single wound, in 4 patients it was multiple, in 7--blunt, in 12--perforating and 5 patients had gutter wounds. All the patients were treated according to the principles of field military surgery. Five patients had severe wounds: penetrating fracture of the skull (2 of them died), fracture of the shoulder (1 case), injury of the main artery (1 case), of the pleura (1 case). The wounds were closed up by primary intention in 19 patients, by second intention in 4 patients. The authors' experience shows that a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" rather often caused permanent harm to health and can be mortal. Active surgical strategy in treatment of such patients prevents the development of serious infectious complications.

  6. Physiology of Arousal in OSA and Potential Impacts for Sedative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy S; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Cori, Jennifer M; Trinder, John

    2017-04-11

    Treatment options for patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) intolerant of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) are limited. Thus, new therapies are sought. Recently, there has been interest in using sedatives to delay arousal from sleep, allowing upper airway dilator muscle recruitment sufficient to re-open the airway while maintaining sleep. In this review the rationale for sedative use and prior sedative studies in OSA are presented, along with a description of six factors that may determine sedative treatment success. It is proposed that in order for a sedative to treat OSA the patient must have each of the following three traits: 1) a mild to moderately collapsible upper airway, 2) responsive and effective upper airway dilator muscles and 3) a low to moderate arousal threshold. In addition (4), proponents of sedative treatment generally believe that to be effective the sedative must increase the arousal threshold. Finally (5), sedatives may have additional utility in patients with large ventilatory responses to arousal and (6) the metric used to define sedative success needs to be considered. To date, few of these factors have been evaluated in sedative trials. Further, it is likely only a relatively small percentage of patients will have all of the required traits. If sedative treatment is successful in appropriate patients, easily measured surrogate markers for the factors that determine sedative success will be critical for implementation in the clinic. Finally, sedatives may have detrimental outcomes for some patients and prospective identification of such patients will be required.

  7. Orbital Signature Analyzer (OSA): A spacecraft health/safety monitoring and analysis tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Steven; Degeorges, Charles; Bush, Joy; Shendock, Robert; Mandl, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Fixed or static limit sensing is employed in control centers to ensure that spacecraft parameters remain within a nominal range. However, many critical parameters, such as power system telemetry, are time-varying and, as such, their 'nominal' range is necessarily time-varying as well. Predicted data, manual limits checking, and widened limit-checking ranges are often employed in an attempt to monitor these parameters without generating excessive limits violations. Generating predicted data and manual limits checking are both resource intensive, while broadening limit ranges for time-varying parameters is clearly inadequate to detect all but catastrophic problems. OSA provides a low-cost solution by using analytically selected data as a reference upon which to base its limits. These limits are always defined relative to the time-varying reference data, rather than as fixed upper and lower limits. In effect, OSA provides individual limits tailored to each value throughout all the data. A side benefit of using relative limits is that they automatically adjust to new reference data. In addition, OSA provides a wealth of analytical by-products in its execution.

  8. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment.

  9. Recognition of upper airway and surrounding structures at MRI in pediatric PCOS and OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is common in obese children with risk being 4.5 fold compared to normal control subjects. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has recently been shown to be associated with OSAS that may further lead to significant cardiovascular and neuro-cognitive deficits. We are investigating image-based biomarkers to understand the architectural and dynamic changes in the upper airway and the surrounding hard and soft tissue structures via MRI in obese teenage children to study OSAS. At the previous SPIE conferences, we presented methods underlying Fuzzy Object Models (FOMs) for Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) based on CT images of the thorax and the abdomen. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AAR approach is applicable to a different body region and image modality combination, namely in the study of upper airway structures via MRI. FOMs were built hierarchically, the smaller sub-objects forming the offspring of larger parent objects. FOMs encode the uncertainty and variability present in the form and relationships among the objects over a study population. Totally 11 basic objects (17 including composite) were modeled. Automatic recognition for the best pose of FOMs in a given image was implemented by using four methods - a one-shot method that does not require search, another three searching methods that include Fisher Linear Discriminate (FLD), a b-scale energy optimization strategy, and optimum threshold recognition method. In all, 30 multi-fold cross validation experiments based on 15 patient MRI data sets were carried out to assess the accuracy of recognition. The results indicate that the objects can be recognized with an average location error of less than 5 mm or 2-3 voxels. Then the iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was adopted for delineation of the target organs based on the recognized results. The delineation results showed an overall FP and TP volume fraction of 0.02 and 0.93.

  10. Nasal and oral snoring endoscopy: novel and promising diagnostic tools in OSAS patients.

    PubMed

    Lovato, Andrea; Kotecha, Bhik; Vianello, Andrea; Giacomelli, Luciano; Staffieri, Alberto; Marchese-Ragona, Rosario

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if any of the three awake procedures [fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy with modified Müller Maneuver (FNMM), nasal snoring endoscopy (NSE), or oral snoring endoscopy (OSE)] could efficiently predict the grade or pattern of upper airway (UA) collapse found with drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), which is considered by many authors as the current gold standard in optimizing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patient selection for UA surgery. Twenty consecutive patients (simple snorers and OSAS patients) were studied with FNMM, NSE, OSE, and DISE. The inter-test agreement was evaluated with Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). In the current series, we found that NSE and OSE were better than FNMM in predicting the pattern of collapse found with DISE. A significant pattern agreement between NSE and DISE was present in all sub-sites, and the agreement was measured with a scale proposed by Landis and Koch as: moderate in velo- and oropharynx (κ = 0.52, p = 0.001, and κ = 0.47, p = 0.003, respectively), and substantial in hypopharynx (κ = 0.63, p < 0.00001). Comparing OSE with DISE, the pattern agreement was almost perfect at oropharyngeal level (κ = 0.82, p < 0.00001), and moderate at hypopharyngeal level (κ = 0.55, p = 0.0002); while a trend towards significance was found at velopharyngeal level (κ = 0.20, p = 0.07). FNMM showed a fair pattern agreement with DISE only at oropharyngeal level (κ = 0.31, p = 0.009); while in the other sub-sites, no significant agreement was found. NSE and OSE are new promising diagnostic tools in OSAS patients. Further investigations are needed to see if they could predict the effectiveness of UA surgery.

  11. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species.

  12. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H+-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H+-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H+-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H+-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H+-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H+-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H+-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  13. An automatic rules extraction approach to support OSA events detection in an mHealth system.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; De Falco, Ivanoe; De Pietro, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Detection and real time monitoring of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) episodes are very important tasks in healthcare. To suitably face them, this paper proposes an easy-to-use, cheap mobile-based approach relying on three steps. First, single-channel ECG data from a patient are collected by a wearable sensor and are recorded on a mobile device. Second, the automatic extraction of knowledge about that patient takes place offline, and a set of IF…THEN rules containing heart-rate variability (HRV) parameters is achieved. Third, these rules are used in our real-time mobile monitoring system: the same wearable sensor collects the single-channel ECG data and sends them to the same mobile device, which now processes those data online to compute HRV-related parameter values. If these values activate one of the rules found for that patient, an alarm is immediately produced. This approach has been tested on a literature database with 35 OSA patients. A comparison against five well-known classifiers has been carried out.

  14. Enhancer-promoter communication mediated by Chip during Pannier-driven proneural patterning is regulated by Osa.

    PubMed

    Heitzler, Pascal; Vanolst, Luc; Biryukova, Inna; Ramain, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    The GATA factor Pannier activates proneural achaete/scute (ac/sc) expression during development of the sensory organs of Drosophila through enhancer binding. Chip bridges Pannier with the (Ac/Sc)-Daughterless heterodimers bound to the promoter and facilitates the enhancer-promoter communication required for proneural development. We show here that this communication is regulated by Osa, which is recruited by Pannier and Chip. Osa belongs to Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes and we show that Osa negatively regulates ac/sc. Consequently, Pannier and Chip also play an essential role during repression of proneural gene expression. Our study suggests that altering chromatin structure is essential for regulation of enhancer-promoter communication.

  15. Total analysis of clinical factors for surgical success of adenotonsillectomy in pediatric OSAS.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-So; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is the total evaluation of most common clinical factors influencing the successful rate of adenotonsillectomy for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Retrospectively, 63 pediatric patients ranged from 2 to 16 years old were included. Syndromics and patients who had received orthodontic treatment or orthognathic surgery were excluded. All patients received pre-operative and postoperative polysomnography and cephalometry. Each patient received adenotonsillectomy by single surgeon. Surgical success was defined as apneahypopnea index (AHI) decreased ≧50 % or post-operative AHI <5. Total evaluated clinical factors related to success of adenotonsillectomy for pediatric OSAS include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), tonsil size, adenoid/nasopharynx ratio (A/N Ratio), pre-operative data of polysomnography, including AHI, apnea index (AI), hypopnea index (HI), mean O2 saturation and nadir O2 saturation, and 18 cephalometry parameters. Mean age of the total 63 patients was 7.78 years old. Mean BMI of the patients was 19.02. The proportion of obese patients was 25.4% (16/63). Surgical success was achieved in 42 out of 63 patients (66.7%). The surgical success was not statistically significant related to all pre-operative cephalometric parameters, age, gender, BMI and adenoid size by multiple logistic regression model. However, the surgical success was significantly related to pre-operative AHI and tonsil size. In addition, all patients who received adenotonsillectomy showed improved polysomnography parameters, including AHI, AI, HI, mean O2 saturation and nadir O2 saturation which all reached statistically significant improvement. Although adenotonsillectomy cannot cure pediatric OSAS in our research, all patients showed significant improvement of polysomnography parameters after this procedure. Pre-operative cephalometry parameters, BMI and age did not show significant correlation with surgical success, however, pre-op AHI and

  16. Impact of CPAP on Activity Patterns and Diet in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    PubMed Central

    Batool-Anwar, Salma; Goodwin, James L.; Drescher, Amy A.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with severe OSA consume greater amounts of cholesterol, protein, and fat as well as have greater caloric expenditure. However, it is not known whether their activity levels or diet change after treatment with CPAP. To investigate this issue, serial assessments of activity and dietary intake were performed in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES); a 6-month randomized controlled study of CPAP vs. sham CPAP on neurocognitive outcomes. Methods: Subjects were recruited into APPLES at 5 sites through clinic encounters or public advertisement. After undergoing a diagnostic polysomnogram, subjects were randomized to CPAP or sham if their AHI was ≥ 10. Adherence was assessed using data cards from the devices. At the Tucson and Walla Walla sites, subjects were asked to complete validated activity and food frequency questionnaires at baseline and their 4-month visit. Results: Activity and diet data were available at baseline and after 4 months treatment with CPAP or sham in up to 231 subjects (117 CPAP, 114 Sham). Mean age, AHI, BMI, and Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) for this cohort were 55 ± 13 [SD] years, 44 ± 27 /h, 33 ± 7.8 kg/m2, and 10 ± 4, respectively. The participants lacking activity and diet data were younger, had lower AHI and arousal index, and had better sleep efficiency (p < 0.05). The BMI was higher among women in both CPAP and Sham groups. However, compared to women, men had higher AHI only in the CPAP group (50 vs. 34). Similarly, the arousal index was higher among men in CPAP group. Level of adherence defined as hours of device usage per night at 4 months was significantly higher among men in CPAP group (4.0 ± 2.9 vs. 2.6 ± 2.6). No changes in consumption of total calories, protein, carbohydrate or fat were noted after 4 months. Except for a modest increase in recreational activity in women (268 ± 85 vs. 170 ± 47 calories, p < 0.05), there also were no changes in activity patterns. Conclusion

  17. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  18. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  19. Improved stability and controlled release of CLA with spray-dried microcapsules of OSA-modified starch and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    He, Huizi; Hong, Yan; Gu, Zhengbiao; Liu, Guodong; Cheng, Li; Li, Zhaofeng

    2016-08-20

    The objective of this investigation was to improve the stability of CLA and to allow for its controlled release by encapsulating it with combinations of octenyl-succinic anhydride (OSA) starch and xanthan gum (XG) in three ratios (OSA/XG: 60/1, 80/1, and 100/1, w/w). The wall material was examined using FTIR and TGA. The microcapsules were characterized by laser particle size analysis (LPS) and SEM. Oxidation of the microcapsules was monitored by headspace method. The results revealed that microcapsules created with an OSA/XG ratio of 60/1 provided superior protection to CLA against oxidation. When CLA-microcapsules were subjected to conditions simulating those in the human gastrointestinal system, 12.1%-50.1% of the CLA was released. CLA encapsulation in spray-dried microcapsules of OSA/XG appears to be an effective technique that provides good protection against oxidation and could be useful in the targeted delivery of functional lipids or other bioactive components to the small intestine.

  20. Quantifying the dynamic of OSA brain using multifractal formalism: A novel measure for sleep fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Raiesdana, Somayeh

    2016-11-18

    It is thought that the critical brain dynamics in sleep is modulated during frequent periods of wakefulness. This paper utilizes the capacity of EEG based scaling analysis to quantify sleep fragmentation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The scale-free (fractal) behavior refers to a state where no characteristic scale dominates the dynamics of the underlying process which is evident as long range correlations in a time series. Here, Multiscaling (multifractal) spectrum is utilized to quantify the disturbed dynamic of an OSA brain with fragmented sleep. The whole night multichannel sleep EEG recordings of 18 subjects were employed to compute and quantify variable power-law long-range correlations and singularity spectra. Based on this characteristic, a new marker for sleep fragmentation named ``scaling based sleep fragmentation'' was introduced. This measure takes into account the sleep run length and stage transition quality within a fuzzy inference system to improve decisions made on sleep fragmentation. The proposed index was implemented, validated with sleepiness parameters and compared to some common indexes including sleep fragmentation index, arousal index, sleep diversity index, and sleep efficiency index. Correlations were almost significant suggesting that the sleep characterizing measure, based on singularity spectra range, could properly detect fragmentations and quantify their rate. This method can be an alternative for quantifying the sleep fragmentation in clinical practice after being approved experimentally. Control of sleep fragmentation and, subsequently, suppression of excessive daytime sleepiness will be a promising outlook of this kind of researches.

  1. How the Navy Can Use Open Systems Architecture to Revolutionize Capability Acquisition: The Naval OSA Strategy Can Yield Multiple Benefits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-30

    ååì~ä=^Åèìáëáíáçå= oÉëÉ~êÅÜ=póãéçëáìã= tÉÇåÉëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=f= = How the Navy Can Use Open Systems Architecture to Revolutionize Capability...Acquisition: The Naval OSA Strategy Can Yield Multiple Benefits Nickolas Guertin, DASN RDT&E Robert Sweeney, Naval Air Systems Command Douglas C...to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE How the Navy Can Use Open Systems Architecture to Revolutionize Capability Acquisition: The Naval OSA Strategy

  2. Program for catenary-pantograph analysis, PrOSA statement of methods and validation according EN 50318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finner, Lars; Poetsch, Gero; Sarnes, Bernhard; Kolbe, Michael

    2015-03-01

    DB Systemtechnik is a high-performing, customer-driven service provider that, as well as authoritatively serving the Deutsche Bahn Group by dint of its specialist knowledge is also increasingly active on the global railway market. Development and testing of pantograph models and catenary systems have been part of the company's essential activity fields from the beginning. Therefore, an efficient and high-performing simulation tool is indispensable. That is why DB Systemtechnik spent high efforts to develop the program PrOSA in cooperation with the Heinz-Nixdorf-Institut (HNI) of the university Paderborn to simulate the interaction of pantograph and catenary. This article gives an overview of the most relevant properties of PrOSA. Furthermore, it is described how the benchmark requirements were implemented and processed.

  3. Protective Effect of Long-Term CPAP Therapy on Cognitive Performance in Elderly Patients with Severe OSA: The PROOF Study

    PubMed Central

    Crawford-Achour, Emilie; Dauphinot, Virginie; Saint Martin, Magali; Tardy, Magali; Gonthier, Régis; Barthelemy, Jean Claude; Roche, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) leads to a deterioration in cognitive functions, with regard to memory and executive functions. However, few studies have investigated the impact of treatment on these cognitive functions in elderly subjects. Methods: The study was conducted in a large cohort of subjects aged 65 years or older (the PROOF cohort). Subjects were not diagnosed or treated for OSA. Subjects underwent a polygraphic recording. Cognitive performance was assessed in all OSA subjects at baseline and 10 years later, whether or not they were receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Results: A group of 126 patients were analyzed. Only 26% of them were treated, with therapy initiated at the discretion of the primary care physician. Among treated subjects, self-reported compliance with therapy was good (> 6 h/night on average), and 66% of them reported an improvement in their quality of life. Patients receiving CPAP treatment had a higher apneahypopnea index (p = 0.006), a higher oxygen desaturation index (p < 0.001), and experienced more pronounced daytime repercussions (p = 0.004). These patients showed a statistically significant improvement in mental agility (similarities test; p < 0.0001) and memory performance (Grober and Buschke delayed free recall; p = 0.02). Conclusion: CPAP treatment is associated with the maintenance of memory performance over time. Citation: Crawford-Achour E, Dauphinot V, Saint Martin M, Tardy M, Gonthier R, Barthelemy JC, Roche F. Protective effect of long-term CPAP therapy on cognitive performance in elderly patients with severe OSA: the PROOF study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):519–524. PMID:25700873

  4. Coexistence of OSA may compensate for sleep related reduction in neural respiratory drive in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    He, Bai-Ting; Lu, Gan; Xiao, Si-Chang; Chen, Rui; Steier, Joerg; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Luo, Yuan-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying sleep-related hypoventilation in patients with coexisting COPD and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), an overlap syndrome, are incompletely understood. We compared neural respiratory drive expressed as diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi) and ventilation during stage 2 sleep in patients with COPD alone and patients with overlap syndrome. Methods EMGdi and airflow were recorded during full polysomnography in 14 healthy subjects, 14 patients with OSA and 39 consecutive patients with COPD. The ratio of tidal volume to EMGdi was measured to indirectly assess upper airway resistance. Results Thirty-five patients with COPD, 12 healthy subjects and 14 patients with OSA completed the study. Of 35 patients with COPD, 19 had COPD alone (FEV1 38.5%±16.3%) whereas 16 had an overlap syndrome (FEV1 47.5±16.2%, AHI 20.5±14.1 events/hour). Ventilation (VE) was lower during stage 2 sleep than wakefulness in both patients with COPD alone (8.6±2.0 to 6.5±1.5 L/min, p<0.001) and those with overlap syndrome (8.3±2.0 to 6.1±1.8 L/min). Neural respiratory drive from wakefulness to sleep decreased significantly for patients with COPD alone (29.5±13.3% to 23.0±8.9% of maximal, p<0.01) but it changed little in those with overlap syndrome. The ratio of tidal volume to EMGdi was unchanged from wakefulness to sleep in patients with COPD alone and healthy subjects but was significantly reduced in patients with OSA or overlap syndrome (p<0.05). Conclusions Stage 2 sleep-related hypoventilation in COPD alone is due to reduction of neural respiratory drive, but in overlap syndrome it is due to increased upper airway resistance. PMID:27807016

  5. Microencapsulation of white champaca (Michelia alba D.C.) extract using octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch for controlled release aroma.

    PubMed

    Samakradhamrongthai, Rajnibhas; Thakeow, Prodpran; Kopermsub, Phikunthong; Utama-Ang, Niramon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the study was to optimise the encapsulation of Michelia alba D.C. (MAD) extract using octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch. The MAD extract (5-10 g/100 g of dry starch) and the OSA starch (25-100 g/100 ml of water) was used in microcapsule preparation and analysed for the physicochemical and encapsulation properties. The optimised formula using the MAD extract and the OSA starch were 15.00 g/100 g of dry starch and 96.32 g/100 g water, which provided the highest in yield recovery (40.65% ± 0.99) and encapsulation efficiency (68.91% ± 1.50), with the lowest moisture content (3.19% ± 0.06) and water activity (0.236 ± 0.004). The aroma release from the optimum encapsulated powder in simulated artificial saliva fluid (SSF) suggested that linalool retention in microcapsules was higher than verbenone and 2-methyl butanoic acid. This study shows that the optimised formulation of MAD encapsulated flavour powder was found to be effective for controlling the aroma release.

  6. [Forest and population at Península de Osa, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Maldonado-Ulloa, Tirso; Bonilla-Carrión, Roger

    2002-06-01

    The research is focused on the relationship between population growth and conservation of the forest on the Osa Peninsula. Data of the geo-referenced censuses and information on land-use, derived from satellite images and aerial photography, were integrated into a GIS. We undertook an historical inventory of the changes in the population and the forest coverage, and the key events in the land tenure and economy of the region. Deforestation, reforestation, and fragmentation of the forest during the period 1980-1995 were analyzed. Relationships with the population potential, derived from the 1984 Costa Rican censuses, were identified, and the effects of third variables were controlled such as distances to the roads, rain, distances to the forest frontier, level of protection, etc. Both strong and significant associations between 1984 population potential and the three processes were detected. The probability of deforestation is null in unpopulated areas, 35% in areas with 25-30 potential farmers and to 65% in areas with 50 farmers and over. The probability of reforestation decreases from 100% to 28% and to 18% in these three categories. This kind of relationship persists in the multivariable analysis. An increase of 0.63% in the number of household, results in an increment of 1% in the risk of deforestation (elasticity). The elasticity in the chances of reforestation is -0.37 and 1% in fragmentation of the forest. An evaluation in the risk of deforestation for the period 1995-2005 was done. The most recent population data were used and it identifies several geographic areas with high deforestation risk.

  7. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  8. Automatic anatomy recognition in post-tonsillectomy MR images of obese children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) is a recently developed approach for the automatic whole body wide organ segmentation. We previously tested that methodology on image cases with some pathology where the organs were not distorted significantly. In this paper, we present an advancement of AAR to handle organs which may have been modified or resected by surgical intervention. We focus on MRI of the neck in pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). The proposed method consists of an AAR step followed by support vector machine techniques to detect the presence/absence of organs. The AAR step employs a hierarchical organization of the organs for model building. For each organ, a fuzzy model over a population is built. The model of the body region is then described in terms of the fuzzy models and a host of other descriptors which include parent to offspring relationship estimated over the population. Organs are recognized following the organ hierarchy by using an optimal threshold based search. The SVM step subsequently checks for evidence of the presence of organs. Experimental results show that AAR techniques can be combined with machine learning strategies within the AAR recognition framework for good performance in recognizing missing organs, in our case missing tonsils in post-tonsillectomy images as well as in simulating tonsillectomy images. The previous recognition performance is maintained achieving an organ localization accuracy of within 1 voxel when the organ is actually not removed. To our knowledge, no methods have been reported to date for handling significantly deformed or missing organs, especially in neck MRI.

  9. High Adherence to CPAP Treatment Does Not Prevent the Continuation of Weight Gain among Severely Obese OSAS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Myllylä, Minna; Kurki, Samu; Anttalainen, Ulla; Saaresranta, Tarja; Laitinen, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients benefit from continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in a dose-response manner. We determined adherence and weight control, as well as their predictors, among long-term CPAP users. Methods: Cohort of 1,023 OSAS patients had used CPAP on average of 6.6 ± 1.2 years. BMI was determined at baseline and at follow-up visits. There were 7.4 ± 1.7 BMI and 6.5 ± 1.8 CPAP usage measurements per patient on average. Using the Bayesian hierarchical model, we determined the patients' individual trends of BMI and adherence development. Patients with significantly increasing or decreasing trends were identified at the posterior probability level of > 90%. Results: The mean age in the cohort was 55.6 ± 9.8 years, BMI 33.5 ± 6.4 kg/m2, apnea-hypopnea index 33.7 ± 23.1, and CPAP usage 6.0 ± 1.8 h/day. The majority of patients had no significant change in BMI (mean annual weight gain 0.04 ± 0.29 kg/m2) or CPAP adherence (mean annual increase 11.4 ± 7.0 min/day). However, at the individual level, 10% of the patients showed significant annual weight gain (0.63 ± 0.35 kg/m2) during the 5-year follow-up period. At baseline these patients were already more severely obese (mean BMI 40.0 ± 5.9 kg/m2) despite being younger (mean 50.9 ± 9.5 years) than the rest of the cohort. Conclusions: In the majority of CPAP-treated OSAS patients, weight did not significantly change but gained slightly slower than in age-matched population in general. However, in 10% of patients, high adherence to CPAP treatment did not prevent the continuation of weight gain. These patients present a high-risk group for OSAS-related multimorbidity later in life. Citation: Myllylä M, Kurki S, Anttalainen U, Saaresranta T, Laitinen T. High adherence to CPAP treatment does not prevent the continuation of weight gain among severely obese OSAS patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):519–528. PMID:26888588

  10. Treatment of obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS): effect of weight loss and interference of otorhinolaryngoiatric pathology.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, R; Colella, P; Cirignotta, F; Mondini, S; Gerardi, R; Buratti, P; Rinaldi Ceroni, A; Tartari, F; Schiavina, M; Melchionda, N

    1990-03-01

    The role of weight loss in the therapy of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) was investigated in 23 affected patients with various degrees of obesity (body mass index range 26.6-61.0) free of cranio-facial malformations. Weight loss resulted 18.5 +/- 14.7 (s.d.) kg and was significantly correlated with baseline BMI value (r = 0.94; P less than 0.0001). Weight loss significantly reduced the number of apneas + hypopneas per hour of sleep ((A + H)I) from 66.5 +/- 23.0 to 33.0 +/- 26.2 (P less than 0.0001) and improved the mean of oxygen desaturation peaks during apneas (mSaO2) from 81.9 +/- 6.9 to 87.6 +/- 3.9; P less than 0.001). A significant correlation was found between weight loss and changes in the (A + H)I (r = -0.55; P less than 0.01) and the mSaO2 (r = 0.46; P less than 0.05). The (A + H)I significantly improved in both patients who lost more than 10 kg (basal BMI: 42.3 +/- 10.0) and in those who lost less than 10 kg (basal BMI: 30.2 +/- 2.3), whereas the mSaO2 improved only in the former. Obese patients with moderate to heavy ORL pathological findings had worse pretreatment and final OSAS parameters than those with absent or mild ORL lesions. However, both groups showed a significant, although quantitatively different, improvement of the (A + H)I and mSaO2 after weight loss. Compared to those who were cured or improved after the treatment, patients who failed to obtain significant effects on OSAS clinical presentation also had a significantly higher prevalence of ORL pathology. It is concluded that: (1) weight loss improves parameters and clinical presentation of OSAS in the majority of affected obese patients; (2) a relationship exists between the entity of weight loss and that of improvement of the syndrome; (3) weight loss must be encouraged even in patients with mild to moderate overweight; (4) the presence of ORL pathology may represent a confusing factor in the interpretation of the results obtained after weight loss.

  11. Uniformities in OSA-UCS and in NCS tested by color difference prediction based on principal hue components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indow, Tarow

    2002-06-01

    The OSA uniform color system is a 3-D collection of color samples according to the regular rhombohedral structure in which each color is surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors, all perceptually equally different (local uniformity). The Swedish NCS system is a 3-D collection of color samples that vary gradually in each of the three perceptual attributes. It is not clear that this arrangement implies all neighboring pairs along the respective coordinates being perceptually equally different (local uniformity). Of pairs (j,k) of interest, predicted color differences djk were calculated that have the following property. Suppose an observer selects a pair of Munsell grays (Va, Vb) that matches in size with the color difference between (j,k), then djk=|Va-Vb| is predicted by djk, on the average, with error of 0.34 in Munsell V-unit. Variation of djk in this unit was in the order of 0.22V for nearest neighboring pairs (j,k) in various cleavage planes of OSA-UCS and in the order of 0.11V for neighboring pairs (j,k) along s-coordinate and c-coordinate in sheets with fixed hue of NCS. Both were well within the prediction error range, but some systematic trends in values of djk were found.

  12. Michels syndrome, Carnevale syndrome, OSA syndrome, and Malpuech syndrome: variable expression of a single disorder (3MC syndrome)?

    PubMed

    Titomanlio, Luigi; Bennaceur, Selim; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Baumann, Clarisse; Dupuy, Olivier; Verloes, Alain

    2005-09-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with Michels syndrome, a rare condition characterized by craniosynostosis, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus, cleft lip/palate, abnormal supra-umbilical abdominal wall, and mental deficiency. The phenotypic findings are compared with the six previously reported Michels cases, and with patients referred to as Carnevale, OSA, and Malpuech syndromes. Michels syndrome is characterized by cleft lip and palate, anterior chamber anomalies, blepharophimosis, epicanthus inversus, and craniosynostosis. Carnevale syndrome shows hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, ptosis, strabismus synophrys, large and fleshy ears, and lozenge-shaped diastasis around the umbilicus. OSA syndrome resembles Carnevale, with humeroradial synostoses, and spinal anomalies as extra features. Malpuech syndrome shows IUGR, hypertelorism, cleft lip and palate, micropenis, hypospadias, renal anomalies, and caudal appendage. All are autosomal recessive. Despite the presence of apparently distinctive key features, it appears that these four entities share multiple similarities in the facial Gestalt and the pattern of MCA. Those similarities lead us to postulate that they belong to the same spectrum, which could be referred to as "3MC syndrome" (Malpuech-Michels-Mingarelli-Carnevale syndrome).

  13. PREVALENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH VITAMIN B12 DEFICIENCY IN ELDERLY FROM VIÇOSA/MG, BRASIL.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Martinho, Karina; Luiz Araújo Tinôco, Adelson; Queiroz Ribeiro, Andréia

    2015-11-01

    La prevalencia de deficiencia nutricional de vitamina B12 aumenta con la edad y es especialmente común en la población mayor. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en determinar su prevalencia y los factores asociados a esta carencia en mayores no institucionalizados de Viçosa, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil. Métodos: estudio poblacional interseccional, realizado para identificar la prevalencia y los factores asociados a deficiencia de vitamina B12 entre la población de mayores en Viçosa (MG). Los datos fueron recopilados desde agosto de 2011 hasta junio de 2012 mediante una encuesta en los hogares y pruebas hematológicas y bioquímicas realizadas en 340 mayores. Resultados: la prevalencia de deficiencia de vitamina B12 en este grupo fue del 17,4% (95% CI, 13,4% - 21,4%). La deficiencia cognitiva se presenta como un factor importante relacionado con la deficiencia de vitamina B12. Conclusiones: el informe actual contribuye a los estudios que destacan ciertos factores que podrían afectar al rendimiento de las personas mayores en su proceso de envejecimiento natural, especialmente cuando estos factores están asociados con deficiencia cognitiva y dan lugar a una discapacidad significativa así como pérdida de calidad de vida. Así, los resultados aquí presentados han servido para aportar un conocimiento más comprensivo sobre la relación entre deficiencia de B12 y su impacto sobre este grupo de población. También han demostrado su relevancia de cara a la planificación de programas e iniciativas de salud pública centrados en este grupo de población.

  14. Osa Protein Constitutes a Strong Oncogenic Suppression System That Can Block vir-Dependent Transfer of IncQ Plasmids between Agrobacterium Cells and the Establishment of IncQ Plasmids in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2004-01-01

    The osa (oncogenic suppressive activity) gene of the IncW group plasmid pSa is sufficient to suppress tumorigenesis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. osa confers oncogenic suppression by inhibiting VirE2 protein export. This result is similar, but not identical, to that of oncogenic suppression by the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. We conducted a series of experiments to compare oncogenic suppression by these two systems. Agrobacterium strains harboring plasmids containing osa are more able to effect oncogenic suppression than are similar strains containing various RSF1010 derivatives. When osa is present within a donor Agrobacterium strain that also carries a derivative of RSF1010, the transfer of RSF1010 derivatives to recipient bacteria and their establishment in plants are blocked. Oncogenic suppression is still effected when the osa gene is integrated into the Agrobacterium chromosome, suggesting that it is the osa gene product that is active in suppression and that suppression does not require a protein-nucleic acid intermediate like that described for IncQ plasmids. Extracellular complementation experiments with tobacco leaf disks indicated that Osa blocks stable transfer of RSF1010 to plant cells by inhibiting transfer of VirE2, which is essential for the transfer of RSF1010 into plant cells, and not by inhibiting the actual transfer of RSF1010 itself. Our results suggest that Osa and RSF1010 cause oncogenic suppression by using different mechanisms. PMID:15489437

  15. Preservation of Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 Marine Terrace Deposits along the Southwest Coast of the Osa Peninsula, Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, W. N.; Sak, P. B.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction of the aseismic Cocos Ridge at the Middle American Trench outboard of the Osa Peninsula results in rapid late Quaternary surface uplift. The distribution of surface uplift corresponds with the imaged bathymetric relief. On the Osa Peninsula, inboard of the northwest flank of the Cocos Ridge, exposures of the Late Pleistocene Puerto Armuelles Formation are recognized. The Puerto Armuelles Fm consists of poorly consolidated sands, silts, and muds from shallow marine, estuarine, and mangrove systems. Along the southwest coast, Puerto Armuelles Fm sediment infills paleo-topographic depressions. AMS radiocarbon dates obtained on 4 marine macrofossil samples yield ages ranging from 38.51 ka B.P. to 42.35 ka B.P. Dates obtained on multiple samples from individual sections are internally consistent, recording younger ages at higher stratigraphic levels within two fining upward deposits. The sections are displaced relative to one another across a northeast striking fault. The two measured stratigraphic sections are used to quantify a minimum Late Pleistocene to recent separation rate of 0.54 m ka-1. A suite of 15 radiocarbon dates on exposures of the Puerto Armuelles Fm from the eastern portion of the Osa Peninsula (Gardner et al., 1992) and 14 radiocarbon dates obtained from equivalent strata along the northwestern portions of the Osa Peninsula (Sak et al., 2004) clearly and consistently indicate a Late Pleistocene age of deposition during Oxygen Isotope Stage 3.

  16. [Application medical history indicators and goals for the diagnosis of OSAS in a cohort of workers of the private car transportation: results of a year of health surveillance].

    PubMed

    Romano, C; Ricco, G; Launaro, N; Ceccarelli, M; Cravero, A; Manassero, F

    2012-01-01

    Even though Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is one of the main causes of daytime sleepiness with high subsequent risk for causing vehicle accidents, its evaluation is not usually included among the criteria used for the certification of job fitness among professional drivers. In order to assess the feasibility of a screening method that allows the occupational physician to identify the subjects at risk for OSAS which should undergo second level tests (cardiorespiratory monitoring), we recorded and subsequently processed appropriate subjective and objective indicators among 455 professional drivers employed in private transportation companies. Only 17 subjects (47%) out of 36 tested positive underwent cardiorespiratory monitoring (due to technical and organizational difficulties and to the poor compliance of workers). OSAS was confirmed in 15 subjects out of 17 showing an excellent positive predictive value of the screening. Risk management for OSAS is currently unavoidable yet not formally provided by law. Our results show the possibility of completing the health surveillance program with feasible and valuable screening tests. Difficulties (hardly compliant with a timely certification of the job fitness) arise instead as far as second level confirmatory procedures are involved.

  17. Capability of Paraguaçu estuary (Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil) to form oil-SPM aggregates (OSA) and their ecotoxicological effects on pelagic and benthic organisms.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana C; Moreira, Ícaro T A; Oliveira, Olívia M C; Pereira, Taís S; de Almeida, Marcos; Trindade, Maria Clara L F; Menezes, Leonardo; Caldas, Alex S

    2017-01-15

    For experiments concerning the formation of oil-suspended particulate matter (SPM) aggregates (OSA), oil and sediment samples were collected from Campos Basin and six stations of Paraguaçu estuary, Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil, respectively. The sediments samples were analyzed for organic matter determined by the EMBRAPA method, nitrogen determined by the Kjeldahl method, and phosphorus determined by the method described by Aspila. The oil trapped in OSA was extracted following the method described by Moreira. The experiment showed a relationship between the amount of organic matter and OSA formation and consequently the dispersion of the studied oil. On the basis of the buoyancy of OSA and the ecotoxicological effects on pelagic and benthic community, the priority areas for application of remediation techniques are Cachoeira, Maragogipe, and Salinas da Margarida because of the large amount of oil that accumulated at the bottom of the experiment flask (5.85%, 27.95%, and 38,98%; 4.2%, 17.66%, and 32.64%; and 11.82%, 8.07%, and 10.91% respectively).

  18. Rice microRNA osa-miR1848 targets the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene OsCYP51G3 and mediates the biosynthesis of phytosterols and brassinosteroids during development and in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kuaifei; Ou, Xiaojing; Tang, Huadan; Wang, Ren; Wu, Ping; Jia, Yongxia; Wei, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xinlan; Kang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Seong-Ki; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-11-01

    Phytosterols are membrane components or precursors for brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis. As they cannot be transported long distances, their homeostasis is tightly controlled through their biosynthesis and metabolism. However, it is unknown whether microRNAs are involved in their homeostatic regulation. Rice (Oryza sativa) plants transformed with microRNA osa-miR1848 and its target, the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene, OsCYP51G3, were used to investigate the role of osa-miR1848 in the regulation of phytosterol biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 directs OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage to regulate phytosterol and BR biosynthesis in rice. The role of OsCYP51G3 as one of the osa-miR1848 targets is supported by the opposite expression patterns of osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 in transgenic rice plants, and by the identification of OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage sites. Increased osa-miR1848 and decreased OsCYP51G3 expression reduced phytosterol and BR concentrations, and caused typical phenotypic changes related to phytosterol and BR deficiency, including dwarf plants, erect leaves, semi-sterile pollen grains, and shorter cells. Circadian expression of osa-miR1848 regulated the diurnal abundance of OsCYP51G3 transcript in developing organs, and the response of OsCYP51G3 to salt stress. We propose that osa-miR1848 regulates OsCYP51G3 expression posttranscriptionally, and mediates phytosterol and BR biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 might have potential applications in rice breeding to modulate leaf angle, and the size and quality of seeds.

  19. Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao, Psittaciformes: Psittacidae) nest characteristics in the Osa Peninsula Conservation Area (ACOSA), Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Guittar, John L; Dear, Fiona; Vaughan, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) is an endangered species. In Costa Rica, the Scarlet Macaw population of the Central Pacific Conservation Area (ACOPAC, n =432 individuals) has undergone considdrable study and has been used effectively as a flagship species for regional conservation. Costa Rica's only other viable Scarlet Macaw population, located in the Osa Peninsula Conservation Area (ACOSA, n=800-1200 individuals), remains virtually unstudied. We studied ACOSA Scarlet Macaw nest cavities from February 19th to March 22nd 2006. Through informal interviews with park guards and residents, we found a total of 57 potential nests in 52 trees. Eleven nests were reported as frequently poached. Scarlet Macaws used 14 identified tree species, ten of which are unrecorded in Costa Rica. The most common nesting trees were Caryocar costaricense (n=12, 24%), Schizolobium parahyba (n=9, 18.0%), Ceibapentandra (n=7, 14.0%) and Ficus sp. (n=5, 10.0%). We compare nesting characteristics to those recorded in ACOPAC. A combination of bottom-up and top-down strategies are necessary to ensure the Scarlet Macaw's long-term success, including environmental education in local schools, community stewardship of active nests, and the advertisement of stricter penalties for poaching.

  20. Underwater topography determines critical breeding habitat for humpback whales near Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica: implications for marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, L; Solís, M

    2008-06-01

    Migrating humpback whales from northern and southern feeding grounds come to the tropical waters near Osa Peninsula, Pacific of Costa Rica, to reproduce and raise their calves. Planning effective marine protected areas that encompass humpback critical habitats require data about which oceanographic features influence distribution during the breeding period. This study examines the relationship between water depth and ocean floor slope with humpback whale distribution, based on sightings during two breeding seasons (2005 and 2006). Data are from the Southern and Northern subpopulations in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP). Analysis followed the basic principles of the Ecological Niche Factors Analysis (ENFA), where indices of Marginality and Tolerance provide insights on the restrictiveness of habitat use. At a fine scale, physical factors such as water depth and slope define the critical breeding and nursing habitat for M. novaeangliae. Divergence in the subsamples means of depths and slope distribution, with the global mean of the study area in both eco-geographical variables, determine habitat requirements restricted by topographic features such as depths (< 100 m) and slope (< 10%), and locate the key breeding and nursing habitat of the species within the continental shelf domains. Proposed Marine Protected Areas (MPA's) network plans should consider connectivity of Cafio Island-Drake Bay and the extension of Corcovado National Park maritime borders.

  1. Terrestrial ecosystems of the Osa-Golfito region: one component of an integrative cross-disciplinary initiative for sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, E. N.; Dirzo, R.; Morales Barquero, L.

    2012-12-01

    Sustainability science seeks to develop approaches incorporating simultaneous human and environmental well-being. The Osa-Golfito Initiative (InOGo), as described in the previous presentation by Dr. Hunt et al. in this session, represents a cutting edge project seeking to develop both a fundamental framework for linking interdisciplinary components to address this objective with the creation of an applied approach for a sustainable future in this area of exceptional cultural and environmental diversity. In this presentation we describe the terrestrial ecosystems component of InOGo. This component incorporates four primary research approaches: (a) an extensive literature review; (b) spatial and non-spatial data aggregation; (c) change analysis via remote sensing; and (d) a questionnaire and participatory mapping survey with relevant experts. Integrating these approaches we seek to: (a) establish a detailed baseline understanding of the terrestrial ecosystems and their spatial distribution in the study region; (b) quantify temporal changes in their extent, connectivity, and ecosystem services; (c) identify the principal conservation priorities and threats in the region; and (d) isolate specific actions to address identified threats. We highlight both the overall approach developed for this component, which is broadly applicable throughout similar tropical regions, as well as results specific to the initiative.;

  2. Environmental service payments: evaluating biodiversity conservation trade-offs and cost-efficiency in the Osa Conservation Area, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Barton, D N; Faith, D P; Rusch, G M; Acevedo, H; Paniagua, L; Castro, M

    2009-02-01

    The cost-efficiency of payments for environmental services (PES) to private landowners in the Osa Conservation Area, Costa Rica, is evaluated in terms of the trade-off between biodiversity representation and opportunity costs of conservation to agricultural and forestry land-use. Using available GIS data and an 'off-the-shelf' software application called TARGET, we find that the PES allocation criteria applied by authorities in 2002-2003 were more than twice as cost-efficient as criteria applied during 1999-2001. Results show that a policy relevant assessment of the cost-effectiveness of PES relative to other conservation policies can be carried out at regional level using available studies and GIS data. However, there are a number of data and conceptual limitations to using heuristic optimisation algorithms in the analysis of the cost-efficiency of PES. Site specific data on probabilities of land-use change, and a detailed specification of opportunity costs of farm land, labour and capital are required to use algorithms such as TARGET for ranking individual sites based on cost-efficiency. Despite its conceptual soundness for regional conservation analysis, biodiversity complementarity presents a practical challenge as a criterion for PES eligibility at farm level because it varies depending on the set of areas under PES contracts at any one time.

  3. Comparison between ozonation and the OSA process: analysis of excess sludge reduction and biomass activity in two different pilot plants.

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, Michele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Di Trapani, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    The excess biomass produced during biological treatment of municipal wastewater represents a major issue worldwide, as its disposal implies environmental, economic and social impacts. Therefore, there has been a growing interest in developing technologies to reduce sludge production. The main proposed strategies can be categorized according to the place inside the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) where the reduction takes place. In particular, sludge minimization can be achieved in the wastewater line as well as in the sludge line. This paper presents the results of two pilot scale systems, to evaluate their feasibility for sludge reduction and to understand their effect on biomass activity: (1) a pilot plant with an ozone contactor in the return activated sludge (RAS) stream for the exposition of sludge to a low ozone dosage; and (2) an oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process with high retention time in the anaerobic sludge holding tank have been studied. The results showed that both technologies enabled significant excess sludge reduction but produced a slight decrease of biomass respiratory activity.

  4. MASP1 Mutations in Patients with Facial, Umbilical, Coccygeal, and Auditory Findings of Carnevale, Malpuech, OSA, and Michels Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sirmaci, Asli; Walsh, Tom; Akay, Hatice; Spiliopoulos, Michail; Şakalar, Yıldırım Bayezit; Hasanefendioğlu-Bayrak, Aylin; Duman, Duygu; Farooq, Amjad; King, Mary-Claire; Tekin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive facial features consisting of hypertelorism, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, blepharoptosis, epicanthus inversus, periumbilical defects, and skeletal anomalies are seen in autosomal-recessive Carnevale, Malpuech, Michels, and oculo-skeletal-abdominal (OSA) syndromes. The gene or genes responsible for these syndromes were heretofore unknown. We report on three individuals from two consanguineous Turkish families with findings characteristic of these syndromes, including facial dysmorphism, periumbilical depression, mixed hearing loss, radioulnar synostosis, and coccygeal appendage. Homozygosity mapping yielded an autozygous region on chromosome 3q27 in both families. In one family, whole exome sequencing revealed a missense mutation, MASP1 c.2059G>A (p.G687R), that cosegregated with the phenotype. In the second family, Sanger sequencing of MASP1 revealed a nonsense mutation, MASP1 c.870G>A (p.W290X), that also cosegregated with the phenotype. Neither mutation was found in 192 Turkish controls or 1200 controls of various other ancestries. MASP1 encodes mannan-binding lectin serine protease 1. The two mutations occur in a MASP1 isoform that has been reported to process IGFBP-5, thereby playing a critical role in insulin growth factor availability during craniofacial and muscle development. These results implicate mutations of MASP1 as the cause of a human malformation syndrome and demonstrate the involvement of MASP1 in facial, umbilical, and ear development during the embryonic period. PMID:21035106

  5. Rice osa-miR171c Mediates Phase Change from Vegetative to Reproductive Development and Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance by Repressing Four OsHAM Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wu; Xia, Kuaifei; Ouyang, Jie; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-01-01

    Phase change from vegetative to reproductive development is one of the critical developmental steps in plants, and it is regulated by both environmental and endogenous factors. The maintenance of shoot apical meristem (SAM) identity, miRNAs and flowering integrators are involved in this phase change process. Here, we report that the miRNA osa-miR171c targets four GRAS (GAI-RGA-SCR) plant-specific transcription factors (OsHAM1, OsHAM2, OsHAM3, and OsHAM4) to control the floral transition and maintenance of SAM indeterminacy in rice (Oryza sativa). We characterized a rice T-DNA insertion delayed heading (dh) mutant, where the expression of OsMIR171c gene is up-regulated. This mutant showed pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including especially prolonged vegetative phase, delayed heading date, and bigger shoot apex. Parallel expression analysis showed that osa-miR171c controlled the expression change of four OsHAMs in the shoot apex during floral transition, and responded to light. In the dh mutant, the expression of the juvenile-adult phase change negative regulator osa-miR156 was up-regulated, expression of the flowering integrators Hd3a and RFT1 was inhibited, and expression of FON4 negative regulators involved in the maintenance of SAM indeterminacy was also inhibited. From these data, we propose that the inhibition of osa-miR171c-mediated OsHAM transcription factors regulates the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive development by maintaining SAM indeterminacy and inhibiting flowering integrators. PMID:26023934

  6. Rice osa-miR171c Mediates Phase Change from Vegetative to Reproductive Development and Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance by Repressing Four OsHAM Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tian; Li, Xiumei; Yang, Wu; Xia, Kuaifei; Ouyang, Jie; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-01-01

    Phase change from vegetative to reproductive development is one of the critical developmental steps in plants, and it is regulated by both environmental and endogenous factors. The maintenance of shoot apical meristem (SAM) identity, miRNAs and flowering integrators are involved in this phase change process. Here, we report that the miRNA osa-miR171c targets four GRAS (GAI-RGA-SCR) plant-specific transcription factors (OsHAM1, OsHAM2, OsHAM3, and OsHAM4) to control the floral transition and maintenance of SAM indeterminacy in rice (Oryza sativa). We characterized a rice T-DNA insertion delayed heading (dh) mutant, where the expression of OsMIR171c gene is up-regulated. This mutant showed pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including especially prolonged vegetative phase, delayed heading date, and bigger shoot apex. Parallel expression analysis showed that osa-miR171c controlled the expression change of four OsHAMs in the shoot apex during floral transition, and responded to light. In the dh mutant, the expression of the juvenile-adult phase change negative regulator osa-miR156 was up-regulated, expression of the flowering integrators Hd3a and RFT1 was inhibited, and expression of FON4 negative regulators involved in the maintenance of SAM indeterminacy was also inhibited. From these data, we propose that the inhibition of osa-miR171c-mediated OsHAM transcription factors regulates the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive development by maintaining SAM indeterminacy and inhibiting flowering integrators.

  7. AtSIA1 AND AtOSA1: two Abc1 proteins involved in oxidative stress responses and iron distribution within chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Manara, Anna; DalCorso, Giovanni; Leister, Dario; Jahns, Peter; Baldan, Barbara; Furini, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The Abc1 protein kinases are a large family of functionally diverse proteins with multiple roles in the regulation of respiration and oxidative stress tolerance. A functional characterization was carried out for AtSIA1, an Arabidopsis thaliana Abc1-like protein, focusing on its potential redundancy with its homolog AtOSA1. Both proteins are located within chloroplasts, even if a different subplastidial localization seems probable. The comparison of atsia1 and atosa1 mutants, atsia1/atosa1 double mutant and wild-type plants revealed a reduction in plastidial iron-containing proteins of the Cytb6 f complex in the mutants. Iron uptake from soil is not hampered in mutant lines, suggesting that AtSIA1 and AtOSA1 affect iron distribution within the chloroplast. Mutants accumulated more ferritin and superoxide, and showed reduced tolerance to reactive oxygen species (ROS), potentially indicating a basal role in oxidative stress. The mutants produced higher concentrations of plastochromanol and plastoquinones than wild-type plants, but only atsia1 plants developed larger plastoglobules and contained higher concentrations of α- and γ-tocopherol and VTE1. Taken together, these data suggest that AtSIA1 and AtOSA1 probably act in signaling pathways that influence responses to ROS production and oxidative stress.

  8. Potential application of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregates (OSA) on the remediation of reflective beaches impacted by petroleum: a mesocosm simulation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carine S; de Oliveira, Olivia M C; Moreira, Icaro T A; Queiroz, Antonio F S; de Almeida, Marcos; Silva, Jessica V L; da Silva Andrade, Igor Oliveira

    2015-08-28

    This paper presents the oil-suspended particulate matter aggregate (OSA) resulted from the interaction of droplets of dispersed oil in a water column and particulate matter. This structure reduces the adhesion of oil on solid surfaces, promotes dispersion, and may accelerate degradation processes. The effects of the addition of fine sediments (clay + silt) on the formation of OSA, their impact on the dispersion and degradation of the oil, and their potential use in recovering reflective sandy beaches were evaluated in a mesoscale simulation model. Two simulations were performed (21 days), in the absence and presence of fine sediments, with four units in each simulation using oil from the Recôncavo Basin. The results showed that the use of fine sediment increased the dispersion of the oil in the water column up to four times in relation to the sandy sediment. There was no evidence of the transport of hydrocarbons in bottom sediments associated with fine sediments that would have accelerated the dispersion and degradation rates of the oil. Most of the OSA that formed in this process remained in the water column, where the degradation processes were more effective. Over the 21 days of simulation, we observed a 40 % reduction on average of the levels of saturated hydrocarbons staining the surface oil.

  9. The geology, geochemistry and emplacement of the Cretaceous—Tertiary ophiolitic Nicoya Complex of the Osa Peninsula, southern Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrangé, J. P.; Thorpe, R. S.

    1988-04-01

    The Nicoya Complex of the Osa Peninsula is essentially an obducted segment of oceanic crust comprising basaltic lavas and associated intrusive dolerite and gabbro, interstratified with lesser amounts of pelagic limestones, cherts and argillites. The sediments contain a minor clastic component and were deposited on an ocean floor of considerable relief and distant from a major landmass. The extrusive and intrusive basaltic rocks have geochemical affinities to large ion lithophile (LIL) element-enriched oceanic crust, and are interpreted to have formed in a back-arc basin analagous to the Mariana Trough, Lau Basin or Gulf of California. One sample has distinctly different geochemical characteristics and may represent a younger within-plate seamount. In the Late Cretaceous, an E-W-trending intra-oceanic trench/volcanic/back-arc system developed in association with an active southward-dipping subduction zone located south of the present-day southern Central American isthmus. Pelagic sediments and basaltic lavas accumulated in the back-arc over a period of at least 34 Ma spanning the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary. During this period there were three major volcanic events dated respectively as Santonian-Campanian (78.0 ± 2 Ma), Palaeocene (60.2 ± 7.6 Ma) and Middle Eocene (44.0 ± 4.4 Ma). Continuing northward movement of the southern plate caused overthrusting of the volcanic arc onto the northern plate and production of a thickened embryonic continental crust. Inferred reorganization of crustal stress in the Late Eocene caused fragmentation of the single ancestral plate into the Caribbean and "East Pacific" plates, with a flipping of the subduction zone accompanying development of the NE-dipping Middle America subduction zone and andesitic volcanism. During the Oligocene, the ancestral East Pacific plate split into the NE-moving Cocos plate and the eastward-moving Nazca plate, separated by the E-W-trending Colón spreading ridge and a series of N

  10. In patients with minimally symptomatic OSA can baseline characteristics and early patterns of CPAP usage predict those who are likely to be longer-term users of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Bratton, Daniel J.; Craig, Sonya E.; Kohler, Malcolm; Stradling, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) usage varies between individuals. It would be of value to be able to identify those who are likely to benefit from CPAP (and use it long term), versus those who would not, and might therefore benefit from additional help early on. First, we explored whether baseline characteristics predicted CPAP usage in minimally symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients, a group who would be expected to have low usage. Second, we explored if early CPAP usage was predictive of longer-term usage, as has been shown in more symptomatic OSA patients. Methods The MOSAIC trial was a multi-centre randomised controlled trial where minimally symptomatic OSA patients were randomised to CPAP, or standard care, for 6 months. Here we have studied only those patients randomised to CPAP treatment. Baseline characteristics including symptoms, questionnaires [including the Epworth sleepiness score (ESS)] and sleep study parameters were recorded. CPAP usage was recorded at 2–4 weeks after initiation and after 6 months. The correlation and association between baseline characteristics and 6 months CPAP usage was assessed, as was the correlation between 2 and 4 weeks CPAP usage and 6 months CPAP usage. Results One hundred and ninety-five patients randomised to CPAP therapy had median [interquartile range (IQR)] CPAP usage of 2:49 (0:44, 5:13) h:min/night (h/n) at the 2–4 weeks visit, and 2:17 (0:08, 4:54) h/n at the 6 months follow-up visit. Only male gender was associated with increased long-term CPAP use (male usage 2:56 h/n, female 1:57 h/n; P=0.02). There was a moderate correlation between the usage of CPAP at 2–4 weeks and 6 months, with about 50% of the variability in long-term use being predicted by the short-term use. Conclusions In patients with minimally symptomatic OSA, our study has shown that male gender (and not OSA severity or symptom burden) is associated with increased long-term use of CPAP at 6 months

  11. LIPID PROFILE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE, ATTENDED AT THE FAMILY HEALTH STRATEGY, VIÇOSA/MG.

    PubMed

    Danésio de Souza, Jacqueline; Queiroz Ribeiro, Andréia; Oliveira Martinho, Karina; Silva Franco, Fernanda; Vidal Martins, Marcos; Gonçalves Rodrigues, Meirele; Wick, Jeannette Y; Araújo Tinôco, Adelson Luiz

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: el envejecimiento de la población ha ido acompañado de cambios epidemiológicos de la población brasileña, destacando el crecimiento continuo de la prevalencia de enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles, especialmente cardiovasculares o de la arteria coronaria, como resultado de los cambios en el perfil lipídico de las personas mayores. Objetivo: describir las variables antropométricas, estilo de vida y composición corporal como factores de comportamiento y su asociación con los cambios en el perfil lipídico de las personas de edad avanzada. Metodología: la muestra incluyó a 402 participantes que asistieron a la Estrategia Salud de la Familia, Viçosa (MG), a los que se aplicó un cuestionario con información socio-demográfica, de comportamiento y de estilo de vida. Se recogió una muestra de sangre para obtener las fracciones de lípidos, y se midió el porcentaje de peso, talla, circunferencia de la cintura y grasa corporal. La regresión lineal múltiple se realizó para identificar factores independientemente asociados con los cambios en cada una de las fracciones de lípidos seleccionados. Resultado: los factores asociados de forma independiente con un aumento de los niveles de colesterol total fueron la presencia de conducta sedentaria, un porcentaje de grasa corporal alto, mayor altura de la cintura y una mayor circunferencia de la cintura. El consumo de bebidas alcohólicas y una proporción cintura-cadera más alta se mantuvo asociado de forma independiente con la disminución de los niveles de lipoproteínas de alta densidad. El aumento de la circunferencia de la cintura se asoció de forma independiente con valores bajos de los niveles de lipoproteínas de baja densidad. El valor del aumento de triglicéridos se asocia de forma independiente con una mayor relación cintura-cadera, un mayor índice de masa corporal y tabaquismo. Conclusión: los factores de riesgo modificables asociados con un perfil lipídico cambiado deben

  12. Effect of CPAP on Cardiac Function in Minimally Symptomatic Patients with OSA: Results from a Subset of the MOSAIC Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Sonya; Kylintireas, Ilias; Kohler, Malcolm; Nicoll, Debby; Bratton, Daniel J.; Nunn, Andrew J.; Leeson, Paul; Neubauer, Stefan; Stradling, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Minimally symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent, and the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on myocardial function in these patients are unknown. The MOSAIC randomized, controlled trial of CPAP for minimally symptomatic OSA assessed the effect of CPAP on myocardial function in a subset of patients. Methods: Two centers taking part in the MOSAIC trial randomized 238 patients in parallel to 6 months of CPAP (120) or standard care (118). Of these, 168 patients had echocardiograms, and 68 patients had a cardiac magnetic resonance scan (CMR). A larger group (314) from 4 centers had brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measured. Results: Mean (SD) baseline oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and Epworth sleepiness score (ESS) were 13.5 (13.2), and 8.4 (4.0), respectively. CPAP significantly reduced ESS and ODI. Baseline LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was well preserved (60.4%). CPAP had no significant effect on echo-derived left atrial (LA) area (−1.0 cm2, 95% CI −2.6 to +0.6, p = 0.23) or early to late left ventricular filling velocity (E/A) ratio (−0.01, 95% CI −0.07 to +0.05, p = 0.79). There was a small change in echo-derived LV end diastolic volume (EDV) with CPAP (−5.9 mL, 95% CI −10.6 to −1.2, p = 0.015). No significant changes were detected by CMR on LV mass index (+1.1 g/m2, 95% CI −5.9 to +8.0, p = 0.76) or LVEF (+0.8%, 95% CI −1.2 to +2.8, p = 0.41). CPAP did not affect BNP levels (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Six months of CPAP therapy does not change cardiac functional or structural parameters measured by echocardiogram or CMR in patients with minimally symptomatic mild-to-moderate OSA. Clinical Trial Registration: ISRCTN 34164388 (http://isrctn.org). Citation: Craig S, Kylintireas I, Kohler M, Nicoll D, Bratton DJ, Nunn AJ, Leeson P, Neubauer S, Stradling JR. Effect of CPAP on cardiac function in minimally symptomatic patients with OSA: results from a subset of the MOSAIC randomized trial. J Clin

  13. Olive Volatiles from Portuguese Cultivars Cobrançosa, Madural and Verdeal Transmontana: Role in Oviposition Preference of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Cunha, Sara C.; Baptista, Paula; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), a serious threat to the olive crop worldwide, displays ovipositon preference for some olive cultivars but the causes are still unclear. In the present work, three Portuguese olive cultivars with different susceptibilities to olive fly (Cobrançosa, Madural, and Verdeal Transmontana) were studied, aiming to determine if the olive volatiles are implicated in this interaction. Olive volatiles were assessed by SPME-GC-MS in the three cultivars during maturation process to observe possible correlations with olive fly infestation levels. Overall, 34 volatiles were identified in the olives, from 7 chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, sesquiterpenes, and terpenes). Generally, total volatile amounts decrease during maturation but toluene, the main compound, increased in all cultivars, particularly in those with higher susceptibility to olive fly. Sesquiterpenes also raised, mainly α-copaene. Toluene and α-copaene, recognized oviposition promoters to olive fly, were correlated with the infestation level of cvs. Madural and Verdeal Trasnmontana (intermediate and highly susceptible cultivars respectively), while no correlations were established with cv. Cobrançosa (less susceptible). No volatiles with inverse correlation were observed. Volatile composition of olives may be a decisive factor in the olive fly choice to oviposit and this could be the basis for the development of new control strategies for this pest. PMID:25985460

  14. Olive Volatiles from Portuguese Cultivars Cobrançosa, Madural and Verdeal Transmontana: Role in Oviposition Preference of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Cunha, Sara C; Baptista, Paula; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), a serious threat to the olive crop worldwide, displays ovipositon preference for some olive cultivars but the causes are still unclear. In the present work, three Portuguese olive cultivars with different susceptibilities to olive fly (Cobrançosa, Madural, and Verdeal Transmontana) were studied, aiming to determine if the olive volatiles are implicated in this interaction. Olive volatiles were assessed by SPME-GC-MS in the three cultivars during maturation process to observe possible correlations with olive fly infestation levels. Overall, 34 volatiles were identified in the olives, from 7 chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, sesquiterpenes, and terpenes). Generally, total volatile amounts decrease during maturation but toluene, the main compound, increased in all cultivars, particularly in those with higher susceptibility to olive fly. Sesquiterpenes also raised, mainly α-copaene. Toluene and α-copaene, recognized oviposition promoters to olive fly, were correlated with the infestation level of cvs. Madural and Verdeal Trasnmontana (intermediate and highly susceptible cultivars respectively), while no correlations were established with cv. Cobrançosa (less susceptible). No volatiles with inverse correlation were observed. Volatile composition of olives may be a decisive factor in the olive fly choice to oviposit and this could be the basis for the development of new control strategies for this pest.

  15. [Prevalence and factors associated with the presence of anemia in the elderly of the municipality of Viçosa, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Milagres, Clarice Santana; de Moraes, Keila Bacelar Duarte; Franceschini, Sylvia Carmo Castro; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira Rocha; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz

    2015-12-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological problem encountered in the elderly population. A cross-sectional, population-based survey was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in the elderly in Viçosa (State of Minas Gerais). Data were collected by means of a household survey and conducting biochemical tests on 349 elderly between June and December 2009. The prevalence of anemia was 11.7% (95% CI 8.3% -15.1%) and was found to be higher among men (15.4%) among those aged 80 years and older (30%) and those who practiced polypharmacy (16.8%). The results obtained indicate anemia determinants similar to those observed in developed countries. The real need of polypharmacy should be evaluated in health care for the elderly, in order to prevent iatrogenic complications, of which anemia is one such complication.

  16. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  17. Retinal Atherosclerosis, Ophthalmologically Reported and Documented with OSA in 1987, is now Totally Reversed, and Recorded, Photographically. The Supposition then was that Equivalent Cortical Damage could Respond to the same Healing Protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Paul N.; O., D.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-10-01

    Documented retinal atherosclerosis, ``silver streaking'' of retinal capillaries, was reported and documented with OSA, in October 1987. That retinal damage, despite claims it usually progresses and is nonreversible, is now completely cleared. The original OSA presentation proposed that equivalent cortical damage was probably present throughout the brain at that time, as attested by failing short-term memory performance and transient ischemic attacks, TIAs, brief vision strokes. The supposition then was that ophthalmologic access to the retina, by some accounts the progenitor of all brain evolution, could provide a means of monitoring the actual circulatory state of inaccessible parts of the brain. To the extent that retinal health was naturopathically restored, and memory performance seems also to have significantly kept pace, is it a tenable premise that such protocols have rather general importance? Can applied optics help establish more appropriate diagnoses, and evaluate treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's disease?

  18. Pre- and in-therapy predictive score models of adult OSAS patients with poor adherence pattern on nCPAP therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yeying; Geater, Alan F; Chai, Yanling; Luo, Jiahong; Niu, Xiaoqun; Hai, Bing; Qin, Jingting; Li, Yongxia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify patterns of adherence to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) use in the first 3 months of therapy among newly diagnosed adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) and their predictors. To develop pretherapy and in-therapy scores to predict adherence pattern. Methods Newly diagnosed adult OSAS patients were consecutively recruited from March to August 2013. Baseline clinical information and measures such as Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Zung’s Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), and The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline and at the end of 3rd-week therapy were collected. Twelve weeks’ adherence data were collected from the nCPAP memory card, and K-means cluster analysis was used to explore adherence patterns. Predictive scores were developed from the coefficients of cumulative logit models of adherence patterns using variables available at baseline and after 3 weeks of therapy. Performance of the score was validated using 500 bootstrap resamples. Results Seventy six patients completed a 12-week follow-up. Three patterns were revealed. Patients were identified as developing an adherence pattern that was poor (n=14, mean ± SD, 2.3±0.9 hours per night), moderate (n=19, 5.3±0.6 hours per night), or good (n=43, 6.8±0.3 hours per night). Cumulative logit regression models (good → moderate → poor) revealed independent baseline predictors to be ESS (per unit increase) (OR [95% CI], 0.763 [0.651, 0.893]), SDS (1.461 [1.238, 1.724]), and PSQI (2.261 [1.427, 3.584]); and 3-week therapy predictors to be ESS (0.554 [0.331, 0.926]), PSQI (2.548 [1.454, 4.465]), and the changes (3rd week–baseline data) in ESS (0.459 [0.243, 0.868]), FSS (3.556 [1.788, 7.070]), and PSQI (2.937 [1.273, 6.773]). Two predictive score formulas for poor adherence were developed. The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for baseline and 3

  19. The impact of pasture conversion on nutrient cycles of tropical streams on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica: a paired catchment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringhurst, K.; Jordan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in nutrient and hydrologic cycles caused by land disturbance typically lead to detrimental changes to ecosystems. This study utilized a paired, small-catchment approach to examine the effect of deforestation on nutrient transfer and hydrological discharge and the resulting impact on soils and streams of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. Two first order streams were chosen, the first catchment had been cleared for pasture and the second consisted of undisturbed tropical wet forest. Soil concentrations of organic matter, total and soil available P were higher in the forested catchment with decreases of >33% of each in the deforested catchment. The effect of deforestation on stream discharge was a 59% increase in flow during the wet season and an increase in the Q5:Q95 ratio showing that the deforested stream was flashier. The deforested catchment loss of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) increased 95% over the forested catchment. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) showed an increase in load of 43% in the deforested catchment compared to the forested catchment. The molar N:P ratios were lower than the Redfield ratio and both streams were well below the level at which N-limitation of lotic algal growth has been reported, therefore it is hypothesized that N is the limiting nutrient in streams in the study area. Soil nutrient depletion in the deforested catchment, accelerated by a changed hydrologic regime, is the likely trajectory of soil-water interactions in this tropical ecosystem. This will likely be among the secondary impacts should deforestation become widespread along this stretch of the Pacific coastline, with associated eutrophication of receiving transitional and coastal waters.

  20. Risky consumption habits and safety of fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Fabio Alessandro; Colombo, Monique; Merhi, Carolina Milner; Juliati, Vinícius Augusto; Ferreira, Marcello Sebe; Nero, Marcelo Antônio; Nero, Luis Augusto

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess raw milk consumption habits in the urban population of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and the microbiological safety and quality of the fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in the same region. A simplified questionnaire regarding raw milk consumption was applied to the persons responsible for food acquisition in 411 residences. The regular consumption of raw milk was observed by 18.5% of the interviewers, and lack of knowledge of possible risks related to this food product. Microbiological safety and quality were assessed for raw (n=69), pasteurized (n=80), and ultra-high-temperature (UHT)-treated milk (n=80) by analyzing the counts of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli, and detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.; raw milk samples were also subjected to enumeration of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus. Concerning raw milk, 59.4% of the samples were considered as produced in inadequate hygienic conditions, 5.8% of the samples presented counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus lower than 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and no samples presented with positive results for L. monocytogenes or Salmonella spp. All pasteurized and UHT milk samples presented with low counts of mesophilic aerobes and coliforms, while L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were absent. The data demonstrated that raw milk was consumed by the population studied. Despite the absence of potential hazards, raw milk was of poor hygienic quality, in contrast with the processed fluid milk available in retail sales outlets that was safe and of good hygienic quality, highlighting the suitability of pasteurized and UHT milk for human consumption.

  1. Effects of CPAP-therapy on brain electrical activity in obstructive sleep apneic patients: a combined EEG study using LORETA and Omega complexity : reversible alterations of brain activity in OSAS.

    PubMed

    Toth, Marton; Faludi, Bela; Kondakor, Istvan

    2012-10-01

    Effects of initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on EEG background activity were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, N = 25) to test possible reversibility of alterations of brain electrical activity caused by chronic hypoxia. Normal control group (N = 14) was also examined. Two EEG examinations were done in each groups: at night and in the next morning. Global and regional (left vs. right, anterior vs. posterior) measures of spatial complexity (Omega complexity) were used to characterize the degree of spatial synchrony of EEG. Low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was used to localize generators of EEG activity in separate frequency bands. Before CPAP-treatment, a significantly lower Omega complexity was found globally and over the right hemisphere. Due to CPAP-treatment, these significant differences vanished. Significantly decreased Omega complexity was found in the anterior region after treatment. LORETA showed a decreased activity in all of the beta bands after therapy in the right hippocampus, premotor and temporo-parietal cortex, and bilaterally in the precuneus, paracentral and posterior cingulate cortex. No significant changes were seen in control group. Comparing controls and patients before sleep, an increased alpha2 band activity was seen bilaterally in the precuneus, paracentral and posterior cingulate cortex, while in the morning an increased beta3 band activity in the left precentral and bilateral premotor cortex and a decreased delta band activity in the right temporo-parietal cortex and insula were observed. These findings indicate that effect of sleep on EEG background activity is different in OSAS patients and normal controls. In OSAS patients, significant changes lead to a more normal EEG after a night under CPAP-treatment. Compensatory alterations of brain electrical activity in regions associated with influencing sympathetic outflow, visuospatial abilities, long

  2. Constraining Source Locations of Shallow Subduction Megathrust Earthquakes in 1-D and 3-D Velocity Models - A Case Study of the 2002 Mw=6.4 Osa Earthquake, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source locations are generally routinely constrained using a global 1-D Earth model. However, the source location might be associated with large uncertainties. This is definitively the case for earthquakes occurring at active continental margins were thin oceanic crust subducts below thick continental crust and hence large lateral changes in crustal thickness occur as a function of distance to the deep-sea trench. Here, we conducted a case study of the 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa thrust earthquake in Costa Rica that was followed by an aftershock sequence. Initial relocations indicated that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of ocean-bottom-hydrophones and land stations 80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent Costa Rican stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocated this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach using a 1-D and two 3-D P-wave velocity models. The 3-D model was either derived from 3-D tomography based on onshore stations and a priori model based on seismic refraction data. All epicentres occurred close to the trench axis, but depth estimates vary by several tens of kilometres. Based on the epicentres and constraints from seismic reflection data the main shock occurred 25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. The source location that agreed best with the geology was based on the 3-D velocity model derived from a priori data. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interpolate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  3. Generalization of color-difference formulas for any illuminant and any observer by assuming perfect color constancy in a color-vision model based on the OSA-UCS system.

    PubMed

    Oleari, Claudio; Melgosa, Manuel; Huertas, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The most widely used color-difference formulas are based on color-difference data obtained under D65 illumination or similar and for a 10° visual field; i.e., these formulas hold true for the CIE 1964 observer adapted to D65 illuminant. This work considers the psychometric color-vision model based on the Optical Society of America-Uniform Color Scales (OSA-UCS) system previously published by the first author [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21, 677 (2004); Color Res. Appl. 30, 31 (2005)] with the additional hypothesis that complete illuminant adaptation with perfect color constancy exists in the visual evaluation of color differences. In this way a computational procedure is defined for color conversion between different illuminant adaptations, which is an alternative to the current chromatic adaptation transforms. This color conversion allows the passage between different observers, e.g., CIE 1964 and CIE 1931. An application of this color conversion is here made in the color-difference evaluation for any observer and in any illuminant adaptation: these transformations convert tristimulus values related to any observer and illuminant adaptation to those related to the observer and illuminant adaptation of the definition of the color-difference formulas, i.e., to the CIE 1964 observer adapted to the D65 illuminant, and then the known color-difference formulas can be applied. The adaptations to the illuminants A, C, F11, D50, Planckian and daylight at any color temperature and for CIE 1931 and CIE 1964 observers are considered as examples, and all the corresponding transformations are given for practical use.

  4. Predicting sleep disordered breathing in outpatients with suspected OSA

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas C; Allardice, Gwen; MacFarlane, Duncan; Ramsay, Darren; Ambler, Heather; Banham, Stephen; Livingston, Eric; Carlin, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objective To validate the utilities of Berlin, STOP and STOP-BANG Questionnaires, other patient characteristics, comorbidities, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) and blood markers for the prediction of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) on limited polygraphy. Setting North Glasgow Sleep Service (a tertiary referral centre). Participants 129 consecutive patients, aged ≥16 years, referred to the sleep clinic for assessment of possible obstructive sleep apnoea. Interventions We selected cut-points of apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) of ≥5 and ≥15/h from their home polygraphy and determined associations of these with individual symptoms, questionnaire scores and other results. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to explore these. Primary and secondary outcomes measures Primary: The utility of STOP, STOP-BANG and Berlin Questionnaires for prediction of SDB. Secondary: The utility of other measures for prediction of SDB. Results AHI was ≥5 in 97 patients and ≥15 in 56 patients. STOP and STOP-BANG scores were associated with both AHI cut-points but results with ESS and Berlin Questionnaire scores were negative. STOP-BANG had a negative predictive value 1.00 (0.77–1.00) for an AHI ≥15 with a score ≥3 predicting AHI ≥5 with sensitivity 0.93 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.98) and accuracy 79%, while a score ≥6 predicted AHI ≥15 with specificity 0.78 (0.65 to 0.88) and accuracy 72%. Neck circumference ≥17 inch and presence of witnessed apnoeas were independent predictors of SDB. Conclusions STOP and STOP-BANG Questionnaires have utility for the prediction of SDB in the sleep clinic population. Modification of the STOP-BANG Questionnaire merits further study in this and other patient groups. PMID:24736037

  5. Gregor Mendel, OSA (1822-1884), founder of scientific genetics.

    PubMed

    Dunn, P M

    2003-11-01

    Gregor Mendel, an Augustinian monk and part-time school teacher, undertook a series of brilliant hybridisation experiments with garden peas between 1857 and 1864 in the monastery gardens and, using statistical methods for the first time in biology, established the laws of heredity, thereby establishing the discipline of genetics.

  6. Treatment of patients with OSAS using Nd-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    The authors present their clinical experience regarding the possibilities of application of Nd:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers for the treatment of disorders in the are of the upper respiratory tract. The patients with symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Aphnoe Syndrom need a various operations techniques. Lasers techniques makes it possible to perform a number of procedures in local anesthesia which considerably improves the economic effectiveness of the treatment. The surgeries performed using laser beam enabled very good effect of treatment.

  7. OSA Proceedings on Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics. Volume 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    of Anharmonicity and Disorder-Induced Effects in 2. N. S. Wingreen, K. W. Jacobsen, and J. W. Ga -lxAlxAs Epitaxial Layers", Phys. Rev. B24, Wilkins...probably not due to hot emission /absorption process at a higher phonon effects alone, but additionally energy has a lower wavevector associated anti...GaAs MESFET and HBT Technology in Picosecond Electronics ............. 139 KazuyoshiAsai and Tadao Ishibashi Electron-Hole Effects on the Velocity

  8. Process optimization of ultrasound-assisted curcumin nanoemulsions stabilized by OSA-modified starch.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shabbar; Bashari, Mohanad; Akhtar, Waseem; Li, Wei Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    This study reports on the process optimization of ultrasound-assisted, food-grade oil-water nanoemulsions stabilized by modified starches. In this work, effects of major emulsification process variables including applied power in terms of power density and sonication time, and formulation parameters, that is, surfactant type and concentration, bioactive concentration and dispersed-phase volume fraction were investigated on the mean droplet diameter, polydispersity index and charge on the emulsion droplets. Emulsifying properties of octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches, that is, Purity Gum 2000, Hi-Cap 100 and Purity Gum Ultra, and the size stability of corresponding emulsion droplets during the 1 month storage period were also investigated. Results revealed that the smallest and more stable nanoemulsion droplets were obtained when coarse emulsions treated at 40% of applied power (power density: 1.36 W/mL) for 7 min, stabilized by 1.5% (w/v) Purity Gum Ultra. Optimum volume fraction of oil (medium chain triglycerides) and the concentration of bioactive compound (curcumin) dispersed were 0.05 and 6 mg/mL oil, respectively. These results indicated that the ultrasound-assisted emulsification could be successfully used for the preparation of starch-stabilized nanoemulsions at lower temperatures (40-45 °C) and reduced energy consumption.

  9. Osa-miR169 Negatively Regulates Rice Immunity against the Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Sheng-Li; Li, Jin-Lu; Hu, Xiao-Hong; Wang, He; Cao, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yong-Ju; Zhao, Zhi-Xue; Xiao, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Nan; Fan, Jing; Huang, Fu; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2017-01-01

    miR169 is a conserved microRNA (miRNA) family involved in plant development and stress-induced responses. However, how miR169 functions in rice immunity remains unclear. Here, we show that miR169 acts as a negative regulator in rice immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae by repressing the expression of nuclear factor Y-A (NF-YA) genes. The accumulation of miR169 was significantly increased in a susceptible accession but slightly fluctuated in a resistant accession upon M. oryzae infection. Consistently, the transgenic lines overexpressing miR169a became hyper-susceptible to different M. oryzae strains associated with reduced expression of defense-related genes and lack of hydrogen peroxide accumulation at the infection site. Consequently, the expression of its target genes, the NF-YA family members, was down-regulated by the overexpression of miR169a at either transcriptional or translational level. On the contrary, overexpression of a target mimicry that acts as a sponge to trap miR169a led to enhanced resistance to M. oryzae. In addition, three of miR169’s target genes were also differentially up-regulated in the resistant accession upon M. oryzae infection. Taken together, our data indicate that miR169 negatively regulates rice immunity against M. oryzae by differentially repressing its target genes and provide the potential to engineer rice blast resistance via a miRNA. PMID:28144248

  10. Hydrogeological responses to incoming materials at the erosional subduction margin, offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Jun; Harris, Robert N.; Shimizu, Mayuko; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ikehara, Minoru; Uno, Masaoki; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Namiki, Yuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-09-01

    Bulk mineral assemblages of sediments and igneous basement rocks on the incoming Cocos Plate at the Costa Rica subduction zone are examined by X-ray diffraction analyses on core samples. These samples are from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334 reference Site U1381, ˜ 5 km seaward of the trench. Drilling recovered approximately 100 m of sediment and 70 m of igneous oceanic basement. The sediment includes two lithologic units: hemipelagic clayey mud and siliceous to calcareous pelagic ooze. The hemipelagic unit is composed of clay minerals (˜50 wt.%), quartz (˜5 wt.%), plagioclase (˜5 wt.%), calcite (˜15 wt.%) and ˜30 wt.% of amorphous materials, while the pelagic unit is mostly made up of biogenic amorphous silica (˜50 wt.%) and calcite (˜50 wt.%). The igneous basement rock consists of plagioclase (˜50-60 wt.%), clinopyroxene (˜>25 wt.%), and saponite (˜15-40 wt.%). Saponite is more abundant in pillow basalt than in the massive section, reflecting the variable intensity of alteration. We estimate the total water influx of the sedimentary package is 6.9 m3/yr per m of trench length. Fluid expulsion models indicate that sediment compaction during shallow subduction causes the release of pore water while peak mineral dehydration occurs at temperatures of approximately ˜100°C, 40-30 km landward of the trench. This region is landward of the observed updip extent of seismicity. We posit that in this region the presence of subducting bathymetric relief capped by velocity weakening nannofossil chalk is more important in influencing the updip extent of seismicity than the thermal regime.

  11. 'REM-related OSA': a forgotten diagnostic? Possible path to under-diagnosing sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Beneto, A; Soler-Algarra, S; Salavert, V

    2016-12-01

    Introduccion. Recientemente se han propugnado criterios restrictivos para definir el sindrome de apnea/hipopnea obstructiva ligado al sueño REM y persisten interrogantes sobre su trascendencia nosologica y manejo clinico. Objetivo. Evaluar los criterios definitorios de la apnea del sueño REM, su relacion con la comorbilidad cardiometabolica y los aspectos relacionados con su diagnostico. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio observacional retrospectivo sobre datos clinicos y polisomnograficos de pacientes ambulatorios. Se incluyo a 525 pacientes mayores de 18 años que tenian un indice apnea/hipopnea (IAH) por hora de sueño = 5 (total, o parcial en REM o no REM). Resultados. Se han configurado subgrupos 'dependientes de la fase' utilizando un criterio basado en la 'proporcion = 2' y otro 'estricto' basado en uno de los IAH parciales = 5 frente al otro IAH < 5 (en REM o en no REM). En el subgrupo 'apnea del sueño REM estricto', la mitad de los pacientes muestra un IAH global < 5 y menos gravedad en los parametros respiratorios, pero sin menores porcentajes de comorbilidad. Con los criterios diagnosticos actuales quedarian excluidos del diagnostico de sindrome de apnea/hipopnea obstructiva del sueño (SAHOS). Conclusiones. Aplicar un criterio estricto para detectar apnea del sueño REM permite filtrar formas muy leves de SAHOS asociadas a comorbilidad cardiometabolica en porcentajes no diferentes significativamente de otras formas mas graves. Para evitar el infradiagnostico del SAHOS seria oportuno revisar los criterios diagnosticos actuales y las indicaciones de las tecnicas reducidas.

  12. First Image Products from EcoSAR - Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Rincon, Rafael; Fatuyinbo, Lola; Bollian, Tobias; Ranson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Designed especially for forest ecosystem studies, EcoSAR employs state-of-the-art digital beamforming technology to generate wide-swath, high-resolution imagery. EcoSARs dual antenna single-pass imaging capability eliminates temporal decorrelation from polarimetric and interferometric analysis, increasing the signal strength and simplifying models used to invert forest structure parameters. Antennae are physically separated by 25 meters providing single pass interferometry. In this mode the radar is most sensitive to topography. With 32 active transmit and receive channels, EcoSARs digital beamforming is an order of magnitude more versatile than the digital beamforming employed on the upcoming NISAR mission. EcoSARs long wavelength (P-band, 435 MHz, 69 cm) measurements can be used to simulate data products for ESAs future BIOMASS mission, allowing scientists to develop algorithms before the launch of the satellite. EcoSAR can also be deployed to collect much needed data where BIOMASS satellite wont be allowed to collect data (North America, Europe and Arctic), filling in the gaps to keep a watchful eye on the global carbon cycle. EcoSAR can play a vital role in monitoring, reporting and verification schemes of internationals programs such as UN-REDD (United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) benefiting global society. EcoSAR was developed and flown with support from NASA Earth Sciences Technology Offices Instrument Incubator Program.

  13. Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Or is it OSA and Obesity?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    enjoyable physical activity before turning to edications. Depressed patients are often apathetic and lack otivation to exercise , but this simply...to increase physical activity , improve diet, and otherwise facilitate weight management ecome particularly vital given the epidemics of obesity and...sleepiness scores, nd self-reported physical activity decreased with increasing leepiness. They also found increased incidence of depres- ion with increased

  14. OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics Series. Volume 13: Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    David DiGiovanni, Uziel Koren, and Kevin Dreyer Multiwavelength , 10 GHz Picosecond Pulse Generation from a Single-Stripe Semiconductor Traveling...community. The change in slope in the experimental results that led to more rapid progress was due to the invention of an experimental trick which...feed-forward channel equalization for chirped pulse wavelength division multiplexing," Electr. Lett., vol. 33, p. 10-11,(1997). Multiwavelength

  15. OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics Series, Volume 14 Spatial Light Modulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Assessment of the Visual System Dean Yager, ed. Vol. 12 System Technologies , from OFC 󈨥 Curtis R Menyuk and Alan E . Willner, eds. Vol. 13... based on MQW technology . CMOS/SEED smart pixels, using flip-chip bonding of MQW arrays on CMOS, now enable optoelectronic systems to outperform their... system that allows three levels of metallized interconnect. Our optical interconnect technology is based on free-space holographic interconnect

  16. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds recorded with a smartphone according to obstruction site in OSAS patients.

    PubMed

    Koo, Soo Kweon; Kwon, Soon Bok; Kim, Yang Jae; Moon, J I Seung; Kim, Young Jun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Snoring is a sign of increased upper airway resistance and is the most common symptom suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds is a non-invasive diagnostic technique and may provide a screening test that can determine the location of obstruction sites. We recorded snoring sounds according to obstruction level, measured by DISE, using a smartphone and focused on the analysis of formant frequencies. The study group comprised 32 male patients (mean age 42.9 years). The spectrogram pattern, intensity (dB), fundamental frequencies (F 0), and formant frequencies (F 1, F 2, and F 3) of the snoring sounds were analyzed for each subject. On spectrographic analysis, retropalatal level obstruction tended to produce sharp and regular peaks, while retrolingual level obstruction tended to show peaks with a gradual onset and decay. On formant frequency analysis, F 1 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 488.1 ± 125.8 vs. 634.7 ± 196.6 Hz) and F 2 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 1267.3 ± 306.6 vs. 1723.7 ± 550.0 Hz) of retrolingual level obstructions showed significantly higher values than retropalatal level obstruction (p < 0.05). This suggests that the upper airway is more severely obstructed with retrolingual level obstruction and that there is a greater change in tongue position. Acoustic analysis of snoring is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that can be easily applied at a relatively low cost. The analysis of formant frequencies will be a useful screening test for the prediction of occlusion sites. Moreover, smartphone can be effective for recording snoring sounds.

  17. Tree Diversity and Dynamics of the Forest of Seu Nico, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leyh, Werner; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand future changes in community composition due to global changes, the knowledge about forest community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our understanding about processes and patterns involved in maintaining species rich Neotropical ecosystems, we provide here a dataset from the one hectare Forest of Seu Nico (FSN) Dynamics Plot from Southeastern Brazil. New information We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 2868 trees and treelets identified from two census spanning over a nine-year period. Furthermore, soil properties and understory light availability of all 100 10 x 10m subplots from the one hectare FSN Dynamics Plot during the second census are given. PMID:26312053

  18. OSA Proceedings on Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics Held in San Francisco, California on January 25 -27, 1993. Volume 14,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-27

    Venkatesan, Zhi- Yuan Shen, Philip Pang, Dennis J. Kountz, and William L Holstein Response of a Nb/A1203/Nb Tunnel Junction to Picosecond Electrical Pulses...Mwhra (edo) 0 1993 Optical Sockty ofAnierica 152 Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics core cladding COW MAD 75. 4UHN 1058nm 50Ps A A optical...Maryland. College Park; Maryland 20742 7hi-Yuan Shen, Philip Pang, Dennis J. Kountz, and William L. Holstein Central Research and Development, Du Pont, PO

  19. Converting a Manned LCU into an Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV): An Open Systems Architecture (OSA) Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    conduct development of several USV target drones ( Bertram n.d.) While USVs date back at least to World War II, it is only in the 1990s that a large...focus on littoral warfare 14 and anti-terrorism missions ( Bertram n.d.). Successful missions of USVs in the global war on terrorism have increased...Accessed July 23, 2014. NPS Dudley Knox Library Interlibrary Loan System. Bertram , Volker. n.d. Unmanned Surface Vehicles – A Survey. Technical Report

  20. A 51-Year-Old Woman With Hypoacusia and Increased Respiratory Effort in the Supine Position and OSA.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Barriales, Marcos; Vázquez Marcos, Virginia; Álvarez, Ainhoa; Odriozola, Beatriz; Alonso, Juan; Egea Santaolalla, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman with a personal history of vitiligo, normal thyroid hormone studies, a simple hysterectomy for multiple uterine myomas at age 35 years, and childhood adenotonsillectomy was seen for progressive hearing loss. She reported mild asthenia, cold intolerance, mild dysphagia with frequent choking while eating and drinking, and a progressive increase in inspiratory effort, especially in the supine position. Her partner described a progressively worsening history of snoring and witnessed apneic episodes, mostly in the supine position. Mild to moderate daytime sleepiness was also present.

  1. OSA Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Held in Monterey, California on 10-12 April 1991. Volume 12

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    Carbide because of its high thermal the mirror on its backside or edge. Shott Zerodur conductivity. Edge cooling causes a larger exceeded the limit by about...Characterization Angstrom-level noncontact profiling of mirrors for soft x-ray lithography............ 134 Paul Glenn Nonspecular Scattering from X-Ray...structed by patterning a Mo/Si Tropel Division of GCA Corporation. multilayer coated silicon wafer. The mirrors were coated at AT&T Bell The multilayer

  2. OSA (Optical Society of America) Proceedings on Short Wavelength Coherent Radiation: Generation and Applications Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on 26-29 September 1988. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    previously.[6] The spherical tem will allow the final alignment to be performed zerodur mirror blanks were custom fabricated by Zygo using x-rays...X-Ray Camera by D. A. Whela- M. R. Carter, D. F. Price, and R. E. Stewart .... ............ 371 Parabolic Mirror Electron Energy Analyzer for...up involving a single I. Introduction normal incidence multilayered mirror , put at the rear of a 60mm laser- On the way to get a usable soft x-ray

  3. Osa Topical Meeting Proceedings (4th) on Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics Held in Salt Lake City, Utah on 13-15 March 1991. Volume 9

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    photodiode, this device acts as a solar cell and converts the spontaneous emitted photons of the laser diode into electrical power, This Introduction...the of ultrashort optical pulses spaced by 2 ps to photoconductor elements, ln(I ) is the optical produce a burst at 500 GHz. A dual-jet, hybrid ...repetition of a pattern or cell . One A new type of log-periodic antenna, the wire log- advantage of this design is that it is resonant at spiral, has

  4. OSA Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Photonic Switching, Held in Salt Lake City, Utah on 6 - 8 March, 1992. Volume 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    Multiple Quantum-Well Modulator Arrays for Neural Network and Photonic Switching Applications ........................ 210 M. A. Z Rejman- Greene , E G. Scott...34. Kobe, Japan, April 12-14, 1990 16. OSCAR Annual Report, Part A2-CS5 2. N.F. Whitehead, OFC󈨞, January 22-26, 17. M. Gustavsson , A. Karlsson and L... Gustavsson and L. Thylen, Top. Meeting Topical Meetings on Photonic Switching, on Photonic Swithcing, Salt Lake City, 1-3 Kobe, Japan, April 12-14, 1990

  5. OSA Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on Optical Amplifiers and Their Applications, Held in Snowmass Village, Colorado on 24 - 26 July 1991. Volume 13

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    R. B. Lauer, P. band, B. Pedersen , Technical U., Denmark; S. Zemon, W. J. Mabrahtu, E. Eichen, GTE Laboratories, Inc. Ridge wave- Miniscalco, M. P...Systems per- formance in an EDFA power amplifier is described. (p. 38) CABARET LOBBY 12:00 m-1:30 pm LUNCH (on your own) 3.00 pm-3:30 pm COFFEE...CHECK-IN 4:30 pm-4:50 pm PP1 EDFA Consultants, Kingston, RI, Dr. Harish R. D. ANDERSON ROOM (Conference Center) Sunak, President, is author of

  6. OSA Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on Nonlinear Guided-Wave Phenomena Held in Cambridge, England (United Kingdom) on 2-4 September 1991. Volume 15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    constitute another potential limit in the throughput of an optical communication system; for erbium doped fiber amplifiers ( EDFA ) the output saturation power...degradation of the signal- to-noise power ratio (SNR) at the output of the communication line caused by the random fluctuations of a gain in lumped optical ...coherent optical communication , Johan Nilsson. Royal Institute of Technol- 5:30 pm-7:00 pm ogy, Sweden; Milan Dado, U. Transport & Communication , ME

  7. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  8. Tracking Pulse Oximeter Findings Before, During and After Titration of Mandibular Advancement Devices (MAD) for Patients With Mild to Moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    maxillary and mandibular dentition , worn at night and can be variably adjusted to move the lower jaw forward and advance the base of the tongue. Such...dentist assesses the suitability of the patient’s dentition for customized MAD treatment (Chan et al., 2007). This assessment includes a complete dental...WNL: -----------------~ Tooth sensitivity/percussion: ____________________ _ General description of the dentition : 84 Tooth Wear: Physiologic

  9. Piecing Together Phenotypes of Brain Injury and Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition that is associated with significant neurobehavioral impairments. Cognitive abnormalities identified in individuals with OSA include impaired verbal memory, planning, reasoning, vigilance, and mood. Therapy for OSA improves some but not all neurobehavioral outcomes, supporting a direct role for OSA in brain dysfunction and raising the question of irreversible injury from OSA. Recent clinical studies have refined the neurobehavioral, brain imaging, and electrophysiological characteristics of OSA, highlighting findings shared with aging and some unique to OSA. This review summarizes the cognitive, brain metabolic and structural, and peripheral nerve conduction changes observed in OSA that collectively provide a distinct phenotype of OSA brain injury and dysfunction. Findings in animal models of OSA provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying OSA neuronal injury that can be related back to human neural injury and dysfunction. A comprehensive phenotype of brain function and injury in OSA is essential for advancing diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of this common disorder. PMID:23087666

  10. Sleep Apnea Research in Animals. Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Swati; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that describes recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Animal models have been pivotal to the understanding of OSA pathogenesis, consequences, and treatment. In this review, we highlight the history of OSA research in animals and include the discovery of animals with spontaneous OSA, the induction of OSA in animals, and the emulation of OSA using exposures to intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. PMID:26448201

  11. OSA Proceedings of the Topical Meeting (5th) on Short-Wave Length Coherent Radiation: Generation and Applications Held in Monterey, California on 8-10 April 1991. Volume 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    after passing through the chamber-was blocked, first by an HR mirror , followed by two IR. filters. The spectrum of the SHG in the forward direction was...counterpropaganng pulse (the "probe pulse") with this "moving mirror ", we shift to a reference frame moving at the velocity 3c with the ionization...factor f2 (1 + 13) 2 as the frequency upshift. This is exactly analogous to a mirror which is physically moving. However, in contrast to a real mirror

  12. Three-year changes of prothrombotic factors in a cohort of South Africans with a high clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    von Känel, Roland; Malan, Nico T; Hamer, Mark; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus; Reimann, Manja; Malan, Leoné

    2016-01-01

    A hypercoagulable state might be one important mechanism linking obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with incident myocardial infarction and stroke. However, previous studies on prothrombotic factors in OSA are not uniform and cross-sectional. We longitudinally studied prothrombotic factors in relation to OSA risk, adjusting for baseline levels of prothrombotic factors, demographics, metabolic parameters, aspirin use, and life style factors. The Berlin Questionnaire and/or neck circumference were used to define high OSA risk in 329 South African teachers (48.0% male, 44.6% black) at baseline and at three-year follow-up. Von Willebrand factor (VWF), fibrinogen, D-dimer, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, clot lysis time (CLT), and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) were measured in plasma. At baseline 35.7% of participants had a high risk of OSA. At follow-up, persistently high OSA risk, persistently low OSA risk, OSA risk remission, and new-onset OSA risk were present in 26.1%, 53.2%, 9.4%, and 11.3% of participants, respectively. New-onset OSA risk was associated with a significant and longitudinal increase in VWF, fibrinogen, CLT, and suPAR relative to persistently low OSA risk; in VWF, fibrinogen, and suPAR relative to remitted OSA risk; and in VWF relative to persistently high OSA risk. Persistently high OSA risk was associated with an increase in CLT and suPAR relative to persistently low OSA risk and in D-dimer relative to remitted OSA risk. Remitted OSA risk was associated with D-dimer decrease relative to persistently low OSA risk. In OSA, hypercoagulability is a dynamic process with a most prominent three-year increase in individuals with new-onset OSA risk.

  13. The Benefits of Perioperative Screening for Sleep Apnea in Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Yamini; Wong, Jean; Nagappa, Mahesh; Chung, Frances

    2017-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Untreated OSA can lead to about a 2-fold increase in medical expenses, mainly because of cardiovascular morbidity. OSA is highly prevalent in the surgical population, with an increased risk of perioperative complications. This article describes the perioperative and long-term social and economic benefits of preoperative screening for OSA. Screening patients to identify high-risk OSA is important to decrease the adverse outcomes and associated health care costs in the perioperative period. Screening for OSA is particularly relevant because most patients are undiagnosed at the time of surgery.

  14. Managing Comorbid Illness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: What Can We Learn from Other Diseases?

    PubMed

    Conwell, Walter D; Tsai, Sheila C

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with numerous comorbid medical conditions. Symptoms of OSA may mimic those of comorbid conditions. The presence of OSA may worsen outcomes from the primary condition. Conversely, OSA treatment may benefit both sleep symptomatology and comorbid illness. Because of potential significant benefit, it is important to screen for sleep apnea symptoms, to have a low threshold to perform diagnostic testing, to treat OSA if present, and to closely monitor symptoms. OSA management does not necessarily replace, but rather, should be performed in conjunction with primary therapy for comorbid conditions.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Pathological Characteristics of Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Marco; Brant, Aaron; Blackford, Amanda L.; Griffin, James F.; Shindo, Koji; Barkley, Thomas; Rezaee, Neda; Hruban, Ralph H.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Prospective studies have identified obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a risk factor for increased overall cancer incidence and mortality. The potential role of OSA in the risk or progression of specific cancers is not well known. We hypothesized that pathological differences in pancreatic cancers from OSA cases compared to non-OSA cases would implicate OSA in pancreatic cancer progression. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 1031 patients who underwent surgical resection without neoadjuvant therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2003 and 2014 and compared the TNM classification of their cancer and their overall survival by patient OSA status. Results OSA cases were significantly more likely than non-OSA cases to have lymph node-negative tumors (37.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.004). Differences in the prevalence of nodal involvement of OSA vs. non-OSA cases were not associated with differences in other pathological characteristics such as tumor size, tumor location, resection margin status, vascular or perineural invasion, or other comorbidities more common to OSA cases (BMI, smoking, diabetes). A logistic regression model found that a diagnosis of OSA was an independent predictor of lymph node status (hazard ratio, 0.051, p = 0.038). Patients with OSA had similar overall survival compared to those without OSA (HR, 0.89, (0.65–1.24), p = 0.41). Conclusion The observed pathological differences between OSA-associated and non-OSA-associated pancreatic cancers supports the hypothesis that OSA can influence the pathologic features of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27732623

  16. Chronic obstructive sleep apnea accelerates pulmonary remodeling via TGF-β/miR-185/CoLA1 signaling in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xue; Yu, Chengyuan; Liu, Yang; Yan, Sen; Li, Wenpeng; Wang, Dingyu; Sun, Li; Han, Yu; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Song; Yun, Fengxiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Yue

    2016-09-06

    Chronic obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is considered to be associated with pulmonary diseases. However, the roles and mechanisms of OSA in pulmonary remodeling remain ambiguous. Thus, this study was aimed to elucidate the morphological and mechanical action of OSA in lung remodeling. In the present study, we employed a novel OSA model to mimic the OSA patient and investigate the role of OSA in pulmonary remodeling. We showed that pulmonary artery pressure of OSA group has no significant increased compared with the sham group. Nevertheless, we found that fibrotic tissue was predominantly located around the bronchi and vascular in the lung. Additionally, inflammatory cell infiltration was also detected in the peribonchial and perivascular space. The morphological change in OSA canines was ascertained by ultrastructure variation characterized by mitochondrial swelling, lamellar bodies degeneration and vascular smooth muscle incrassation. Moreover, sympathetic nerve sprouting was markedly increased in OSA group. Mechanistically, we showed that several pivotal proteins including collagen type I(CoLA1), GAP-43, TH and NGF were highly expressed in OSA groups. Furthermore, we found OSA could activated the expression of TGF-β, which subsequently suppressed miR-185 and promoted CoL A1 expression. This signaling cascade leads to pulmonary remodeling. In conclusion, Our data demonstrates that OSA can accelerate the progression of pulmonary remodeling through TGF-β/miR-185/CoLA1 signaling, which would potentially provide therapeutic strategies for chronic OSAS.

  17. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Timo; Töyräs, Juha; Muraja-Murro, Anu; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Kulkas, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The individual apnea, and hypopnea durations and desaturation event depth, duration, and area of 526 included patients were compared between supine and nonsupine positions in different OSA severity categories. Apnea events were 6.3%, 12.5%, and 11.1% longer (p < 0.001) in supine compared to nonsupine position in mild, moderate, and severe OSA categories, respectively. In moderate and severe OSA categories desaturation areas were 5.7% and 25.5% larger (p < 0.001) in supine position. In both positions the individual event severity was elevated along increasing OSA severity category (p < 0.05). Supine position elevates apnea duration in all and desaturation area in moderate and severe OSA severity categories. This might be more hazardous for supine OSA patients and therefore, estimation of clinical severity of OSA should incorporate also information about individual event characteristics besides AHI.

  18. Effect of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Dan M; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kerfeld, Mitchell J; Hambsch, Zakary J; Reisbig, Mark D; Agrawal, Devendra K; Youngblood, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    The perioperative care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is currently receiving much attention due to an increased risk for complications. It is established that postoperative changes in sleep architecture occur and this may have pathophysiological implications for OSA patients. Upper airway muscle activity decreases during rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Severe OSA patients exhibit exaggerated chemoreceptor-driven ventilation during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), which leads to central and obstructive apnea. This article critically reviewed the literature relevant to preoperative screening for OSA, prevalence of OSA in surgical populations and changes in postoperative sleep architecture relevant to OSA patients. In particular, we addressed three questions in regard to the effects of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture, the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to OSA. Indeed, these classes of drugs alter sleep architecture, which likely significantly contributes to abnormal postoperative sleep architecture, exacerbation of OSA and postoperative complications.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and autoimmune rheumatic disease: is there any link?

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E

    2013-10-01

    The association between autoimmune rheumatic diseases and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is complex. Systemic inflammation secondary to OSA may underlie this association. It is possible that OSA-related inflammation may trigger the occurrence of autoimmune rheumatic disease in genetically susceptible individuals. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases can lead to OSA or worsen preexisting OSA. Temporomandibular joint destruction, cervical spine subluxation and brainstem compression are the factors responsible for the above observation. Future studies are needed to clarify whether OSA is an independent risk factor for the development of autoimmune disease and whether OSA management will lead to a reduction in the incidence of autoimmune disease. On the other hand, it is important to treat autoimmune rheumatic disease promptly, to reduce the risk of complications, with OSA being one of these.

  20. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  1. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  2. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. These have been mechanistically linked to initiation of AF in OSA patients by lowering atrial effective refractory period, promoting pulmonary vein discharges and atrial dilation. OSA not only promotes initiation of AF but also makes management of AF difficult. Drug therapy and electrical cardioversion for AF are less successful in presence of OSA. There has been higher rate of early and overall recurrence after catheter ablation of AF in patients with OSA. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure has been shown to improve control of AF. However, additional studies are needed to establish a stronger relationship between OSA treatment and success of AF therapies. There should be heightened suspicion of OSA in patients with AF. There is a need for guidelines to screen for OSA as a part of AF management. PMID:23802045

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L J; Strollo, P J; Donegan, R B; Delmar, J; Hendrix, C; Westbrook, P R

    1995-06-01

    Adenotonsillar hypertrophy has been identified as an early manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Three patients with HIV disease were identified with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy. In order to examine the relationship between HIV-induced adenotonsillar hypertrophy and OSA, 134 patients with asymptomatic HIV disease were screened with a self-administered sleep survey designed to detect OSA and excessive daytime somnolence. Patients meeting trigger score criteria were studied with overnight polysomnography and nine additional patients were identified with OSA. The only consistent risk factor for OSA in this young and primarily nonobese population was the presence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy, found in 11 of 12 patients with OSA. Three patients had tonsillar biopsy or tonsillectomy and all displayed benign follicular lymphoid hyperplasia. Scores on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were significantly higher for patients with OSA, indicating a greater degree of hypersomnolence (mean ESS scores: OSA+ = 11.4 +/- 3.6, OSA- = 7.8 +/- 4.6, p = 0.012). In our population, patients with HIV disease had a prevalence of OSA of 7%. HIV-induced adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a risk factor for the development of OSA. HIV patients with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring who are found to have adenotonsillar hypertrophy on exam should undergo a sleep evaluation to rule out the presence of OSA.

  4. Pediatric Home Sleep Studies: A Prospective Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-19

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 1-5% of pediatric patients. Untreated pediatric OSA is associated with neurocognitive impairment...not always available, and is inconvenient for patients. Therefore, 90% of children undergo adenotonsillectomy without confirmatory diagnostic testing. Home sleep testing for OSA may alleviate these issues.

  5. Quality-of-life improvement after endoscopic sinus surgery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tajudeen, Bobby A.; Brooks, Steven G.; Yan, Carol H.; Kuan, Edward C.; Schwartz, Joseph S.; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Palmer, James N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is preliminary evidence that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and comorbid obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have reduced quality-of-life (QOL) improvements after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) compared with patients without OSA. The effect of OSA severity on QOL improvement after FESS is unknown. Objectives: To better characterize the QOL improvement after FESS for patients with comorbid OSA and to assess whether QOL improvement is dependent on OSA severity. Methods: This multi-institution, retrospective cohort study evaluated adult patients with CRS who underwent FESS between 2007 and 2015. Preoperative, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year postoperative 22-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test scores were used to evaluate QOL. We compared patients without OSA with patients with stratified OSA based on the preoperative apnea-hypopnea index. A multilevel, mixed-effects linear regression model was used for the analysis. Results: Of 480 participants, 83 (17%) had OSA, and 47 of these patients had polysomnography results available for review. Both patients with OSA and patients without OSA reported significant QOL improvement after surgery (p < 0.0001) relative to baseline. In the unadjusted model, the subjects with OSA demonstrated a statistically worse outcome in 22-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test scores at each time point (2.4 points higher per time point, p = 0.006). When controlling for covariates, the adjusted model showed no difference in QOL outcome based on OSA status (p = 0.114). When stratified by OSA disease severity, the adjusted model showed no difference in the QOL outcome. Conclusions: Patients with CRS and comorbid OSA had worse QOL outcomes after FESS; however, when controlling for patient factors, there was no difference in QOL outcome. OSA disease severity did not seem to predict QOL improvement after FESS. PMID:28381324

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Related to Impaired Cognitive and Functional Status after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, decreased functional outcome, and recurrent stroke. Research on the effect of OSA on cognitive functioning following stroke is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to compare stroke patients with and without OSA on cognitive and functional status upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Case-control study. Setting and Patients: 147 stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: All patients underwent sleep examination for diagnosis of OSA. We assessed cognitive status by neuropsychological examination and functional status by two neurological scales and a measure of functional independence. Results: We included 80 stroke patients with OSA and 67 stroke patients without OSA. OSA patients were older and had a higher body mass index than patients without OSA. OSA patients performed worse on tests of attention, executive functioning, visuoperception, psychomotor ability, and intelligence than those without OSA. No differences were found for vigilance, memory, and language. OSA patients had a worse neurological status, lower functional independence scores, and a longer period of hospitalization in the neurorehabilitation unit than the patients without OSA. OSA status was not associated with stroke type or classification. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a lower cognitive and functional status in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. This underlines the importance of OSA as a probable prognostic factor, and calls for well-designed randomized controlled trials to study its treatability. Citation: Aaronson JA, van Bennekom CA, Hofman WF, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Obstructive sleep apnea is related to impaired cognitive and functional status after stroke. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1431–1437. PMID

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  8. Effectiveness of Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery in sleep apnea treatment: Case report.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Otávio; Guimarães, Thais M; Rossi, Rowdley R; Cunali, Paulo A; Fabbro, Cibele Dal; Chaves, Cauby M; Maluly, Milton; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by episodes of pharyngeal collapse during sleep. Craniofacial alterations such as retrognathia are often found in OSA patients. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgeries increase the pharyngeal space and are a treatment option for OSA. The aim of this study was to present a successful case of MMA surgery in the treatment of OSA. A patient with moderate OSA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)=25.2) and mandibular retrognathism and Maxillomandibular asymmetry underwent MMA surgery. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were considerably improved after six months (IAH =6.7) and one year of treatment (IAH=0.2).

  9. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  10. Assessment of the calcification of the nuchal ligament and osteophytes of the cervical spine in obstructive sleep apnoea subjects and snorers.

    PubMed

    Ando, E; Shigeta, Y; Nejima, J; Yamanaka, H; Hirai, S; Ogawa, T; Clark, G T; Enciso, R

    2016-02-01

    The previous reports suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is related to metabolic syndrome, mineral metabolism disorders and cardiovascular disease. In addition, a possible relationship between obesity and the calcification of ligaments has been implied. However, the potential link between OSA and the calcification of ligaments has not been directly studied. In this present study, to investigate the potential link between OSA and the calcification of ligaments, we examined the prevalence of the calcification of ligaments in OSA patients and the relationship between these findings and OSA severity. Eighty consecutive patients (60 males, 20 females) diagnosed as OSA or a heavy snorer based on full-night polyso-mnography were retrospectively recruited from May 2006 to July 2008. Each patient underwent cephalometric imaging examination before the arrangement of an oral appliance. One calibrated observer (YS) reviewed the cephalometric images for the presence of calcification of the nuchal ligament and osteophytes of the cervical spine. The prevalence of calcification of the nuchal ligament in OSA patients and snorers was 46.3% (males: 52%, females: 30%) There was a significant positive correlation between the severity of OSA (AHI) and the calcification of the nuchal ligament before and after adjusting for BMI. The prevalence of the calcification of the nuchal ligament in OSA subjects and snorers was higher than in previous studies with non-OSA subjects. In addition, it is suggested that the severity of OSA correlates with the presence of calcification of the nuchal ligament.

  11. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  12. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Durgan, David J.; Ganesh, Bhanu P.; Cope, Julia L.; Ajami, Nadim J.; Phillips, Sharon C.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Hollister, Emily B.; Bryan, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for systemic hypertension. The importance of a healthy gut microbiota, and detriment of a dysbiotic microbiota, on host physiology is becoming increasingly evident. We tested the hypothesis that gut dysbiosis contributes to hypertension observed with OSA. OSA was modeled in rats by inflating a tracheal balloon during the sleep cycle (10 sec inflations, 60/hour). On normal chow diet, OSA had no effect on blood pressure; however, in rats fed a high fat diet, blood pressure increased 24 and 29mmHg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively (p<0.05 each). Bacterial community characterization was performed on fecal pellets isolated before and after 14 days of OSA in chow and high fat fed rats. High fat diet and OSA led to significant alterations of the gut microbiota including decreases in bacterial taxa known to produce the short chain fatty acid butyrate (p<0.05). Finally, transplant of dysbiotic cecal contents from hypertensive OSA rats on high fat diet into OSA recipient rats on normal chow diet (shown to be normotensive) resulted in hypertension similar to that of the donor (increased 14 and 32mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively; p<0.05). These studies demonstrate a causal relationship between gut dysbiosis and hypertension, and suggest that manipulation of the microbiota may be a viable treatment for OSA-induced, and possibly other forms of, hypertension. PMID:26711739

  13. Obstructive sleep apnoea in the general population: highly prevalent but minimal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Erna S; Bjornsdottir, Erla; Olafsdottir, Kristin A; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to assess the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as defined by an apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 in the middle-aged general population, and the interrelationship between OSA, sleep-related symptoms, sleepiness and vigilance.A general population sample of 40-65-year-old Icelanders was invited to participate in a study protocol that included a type 3 sleep study, questionnaire and a psychomotor vigilance test (PVT).Among the 415 subjects included in the study, 56.9% had no OSA (AHI <5), 24.1% had mild OSA (AHI 5-14.9), 12.5% had moderate OSA (AHI 15-29.9), 2.9% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30) and 3.6% were already diagnosed and receiving OSA treatment. However, no significant relationship was found between AHI and subjective sleepiness or clinical symptoms. A relationship with objective vigilance assessed by PVT was only found for those with AHI ≥30. Subjects already on OSA treatment and those accepting OSA treatment after participating in the study were more symptomatic and sleepier than others with similar OSA severity, as assessed by the AHI.In a middle-aged general population, approximately one in five subjects had moderate-to-severe OSA, but the majority of them were neither symptomatic nor sleepy and did not have impaired vigilance.

  14. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Ganesh, Bhanu P; Cope, Julia L; Ajami, Nadim J; Phillips, Sharon C; Petrosino, Joseph F; Hollister, Emily B; Bryan, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for systemic hypertension. The importance of a healthy gut microbiota, and detriment of a dysbiotic microbiota, on host physiology is becoming increasingly evident. We tested the hypothesis that gut dysbiosis contributes to hypertension observed with OSA. OSA was modeled in rats by inflating a tracheal balloon during the sleep cycle (10-s inflations, 60 per hour). On normal chow diet, OSA had no effect on blood pressure; however, in rats fed a high-fat diet, blood pressure increased 24 and 29 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively (P<0.05 each). Bacterial community characterization was performed on fecal pellets isolated before and after 14 days of OSA in chow and high-fat fed rats. High-fat diet and OSA led to significant alterations of the gut microbiota, including decreases in bacterial taxa known to produce the short chain fatty acid butyrate (P<0.05). Finally, transplant of dysbiotic cecal contents from hypertensive OSA rats on high-fat diet into OSA recipient rats on normal chow diet (shown to be normotensive) resulted in hypertension similar to that of the donor (increased 14 and 32 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively; P<0.05). These studies demonstrate a causal relationship between gut dysbiosis and hypertension, and suggest that manipulation of the microbiota may be a viable treatment for OSA-induced, and possibly other forms of, hypertension.

  15. Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Garvey, John F; Pengo, Martino F; Drakatos, Panagis; Kent, Brian D

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is probably the most common respiratory disorder, with recent data from the United States and Europe suggesting that between 14% and 49% of middle-aged men have clinically significant OSA. The intimate relationship between OSA and obesity means that its prevalence will only increase as the global obesity epidemic evolves. At an individual level, OSA leads to a significant decrease in quality of life (QOL) and functional capacity, alongside a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Emerging data also suggest that the presence and severity of OSA and associated nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. At a societal level, OSA not only leads to reduced economic productivity, but also constitutes a major treatable risk factor for hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. This article addresses OSA from an epidemiological perspective, from prevalence studies to economic aspects to co-morbidity.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Karkinski, Dimitar; Georgievski, Oliver; Dzekova-Vidimliski, Pavlina; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Dokic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a great interest in the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic dysfunction, but there is no consistent data suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for dyslipidemia. AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients suspected of OSA, referred to our sleep laboratory for polysomnography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred patients referred to our hospital with suspected OSA, and all of them underwent for standard polysomnography. All patients with respiratory disturbance index (RDI) above 15 were diagnosed with OSA. In the morning after 12 hours fasting, the blood sample was collected from all patients. Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), were determined in all study patients. In the study, both OSA positive and OSA negative patients were divided according to the body mass index (BMI) in two groups. The first group with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 and the second group with BMI > 30 kg/m^2. RESULTS: OSA positive patients with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 had statistically significant higher levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, and statistically significant lower level of HDL compared to OSA negative patients with BMI ≤ 30. There were no statistically significant differences in age and LDL levels between these groups. OSA positive patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2 had higher levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL and lower levels of HDL versus OSA negative patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2, but without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION: OSA and obesity are potent risk factors for dyslipidemias. OSA could play a significant role in worsening of lipid metabolism in non-obese patients. But in obese patients, the extra weight makes the metabolic changes of lipid metabolism, and the role of OSA is not that very important like in non-obese patients. PMID

  17. Prevalence and correlates of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with and without HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    KUNISAKI, Ken M.; AKGÜN, Kathleen M.; FIELLIN, David A.; GIBERT, Cynthia L.; KIM, Joon W.; RIMLAND, David; RODRIGUEZ-BARRADAS, Maria C.; YAGGI, H. Klar; CROTHERS, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In HIV-uninfected populations, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is commonly associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and cognitive impairment. These comorbidities are common in HIV-infected patients, but there are scarce data regarding OSA in HIV-infected patients. Therefore, we examined the prevalence and correlates of OSA in a cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected patients. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Electronic medical record and self-report data were examined in patients enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) between 2002-2008 and followed through 2010. The primary outcome was OSA diagnosis, determined using ICD-9 codes, in HIV-infected compared with uninfected. We used regression analyses to determine the association between OSA diagnosis, symptoms and comorbidities in adjusted models. Results Of 3,683 HIV-infected and 3,641 uninfected patients, 143 (3.9%) and 453 (12.4%) had a diagnosis of OSA (p<0.0001), respectively. HIV-infected patients were more likely to report symptoms associated with sleep and OSA such as tiredness and fatigue. Compared with uninfected patients with OSA, HIV-infected patients with OSA were younger, had lower BMIs, and were less likely to have hypertension. In models adjusting for these traditional OSA risk factors, HIV infection was associated with markedly reduced odds of OSA diagnosis (odds ratio=0.48; 95% confidence interval 0.39—0.60). Conclusions HIV-infected patients are less likely to receive a diagnosis of OSA. Future studies are needed to determine whether the lower prevalence of OSA diagnoses in HIV-infected patients is due to decreased screening and detection or due to a truly decreased likelihood of OSA in the setting of HIV. PMID:25230851

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea related to rapid-eye-movement or non-rapid-eye-movement sleep: comparison of demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic features

    PubMed Central

    Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Sertogullarından, Bunyamin; Ozbay, Bulent; Gunbatar, Hulya; Ekin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine whether there are significant differences between rapid-eye-movement (REM)-related obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and non-REM (NREM)-related OSA, in terms of the demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic characteristics of the subjects. Methods : This was a retrospective study of 110 patients (75 males) with either REM-related OSA (n = 58) or NREM-related OSA (n = 52). To define REM-related and NREM-related OSA, we used a previously established criterion, based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): AHI-REM/AHI-NREM ratio > 2 and ≤ 2, respectively. Results : The mean age of the patients with REM-related OSA was 49.5 ± 11.9 years, whereas that of the patients with NREM-related OSA was 49.2 ± 12.6 years. The overall mean AHI (all sleep stages combined) was significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (38.6 ± 28.2 vs. 14.8 ± 9.2; p < 0.05). The mean AHI in the supine position (s-AHI) was also significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (49.0 ± 34.3 vs. 18.8 ± 14.9; p < 0.0001). In the NREM-related OSA group, the s-AHI was higher among the men. In both groups, oxygen desaturation was more severe among the women. We found that REM-related OSA was more common among the patients with mild-to-moderate OSA, whereas NREM-related OSA was more common among those with severe OSA. Conclusions : We found that the severity of NREM-related OSA was associated mainly with s-AHI. Our findings suggest that the s-AHI has a more significant effect on the severity of OSA than does the AHI-REM. When interpreting OSA severity and choosing among treatment modalities, physicians should take into consideration the sleep stage and the sleep posture. PMID:26982041

  19. Serum Vitamin D Is Significantly Inversely Associated with Disease Severity in Caucasian Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kerley, Conor P.; Hutchinson, Katrina; Bolger, Kenneth; McGowan, Aisling; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and possible relationships to OSAS severity, sleepiness, lung function, nocturnal heart rate (HR), and body composition. We also aimed to compare the 25(OH)D status of a subset of OSAS patients compared to controls matched for important determinants of both OSAS and vitamin D deficiency (VDD). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at an urban, clinical sleep medicine outpatient center. We recruited newly diagnosed, Caucasian adults who had recently undergone nocturnal polysomnography. We compared body mass index (BMI), body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis), neck circumference, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), lung function, and vitamin D status (serum 25-hydrpoxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) across OSAS severity categories and non-OSAS subjects. Next, using a case-control design, we compared measures of serum 25(OH)D from OSAS cases to non-OSAS controls who were matched for age, gender, skin pigmentation, sleepiness, season, and BMI. Results: 106 adults (77 male; median age = 54.5; median BMI = 34.3 kg/m2) resident in Dublin, Ireland (latitude 53°N) were recruited and categorized as non-OSAS or mild/moderate/severe OSAS. 98% of OSAS cases had insufficient 25(OH)D (< 75 nmol/L), including 72% with VDD (< 50 nmol/L). 25(OH)D levels decreased with OSAS severity (P = 0.003). 25(OH)D was inversely correlated with BMI, percent body fat, AHI, and nocturnal HR. Subsequent multivariate regression analysis revealed that 25(OH)D was independently associated with both AHI (P = 0.016) and nocturnal HR (P = 0.0419). Our separate case-control study revealed that 25(OH)D was significantly lower in OSAS cases than matched, non-OSAS subjects (P = 0.001). Conclusions: We observed widespread vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in a Caucasian, OSAS population. There were significant, independent, inverse relationships between 25(OH)D and AHI as well as

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Taryn; Zolezzi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms. PMID:26508864

  1. Prevalence and Diagnostic Approach to Sleep Apnea in Hemodialysis Patients: A Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Forni Ogna, Valentina; Ogna, Adam; Pruijm, Menno; Bassi, Isabelle; Zuercher, Emilie; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Bullani, Roberto; Teta, Daniel; Gauthier, Thierry; Cherpillod, Anne; Mathieu, Claudine; Mihalache, Alexandra; Cornette, Francoise; Haba-Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous observations found a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the hemodialysis population, but the best diagnostic approach remains undefined. We assessed OSA prevalence and performance of available screening tools to propose a specific diagnostic algorithm. Methods. 104 patients from 6 Swiss hemodialysis centers underwent polygraphy and completed 3 OSA screening scores: STOP-BANG, Berlin's Questionnaire, and Adjusted Neck Circumference. The OSA predictors were identified on a derivation population and used to develop the diagnostic algorithm, which was validated on an independent population. Results. We found 56% OSA prevalence (AHI ≥ 15/h), which was largely underdiagnosed. Screening scores showed poor performance for OSA screening (ROC areas 0.538 [SE 0.093] to 0.655 [SE 0.083]). Age, neck circumference, and time on renal replacement therapy were the best predictors of OSA and were used to develop a screening algorithm, with higher discriminatory performance than classical screening tools (ROC area 0.831 [0.066]). Conclusions. Our study confirms the high OSA prevalence and highlights the low diagnosis rate of this treatable cardiovascular risk factor in the hemodialysis population. Considering the poor performance of OSA screening tools, we propose and validate a specific algorithm to identify hemodialysis patients at risk for OSA for whom further sleep investigations should be considered. PMID:26229952

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes: interacting epidemics.

    PubMed

    Tasali, Esra; Mokhlesi, Babak; Van Cauter, Eve

    2008-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major public health concern with high morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Recent reports have indicated that the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). There is compelling evidence that OSA is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Rapidly accumulating data from both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that OSA is also independently associated with alterations in glucose metabolism and places patients at an increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. Experimental studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that intermittent hypoxia and reduced sleep duration due to sleep fragmentation, as occur in OSA, exert adverse effects on glucose metabolism. Based on the current evidence, clinicians need to address the risk of OSA in patients with type 2 diabetes and, conversely, evaluate the presence of type 2 diabetes in patients with OSA. Clearly, there is a need for further research, using well-designed studies and long-term follow-up, to fully demonstrate a causal role for OSA in the development and severity of type 2 diabetes. In particular, future studies must carefully consider the confounding effects of central obesity in examining the link between OSA and alterations in glucose metabolism. The interactions among the rising epidemics of obesity, OSA, and type 2 diabetes are likely to be complex and involve multiple pathways. A better understanding of the relationship between OSA and type 2 diabetes may have important public health implications.

  3. A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Micha T; Schoch, Otto D; Rickli, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA. PMID:27051291

  4. Body Composition, Anthropometric Indices and Hydration Status of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: Can Cachexia Coexist with Obesity?

    PubMed

    Kuźnar-Kamińska, Barbara; Grabicki, Marcin; Trafas, Tomasz; Szulińska, Monika; Cofta, Szczepan; Piorunek, Tomasz; Brajer-Luftmann, Beata; Nowicka, Agata; Bromińska, Barbara; Batura-Gabryel, Halina

    2017-03-03

    The aim of this study was to elucidate body composition, anthropometric indices, and hydration status in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, taking into account different disease stages, gender, and the possibility of the presence of cachexia. There were 98 OSA patients and 23 control subjects enrolled into the study. All study participants underwent polysomnography examination. Body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), fat free mass, muscle mass, body cell mass, total body water, and extracellular and intracellular water were evaluated. The neck, abdominal, and waist circumference was measured. We found that overweight and obesity were present in 96% of patients. Cachexia was present in one OSA individual with comorbidities. Apnea-hypopnea index correlated with the neck and waist circumference, and with BMI in OSA patients. All muscle indices and water contents above outlined were significantly higher in severe OSA compared with control subjects. BMI, FMI, neck circumference, and extracellular water were greater in a subset of severe OSA compared with a moderate OSA stage. The female OSA patients had a higher FMI than that present in males at a comparable BMI. We conclude that the most body composition indices differed significantly between severe OSA patients and control subjects. A higher FMI in females at a comparable BMI could be due to a discordance between BMI and FMI. Cachexia occurs rarely in OSA and seems to coexist with comorbidities.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypertension in Adolescents: Effect on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Madaeva, Irina; Polyakov, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data in regard to the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension and neurobehavioral and mental status in adolescence. The aim of our study was to evaluate neurobehavioral patterns and cognitive functions in adolescents with hypertension according to absence or presence of OSA. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study completed at the Scientific Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems. Participants included adolescents aged 14–17 years and referred for 24-hour ambulance blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and polysomnographic (PSG) studies between 2007 and 2009, inclusive. Results. 18 hypertensive OSA (the 1st group) and 20 hypertensive non-OSA adolescents (the 2nd group) were included in the study. Significant changes of neurobehavioral functioning in OSA patients were shown. Cognitive abilities also were impaired. Verbal and visual memory indexes and attention index were 2.1 and 2.2 times lower, accordingly, in the 1st group than in the 2nd group (P < 0.05). Speech index was significantly 2.8 times lower in OSA patients than in non-OSA patients (P < 0.05). In hypertensive OSA adolescents more significant Spearman correlations between classic sleep parameters and cognitive measures were found compared to patients without OSA. Conclusions. These results suggest that OSA is closely associated with neurobehavioral and cognitive functioning in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:27445534

  6. High levels of inflammation and insulin resistance in obstructive sleep apnea patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoshun; Yin, Tong; Li, Tianzhi; Kang, Chunyan; Guo, Ruibiao; Sun, Baojun; Liu, Changting

    2012-08-01

    Hypertension induced by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be multifactorial in origin, and systemic inflammation is one of the major factors. However, OSA patients do not always have the identical probability with hypertension even in patients with the same history and degree of OSA. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of inflammation and insulin resistance in two groups of patients who had the same degree as well as the same long history of OSA, but with/without hypertension. OSA patients (Apnea Hyponea Index, AHI ≥ 40/h, n = 70) were examined by polysomnography and blood analysis for the measurements of fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin (FINS), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), peptide C,TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10. Patients with hypertension (n = 40) had higher level of LDL-C and lower HDL-C levels than patients without hypertension. Almost half (16/40) of OSA patients with hypertension had family history of hypertension. Moreover in OSA patients with hypertension, the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and CRP were higher, but IL-10 was lower than those without hypertension. FINS, peptide C, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-islet were also higher in OSA patients with hypertension. OSA patients with hypertension have higher level of inflammation and insulin resistance. Systemic inflammation and insulin resistance are both important factors for the development of hypertension in OSA patients.

  7. Reaction of octenylsuccinic anhydride with a mixture of granular starch and soluble maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2013-11-06

    The reaction of octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) with a mixture of granular waxy maize starch and soluble maltodextrin was investigated. OSA was reacted with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of the granular starch and maltodextrin at OSA levels of 1.5, 3, 9, and 15% (wt% based on starch weight). After the first 0.5h of the reaction, degree of substitution (DS) on maltodextrin reached 0.021, 0.030, 0.080, and 0.10 for 1.5, 3, 9, and 15% OSA, respectively, whereas DS for granular starch was only 0.0020, 0.0087, 0.014, and 0.016. At 2h of the reaction, the bound OS ratio of maltodextrin to granular starch was 10.8 when OSA concentration was 1.5% and the ratio decreased to ca. 5 at higher OSA concentrations. OSA preferred to react with maltodextrin than semi-crystalline granular starch when both existed in the system. OSA reacted with maltodextrin at a much faster rate and to a greater extent than with granular starch, but a significant amount of OSA reacted with granular starch at 3-15% OSA concentrations.

  8. [Obstructive sleep-apnoea syndrome in adult and its perioperative management].

    PubMed

    Payen, J-F; Jaber, S; Levy, P; Pepin, J-L; Fischler, M

    2010-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome in adult is defined as an Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index (AHI) of 5 or more per hour of sleep in a context of excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring. OSA is considered as mild with an AHI of 5-15, moderate with an AHI of 15-30, and severe with an AHI greater than 30. OSA is a highly prevalent disease since it should affect 7-15% of the middle-aged population, but most patients are not yet diagnosed for OSA. Middle age, male gender, obesity and arterial hypertension are main risk factors for OSA in adults. OSA patients are exposed to higher neurological and cardiovascular morbidity, including stroke, depression, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, arrhythmias. Because OSA may lead to life-threatening problems if undiagnosed, anaesthesiologists should be aware of their screening role in the preoperative period. In that way, the STOP-BANG questionnaire is a well-adapted instrument to screen patients for OSA during the preoperative visit. OSA patients are exposed to higher preoperative morbidity in relation with OSA severity, particularly difficult manual ventilation with mask, difficult tracheal intubation and postoperative upper airway obstruction. The unknown diagnosis of OSA is one major contributor to facilitate the occurrence of those events. In the postoperative period, early resuming continuous positive airway pressure and installing the OSA patient in a nonsupine position could be effective in preventing pharyngeal obstruction. Considering the timing of postoperative complications, a careful monitoring in the post-anesthesia care unit for three hours is an appropriate strategy for a majority of OSA patients. Alternatives to opioids should be promoted for postoperative pain control.

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Syndrome in Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Bienvenido; Garcia, Luis; Lozano, Lourdes; Almagro, Pere; Quintana, Salvador; Alsina, Monserrat; Heredia, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a clinical picture characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, some of which are components of metabolic syndrome (MS). Objectives: First, determine the prevalence of MS in patients with OSA visited in sleep clinic. Second, evaluate whether there is an independent association between MS components and the severity of OSA. Methods: Patients with clinical suspicion of OSA were evaluated by polysomnography. Three groups were defined according to apnea hypoapnea index (AHI): no OSA (AHI <5), mild-moderate (AHI≥ 5 ≤30), and severe (AHI> 30). All patients were determined in fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin. MS was defined according to criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Results: A total of 141 patients (mean age 54 ± 11 years) were evaluated. According to AIH, 25 subjects had no OSA and 116 had OSA (41mild-moderate and 75 severe). MS prevalence ranged from 43-81% in OSA group. Also, a significant increase in waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, blood pressure levels, and a decrease in HDL cholesterol levels was observed in more severe OSA patients. All polysomnographic parameters correlated significantly with metabolic abnormalities. After a multiple regression analysis, abdominal obesity (p <0.02), glucose (p <0.01) and HDL cholesterol (p <0.001) were independently associated with OSA. Conclusions: Our findings show high prevalence of MS in OSA, especially in severe group. A significant association between OSA and some of the components of MS was found in Spanish population. PMID:24222804

  10. Evaluation of the risk factors of depressive disorders comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liqiang; Xu, Luoyi; Wei, Lili; Sun, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Overlap of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) complicates diagnosis of depressive disorder and renders antidepressant treatment challenging. Previous studies have reported that the incidence of OSA is higher in patients with depression than in the general population. The purpose of this article was to investigate clinical risk factors to predict OSA in depression disorders. Methods A total of 115 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (in a major depressive episode), who underwent overnight polysomnography, were studied retrospectively. They were divided into two groups: non-OSA and OSA. The patients who had apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) <5 were defined as the non-OSA group, whereas the OSA group was defined as those with an AHI ≥5. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association among AHI and clinical factors, including sex, age, body mass index (BMI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and diagnosis (MDD or bipolar disorder [in a major depressive episode]). Results In 115 patients, 51.3% had OSA. Logistic regression analysis showed significant associations between AHI and diagnosis (MDD or bipolar disorder [in a major depressive episode]), BMI, HAMD, and PSQI (P<0.05). Conclusion The findings of our study suggested that the rate of depression being comorbid with OSA is remarkably high and revealed that there is a high rate of undetected OSA among depressive disorder patients and untreated OSA among mood disorder patients. The clinical risk factors (diagnosis [MDD or bipolar disorder {in a major depressive episode}], BMI, HAMD, and PSQI) could predict AHI or OSA diagnosis and contribute to OSA screening in depressive disorder patients. PMID:28144146

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee Jung; Kang, Eui Chun; Lee, Junwon; Han, Jinu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our study aimed to determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) patients without systemic risk factors using a Watch PAT-100 portable monitoring device. Methods The study participants included consecutive patients with BRVO of less than 3 months duration without any risk factors known to be associated with OSA (diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, hematologic diseases, autoimmune disease, etc.) except for hypertension. All patients underwent full-night unattended polysomnography by means of a portable monitor Watch PAT-100 device. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was calculated as the average number of apnea and hypopnea events per hour of sleep, and an AHI score of five or more events was diagnosed as OSA. Results Among 19 patients (6 males and 13 females), 42.1% (8 of 19) had an AHI reflective of OSA. In the 13 patients who had no concurrent illness, including hypertension, 30.8% (4 of 13) had positive test results for OSA; three of these patients were ranked as mild OSA, while one had moderate OSA. The OSA group had an average AHI of 12.3 ± 7.8, and the average AHI was 2.0 ± 0.9 in the non-OSA group. Although it was not statistically proven, we found that OSA patients experienced a more severe form of BRVO. Conclusions We found a higher than expected rate of OSA in BRVO patients lacking concomitant diseases typically associated with OSA. Our findings suggest that OSA could be an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of BRVO or at least a frequently associated condition that could function as a triggering factor. PMID:27051260

  12. Coexistence of obstructive sleep apnea worsens the overall outcome of intracranial aneurysm: a pioneer study.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Nanda, Anil; Cuellar, Hugo; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Liendo, Cesar; Minagar, Alireza; Chernyshev, Oleg Y

    2017-03-21

    OBJECTIVE Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. However, the role of OSA in the overall outcome of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) has not yet been established. Authors of this report investigated the role of OSA in the overall outcome of IAs. METHODS Radiological and clinical data on patients (from 2010 through 2015) with confirmed IA were retrospectively reviewed. Significant differences between the OSA and non-OSA groups were determined using a chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of an unfavorable IA outcome. RESULTS Among the 283 patients with confirmed IAs, 45 patients (16%) were positively screened for OSA, a proportion that was significantly higher than the prevalence of OSA in nonaneurysmal neurosurgical patients (4%, p = 0.008). The percentage of patients with hypertension (p = 0.018), a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (p < 0.0001), hyperlipidemia (p = 0.034), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.005), chronic heart disease (CHD; p = 0.024), or prior stroke (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. Similarly, the percentage of wide-necked aneurysms (p = 0.00001) and patients with a poor Hunt and Hess Grade IV-V (p = 0.01) was significantly higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group. In addition, the percentage of ruptured aneurysms (p = 0.03) and vasospasms (p = 0.03) was significantly higher in the OSA group. The percentage of patients with poor modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores (3-6) was significantly higher in the OSA group (p = 0.03). A separate cohort of patients with ruptured IAs showed similar results. In both univariate (p = 0.01) and multivariate (p = 0.04) regression analyses, OSA was identified as an individual predictor of an unfavorable outcome. In addition, hypertension and prior stroke were revealed as predictors of a poor IA outcome. CONCLUSIONS Complications of IA such as rupture and

  13. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk

  14. Predictive abilities of the STOP-Bang and Epworth Sleepiness Scale in identifying sleep clinic patients at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vana, Kimberly D; Silva, Graciela E; Goldberg, Rochelle

    2013-02-01

    This study compared the predictive abilities of the STOP-Bang and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) for screening sleep clinic patients for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Forty-seven new adult patients without previous diagnoses of OSA or SDB were administered the STOP-Bang and ESS and were assigned to OSA or SDB risk groups based on their scores. STOP-Bang responses were scored with two Body Mass Index cut points of 35 and 30 kg/m(2) (SB35 and SB30). The tools' predictive abilities were determined by comparing patients' predicted OSA and SDB risks to their polysomnographic results. The SB30 correctly identified more patients with OSA and SDB than the ESS alone. The ESS had the highest specificity for OSA and SDB.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Preethi; Greenberg, Harly

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic risk in several large epidemiologic studies. OSA leads to several physiologic disturbances such as intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increase in autonomic tone. These disturbances have been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in animal and human studies. Studies also suggest a bidirectional relationship between OSA and T2DM whereby T2DM itself might contribute to the features of OSA. Moreover, successful treatment of OSA may reduce these risks, although this is controversial. The purpose of this article is to review 1) the links and bidirectional associations between OSA and T2DM; 2) the pathogenic mechanisms that might link these two disease states; 3) the role of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in improving glucose tolerance, sensitivity, and resistance; and 4) the implications for clinical practice. PMID:26491377

  16. Evaluation of optimal water fluoridation on the incidence and skeletal distribution of naturally arising osteosarcoma in pet dogs.

    PubMed

    Rebhun, R B; Kass, P H; Kent, M S; Watson, K D; Withers, S S; Culp, W T N; King, A M

    2016-01-14

    Experimental toxicological studies in laboratory animals and epidemiological human studies have reported a possible association between water fluoridation and osteosarcoma (OSA). To further explore this possibility, a case-control study of individual dogs evaluated by the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital was conducted using ecologic data on water fluoridation based on the owner's residence. The case group included 161 dogs with OSA diagnosed between 2008-2012. Two cancer control groups included dogs diagnosed with lymphoma (LSA) or hemangiosarcoma (HSA) during the same period (n = 134 and n = 145, respectively). Dogs with OSA were not significantly more likely to live in an area with optimized fluoride in the water than dogs with LSA or HSA. Additional analyses within OSA patients also revealed no significant differences in age, or skeletal distribution of OSA cases relative to fluoride status. Taken together, these analyses do not support the hypothesis that optimal fluoridation of drinking water contributes to naturally occurring OSA in dogs.

  17. A Novel Class of Plant Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Orsellinic Acid Biosynthesis from Rhododendron dauricum

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Futoshi; Iijima, Miu; Yamanaka, Eriko; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Saeki, Haruna; Morimoto, Satoshi; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kurosaki, Fumiya; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhododendron dauricum L. produces daurichromenic acid, the anti-HIV meroterpenoid consisting of sesquiterpene and orsellinic acid (OSA) moieties. To characterize the enzyme responsible for OSA biosynthesis, a cDNA encoding a novel polyketide synthase (PKS), orcinol synthase (ORS), was cloned from young leaves of R. dauricum. The primary structure of ORS shared relatively low identities to those of PKSs from other plants, and the active site of ORS had a unique amino acid composition. The bacterially expressed, recombinant ORS accepted acetyl-CoA as the preferable starter substrate, and produced orcinol as the major reaction product, along with four minor products including OSA. The ORS identified in this study is the first plant PKS that generates acetate-derived aromatic tetraketides, such as orcinol and OSA. Interestingly, OSA production was clearly enhanced in the presence of Cannabis sativa olivetolic acid cyclase, suggesting that the ORS is involved in OSA biosynthesis together with an unidentified cyclase in R. dauricum. PMID:27729920

  18. Consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome on left ventricular geometry and diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Bodez, Diane; Damy, Thibaud; Soulat-Dufour, Laurie; Meuleman, Catherine; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a frequent sleep disorder that is known to be an independent risk factor for arterial hypertension (AHT). Potential confounding factors associated with both OSAS and AHT, such as age, diabetes mellitus and obesity, have been explored extensively, and are considered as independent but additive factors. However, these factors are also contributors to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and LV diastolic dysfunction, both of which are important causes of cardiovascular morbidity, and have been reported to be associated with OSAS for decades. In this review, we present an overview of how OSAS may promote changes in LV geometry and diastolic dysfunction through its best-known cardiovascular complication, arterial hypertension. We also summarize the epidemiological links between OSAS and LVH, outline diastolic dysfunction in OSAS patients, and try to highlight the mechanisms responsible, focusing on the effect of confounding factors.

  19. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  20. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  1. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  2. Effects of concurrent ball milling and octenyl succinylation on structure and physicochemical properties of starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Niu, Meng; Zhang, Binjia; Zhao, Siming; Xiong, Shanbai; Xie, Fengwei

    2017-01-02

    This work concerns the effects of concurrent ball milling (BM) and octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) modification on the starch microstructure and physicochemical properties (swelling, emulsifying, and rheological). Unlike normal OSA-modified starches, the BM/OSA-modified starch displayed new features such as reduced viscosity and rigidity but increased paste stability during shearing, heating and cooling, regardless of the substitution degree. More interestingly, while the physicochemical properties could be regulated by simply altering the BM treatment time, BM/OSA was more efficient and effective at modulating starch properties during the initial period (approx. 10h), as seen by the rapid evolutions in starch structural disruption and OSA esterification. Thus, the BM/OSA modification can serve as a viable and cost-effective approach for producing octenyl succinate starches where low viscosity (at relatively high concentrations) and high paste stability are desired.

  3. Preparation and characterization of octenylsuccinylated plantain starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, Maria C; San Martín-Gonzalez, María F; BeMiller, James N; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    Plantain starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at two concentrations (3 and 15% w/w) of OSA. The morphology, granule size distribution, pasting, gelatinization, swelling, and solubility of granules and structural features of the starch polymers were evaluated. Granules of the OSA-modified starches increased in size during cooking more than did the granules of the native starch, and the effect was greater at the higher OSA concentration. Pasting viscosities also increased, but gelatinization and pasting temperatures and enthalpy of gelatinization decreased in the OSA-modified starches. It was concluded that insertion of OS groups effected disorder in the granular structure. Solubility, weight average molar mass, Mw¯, and z-average radius of gyration, RGz, of the amylopectin decreased as the OSA concentration increased, indicating a decrease in molecular size.

  4. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made

  5. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  6. Risk Assessment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Population of Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stierer, Tracey L.; Wright, Christopher; George, Anu; Thompson, Richard E.; Wu, Christopher L.; Collop, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were to: (a) assess the prevalence of diagnosed OSA and symptoms of undiagnosed OSA in a cohort of ambulatory surgical patients, and (b) characterize the frequency of postoperative complications in outpatients with a diagnosis of or a propensity to OSA. Methods: Patients presenting for ambulatory surgery completed a self-administered questionnaire. Using a previously validated prediction model, the probability for OSA was determined. Patients with ≥ 70% propensities were considered to be at high risk of having the disorder. Relevant perioperative data and complications were tracked and recorded, and differences in median estimated propensities for OSA were considered by these data. Results: Three-thousand five hundred fifty-three patients completed the preoperative survey. A total of 2139 patients had perioperative data and estimated propensity scores. Ninety-four of the 2139 (4.4%) patients gave a self-reported prior diagnosis of OSA. One hundred three (4.8%) patients were found to be at high risk of OSA based on the survey and prediction model. Seventy-five percent of the patients with > 70% propensity for OSA had not yet been diagnosed. There was no association between OSA propensity scores and unplanned hospital admission, however there was an association of increased propensity with difficult intubation, intraoperative use of pressors, and postoperative oxygen saturation in the PACU. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that undiagnosed OSA may be relatively common in an ambulatory surgical population. There was no relationship between unplanned hospital admission and diagnosis of or increased risk of OSA. However, there was an association of increased perioperative events requiring additional anesthetic management in patients with a diagnosis of, or with a higher propensity to OSA. Citation: Stierer TL; Wright C; George A; Thompson RE; Wu CL; Collop N. Risk assessment of obstructive sleep apnea in a

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Fatigue in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Tiffany J.; Segal, Benjamin M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown, and little information exists regarding the relative contributions of OSA to symptoms of MS-related fatigue in the presence of other clinical and sleep-related confounders. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of diagnosed OSA and OSA risk among MS patients, and to assess relationships between fatigue severity, OSA, OSA risk, and sleep quality among persons with MS. Methods: N = 195 MS patients completed a questionnaire comprised of items regarding OSA diagnosis, sleep quality and quantity, daytime symptoms, and 4 validated scales: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and STOP-Bang questionnaire. Medical records were also accessed to examine clinical characteristics that may predict fatigue or OSA risk. Results: N = 41 patients (21%) carried a formal diagnosis of OSA. N = 110 (56%) of all patients, and 38 (93%) of those with diagnosed OSA had STOP-Bang scores ≥ 3, indicating an elevated OSA risk. In regression models, the most significant predictors of higher FSS scores were higher STOP-Bang scores (p = 0.01), higher number of nocturnal symptoms (p < 0.0001), and higher disability level (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances, and OSA in particular, may be highly prevalent yet underrecognized contributors to fatigue in persons with MS. Citation: Braley TJ; Segal BM; Chervin RD. Obstructive sleep apnea and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):155-162. PMID:24532998

  8. The influence of the oscillation angle and the neck anteversion of the prosthesis on the cup safe-zone that fulfills the criteria for range of motion in total hip replacements. The required oscillation angle for an acceptable cup safe-zone.

    PubMed

    Yoshimine, Fumihiro

    2005-01-01

    A normal hip joint has more than 120 degrees flexion. The reduced range of motion (ROM) of total hip arthroplast leads to frequent prosthetic impingement, subluxation and dislocation. Prosthetic impingement may be more serious for metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic total hip prosthesis (THP). A larger oscillation angle of THP (OsA) and proper cup and neck positions make a larger theoretical ROM of a patient's artificial hip joint. But what OsA is required and what range of cup positions is kinetically accepted are not clearly understood. A ROM of more than 120 degrees flexion, 45 degrees internal-rotation at 90 degrees flexion, 30 degrees extension and 40 degrees external-rotation was defined as severe criteria for an acceptable ROM. Theoretical cup safe-zones were created that fulfill the severe criteria of ROM for (OsA=110 degrees , 120 degrees , 135 degrees ) by the mathematical formulas. The size of the cup safe-zone mainly depends on the size of the OsA. There is no cup safe-zone for 110 degrees OsA, an extremely small safe-zone for 120 degrees OsA and an acceptable safe-zone for 135 degrees OsA. Each THP has its own OsA, because OsA is the function of head and neck diameter and cup design. More than 135 degrees OsA enlarges the safe-zone of the prosthetic position, so it extends the acceptable range of error that surgeons cannot avoid completely. However, few THPs with more than 135 degrees OsA are currently clinically available. Both surgeons and manufacturers must realize that OsA is as essential as cup and neck orientations for ROM.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  10. [Orthodontic treatment in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Huet, A P; Paulus, C

    2015-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may affect children, especially those with dentofacial disharmonies. Dentofacial orthopedic (DFO) treatments carried out in those patients must take this condition into account and can, in selected cases, improve or even treat the OSAS. The goal of our work was to report our experience about DFO treatments of children affected by OSAS in the department of maxillofacial surgery of Femme-Mère-Enfant hospital of university hospitals of Lyon, France.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Modulates Airway Inflammation and Remodelling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Taillé, Camille; Rouvel-Tallec, Anny; Stoica, Maria; Danel, Claire; Dehoux, Monique; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Pretolani, Marina; Aubier, Michel; d’Ortho, Marie-Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is frequently observed in severe asthma but the causal link between the 2 diseases remains hypothetical. The role of OSA-related systemic and airway neutrophilic inflammation in asthma bronchial inflammation or remodelling has been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to compare hallmarks of inflammation in induced sputum and features of airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies from adult patients with severe asthma with and without OSA. Materials and Methods An overnight polygraphy was performed in 55 patients referred for difficult-to-treat asthma, who complained of nocturnal respiratory symptoms, poor sleep quality or fatigue. We compared sputum analysis, reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, smooth muscle area, vascular density and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchial biopsies. Results In total, 27/55 patients (49%) had OSA diagnosed by overnight polygraphy. Despite a moderate increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; 14.2±1.6 event/h [5–35]), the proportion of sputum neutrophils was higher and that of macrophages lower in OSA than non-OSA patients, with higher levels of interleukin 8 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. The RBM was significantly thinner in OSA than non-OSA patients (5.8±0.4 vs. 7.8±0.4 μm, p<0.05). RBM thickness and OSA severity assessed by the AHI were negatively correlated (rho = -0.65, p<0.05). OSA and non-OSA patients did not differ in age, sex, BMI, lung function, asthma control findings or treatment. Conclusion Mild OSA in patients with severe asthma is associated with increased proportion of neutrophils in sputum and changes in airway remodelling. PMID:26934051

  12. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39). Conclusion Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. PMID:25232509

  13. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Collop, Nancy A.; Jacobowitz, Ofer; Thomas, Sherene M.; Quan, Stuart F.; Aronsky, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes when left untreated. There is significant heterogeneity in the evaluation and management of OSA resulting in variation in cost and outcomes. Thus, the goal for developing these measures was to have a way to evaluate the outcomes and reliability of the processes involved with the standard care approaches used in the diagnosis and management of OSA. The OSA quality care measures presented here focus on both outcomes and processes. The AASM commissioned the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup to develop quality care measures aimed at optimizing care for adult patients with OSA. These quality care measures developed by the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup are an extension of the original Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) measures group for OSA. The measures are based on the available scientific evidence, focus on public safety, and strive to improve quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes for individual OSA patients. The three outcomes that were selected were as follows: (1) improve disease detection and categorization; (2) improve quality of life; and (3) reduce cardiovascular risk. After selecting these relevant outcomes, a total of ten process measures were chosen that could be applied and assessed for the purpose of accomplishing these outcomes. In the future, the measures described in this document may be reported through the PQRS in addition to, or as a replacement for, the current OSA measures group. The overall objective for the development of these measures is that implementation of these quality measures will result in improved patient outcomes, reduce the public health burden of OSA, and provide a measurable standard for evaluating and managing OSA. Citation: Aurora RN, Collop NA, Jacobowitz O, Thomas SM, Quan SF, Aronsky AJ. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with

  14. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a north Indian hospital-based population with obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Sharma, Surendra K.; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is known to be associated with cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome (MS). The burden of MS in patients with OSA in India is unknown. We investigated the prevalence of MS and its components in a cross-sectional study in patients with and without OSA in a hospital-based population of a tertiary health care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Consecutive patients undergoing overnight polysomnography in the Sleep Laboratory of the Department of Internal Medicine of All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) hospital, New Delhi, were studied. Anthropometry and body composition analysis, blood pressure (BP), fasting blood glucose, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and fasting blood lipid profile were measured. MS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult treatment panel III criteria, with Asian cut-off values for abdominal obesity. Results: Of the 272 subjects recruited, 187 (82%) had OSA [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)>5 events/h] while 40 (18%) had a normal sleep study. Prevalence of MS in OSA patients was 79 per cent compared to 48 per cent in non-OSA individuals [OR 4.15, (2.05-8.56), P<0.001]. Prevalence of OSA in mild, moderate and severe OSA was 66, 72 and 86 per cent, respectively (P<0.001). Patients with OSA were more likely to have higher BP [OR: 1.06 (1.02-1.11)], fasting insulin [OR: 1.18 (1.05-1.32)], HOMA-IR [OR: 1.61 (1.11-2.33)] and waist circumference [OR: 1.20 (1.13-1.27)]. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings suggest that OSA is associated with a 4-fold higher occurrence of MS than patients without OSA. The prevalence of MS increases with increasing severity of OSA, therefore, early detection will be beneficial. PMID:22199102

  15. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  16. Evaluation of Ocular Surface Health in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Emine Esra; Akçam, Hanife Tuba; Uzun, Feyzahan; Özdek, Şengül; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate ocular surface health in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to investigate the tendency of these patients toward dry eyes. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients who underwent polysomnography and were diagnosed with OSAS and 50 normal control subjects were compared with respect to ocular surface disease index (OSDI), Schirmer I test and tear film break-up time (TBUT) values. Results: Patients were grouped as mild (n=15, 30%), moderate (n=15, 30%) and severe (n=20, 40%) according to apnea-hypopnea index values. The right eyes of patients were included in both groups. OSDI values were as follows: control group, 18.7±8.5; mild OSAS group, 40.2±2.8; moderate OSAS group, 48.5±2.2 and severe OSAS group, 62.7±2.3 (p<0.001). TBUT values were as follows: control group, 12.3±4.9; mild OSAS group, 8.2±4.7; moderate OSAS group, 5.8±2.1 and severe OSAS group, 4.2±3.7 (p<0.001). Schirmer values were as follows: control group, 18±6.1 mm; mild OSAS group, 12.9±6.7 mm; moderate OSAS group, 8.5±5.2 mm and severe OSAS group, 7.9±4.7 mm (p<0.001). Conclusion: Patients with OSAS seem to have a tendency toward dry eyes. Clinicians should be aware of dry eye development in these patients. PMID:27800271

  17. Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A.G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M.S.; Kharbanda, O.P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P.R.; Mallick, B.N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S.C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J.C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V.K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive sleep apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:25366217

  18. A longitudinal study of CPAP therapy for patients with chronic cough and obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cough patients are rendered therapies for gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD), upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) and cough-variant asthma (CVA) with varying benefit. Idiopathic or unexplained cough has emerged as an important clinical entity in both primary care and subspecialty clinics. Recent evidence points to a link between chronic cough and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A prospective observational study was done to evaluate the effect of OSA therapy in patients with chronic cough. Patients enrolled into the study underwent questionnaires to evaluate for GERD, UACS and CVA along with screening questionnaires for OSA and daytime sleepiness. The Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) was done at baseline and during serial visits to evaluate cough intensity and was used as the primary outcome measure of the effect of CPAP therapy on chronic cough. Results Out of 37 patients enrolled into the study, only 28 patients had follow up LCQ scores available and therefore underwent analysis. 22/28 patients were suspected to have OSA based on abnormal STOP-BANG screening questionnaire scores and overnight oximetry abnormalities. Of these 19/28 patients had overnight attended polysomnography with definitive diagnosis of OSA yielding a 68% prevalence of OSA in our chronic cough population. Chronic cough patients treated for OSA tended to be older with a significantly higher BMI than chronic cough patients without OSA. Significant improvement of LCQ scores occurred with CPAP therapy for OSA in chronic cough patients. Conclusion OSA is significantly prevalent in chronic cough patients. Subjects with chronic cough and OSA tend to be older and obese. Treatment of OSA in chronic cough patients yields significant improvement in their health status. PMID:23845135

  19. Acoustic-integrated dynamic MR imaging for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunn-Jy; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Ying-Chieh; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Lo, Men-Tzung; Pham, Van-Truong; Lin, Chen; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by multi-level upper airway obstruction. Anatomic changes at the sites of obstruction may modify the physical or acoustic properties of snores. The surgical success of OSA depends upon precise localization of obstructed levels. We present a case of OSAS who received simultaneous dynamic MRI and snore acoustic recordings. The synchronized image and acoustic information successfully characterize the sites of temporal obstruction during sleep-disordered breathing events.

  20. Relationship of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Gámez, B; Fernandez-Marin, M C; Gómez-Chaparro, J L; Muñoz-Cabrera, L; Lopez-Barea, J; Perez-Jimenez, F; Lopez-Miranda, J

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate ischaemic reactive hyperaemia (IRH) in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and its relationship with oxidative stress. We studied 69 consecutive patients referred to our Sleep Unit (Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba, Spain). Patients with chronic diseases or those taking medication were excluded. IRH was assessed before and after polysomnography. Morning IRH and oxidative stress markers were compared between patients with (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) ≥ 5) and without (AHI < 5) OSA. Measurements were repeated in 25 severe OSA patients after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We included 46 OSA patients (mean ± sd AHI 49 ± 32.1) and 23 non-OSA subjects (AHI 3 ± 0.9). The OSA patients showed a significant worsening of morning IRH, and a significant increase in malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels. Only the oxygen desaturation index independently explained morning IRH, while malondialdehyde levels showed a weak effect on IRH. In severe OSA patients, IRH improved significantly after CPAP treatment, as did malondialdehyde, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and protein carbonyl levels. In OSA patients, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed, and IRH worsened after sleep. The increase in oxidative stress was not associated with IRH, while intermittent hypoxia was strongly associated with IRH. In severe OSA patients, CPAP treatment improved oxidative stress and endothelial function.

  1. Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Adults: A Brief Review of Existing Data for Practice in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Foroughi, Moein; Razavi, Hossein; Malekmohammad, Majid; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with major comorbidities. It is estimated that 5–35% of the adult population in Iran are at high risk for OSA. This review article is designed to assist sleep medicine specialists as well as general practitioners in Iran to screen for OSA. It summarizes empirical data for diagnosing OSA including history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, and diagnostic criteria with regards to existing sleep medicine centers and availability of diagnostic tests in Iran. PMID:27904537

  2. Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in patients attending a tertiary health facility in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ozoh, Obianuju Beatrice; Okubadejo, Njideka Ulunma; Akinkugbe, Ayesha Omolara; Ojo, Oluwadamilola Omolara; Asoegwu, Chinyere Nkiru; Amadi, Casmir; Odeniyi, Ifedayo; Mbakwem, Amam Chinyere

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The impact of Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in worsening outcomes is profound, especially in the presence of comorbid conditions. This study aimed to describe the proportion of patients at a high risk of OSA in our practice setting. Methods The STOP BANG questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness scale were used to assess for OSA risk and excessive daytime sleepiness respectively. Hospitalized patients and out-patients were recruited. Intergroup differences in continuous variables were compared using the analysis of variance. The proportion of patients with high risk of OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness was presented as frequencies and group differences compared with the Pearson χ2 test. Independent risk predictors for OSA were assessed in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 1100 patients (53.4% females) participated in the study. Three hundred and ninety nine (36.3%) had a high risk of OSA, and 268 (24.4%) had excessive daytime sleepiness. Of the participants with high OSA risk, 138 (34.6%) had excessive daytime sleepiness compared to 130 (18.5%) of those with low OSA risk (p). Conclusion A significant proportion of patients attending our tertiary care center are at high risk of OSA. PMID:25328598

  3. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Markers and Lipid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Te; Tsai, Su-Shan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Ting, Hua; Wu, Trong-Neng; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and metabolic markers and whether the elevated risk of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is related to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 246 male bus drivers from one transportation company in Taiwan. Each participant was evaluated by a polysomnography (PSG) test and by blood lipids examination. Severity of OSA was categorized according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Results The results showed that a 73.3% prevalence of MetS in OSA (AHI > 15) and a 80.0% prevalence of MetS in severe OSA (AHI > 30) were found. After adjusting for confounding variables, an increased level of Body-Mass Index (BMI) and two non-MetS cardiovascular risk factors, total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and TG/HDL-C ratio was significantly associated with AHI in subjects with severe OSA. MetS was about three times to be present in subjects with severe OSA, even adjusted for BMI. Conclusions The findings showed a high prevalence of MetS in OSA among professional drivers, especially in the severe group category. BMI was the major contributing factor to OSA. However, the present study did not find a sensitive clinical marker of a detrimental metabolic profile in OSA patients. PMID:26115005

  4. Perioperative sleep apnea: a real problem or did we invent a new disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, Sebastian; Mojica, James E.; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the subpopulation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can affect more than 75% of surgical patients. An increasing body of evidence supports the association between OSA  and perioperative complications, but some data indicate important perioperative outcomes do not differ between patients with and without OSA. In this review we will provide an overview of the pathophysiology of sleep apnea and the risk factors for perioperative complications related to sleep apnea. We also discuss a clinical algorithm for the identification and management of OSA patients facing surgery. PMID:27006758

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia-Arenas, Martin A.; Powers, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has a higher prevalence in patients with heart failure than in the general middle-aged population. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), one of the forms of SBD, promotes poorly controlled hypertension, coronary events, and atrial fibrillation events that can lead to acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and evidence suggests that untreated OSA increases mortality in patients with heart failure. Cheyne–Stokes respiration and central sleep apnea (CSA) have long been associated with heart failure and, in many patients, can coexist with OSA. In this article, we propose a systematic approach to diagnose and treat OSA in patients with ADHF based on current evidence. PMID:18758944

  6. Prevalence of M75 Streptococcus pyogenes Strains Harboring slaA Gene in Patients Affected by Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Viciani, Elisa; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Romano, Antonio; Salerni, Lorenzo; De Luca, Andrea; Ruggiero, Paolo; Manetti, Andrea G. O.

    2017-01-01

    Recently we reported an association between pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and Group A streptococcus (GAS) sub-acute chronic tonsil colonization. We showed that GAS may contribute to tonsil hyperplasia via a streptolysin O (SLO)-dependent cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) production, which can trigger T and B cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the GAS strains isolated from pediatric OSAS patients in comparison with a panel of age and sex matched GAS strains unrelated to OSAS, but isolated in the same area and during the same period ranging from 2009 to 2013. We found that slaA gene, previously reported to be associated to CysLTs production pathway, was significantly associated to GAS OSAS strains. Moreover, the most numerous group (32%) of the GAS OSAS strains belonged to M75 type, and 6 out of 7 of these strains harbored the slaA gene. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) experiments demonstrated that the clone emm75/ST49/ smeZ, slaA was associated to OSAS cases. In conclusion, we found an association between slaA gene and the GAS OSAS strains, and we showed that the clone emm75/ST49 harboring genes smeZ and slaA was exclusively isolated from patients affected by OSAS, thus suggesting that this genotype might be associated to the pathogenesis of OSAS, although further studies are needed to elucidate the possible role of SlaA in tonsil hypertrophy development. PMID:28293224

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: From pathogenesis to treatment: Current controversies and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Peter R.; Malhotra, Atul; Palmer, Lyle J.; Kezirian, Eric J.; Horner, Richard L.; Ip, Mary S.; Thurnheer, Robert; Antic, Nick A.; Hillman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disease, recognized as an independent risk factor for a range of clinical conditions, such as hypertension, stroke, depression and diabetes. Despite extensive research over the past two decades, the mechanistic links between OSA and other associated clinical conditions, including metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease, remain unclear. Indeed, the pathogenesis of OSA itself remains incompletely understood. This review provides opinions from a number of leading experts on issues related to OSA and its pathogenesis, interaction with anaesthesia, metabolic consequences and comorbidities, cardiovascular disease, genetics, measurement and diagnosis, surgical treatment and pharmacotherapeutic targets. PMID:20136736

  8. Emerging co-morbidities of obstructive sleep apnea: cognition, kidney disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gildeh, Nadia; Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation. PMID:27747026

  9. A review of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation--a natural process of cleansing spilled oil in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Zheng, Xilai

    2009-10-01

    It has been acknowledged that following an oil spill in coastal areas where suspended particulate matter (SPM) is rich, aggregation between oil and SPM can be naturally formed. This kind of aggregation product is termed as oil-SPM aggregates (OSAs). Because OSAs are not as sticky to the shorelines as crude oil and the oil-water contact area is greatly increased due to the formation of OSAs, both oil dispersion into the water body and oil biodegration would be significantly enhanced. In this review article, the authors (1) describe in detail the mechanism of OSA formation and controlling parameters which can influence OSA formation (the parameters discussed include the oil nature and properties, sediment types and concentrations, and the environmental factors such as salinity, temperature and mixing energy); (2) briefly review qualitative and quantitative methods used for characterization of OSA formation (two main methods used for the OSA characterization are the UV epi-fluorescence microscopy and gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detector (GC-FID); (3) elucidate the applications of OSA formation in oil spill response strategies including natural attenuation, sediment relocation, and sediment mixing; and (4) discuss research needs in the future which would further improve our understanding of OSA formation and move towards the development of adequate oil behaviour models.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with craniofacial syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is common in children. Craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate are among the most common congenital conditions. Children with a variety of craniofacial conditions, including cleft palate, micrognathia, craniosynostosis, and midface hypoplasia are at increased risk for OSAS. Available evidence, which is largely limited to surgical case series and retrospective studies, suggests that OSAS can be successfully managed in these children through both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Prospective studies using larger cohorts of patients and including polysomnograms are needed to better understand the risk factors for this patient population and the efficacy of treatment options for OSAS and their underlying conditions. PMID:25555676

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Supine-Dependent Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients Using Oral Appliance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dieltjens, Marijke; Braem, Marc J.; Van de Heyning, Paul H.; Wouters, Kristien; Vanderveken, Olivier M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: The prevalence of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea (sdOSA) in a general population ranges from 20% to 60%, depending on the criteria used. Currently, the prevalence and evolution of sdOSA once oral appliance therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) has started is unknown. In addition, literature on the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm is not unequivocal. The first purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA during OAm therapy was evaluated. The third and final goal was to analyze the correlation between sdOSA and treatment success with OAm therapy in the patient population. Methods: Two hundred thirty-seven consecutive patients (age 48 ± 9 years; male/female ratio 173/64; AHI 20.1 ± 14.7 events/h; BMI 27.2 ± 4.3 kg/m2) starting OAm therapy were included. Results: The prevalence of sdOSA before the start of OAm therapy, ranged from 27.0% to 67.5%. The prevalence of residual sdOSA under OAm therapy in this study ranged from 17.5% to 33.9%. Second, the conversion rate from non-sdOSA to sdOSA ranged from 23.0% to 37.5%. Third, the presence of sdOSA at baseline was not a significant factor for treatment success with OAm therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the prevalence of sdOSA before and under OAm therapy is relatively high. One-third of patients shift from non-sdOSA to sdOSA. Finally, treatment success for OAm therapy was not significantly correlated with the presence of sdOSA at baseline. Citation: Dieltjens M, Braem MJ, Van de Heyning PH, Wouters K, Vanderveken OM. Prevalence and clinical significance of supine-dependent obstructive sleep apnea in patients using oral appliance therapy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(9):959-964. PMID:25142766

  12. Pediatric Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of overweight across all pediatric age groups and ethnicities has increased substantially, with the current prevalence of overweight among adolescents estimated to be approximately 30%. Current evidence suggests that overweight is modestly associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among young children, but strongly associated with OSAS in older children and adolescents. The rising incidence of pediatric overweight likely will impact the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of childhood OSAS. The subgroup of children who may be especially susceptible include ethnic minorities and those from households with caregivers from low socioeconomic groups. OSAS, by exposing children to recurrent intermittent hypoxemia or oxidative stress, may amplify the adverse effects of adiposity on systemic inflammation and metabolic perturbations associated with vascular disease and diabetes. When these conditions manifest early in life, they have the potential to alter physiology at critical developmental stages, or, if persistent, provide cumulative exposures that may powerfully alter long-term health profiles. An increased prevalence of overweight also may impact the response to adenotonsillectomy as a primary treatment for childhood OSAS. The high and anticipated increased prevalence of pediatric OSAS mandates assessment of optimal approaches for preventing and treating both OSAS and overweight across the pediatric age range. In this Pulmonary Perspective, the interrelationships between pediatric OSAS and overweight are reviewed, and the implications of the overweight epidemic on childhood OSAS are discussed. PMID:17158283

  13. The incremental effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on right and left ventricular myocardial performance in newly diagnosed essential hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Hua, Qi; Li, Jing; Wang, Cai-Rong

    2009-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may predispose patients to congestive heart failure, suggesting a deleterious effect of OSAS on myocardial contractility. We investigated whether essential hypertensive individuals with OSAS are characterized by decreased right and left ventricular myocardial performance. Our study population consisted of 45 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed untreated stage I-II essential hypertension suffering from OSAS (35 men, aged 49+/-8 years) and 48 hypertensives without OSAS, matched for age, sex, level of blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index and smoking status. All subjects underwent polysomnography and echocardiography. Right and left ventricular functions were evaluated using the myocardial performance index (MPI). Right and left ventricular functions were altered in hypertensives with OSAS. The mean right MPI was 0.26+/-0.11 in hypertensives without OSAS and 0.51+/-0.16 in hypertensives with OSAS (P<0.01). The mean left MPI values were 0.29+/-0.07 and 0.44+/-0.13, respectively (P<0.01). Right and left MPI correlated positively and significantly with apnea-hypopnea index (rho=0.40, P=0.002).OSAS is associated with impaired right and left ventricular function. These phenomena were independent of hypertension.

  14. Serum sLOX-1 Levels Are Correlated with the Presence and Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun-Yan; Li, Da-Ju; Wu, Chun-Ling; Lou, Han-Jian; Jiang, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Context: Inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) activation is involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory process-related disorders. Objective: This study aims to investigate whether serum soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) levels are associated with the presence and severity of OSA. Materials and Methods: A total of 137 OSA patients and 78 controls were recruited in this study. Serum sLOX-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The severity of OSA was assessed by the apnea–hypopnea index (AHI). Results: OSA patients had significantly higher serum sLOX-1 levels compared with controls. Serum sLOX-1 levels elevated with the increment of OSA severity. sLOX-1 was the independent predictor of OSA. Serum sLOX-1 levels were significantly correlated with AHI and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Conclusions: Serum sLOX-1 levels were independently correlated with the presence and severity of OSA. These findings revealed that sLOX-1 might function as a potential biomarker for monitoring the development and progression of OSA. PMID:25825846

  15. Liking for high fat foods in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simon S; Waight, Catherine; Doyle, Geoffrey; Rossa, Kalina R; Sullivan, Karen A

    2014-07-01

    Excess weight and obesity are factors that are strongly associated with risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Weight loss has been associated with improvements in clinical indicators of OSA severity; however, patients' beliefs about diet change have not been investigated. This study utilized a validated behaviour change model to estimate the relationship between food liking, food intake and indices of OSA severity. Two-hundred and six OSA patients recruited from a Sleep Disorders Clinic completed standardized questionnaires of: a) fat and fibre food intake, food liking, and food knowledge and; b) attitudes and intentions towards fat reduction. OSA severity and body mass index (BMI) were objectively measured using standard clinical guidelines. The relationship between liking for high fat food and OSA severity was tested with hierarchical regression. Gender and BMI explained a significant 20% of the variance in OSA severity, Fibre Liking accounted for an additional 6% (a negative relationship), and Fat Liking accounted for a further 3.6% of variance. Although the majority of individuals (47%) were currently "active" in reducing fat intake, overall the patients' dietary beliefs and behaviours did not correspond. The independent relationship between OSA severity and liking for high fat foods (and disliking of high fibre foods) may be consistent with a two-way interaction between sleep disruption and food choice. Whilst the majority of OSA patients were intentionally active in changing to a healthy diet, further emphasis on improving healthy eating practices and beliefs in this population is necessary.

  16. Sleep apnea syndrome in endocrine clinics.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, F; Bernkopf, E; Scaroni, C

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic condition with a high prevalence (up to 7 % of the general population) characterized by frequent episodes of upper airway collapse while sleeping. Left untreated, OSAS can cause severe complications, including systemic hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and abnormal glucose metabolism. This review aims to summarize the close links between OSAS, endocrinology, and metabolism. In patients with metabolic syndrome, OSAS is an independent risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes and a worsening glycemic control. The accumulation of adipose tissue in the neck and limited chest wall dynamics, hypoxia, and local micro-inflammation link visceral obesity closely with OSAS. There is now an abundance of convincing data indicating that promoting lifestyle changes, improving sleep hygiene, and adjusting diet can ameliorate both metabolic syndrome and OSAS, especially in obese patients. The incidence of OSAS in acromegaly is high, though GH treatments seem to be unrelated to the onset of apnea in GH-deficient individuals. Prospective studies have suggested an association between hypertension and OSAS because intermittent nocturnal hypoxia prompts an increase in sympathetic tone, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation: aldosterone excess may have a pathophysiological role, and some authors have reported that treating OSAS leads to a modest, but significant, reduction in blood pressure.

  17. BMI1 Is Expressed in Canine Osteosarcoma and Contributes to Cell Growth and Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Withers, Sita S.; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BMI1, a stem cell factor and member of the polycomb group of genes, has been shown to contribute to growth and chemoresistance of several human malignancies including primary osteosarcoma (OSA). Naturally occurring OSA in the dog represents a large animal model of human OSA, however the potential role of BMI1 in canine primary and metastatic OSA has not been examined. Immunohistochemical staining of canine primary and metastatic OSA tumors revealed strong nuclear expression of BMI1. An identical staining pattern was found in both primary and metastatic human OSA tissues. Canine OSA cell lines (Abrams, Moresco, and D17) expressed high levels of BMI1 compared with canine osteoblasts and knockdown or inhibition of BMI1 by siRNA or by small molecule BMI1-inhibitor PTC-209 demonstrated a role for BMI1 in canine OSA cell growth and resistance to carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. These findings suggest that inhibition of BMI1 in primary or metastatic OSA may improve response to chemotherapy and that the dog may serve as a large animal model to evaluate such therapy. PMID:26110620

  18. Validation of the STOP-Bang Questionnaire as a Screening Tool for Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Different Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auckley, Dennis; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Memtsoudis, Stavros; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is clinically relevant because untreated OSA has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The STOP-Bang questionnaire is a validated screening tool for OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of STOP-Bang for screening patients suspected of having OSA and to predict its accuracy in determining the severity of OSA in the different populations. Methods A search of the literature databases was performed. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Studies that used STOP-Bang questionnaire as a screening tool for OSA in adult subjects (>18 years); 2) The accuracy of the STOP-Bang questionnaire was validated by polysomnography—the gold standard for diagnosing OSA; 3) OSA was clearly defined as apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) or respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥ 5; 4) Publications in the English language. The quality of the studies were explicitly described and coded according to the Cochrane Methods group on the screening and diagnostic tests. Results Seventeen studies including 9,206 patients met criteria for the systematic review. In the sleep clinic population, the sensitivity was 90%, 94% and 96% to detect any OSA (AHI ≥ 5), moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI ≥15), and severe OSA (AHI ≥30) respectively. The corresponding NPV was 46%, 75% and 90%. A similar trend was found in the surgical population. In the sleep clinic population, the probability of severe OSA with a STOP-Bang score of 3 was 25%. With a stepwise increase of the STOP-Bang score to 4, 5, 6 and 7/8, the probability rose proportionally to 35%, 45%, 55% and 75%, respectively. In the surgical population, the probability of severe OSA with a STOP-Bang score of 3 was 15%. With a stepwise increase of the STOP-Bang score to 4, 5, 6 and 7/8, the probability increased to 25%, 35%, 45% and 65%, respectively. Conclusion This meta-analysis confirms the high performance of the STOP-Bang questionnaire in the sleep

  19. Cumulative Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Short Sleep Duration with the Risk for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Paris, Audrey; Pigeanne, Thierry; Nguyen, Xuan-Lan; Alizon, Claire; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurene; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN). The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3%) previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST) <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h) without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35–4.68) in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18–8.78) in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend). The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30) (OR, 4.29 [2.03–9.07]). In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA. PMID:25531468

  20. Is brain damage really involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Li, Ming-Xian; Liu, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Jing-Hua; Huang, Min; Wang, Min; Wang, Shao

    2014-05-28

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a surprisingly complex and highly individualized disease, with different factors contributing toward the disease process. Many factors can induce OSA disease, such as hypertrophy uvula, adenoidectomy, tonsil caused by mechanical obstruction of the airway, airway obstruction on obesity cause of decubitus, etc.; in addition, abnormal structure and function of the central nervous system (CNS) is also one of the important factors. This paper examines the relationship of the CNS with the onset of OSA. Evidence has shown that dysfunction of the CNS may be related to the occurrence of OSA. Although modification of the behaviors of the motor neurons may offer a potentially interesting means of controlling the airway, human afferent and motor pathways that regulate eupnea are still poorly understood. Combining some clinical phenomena of patients with cerebral hemorrhage or brain trauma at the temporal lobe, it seems that no close relation with OSA has been observed in clinical work and animal experiments; however, CNS damage at the temporal lobe is involved in the pathogenesis of OSA. This article examines the role of the CNS in the pathogenesis of OSA and its mechanisms. We have summarized previous findings of OSA-related brain damage, which were obtained by brain functional MRI, clinical, and animal experiment data to better understand the roles of the CNS in the pathogenesis of OSA. More specifically, this review summarizes how altered activity of the limbic system and its related structures could be associated with the occurrence of OSA. This conclusion may contribute toward our understanding of nosogenesis and the treatment of OSA.

  1. A Nomogram for Predicting the Likelihood of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Reduce the Unnecessary Polysomnography Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Miao; Zheng, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuan; Li, Dan-Qing; Li, Xiao-Lin; Han, Jian-Fang; Li, Tao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: The currently available polysomnography (PSG) equipments and operating personnel are facing increasing pressure, such situation may result in the problem that a large number of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients cannot receive timely diagnosis and treatment, we sought to develop a nomogram quantifying the risk of OSA for a better decision of using PSG, based on the clinical syndromes and the demographic and anthropometric characteristics. Methods: The nomogram was constructed through an ordinal logistic regression procedure. Predictive accuracy and performance characteristics were assessed with the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics and calibration plots, respectively. Decision curve analyses were applied to assess the net benefit of the nomogram. Results: Among the 401 patients, 73 (18.2%) were diagnosed and grouped as the none OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] <5), 67 (16.7%) the mild OSA (5 ≤ AHI < 15), 82 (20.4%) the moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI < 30), and 179 (44.6%) the severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). The multivariable analysis suggested the significant factors were duration of disease, smoking status, difficulty of falling asleep, lack of energy, and waist circumference. A nomogram was created for the prediction of OSA using these clinical parameters and was internally validated using bootstrapping method. The discrimination accuracies of the nomogram for any OSA, moderate-severe OSA, and severe OSA were 83.8%, 79.9%, and 80.5%, respectively, which indicated good calibration. Decision curve analysis showed that using nomogram could reduce the unnecessary polysomnography (PSG) by 10% without increasing the false negatives. Conclusions: The established clinical nomogram provides high accuracy in predicting the individual risk of OSA. This tool may help physicians better make decisions on PSG arrangement for the patients referred to sleep centers. PMID:26265604

  2. A new approach for the assessment of sleepiness and predictivity of obstructive sleep apnea in drivers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Dragonieri, Silvano; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Carucci, Elisa; Ranieri, Teresa; Ventura, Valentina; Resta, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falling asleep behind the wheel is one of the most relevant consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We created a new screening questionnaire, named the Driver Sleepiness Score (DSS), aiming to assess sleepiness in drivers with suspected OSA. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate sleepiness in drivers with a suspicion of OSA by the DSS in order to assess its correlation with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and total sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90% (TST90). We also aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of DSS for three different cutoffs of AHI (AHI = 5, AHI = 15, AHI = 30), which allow stratification of the severity of OSA. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three driving patients at risk for OSA participated in the study. DSS and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were both administered in operator-dependent modality and in randomized sequence. Results: The DSS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with mild OSA [area under curve (AUC): 0.88 vs 0.74] and moderate OSA (AUC: 0.88 vs 0.79), whereas ESS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with severe OSA (AUC: 0.91 vs 0.78). A DSS score ≥ 7 is the optimal cutoff for distinguishing true positives from false positives for the presence of OSA and for its different severity levels. The administration of both questionnaires increases the accuracy for the detection of all OSA severity levels. Conclusions: If validated, DSS may qualify as a new screening tool specifically for drivers with the suspicion of having OSA, in combination with the ESS. PMID:26933301

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Young Infants with Down Syndrome Evaluated in a Down Syndrome Specialty Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Goffinski, Alida; Stanley, Maria A.; Shepherd, Nicole; Duvall, Nichole; Jenkinson, Sandra B.; Davis, Charlene; Bull, Marilyn J.; Roper, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Children with Down syndrome (DS) experience congenital and functional medical issues that predispose them to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Research utilizing stringent age criteria among samples of infants with DS and OSA is limited. This study examines clinical correlates of OSA among infants with DS. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of infants ≤6 months of age referred to a DS clinic at a tertiary children’s hospital over five-years (n=177). Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression models were utilized to analyze the data. Results Fifty-nine infants underwent polysomnography, based on clinical concerns. Of these, 95% (56/59) had studies consistent with OSA. Among infants with OSA, 71% were identified as having severe OSA (40/56). The minimum overall prevalence of OSA among the larger group of infants was 31% (56/177). Significant relationships were found between OSA and dysphagia, congenital heart disease (CHD), prematurity, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and other functional and anatomic gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. Results indicate that odds of OSA in this group are higher among infants with GI conditions in comparison to those without. Co-occurring dysphagia and CHD predicted the occurrence of OSA in 36% of cases with an overall predictive accuracy rate of 71%. Discussion Obstructive sleep apnea is relatively common in young infants with DS and often severe. Medical factors including GI conditions, dysphagia and CHD may help to identify infants who are at greater risk and may warrant evaluation. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of OSA in infants with DS. PMID:25604659

  4. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  5. Neurobehavioral Functioning in Adolescents With and Without Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S.; Gallagher, Paul R.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Design: Cross-sectional, case control. Setting: Sleep Center and community. Participants: Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Interventions: Neurobehavioral evaluation. Measurements and Results: Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P < 0.001) and lean (P < 0.001) controls, and more depression (P = 0.004) and externalizing symptoms than lean controls (P = 0.008). A higher percentage of participants in the OSAS group scored in the clinically abnormal range on executive functioning, attention, sleepiness, and behavioral functioning than lean controls. Mediation analyses indicated that level of sleep apnea significantly mediated the effect of body mass on executive functioning, attention, and behavior. Conclusions: Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. Citation: Xanthopoulos MS, Gallagher PR, Berkowitz RI, Radcliffe J, Bradford R, Marcus CL

  6. Oxidative Stress-induced Telomere Length Shortening of Circulating Leukocyte in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Kwak, Jin Wook; Lim, Su Jin; Park, Yong Kyun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2016-01-01

    The main mechanism of pathogenesis which causes systemic complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is believed to be intermittent hypoxia-induced intermediary effect and it depends on the burden of oxidative stress during sleep. We aimed to search the predictive markers which reflect the burden of systemic oxidative stress in patients with OSA and whether excessive telomere length shortening is a characteristic feature that can assess oxidative stress levels. We used quantitative PCR to measure telomere length using peripheral blood genomic DNA. Telomere lengths were compared in an age- and body mass index (BMI)-dependent manner in 34 healthy volunteers and 43 OSA subjects. We also performed reactive oxygen species assay to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and OSA subjects. We found that the serum concentration of hydrogen peroxide was considerably higher in OSA patients, and that this was closely related with the severity of OSA. Significantly shortened telomere length was observed in the circulating leukocytes of the peripheral blood of OSA patients, and telomere length shortening was aggravated more acutely in an age- and BMI-dependent manner. An inverse correlation was observed between the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the telomere length of OSA patients and excessive telomere length shortening was also linked to severity of OSA. The results provided evidence that telomere length shortening or excessive cellular aging might be distinctive in circulating leukocyte of OSA patients and may be an predictive biomarker for reflect the burden of oxidative stress in the peripheral blood of OSA patients. PMID:27699083

  7. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  8. Vaspin and lipocalin-2 levels in severe obsructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zorlu, Mehmet; Akkoyunlu, Muhammed Emin; Kilic, Elif; Karatoprak, Cumali; Cakirca, Mustafa; Yavuz, Erdinc; Ardic, Cuneyt; Camli, Ahmet Adil; Cikrikcioglu, Mehmetali; Kart, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaspin and lipocalin-2 are less-known recent members of adipocytokine family. There are ongoing studies investigating the role of vaspin ve lipocalin-2 in metabolic syndrome (MS). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased prevalence of MS. We aimed to measure the levels of vaspin and lipocalin-2 which are secreted from adipocytes in patients with severe OSAS and examine the relationship between these two adipocytokines and OSAS. Methods The study consisted of two groups: severe OSAS patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >30/h (OSAS group, 34 subjects) and age-matched healthy volunteers with a AHI <5/h (control group, 25 subjects) Serum levels of vaspin and lipocalin-2 in these two groups were compared. Results Serum levels of vaspin were significantly lower in OSAS group; patients with severe OSAS compared with control group; healthy volunteers (OSAS group: 0.69±0.5 vs. control group: 1.24±1.13; P=0.034). The difference between the two groups in terms of serum levels of lipocalin-2 has not reached statistical significance (OSAS group: 61.6±18.2 vs. control group: 68.5±20.1; P=0.17). Conclusions We found that serum vaspin levels were significantly lower in patients with severe OSAS compared with healthy controls. Lipocalin-2 levels were similar. The decrease in serum vaspin levels in severe OSAS patients may be important in diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. PMID:24976995

  9. Vascular dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yim-Yeh, Susie; Rahangdale, Shilpa; Nguyen, Anh Tu Duy; Stevenson, Karen E; Novack, Victor; Veves, Aristidis; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), the attributable vascular risk from each condition is unknown. We hypothesize that OSA may have a similar effect on vascular function as type 2 diabetes does. Healthy normal-weight subjects, healthy obese subjects, subjects with type 2 diabetes, and obese subjects with OSA were enrolled. Vascular function was assessed with brachial artery ultrasound for flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and in skin microcirculation by laser Doppler flowmetry. One hundred fifty-three subjects were studied: healthy normal-weight controls (NCs) (n = 14), healthy obese controls (OCs) (n = 33), subjects with DM (n = 68), and obese subjects with OSA (n = 38). The DM group did not undergo sleep study and thus may have had subclinical OSA. The OSA and type 2 diabetes groups had impaired FMD as compared to both the normal-weight and OC groups (5.8 ± 3.8%, 5.4 ± 1.6% vs. 9.1 ± 2.5%, 8.3 ± 5.1%, respectively, P < 0.001, post hoc Fischer test). When referenced to the NC group, a multiple linear regression model adjusting for covariates found that baseline brachial artery diameter (β = -3.75, P < 0.001), OSA (β = -2.45, P = 0.02) and type 2 diabetes status (β = -2.31, P = 0.02), negatively predicted % FMD. OSA status did not seem to affect nitroglycerin-induced vasodilation (endothelium-independent) of the brachial artery or vascular function in the skin microcirculation. OSA impairs endothelial function in the brachial artery to a similar degree as type 2 diabetes does. OSA, however, does not appear to affect brachial endothelium-independent vasodilation or skin microcirculatory function. Treatment of OSA in patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes, therefore, may be a potential therapeutic option to improve macro-, but not microvascular outcomes.

  10. Understanding the Anatomic Basis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Bagchi, Sheila; Keenan, Brendan T.; Comyn, François-Louis; Wang, Stephen; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Huang, Shirley; Traylor, Joel; Torigian, Drew A.; Bradford, Ruth M.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Structural risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in adolescents have not been well characterized. Because many adolescents with OSAS are obese, we hypothesized that the anatomic OSAS risk factors would be more similar to those in adults than those in children. Objectives: To investigate the anatomic risk factors in adolescents with OSAS compared with obese and lean control subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Three groups of adolescents (age range: 12–16 yr) underwent MRI: obese individuals with OSAS (n = 49), obese control subjects (n = 38), and lean control subjects (n = 50). Measurements and Main Results: We studied 137 subjects and found that (1) obese adolescents with OSAS had increased adenotonsillar tissue compared with obese and lean control subjects; (2) obese OSAS adolescents had a smaller nasopharyngeal airway than control subjects; (3) the size of other upper airway soft tissue structures (volume of the tongue, parapharyngeal fat pads, lateral walls, and soft palate) was similar between subjects with OSAS and obese control subjects; (4) although there were no major craniofacial abnormalities in most of the adolescents with OSAS, the ratio of soft tissue to craniofacial space surrounding the airway was increased; and (5) there were sex differences in the pattern of lymphoid proliferation. Conclusions: Increased size of the pharyngeal lymphoid tissue, rather than enlargement of the upper airway soft tissue structures, is the primary anatomic risk factor for OSAS in obese adolescents. These results are important for clinical decision making and suggest that adenotonsillectomy should be considered as the initial treatment for OSAS in obese adolescents, a group that has poor continuous positive airway pressure adherence and difficulty in achieving weight loss. PMID:25835282

  11. Disparities and Genetic Risk Factors in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Katherine A.; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. Burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, though Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  12. Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Influence Perioperative Outcome? A Qualitative Systematic Review for the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Task Force on Preoperative Preparation of Patients with Sleep-Disordered Breathing.

    PubMed

    Opperer, Mathias; Cozowicz, Crispiana; Bugada, Dario; Mokhlesi, Babak; Kaw, Roop; Auckley, Dennis; Chung, Frances; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a commonly encountered problem in the perioperative setting even though many patients remain undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate whether the diagnosis of OSA has an impact on postoperative outcomes. We performed a systematic review of studies published in PubMed-MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, and other nonindexed citations, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Health Technology Assessment up to November 2014. Studies of adult patients with a diagnosis of OSA or high risk thereof, published in the English language, undergoing surgery or procedures under anesthesia care, and reporting ≥1 postoperative outcome were included. Overall, the included studies reported on 413,304 OSA and 8,556,279 control patients. The majority reported worse outcomes for a number of events, including pulmonary and combined complications, among patients with OSA versus the reference group. The association between OSA and in-hospital mortality varied among studies; 9 studies showed no impact of OSA on mortality, 3 studies suggested a decrease in mortality, and 1 study reported increased mortality. In summary, the majority of studies suggest that the presence of OSA is associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications.

  13. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  14. Cognitive deficits in adults with obstructive sleep apnea compared to children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Krysta, Krzysztof; Bratek, Agnieszka; Zawada, Karolina; Stepańczak, Radosław

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can negatively affect the patient's physical and psychological functioning, as well as their quality of life. A major consequence of OSA is impaired cognitive functioning. Indeed, several studies have shown that OSA mainly leads to deficits in executive functions, attention, and memory. As OSA can present in all age groups, these associated cognitive deficits have been observed in adults, as well as in children and adolescents. However, these cognitive deficits may have a different clinical picture in young patients compared to adults. In this review, we analyze the most affected cognitive domains in adults and children/adolescents with OSA, as evaluated by neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies. We found that deficits in working memory, attention, or executive functions cognitive domains are found in both adults and children with OSA. However, children with OSA also show changes in behavior and phonological processing necessary for proper development. Moreover, we examine the possible OSA treatments in children and adults that can have a positive influence on cognition, and therefore, improve patients' general functioning and quality of life.

  15. New Data Pre-processing on Assessing of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Güneş, Salih; Yosunkaya, Şebnem

    Sleep disorders are a very common unawareness illness among public. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized with decreased oxygen saturation level and repetitive upper respiratory tract obstruction episodes during full night sleep. In the present study, we have proposed a novel data normalization method called Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM) to evaluate OSAS using real data set obtained from Polysomnography device as a diagnostic tool in patients and clinically suspected of suffering OSAS. Here, we have combined the LBNM and classification methods comprising C4.5 decision tree classifier and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose the OSAS. Firstly, each clinical feature in OSAS dataset is scaled by LBNM method in the range of [0,1]. Secondly, normalized OSAS dataset is classified using different classifier algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier and ANN, respectively. The proposed normalization method was compared with min-max normalization, z-score normalization, and decimal scaling methods existing in literature on the diagnosis of OSAS. LBNM has produced very promising results on the assessing of OSAS. Also, this method could be applied to other biomedical datasets.

  16. A retrospective analysis of airway management in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and its effects on postanesthesia care unit length of stay.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, Claire A; Dobson, Gregory R; Milne, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a form of sleep-disordered breathing characterized by periods of partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, resulting in oxygen desaturations. Symptoms and risk factors for OSA are of particular importance in the management of OSA patients in the perioperative setting. The present study collected data regarding the intraoperative airway management of OSA patients and their course in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) over a six-month period. A total of 86 patients underwent general anesthesia, 63 of whom were intubated by direct laryngoscopy. Of these, 43% were classified as a grade 1 view by direct laryngoscopy, 43% were grade 2 and 14% were classified as grade 3. Apnea events or periods of desaturation in the PACU were observed in 27% of cases. Length of stay was significantly longer for cases in which PACU nurses had indicated that OSA had affected the individuals' postoperative course of treatment. Overall, OSA patients had an increased frequency of grade 3 views compared with the general population, and adjuncts were commonly used to help secure the airway in OSA patients. Symptomatic OSA patients placed increased demands on the PACU in terms of length of stay and hospital resources.

  17. A Prognosis Tool Based on Fuzzy Anthropometric and Questionnaire Data for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kung-Jeng; Chen, Kun-Huang; Huang, Shou-Hung; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are linked to the augmented risk of morbidity and mortality. Although polysomnography is considered a well-established method for diagnosing OSA, it suffers the weakness of time consuming and labor intensive, and requires doctors and attending personnel to conduct an overnight evaluation in sleep laboratories with dedicated systems. This study aims at proposing an efficient diagnosis approach for OSA on the basis of anthropometric and questionnaire data. The proposed approach integrates fuzzy set theory and decision tree to predict OSA patterns. A total of 3343 subjects who were referred for clinical suspicion of OSA (eventually 2869 confirmed with OSA and 474 otherwise) were collected, and then classified by the degree of severity. According to an assessment of experiment results on g-means, our proposed method outperforms other methods such as linear regression, decision tree, back propagation neural network, support vector machine, and learning vector quantization. The proposed method is highly viable and capable of detecting the severity of OSA. It can assist doctors in pre-diagnosis of OSA before running the formal PSG test, thereby enabling the more effective use of medical resources.

  18. Fast Uncooled Low Density FPA of VPD PbSe for Applications in Hyperspectral Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Marañosa (ITM-CIDA). Area de Optronica y Acustica Unidad de Sensores y Micro-Nano Tecnologia Arturo Soria, 289 E-28033 Madrid, Spain ABSTRACT...ADDRESS(ES) Instituto Tecnologico de la Marañosa (ITM-CIDA). Area de Optronica y Acustica Unidad de Sensores y Micro-Nano Tecnologia Arturo Soria, 289

  19. Is there an association between altered baroreceptor sensitivity and obstructive sleep apnoea in the healthy elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Magali Saint; Barthélémy, Jean Claude; Roche, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with a rise in cardiovascular risk in which increased sympathetic activity and depressed baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) have been proposed. We examined this association in a sample of healthy elderly subjects with unrecognised OSA. 801 healthy elderly (aged ≥65 years) subjects undergoing clinical, respiratory polygraphy and vascular assessment were examined. According to the apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI), the subjects were stratified into no OSA, mild–moderate OSA and severe OSA cases. OSA was present in 62% of the sample, 62% being mild–moderate and 38% severe. No differences were found for BRS value according to sex and OSA severity. 54% of the group had normal BRS value, 36% mild impairment and 10% severe dysfunction. BRS was negatively associated with body mass index (p=0.006), 24-h systolic (p=0.001) and diastolic pressure (p=0.001), and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (p=0.03). Regression analyses revealed that subjects with lower BRS were those with hypertension (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24–0.81; p=0.002) and overweight (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25–0.81; p=0.008), without the effect of AHI and ODI. In the healthy elderly, the presence of a severe BRS dysfunction affects a small amount of severe cases without effect on snorers and mild OSA. Hypertension and obesity seem to play a great role in BRS impairment. PMID:27957483

  20. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pak, Victoria M; Grandner, Michael A; Pack, Allan I

    2014-02-01

    Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA.

  1. A Comparison of Personality Characteristics and Psychiatric Symptomatology between Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    So, Soo-Jung; Kang, Seung-Gul; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the personality characteristics of patients with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and those of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods Eighty-eight patients with UARS and 365 patients with OSAS participated. All patients had a diagnostic full-night attended polysomnography (PSG) and completed the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Results The UARS group scored significantly higher than the OSAS group on the ESS, AIS, and PSQI (p<0.001). The scores of all SCL-90-R subscales in the UARS group were significantly higher than those in the OSA group (all p<0.001, except for somatization, p=0.016). Patients with UARS scored lower on EPQ-E (extroversion/introversion) (p=0.006) and EPQ-L (lie) (p<0.001) than those with OSA. UARS patients also showed higher scores on EPQ-P (psychoticism) (p=0.002) and EPQ-N (neuroticism) (p<0.001) than OSAS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that patients with UARS have worse subjective sleep quality than OSAS patients in spite of their better PSG findings. UARS patients tend to have more neurotic and sensitive personalities than patients with OSAS, which may be a cause of the clinical features of UARS. PMID:25866518

  2. Supine position related obstructive sleep apnea in adults: pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Simon A; O'Driscoll, Denise M; Berger, Philip J; Hamilton, Garun S

    2014-02-01

    The most striking feature of obstructive respiratory events is that they are at their most severe and frequent in the supine sleeping position: indeed, more than half of all obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients can be classified as supine related OSA. Existing evidence points to supine related OSA being attributable to unfavorable airway geometry, reduced lung volume, and an inability of airway dilator muscles to adequately compensate as the airway collapses. The role of arousal threshold and ventilatory control instability in the supine position has however yet to be defined. Crucially, few physiological studies have examined patients in the lateral and supine positions, so there is little information to elucidate how breathing stability is affected by sleep posture. The mechanisms of supine related OSA can be overcome by the use of continuous positive airway pressure. There are conflicting data on the utility of oral appliances, while the effectiveness of weight loss and nasal expiratory resistance remains unclear. Avoidance of the supine posture is efficacious, but long term compliance data and well powered randomized controlled trials are lacking. The treatment of supine related OSA remains largely ignored in major clinical guidelines. Supine OSA is the dominant phenotype of the OSA syndrome. This review explains why the supine position so favors upper airway collapse and presents the available data on the management of patients with supine related OSA.

  3. Population prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea in a community of German third graders.

    PubMed

    Urschitz, M S; Brockmann, P E; Schlaud, M; Poets, C F

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to estimate the population prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in an urban community of German third graders (age range 7.3-12.4 yrs) and the diagnostic test accuracy of two OSA screening methods. Using a cross-sectional study design with a multi-stage sampling strategy, 27 out of 59 primary schools within the city limits of Hanover, Germany, were selected. 1,144 third graders were screened for symptoms and signs of OSA using questionnaires and nocturnal home pulse oximetry. 183 children underwent abbreviated nocturnal home polysomnography (OSA definition: apnoea/hypopnoea index ≥1) and 22 were diagnosed to suffer from OSA. In general, sensitivity for both screening methods was low (<0.6), while specificity was moderately high (mostly >0.7). Independent predictors for OSA were body mass index, history of allergy, a composite questionnaire score, and two oximetry-based criteria. Based on these variables and logistic regression, a prediction model (accuracy; 95% confidence interval: 0.86; 0.71-0.94) was constructed and applied to children who had not successfully undergone polysomnography. This resulted in nine additional OSA cases and an overall design-adjusted population prevalence (95% confidence interval) of 2.8% (1.5-4.1%). Clinical and oximetry findings may be helpful for screening and predicting OSA in primary school children.

  4. The Interaction between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson's Disease: Possible Mechanisms and Implications for Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Marta; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Kimoff, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with hallmark motor and nonmotor symptoms (NMS) such as sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. While dopaminergic treatments have improved the motor aspects of PD, progression remains inevitable. Research has recently increasingly focused on strategies to modify disease progression and on nonmotor manifestations of PD, given their impact on patients' quality of life. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable sleep disorder, common in the general population, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive deficits. Neuroimaging has demonstrated structural and functional changes in OSA patients; in animal models, OSA causes brain inflammation and oxidative injury, including in key areas involved in PD pathophysiology such as locus coeruleus. The prevalence of OSA in PD has been variable in studies to date, and potential consequences and interrelationship between the two disorders have not been well studied. There is however emerging evidence that OSA is associated with increased NMS in PD, particularly cognitive dysfunction. This review focuses on the possible interrelationship between OSA and PD. Mechanisms promoting OSA in PD will be reviewed, as well as mechanisms whereby OSA can affect the neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26509097

  5. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority.

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Atherogenic Serum Lipoprotein Dyslipidemia in Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Wang, Yuyu; Qian, Yingjun; Li, Xinyi; Xu, Huajun; Zou, Jianyin; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yin, Shankai

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with dyslipidemia. However, no study has focused on dyslipidemia in women with OSA. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for dyslipidemia in women with OSA. Between 2007 and 2013, 570 eligible female patients with suspected OSA were consecutively recruited. The analyzed data consisted of polysomnography parameters, biochemical indicators, and anthropometric measurements. Serum lipid levels and dyslipidemia were compared. Binary logistic regression and multivariate linear regression models were used to determine the independent risk factors influencing serum lipids. After multivariate adjustment, there were essentially no major differences in serum lipid levels among patients with no to mild, moderate, and severe OSA nor did serum lipid levels change with OSA severity. Dyslipidemia in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins(apo) B and apoE increased with OSA severity, but only in non-obese subjects and those <55 years of age. Age, body mass index, waist to hip ratio, glucose and insulin were major risk factors for most serum lipids after multivariate adjustments. Our results indicate that, in women with OSA, age, obesity/central obesity, and insulin resistance are major determinants of dyslipidemia. PMID:28134311

  7. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  8. PAHs in leachates from thermal power plant wastes and ash-based construction materials.

    PubMed

    Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Jefimova, Jekaterina; Koroljova, Arina; Raado, Lembi-Merike; Hain, Tiina; Uibu, Mai; Kuusik, Rein

    2015-08-01

    The focus of the current study is to characterise the leaching behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil shale ashes (OSAs) of pulverised firing (PF) and circulating fluidised-bed (CFB) boilers from Estonian Thermal Power Plant (Estonia) as well as from mortars and concrete based on OSAs. The target substances were 16 PAHs from the EPA priority pollutant list. OSA samples and OSA-based mortars were tested for leaching, according to European standard EN 12457-2 (2002). European standard CEN/TC 15862(2012) for monolithic matter was used for OSA-based concrete. Water extracts were analysed by GC-MS for the concentration of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were detected. Still, the release of PAHs was below the threshold limit value for inert waste. The amount of the finest fraction (particle size <0.045 mm), the content of the Al-Si glass phase and the surface characteristics were the main factors, which could affect the accessibility of PAHs for leaching. The mobility of PAHs from OSA of CFB and PF boilers was 20.2 and 9.9%, respectively. Hardening of OSA-based materials did not lead to the immobilisation of soluble PAHs. Release of PAHs from the monolith samples did not exceed 0.5 μg/m(2). In terms of leaching of PAHs, OSA is safe to be used for construction purposes.

  9. Facial features and hyoid bone position in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruno B; Itikawa, Carla E; de Almeida, Leila A; Sander, Heidi H; Aragon, Davi C; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T; Matsumoto, Mirian; Valera, Fabiana C P

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate facial features and hyoid bone position in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by cephalometric radiography. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. Twenty-nine children in the 3-6 year age bracket were evaluated: 14 children with OSAS and 15 nasal-breathing children. All children underwent otorhinolaryngologic examination, and those with OSAS also underwent in-laboratory polysomnography for diagnostic confirmation. The children were then submitted to orthodontic evaluation and cephalometry. Lateral cephalometric radiographs from children with OSAS were compared to those of nasal-breathing children. We found no differences between the two groups regarding the linear and angular measurements of the face. However, the children with OSAS presented, already at the preschool age, with an inferiorly positioned hyoid bone, thus increasing the pharyngeal area. In children with OSAS, the hyoid bone appears to be in a significantly inferior position at an early age. Our findings provide evidence that there is a relationship between the position of the hyoid bone and OSAS in children, which could contribute to the persistence of OSAS into adulthood.

  10. Predictive value of specific risk factors, symptoms and signs, in diagnosing obstructive sleep apnoea and its severity.

    PubMed

    Pillar; Peled; Katz; Lavie

    1994-12-01

    A positive diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is based on a combination of characteristic symptoms and polysomnographic findings. The present study evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of several risk factors, signs and symptoms in predicting an Apnoea Index in 86 patients referred to the sleep laboratory with suspected OSA. All 86 subjects completed a detailed questionnaire, were interviewed, underwent a brief physical examination, and then a whole-night polysomnographic study. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that self reporting on apnoeas, neck circumference index (NCI), age, and a tendency to fall asleep unintentionally, were all significant positive predictors of apnoea index (AI), explaining 41.8% of the variability. The sensitivity of the model for predicting OSA (taking OSA as AI > 10) was 92.2%, specificity was 18.2% and the positive predictive value was 76.6%. Raising the cut-off AI values resulted in decreased sensitivity and increased specificity. Applying the predicting equation of AI to another group of 50 patients referred to the sleep laboratory with suspected OSA revealed similar results. However, running the equation on 105 offspring of OSA patients who did not complain of OSA-associated symptoms resulted in 32% sensitivity and 94% specificity in predicting OSA. It is concluded that questionnaires, interviews and physical examination, can only vaguely predict AI, and cannot replace polysomnographic recordings. However, the low rates of false negative in predicting AI > 10, and the low rates of false positive in predicting AI > 50, can be used for specific purposes.

  11. Cardiovascular implications in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vanderveken, Olivier M; Boudewyns, An; Ni, Quan; Kashyap, Bhavani; Verbraecken, Johan; De Backer, Wilfried; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular complications such as systemic hypertension, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Successful OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has resulted in coincident reductions in systemic hypertension, improvements in left ventricular systolic function, and reductions in sympathetic nervous activity. These data suggest that successful treatment of OSA may reduce cardiovascular morbidity in such patients. Although CPAP is the more successful treatment for OSA when used properly and consistently, its clinical success is often limited by poor patient and partner acceptance, which leads to suboptimal compliance. Oral appliances or upper airway surgeries are considered a second line of treatment for patients with mild to moderate OSA who do not comply with or refuse long-term CPAP treatment. Oral devices such as mandibular repositioning appliances were recently shown to improve arterial hypertension in OSA patients. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve is a new investigational therapy for patients with moderate to severe OSA. This new treatment option, if proven effective, may provide cardiovascular benefits secondary to treating OSA.

  12. Is there an association between altered baroreceptor sensitivity and obstructive sleep apnoea in the healthy elderly?

    PubMed

    Sforza, Emilia; Martin, Magali Saint; Barthélémy, Jean Claude; Roche, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with a rise in cardiovascular risk in which increased sympathetic activity and depressed baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) have been proposed. We examined this association in a sample of healthy elderly subjects with unrecognised OSA. 801 healthy elderly (aged ≥65 years) subjects undergoing clinical, respiratory polygraphy and vascular assessment were examined. According to the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), the subjects were stratified into no OSA, mild-moderate OSA and severe OSA cases. OSA was present in 62% of the sample, 62% being mild-moderate and 38% severe. No differences were found for BRS value according to sex and OSA severity. 54% of the group had normal BRS value, 36% mild impairment and 10% severe dysfunction. BRS was negatively associated with body mass index (p=0.006), 24-h systolic (p=0.001) and diastolic pressure (p=0.001), and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (p=0.03). Regression analyses revealed that subjects with lower BRS were those with hypertension (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24-0.81; p=0.002) and overweight (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25-0.81; p=0.008), without the effect of AHI and ODI. In the healthy elderly, the presence of a severe BRS dysfunction affects a small amount of severe cases without effect on snorers and mild OSA. Hypertension and obesity seem to play a great role in BRS impairment.

  13. Self-appraisals of arousal-oriented online sexual activities in university and community samples.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Krystelle; Byers, E Sandra; Clowater, Sarah L; Kalinowski, Alana

    2014-08-01

    Arousal-oriented online sexual activities (OSAs) are any activities on the Internet that involve sexually explicit and/or sexually arousing stimuli. These can be solitary-arousal activities, requiring only one person be involved. They can also be partnered-arousal activities that involve at least two people interacting (Shaughnessy, Byers, & Walsh, 2011). Most researchers have focused on the negative outcomes of arousal-oriented OSAs on users' sexual life and life in general. Yet, these activities can also have positive outcomes. In two separate studies, we examined men's and women's perceptions of the positive and negative outcomes of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA experience. Study 1 included heterosexual university students (N = 191); Study 2 consisted of heterosexual and sexual minority individuals from the community (N = 316). Participants completed a background questionnaire and measures of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA experience and outcomes of these experiences. Overall, solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA was common among study participants. In both studies, participants reported significantly greater positive than negative outcomes of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSAs, albeit the overall impact was small. We did not find significant gender differences or differences by sexual orientation in positive or negative outcomes of arousal-oriented OSAs. Our results suggest that, for most people, participating in solitary- and partnered-arousal OSAs has little impact on them.

  14. Metabolomics Profiling for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Simple Snorers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Zhao, Aihua; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Few clinical studies have explored altered urinary metabolite levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thus, we applied a metabolomics approach to analyze urinary metabolites in three groups of participants: patients with polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed OSA, simple snorers (SS), and normal subjects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used. A total of 21 and 31 metabolites were differentially expressed in the SS and OSA groups, respectively. Patients with OSA had 18 metabolites different from those with SS. Of the 56 metabolites detected among the 3 groups, 24 were consistently higher or lower. A receiver operator curve analysis revealed that the combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, arabinose, glycochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate, isoleucine, serine, and xanthine produced a moderate diagnostic score with a sensitivity (specificity) of 75% (78%) for distinguishing OSA from those without OSA. The combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, 5-dihydrotestosterone sulfate, serine, spermine, and xanthine distinguished OSA from SS with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 80%. Multiple metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with SS and OSA were identified using the metabolomics approach, and the altered metabolite signatures could potentially serve as an alternative diagnostic method to PSG. PMID:27480913

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women: Specific Issues and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Holger; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ramanan, Dinesh; Armitstead, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been seen as a male disease. However, the importance of OSA in women is increasingly being recognized, along with a number of significant gender-related differences in the symptoms, diagnosis, consequences, and treatment of OSA. Women tend to have less severe OSA than males, with a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and shorter apneas and hypopneas. Episodes of upper airway resistance that do not meet the criteria for apneas are more common in women. Prevalence rates are lower in women, and proportionally fewer women receive a correct diagnosis. Research has also documented sex differences in the upper airway, fat distribution, and respiratory stability in OSA. Hormones are implicated in some gender-related variations, with differences between men and women in the prevalence of OSA decreasing as age increases. The limited data available suggest that although the prevalence and severity of OSA may be lower in women than in men, the consequences of the disease are at least the same, if not worse for comparable degrees of severity. Few studies have investigated gender differences in the effects of OSA treatment. However, given the differences in physiology and presentation, it is possible that personalized therapy may provide more optimal care. PMID:27699167

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Screening and Postoperative Mortality in a Large Surgical Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Willingham, Mark D.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Helsten, Daniel L.; Bedair, Bahaa A.; Thomas, James; Duntley, Stephen; Avidan, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A recent investigation at Barnes-Jewish Hospital located in St. Louis, Missouri, found that an estimated 22% of adults presenting for inpatient surgery screened as high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Surgical patients with OSA have multiple comorbidities and are at increased risk for perioperative complications. Our objective was to determine whether a prior diagnosis of OSA, or a positive screen for OSA is associated with increased risk for 30 days and one year mortality. Methods B-J APNEAS (Barnes-Jewish Apnea Prevalence in Every Admission Study) was a prospective cohort study. Unselected adult surgical patients at Barnes Jewish Hospital were prospectively enrolled between February 2006 and April 2010. All patients completed preoperative OSA screening and those who were at risk for OSA according to a combination of the Berlin and Flemons screening tools received targeted postoperative interventions. STOP and STOP-BANG scores were also obtained. Results Overall, the sample included 14,962 patients, of whom 1,939 (12.9%) reported a history of OSA. All four screening tools identified a high prevalence of undiagnosed patients at risk for OSA (9.5% to 41.6%), but agreement among screens was not strong with Kappa ranging from 0.225 to 0.611. There was no significant difference in 30 day postoperative mortality between patients with possible OSA (based on their history or on a positive OSA screen with any of the four instruments) and the rest of the surgical population. Significant differences in one-year mortality were noted between the low and high-risk groups as identified by the Flemons’ (4.96% versus 6.91%; p <0.0001), STOP (5.28% versus 7.57%; p <0.0001) and STOP-BANG (4.13% versus 7.45%; p <0.0001) screens. After adjusting for risk factors, none of the OSA screening tools independently predicted mortality rate up to one year postoperatively. Conclusion Neither a prior diagnosis of OSA, or a positive screen for OSA risk was associated with

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Elevated High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels Independent of Obesity: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkwan; Lee, Seok Jun; Choi, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Lee, Seung Gwan; Shin, Chol

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) has been recognized as a common health problem, and increasing obesity rates have led to further remarkable increases in the prevalence of OSA, along with more prominent cardiovascular morbidities. Though previous studies have reported an independent relationship between elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and OSA, the issue remains controversial owing to inadequate consideration of obesity and various confounding factors. So far, few population based studies of association between OSA and hsCRP levels have been published. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether OSA is associated with increased hsCRP levels independent of obesity in a large population-based study. A total of 1,835 subjects (968 men and 867 women) were selected from a larger cohort of the ongoing Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). Overnight polysomnography was performed on each participant. All participants underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses, including analysis of lipid profiles and hsCRP levels. Based on anthropometric data, body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) were calculated and fat mass (FM) were measured by means of multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Mild OSA and moderate to severe OSA were defined by an AHI >5 and ≥15, respectively. The population was sub-divided into 3 groups based on the tertile cut-points for the distribution of hsCRP levels. The percentage of participants in the highest tertile of hsCRP increased dose-dependently according to the severity of OSA. After adjustment for potential confounders and obesity-related variables (BMI, WHR, and body fat) in a multiple logistic model, participants with moderate to severe OSA had 1.73-, 2.01-, and 1.61-fold greater risks of being in the highest tertile of hsCRP levels than participants with non-OSA, respectively. Interaction between obesity (BMI ≥25kg/m2) and the

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Impairs Postexercise Sympathovagal Balance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Felipe X.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Rondon, Maria Urbana P.B.; Alves, Maria Janieire N.N.; Braga, Ana Maria F.W.; Martinez, Daniel G.; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrao, Carlos E.; Trombetta, Ivani C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise (ΔHRR) is independently impaired by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Therefore, we tested the hypotheses: (1) MetS + OSA restrains ΔHRR; and (2) Sympathetic hyperactivation is involved in this impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: We studied 60 outpatients in whom MetS had been newly diagnosed (ATP III), divided according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h in MetS + OSA (n = 30, 49 ± 1.7 y) and AHI < 15 events/h in MetS - OSA (n = 30, 46 ± 1.4 y). Normal age-matched healthy control subjects (C) without MetS and OSA were also enrolled (n = 16, 46 ± 1.7 y). Interventions: Polysomnography, microneurography, cardiopulmonary exercise test. Measurements and Results: We evaluated OSA (AHI - polysomnography), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA - microneurography) and cardiac autonomic activity (LF = low frequency, HF = high frequency, LF/HF = sympathovagal balance) based on spectral analysis of heart rate (HR) variability. ΔHRR was calculated (peak HR minus HR at first, second, and fourth minute of recovery) after cardiopulmonary exercise test. MetS + OSA had higher MSNA and LF, and lower HF than MetS - OSA and C. Similar impairment occurred in MetS - OSA versus C (interaction, P < 0.01). MetS + OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at first, second, and at fourth minute than did C, and attenuated ΔHRR at fourth minute than did MetS - OSA (interaction, P < 0.001). Compared with C, MetS - OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at second and fourth min (interaction, P < 0.001). Further analysis showed association of the ΔHRR (first, second, and fourth minute) and AHI, MSNA, LF and HF components (P < 0.05 for all associations). Conclusions: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is impaired to a greater degree where metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than by MetS with no or

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: blood viscosity, blood coagulation abnormalities, and early atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Peverini, Francesco; De Benedetto, Michele; De Nuccio, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and arterial thrombosis, which are associated with high cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. In studies performed in clinical populations with elevated CV event risk profiles, the occurrence of moderate to severe OSAS was very often accompanied by a worsened vascular function and increased prevalence of structural abnormalities. Recent investigations of atherosclerosis in OSAS have focused on thrombotic tendency and blood viscosity, providing new insight into mechanisms of the disease. Despite that knowledge about the mechanisms of development of CV disease in patients with OSAS is still incomplete, observations confirm a relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and the rheological properties (flow properties) of blood. While platelet dysfunction and hypercoagulability (PDMPs, PaI-1, and SF) play important roles in the pathogenesis of vascular disease, there are limited studies on the potential role of blood viscosity in the development of vascular disease in OSAS.

  1. Sleep disturbances in persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Diana M

    2013-01-01

    Up to 70% of persons living with HIV (PLWH) experience sleep disturbances. Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are common disorders seen in the primary care of PLWH. This paper reviews the current evidence and practice recommendations for treating these conditions. Insomnia is evaluated by clinical interview, questionnaires, and sleep diaries. The recommended first-line treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) delivered by a trained therapist. Certain sedative medications may be useful, but over-the-counter treatments (particularly those containing antihistamines) are not recommended. OSAS is diagnosed by overnight sleep study but can be screened for in primary care. The STOP-BANG is a useful eight-item screening tool. The gold standard of treatment for OSAS is the use of a continuous positive airway pressure device. Treatment of insomnia and OSAS is important for improving quality of life and preventing associated health problems (especially cardiovascular disease in OSAS) in PLWH.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in North American Commercial Drivers

    PubMed Central

    KALES, Stefanos N.; STRAUBEL, Madeleine G.

    2013-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17–28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  3. Obstructive sleep apnoea, motor vehicle accidents, and work performance.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) shows a very high prevalence in the middle-age work force population and, between all diseases and medical conditions, is the major risk factor for motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). OSA can be diagnosed and treated, with resultant reduction in MVAs to those seen in the healthy population. It is increasing evidence that it is a major risk factor for occupational accidents also in fields different from the professional transport and for work disability. It is likely that the treatment of OSA results in the reduction of occupational accidents and work performance improvement with expected benefits in work processes and business in general. It is therefore advisable to develop strategies for screening and treatment of OSA in workers. The risk assessment of OSA in workers may also help to reduce the burden on national health care systems.

  4. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in school-aged children. Tonsillar and/or adenoids hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSA in children. OSA has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas-exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), complicated with a large array of negative health outcomes. The clinical symptoms are not able to distinguish primary snoring from OSA. Polysomnography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing, but the demand is increasing for this highly technical sleep test. So, some other simpler diagnostic methods are available, as respiratory polygraphy, but need to be validated in children. Treatment of OSA in children must be based on a mutlidisciplinary approach with pediatricians, ENT surgeons and orthodontists.

  5. Cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Baril, A-A; Gagnon, J-F; Fortin, M; Décary, A; Lafond, C; Desautels, A; Montplaisir, J; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive cessation or reduction of airflow due to upper airway obstructions. These respiratory events lead to chronic sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have shown that OSA is associated with daytime sleepiness and cognitive dysfunctions, characterized by impairments of attention, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions. This paper reviews the cognitive profile of adults with OSA and discusses the relative role of altered sleep and hypoxemia in the aetiology of these cognitive deficits. Markers of cognitive dysfunctions such as those measured with waking electroencephalography and neuroimaging are also presented. The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on cognitive functioning and the possibility of permanent brain damage associated with OSA are also discussed. Finally, this paper reviews the evidence suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging population and stresses the importance of its early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Where There Is Smoke…There Is Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Williams, Sherrie; Thornton, J. Daryl

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and OSA are widely prevalent and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has been hypothesized that each of these conditions adversely affects the other, leading to increased comorbidity while altering the efficacy of existing therapies. However, while the association between smoking and OSA is plausible, the evidence is less than conclusive. Cigarette smoking may increase the severity of OSA through alterations in sleep architecture, upper airway neuromuscular function, arousal mechanisms, and upper airway inflammation. Conversely, some evidence links untreated OSA with smoking addiction. Smoking cessation should improve OSA, but the evidence to support this is also limited. This article reviews the current evidence linking both conditions and the efficacy of various treatments. Limitations of the current evidence and areas in need of future investigation are also addressed. PMID:25451354

  7. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tasali, Esra; Van Cauter, Eve; Ehrmann, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder of pre-menopausal women, is characterized by chronic hyperandrogenism, oligoanovulation, obesity and insulin resistance. Importantly, PCOS women are at increased risk for glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Recent reports indicate an unexpectedly high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in PCOS. Alterations in sex steroids (i.e. high androgen and low estrogen levels) and increased visceral adiposity in PCOS could potentially contribute to the increased prevalence of OSA in this disorder. There is some evidence to suggest that there may be strong associations between the presence and severity of OSA and the metabolic disturbances that characterize PCOS. Causal mechanisms in the link between PCOS and OSA remain to be elucidated. Clinicians who manage PCOS patients should be aware of the high prevalence of OSA in these patients and systematically evaluate these women for sleep disturbances. PMID:19255602

  8. Distribution of common methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutations in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Bekci, T T; Kocak, N; Kesli, R

    2009-01-01

    Homocysteine levels have been investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), a syndrome associated with a high level of comorbid cardiovascular disease (CVD). While significant increases in homocysteine levels have been observed in OSAS patients with CVD, no increases have been noted in OSAS patients without CVD. This study was designed to investigate the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, which is essential for homocysteine metabolism and has been shown to have a causal role in the development of CVD. Eighty subjects, 30 diagnosed with OSAS by polysomnography and 50 controls (healthy volunteers with no symptoms of OSAS) were enrolled. Two mutations in the MTHFR gene were investigated using polymerase chain reactions and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. No significant differences were found in mean age, body mass index, homocysteine levels, or MTHFR allele or genotype distributions between patient and control groups.

  9. Differences in Perceptions of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Among Adherers and Nonadherers

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Amy M.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Kuna, Samuel T.; Weaver, Terri E.

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients’ consistent use of CPAP is critical to realizing improved functional outcomes and reducing untoward health risks associated with OSA. We conducted a mixed methods concurrent, nested study to describe OSA patients’ beliefs and perceptions of the diagnosis and CPAP treatment that importantly differentiate adherent from nonadherent patients prior to and after the first week of treatment when the pattern of CPAP use is established. Guided by social cognitive theory, themes were derived from 30 interviews conducted post-diagnosis and after one week CPAP use. Directed content analysis followed by categorization of participants as adherent/nonadherent from objectively measured CPAP use preceded across-case analysis among 15 participants with severe OSA. Beliefs and perceptions that differed between adherers and nonadherers included OSA risk perception, symptom recognition, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, treatment goals, and treatment facilitators/barriers. Our findings suggest opportunities for developing and testing tailored interventions to promote CPAP use. PMID:20354236

  10. Update on paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common causes of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children. It is associated with significant morbidity, potentially impacting on long-term neurocognitive and behavioural development, as well as cardiovascular outcomes and metabolic homeostasis. The low grade systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress seen in this condition are believed to underpin the development of these OSA-related morbidities. The significant variance in degree of end organ morbidity in patients with the same severity of OSA highlights the importance of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in determining the overall OSA phenotype. This review seeks to summarize the current understanding of the aetiology and mechanisms underlying OSA, its risk factors, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904263

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic bone disease: Insights in to the relationship between bone and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine M.; Shea, Steven A.; Stone, Katie L.; Cauley, Jane A.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Redline, Susan; Karsenty, Gerard; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and low bone mass are two prevalent conditions, particularly among older adults, a section of the U.S. population that is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years. OSA, the most common form of sleep disordered breathing, has been linked to multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory derangements and may have adverse effects on bone. However, little is known about how OSA (including the associated hypoxia and sleep loss) affects bone metabolism. In order to gain insight into the relationship between sleep and bone, we review the growing information on OSA and metabolic bone disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms by which OSA may affect bone metabolism/architecture. PMID:25639209

  12. PubMed Central

    DE NUCCIO, F.; DE BENEDETTO, M.; SCODITTI, E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with severe cerebro-cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, arterial thrombosis and metabolic syndrome, and recently has been associated with an increased incidence of cancer and death. A causal link between OSAS and atherosclerosis has been partially established. Recent research on atherosclerosis in OSAS has focused on thrombotic tendency and blood viscosity, providing new insight into disease mechanisms. Hypoxia is a critical pathophysiological element in OSAS that leads to intensive sympathetic activity, in association with inflammation, oxidative stress and procoagulant activity. Hypoxia and the induction of oxidative stress can simultaneously represent an underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of cancer development and progression. This mini-review will discuss the latest findings on the association and potential relationship between OSA and pathological vascular sequelae. PMID:26019388

  13. Ionic liquids as novel solvents for biosynthesis of octenyl succinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Zhang, Xiwen; Tian, Yaoqi

    2016-05-01

    Biosynthesis of octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) starch was investigated using ionic liquids (ILs) as reaction media. Waxy maize starch was pretreated in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chlorine and then esterified with OSA in 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate by using Novozyme 435 as catalyst. The degree of substitution of OSA starch reached 0.0130 with 5 wt% starch concentration and 1 wt% lipase dosage based on ILs weight at 50 °C for 3h. The formation of OSA starch was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that the morphology and crystal structure of starch were significantly destroyed. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that esterification decreased the thermal stability of starch. The successful lipase-catalyzed synthesis of OSA starch in ILs suggests that ILs are potential replacement of traditional organic solvents for starch ester biosynthesis.

  14. The application of Open System Architecture to planetary surface systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, D. A.; Pieniazek, L. A.; Toups, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The issues that future planet surface activities must confront are explored, the basic concepts that provide the basis for establishing an Open System Architecture (OSA) are defined, the appropriate features of such an architecture are identified, and examples of OSAs are discussed. OSAs are designed to provide flexibility and evolutionary growth of planet surface systems to support the users needs. An OSA is based on two fundamental principles: precise definition of component functionality and the establishment of standards. An OAS must be functionally decomposed, top down, to identify all functions, subfunctions, subsubfunctions, etc., that are required to be performed by the system. There is an allocation of function, or process, to components. The functional packaging within a component becomes the user's primary perception of the system. The standards of an OSA enable the user to attain the full functional capabilities inherent in the system.

  15. The application of Open System Architecture to planetary surface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, D. A.; Pieniazek, L. A.; Toups, L. D.

    The issues that future planet surface activities must confront are explored, the basic concepts that provide the basis for establishing an Open System Architecture (OSA) are defined, the appropriate features of such an architecture are identified, and examples of OSAs are discussed. OSAs are designed to provide flexibility and evolutionary growth of planet surface systems to support the users needs. An OSA is based on two fundamental principles: precise definition of component functionality and the establishment of standards. An OAS must be functionally decomposed, top down, to identify all functions, subfunctions, subsubfunctions, etc., that are required to be performed by the system. There is an allocation of function, or process, to components. The functional packaging within a component becomes the user's primary perception of the system. The standards of an OSA enable the user to attain the full functional capabilities inherent in the system.

  16. Synthesis and paste properties of octenyl succinic anhydride modified early Indica rice starch.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-yan; Chen, Qi-he; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing; Xu, Qiong

    2006-10-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) modified early Indica rice starch was prepared in aqueous slurry systems using response surface methodology. The paste properties of the OSA starch were also investigated. Results indicated that the suitable parameters for the preparation of OSA starch from early Indica rice starch were as follows: reaction period 4 h, reaction temperature 33.4 degrees C, pH of reaction system 8.4, concentration of starch slurry 36.8% (in proportion to water, w/w), amount of OSA 3% (in proportion to starch, w/w). The degree of substitution was 0.0188 and the reaction efficiency was 81.0%. The results of paste properties showed that with increased OSA modification, the starch derivatives had higher paste clarity, decreased retrogradation and better freeze-thaw stability.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea in North American commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stefanos N; Straubel, Madeleine G

    2014-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17-28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen.

  18. STOP-Bang Questionnaire: A Practical Approach to Screen for Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frances; Abdullah, Hairil R; Liao, Pu

    2016-03-01

    There exists a high prevalence of OSA in the general population, a great proportion of which remains undiagnosed. The snoring, tiredness, observed apnea, high BP, BMI, age, neck circumference, and male gender (STOP-Bang) questionnaire was specifically developed to meet the need for a reliable, concise, and easy-to-use screening tool. It consists of eight dichotomous (yes/no) items related to the clinical features of sleep apnea. The total score ranges from 0 to 8. Patients can be classified for OSA risk based on their respective scores. The sensitivity of STOP-Bang score ≥ 3 to detect moderate to severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 15) and severe OSA (AHI > 30) is 93% and 100%, respectively. Corresponding negative predictive values are 90% and 100%. As the STOP-Bang score increases from 0 to 2 up to 7 to 8, the probability of moderate to severe OSA increases from 18% to 60%, and the probability of severe OSA rises from 4% to 38%. Patients with a STOP-Bang score of 0 to 2 can be classified as low risk for moderate to severe OSA whereas those with a score of 5 to 8 can be classified as high risk for moderate to severe OSA. In patients whose STOP-Bang scores are in the midrange (3 or 4), further criteria are required for classification. For example, a STOP-Bang score of ≥ 2 plus a BMI > 35 kg/m(2) would classify that patient as having a high risk for moderate to severe OSA. In this way, patients can be stratified for OSA risk according to their STOP-Bang scores.

  19. Risk of obstructive sleep apnea among Saudis with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj Omar; Alkhouli, Abeer; Howladar, Mohannad; Ahmad, Ibrahim; Alshohaib, Saad; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed; Krayem, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients was reported to be 10-fold that in the general population. OSA can worsen the clinical symptoms and cardiovascular complications of ESRD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of symptoms and risk of OSA among Saudi patients with ESRD. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between June 2012 and September 2013. METHODS: The prevalence of OSA was assessed using the Berlin questionnaire. The presence of daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Data were also collected on the medical history, clinical, and laboratory findings of participants. RESULTS: In all, 355 patients (61% male) were enrolled (mean age: 45.5 ± 15.4 years). The overall prevalence of high-risk of OSA was 44.2% (males, 47.3%; females, 44.8%; P = 0.65). The prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was 74%. Controlling for age, gender and body mass index, multivariate analysis revealed that hypertension and hepatitis C infection were the only comorbidities significantly associated with OSA (odds ratio [OR]: 3.827 and 0.559; confidence interval [CI]: 2.120-6.906 and 0.324-0.964; P < 0.0001 and 0.036, respectively). OSA was also strongly associated with EDS (OR: 3.054; CI: 1.676-5.565; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: In Saudi Arabia, the risk of OSA is more common in ESRD patients than in the general population. OSA is strongly associated with EDS. Interestingly, a significant negative correlation between OSA and hepatitis C infection was noted, which warrants further investigation. PMID:26664564

  20. High-risk of obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness among commercial intra-city drivers in Lagos metropolis

    PubMed Central

    Ozoh, Obianuju B.; Okubadejo, Njideka U.; Akanbi, Maxwell O.; Dania, Michelle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The burden of obstructive sleep apnea among commercial drivers in Nigeria is not known. Aim: To assess the prevalence of high risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) among intra-city commercial drivers. Setting and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study in three major motor parks in Lagos metropolis. Materials and Methods: Demographic, anthropometric and historical data was obtained. The risk of OSA and EDS was assessed using the STOP BANG questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, respectively. Statistical Analysis: The relationship between the OSA risk, EDS risk and past road traffic accident (RTA) was explored using the Pearson's chi square. Independent determinants of OSA risk, EDS risk and past RTA, respectively, were assessed by multiple logistic regression models. Result: Five hundred male commercial drivers (mean age (years) ±SD = 42.36 ± 11.17 and mean BMI (kg/m2) ±SD = 25.68 ± 3.79) were recruited. OSA risk was high in 244 (48.8%) drivers and 72 (14.4%) had EDS. There was a positive relationship between OSA risk and the risk of EDS (Pearson's X2 = 28.2, P < 0.001). Sixty-one (12.2%) drivers had a past history of RTA but there was no significant relationship between a past RTA and either OSA risk (X2 = 2.05, P = 0.15) or EDS risk (X2 = 2.7, P = 0.1), respectively. Abdominal adiposity, regular alcohol use and EDS were independent determinants of OSA risk while the use of cannabis and OSA risk were independent determinants of EDS. No independent risk factor for past RTA was identified. Conclusion: A significant proportion of commercial drivers in Lagos metropolis are at high risk of OSA and EDS. PMID:24249946

  1. Evaluation and Validation of a Method for Determining Platelet Catecholamine in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Feres, Marcia C.; Cintra, Fatima D.; Rizzi, Camila F.; Mello-Fujita, Luciane; Lino de Souza, Altay A.; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurements of plasma and urinary catecholamine are susceptible to confounding factors that influence the results, complicating the interpretation of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in the Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and arterial hypertension (HYP) conditions. Objective In this study, we validated a test for platelet catecholamine and compared the catecholamine levels (adrenaline and noradrenaline) in urine, plasma and platelets in patients with OSA and HYP compared with controls. Methods In the validation, 30 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers who were not currently undergoing treatment or medication were selected as the control group. One hundred fifty-four individuals (114 OSA, 40 non-OSA) were consecutively selected from the outpatient clinic of the Sleep Institute and underwent clinical, polysomnographic and laboratory evaluation, including the urinary, plasma and platelet levels of adrenaline (AD) and noradrenaline (NA). Patients were then allocated to groups according to the presence of OSA and/or hypertension. Results A logistic regression model, controlled for age and BMI, showed that urinary AD and urinary NA were risk factors in the OSA+HYP group and the HYP group; however, the model showed higher levels of platelet NA for OSA without HYP. After 1 year of CPAP (continuous upper airway pressure) treatment, patients (n = 9) presented lower levels of urinary NA (p = 0.04) and platelet NA (p = 0.05). Conclusion Urinary NA and AD levels were significantly associated with the condition of hypertension with and without OSA, whereas platelet NA with OSA without comorbidity. These findings suggest that platelet catecholamine levels might reflect nocturnal sympathetic activation in OSA patients without hypertension. PMID:24911183

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias in obstructive sleep apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project).

    PubMed

    Namtvedt, Silje K; Randby, Anna; Einvik, Gunnar; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Somers, Virend K; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2011-10-15

    Increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but this may not be generalizable to patients from the general population with a milder form of the condition. The aim of this study was to assess the association between cardiac arrhythmias and OSA of mainly mild and moderate severity. In total, 486 subjects (mean age 49 years, 55% men) recruited from a population-based study in Norway underwent polysomnography for OSA assessment and Holter recordings for arrhythmia assessment. Of these, 271 patients were diagnosed with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5, median AHI 16.8, quartiles 1 to 3 8.9 to 32.6). Mean nadir oxygen saturations were 82% and 89% in patients with and without OSA, respectively. Ventricular premature complexes (≥5/hour) were more prevalent in subjects with OSA compared to subjects without OSA (median AHI 1.4, quartiles 1 to 3 0.5 to 3.0) during the night (12.2% vs 4.7%, p = 0.005) and day (14% vs 5.1%, p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis after adjusting for relevant confounders, AHI was independently associated with an increased prevalence of ventricular premature complexes at night (odds ratio per 1-U increase of log-transformed AHI 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p = 0.008) and during the day (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.8, p = 0.035). In conclusion, the prevalence of ventricular premature complexes is increased in middle-aged patients with mainly mild or moderate OSA, suggesting an association between OSA and ventricular arrhythmias even in mild OSA.

  3. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognition: A review].

    PubMed

    Daurat, Agnès; Sarhane, Majdouline; Tiberge, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation, resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. OSAS is associated with a number of adverse health consequences, and cognitive difficulties. The overall pattern of cognitive impairment in OSAS is complex, and research in this field is mixed. On balance, OSAS have negative effects on cognition, most likely in the domain of attention/vigilance, verbal and visual delayed long-term memory, and executive functions. A still unanswered question is whether these deficits are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and/or hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSAS. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective and widely used treatment of OSAS. No consistent effect of CPAP use on cognitive performance was evident. This may be due, in part, to variability in study design and sampling methodology across studies. Structural changes have been reported in different brain regions, particularly in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the OSAS-related structural changes may improve with CPAP treatment. However, one of the challenges is to interpret the findings in light of comorbid conditions that also cause neural lesions. Animal models will be specifically useful to disentangle the different potential contributors to cognitive impairment in OSAS. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on cognition and neuroimaging in OSAS patients before and after CPAP treatment. We also discuss the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain cognitive deficits in OSAS patients.

  4. The role of physical exercise in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Flávio Maciel Dias; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical condition, with a variable and underestimated prevalence. OSA is the main condition associated with secondary systemic arterial hypertension, as well as with atrial fibrillation, stroke, and coronary artery disease, greatly increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is not tolerated by all OSA patients and is often not suitable in cases of mild OSA. Hence, alternative methods to treat OSA and its cardiovascular consequences are needed. In OSA patients, regular physical exercise has beneficial effects other than weight loss, although the mechanisms of those effects remain unclear. In this population, physiological adaptations due to physical exercise include increases in upper airway dilator muscle tone and in slow-wave sleep time; and decreases in fluid accumulation in the neck, systemic inflammatory response, and body weight. The major benefits of exercise programs for OSA patients include reducing the severity of the condition and daytime sleepiness, as well as increasing sleep efficiency and maximum oxygen consumption. There are few studies that evaluated the role of physical exercise alone for OSA treatment, and their protocols are quite diverse. However, aerobic exercise, alone or combined with resistance training, is a common point among the studies. In this review, the major studies and mechanisms involved in OSA treatment by means of physical exercise are presented. In addition to systemic clinical benefits provided by physical exercise, OSA patients involved in a regular, predominantly aerobic, exercise program have shown a reduction in disease severity and in daytime sleepiness, as well as an increase in sleep efficiency and in peak oxygen consumption, regardless of weight loss. PMID:28117479

  5. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders.

  6. Cephalometric comparison of obstructive sleep apnea patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Ahmet Yalcin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Yilmaz, H. Huseyin; Yariktas, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the cephalometric characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with those of healthy subjects and to determine possible relationships between cephalometric measurements of OSA patients and control subjects. Methods: Standardized lateral cephalograms of 16 OSA patients and 16 healthy controls were obtained. Airway dimensions and dentofacial parameters were measured using a cephalometric analysis program (Dolphin Imaging Cephalometric and Tracing Software, Chatsworth, CA, USA). All statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS version 17.0.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measurements, and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate intergroup differences. Results: Midface length was significantly shorter and upper lip E-plane length was significantly longer in the OSA group than in the controls (P<.05). SNA, SNB, and mandibular plane angles (GoGn-SN), anterior and posterior facial heights, and posteroanterior face height ratio were similar in both groups. Maxillary length was slightly longer in the OSA group, whereas the mandibular length showed a slight increase in the control group (P<.05). The axial inclination of the lower incisor to its respective plane was normal, whereas the upper incisor was significantly protrusive (P<.05) in the OSA group. Distance between the hyoid and mandible was significantly greater in the OSA group than in the controls, indicating that the hyoid bone was positioned more downward in the OSA group (P<.05). Conclusions: In this study, the patients with OSA demonstrated significant differences in several craniofacial measurements. OSA patients showed reduced midface length and inferiorly placed hyoid bone and tended to have smaller airway dimensions. PMID:23408768

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Risk Factor for Cerebral White Matter Change in a Middle-Aged and Older General Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Chang-Ho; Thomas, Robert Joseph; Lee, Seung Hoon; Seo, Hyung Suk; Cho, Eo Rin; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Suh, Sooyeon; Shin, Chol

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) contributes to the development of systemic hypertension, and hypertension strongly predicts the development of white matter change (WMC). Thus, it is plausible that OSA mediates WMC. The goal of the current study is to determine whether a contextual relationship exists between OSA and cerebral WMC. Design: Cross-sectional analyses conducted in a population-based study. Setting: Korean community-based sample from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) who attended examinations in 2011 at a medical center. Participants: There were 503 individuals (mean ± SD, age 59.63 ± 7.48 y) who were free of previously diagnosed cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent 1-night polysomnography and were classified as no OSA (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] < 5, n = 289), mild OSA (AHI 5-15, n = 161), and moderate to severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15, n = 53). WMC was identified with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was found in 199 individuals (39.56%). Multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for covariates revealed that moderate to severe OSA was significantly associated with the presence of WMC (odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 95%, confidence interval [CI] 1.05-4.13) compared with no OSA. Additional adjustment of hypertension to the model did not alter the significance of the association (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.02-4.05). Conclusions: Moderate to severe OSA is an independent risk factor for WMC in middle-aged and older individuals. Thus, early recognition and treatment of OSA could reduce the risk of stroke and vascular dementia. Citation: Kim H; Yun CH; Thomas RJ; Lee SH; Seo HS; Cho ER; Lee SK; Yoon DW; Suh S; Shin C. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cerebral white matter change in a middle-aged and older general population. SLEEP 2013;36(5):709-715. PMID:23633753

  8. Evolution of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Infants with Cleft Palate and Micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.; Taylor, Jesse A.; Vossough, Arastoo; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Thomas, Allison; Bradford, Ruth; Lioy, Janet; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Assadsangabi, Reza; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with craniofacial anomalies are a heterogeneous group at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the prevalence and structural predictors of OSA in this population are unknown. We hypothesized that infants with micrognathia would have more significant OSA than those with isolated cleft palate ± cleft lip (ICP), and those with ICP would have more significant OSA than controls. We postulated that OSA severity would correlate with reduced mandibular size, neurodevelopmental scores, and growth. Methods: Prospective cohort study. 15 infants with ICP, 19 with micrognathia, and 9 controls were recruited for polysomnograms, neurodevelopmental testing, cephalometrics (ICP and micrognathia groups) at baseline and a follow-up at 6 mo. Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) [median (range)] of the micrognathia group [20.1 events/h (0.8, 54.7)] was greater than ICP [3.2 (0.3, 30.7)] or controls [3.1 (0.5, 23.3)] (p = 0.001). Polysomnographic findings were similar between ICP and controls. Controls had a greater AHI than previously reported in the literature. Cephalometric measures of both midface hypoplasia and micrognathia correlated with OSA severity. Neurodevelopment was similar among groups. OSA improved with growth in participants with ICP and postoperatively in infants with micrognathia. Conclusions: Micrognathia, but not ICP, was associated with more significant OSA compared to controls. Both midface and mandibular hypoplasia contribute to OSA in these populations. OSA improved after surgical correction in most infants with micrognathia, and improved without intervention before palate repair in infants with ICP. Citation: Cielo CM, Taylor JA, Vossough A, Radcliffe J, Thomas A, Bradford R, Lioy J, Tapia IE, Assadsangabi R, Shults J, Marcus CL. Evolution of obstructive sleep apnea in infants with cleft palate and micrognathia. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):979–987. PMID:27092700

  9. Polysomnographic findings in infants with Pierre Robin sequence

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, Abdullah; Bin-Hassan, Saadoun; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is characterized by the triad of micrognathia, glossoptosis, and upper airway obstruction. It is commonly associated with the secondary cleft palate. Infants with PRS commonly have sleep-disordered breathing (SDB); including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as central sleep breathing abnormalities that are present from infancy. AIM OF THE STUDY: Evaluate the prevalence and severity of SDB in infants with PRS using polysomnography (PSG). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: We retrospectively reviewed the sleep laboratory database at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, during the period of May 2007 to March 2016. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Comparisons of PSG data were made between the OSA and non-OSA group using the Student's t-test for age and body mass index, Wilcoxon signed ranks test for the continuous PSG data and Chi-squared test for the categorical variables. METHODS: Patients with PRS were identified and their initial PSG was selected for this study. The main indication for referral was ongoing concerns regarding OSA symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 46 patients (28 females) were included with a mean age (±standard deviation) of 0.8 (±0.3) year. Twenty-two out of 46 (47%) had evidence of OSA of which 10 had mild, 3 had moderate, and 9 had severe OSA. The PRS infants with OSA were younger than the non-OSA group. Significant correlations were found between desaturation and arousal indices with obstructive apnea–hypopnea index. CONCLUSION: This retrospective chart review confirms a high prevalence of OSA in this population. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the outcomes of OSA in PRS population. PMID:28197218

  10. Sex-Specific Association of Sleep Apnea Severity with Subclinical Myocardial Injury, Ventricular Hypertrophy, and Heart Failure Risk in a Community Dwelling Cohort: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities-Sleep Heart Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Gabriela Querejeta; Redline, Susan; Claggett, Brian; Bello, Natalie; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Solomon, Scott D.; Shah, Amil M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and development of subsequent cardiovascular (CV) complications differ by sex. We hypothesize that the relationship between OSA and high sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT), cardiac structure, and CV outcomes differs by sex. Methods and Results 752 men and 893 women free of CV disease participating in both the Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities and the Sleep Heart Health Studies were included. All participants (mean age 62.5±5.5 years) underwent polysomnography and measurement of hs-TnT. OSA severity was defined using established clinical categories. Subjects were followed for 13.6±3.2 years for incident coronary disease, heart failure, and CV and all-cause mortality. Surviving subjects underwent an echocardiography after 15.2±0.8 years. OSA was independently associated with hs-TnT among women (p=0.03) but not in men (p=0.94). Similarly, OSA was associated with incident HF or death in women (p=0.01) but not men (p=0.10). This association was no longer significant after adjusting for hs-TnT (p=0.09). Among surviving participants without an incident CV event, OSA assessed in mid-life was independently associated with higher left ventricle mass index only among women (p=0.001). Conclusions Sex-specific differences exist in the relationship between OSA and CV disease. OSA, assessed in mid-life, is independently associated with higher levels of concomitantly measured hs-TnT among women but not men, in whom other comorbidities associated with OSA may play a more important role. During 13-year follow-up, OSA was associated with incident HF or death only among women, and among those without an incident event, was independently associated with LV hypertrophy only in women. PMID:26316620

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders. PMID:27835632

  12. The Impact of Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cardiopulmonary Complications in General and Vascular Surgery: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsattar, Zaid M.; Hendren, Samantha; Wong, Sandra L.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine whether preoperatively untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects postoperative outcomes. Design: Cohort study of patients undergoing surgery between July 2012 and September 2013, utilizing prospectively collected data from the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. Multivariable regression models were used to compare complication rates between treated and untreated OSA, while adjusting for important patient covariates and clustering within hospitals. Setting: Fifty-two community and academic hospitals in Michigan. Patients: Adult patients undergoing various general or vascular operations were categorized as: (1) no diagnosis or low risk of OSA; (2) documented OSA without therapy or suspicion of OSA; and (3) diagnosis of OSA with treatment (e.g., positive airway pressure). Exposures: OSA, preoperatively treated or untreated, was the exposure variable. Postoperative 30-day cardiopulmonary complications including arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, unplanned reintubation, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonia were the outcomes of interest. Measurements and Results: Of 26,842 patients, 2,646 (9.9%) had a diagnosis or suspicion of OSA. Of those, 1,465 (55.4%) were untreated. Patient and procedural risk factors were evenly balanced between treated and untreated groups. Compared with treated OSA, untreated OSA was independently associated with more cardiopulmonary complications (risk-adjusted rates 6.7% versus 4.0%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.8, P = 0.001), particularly unplanned reintubations (aOR = 2.5, P = 0.003) and myocardial infarction (aOR = 2.6, P = 0.031). Conclusions: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are not treated with positive airway pressure preoperatively are at increased risks for cardiopulmonary complications after general and vascular surgery. Improving the recognition of OSA and ensuring adequate treatment may be a strategy to reduce risk for surgical patients with OSA. Citation

  13. Concurrent presence of inflammation and obstructive sleep apnea exacerbates the risk of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkwan; Yoon, Dae Wui; Lee, Seung Ku; Lee, Seunggwan; Choi, Kyung-Mee; Robert, Thomas J.; Shin, Chol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to multiple end-organ morbidities that are mediated by the cumulative burden of oxidative stress and inflammation. Both OSA and inflammation play key roles in increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of inflammation and OSA could accelerate the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a large cohort study. A total of 1835 participants were randomly selected from the ongoing Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study for the years between 2007 and 2015. Overnight polysomnography was performed on each participant. Blood was drawn for biochemical analyses. Participants with high or low inflammation were divided by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). MetS was defined using the criteria of the modified National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. The prevalence of MetS was higher among the subjects with OSA and high hsCRP levels than among the other corresponding groups. The incidence of MetS among the 4 groups stratified by OSA and inflammation status at the 6-year follow-up was 11.8%, 19.9%, 25.8%, and 36.0% (HsCRP[−]/OSA[−] vs HsCRP[+]/OSA[−] vs HsCRP[−]/OSA[+] vs HsCRP[+]/OSA[+], P < 0.01). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol status, BMI, and change in BMI (ΔBMI) in a multiple logistic regression, the subjects with OSA and high hsCRP levels at follow-up had a 2.22-fold risk of developing MetS, as compared with those with no-OSA and low hsCRP levels (P < 0.01). MetS is more prevalent in the concurrent presence of inflammation and OSA. The combination of these conditions is associated with higher risk of MetS. Additional research is needed to help further define the significance of the combined effect of OSA and subclinical inflammation on the development of MetS in the context of reduction of CVD risk. PMID:28207497

  14. Concurrent presence of inflammation and obstructive sleep apnea exacerbates the risk of metabolic syndrome: A KoGES 6-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkwan; Yoon, Dae Wui; Lee, Seung Ku; Lee, Seunggwan; Choi, Kyung-Mee; Robert, Thomas J; Shin, Chol

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to multiple end-organ morbidities that are mediated by the cumulative burden of oxidative stress and inflammation. Both OSA and inflammation play key roles in increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of inflammation and OSA could accelerate the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a large cohort study.A total of 1835 participants were randomly selected from the ongoing Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study for the years between 2007 and 2015. Overnight polysomnography was performed on each participant. Blood was drawn for biochemical analyses. Participants with high or low inflammation were divided by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). MetS was defined using the criteria of the modified National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III.The prevalence of MetS was higher among the subjects with OSA and high hsCRP levels than among the other corresponding groups. The incidence of MetS among the 4 groups stratified by OSA and inflammation status at the 6-year follow-up was 11.8%, 19.9%, 25.8%, and 36.0% (HsCRP[-]/OSA[-] vs HsCRP[+]/OSA[-] vs HsCRP[-]/OSA[+] vs HsCRP[+]/OSA[+], P < 0.01). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol status, BMI, and change in BMI (ΔBMI) in a multiple logistic regression, the subjects with OSA and high hsCRP levels at follow-up had a 2.22-fold risk of developing MetS, as compared with those with no-OSA and low hsCRP levels (P < 0.01).MetS is more prevalent in the concurrent presence of inflammation and OSA. The combination of these conditions is associated with higher risk of MetS. Additional research is needed to help further define the significance of the combined effect of OSA and subclinical inflammation on the development of MetS in the context of reduction of CVD risk.

  15. The correlation of anxiety and depression with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeitalab, Fariborz; Moharrari, Fatemeh; Saberi, Soheila; Asadpour, Hadi; Rezaeetalab, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep. While respiratory pauses followed by loud snoring and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of OSAS, the patients may complain from sleep disruption, headache, mood disturbance, irritability, and memory impairment. However, the association of sleep apnea with anxiety and depression is not completely understood. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the treatment of choice for OSAS, may be influenced by psychological conditions, especially claustrophobia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of OSAS with anxiety and depression symptoms. This study also investigated the association of anxiety with body mass index (BMI) and the severity of OSAS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 178 adult individuals diagnosed with OSAS at the sleep laboratory between September 2008 and May 2012. The participants were interviewed according to a checklist regarding both their chief complaints and other associated symptoms. The psychological status was assessed according to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and Beck depression inventory (BDI) scoring. The severity of breathing disorder was classified as mild, moderate, and severe based on apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) which was ascertained by overnight polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Results: The mean (SD) age of participants was 50.33 years. In terms of sex, 85.5% of the study population were males and14.4% were females. We found no relation between sex and the symptoms of OSAS. Regarding the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms, 53.9% of the individuals had some degree of anxiety, while 46.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In terms of OSAS severity, this study showed that OSAS severity was associated with the frequency of anxiety, chocking, and sleepiness (P : 0

  16. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  17. Hypoxia-induced vasodilation and effects of regional phentolamine in awake patients with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Moradkhan, Raman; Spitnale, Brett; McQuillan, Patrick; Hogeman, Cynthia; Gray, Kristen S; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity, endothelial dysfunction, and premature cardiovascular disease. To determine whether hypoxia is associated with impaired skeletal muscle vasodilation, we compared femoral artery blood flow (ultrasound) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (peroneal microneurography) during exposure to acute systemic hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 0.1) in awake patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=8). To assess the role of elevated sympathetic nerve activity, in a separate group of patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=10) we measured brachial artery blood flow during hypoxia before and after regional alpha-adrenergic block with phentolamine. Despite elevated sympathetic activity, in OSA the vascular responses to hypoxia in the leg did not differ significantly from those in controls [P=not significant (NS)]. Following regional phentolamine, in both groups the hypoxia-induced increase in brachial blood flow was markedly enhanced (OSA pre vs. post, 84+/-13 vs. 201+/-34 ml/min, P<0.002; controls pre vs. post 62+/-8 vs. 140+/-26 ml/min, P<0.01). At end hypoxia after phentolamine, the increase of brachial blood flow above baseline was similar (OSA vs. controls +61+/-16 vs. +48+/-6%; P=NS). We conclude that despite high sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone and prominent sympathetic responses to acute hypoxia, hypoxia-induced limb vasodilation is preserved in OSA.

  18. Use of electronic data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Carl A; Pendharkar, Sachin R; Ronksley, Paul E; Tsai, Willis H

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the ability of electronic health data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), as defined by symptomatic or severe OSA. METHODS: The present retrospective cohort study of 1041 patients referred for sleep diagnostic testing was undertaken at a tertiary sleep centre in Calgary, Alberta. A diagnosis of clinically significant OSA or an alternative sleep diagnosis was assigned to each patient through blinded independent chart review by two sleep physicians. Predictive variables were identified from online questionnaire data, and diagnostic algorithms were developed. The performance of electronically derived algorithms for identifying patients with clinically significant OSA was determined. Diagnostic performance of these algorithms was compared with versions of the STOP-Bang questionnaire and adjusted neck circumference score (ANC) derived from electronic data. RESULTS: Electronic questionnaire data were highly sensitive (>95%) at identifying clinically significant OSA, but not specific. Sleep diagnostic testing-determined respiratory disturbance index was very specific (specificity ≥95%) for clinically relevant disease, but not sensitive (<35%). Derived algorithms had similar accuracy to the STOP-Bang or ANC, but required fewer questions and calculations. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that a two-step process using a small number of clinical variables (maximizing sensitivity) and objective diagnostic testing (maximizing specificity) is required to identify clinically significant OSA. When used in an online setting, simple algorithms can identify clinically relevant OSA with similar performance to existing decision rules such as the STOP-Bang or ANC. PMID:26083542

  19. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with coronary artery disease in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Siraj O.; Alsharif, Muath A.; Albanji, Mohammed H.; Baabbad, Murad S.; Almotary, Haneen M.; Alama, Nabil; Mimish, Layth; Alsulami, Adil; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and coronary artery disease (CAD), few studies have investigated this issue in Saudi Arabia. Objectives This study aimed to identify the prevalence of OSA among CAD patients. Subjects and methods This was a cross-sectional (descriptive) study conducted at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from April 2012 to December 2013. All consecutive patients referred to the cardiac catheterization lab for coronary angiography who exhibited evidence of CAD were included in this study. This study was conducted in two stages. During the first stage, each participant was interviewed individually. The administered interview collected data pertaining to demographics, comorbidities, and the STOP-BANG questionnaire score. The second stage of this study consisted of a diagnostic overnight polysomnography (PSG) of 50% of the subjects at high risk for OSA according to the STOP-BANG questionnaire. Results Among the patients with CAD (N = 156), 128 (82%) were categorized as high risk for developing OSA. PSG was conducted on 48 patients. The estimated prevalence of OSA in the study sample was 56.4%. Approximately 61% of the documented sleep apnea patients suffered from moderate to severe OSA. Conclusion This local study concurs with reports in the literature indicating that OSA is very common among CAD patients. PMID:26557740

  20. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process.

    PubMed

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%).

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Using Watch-PAT 200 Is Independently Associated With an Increase in Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Never-Treated Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sun; Ihm, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Tae-Seok

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and morning blood pressure surge in never-treated patients with essential hypertension. This prospective study included a total of 58 patients (mean age, 51.7 years; 55.2% men) with never-treated essential hypertension. The patients were divided into non-OSA (n=23, 49.3±12.7 years) and OSA (n=35, 53.2±9.8 years) groups. The OSA group was defined as having an apnea-hypopnea index level >5 as measured by the Watch-PAT 200. The authors collected 24-hour ambulatory BP, plasma aldosterone concentration, and plasma renin activity data from all of the patients. The measured sleep-trough morning systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases were higher in the OSA group than in the non-OSA group (28.7±11.8 mm Hg vs 19.6±12.8 mm Hg, P=.008). The sleep-trough morning SBP increase was inversely correlated with the lowest oxygen saturation (r=-0.272, P=.039). OSA known to be associated with increased daytime and nocturnal sympathetic activity was associated with significantly higher sleep-trough morning SBP levels in this study.

  2. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of octenyl succinic anhydride modified inulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ye-Wang; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Wang, Haiying; Zhang, Guochao

    2015-01-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified inulin (In-OSA) was synthesized via chemical modification of inulin with octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). The esterification of inulin with OSA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and degree of substitution (DS) calculation. Antibacterial activity of In-OSA against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and inhibition rate determination. The results showed that inhibition rates against both E.coli and S. aureus increased with the increase of the In-OSA concentration. And the MICs against E. coli and S. aureus were 1% and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. The antibacterial mechanism was analyzed with the results of the proteins and nucleic acids leakage, SEM and negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both the leakages of proteins and nucleic acids increased with the increase of the In-OSA concentration. The leakage occurred mainly in the early stage which indicated that cell membrane and wall were destroyed by In-OSA quickly. The images of SEM and negative staining TEM suggested that the cell membranes and cell walls of S. aureus were damaged more severely and even destroyed completely; but only pores appeared on the surface of E. coli.

  3. New frontiers in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    AYAS, Najib T.; HIRSCH, Allen A. J.; LAHER, Ismail; BRADLEY, T. Douglas; MALHOTRA, Atul; POLOTSKY, Vsevolod Y.; TASALI, Esra

    2015-01-01

    OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea), the most common respiratory disorder of sleep, is caused by the loss of upper airway dilating muscle activity during sleep superimposed on a narrow upper airway. This results in recurrent nocturnal asphyxia. Termination of these events usually requires arousal from sleep and results in sleep fragmentation and hypoxaemia, which leads to poor quality sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, reduced quality of life and numerous other serious health consequences. Furthermore, patients with untreated sleep apnoea are at an increased risk of hypertension, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Although there are many predisposing risk factors for OSA, including male gender, endocrine disorders, use of muscle relaxants, smoking, fluid retention and increased age, the strongest risk factor is obesity. The aim of the present review is to focus on three cutting-edge topics with respect to OSA. The section on animal models covers various strategies used to simulate the physiology or the effects of OSA in animals, and how these have helped to understand some of the underlying mechanisms of OSA. The section on diabetes discusses current evidence in both humans and animal models demonstrating that intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation has a negative impact on glucose tolerance. Finally, the section on cardiovascular biomarkers reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biomarkers to both measure some of the negative consequences of OSA, as well as the potential benefits of OSA therapies. PMID:24780001

  4. Reduced Regional Grey Matter Volumes in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Philby, Mona F.; Macey, Paul M.; Ma, Richard A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric OSA is associated with cognitive risk. Since adult OSA manifests MRI evidence of brain injury, and animal models lead to regional neuronal losses, pediatric OSA patients may also be affected. We assessed the presence of neuronal injury, measured as regional grey matter volume, in 16 OSA children (8 male, 8.1 ± 2.2 years, AHI:11.1 ± 5.9 events/hr), and 200 control subjects (84 male, 8.2 ± 2.0 years), 191 of whom were from the NIH-Pediatric MRI database. High resolution T1-weighted whole-brain images were assessed between groups with voxel-based morphometry, using ANCOVA (covariates, age and gender; family-wise error correction, P < 0.01). Significant grey matter volume reductions appeared in OSA throughout areas of the superior frontal and prefrontal, and superior and lateral parietal cortices. Other affected sites included the brainstem, ventral medial prefrontal cortex, and superior temporal lobe, mostly on the left side. Thus, pediatric OSA subjects show extensive regionally-demarcated grey matter volume reductions in areas that control cognition and mood functions, even if such losses are apparently independent of cognitive deficits. Since OSA disease duration in our subjects is unknown, these findings may result from either delayed neuronal development, neuronal damaging processes, or a combination thereof, and could either reflect neuronal atrophy or reductions in cellular volume (neurons and glia). PMID:28303917

  5. Neuropathy and Dysautonomia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    EVLİCE, Ahmet; UĞUREL, Burcu; BAKLAN, Barış; ÖZTURA, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study is to search for the existence of neuropathy, dysautonomia and to identify the correlations of sickness level of patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Methods The research is based on the real cases at Dokuz Eylul University of Medicine Sleep and Epilepsy Center, observed during September 2008–May 2009. The patients were selected by polysomnography samples based on 20 persons at same ages with following criteria; high leveled OSAS (AHİ≥30), low OSAS (5≤AHİ<30) and healthy participants. Classical ENMG protocol, symphatic skin response and R-R interval variation test were performed on these samples. Results High and low leveled OSAS patients had a statistically significant (p<0.05) decrease in the average velocity of motor conduction in right tibialis posterior when compared to the control group. Besides we observed an statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in the average amplitud of symphatic skin responses in high leveled OSAS patients than control group. Conclusion OSAS indicates a risk of possible peripheral neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction risk increases in positive correlation with level of OSAS.

  6. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length.

    PubMed

    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-10-25

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening.

  7. Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Huang, Chien-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sleep disorders are prevalent medical disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, whether patients with RA are at an increased risk of developing obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is unclear. Design Using population-based retrospective cohort study to examine the risk of OSA in patients with RA. Setting We used claims data of the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Participants We identified a RA cohort with 33 418 patients newly diagnosed in 2000–2010 and a randomly selected non-RA comparison cohort with 33 418 individuals frequency matched by sex, age and diagnosis year. Primary and secondary outcome measures Incident OSA was estimated by the end of 2011. The HRs of OSA were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results The overall incidence rate of OSA was 75% greater in the RA cohort than in the non-RA cohort (3.04 vs 1.73/10 000 person-years, p<0.001), with an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI 1.18 to 2.60). Stratified analyses by sex, age group and comorbidity revealed that the incidence rates of OSA associated with RA were higher in all subgroups. Conclusions This population-based retrospective cohort study suggested that patients with RA should be monitored for the risk of developing OSA. PMID:27895064

  8. Simplified Berlin Questionnaire for Screening of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Thai Male Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Arunsurat, Itthiphat; Luengyosluechakul, Swita; Prateephoungrat, Krittin; Siripaupradist, Pittayapoom; Khemtong, Sukanya; Jamcharoensup, Kunranan; Thanapatkaiporn, Narin; Limpawattana, Panita; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disease associated with major cardiovascular diseases. Male subjects are more at higher risk for OSA than female subjects. The Berlin questionnaire is a beneficial screening tool for OSA and has 14 items. The Berlin questionnaire may need some adjustment for Thai or Asian populations. We aimed to find items that should be asked in the Berlin questionnaire to identify high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Thai male healthcare workers. This study was performed in Thai male healthcare workers over the age of 35 and currently working at the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University. The Thai version of the Berlin questionnaire was randomly distributed. A study population of 273 subjects was required to provide a confidence value of 95%. An item analysis of the Berlin questionnaire was evaluated as independent factors for being high risk of OSA by using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of the 273 distributed questionnaires, 135 subjects returned then (49.5% response rate). Of those, 41 (30.4%) were identified as being at high risk of OSA. Only three items of the Berlin questionnaire, including frequent snoring, high body mass index and hypertension, were independently associated with being at high risk for OSA. In conclusion, the Berlin questionnaire can be shortened to identify high risk for OSA by itself; not polysomnography.

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea: an experimental and clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Emilia; Roche, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder considered as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular consequences, such as systemic arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, metabolic disorders, and cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of OSA-related consequence is assumed to be chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) inducing alterations at the molecular level, oxidative stress, persistent systemic inflammation, oxygen sensor activation, and increase of sympathetic activity. Overall, these mechanisms have an effect on vessel permeability and are considered to be important factors for explaining vascular, metabolic, and cognitive OSA-related consequences. The present review attempts to examine together the research paradigms and clinical studies on the effect of acute and chronic IH and the potential link with OSA. We firstly describe the literature data on the mechanisms activated by acute and chronic IH at the experimental level, which are very helpful and beneficial to explaining OSA consequences. Then, we describe in detail the effect of IH in patients with OSA that we can consider “the human model” of chronic IH. In this way, we can better understand the specific pathophysiological mechanisms proposed to explain the consequences of IH in OSA. PMID:27800512

  10. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced (“bigdata”) preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  11. The Severity of Sleep Disordered Breathing Induces Different Decrease in the Oxygen Saturation During Rapid Eye Movement and Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunkyung; Yu, Jae-hak; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Ha, Ji-Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate how differences in oxygen saturation between non-REM (NREM) and REM sleep in patients according to the severity of sleep apnea. Methods We studied 396 male patients diagnosed with simple snoring or obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on nocturnal polysomnography. Patients were divided into groups by the OSAS severity. We compared the average oxygen saturation between REM and NREM sleep in each group. Results In the simple snoring group, average oxygen saturation was significantly greater during REM than during NREM sleep. In the severe OSA group alone, average oxygen saturation was greater in NREM than in REM sleep. The difference of NREM-REM average oxygen saturation correlated significantly with AHI in the severe OSA group. Conclusion More severe hypoxemia was seen in REM than NREM sleep in the severe OSAS group. The differential oxygen decrease between REM and NREM sleep is likely due to the differentially occurring sleep breathing events in each sleep stage according to the SDB severity. The more AHI increases in the severe OSAS patients, the more prominent the hypoxemia of REM sleep compared with NREM sleep is likely to appear. This suggests that the pressure of continuous positive airway pressure should be increased to control the hypoxemia of REM sleep in extremely severe OSAS. PMID:27909457

  12. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening. PMID:27690344

  13. Sleeping too close together: obesity and obstructive sleep apnea in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Joseph L; Narang, Indra

    2014-09-01

    To review the current available literature exploring the prevalence, severity, consequences and treatments for obesity related OSA in children and adolescents. The published literature was searched through EMBASE and Pubmed using a pre-defined search strategy. There is evidence showing that OSA occurs more frequently and may be more severe in children and adolescents who are overweight or obese compared with lean children. Obesity and OSA are independently associated with adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuropsychological consequences. The magnitude of these abnormalities when obesity and OSA co-exist is not well established. Treatment options for obesity related OSA includes adenotonsillectomy, but it does not cure OSA in over 50% of obese children. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy delivered through continuous or bi-level modes is successful, but limited by generally poor compliance. There is increasing experience with bariatric surgical techniques which are effective for the treatment of obesity and its related complications. As obesity related OSA is highly prevalent, more research is needed to understand the interaction of these two conditions with regards to pathophysiology, adverse consequences and optimal management strategies.

  14. Met interacts with EGFR and Ron in canine osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    McCleese, J. K.; Bear, M. D.; Kulp, S. K.; Mazcko, C.; Khanna, C.; London, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Met is known to be over-expressed in canine osteosarcoma (OSA). In human cancers, the RTKs Met, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Ron are frequently co-expressed and engage in heterodimerization, altering signal transduction and promoting resistance to targeted therapeutics. We found that EGFR and Ron are expressed in canine OSA cell lines and primary tissues, EGFR and Ron are frequently phosphorylated in OSA tumour samples, and Met is co-associated with EGFR and Ron in canine OSA cell lines. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation induced amplification of ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation in OSA cells and Met was phosphorylated following TGFα stimulation providing evidence for receptor cross-talk. Lastly, treatment of OSA cells with combined gefitinib and crizotinib inhibited cell proliferation in an additive manner. Together, these data support the notion that Met, EGFR and Ron interact in OSA cells and as such, may represent viable targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22235915

  15. CPAP Treatment Adherence in Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Baltzan, M.; Pavilanis, A.; Tran, D.-L.; Conrod, K.

    2017-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has numerous negative health-related consequences. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is generally considered the treatment of choice for OSA, but rates of nonadherence are high. It is believed that OSA is more prevalent among men; therefore understanding how OSA presents among women is limited and treatment adherence has received little research attention. For this study, 29 women were recruited from primary care offices. They completed a questionnaire battery and underwent a night of nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) followed by a visit with a sleep specialist. Women diagnosed with OSA were prescribed CPAP; 2 years later CPAP adherence was evaluated. Results show that approximately half the sample was adherent. There were no significant differences between adherent and nonadherent women on OSA severity; however CPAP adherent women had worse nocturnal and daytime functioning scores at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, when the seven nocturnal and daytime variables were used as predictors in a discriminant analysis, they could predict 87% of adherent and 93% of the nonadherent women. The single most important predictor was nonrefreshing sleep. We discuss the implications of the findings for identifying women in primary care with potential OSA and offer suggestions for enhancing treatment adherence. PMID:28352476

  16. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    PubMed Central

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%). PMID:26221183

  17. Sleep clinical record: what differences in school and preschool children?

    PubMed Central

    Shafiek, Hanaa; Evangelisti, Melania; Rabasco, Jole; Cecili, Manuela; Montesano, Marilisa; Barreto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The sleep clinical record (SCR) may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively. Obesity, malocclusions, nasal septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent in school-age children (p<0.05); however, only tonsillar hypertrophy had significant hazard ratio (2.3) for OSA development. Saddle nose, nasal hypotonia, oral breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent for development of OSA in preschoolers (p<0.03). The SCR score was significantly higher among preschool children than in school-age children (8.4±2.22 versus 7.9±2.6; p=0.044). Further, SCR score >6.5 had a sensitivity of 74% in predicting OSA in preschool children with positive predictive value of 86% (p=0.0001). Our study confirms the validity of the SCR as a screening tool for patient candidates for a PSG study for suspected OSA, in both school and preschool children. PMID:27730168

  18. Reduced Systemic Levels of IL-10 Are Associated with the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Insulin Resistance in Morbidly Obese Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Arana-Lechuga, Yoaly; Esqueda-León, Enrique; Terán-Pérez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Chavez, Antonio; Velázquez Moctezuma, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been related to elevation of inflammatory cytokines and development of insulin resistance in morbidly obese (MO) subjects. However, it is still unclear whether the systemic concentration of anti-inflammatory mediators is also affected in MO subjects directly related to the severity of OSA and level of insulin resistance. Normal weight and MO subjects were subjected to overnight polysomnography in order to establish the severity of OSA, according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Blood samples were obtained for estimation of total cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interleukin 10 (IL-10). Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in MO subjects with OSA than in MO and control individuals without OSA. Besides being inversely associated with serum TNF-α and IL-12, decreased IL-10 levels were significantly related to increased AHI, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Serum IL-10 is significantly reduced in morbidly obese subjects with severe OSA while also showing a clear relationship with a state of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance probably regardless of obesity in the present sample. It may be of potential clinical interest to identify the stimulatory mechanisms of IL-10 in obese individuals with OSA. PMID:25944984

  19. Orthodontic treatment in children to prevent sleep-disordered breathing in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Makoto

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review human craniofacial growth and development, especially the growth of the mandible, to clarify the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome and craniofacial abnormality, and finally, to propose the hypothesis that negative pressure produced in the chest of the OSA child inhibits the growth of the mandible. Recently, the development of diagnosis and treatment of OSA syndrome has progressed rapidly; however, the prevention of OSA syndrome was merely seen. Craniofacial abnormality is reported as one of the causes of OSA syndrome. If craniofacial abnormality is determined only by genetics, it is difficult to manage the craniofacial skeleton to prevent OSA syndrome. The role of epigenetic factors on craniofacial growth and development is still controversial. However, if we stand on the functional matrix hypothesis, we can manage not only growth of the mandible but also the craniofacial skeleton as a whole. The author proposes the hypothesis that the negative pressure produced in the chest prohibits the growth of the mandible even if the patients have a capacity for growth and development; therefore, if this negative pressure disappears because of the removal of the tonsil and/or adenoids or by an orthodontic treatment to make a patency of the airway, the mandible may grow normally, and we can prevent or reduce a number of OSA syndromes in the future.

  20. CPAP Treatment Adherence in Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Libman, E; Bailes, S; Fichten, C S; Rizzo, D; Creti, L; Baltzan, M; Grad, R; Pavilanis, A; Tran, D-L; Conrod, K; Amsel, R

    2017-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has numerous negative health-related consequences. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is generally considered the treatment of choice for OSA, but rates of nonadherence are high. It is believed that OSA is more prevalent among men; therefore understanding how OSA presents among women is limited and treatment adherence has received little research attention. For this study, 29 women were recruited from primary care offices. They completed a questionnaire battery and underwent a night of nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) followed by a visit with a sleep specialist. Women diagnosed with OSA were prescribed CPAP; 2 years later CPAP adherence was evaluated. Results show that approximately half the sample was adherent. There were no significant differences between adherent and nonadherent women on OSA severity; however CPAP adherent women had worse nocturnal and daytime functioning scores at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, when the seven nocturnal and daytime variables were used as predictors in a discriminant analysis, they could predict 87% of adherent and 93% of the nonadherent women. The single most important predictor was nonrefreshing sleep. We discuss the implications of the findings for identifying women in primary care with potential OSA and offer suggestions for enhancing treatment adherence.

  1. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced ("bigdata") preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow).

  2. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea on heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina A; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2013-06-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has been proven to be a risk factor for hypertension and vascular dysfunction, and has been proposed to be causally related with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Searches of bibliographical databases revealed that several mechanisms seem to underpin the association between OSA and cardiac arrhythmias: intermittent hypoxia associated with autonomic nervous system activation and increased oxidative stress, which may lead to cardiac cellular damage and alteration in myocardial excitability; recurrent arousals, resulting in sympathetic activation and coronary vasoconstriction; and increased negative intrathoracic pressure which may mechanically stretch the myocardial walls and, thus, promote acute changes in myocardial excitability as well as structural remodelling of the myocardium. Findings from cross-sectional studies suggest a high prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with OSA and a high prevalence of OSA in those with cardiac arrhythmias. Preliminary evidence from uncontrolled interventional studies suggests that treatment of OSA may prevent cardiac arrhythmias. In conclusion, there is preliminary evidence that OSA is associated with the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Data from randomised controlled studies are needed to definitively clarify the role of OSA in arrhythmogenesis.

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI <30), and 22.6% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30). Waist circumference (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.1; P = 0.03) was significantly related to the presence of OSA. Severe OSA was most likely in individuals with a higher BMI (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Physicians should be particularly cognizant of the likelihood of OSA in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, especially among individuals with higher waist circumference and BMI. PMID:19279303

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Surgery: Quality Improvement Imperatives and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in surgical candidates than in the general population and may increase susceptibility to perioperative complications that range from transient desaturation to catastrophic injuries. Understanding the potential impact of OSA on patients’ surgical risk profile is of particular interest to otolaryngologists, who routinely perform airway procedures—including surgical procedures for treatment of OSA. Whereas the effects of OSA on long-term health outcomes are well documented, the relationship between OSA and surgical risk is not collinear, and clear consensus on the nature of the association is lacking. Better guidelines for optimization of pain control, perioperative monitoring, and surgical decision making are potential areas for quality improvement efforts. Many interventions have been suggested to mitigate the risk of adverse events in surgical patients with OSA, but wide variations in clinical practice remain. We review the current literature, emphasizing recent progress in understanding the complex pathophysiologic interactions noted in OSA patients undergoing surgery and outlining potential strategies to decrease perioperative risks. PMID:25013745

  5. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-05

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types.

  6. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the obstructive sleep apnea: comparison between NOHL and VOTE classifications.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Viana, Alonço; Mendes, Daniella Leitão; de Andrade Lemes, Lucas Neves; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Neves, Denise Duprat; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete collapse of the pharynx that result in a decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation. Nasofibrolaryngoscopy under induced sleep is a promising alternative for identifying sites of upper airway obstruction in patients with OSA. This study aimed to compare the obstruction sites screened by drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) using the Nose oropharynx hypopharynx and larynx (NOHL) and Velum oropharynx tongue base epiglottis (VOTE) classifications. We also determined the relationship between OSA severity and the number of obstruction sites and compared the minimum SaO2 levels between DISE and polysomnography (PSG). This was a prospective study in 45 patients with moderate and severe OSA using DISE with target-controlled infusion of propofol bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. The retropalatal region was the most frequent obstruction site, followed by the retrolingual region. Forty-two percent of patients had obstruction in the epiglottis. Concentrically shaped obstructions were more prevalent in both ratings. The relationship between OSA severity and number of obstruction sites was significant for the VOTE classification. Similar minimum SaO2 values were observed in DISE and PSG. The VOTE classification was more comprehensive in the analysis of the epiglottis and pharynx by DISE and the relationship between OSA severity and number of affected sites was also established by VOTE. The use of BIS associated with DISE is a reliable tool for the assessment of OSA patients.

  7. Sleep Apnea Symptoms and Risk of Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, A.E.; Essick, G.K.; Fillingim, R.; Knott, C.; Ohrbach, R.; Greenspan, J.D.; Diatchenko, L.; Maixner, W.; Dubner, R.; Bair, E.; Miller, V.E.; Slade, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) signs/symptoms are associated with the occurrence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), using the OPPERA prospective cohort study of adults aged 18 to 44 years at enrollment (n = 2,604) and the OPPERA case-control study of chronic TMD (n = 1,716). In both the OPPERA cohort and case-control studies, TMD was examiner determined according to established research diagnostic criteria. People were considered to have high likelihood of OSA if they reported a history of sleep apnea or ≥ 2 hallmarks of OSA: loud snoring, daytime sleepiness, witnessed apnea, and hypertension. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence limits (CL) for first-onset TMD. Logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% CL for chronic TMD. In the cohort, 248 individuals developed first-onset TMD during the median 2.8-year follow-up. High likelihood of OSA was associated with greater incidence of first-onset TMD (adjusted HR = 1.73; 95% CL, 1.14, 2.62). In the case-control study, high likelihood of OSA was associated with higher odds of chronic TMD (adjusted OR = 3.63; 95% CL, 2.03, 6.52). Both studies supported a significant association of OSA symptoms and TMD, with prospective cohort evidence finding that OSA symptoms preceded first-onset TMD. PMID:23690360

  8. Microbial community in anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic sludge reduction process revealed by 454 pyrosequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xinqiang; Qiao, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Modification of the anoxic-oxic (AO) process by inserting a sludge holding tank (SHT) into the sludge return line forms an anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic (A+OSA) process that can achieve a 48.98% sludge reduction rate. The 454 pyrosequencing method was used to obtain the microbial communities of the AO and A+OSA processes. Results showed that the microbial community structures of the 2 processes were different as a result of the SHT insertion. Bacteria assigned to the phyla Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes commonly existed and dominated the microbial populations of the 2 processes. However, the relative abundance of these populations shifted in the presence of SHT. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria decreased during the A+OSA process. A specific comparison at the class level showed that Sphingobacteria was enriched in the A+OSA process. The result suggested that the fermentative bacteria Sphingobacteria may have key functions in reducing the sludge from the A+OSA process. Uncultured Nitrosomonadaceae gradually became the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrospira was enriched in the A+OSA process. Both occurrences were favorable for stabilized nitrogen removal. The known denitrifying species in the A+OSA process were similar to those in the AO process; however, their relative abundance also decreased.

  9. A Pilot Study of the Inability to Fit Hands Around Neck as a Predictor of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Peter J; Edmonds, Lee C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the high estimates of undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is a need for simple and accurate diagnostic tests. Neck circumference has long been correlated with OSA, but its usefulness as a diagnostic tool has been limited. Aims: We proposed to evaluate the value of a simple neck grasp test to help identify OSA. We hypothesized that the inability of a patient in a sleep clinic to fit their hands around their neck is predictive of OSA. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of patients evaluated in a general sleep clinic was performed. Easy sleep apnea predictor (ESAP) positive was defined as the inability to place the hands around the neck with digits touching in the anterior and posterior. ESAP negative was the ability to place hands around the neck. Positive for OSA in this symptomatic sleep clinic population was defined as an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) of ≥5. Results: A total of 47 subjects (36% female) had ESAP data available, which were reviewed. The mean age was 51.6 years (SD 14.4, range 29-81 years). The mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.8 (SD 9.9, range 20.4-69.5). Review showed 87.2% (N = 41) tested positive for OSA by AHI of ≥5. The sensitivity and specificity of ESAP were 68.3% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive power was 100% and the negative predictive power was 31.6%. Conclusion: As we hypothesized, ESAP positive (inability to span neck) was predictive of OSA in a population of sleep clinic patients. An ESAP positive test was 100% predictive of the presence of OSA (AHI of ≥5). ESAP shows promise for ease of clinical use to predict the presence of OSA in a general sleep clinic population. PMID:26942131

  10. Treatments for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Review of the literature. Results OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The current “gold standard” treatment for OSA is continuous positive air pressure (CPAP), which pneumatically stabilizes the upper airways. CPAP has proven efficacy and potential cost savings via decreases in health comorbidities and/or motor-vehicle crashes. However, CPAP treatment is not well-tolerated due to various side effects, and adherence among OSA subjects can be as low as 50% in certain populations. Other treatment options for OSA include improving CPAP tolerability, increasing CPAP adherence through patient interventions, weight loss/exercise, positional therapy, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, oral pressure therapy, oral appliances, surgery, hypoglossal nerve stimulation, drug treatment, and combining 2 or more of the aforementioned treatments. Despite the many options available to treat OSA, none of them are as efficacious as CPAP. However, many of these treatments are tolerable, and adherence rates are higher than those of the CPAP, making them a more viable treatment option for long-term use. Conclusion Patients need to weigh the benefits and risks of available treatments for OSA. More large randomized controlled studies on treatments or combination of treatments for OSA are needed that measure parameters such as treatment adherence, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation, subjective sleepiness, quality of life, and adverse events. PMID:27134515

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Javid Ahmad; Masoodi, Shariq Rashid; Shoib, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG) studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2%) had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) score, 3 (5.1%) patients had mild, 28 (47.5%) had moderate, and 28 (47.5%) had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001). Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05); however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics. PMID:28217508

  12. Preparation of organic sulfur adsorbent from coal for adsorption of dibenzothiophene-type compounds in diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cigdem Shalaby; Xiaoliang Ma; Anning Zhou; Chunshan Song

    2009-05-15

    High-performance organic sulfur adsorbents (OSA) have been prepared from coal by chemical activation for selective adsorption of the refractory sulfur compounds, such as 4-methyl dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, in diesel fuel. The performance of the prepared OSAs for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) was evaluated in batch and flow adsorption systems at room temperature using a model diesel fuel. It was found that coal rank and preparation conditions, including activation agents (NaOH, KOH, and NaOH + KOH) and their ratio to coal, activation temperature, and time have significant impacts on the yield and ADS performance of the OSAs. The high-performance OSAs can be prepared from different ranks of coal by using NaOH + KOH as an activation agent with an activating-agent-to-coal ratio of 3.5. The yield of OSA increased in the order of lignite < high volatile bituminous coal < medium volatile bituminous coal < anthracite. The OSA-A, which was derived from an anthracite with the highest yield (68 wt %) by the activation at 650{sup o}C for 1 h, gave the best ADS performance among the OSAs from all coal samples tested. The sulfur adsorption capacity of OSA-A reached 0.281 mmol-S/g-A at an equilibrium sulfur concentration of 50 ppmw in the model diesel fuel, which was 155% higher than a commercial coal-derived activated carbon and 35% higher than the best commercial activated carbon among all commercial activated carbons examined in our laboratory. The higher ADS capacity of OSA-A can be attributed to its significantly higher density (2.77 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) of the adsorption sites on the surface as determined by Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which is related to its oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbonaceous surface as revealed by temperature-programmed desorption analysis. 57 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Li, Qiong; Chen, Baoyuan; Zhang, Yunting; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Structural and functional brain changes may contribute to neural dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the effect of OSA on resting-state brain activity has not been established. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the common brain networks in patients with OSA and their relationships with changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the corresponding brain regions. Designs: Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired from patients with OSA and healthy controls. Seven brain networks were identified by independent component analysis. The rsFC in each network was compared between groups and the GMV of brain regions with significant differences in rsFC was also compared. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-four male patients with untreated OSA and 21 matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: OSA specifically affected the cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks but not the visual and auditory networks. The medial prefrontal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed decreased rsFC and GMV in patients with OSA, suggesting structural and functional deficits. The right DLPFC and left precentral gyrus showed decreased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting a functional deficit. The right posterior cingulate cortex demonstrated increased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting functional compensation. In patients with OSA, the rsFC of the right DLPFC was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: OSA specifically affects resting-state functional connectivity in cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks, which may be related to the impaired cognitive and motor functions in these patients. Citation: Zhang Q; Wang D; Qin W; Li Q; Chen B; Zhang Y; Yu C. Altered resting-state brain activity in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2013

  14. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression.

  15. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Kumar, Rajesh; Cross, Rebecca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2010-04-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight <125 kg). We evaluated relationships between the AHI and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI), and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI), as well as sex and body mass index (BMI). AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  16. Prevalence and risks of habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in adult dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Nazir, Mohammed A.; Al-Masoud, Naif N.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among dental patients and investigate factors associated with high-risk OSA. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between October and December 2014. A total of 200 consecutive female and male dental patients were included in this study. Subjective and objective assessments were carried out. Habitual snoring and risk of OSA were assessed using the Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Two trained investigators carried out the objective measurements of anthropometric data, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and clinical examination of upper-airway, and dental occlusion. Results: Habitual snoring was present in 18.2% of the females and 81.8% of the males (p<0.05). Breathing pauses during sleep of more than once a week occurred in 9% (n=17) of the sample. Of the males, 78.3% were at high risk of OSA compared with 21.7% of the females. Multivariate analysis for risk of OSA revealed that obese patients were almost 10 times more likely to report OSA symptoms than their non-obese counterparts (odds ratio: 9.9, 95% confidence intervals: 4.4-22.1). Tongue indentations, tonsil size, and a high Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were also independent risks of OSA. Conclusion: Tongue indentations and tonsil grades III and IV were significantly associated with risk of OSA. This validates the important role of dentists in the recognition of the signs and symptoms of OSA. PMID:26837402

  17. Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in Patients With Tumors in the Head and Neck Region

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Diwakar; Hessel, Amy C.; Lei, Xiudong; Beadle, Beth M.; William, William N.; Bashoura, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint of cancer patients. Most studies have focused on insomnia and cancer-related fatigue. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been reported in small studies and case reports. Methods. In a retrospective review of patients who underwent formal sleep evaluation and polysomnography (PSG) from 2006 to 2011, 56 patients with tumors in the head and neck region were identified. Clinical characteristics, sleep-related history, and PSG data were reviewed. Results. Most patients had active cancer (80%), and the majority had squamous pathology (68%). Prominent symptoms included daytime fatigue (93%), daytime sleepiness (89%), and snoring (82%). Comorbid conditions primarily included hypertension (46%) and hypothyroidism (34%). Significant sleep-related breathing disorder was noted in 93% of patients, and 84% met clinical criteria for OSA. A male predominance (77%) was noted, and patients were not obese (body mass index <30 kg/m2 in 52%). The majority of patients (79%) underwent radiation prior to sleep study, of which 88% had OSA, and in the group without prior radiation, 67% had OSA. Adherence to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy was slightly better when compared with the general population. A subset of patients with persistent hypoxia despite advanced forms of PAP required tracheostomy. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients with active disease and radiation prior to PSG were more likely to have OSA. Conclusion. Sleep-related breathing disorder was common in patients with tumors in the head and neck region referred for evaluation of sleep disruption, and most met clinical criteria for OSA. Daytime fatigue and sleepiness were the most common complaints. OSA was prevalent in male patients, and most with OSA were not obese. Architectural distortion from the malignancy and/or treatment may predispose these patients to OSA by altering anatomic and neural factors. A heightened clinical suspicion for sleep

  18. Pupillometric findings in children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Philby, Mona; Aydinoz, Secil; Gozal, David; Kilic, Selim; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Bandla, Hari P.; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to intermittent hypoxia, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and eventually cardiovascular morbidity. Alterations in autonomic nervous system (ANS) tone and reflexes are likely to play major roles in OSA-associated morbidities, and have been identified in a subset of children with OSA. Objectives To evaluate whether pupillometry, a noninvasive and rapid bedside test for the assessment of autonomic nervous system dysfunction (ANS), would detect abnormal ANS function in children with OSA. Methods Children ages 2-12 years underwent polysomnography (PSG), and were divided based on PSG findings into two groups; Habitual Snorers (HS; AHI <1 h/TST, n=17) and OSA (AHI>1 h/TST, n=49), the latter then sub-divided into AHI severity categories (>1 but <5, >5 but <10, and >10 h/TST). Pupillometric measurements were performed during the clinic visit in a dark room using an automated pupillometer device. Results A total of 66 subjects with a mean age of 7.3 ±2.6 years were recruited. There were no statistically significant differences between any of the groups, even when comparing severe OSA (n=15) and HS in any of the measures related to pupillary reflexes. However, mild, yet significant increases in systolic blood pressure and morning plasma norepinephrine levels were detected in the severe OSA group. Conclusion Although ANS perturbation are clearly present in a proportion of children with OSA, particularly those with severe disease, pupillary responses do not appear to provide a sensitive method for the detection of ANS dysfunction in OSA children. PMID:26429743

  19. Investigation of the Plasma Nitrite Levels and Oxidant–Antioxidant Status in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BOZKURT, Hakan; NEYAL, Abdurrahman; GEYİK, Sırma; TAYSI, Seyithan; ANARAT, Rüksan; BULUT, Mesut; NEYAL, Ayşe Münife

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most prevalent sleep disorders. In the present study, we assessed the nitrite level, which is an indirect indicator of nitric oxide (NO), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) and oxidative stress index (OSI), which may be associated with endotel dysfunction. We investigated the difference between the groups and the relationship among the severity of comorbid conditions. Methods This study was conducted in 39 OSA patients confirmed by polysomnography and 40 healthy subjects (controls). The OSA group consisted of 10 women and 29 men and the control group consisted of 20 women and 20 men. Polysomnographic revealed mild OSA in two, moderate in 7 and severe in 30 cases. We measured plasma TAS, TOS and nitrite levels from venous blood. The OSI value was obtained by dividing the TOS and TAS values. Values were compared with the control group and between patient groups. Results A high body mass index (BMI), cardiovasculer diseases (CVD) and the use of medication for co-morbid diseases were more prevalent in the OSA group (p=.001, p=.029 and p=.006, respectively). The median plasma TOS level and OSI in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OUA) group were significantly higher than those in the control group (p=.001 and p=.001, respectively). The plasma median nitrite level and TAS did not show any significant difference between the OSA and the control groups. None of the parameters revealed a significant difference between severe and moderate OSA cases. Conclusion Our findings in the present study revealed that the oxidant–antioxidant balance shifted toward the oxidant side in OSA cases; however, the NO level did not change. These findings together may point out that some molecules other than NO may have a role in the pathophysiology of endothelial dysfunction and also in the disturbed oxidant–antioxidant balance in OSA.

  20. Selection Incentives in a Performance-Based Contracting System

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yujing

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a performance-based contracting (PBC) system provides incentives for nonprofit providers of substance abuse treatment to select less severe clients into treatment. Data Sources The Maine Addiction Treatment System (MATS) standardized admission and discharge data provided by the Maine Office of Substance Abuse (OSA) for fiscal years 1991–1995, provides demographic, substance abuse, and social functional information on clients of programs receiving public funding. Study Design We focused on OSA clients (i.e., those patients whose treatment cost was covered by the funding from OSA) and Medicaid clients in outpatient programs. Clients were identified as being “most severe” or not. We compared the likelihood for OSA clients to be “most severe” before PBC and after PBC using Medicaid clients as the control. Multivariate regression analysis was employed to predict the marginal effect of PBC on the probability of OSA clients' being most severe after controlling for other factors. Principal Findings The percentage of OSA outpatient clients classified as most severe users dropped by 7 percent (p<=0.001) after the innovation of performance-based contracting, compared to the increase of 2 percent for Medicaid clients. The regression results also showed that PBC had a significantly negative marginal effect on the probability of OSA clients being most severe. Conclusions Performance-based contracting gave providers of substance abuse treatment financial incentives to treat less severe OSA clients in order to improve their performance outcomes. Fewer OSA clients with the greatest severity were treated in outpatient programs with the implementation of PBC. These results suggest that regulators, or payers, should evaluate programs comprehensively taking this type of selection behavior into consideration. PMID:12785560

  1. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  2. Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin.

    PubMed

    Barel, A; Calomme, M; Timchenko, A; De Paepe, K; Paepe, K De; Demeester, N; Rogiers, V; Clarys, P; Vanden Berghe, D

    2005-10-01

    Chronic exposure of the skin to sunlight causes damage to the underlying connective tissue with a loss of elasticity and firmness. Silicon (Si) was suggested to have an important function in the formation and maintenance of connective tissue. Choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid ("ch-OSA") is a bioavailable form of silicon which was found to increase the hydroxyproline concentration in the dermis of animals. The effect of ch-OSA on skin, nails and hair was investigated in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study. Fifty women with photodamaged facial skin were administered orally during 20 weeks, 10 mg Si/day in the form of ch-OSA pellets (n=25) or a placebo (n=25). Noninvasive methods were used to evaluate skin microrelief (forearm), hydration (forearm) and mechanical anisotropy (forehead). Volunteers evaluated on a virtual analog scale (VAS, "none=0, severe=3") brittleness of hair and nails. The serum Si concentration was significantly higher after a 20-week supplementation in subjects with ch-OSA compared to the placebo group. Skin roughness parameters increased in the placebo group (Rt:+8%; Rm: +11%; Rz: +6%) but decreased in the ch-OSA group (Rt: -16%; Rm: -19%; Rz: -8%). The change in roughness from baseline was significantly different between ch-OSA and placebo groups for Rt and Rm. The difference in longitudinal and lateral shear propagation time increased after 20 weeks in the placebo group but decreased in the ch-OSA group suggesting improvement in isotropy of the skin. VAS scores for nail and hair brittleness were significantly lower after 20 weeks in the ch-OSA group compared to baseline scores. Oral intake of ch-OSA during the 20 weeks results in a significant positive effect on skin surface and skin mechanical properties, and on brittleness of hair and nails.

  3. Mandibular Advancement Device as a Comparable Treatment to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Tsuiki, Satoru; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positional obstructive sleep apnea (P-OSA) is a clinically common phenotype of OSA, which can be treated effectively with mandibular advancement devices (MADs). We hypothesized that the efficacy of an MAD is comparable to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in P-OSA patients. Methods: Among patients diagnosed with OSA at a single sleep center from January 2008 to May 2014, male subjects with moderate OSA were recruited and stringently categorized as having P-OSA when the ratio of their lateral apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to supine AHI was ≤ 0.5, their lateral sleep time was > 60 minutes, and their lateral REM sleep time was longer than 10 minutes. Treatment efficacy was compared between P-OSA subjects with an MAD (n = 34) and those with nCPAP (n = 34) after matching for age, body-mass index, and baseline AHI. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 20.6 ± 3.9/h: 21.3 ± 1.7/h, p = 0.35) or in follow-up AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 4.7 ± 3.5/h: 3.4 ± 3.7/h, p = 0.12) between the 2 treatment groups, and hence MADs lowered the AHI to the same extent as nCPAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an MAD is as efficacious as nCPAP for P-OSA patients. MAD treatment for this specific phenotype may be a promising patient-tailored and first-line approach to OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1079. Citation: Takaesu Y, Tsuiki S, Kobayashi M, Komada Y, Nakayama H, Inoue Y. Mandibular advancement device as a comparable treatment to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for positional obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1113–1119. PMID:27250814

  4. The association between TNF-α and erectile dysfunction complaints.

    PubMed

    Matos, G; Hirotsu, C; Alvarenga, T A; Cintra, F; Bittencourt, L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2013-11-01

    Inflammatory markers like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) have been related to erectile dysfunction (ED) and may interact with other cardiovascular risk factors such as obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The aim of this study was to examine the inflammatory, metabolic and hormonal profile of men with or without ED complaints and/or OSAS recruited through the Epidemiologic Sleep Study (EPISONO). A sample of 363 men completed sexual questionnaires for ED and had physical and blood examinations. OSAS was evaluated by polysomnography and clinical assessment. The blood samples were used for determination of TNF-α, interleukin-6, leptin, cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, homocysteine, glucose and hormonal levels. After controlling for confounding factors, men with ED complaints presented higher systolic blood pressure and TNF-α, independent of OSAS. Significant interaction between ED and OSAS was only observed for neck circumference, which was higher in ED men with OSAS than men with OSAS without ED and men with ED without OSAS. Binary logistic regression showed that the predictor factors for ED were age >43 years, myocardial infarction events, TNF-α and systolic blood pressure. Finally, a receiver-operating characteristics curve suggested a cut-off point of 9.95 pg/mL for TNF-α with sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 59% in men with ED complaints. Furthermore, there was a significant association between high levels of TNF-α (>9.95 pg/mL) and the presence of ED complaints. The results showed that there was an association between TNF-α levels and ED complaints in men independent of OSAS.

  5. Sleep apnea is not associated with worse outcomes in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fornadi, Katalin; Ronai, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Turanyi, Csilla Zita; Malavade, Tushar S.; Shapiro, Colin Michael; Novak, Marta; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea(OSA) is one of the most common sleep disorders in kidney transplant recipients, however its long-term consequences have only rarely been investigated. Here, we hypothesized that the presence of OSA would be associated with higher risk of mortality and faster decline of graft function in kidney transplant recipients. In a prospective cohort study 100 prevalent kidney transplant recipients who underwent one-night polysomnography at baseline and were followed for a median 75 months. Generalized linear mixed-effects models and Cox regression models were used to assess the association between OSA and the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease(CKD) and mortality. The estimated slopes of estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR) in patients with and without OSA were compared using a two-stage model of eGFR change including only OSA as a variable. In this model patients with OSA (eGFR versus time was −0.93 ml/min/1.73 m2/yr(95%CI:−1.75 to−0.11) had a similar slope as compared to patients without OSA(eGFR versus time was −1.24 ml/min/1.73 m2/yr(95%CI: −1.67 to −0.81). In unadjusted Cox proportional regression analyses OSA was not associated with higher all-cause mortality risk (Hazard Ratio(HR) = 1.20; 95% Confidence Interval(CI): 0.50–2.85). No association was found between the presence of OSA and the rate of progression of CKD or all-cause mortality in prevalent kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25384581

  6. Sleep Apnea and Cancer: Analysis of a Nationwide Population Sample

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, David; Ham, Sandra A.; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Epidemiological evidence from relatively small cohorts suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with higher cancer incidence and mortality. Here we aimed to determine whether cancer incidence for major cancer types and risk of metastases or mortality from cancer are increased in the presence of OSA. Methods: All OSA diagnoses included in an employee-sponsored health insurance database spanning the years 2003–2012 were identified and 1:1 matched demographically based on age, gender, and state of residence, or alternatively matched by comorbidities. The incidence of 12 types of cancer was assessed. In addition, another cohort of patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer was retrieved, and the risk of metastatic disease or cancer mortality was determined as a function of the presence or absence of OSA. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were fitted to assess the independent associations between OSA and outcomes of interest. Results: Based on a cohort of ∼5.6 million individuals, the incidence of all cancer diagnoses combined was similar in OSA and retrospectively matched cases. However, the adjusted risk of pancreatic and kidney cancer and melanoma were significantly higher in patients with OSA, while the risk of colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers appeared to be lower. Among individuals with a diagnosis of cancer, the presence of OSA was not associated with an increased risk for metastasis or death. Conclusions: In a large nationally representative health insurance database, OSA appears to increase the risk for only a very selective number of cancer types, and does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of metastatic cancer or cancer-related deaths. Citation: Gozal D, Ham SA, Mokhlesi B. Sleep apnea and cancer: analysis of a nationwide population sample. SLEEP 2016;39(8):1493–1500. PMID:27166241

  7. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of functional and anatomical disorders of the patients with distal occlusion and accompanying obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, F. H.; Dobrodeev, A. S.; Libin, P. V.; Kotov, I. I.; Ovsyannikov, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper defines the therapeutic and rehabilitation approach to the patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies, accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with posterior occlusion, accompanied by OSA, allows for objective evaluation of intensity of a dento-facial anomaly and accompanying respiratory disorders in the nasal and oral pharynx, which allows for the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA to be identified, and an optimal plan for surgical procedures to be developed. The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies provides high functional and aesthetic results.

  9. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea–hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: controversies in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Carol L

    2004-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common, under-recognized condition in childhood with significant morbidities if undiagnosed and untreated. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued a clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of childhood OSAS. It was accompanied by a comprehensive evidence-based technical report that summarized the available literature supporting the guideline. The current review highlights areas of controversy and uncertainty that limit the development of more definitive standards of practice, updates the reader to several newer publications relevant to diagnosis and treatment of childhood OSAS, and identifies future directions for clinical research.

  11. Updates on definition, consequences, and management of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Park, John G; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field.

  12. Updates on Definition, Consequences, and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Park, John G.; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field. PMID:21628617

  13. Association of obstructive sleep apnea plus hypertension and prevalent cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Cai, Anping; Zhang, Jiawei; Zhong, Qi; Wang, Rui; Chen, Jiyan; Zhou, Yingling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Current study sought to evaluate the associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) plus hypertension (HTN) and prevalent cardiovascular diseases (CVD). This was a cross-sectional study and a total of 1889 subjects were enrolled. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured by polysomnography and OSA degree was classified as mild (AHI 5–14.9) and moderate-severe (AHI ≥ 15), and AHI < 5 was considered no-OSA. Mean and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) was detected by pulse oximetry. Between-group differences were assessed and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the association of OSA plus HTN and prevalent CVD. Compared to normotensive subjects, hypertensive subjects were older and had higher body mass index (BMI), neck girth, waist–hip ratio, AHI, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. Conversely, mean and lowest SaO2 levels were significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that in an unadjusted model, compared to subjects with no-OSA and no-HTN (reference group), the association of HTN plus moderate-severe-OSA and prevalent CVD was the most prominent (odds ratio [OR]: 2.638 and 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.942–3.583). In normotensive subjects, after adjusted for potential covariates, the associations of OSA (regardless of severity) and prevalent CVD were attenuated to nonsignificant. In hypertensive subjects, however, the associations remained significant but were reduced. Further adjusted for mean and lowest SaO2, the associations remained significant in HTN plus no-OSA (OR: 1.808, 95% CI: 1.207–2.707), HTN plus mild-OSA (OR: 2.003, 95% CI: 1.346–2.980), and HTN plus moderate-severe OSA (OR: 1.834, 95% CI: 1.214–2.770) groups. OSA plus HTN is associated with prevalent CVD, and OSA may potentiate the adverse cardiovascular effects on hypertensives patients but not normotensives. PMID:27684798

  14. IGF-1 Levels are Inversely Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Suelem; Ribeiro-Filho, Fernando F.; Carneiro, Gláucia; Togeiro, Sônia M.; Tufik, Sérgio; Zanella, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study examined insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production and its association with the metabolic syndrome (MS) in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: In total, 47 overweight and obese men who had been referred for suspected OSA underwent polysomnography and were classified based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) into three groups: no OSA, < 5 events/h (n = 11); mild OSA, ≥ 5 to < 15 events/h (n = 8); and moderate-severe OSA, ≥ 15 events/h (n = 28). The assessment of the somatotropic axis function included IGF-1 measurement. MS was diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines. Results: IGF-1 level in the moderate-severe OSA group was lower than in the no-OSA group (156.8 ± 54.3 μg/L versus 225.5 ± 80.5 μg/L; p = 0.013). IGF-1 level was negatively correlated with body mass index, waist circumference (WC), AHI, and sleep duration with oxygen (O2) saturation < 90% and positively correlated with the average and minimum O2 saturation (p = 0.027). In a multivariable linear regression, considering WC and minimum O2 saturation as independent variables, only the minimum O2 saturation was a predictor of low IGF-1 levels. The proportions of patients with MS were different between the three groups (18.2% in no OSA; 25% in mild OSA, and 57.1% in moderate-severe OSA; p = 0.047). Furthermore, in the lowest tertile of IGF-1 value, 66.7% of patients were affected by MS (p = 0.049). Hemoglobin (Hb)A1c correlated negatively with the minimum O2 saturation and IGF-1 levels. However, in multivariable linear regression only IGF-1 levels were a predictor of HbA1c levels. Conclusion: The occurrence of OSA is associated with a reduction in IGF-1 levels. IGF-1 alterations in OSA also seem to be associated with a higher prevalence of MS. Citation: Izumi S, Ribeiro-Filho FF, Carneiro G, Togeiro SM, Tufik S, Zanella MT. IGF-1 levels are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin

  15. AB011. Assessment of anxiety and depressive symptoms in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Batzikosta, Areti; Antoniadou, Maria; Tiga, Paschalina; Nena, Evangelia; Xanthoudaki, Maria; Voulgaris, Athanasios; Sotiropoulou, Rodopi; Kouratzi, Maria; Froudarakis, Marios; Steiropoulos, Paschalis

    2016-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in recently diagnosed patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and to assess their association with OSAS severity. Methods Consecutive individuals (n=376), who were examined with full polysomnography for suspected OSAS, completed the Zung Anxiety Self-Assessment Scale (ZAS) and the Zung Depression Self-Assessment Scale (ZDS). Included were only patients without comorbidities, other than arterial hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. Results Mean age of the study population was 55.2±12.8 years (74.7% males). OSAS was diagnosed in 310/376 participants. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI). Severe OSAS (mean AHI: 58.2±20.8/h) was observed in 162 patients, moderate OSAS (mean AHI: 21±4.6/h) in 71 patients and mild (mean AHI: 9.3±3/h) in 77 patients, while 66 participants had an AHI <5/h and served as controls. ZAS score ≥45, indicating anxiety, was observed 34 individuals (10.97%) and ZDS score ≥45 indicating depression was observed in 65 individuals (20.97%). No difference in the prevalence of anxiety or depression symptoms between OSAS patients and controls was observed. Mean total ZAS score did not differ significantly between the 4 groups (P=0.760). A significant difference was observed in Question 3 (“I get upset easily or feel panicky”) and in Question 10 (“I can feel my heart beating fast”) with severe OSAS patients having the better scores (P=0.013 and P=0.024 respectively). Mean total ZDS score did not differ significantly between the 4 groups (P=0.391). A significant difference was observed in Question 2 (“Morning is when I feel the best”) with controls having the better scores and in Question 15 (“I am more irritable than usual”) with severe OSAS patients having the better scores (P=0.013 and P=0.029 respectively). Conclusions Anxiety and depressive symptoms are detected among OSAS patients

  16. A novel derivative of doxorubicin, AD198, inhibits canine transitional cell carcinoma and osteosarcoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic treatments for a wide range of cancers. N-benzyladriamycin-14-valerate (AD198) is a lipophilic anthracycline that has been shown to target conventional and novel isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) in cytoplasm of cells. Because of the adverse effects of DOX, including hair loss, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, and cardiotoxicity, novel derivatives of DOX have been synthesized and validated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DOX and its derivative, AD198, on cell viability of three canine transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) (K9TCC#1-Lillie, K9TCC#2-Dakota, K9TCC#4-Molly) and three canine osteosarcoma (K9OSA) (K9OSA#1-Zoe, K9OSA#2-Nashville, K9OSA#3-JJ) primary cancer cell lines. DOX and AD198 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. AD198 inhibited cell viability of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines more efficiently as compared to DOX at the same concentration using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2h-tetrazolium) assay. AD198 had lower IC50 values as compared to DOX for all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. In addition, AD198 increased apoptosis in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. AD198 increased the caspase activity in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines, which was confirmed by caspase-3/7 assay, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, AD198 cleaved PKC-δ, which subsequently activated the p38 signaling pathway, resulting in the apoptosis of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Inhibition of the p38 signaling pathway by SB203580 rescued DOX- and AD198-induced apoptosis in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Our in vitro results suggest that AD198 might be considered as a new treatment option for K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines cancers in vivo. PMID:26451087

  17. Cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fusetti, M; Fioretti, A B; Valenti, M; Masedu, F; Lauriello, M; Pagliarella, M

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between severity of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. We recruited 1185 patients with OSAS who underwent a complete ENT examination, including nasolaryngeal fibre optic endoscopy with Müller's manoeuvre, overnight cardio-respiratory monitoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to measure daytime sleepiness, body mass index (BMI), measurement of blood pressure and blood tests.SUBSEQUENTLY, SUBJECTS WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE SUBGROUPS ACCORDING TO THE APNOEA HYPOPNOEA INDEX (AHI): mild OSAS (AHI 5-15), moderate OSAS (AHI 15-30) and severe OSAS (AHI > 30). In the sample collected, 347 (262 males and 85 females) of 1185 patients suffered from mild OSAS, 363 (269 males and 94 females) from moderate OSAS and 475 (330 males and 145 females) from severe OSAS. In the group suffering from mild OSAS, we found: 127 patients affected by hypertension, 48 with diabetes, 11 with dyslipidaemia and 32 with metabolic syndrome. In the group with moderate OSAS there were 157 patients with hypertension, 63 with diabetes, 72 with dyslipidaemia and 47 with metabolic syndrome. In the group suffering from severe OSAS there were 244 patients with hypertension, 138 with diabetes, 47 with dyslipidaemia and 90 with metabolic syndrome. For data analysis, we used the Spearman correlation test adjusted according to Sidak between the dependent variable AHI and the independent variables BMI, ESS, average SO2 (SO(2med)), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. The results show different patterns of correlation in terms of statistical significance: BMI ρ(s) = 0.26, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0:51, hypertension ρ(s) = -0.05, dyslipidaemia ρ(s) = 0.22 for women, and BMI ρ(s) = 0.53, ESS ρ(s) = 0.28, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0.50, hypertension ρ(s) = 0.17, diabetes mellitus ρ(s) = 0.28 and metabolic syndrome ρ(s) = 0.26 for men. The results of the study confirm the

  18. Generic architectures for future flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Generic architecture for future flight systems must be based on open system architectures (OSA). This provides the developer and integrator the flexibility to optimize the hardware and software systems to match diverse and unique applications requirements. When developed properly OSA provides interoperability, commonality, graceful upgradability, survivability and hardware/software transportability to greatly minimize life cycle costs and supportability. Architecture flexibility can be achieved to take advantage of commercial developments by basing these developments on vendor-neutral commercially accepted standards and protocols. Rome Laboratory presently has a program that addresses requirements for OSA.

  19. Atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model of obstructive sleep apnea: mechanisms and prevention by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background OSA increases atrial fibrillation (AF) risk and is associated with poor AF treatment outcomes. However, a causal association is not firmly established and the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aims of this work were to determine whether chronic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) induces an atrial pro-arrhythmogenic substrate and to explore whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to prevent it in a rat model of OSA. Methods A custom-made setup was used to mimic recurrent OSA-like airway obstructions in rats. OSA-rats (n = 16) were subjected to 15-second obstructions, 60 apneas/hour, 6 hours/day during 21 consecutive days. Sham rats (n = 14) were placed in the setup but no obstructions were applied. In a second series of rats, MSC were administered to OSA-rats and saline to Sham-rats. Myocardial collagen deposit was evaluated in Picrosirius-red stained samples. mRNA expression of genes involved in collagen turnover, inflammation and oxidative stress were quantified by real time PCR. MMP-2 protein levels were quantified by Western Blot. Results A 43% greater interstitial collagen fraction was observed in the atria, but not in the ventricles, of OSA-rats compared to Sham-rats (Sham 8.32 ± 0.46% vs OSA 11.90 ± 0.59%, P < 0.01). Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression were significantly increased in both atria, while Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression was decreased. MSC administration blunted OSA-induced atrial fibrosis (Sham + Saline 8.39 ± 0.56% vs OSA + MSC 9.57 ± 0.31%, P = 0.11), as well as changes in MMP-2 and IL-6 expression. Interleukin 1-β (IL-1β) plasma concentration correlated to atrial but not ventricular fibrosis. Notably, a 2.5-fold increase in IL-1β plasma levels was observed in the OSA group, which was prevented in rats receiving MSC. Conclusions OSA induces selective atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model, which can be mediated in part

  20. Association Between Treated and Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Risk of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Marin, José M.; Agusti, Alvar; Villar, Isabel; Forner, Marta; Nieto, David; Carrizo, Santiago J.; Barbé, Ferran; Vicente, Eugenio; Wei, Ying; Nieto, F. Javier; Jelic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Context Systemic hypertension is prevalent among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Short-term studies indicate that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy reduces blood pressure in patients with hypertension and OSA. Objective To determine whether CPAP therapy is associated with a lower risk of incident hypertension. Design, Setting, and Participants A prospective cohort study of 1889 participants without hypertension who were referred to a sleep center in Zaragoza, Spain, for nocturnal polysomnography between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2000. Incident hypertension was documented at annual follow-up visits up to January 1, 2011. Multivariable models adjusted for confounding factors, including change in body mass index from baseline to censored time, were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) of incident hypertension in participants without OSA (controls), with untreated OSA, and in those treated with CPAP therapy according to national guidelines. Main Outcome Measure Incidence of new-onset hypertension. Results During 21 003 person-years of follow-up (median, 12.2 years), 705 cases (37.3%) of incident hypertension were observed. The crude incidence of hypertension per 100 person-years was 2.19 (95% CI, 1.71–2.67) in controls, 3.34 (95% CI, 2.85–3.82) in patients with OSA ineligible for CPAP therapy, 5.84 (95% CI, 4.82–6.86) in patients with OSA who declined CPAP therapy, 5.12 (95% CI, 3.76–6.47) in patients with OSA nonadherent to CPAP therapy, and 3.06 (95% CI, 2.70–3.41) in patients with OSA and treated with CPAP therapy. Compared with controls, the adjusted HRs for incident hypertension were greater among patients with OSA ineligible for CPAP therapy (1.33; 95% CI, 1.01–1.75), among those who declined CPAP therapy (1.96; 95% CI, 1.44–2.66), and among those nonadherent to CPAP therapy (1.78; 95% CI, 1.23–2.58), whereas the HR was lower in patients with OSA who were treated with CPAP therapy (0.71; 95% CI, 0.53–0

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems. PMID:26918568

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea detection using clustering classification of nonlinear features from nocturnal oximetry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Daniel; Hornero, Roberto; Marcos, J Víctor; del Campo, Félix; López, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    This study is focused on the classification of patients suspected of suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of cluster analysis. We assessed the diagnostic ability of three clustering algorithms: k-means, hierarchical and fuzzy c-means (FCM). Nonlinear features of blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) from nocturnal oximetry were used as inputs to the clustering methods. Three nonlinear methods were used: approximate entropy (ApEn), central tendency measure (CTM) and Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity. A population of 74 subjects (44 OSA positive and 30 OSA negative) was studied. 90.5%, 87.8% and 86.5% accuracies were reached with k-means, hierarchical and FCM algorithms, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy values improved those obtained with each nonlinear method individually. Our results suggest that nonlinear analysis and clustering classification could provide useful information to help in the diagnosis of OSA syndrome.

  3. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment...

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems.

  5. Urinary Incontinence in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... can appear as a constant dribbling of urine. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children with ADHD are three times more likely ... asleep. Nighttime UI has also been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and anxiety. Certain ...

  6. Severe onychophagia and finger mutilation associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Singareddy, Ravi

    2013-04-15

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to important neurobehavioral consequences including cognitive deficits, hyperactivity/inattention, daytime sleepiness, and mood disturbances. Interestingly, the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of impulse-control disorders such as nail biting (onychophagia) is currently unknown. We present a case of a man with severe onychophagia and biting-induced finger mutilation that was completely resolved after diagnosis and treatment of severe OSA. Accordingly, this report represents an important clinical observation that suggests a connection between sleep physiology and the neurobiological circuits implicated in the regulation of impulse-control behaviors. Further research in this area may improve our current understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of untreated OSA.

  7. Focus issue introduction: renewable energy and the environment.

    PubMed

    Seassal, Christian; Koshel, John

    2013-05-06

    This focus issue highlights selected contributions from authors who presented promising concepts at OSA's Renewable Energy and the Environment Optics and Photonics Congress held 11-15 November 2012 in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  8. Anti-inflammatory therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Question A 4-year-old child was diagnosed by polysomnography as experiencing mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Despite the child being inattentive and distracted during the day at school, his parents prefer to avoid surgical treatment (adenotonsillectomy). Are there any non-surgical treatments for mild OSA in young children? Answer Obstructive sleep apnea in children is caused mainly by adenotonsillar hypertrophy and can lead to considerable morbidities, including neurocognitive and behavioural disturbances. Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids is the treatment of choice. In recent years, however, a new understanding of the inflammatory components of OSA has led to the assumption that anti-inflammatory treatment can reduce adenotonsillar size and improve OSA symptoms. Evidence from a few studies suggests that intranasal steroids and oral leukotriene receptor antagonists have beneficial effects, but data from randomized controlled trials are still lacking. PMID:21841108

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones and soft tissues in obstructive sleep apnea using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bruwier, Annick; Poirrier, Robert; Albert, Adelin; Maes, Nathalie; Limme, Michel; Charavet, Carole; Milicevic, Mladen; Raskin, Sylvianne; Poirrier, Anne-Lise

    2016-12-01

    A total of 154 adult patients with sleep complaints underwent a polysomnography and a craniofacial cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). OSA was defined as an apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) or an oxygen desaturation index (ODI) ≥ 10. Soft tissues and craniofacial bones volumes were prospectively measured by CBCT and collected blindly from sleep polysomnography. Among the study patients, 127 (83%) suffered from OSA and 27 (17%) did not. OSA patients demonstrated a narrower maxillo-palatine core volume (11.7±3.2 vs 14.6±4.9cm(3)) even when adjusting for age, gender, height, neck circumference and body mass index. These upper airway measures provide a comprehensive analysis of bony structures and soft tissues, which can be involved in OSA.

  10. Breaking through Limbo: Experiences of Adults Living with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a potentially devastating condition that diminishes quality of life and leads to serious consequences without treatment. Diagnosis often is delayed and, once diagnosed, adherence to prescribed therapy tends to be a major barrier to management. This grounded theory study was focused on the experiences of a diverse group of 82 adults who were at various points in the process of obtaining a diagnosis and living with OSA. Participants described being in “limbo” and needing to break through that limbo to be successful at managing their OSA. Results provide new insights into the experience of living with OSA that can be beneficial in promoting treatment and shaping effective management of the condition. PMID:23570652

  11. Nursing assessment of obstructive sleep apnea in hospitalised adults: a review of risk factors and screening tools.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Alison; Belan, Ingrid; Neill, Jane; Rowland, Sharn

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects approximately 2-4% of the general population and may be more prevalent in obese adults. However, sleep apnea remains consistently under-diagnosed in the general population as well as in hospital wards. Nurse awareness of OSA during routine monitoring could allow specific observations of hospitalised adults to identify those at high risk and ensure appropriate referral. This integrative literature review analysed major risk factors for OSA and identified screening tools that nurses could utilise in hospital wards. The most important risk factors relevant to nursing practice in hospital settings were obesity, hypertension and sleep position. The most suitable screening tool was the Berlin Questionnaire, while there was some evidence to support measuring waist circumference. A nursing assessment flow chart was developed based on the literature reviewed. This paper highlights a role for nurses in recognising patients at risk of OSA and minimising complications in hospitalised adults.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  13. Design and performance analysis of a bio-optical sub-assembly for diffuse optical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Je-Myung; Park, Kyoungsu; Kim, Sehwan

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a compact, multi-wavelength, and high-frequency-response light source named the bio-optical sub-assembly (BiOSA). The BiOSA is used to measure the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients from diffuse optics-based biomedical systems. It is equipped with six laser diodes and one optical fiber with a 400- μm diameter core. Simulations can be used to determine the design parameters and to confirm the feasibility of the BiOSA. The evaluation results indicate that the coupling efficiency of the fabricated BiOSA is 80 ˜ 85%, and the frequency response is up to 3.38 GHz.

  14. [Experimental study of non-invasive percutaneous electrical stimulator for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its clinical effect].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing

    2006-08-01

    To study the stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic current pulses as a new therapeutical method to treat the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), polysomnography (PSG) was used to synchronously monitor the patient. When OSAS was occurring, the stimulation with the optimal parameter was given in time to make the tongue move forward, the glossopharyngeal airway dilated, the resistance of the upper respiratory tract reduced, the hypoxia at night to be improved and the sleeping structure to be ameliorated because of the function of the dilated muscle of the upper airway. The results of the clinical therapeutic effect indicated that 17 of 22 patients with OSAS had cured effects, 2 of whom improved and 3 of whom were without effect. The effective rate was 77.27%. It is preliminarily proved that this is a new method in the treatment of patients suffered from OSAS.

  15. New developments in the use of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Boeder, Schafer; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder which afflicts a large number of individuals around the world. OSA causes sleepiness and is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Since its inception in the early 1980’s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as the major treatment of OSA, and it has been shown to improve sleepiness, hypertension, and a number of cardiovascular indices. Despite its successes, adherence with treatment remains a major limitation. Herein we will review the evidence behind the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, its various modes, and the methods employed to improve adherence. We will also discuss the future of PAP therapy in OSA and personalization of care. PMID:26380760

  16. [Dermatoglyphics and body composition in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Luiz Bittencourt; Bezerra, Marcio L de S; Fernandes Filho, José; Struchiner, Claudio José

    2004-09-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and genetic patterns can modulate the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to describe the anthropometrics and dermatoglyphics features among OSAS carriers. We collected information on Body Mass Index (BMI), Conicity Index (CI), Body Fat Mass (BFM), somatotype and fingerprints. Thirty-one cases of OSAS were compared to an equal number of controls. Membership to the obese category is based on observed BMI and BFM. The CI distribution among cases shows a strong central obesity component. The endomorph-mesomorph somatotype category predominates among cases showing high adiposity and relative muscle-skeletic development, such as relative linearity of great mass per unit of height. Increased morbidity, as given by more serious indices of apnea, correlates positively with higher mesomorphic predominance in the body composition. Analysis of dermatoglyphic data does not show significant statistical differences between OSAS--patients and controls.

  17. The sympathetic nervous system and catecholamines metabolism in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valeria; Pengo, Martino F.; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder of breathing in middle-aged and overweight subjects. It features recurrent episodes of upper airway total (apnoea) o partial (hypopnea) collapse during sleep, which are associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and with arousal from sleep to re-establish airway patency. An association of OSA with dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system (ANS) and altered catecholamines (CAs) metabolism has been contended for years. However, the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying these alterations remain to be fully clarified. Nonetheless, these alterations are deemed to play a key pathogenic role in the established association of OSA with several conditions besides arterial hypertension (HT), including coronary artery disease, stroke, and, more in general, with increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. Hence, in this review we will analyse the relationship between the sleep disturbances associated with OSA and the altered function of the ANS, including CAs metabolism. PMID:26904265

  18. Preliminary report on the stimulation of immunity to the larval stage of Taenia multiceps.

    PubMed

    Verster, A; Tustin, R C

    1982-09-01

    The efficacy of Oncosphere Secretory Antigen (OSA) in protecting sheep against the larval stage of Taenia multiceps was assessed in 47 sheep in 2 trials. In the pilot trial no cerebral coenuri were found in 3 sheep which were treated with OSA 28 and 14 days before challenge with 6 000 eggs of T. multiceps. Cerebral coenuri were present in 3 untreated controls. In the second experiment 30 sheep were similarly treated with OSA and challenged with 5 000 eggs of T. multiceps, while 11 sheep served as untreated controls. At necropsy either developing coenuri or degenerate lesions were present in the brain of 5 (16,6%) of the 30 vaccinated animals while 8 out of 11 (72,7%) of the untreated animals had cerebral coenuri or degenerate lesions in the brain. It is concluded that OSA may be used to protect animals against cerebral coenuriosis.

  19. [Obstruction of the upper airways in humans and animal models].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R

    2010-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by repetitive collapse of a narrow upper airway during sleep with the main risk factor being obesity. Apneas are followed by hypoxia, sympathetic activation, intrathoracic pressure swings and arousals. In most animal studies, only the cyclical pattern of hypoxia characteristic of OSA is simulated, however, more complex models have also been developed which additionally reflect the other pathophysiological changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing. These models have contributed to a deeper understanding of the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of OSA. From other experiments the concept of the pharynx behaving like a collapsible tube, i. e. a Starling resistor, has emerged. Finally, the neurotransmitter modulation of upper airway muscle tone has been elucidated by using IN VIVO microdialysis of the caudal medulla of rats. It is hoped that findings from animal studies will in the future impact on the management of patients with OSA, in particular if they are non-compliant with CPAP therapy.

  20. A comparison to schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization and their impact on shortwave radiatation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Feng, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean covers 71% of the Earth's surface and plays a pivotal role in the earth radiation energy balance. The ocean surface albedo(OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation(ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. This study, on the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we evaluate the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. We got some conclusions: The SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. In the summer, the Northern Hemisphere(NH) is high ONSSR, but small deviations compared with Northern Hemisphere(SH),and contrary in the winter. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2 by the analysis of the ONSSR reanalysis dataset, the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).The simple scheme of Taylor and the more complicate schemes of Jin and Feng is very similar, and the scheme B and H is close to each other, the PM86 is more close to MERRA. We use the COVE ocean platform observation data to validate the several scheme result, and the RMSE is 10.96 w m-2, 5.24 w m-2, 12.88 w m-2, 6.52 w m-2, 6.33 w m-2, 6.30 w m-2 for B,T,H,J,PM86,F, respectively. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in

  1. Management and Risk Reduction of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chi-Ching; Chang, Deh-Ming; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chen, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and autoimmune diseases and evaluate whether OSA management reduces the incidence of autoimmune diseases. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using nationwide database research. The data was from 105,846 adult patients in whom OSA was diagnosed and recorded in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 2002 and 2011 were the patients were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with antecedent autoimmune diseases were excluded. A comparison cohort of 423,384 participants without OSA served as age- and sex-matched controls. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed on both cohorts to compute risk of autoimmune diseases during follow-up. Time-dependent OSA treatment effect was analyzed among patients with OSA. There were no interventions. Results: Among patients with OSA, overall risk for incident autoimmune diseases was significantly higher than that in controls (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.66–2.27). Risk for individual autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren syndrome (SS), and Behçet disease, was significantly higher in patients with OSA than in controls (HRs [95% CI]: RA 1.33 [1.03–1.72, SS 3.45 [2.67–4.45] and Behçet disease 5.33 [2.45–12.66]). Increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (HR 1.00 [0.54–1.84]) and systemic sclerosis (HR 1.43 [0.51–3.96]) did not reach statistical significance. Patients with OSA receiving treatment had an overall reduced risk of RA and other autoimmune diseases (time-dependent HRs [95% CI]: 0.22 [0.05–0.94] and 0.51 [0.28–0.92], respectively). Conclusions: Patients with OSA are associated with higher risk for developing RA, SS, and Behçet disease. OSA management is associated with reduced risk of RA. Citation: Chen WS, Chang YS, Chang CC, Chang DM, Chen YH, Tsai CY, Chen JH. Management and risk reduction of rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Decreased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Lin; Zhou, Li-Xiao; Dang, Yalong; Huo, Yin-Ping; Shi, Lei; Chang, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the changes of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Methods: Relevant studies were selected from 3 major literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) without language restriction. Main inclusion criteria is that a case-control study in which RNFL thickness was measured by a commercial available optical coherence tomography (OCT) in OSAS patients. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Efficacy estimates were evaluated by weighted mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcome evaluations were: the average changes of RNFL thickness in total OSAS patients, subgroup analysis of RNFL thickness changes in patients of different OSAS stages, and subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant RNFL thickness changes in total OSAS patients. Results: Of the initial 327 literatures, 8 case-control studies with 763 eyes of OSA patients and 474 eyes of healthy controls were included (NOS scores ≥6). For the people of total OSAS, there had an average 2.92 μm decreased RNFL thickness compared with controls (95% CI: −4.61 to −1.24, P = 0.001). For subgroup analysis of OSAS in different stages, the average changes of RNFL thickness in mild, moderate, severe, and moderate to severe OSAS were 2.05 (95% CI: −4.40 to 0.30, P = 0.088), 2.32 (95% CI: −5.04 to 0.40, P = 0.094), 4.21 (95% CI: −8.36 to −0.06, P = 0.047), and 4.02 (95% CI: −7.65 to −0.40, P = 0.03), respectively. For subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant, the average changes of RNFL thickness in Superior, Nasal, Inferior, and Temporal quadrant were 2.43 (95% CI: −4.28 to −0.57, P = 0.01), 1.41 (95% CI: −3.33 to 0.51, P = 0.151), 3.75 (95% CI: −6.92 to −0.59, P = 0.02), and 0.98 (95% CI: −2.49 to 0.53, P = 0.203), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that RNFL thickness in OSAS patients is much thinner than

  3. The Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome on the Dentate Gyrus and Learning and Memory in Children.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Zea-Hernandez, Johanna A; Sin, Sanghun; Graw-Panzer, Katharina; Shifteh, Keivan; Isasi, Carmen R; Wagshul, Mark E; Moran, Eileen E; Posner, Jonathan; Zimmerman, Molly E; Arens, Raanan

    2017-03-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with intermittent hypoxia and sleep loss. In children, impairments of cognitive function are important manifestations, but underlying pathology is unknown. We hypothesized that OSAS would affect the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subdivision essential to neurogenesis and cognition, and that this impact would further affect cognitive function in children. In children with OSAS (n=11) and control subjects (n=12; age and sex-matched), we performed diffusion tensor imaging and structural MRI, polysomnography, and neuropsychological assessments. We found that OSAS was associated with decreased mean diffusivity of the left dentate gyrus (P=0.002; FDR corrected; adjusting for sex, age, and BMI) showing a large effect size (partial η(2)=0.491), but not with any other structural measures across the brain. Decreased dentate gyrus mean diffusivity correlated with a higher apnea hypopnea index (Spearman's r=-0.50, P=0.008) and a greater arousal index (r=-0.44, P=0.017). OSAS did not significantly affect neuropsychological measures (P's>0.5); however, a lower verbal learning score correlated with lower dentate gyrus mean diffusivity (r=0.54, P=0.004). Path analysis demonstrated that dentate gyrus mean diffusivity mediates the impact of OSAS on the verbal learning capacity. Finally, a diagnostic accuracy of a regression model based on dentate gyrus mean diffusivity reached 85.8% (cross validated). This study demonstrates a likely pathway of effects of OSAS on neurocognitive function in children, as well as potential utility of the dentate gyrus mean diffusivity as an early marker of brain pathology in children with OSAS.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTIn this study we investigate the relationships between dentate gyrus structure, hippocampus-dependent cognition, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We demonstrate lower mean diffusivity of the dentate gyrus in children with OSAS, which correlates with a lower verbal learning and

  4. Upper Airway Vibration Perception in School-Aged Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Ignacio E.; Kim, Ji Young; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Traylor, Joel; Samuel, George J.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have impaired upper airway two-point discrimination compared to controls. In addition, blunted vibration threshold detection (VT) in the palate has been recognized in adults with OSA, but has not been studied in children. Both findings are indicative of a defect in the afferent limb of the upper airway dilator reflex that could prevent upper airway dilation secondary to airway loading, resulting in airway collapse. We hypothesized that children with OSA have impaired palate VT compared to controls, and that this improves after OSA treatment. Methods: Case-control study. Children with OSA and healthy non-snoring controls underwent polysomnography and palate VT measurements. Children with OSA were retested after adenotonsillectomy. Results: 29 children with OSA (median [interquartile range] age = 9.5 [7.5–12.6] years, obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [OAHI] = 11.3 [5.7–19.5] events/h, BMI z = 1.8 [1.3–2.1]) and 32 controls (age = 11.2 [9.3–13.5] years, P = 0.1; OAHI = 0.5 [0.1–0.7] events/h, P < 0.001; BMI z = 1 [0.3–1.7], P = 0.004) were tested. OSA palate VT (1.0 [0.8–1.5] vibration units) was similar to that of controls (1 [0.8–1.3], P = 0.37). 20 children with OSA were retested 4.4 (3.2–7.1) months after treatment. OAHI decreased from 13.1 (5.8–19) to 0.6 (0.2–2.5) events per hour (P < 0.001) postoperatively, but palate VT did not change (before = 1 [0.7–1.5], after = 1.2 [0.8–1.4], P = 0.37). Conclusions: Children with OSA and controls have similar palate VT. Unlike in adults, palate VT does not seem to be affected by childhood OSA. Citation: Tapia IE, Kim JY, Cornaglia MA, Traylor J, Samuel GJ, McDonough JM, Marcus CL. Upper airway vibration perception in school-aged children with obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2016;39(9):1647–1652. PMID:27253764

  5. The Influence of Intermittent Hypoxemia on Platelet Activation in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rahangdale, Shilpa; Yeh, Susie Yim; Novack, Victor; Stevenson, Karen; Barnard, Marc R.; Furman, Mark I.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Literature regarding platelet function in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has considerable limitations. Given the central role of platelets in atherothrombosis and the known cardiovascular risk of OSA, we hypothesized that OSA severity is predictive of platelet function, independent of known comorbidities. Design: Obese subjects, without comorbidities, underwent overnight, in-lab polysomnography. The following morning, 5 biomarkers of platelet activation were measured by whole-blood flow cytometry at baseline and in response to agonists (no stimulation, stimulation with 5 μM ADP agonist, and stimulation with 20 μM ADP agonist): platelet surface P-selectin, activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, and GPIb receptor expression, platelet-monocyte aggregation (PMA) and platelet-neutrophil aggregation (PNA). Results: Of the 77 subjects, 47 were diagnosed with OSA (median apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of 24.7 ± 28.1/h in subjects with OSA and 3.0 ± 3.9/h in subjects without OSA, p < 0.001). The groups were matched for body mass index, with a mean body mass index of 40.3 ± 9.6 kg/m2 in subjects with OSA and 38.9 ± 6.0 kg/m2 in subjects without OSA (p = 0.48). A comparison of time spent with an oxygen saturation of less than 90% showed that subjects who had 1 minute or more of desaturation time per hour of sleep had lower GPIb fluorescence in circulating platelets, as compared with those subjects who had less than 1 minute of desaturation time per hour of sleep; similar findings were observed following 5 μM and 20 μM of ADP stimulation, as compared with control vehicle, suggesting higher levels of circulating platelet activity. In multivariate analyses, only nocturnal hypoxemia and female sex predicted agonist response. Platelet surface P-selectin, platelet surface-activated GPIIb/IIIa, PMA, and PNA were not significantly correlated with markers of OSA. Conclusions: In obese patients with OSA, platelet activation is associated with greater levels of oxygen

  6. Automatic Video Analysis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Jorge; Muñoz-Ferrer, Aida; Cervantes, Miguel Ángel; Esquinas, Cristina; Marin, Alicia; Martínez, Carlos; Morera, Josep; Ruiz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated the diagnostic accuracy for the identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its severity of a noninvasive technology based on image processing (SleepWise). Methods: This is an observational, prospective study to evaluate the degree of agreement between polysomnography (PSG) and SleepWise. We recruited 56 consecutive subjects with suspected OSA who were referred as outpatients to the Sleep Unit of the Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol (HUGTiP) from January 2013 to January 2014. All patients underwent laboratory PSG and image processing with SleepWise simultaneously the same night. Both PSG and SleepWise analyses were carried independently and blindly. Results: We analyzed 50 of the 56 patients recruited. OSA was diagnosed through PSG in a total of 44 patients (88%) with a median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 25.35 (24.9). According to SleepWise, 45 patients (90%) met the criteria for a diagnosis of OSA, with a median AHI of 22.8 (22.03). An analysis of the ability of PSG and SleepWise to classify patients by severity on the basis of their AHI shows that the two diagnostic systems distribute the different groups similarly. According to PSG, 23 patients (46%) had a diagnosis of severe OSA, 11 patients (22%) moderate OSA, and 10 patients (20%) mild OSA. According to SleepWise, 20, 13, and 12 patients (40%, 26%, and 24%, respectively) had a diagnosis of severe, moderate, and mild OSA respectively. For OSA diagnosis, SleepWise was found to have sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 83% in relation to PSG. The positive predictive value was 97% and the negative predictive value was 100%. The Bland-Altman plot comparing the mean AHI values obtained through PSG and SleepWise shows very good agreement between the two diagnostic techniques, with a bias of −3.85, a standard error of 12.18, and a confidence interval of −0.39 to −7.31. Conclusions: SleepWise was reasonably accurate for noninvasive and automatic diagnosis

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Hospitalized Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Kahn, Daron; Shiue, Kristin Y.; Cheema, Mohammed; Malloy, Raymond; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This condition often is underrecognized in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical pathway evaluation (CPE) among obese patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. We also assessed oxygen desaturation index (ODI, measured by overnight pulse oximetry) as a potential low-cost screening tool for identifying OSA. Methods: This was a prospective study of 754 patients admitted to an academic medical center between February 2013 and February 2014. Consecutive obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30) admitted to the hospital (medical services) were screened and evaluated for OSA with the snoring, tiredness during daytime, observed apnea, high blood pressure (STOP) questionnaire. The admitting team was advised to perform follow-up evaluation, including polysomnography, if the test was positive. Results: A total of 636 patients were classified as high risk and 118 as low risk for OSA. Within 4 w of discharge, 149 patients underwent polysomnography, and of these, 87% (129) were shown to have OSA. An optimal screening cutoff point for OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10/h) was determined to be ODI ≥ 10/h [Matthews correlation coefficient = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24–0.47]. Significantly more hospitalized patients were identified and underwent polysomnography compared with the year prior to introduction of the CPE. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the CPE increased the identification of OSA in this population. Furthermore, ODI derived from overnight pulse oximetry may be a cost-effective strategy to screen for OSA in hospitalized patients. Citation: Sharma S, Mather PJ, Efird JT, Kahn D, Shiue KY, Cheema M, Malloy R, Quan SF. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese hospitalized patients: a single center experience. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):717–723. PMID:25766715

  8. Abnormal Intrinsic Functional Hubs in Severe Male Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Evidence from a Voxel-Wise Degree Centrality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi; Gong, Honghan; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xianjun; Ye, Chenglong; Nie, Si; Chen, Liting; Peng, Dechang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with changes in brain structure and regional function in certain brain areas. However, the functional features of network organization in the whole brain remain largely uncertain. The purpose of this study was to identify the OSA-related spatial centrality distribution of the whole brain functional network and to investigate the potential altered intrinsic functional hubs. Methods Forty male patients with newly confirmed severe OSA on polysomnography, and well-matched good sleepers, participated in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and clinical and cognitive evaluation. Voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) was measured across the whole brain, and group difference in DC was compared. The relationship between the abnormal DC value and clinical variables was assessed using a linear correlation analysis. Results Remarkably similar spatial distributions of the functional hubs (high DC) were found in both groups. However, OSA patients exhibited a pattern of significantly reduced regional DC in the left middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and DC was increased in the right orbital frontal cortex, bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, and bilateral lentiform nucleus, including the putamen, extending to the hippocampus, and the inferior temporal gyrus, which overlapped with the functional hubs. Furthermore, a linear correlation analysis revealed that the DC value in the posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus were positively correlated with Montreal cognitive assessment scores, The DC value in the left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobule were negatively correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and arousal index in OSA patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OSA patients exhibited specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs including relatively

  9. Genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Wang, Bin; Lang, Wei-Ya; Xue, Jing; Zhao, Da-Long; Li, Guo-Feng; Zheng, Li-Hong; Pan, Hong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We meta-analytically summarized the associations of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with ACE activity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to see whether ACE activity is causally associated with OSAS. Literature search and data abstraction were done in duplicate. Sixteen articles including 2060 OSAS patients and 1878 controls were summarized. Overall, no significance was observed for the association of I/D polymorphism with OSAS, whereas carriers of II genotype (weighted mean difference or WMD, 95% confidence interval or CI, P: −11.976, −17.168 to −6.783, <0.001) or I allele (−9.842, −14.766 to −4.918, <0.001) had a lower level of serum ACE activity compared with DD genotype carriers, respectively. In subgroup analyses, carriers of II genotype were 3.806 times more likely to develop OSAS (95% CI, P: 1.865 to 7.765, <0.001) in OSAS patients with hypertension, without heterogeneity. Mendelian randomization analysis indicated there was 37.4% (95% CI: 1.115 to 3.142) and 32.4% (1.106 to 2.845) increased risk of OSAS by a reduction of 1 U/L in ACE activity for the II genotype and I allele carriers versus DD genotype carriers, respectively. There was no observable publication bias. Collectively, genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for OSAS. PMID:26486181

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Liver Damage and Atherosclerosis in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petta, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Torres, Daniele; Buttacavoli, Maria; Cammà, Calogero; Di Marco, Vito; Licata, Anna; Lo Bue, Anna; Parrinello, Gaspare; Pinto, Antonio; Salvaggio, Adriana; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Craxì, Antonio; Bonsignore, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We assessed whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and low prevalence of morbid obesity. Secondary aim was to explore the association of OSA and hypoxemia with NASH and severity of liver pathological changes. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 126) with chronically elevated ALT and NAFLD underwent STOP-BANG questionnaire to estimate OSA risk and ultrasonographic carotid assessment. In patients accepting to perform cardiorespiratory polygraphy (PG, n = 50), OSA was defined as an apnea/hypopnea index ≥5. A carotid atherosclerotic plaque was defined as a focal thickening >1.3 mm. Results Prevalence of high OSA risk was similar in patients refusing or accepting PG (76% vs 68%, p = 0.17). Among those accepting PG, overall OSA prevalence was significantly higher in patients with F2-F4 fibrosis compared to those without (72% vs 44%; p = 0.04). Significant fibrosis was independently associated with mean nocturnal oxygen saturation (SaO2)<95% (OR 3.21, 95%C.I. 1.02–7.34; p = 0.04). Prevalence of OSA tended to be higher in patients with, than in those without, carotid plaques (64% vs 40%; p = 0.08). Carotid plaques were independently associated with %time at SaO2<90% >1 (OR 6.30, 95%C.I. 1.02–12.3; p = 0.01). Conclusions In NAFLD patients with chronically elevated ALT at low prevalence of morbid obesity, OSA was highly prevalent and indexes of SaO2 resulted independently associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis. These data suggest to consider sleep disordered breathing as a potential additional therapeutic target in severe NAFLD patients. PMID:26672595

  11. Perceived consequences of casual online sexual activities on heterosexual relationships: a u.s. Online survey.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Royce, Tracy; Lever, Janet

    2011-04-01

    Some researchers have illustrated how the Internet can provide users with an ideal atmosphere to explore sexuality; however, most have stressed the Internet's negative impact on intimate relationships. Notably, much of this research has focused on the small minority of men who compulsively engage in online sexual activities (OSA), overlooking the majority of men and women who use OSA recreationally (either individually or with a partner). Addressing these limitations, data on heterosexual adults in committed relationships were taken from the 2004 "ELLE/msnbc.com Cyber-sex and Romance Survey" (n = 8,376). In quantitative analyses, men were less likely than women to express concerns and more likely to hold favorable attitudes about their partner's OSA. With regard to the impact of OSA on intimate relationships, men and women did not differ in becoming "more open to new things," and finding it easier "to talk about what [they] want sexually." Negative impacts were also identified, with women more likely to indicate they had less sex as a result of a partner's OSA, and men more likely to indicate they were less aroused by real sex as a result of their own OSA. Generally, qualitative results mirrored quantitative ones. Additionally, qualitative data suggested that moderate or light amounts of OSA yield relationship benefits for both female and male users, including increases in the quality and frequency of sex, and increased intimacy with real partners. In addition, men who used the Internet moderately, and men and women who reported being light users, stated that engaging in tandem OSA fostered better sexual communication with partners. Findings underscore the need to explore further the impact that online sexual activities can have on real-life committed relationships.

  12. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density by Computed Tomography in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Satoshi; Ikezoe, Kohei; Hirai, Toyohiro; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Clinical studies have investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can modulate bone metabolism but data are conflicting. Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the standard technique for quantifying bone strength but has limitations in overweight patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2). The aim of this study was to examine the association between OSA and BMD by examining CT images that allow true volumetric measurements of the bone regardless of BMI. Methods: Lumbar vertebrae BMD was evaluated in 234 persons (180 males and 54 females) by CT scan. The method was calibrated by a phantom containing a known concentration of hydroxyapatite. Results: BMD was lower in male patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 30/h) than non OSA (AHI < 5; p < 0.05), while OSA and BMD had no association in females. Linear and multiple regression analyses revealed that age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.52), hypertension (p = 0.0068, β = −0.17), and the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (A-aDO2) (p = 0.012, β = −0.15) in males were associated with BMD, while only age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.68) was associated with BMD in females. Conclusion: Males with severe OSA had a significantly lower BMD than non OSA participants. Age, hypertension, and elevation of A-aDO2 were significant factors for BMD by CT imaging. The usefulness of measuring BMD in OSA patients by CT scanning should be studied in future. Citation: Hamada S, Ikezoe K, Hirai T, Oguma T, Tanizawa K, Inouchi M, Handa T, Oga T, Mishima M, Chin K. Evaluation of bone mineral density by computed tomography in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):25–34. PMID:26235157

  13. Atom Interferometry on Atom Chips - A Novel Approach Towards Precision Inertial Navigation System - PINS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    published in: Proceedings of International Laser Physics Workshop. Barcelona, Spain (Jul, 2009). 2. Spin Squeezing on an Atomic Clock Transition. M...proceedings of Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, San Jose, CA (2008), Technical Digest (OSA...Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, San Jose, CA (2008), Technical Digest (OSA, Washington, DC

  14. Support for Implications of Compressive Sensing Concepts to Imaging Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-02

    underlying factors that lead to these advantages? Are these factors transferable to other important applications? 3. When there is a clear benefit...18:00 Welcome Dinner Ezme, 2016 P Street, NW Thursday, 10 April 2014 7:45 Breakfast OSA Headquarters, 2010 Massachusetts, Ave...Washington, DC 20036 Friday, 11 April 2014 8:30 Breakfast OSA Headquarters, 2010 Massachusetts, Ave., NW 9:00 Break-out Group Discussions

  15. Sleep disordered breathing and autonomic function in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; De Winter, Benedicte Y.; Van Gaal, Luc; De Backer, Wilfried; Verhulst, Stijn L.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), common in children with obesity, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Autonomic dysfunction has been suggested to be a key player in the development of these complications. We investigated the relationship between obesity, OSA and sympathetic activity in children. 191 children with obesity were included and distributed into two groups: 131 controls and 60 with OSA. Beat-to-beat RR interval data were extracted from polysomnography for heart rate variability analysis. Urinary free cortisol levels were determined. Urinary free cortisol did not differ between groups and was not associated with OSA, independent of the level of obesity. Differences in heart rate variability measures were found: mean RR interval decreased with OSA, while low/high-frequency band ratio and mean heart rate increased with OSA. Heart rate variability measures correlated with OSA, independent of obesity parameters and age: oxygen desaturation index correlated with mean heart rate (r=0.19, p=0.009) and mean RR interval (r= −0.18, p=0.02), while high-frequency bands and low/high-frequency band ratio correlated with arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) (r= −0.20, p=0.008 and r= −0.16, p=0.04) and SpO2 nadir (r=0.23, p=0.003 and r= −0.19, p=0.02). These results suggest that sympathetic heart activity is increased in children with obesity and OSA. Measures of hypoxia were related to increased sympathetic tone, suggesting that intermittent hypoxia is involved in autonomic dysfunction. PMID:27999786

  16. The role of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and obesity in determining leptin in the exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Carpagnano, G E; Resta, O; Pergola, G De; Sabato, Roberto; Foschino Barbaro, M P

    2010-09-01

    Leptin plays a key role in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Leptin production in human airways has been previously evaluated by measuring leptin concentration in the exhaled breath condensate and in the induced sputum. The aim was to study leptin expression in the cells of induced sputum and in exhaled breath condensate of subjects with OSAS. Moreover, leptin concentrations in the blood were measured in the same groups of subjects. We enrolled four groups of patients: (1) obese patients with OSAS (OO); (2) non-obese patients with OSAS (NOO); (3) obese patients without OSAS (ONO); and (4) non-obese subjects without OSAS (C). Leptin expression was evaluated by immunocytochemistry in the sputum cells of the enrolled subjects. The concentrations of leptin in the exhaled breath condensate and plasma were measured by using a specific enzyme immunoassay. Leptin protein expression and the percentage of macrophages and neutrophils expressing leptin were higher in the induced sputum of OO, NOO and ONO patients than in C. Leptin concentrations in the exhaled breath condensate were significantly higher in OO patients (5.12 (3.8-6.6) ng ml(-1)) than in NOO (4.1 (3.9-5.2) ng ml(-1)) and ONO (4.2 (3.6-5.0) ng ml(-1)) patients. The concentration of leptin in plasma was significantly more elevated in OO (36 (24-65.9) ng ml(-1)) than in NOO (30.2 (12.4-51.4) ng ml(-1)), whereas it was not significantly different in ONO patients. This study showed that leptin in sputum and in the exhaled breath condensate is higher in obese patients with OSAS than in obese subjects without OSAS. Moreover, different mechanisms for determining leptin concentrations in the exhaled breath condensate and the blood are suggested.

  17. Risk of Cerebrovascular Diseases After Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shin-Yan; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Lee, Fei-Peng; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Yu; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Liao, Chien-Chang; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little was known about the beneficial effects of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) on the outcomes after obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of UPPP on reducing risk of cerebrovascular diseases in patients with OSA. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 10,339 patients with new OSA between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. The incident cerebrovascular disease was identified during the 1-year follow-up period in patients with and without receiving UPPP. The rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cerebrovascular disease associated with receiving UPPP in patients with OSA were calculated in multivariate Poisson regression. The 1-year incidences of cerebrovascular disease for OSA patients with and without UPPP were 1.06% and 5.14%, respectively. Patients with OSA receiving UPPP had lower risk of cerebrovascular disease compared with those without UPPP (RR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.33–0.61). The decreased risk of cerebrovascular disease following UPPP was observed in both sexes and all age groups. In the stratified analysis of medical conditions, the RR of cerebrovascular disease associated with UPPP for patients with 0, 1, ≥ 2 medical conditions were 0.28 (95% CI 0.12–0.68), 0.39 (95% CI 0.21–0.73), and 0.63 (95% CI 0.43–0.93), respectively. Patients with OSA who received UPPP had lower risk of cerebrovascular disease within 1 year after surgery compared with patients not receiving UPPP. Clinical physicians could have more evidence to persuade patients to receive surgical intervention, especially those who have severe OSA symptoms or do not acquire adequate symptom relief under conservative treatments. PMID:26469923

  18. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and endogenous carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masanori; Murase, Kimihiko; Tachikawa, Ryo; Hamada, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Minami, Takuma; Inouchi, Morito; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) levels are recognized as a surrogate marker for activity of heme oxygenase-1, which is induced by various factors, including hypoxia and oxidative stress. Few reports have evaluated endogenous CO in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Whether OSA more greatly affects exhaled or blood CO is not known. Sixty-nine patients with suspected OSA were prospectively included in this study. Exhaled and blood CO were evaluated at night and morning. Blood and exhaled CO levels were well correlated both at night and morning (r = 0.52, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.61, P < 0.0001, respectively). Although exhaled CO levels both at night and morning significantly correlated with total sleep time with arterial oxygen saturation < 90% (ρ = 0.41, P = 0.0005 and ρ = 0.27, P = 0.024, respectively), blood CO levels did not correlate with any sleep parameter. Seventeen patients with an apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 (control group) were compared with 52 patients with AHI ≥ 15 (OSA group). Exhaled CO levels at night in the OSA group were significantly higher than in the control group (3.64 ± 1.2 vs. 2.99 ± 0.70 ppm, P < 0.05). Exhaled CO levels at night decreased after 3 mo of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in OSA patients (n = 36; P = 0.016) to become nearly the same level as in the control group (P = 0.21). Blood CO levels did not significantly change after CPAP therapy. Exhaled CO was positively related to hypoxia during sleep in OSA patients, but blood CO was not. Exhaled CO might better correlate with oxidative stress associated with OSA than blood CO.

  19. Sitting and Television Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Phillips, Barbara; Tulio de Mello, Marco; Hirshkowitz, Max

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excess sitting is emerging as a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental illness, and all-cause mortality. Physical activity, distinct from sitting, is associated with better sleep and lower risk for OSA, yet relationships among sitting behaviors and sleep/OSA remain unknown. We examined whether total sitting time and sitting while viewing television were associated with sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and sleepiness. METHODS: The 2013 National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America Poll was a cross-sectional study of 1,000 adults aged 23 to 60 years. Total sitting time, time watching television while sitting, sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and daytime sleepiness were assessed. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounding factors (including BMI and physical activity), each additional hour per day of total sitting was associated with greater odds of poor sleep quality (OR [95% CI] = 1.06 [1.01, 1.11]) but not with other sleep metrics (including sleep duration), OSA risk, or daytime sleepiness. For television viewing while sitting, each additional hour per day was associated with greater odds of long sleep onset latency (≥ 30 min) (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.27]), waking up too early in the morning (OR = 1.12 [1.03, 1.23]), poor sleep quality (OR = 1.12 [1.02, 1.24]), and “high risk” for OSA (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.28]). Based upon an interaction analysis, regular physical activity was protective against OSA risk associated with television viewing (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Excess sitting was associated with relatively poor sleep quality. Sitting while watching television was associated with relatively poor sleep quality and OSA risk and may be an important risk factor for sleep disturbance and apnea risk. PMID:25633255

  20. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  1. Impact of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Survival after Acute Coronary Syndrome: Insights from the ERICO Registry

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Flavia C; Goulart, Alessandra C.; Drager, Luciano F.; Staniak, Henrique L.; Santos, Itamar de Souza; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Bensenor, Isabela M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a very often clinical condition that can be associated with high mortality risk, particularly in coronary heart disease (CHD). The diagnosis of OSA is not always accessible via the gold-standard method polysomnography. Objective To evaluate long-term influence of the high risk for OSA on fatal and non-fatal outcomes after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Registry Strategy (ERICO) Study using the Berlin questionnaire as a surrogate. Methods Berlin questionnaire, a screening questionnaire for OSA, was applied in 639 cases of ACS 30 days after the index event. Cox regression proportional-hazards model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause, cardiovascular and CHD (myocardial infarction) mortality, as well as, the combined endpoint of fatal or recurrent non-fatal CHD. Results The high-risk group for OSA had higher frequencies of previous personal/family history of CHD and diabetes, in addition to a poorer event-free survival, as compared to the low-risk group (p-log-rank=0.03). The HR for fatal or recurrent non-fatal CHD was 4.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.18 - 15.36) in patients at high risk for OSA compared to those at low risk for OSA after a 2.6-year mean follow-up. Conclusions Using Berlin questionnaire, we were able to identify high risk for OSA as an independent predictor of non-fatal reinfarction or CHD mortality in post-ACS individuals in a long-term follow-up. PMID:28146212

  2. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Levels of Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and Their Value for Predicting Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Antonia; Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; Gomez, Cristina; de la Peña, Monica; Pierola, Javier; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Abad, Jorge; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria Jose; Teran, Joaquin; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Mayos, Mercè; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental growth factor (PlGF) induces angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair, and plasma PlGF levels change markedly during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with AMI is a subject of debate. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between PlGF levels and both the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and short-term outcomes after ACS in patients with and without OSA. Methods A total of 538 consecutive patients (312 OSA patients and 226 controls) admitted for ACS were included in this study. All patients underwent polygraphy in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. The severity of disease and short-term prognoses were evaluated during the hospitalization period. Plasma PlGF levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results Patients with OSA were significantly older and more frequently hypertensive and had higher BMIs than those without OSA. After adjusting for age, smoking status, BMI and hypertension, PlGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with OSA compared with patients without OSA (19.9 pg/mL, interquartile range: 16.6–24.5 pg/mL; 18.5 pg/mL, interquartile range: 14.7–22.7 pg/mL; p<0.001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was associated with higher PlGF concentrations (p<0.003). Patients with higher levels of PlGF had also an increased odds ratio for the presence of 3 or more diseased vessels and for a Killip score>1, even after adjustment. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with ACS, elevated plasma levels of PlGF are associated with the presence of OSA and with adverse outcomes during short-term follow-up. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01335087 PMID:26930634

  3. Evaluation of Fibrinolytic Inhibitors: Alpha-2-Antiplasmin and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Kiciński, Paweł; Przybylska-Kuć, Sylwia; Dybała, Andrzej; Myśliński, Wojciech; Pastryk, Jolanta; Tomaszewski, Tomasz; Mosiewicz, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) induces thrombophilia and reduces fibrinolysis. Alpha-2-antiplasmin (a-2-AP) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) are major inhibitors of the fibrinolytic system. Increased concentrations of these factors are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to assess plasma a-2-AP and PAI-1 in patients with OSA and evaluate correlations with the polysomnographic record and selected risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. The study group comprised 45 patients with OSA, and the control group consisted of 19 patients who did not meet the diagnostic criteria of OSA. Plasma a-2-AP and PAI-1 concentrations were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the study group, the median value of plasma a-2-AP was higher than that of the control group (157.34 vs. 11.89 pg/ml, respectively, P<0.0001). A-2-AP concentration increased proportionally to the severity of OSA. The concentration of a-2-AP was positively correlated with the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), apnoea index (AI), respiratory disturbances time (RDT), and desaturaion index (DI), and negatively correlated with mean and minimal oxygen saturation (SpO2 mean, SpO2 min, respectively). The median value of PAI-1 was higher in the study group than the control group (12.55 vs. 5.40 ng/ml, respectively, P = 0.006) and increased along with OSA severity. PAI-1 concentration was positively correlated with AHI, AI, RDT, DI, and body mass index (BMI) and negatively correlated with SpO2 mean and SpO2 min. Higher plasma concentrations of a-2-AP and PAI-1 in patients with OSA indicated that these patients had increased prothrombotic activity. OSA increases the risk of cardiovascular complications as it enhances prothrombotic activity. PMID:27861608

  4. Evidence Supports No Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Premolar Extraction: An Electronic Health Records Review

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ann J.; Rindal, D. Brad; Hatch, John P.; Kane, Sheryl; Asche, Stephen E.; Carvalho, Chris; Rugh, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A controversy exists concerning the relationship, if any, between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the anatomical position of the anterior teeth. Specifically, there has been speculation that extraction orthodontics and retraction of the anterior teeth contributes to OSA by crowding the tongue and decreasing airway space. This retrospective study utilized electronic medical and dental health records to examine the association between missing premolars and OSA. Methods: The sample (n = 5,584) was obtained from the electronic medical and dental health records of HealthPartners in Minnesota. Half of the subjects (n = 2,792) had one missing premolar in each quadrant. The other half had no missing premolars. Cases and controls were paired in a 1:1 match on age range, gender, and body mass index (BMI) range. The outcome was the presence or absence of a diagnosis of OSA confirmed by polysomnography. Results: Of the subjects without missing premolars, 267 (9.56%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. Of the subjects with four missing premolars, 299 (10.71%) had received a diagnosis of OSA. The prevalence of OSA was not significantly different between the groups (OR = 1.14, p = 0.144). Conclusion: The absence of four premolars (one from each quadrant), and therefore a presumed indicator of past “extraction orthodontic treatment,” is not supported as a significant factor in the cause of OSA. Citation: Larsen AJ, Rindal DB, Hatch JP, Kane S, Asche SE, Carvalho C, Rugh J. Evidence supports no relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and premolar extraction: an electronic health records review. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1443–1448. PMID:26235151

  5. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnea signs and symptoms in the US population

    PubMed Central

    Akinkugbe, Aderonke A.; Slade, Gary D.; Essick, Greg K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between tooth loss and signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a representative sample of the general US population. Methods Data were from 7305 men and women aged ≥25 years participating in the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tooth loss, occlusal contacts, and denture use were determined by dental examination. Four cardinal OSA signs and symptoms were evaluated by questions based on American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Adults with ≥2 signs/symptoms of OSA were classified at high-risk of OSA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % confidence limits (CL) from log binomial regression models estimated the strength of association between tooth loss and high-risk for OSA, adjusting for demographic characteristics, body mass index, dentures, and sleep duration. Results Prevalence of high-risk for OSA increased 2 % for each additional lost tooth (PR = 1.02, 95 % CL, 1.01, 1.03) among adults aged 25 to 65 years. When tooth loss was modeled as an ordinal variable with 0–4 lost teeth as the referent category, adjusted prevalence of high-risk for OSA was as follows: 25 % greater in those missing 5–8 teeth (PR = 1.25, 95 % CL, 1.07, 1.46); 36 % greater in those missing 9–31 teeth (PR = 1.36, 95 % CL, 1.06, 1.73); and 61 % greater in the edentulous (PR = 1.61, 95 % CL, 1.11, 2.33). Conclusion Tooth loss may be an independent risk factor for OSA. PMID:26779902

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome should be considered as a cause of nocturia in younger patients without other voiding symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Takahiro; Fukunaga, Koichi; Nagata, Hirohiko; Haraguchi, Mizuha; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Yamasawa, Wakako; Shirahama, Ryutaro; Narita, Midori; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Asano, Koichiro; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate urination frequency among patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Methods: We evaluated 138 men with moderate-to-severe OSAS by using polysomnography. Urination status was assessed at baseline and three months using the International Prostate Symptom Score and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score. Nocturia was defined as ≥2 nighttime urinations and patients were classified into Group A (<50 years old with nocturia), Group B (≥50 years old with nocturia), and Group C (patients without nocturia). OSAS severity and other urinary symptoms were also evaluated. Results: Patients with nocturia exhibited more severe OSAS, compared to patients without nocturia (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]: 52.0 vs. 44.7; p=0.021). Group A had the worst AHI, but did not have additional voiding symptoms, compared to Group B (p<0.001). The number of urinations was significantly correlated with OSAS severity in <50-year-old patients (p=0.013). CPAP reduced the number of urinations in Group A (75% of patients) and Group B (90% of patients). Patients with and without improved nocturia exhibited significant differences in their baseline OSAS severity (AHI: 53.7 vs. 37.3; p=0.042). Conclusions: OSAS severity was associated with the number of urinations in <50-year-old patients. CPAP decreased the nocturia frequency in 85% of patients with nocturia and was most effective in patients with severe AHI. However, additional studies should evaluate voiding volume in order to elucidate the mechanism of nocturia in patients with OSAS. PMID:28255415

  7. Sleep disordered breathing and autonomic function in overweight and obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Van Eyck, Annelies; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Van Gaal, Luc; De Backer, Wilfried; Verhulst, Stijn L

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), common in children with obesity, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Autonomic dysfunction has been suggested to be a key player in the development of these complications. We investigated the relationship between obesity, OSA and sympathetic activity in children. 191 children with obesity were included and distributed into two groups: 131 controls and 60 with OSA. Beat-to-beat RR interval data were extracted from polysomnography for heart rate variability analysis. Urinary free cortisol levels were determined. Urinary free cortisol did not differ between groups and was not associated with OSA, independent of the level of obesity. Differences in heart rate variability measures were found: mean RR interval decreased with OSA, while low/high-frequency band ratio and mean heart rate increased with OSA. Heart rate variability measures correlated with OSA, independent of obesity parameters and age: oxygen desaturation index correlated with mean heart rate (r=0.19, p=0.009) and mean RR interval (r= -0.18, p=0.02), while high-frequency bands and low/high-frequency band ratio correlated with arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 ) (r= -0.20, p=0.008 and r= -0.16, p=0.04) and SpO2 nadir (r=0.23, p=0.003 and r= -0.19, p=0.02). These results suggest that sympathetic heart activity is increased in children with obesity and OSA. Measures of hypoxia were related to increased sympathetic tone, suggesting that intermittent hypoxia is involved in autonomic dysfunction.

  8. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    BRODIE, FRANK L.; CHARLSON, EMILY S.; ALEMAN, TOMAS S.; SALVO, REBECCA T.; GEWAILY, DINA Y.; LAU, MARISA K.; FARREN, NEIL D.; ENGELHARD, STEPHANIE B.; PISTILLI, MAXWELL; BRUCKER, ALEXANDER J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Methods Patients with CSCR without a history of steroid use or secondary retinal disease were matched based on age/gender/body mass index with control patients and administered the Berlin Questionnaire to assess for OSA risk. Patients were scored “OSA+” if they were at “high risk” on the Berlin Questionnaire or reported a previous OSA diagnosis. Rates of OSA+ were compared between the 2 groups, odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval was calculated using exact conditional logistic regression. Results Forty-eight qualifying patients with CSCR were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the CSCR and control groups by age (mean = 55 years), gender (79% male), body mass index (mean = 28.2), history of diabetes, or hypertension. Within the CSCR group, 22 patients (45.8%) were OSA+ versus 21 control patients (43.8%) (difference = 2.1%; 95% confidence interval, −18.2% to 22.2%; exact odds ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval, 0.47–2.49; P = 1.00). Conclusion When compared with matched controls, patients with CSCR did not have statistically significant higher rates of OSA risk or previous diagnosis. This finding contrasts with previous work showing a strong association between the diseases. The divergence is likely due to our matching controls for body mass index, a significant risk factor for OSA. PMID:25127049

  9. Road traffic accidents in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Liam, C K; How, L G; Tan, C T

    1996-03-01

    Three patients involved in road traffic accidents were suspected to have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Two of them fell asleep while riding motorcycles and one patient fell asleep behind the wheel of a truck causing it to overturn. The diagnosis of OSA in each case was suspected based on a history of loud snoring, restless sleep, and excessive daytime somnolence and was confirmed by sleep studies.

  10. An update on the various practical applications of the STOP-Bang questionnaire in anesthesia, surgery, and perioperative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Mahesh; Wong, Jean; Singh, Mandeep; Wong, David T.; Chung, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review aims to provide an update on the various practical applications of the STOP-Bang questionnaire in anesthesia, surgery, and perioperative medicine. Recent findings The STOP-Bang questionnaire was originally validated as a screening tool to identify surgical patients who are at high-risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A recent meta-analysis confirmed that STOP-Bang is validated for use in the sleep clinic, surgical, and general population. Patients with a STOP-Bang score of 0--2 can be classified as low-risk for moderate-to-severe OSA. Those with a score of 5--8 can be classified as high-risk for moderate-to-severe OSA. In patients with a score of 3 or 4, a specific combination of a STOP score at least 2 + BMI more than 35 kg/m2 or STOP score at least 2 + male or STOP score at least 2 + neck circumference more than 40 cm indicates higher risk for moderate-to-severe OSA. Further, patients with a STOP-Bang score at least 3 can be classified as high risk for moderate-to-severe OSA if the serum HCO3- at least 28 mmol/l. STOP-Bang can be used as a novel tool for perioperative risk stratification because it easily identifies patients who are at increased risk of perioperative complications. Summary STOP-Bang at least 3 was recommended previously to identify the suspected or undiagnosed OSA. To reduce the false positive cases and to improve its specificity, a stepwise stratification is recommended to identify the patients at high risk of moderate-to-severe OSA. Because of its practical application, STOP-Bang is a useful screening tool for patients with suspected or undiagnosed OSA. PMID:27898430

  11. Characterisation of the insulinotropic activity of an aqueous extract of Gymnema sylvestre in mouse beta-cells and human islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Asare-Anane, Henry; Al-Romaiyan, Altaf; Huang, Guocai; Amiel, Stephanie A; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2009-01-01

    Leaves of the Gymnema sylvestre (GS) plant have been used to treat diabetes mellitus for millennia, but the previously documented insulin secretagogue effects of GS extracts in vitro may be non-physiological through damage to the beta-cells. We have now examined the effects of a novel GS extract (termed OSA) on insulin secretion from the MIN6 beta-cell line and isolated human islets of Langerhans. Insulin secretion from MIN6 cells was stimulated by OSA in a concentration-dependent manner, with low concentrations (0.06-0.25 mg/ml) having no deleterious effects on MIN6 cell viability, while higher concentrations (> or = 0.5 mg/ml) caused increased Trypan blue uptake. OSA increased beta-cell Ca2+ levels, an effect that was mediated by Ca2+ influx through voltage-operated calcium channels. OSA also reversibly stimulated insulin secretion from isolated human islets and its insulin secretagogue effects in MIN6 cells and human islets were partially dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that low concentrations of the GS isolate OSA stimulate insulin secretion in vitro, at least in part as a consequence of Ca2+ influx, without compromising beta-cell viability. Identification of the component of the OSA extract that stimulates regulated insulin exocytosis, and further investigation of its mode(s) of action, may provide promising lead targets for Type 2 diabetes therapy.

  12. Effect of zoledronic acid and amputation on bone invasion and lung metastasis of canine osteosarcoma in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Tobie D.; Somanathan Pillai, Smitha Pankajavally; Hildreth, Blake Eason; Lanigan, Lisa G.; Martin, Chelsea K.; Werbeck, Jillian L.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressive, highly metastatic and lytic primary bone neoplasm commonly affecting the appendicular skeleton of dogs and children. Current treatment options include amputation of the afflicted limb, limb-sparing procedures, or palliative radiation with or without adjunct chemotherapy. Therapies that inhibit bone resorption, such as the bisphosphonates, may be an effective palliative therapy by limiting the local progression of OSA in those patients that are not viable candidates for amputation. We have developed a mouse model of canine skeletal OSA following intratibial inoculation of OSCA40 cells that spontaneously metastasized to the lungs. We demonstrated that therapy with a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (Zol), reduced OSA-induced bone lysis; however, Zol monotherapy or in combination with amputation was not effective at inhibiting pulmonary metastasis. While not reaching statistical significance, amputation of the tumor-bearing limb reduced the average incidence of lung metastases; however, this effect was nullified when Zol was added to the treatment protocol. In untreated mice, the magnitude of proximal tibial lysis was significantly correlated with the incidence of metastasis. The data support amputation alone for the management of appendicular OSA rather than combining amputation with Zol. However, in patients that are not viable candidates for amputation, Zol may be a useful palliative therapy for OSA by reducing the magnitude of lysis and therefore bone pain, despite the risk of increased pulmonary metastasis. PMID:21374084

  13. SleepAp: an automated obstructive sleep apnoea screening application for smartphones.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Roebuck, Aoife; Shahid, Mohammed; Daly, Jonathan; Hallack, Andre; Palmius, Niclas; Stradling, John; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a sleep disorder with long-term consequences. Long-term effects include sleep-related issues and cardiovascular diseases. OSA is often diagnosed with an overnight sleep test called a polysomnogram. Monitoring can be costly with long wait times for diagnosis. In this paper, a novel OSA screening framework and prototype phone application are introduced. A database of 856 patients that underwent at-home polygraphy was collected. Features were derived from audio, actigraphy, photoplethysmography (PPG), and demographics, and used as the inputs of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The SVM was trained on 735 patients and tested on 121 patients. Classification on the test set had an accuracy of up to 92.2% when classifying subjects as having moderate or severe OSA versus being healthy or a snorer based on the clinicians' diagnoses. The signal processing and machine learning algorithms were ported to Java and integrated into the phone application-SleepAp. SleepAp records the body position, audio, actigraphy and PPG signals, and implements the clinically validated STOP-BANG questionnaire. It derives features from the signals and classifies the user as having OSA or not using the SVM trained on the clinical database. The resulting software could provide a new, easy-to-use, low-cost, and widely available modality for OSA screening.

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk and Psychological Health among Non-Hispanic Blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ceïde, Mirnova E.; Williams, Natasha J.; Seixas, Azizi; Longman-Mills, Samantha K.; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed associations of depression and anxiety with risk of OSA among Non-Hispanic Blacks in the Metabolic Syndrome Outcome (MetSO) study. Method 1,035 patients provided data for the analysis. ARES™ score ≥ 6 defined high OSA risk. Moderate depression was defined by a CES-D score ≥ 16. Moderate anxiety was measured by a BAI score ≥ 16. Results The mean age was 62 ± 14 years; 70% were female. 93% were diagnosed with hypertension; 61%, diabetes; and 72%, dyslipidemia; 90% were overweight/obese; 33% had a history of heart disease and 10% had a stroke. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age and gender, showed that patients with depression had nearly a two-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.02–2.98, p < .05). Patients with anxiety had a three-fold increased odds of being at risk for OSA (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 2.11–5.15, p < .01). After adjusting for marital status and income, patients with anxiety had a 6% increase in OSA risk (OR=1.06, 95% CI= 1.04–1.09, p<.05) but depression was no longer significant. Conclusion Our results suggest that Non-Hispanic Blacks with metabolic syndrome who experience anxiety and/or depression should be screened for OSA. PMID:26593384

  15. A community-oriented framework to increase screening and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea among blacks

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Natasha J; Jean-Louis, Girardin; Ravenell, Joeseph; Seixas, Azizi; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); is a leading sleep disorder that is disproportionately more prevalent in minority populations and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. OSA is associated with many chronic conditions including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, all of which disproportionately burden blacks (i.e., peoples of African American, Caribbean, or African descent). Methods This article will review studies conducted in the U.S. that examined sleep screenings and adherence to treatment for obstructive sleep apnea among blacks. In addition, we provide guidelines for implementing a practical framework to increase OSA screening and management among blacks. Results Several studies have documented racial/ethnic disparities in adherence to treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. However, despite its public health significance, there is a paucity of studies addressing these disparities. Further, there is a lack of health programs and policies to increase screening and treatment of OSA among blacks and other minority populations. A practical framework to increase the number of blacks who are screened for OSA and treated appropriately is warranted. Such a framework is timely and is of major importance, as early identification of OSA in this high-risk population could potentially lead to early treatment and prevention of CVD, thereby reducing racial and ethnic disparities in sleep-related CVD morbidity and mortality. PMID:26652238

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea, pain, and opioids: is the riddle solved?

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Karen K.; Kunder, Samuel; Wong, Jean; Doufas, Anthony G.; Chung, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Perioperative opioid-based pain management of patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may present challenges because of concerns over severe ventilatory compromise. The interaction between intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, pain, and opioid responses in OSA, is complex and warrants a special focus of perioperative outcomes research. Recent findings Life-threatening opioid-related respiratory events are rare. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that OSA together with other serious renal and heart disease, is among those conditions predisposing patients for opioid-induced ventilatory impairment (OIVI) in the postoperative period. Both intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, two distinct components of OSA, enhance pain. Intermittent hypoxia may also potentiate opioid analgesic effects. Activation of major inflammatory pathways may be responsible for the effects of sleep disruption and intermittent hypoxia on pain and opioid analgesia. Recent experimental evidence supports that these, seemingly contrasting, phenotypes of pain-increasing and opioid-enhancing effects of intermittent hypoxia, are not mutually exclusive. Although the effect of intermittent hypoxia on OIVI has not been elucidated, opioids worsen postoperative sleep-disordered breathing in OSA patients. A subset of these patients, characterized by decreased chemoreflex responsiveness and high arousal thresholds, might be at higher risk for OIVI. Summary OSA may complicate opioid-based perioperative management of pain by altering both pain processing and sensitivity to opioid effect. PMID:26545144

  17. Are diabetic patients being screened for sleep related breathing disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of both diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is high among general population. Both of these conditions are associated with significant morbidity. OSA affects approximately 25% of men and 9% of women, and its prevalence is even higher among obese, Hispanics, African American and diabetic patients. Diabetes on the other hand besides having high prevalence in general population has even higher prevalence among ethnic populations as Hispanics and African American. Despite the availability of several simple screening tools for OSA, as Berlin questionnaire, STOP-BANG questionnaire, NAMES Criteria, the utility for screening of OSA among the diabetic population remains marginal. This in turn can lead to significant morbidity and complications related to OSA as well as worsening of diabetes mellitus and increase in diabetic complications due to untreated sleep related breathing disorder. It is therefore imperative for the primary care giver to screen for OSA among the diabetic population as a part of their routine evaluation to prevent worsening of diabetes, and its cardiovascular, renal, ophthalmologic and neurological complications. PMID:24147199

  18. α2-Adrenergic blockade rescues hypoglossal motor defense against obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Decreased noradrenergic excitation of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep causing hypotonia of pharyngeal dilator muscles is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a widespread disease for which treatment options are limited. Previous OSA drug candidates targeting various excitatory/inhibitory receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons have proved unviable in reactivating these neurons, particularly during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. To identify a viable drug target, we show that the repurposed α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine potently reversed the depressant effect of REM sleep on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity (a first-line motor defense against OSA) in rats. Remarkably, yohimbine also restored the obstructive apnea–induced long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motoneuron activity (hLTF), a much-neglected form of noradrenergic-dependent neuroplasticity that could provide a second-line motor defense against OSA but was also depressed during REM sleep. Corroborating immunohistologic, optogenetic, and pharmacologic evidence confirmed that yohimbine’s beneficial effects on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity and hLTF were mediated mainly through activation of pontine A7 and A5 noradrenergic neurons. Our results suggest a 2-tier (impaired first- and second-line motor defense) mechanism of noradrenergic-dependent pathogenesis of OSA and a promising pharmacotherapy for rescuing both these intrinsic defenses against OSA through disinhibition of A7 and A5 neurons by α2-adrenergic blockade. PMID:28239660

  19. Positive Airway Pressure-Induced Conversion of Atrial Fibrillation to Normal Sinus Rhythm in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harneet K.; Chung, Mina K.; Ibrahim, Sally; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data implicate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a predisposing factor to the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), the latter representing the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. The postulated mechanisms leading to atrial arrhythmogenesis in OSA include alterations in intrathoracic pressures, intermittent hypoxemia, and autonomic nervous system fluctuations. Although these OSA-related pathophysiologic pathways may result in atrial structural and electrical remodeling, thereby predisposing to AF, there are data to suggest that the immediate influences of respiratory events may trigger arrhythmic events. This case demonstrates an immediate reversal of AF to normal sinus rhythm with optimal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in the background of severe OSA. These findings of immediate benefit of reversal of OSA pathophysiology on cardiac arrhythmia suggest OSA may have acute influences on cardiac electrophysiology. Citation: Walia HK, Chung MK, Ibrahim S, Mehra R. Positive airway pressure-induced conversion of atrial fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm in severe obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1301–1303. PMID:27166298

  20. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  1. CPAP Treatment Partly Normalizes Sleep Spindle Features in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saunamäki, Tiia; Huupponen, Eero; Loponen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreases sleep spindle density and frequency. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on different features of sleep spindles. Methods. Twenty OSA patients underwent two night polysomnographies in a diagnostic phase and one night polysomnography after 6 months of CPAP treatment. The control group comprised 20 healthy controls. Sleep spindles were analyzed by a previously developed automated method. Unilateral and bilateral spindles were identified in central and frontopolar brain locations. Spindle density and frequency were determined for the first and last half of the NREM time. Results. The density of bilateral central spindles, which did not change in the untreated OSA patients, increased towards the morning hours during CPAP treatment and in the controls. Central spindles did not become faster with sleep in OSA patients and the central spindles remained slow in the left hemisphere even with CPAP. Conclusion. CPAP treatment normalized spindle features only partially. The changes may be associated with deficits in thalamocortical spindle generating loops. Significance. This study shows that some sleep spindle changes persist after CPAP treatment in OSA patients. The association of these changes to daytime symptoms in OSA patients needs to be further evaluated. PMID:28261503

  2. Increased cerebrovascular sensitivity to endothelin-1 in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea: a role for endothelin receptor B

    PubMed Central

    Durgan, David J; Crossland, Randy F; Lloyd, Eric E; Phillips, Sharon C; Bryan, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known regarding the effects of OSA on the cerebrovascular wall. We tested the hypothesis that OSA augments endothelin-1 (ET-1) constrictions of cerebral arteries. Repeated apneas (30 or 60 per hour) were produced in rats during the sleep cycle (8 hours) by remotely inflating a balloon implanted in the trachea. Four weeks of apneas produced a 23-fold increase in ET-1 sensitivity in isolated and pressurized posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) compared with PCAs from sham-operated rats (EC50=10−9.2 mol/L versus 10−10.6 mol/L; P<0.001). This increased sensitivity was abolished by the ET-B receptor antagonist, BQ-788. Constrictions to the ET-B receptor agonist, IRL-1620, were greater in PCAs from rats after 2 or 4 weeks of apneas compared with that from sham-operated rats (P=0.013). Increased IRL-1620 constrictions in PCAs from OSA rats were normalized with the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) blocker, SKF96365, or the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. These data show that OSA increases the sensitivity of PCAs to ET-1 through enhanced ET-B activity, and enhanced activity of TRPCs and ROCK. We conclude that enhanced ET-1 signaling is part of a pathologic mechanism associated with adverse cerebrovascular outcomes of OSA. PMID:25425077

  3. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. Material/Methods We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. Results The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Conclusions Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  4. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixteen control subjects were compared. The average area, average volume, total volume, and total length of the upper airway were computed. Width and anterior-posterior (AP) measurements were obtained on the smallest axial slice. Results OSA subjects had a significantly smaller average airway area, average airway volume, total airway volume, and mean airway width. OSA subjects had a significantly larger airway length measurement. The mean A-P distance was not significantly different between groups. Conclusion OSA subjects have a smaller upper airway compared to controls with the exception of airway length. The lack of a significant difference in the mean A-P distance may indicate that patient position during imaging (upright vs. supine) can affect this measurement. Comparison of this study with a future prospective study design will allow for validation of these results. PMID:27051634

  5. Frequency of Prosthetic Complications Related to Implant-Borne Prosthesis in a Sleep Disorder Unit.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Saracho, Juan; Almeida, Gabriela Zamora; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan

    2017-02-01

    Sleep bruxism and higher clench index have been associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is no study that reports on the prosthetic complications in patients with OSA. Records of patients who had performed a sleep study to diagnose OSA were examined for the occurrence of prosthetic complications in implant-borne reconstructions. The primary outcome was the frequency of prosthetic complications. The secondary outcomes were anthropometric data, type of complication, type of prosthesis, type of retention, number of supporting implants, number of prosthetic units, and the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. Of the 172 patients, 67 had an implant-supported prosthesis, and all were included in the study. The mean age was 61 ± 10 years, and 36 were female. Thirty complications in 22 prostheses were identified in 16 patients. The complications were porcelain fracture (14 events), screw/implant fracture (8 events), screw loosening (3 events), and decementation (5 events). The follow-up time was 117 ± 90 months after placement of the prosthesis. The average time for complications to occur was 73 ± 65 months after the placement of the prosthesis. According to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 49 patients had OSA. Thirteen of the 16 patients having a prosthetic complication also had OSA. The highest AHI and thus the severity of OSA was identified in patients with a fracture complication related to an implant, a screw, or a porcelain. The frequency of prosthetic complications has been higher in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  6. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  7. Evening and morning peroxiredoxin-2 redox/oligomeric state changes in obstructive sleep apnea red blood cells: Correlation with polysomnographic and metabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Amélia; Vaz, Fátima; Torres, Vukosava M; Valentim-Coelho, Cristina; Silva, Rita; Prosinecki, Vesna; Alexandre, Bruno M; Carvalho, Ana S; Matthiesen, Rune; Malhotra, Atul; Pinto, Paula; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    We have examined the effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) on red blood cell (RBC) proteome variation at evening/morning day time to uncover new insights into OSA-induced RBC dysfunction that may lead to OSA manifestations. Dysregulated proteins mainly fall in the group of catalytic enzymes, stress response and redox regulators such as peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2). Validation assays confirmed that at morning the monomeric/dimeric forms of PRDX2 were more overoxidized in OSA RBC compared to evening samples. Six month of positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment decreased this overoxidation and generated multimeric overoxidized forms associated with chaperone/transduction signaling activity of PRDX2. Morning levels of overoxidized PRDX2 correlated with polysomnographic (PSG)-arousal index and metabolic parameters whereas the evening level of disulfide-linked dimer (associated with peroxidase activity of PRDX2) correlated with PSG parameters. After treatment, morning overoxidized multimer of PRDX2 negatively correlated with fasting glucose and dopamine levels. Overall, these data point toward severe oxidative stress and altered antioxidant homeostasis in OSA RBC occurring mainly at morning time but with consequences till evening. The beneficial effect of PAP involves modulation of the redox/oligomeric state of PRDX2, whose mechanism and associated chaperone/transduction signaling functions deserves further investigation. RBC PRDX2 is a promising candidate biomarker for OSA severity and treatment monitoring, warranting further investigation and validation.

  8. Predicting compliance for mandible advancement splint therapy in 96 obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Tuula; Arte, Sirpa; Bachour, Adel; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Mandible advancement splint (MAS) offers an option for patients with mild or moderate OSA, who refuse or are unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of the study was to find predictive factors in OSA for MAS therapy. The study group comprised 96 consecutive OSA patients who were sent for MAS therapy during 2008. Data were collected on the patients' general and dental condition, diagnosis, and treatment for OSA. Panoramic and cephalometric radiographs were analysed. The treatment compliance rate and problems with the use of the MAS were recorded. This rate was 57% and the significant affecting factors were protrusion of the mandible with MAS during the adaptation to the appliance as well as shorter maxillary and mandible lengths. The compliance of the MAS therapy was best in patients with short maxilla and mandible, which should be taken into consideration when planning MAS therapy for OSA patients. Finally, a sleep study should be part of the follow-up in this patient population.

  9. Sleep structure in patients with periodic limb movements and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iriarte, Jorge; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Toledo, Estefania; Urrestarazu, Elena; Alegre, Manuel; Viteri, Cesar; Salvador, Javier; Baptista, Peter; Alcaide, Belen; Artieda, Julio

    2009-08-01

    Periodic limb movements (PLM) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are two frequent sleep disorders which often occur in the same patient. The goal of this study was to know the influence of the presence of PLM in the sleep architecture in patients with and without OSAS. Two hundred twenty consecutive patients (69 women and 151 men) participated in this transversal study. They were patients with clinical suspicion of dysomnia, including snoring, OSAS, and PLM. All of them underwent a full polysomnography and were interviewed using questionnaires about the sleep quality. The sleep parameters (percentage of sleep stages, rapid eye movement latency, sleep efficiency, awakenings, PLM presence, apnea-hypopnea index) were calculated and compared between groups. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric distribution techniques were used for the analysis. Patients with PLM when compared with patients with OSAS had lower sleep efficiency and less rapid eye movement percentage. The presence of PLM in patients with sleep apnea was less relevant being responsible only for an increase in the rapid eye movement latency and a decrease in the duration of the three to four sleep stages. However, the presence of OSAS was related to a better sleep efficiency (patients with PLM plus OSAS had a better sleep efficiency than patients with only PLM). PLM alters the structure of sleep. In patients with sleep apnea, the presence of PLM is less relevant.

  10. [Obstructive sleep apnoea and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Plíhalová, Andrea; Westlake, Kateřina; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA) is a disease very frequently occurring in people with type 2 diabetes, that significantly increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In a number of studies, OSA has been identified as an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Disorders of glucose homeostasis in patients with OSA are probably mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and/or sleep fragmentation through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, pro-inflammatory paths or oxidative stress. Despite the high prevalence of OSA among patients with type 2 diabetes as well as the proven benefit of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on reduction of mortality, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. Active OSA screening should therefore be performed in all patients with type 2 diabetes, ideally through home monitoring of oxygen saturation and breathing during sleep. Although the effect of CPAP therapy on the improvement in diabetes control (decrease in glycated hemoglobin) has not been clearly proven in patients with type 2 diabetes so far, promising outcomes have been observed during the treatment of patients with prediabetes.Key words: CPAP - diabetes mellitus - glycemic control - intermittent hypoxia - obstructive sleep apnoea - screening - sleep fragmentation.

  11. Non-CPAP therapies in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Randerath, W J; Verbraecken, J; Andreas, S; Bettega, G; Boudewyns, A; Hamans, E; Jalbert, F; Paoli, J R; Sanner, B; Smith, I; Stuck, B A; Lacassagne, L; Marklund, M; Maurer, J T; Pepin, J L; Valipour, A; Verse, T; Fietze, I

    2011-05-01

    In view of the high prevalence and the relevant impairment of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) lots of methods are offered which promise definitive cures for or relevant improvement of OSAS. This report summarises the efficacy of alternative treatment options in OSAS. An interdisciplinary European Respiratory Society task force evaluated the scientific literature according to the standards of evidence-based medicine. Evidence supports the use of mandibular advancement devices in mild to moderate OSAS. Maxillomandibular osteotomy seems to be as efficient as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients who refuse conservative treatment. Distraction osteogenesis is usefully applied in congenital micrognathia or midface hypoplasia. There is a trend towards improvment after weight reduction. Positional therapy is clearly inferior to CPAP and long-term compliance is poor. Drugs, nasal dilators and apnoea triggered muscle stimulation cannot be recommended as effective treatments of OSAS at the moment. Nasal surgery, radiofrequency tonsil reduction, tongue base surgery, uvulopalatal flap, laser midline glossectomy, tongue suspension and genioglossus advancement cannot be recommended as single interventions. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, pillar implants and hyoid suspension should only be considered in selected patients and potential benefits should be weighed against the risk of long-term side-effects. Multilevel surgery is only a salvage procedure for OSA patients.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnoea treatment and fasting lipids: a comparative effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Brendan T; Maislin, Greg; Sunwoo, Bernie Y; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Jackson, Nicholas; Olafsson, Isleifur; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Schwab, Richard J; Gislason, Thorarinn; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I

    2014-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidaemia has been implicated as a mechanism linking OSA with atherosclerosis, but no consistent associations with lipids exist for OSA or positive airway pressure treatment. We assessed the relationships between fasting lipid levels and obesity and OSA severity, and explored the impact of positive airway pressure treatment on 2-year fasting lipid level changes. Analyses included moderate-to-severe OSA patients from the Icelandic Sleep Apnoea Cohort. Fasting morning lipids were analysed in 613 untreated participants not on lipid-lowering medications at baseline. Patients were then initiated on positive airway pressure and followed for 2 years. Sub-classification using propensity score quintiles, which aimed to replicate covariate balance associated with randomised trials and, therefore, minimise selection bias and allow causal inference, was used to design the treatment group comparisons. 199 positive airway pressure adherent patients and 118 non-users were identified. At baseline, obesity was positively correlated with triglycerides and negatively correlated with total cholesterol, and low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A small correlation was observed between the apnoea/hypopnoea index and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. No effect of positive airway pressure adherence on 2-year fasting lipid changes was observed. Results do not support the concept of changes in fasting lipids as a primary mechanism for the increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in OSA.

  13. Ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin levels in sleep apnea syndrome: Role of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ursavas, Ahmet; Ilcol, Yesim Ozarda; Nalci, Nazan; Karadag, Mehmet; Ege, Ercument

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among plasma leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, resistin levels, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). METHODS: Fifty-five consecutive newly diagnosed OSAS patients and 15 age-matched nonapneic controls were enrolled in this study. After sleep study between 8:00 AM and 9:00 AM on the morning, venous blood was obtained in the fasting state to measure ghrelin and adipokines. RESULTS: Serum ghrelin levels of OSAS group were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of the control group. No significant difference was noted in the levels of leptin, adiponectin, and resistin in OSAS group when compared to controls. There was a significant positive correlation between ghrelin and apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) (r = 0.237, P < 0.05) or the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) (r = 0.28, P < 0.05). There was also a significant positive correlation between leptin and body mass index (r = 0.592, P < 0.0001). No significant correlation was observed between leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and any polysomnographic parameters. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrated that serum ghrelin levels were higher in OSAS patients than those of control group and correlated with AHI and ESS. Further studies are needed to clarify the complex relation among OSAS, obesity, adipokines, and ghrelin. PMID:20835311

  14. Slow digestion property of octenyl succinic anhydride modified waxy maize starch in the presence of tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanli; Xue, Lei; Leng, Xue; Yang, Ruobing; Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2015-03-18

    The in vivo slow digestion property of octenyl succinic anhydride modified waxy corn starch (OSA-starch) in the presence of tea polyphenols (TPLs) was studied. Using a mouse model, the experimental results showed an extended and moderate postprandial glycemic response with a delayed and significantly decreased blood glucose peak of OSA-starch after cocooking with TPLs (5% starch weight base). Further studies revealed an increased hydrodynamic radius of OSA-starch molecules indicating an interaction between OSA-starch and TPLs. Additionally, decreased gelatinization temperature and enthalpy and reduced viscosity and emulsifiability of OSA-starch support their possible complexation to form a spherical OSA-starch-TPLs (OSAT) complex. The moderate and extended postprandial glycemic response is likely caused by decreased activity of mucosal α-glucosidase, which is noncompetitively inhibited by tea catechins released from the complex during digestion. Meanwhile, a significant decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased DPPH free radical scavenging activity in small intestine tissue demonstrated the antioxidative functional property of the OSAT complex. Thus, the complex of OSAT, acting as a functional carbohydrate material, not only leads to a flattened and prolonged glycemic response but also reduces the oxidative stress, which might be beneficial to health.

  15. Natriuretic Peptide and High-Sensitive Troponin T Concentrations Correlate with Effectiveness of Short-Term CPAP in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strehmel, Ralf; Valo, Misa; Teupe, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular complications is increased in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective way to treat clinically significant OSA. We hypothesized that the concentrations of the cardiac risk markers N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high-sensitive troponin T (hs-TropT) correlate with the effectiveness of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA and coexisting coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients with severe OSA and coexisting CAD (group 1) and 20 control patients with severe OSA alone (group 2) were treated with CPAP and monitored by laboratory-based polysomnography. NT-proBNP and hs-TropT levels were measured before and after CPAP. Apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation were similar in both groups. In group 1, hs-TropT levels correlated with AHI and oxygen desaturation upon CPAP. Elevated NT-proBNP levels in group 1 were significantly reduced by CPAP. NT-proBNP levels correlated with AHI and showed negative correlation with ST-segment depression. No such correlations were found in group 2. CPAP has the potential to normalize elevated NT-proBNP serum levels in patients with severe OSA and coexisting CAD. Levels of NT-proBNP and hs-TropT correlated with AHI and oxygen desaturation. PMID:27980444

  16. Clinical features and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed Central

    Kimoff, R J; Cosio, M G; McGregor, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical features and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). DATA SOURCE AND SELECTION: All articles on OSA published in French and English between 1970 and 1990 and indexed in Index Medicus were reviewed. Studies addressing the epidemiologic features and clinical aspects of OSA were selected, and special emphasis was given to articles reporting the effects of treatment on morbidity and mortality rates. MAIN RESULTS: OSA is characterized by episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep that result in repetitive hypoxemia and sleep disruption. OSA leads to various neuropsychologic and cardiovascular complications, including daytime hypersomnolence, cognitive impairment, systemic and pulmonary hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias. There is suggestive evidence that the death rate among affected people is increased. The true incidence of OSA is unknown, but estimates have varied from 1% upwards among men. The current treatment with the greatest overall effectiveness and acceptability is nasal continuous positive airway pressure. CONCLUSION: This common, readily treatable disorder is associated with serious complications and therefore must be widely recognized by health professionals. PMID:1998928

  17. Prevalence of Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Association With Risk Factors in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kenia Vieira; Rosa, Maria Luiza Garcia; Jorge, Antônio José Lagoeiro; Leite, Adson Renato; Correia, Dayse Mary Silva; Silva, Davi de Sá; Cetto, Diego Bragatto; Brum, Andreia da Paz; Netto, Pedro Silveira; Rodrigues, Gustavo Domingos

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic, progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed, especially among women. Objective To study the prevalence of high risk for OSAS globally and for the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) categories, and to evaluate the reliability of the BQ use in the population studied. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study with individuals from the Niterói Family Doctor Program, randomly selected, aged between 45 and 99 years. The visits occurred between August/2011 and December/2012. Variables associated with each BQ category and with high risk for OSAS (global) were included in logistic regression models (p < 0.05). Results Of the total (616), 403 individuals (65.4%) reported snoring. The prevalence of high risk for OSA was 42.4%, being 49.7% for category I, 10.2% for category II and 77.6% for category III. Conclusion BQ showed an acceptable reliability after excluding the questions Has anyone noticed that you stop breathing during your sleep? and Have you ever dozed off or fallen asleep while driving?. This should be tested in further studies with samples mostly comprised of women and low educational level individuals. Given the burden of OSAS-related diseases and risks, studies should be conducted to validate new tools and to adapt BQ to better screen OSAS. PMID:27142651

  18. Pathogenesis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Hypothesis with Emphasis on the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2012-01-01

    OSA is characterized by the quintessential triad of intermittent apnea, hypoxia, and hypoxemia due to pharyngeal collapse. This paper highlights the upstream mechanisms that may trigger cognitive decline in OSA. Three interrelated steps underpin cognitive dysfunction in OSA patients. First, several risk factors upregulate peripheral inflammation; these crucial factors promote neuroinflammation, cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in OSA. Secondly, the neuroinflammation exerts negative impact globally on the CNS, and thirdly, important foci in the neocortex and brainstem are rendered inflamed and dysfunctional. A strong link is known to exist between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. A unique perspective delineated here underscores the importance of dysfunctional brainstem nuclei in etiopathogenesis of cognitive decline in OSA patients. Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration hub for afferents from upper airway (somatosensory/gustatory), respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular (baroreceptor and chemoreceptor) and other systems. The NTS has an essential role in sympathetic and parasympathetic systems also; it projects to most key brain regions and modulates numerous physiological functions. Inflamed and dysfunctional NTS and other key brainstem nuclei may play a pivotal role in triggering memory and cognitive dysfunction in OSA. Attenuation of upstream factors and amelioration of the NTS dysfunction remain important challenges. PMID:23470865

  19. [Epworth drowsiness scale value in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Uribe Echevarría, E M; Alvarez, D; Giobellina, R; Uribe Echevarría, A M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersomnia is one of the most consulted symptoms among patients evaluated at sleep disorder centers and it is frequently related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our hypothesis is that Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) is the parameter with the greatest predictive value in the OSAS diagnosis. We compared patients with OSAS diagnosis to a control group. In both groups we compared ESS with body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist perimeter (WP). Anthropometric index (BMI, NC and WC), were similar in both groups (p < 0.10). When we analyzed ESS, a score greater than 10 was observed in the OSAS group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001). Epworth sleepiness scale yielded 60% of sensibility, 82% of specificity and a positive predictive value of 85%. The negative predictive value was 52%. Confidence index was 70%. The relationship between OSAS and ESS scale was significant (Pearson Chi-Square value 7.5). Odds Ratio for apneas was 15 and its confidence interval was lower than 1.5 and upper than 141. We conclude that with ESS score exceeding 10 points OSAS should be suspected.

  20. MRI of the pharynx in ischemic stroke patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Concannon, Maryann; Helman, Joseph I.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common after stroke and associated with poor stroke outcomes. Whether OSA after acute stroke is caused by anatomic, physiologic, or both etiologies has not been studied. We therefore used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess oropharyngeal anatomy in stroke patients with and without OSA. Methods Patients within 7 days of ischemic stroke underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI performed for clinical purposes was used to measure retropalatal distance, soft palatal length, soft palatal thickness, retroglossal space, and tongue length. Nasopharyngeal area and high retropharyngeal area were measured from axial T2-weighted images, and lateral pharyngeal wall thickness from coronal T1-weighted images. Results Among 27 subjects, 18 (67%) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5). Demographics, vascular risk factors, and stroke severity were similar in the two groups. Median retropalatal distance was shorter in subjects with OSA (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p= 0.03). Shorter retropalatal distance was associated with higher AHI (linear regression, p=0.04). None of the other morphological characteristics differed. Conclusions Anatomic difference between awake acute stroke patients with and without OSA shows that the sleep disorder cannot be attributed solely to sleep, sleeping position, or changes in neuromuscular control that are specific to the sleep state. PMID:20466584

  1. Impact of non-dipping on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Ozono, Ryoji; Edahiro, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kiyomi; Seto, Ayako; Okita, Tomomi; Teramen, Kazushi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, it is unclear how OSAS contributes to the events. We investigated the impact of non-dipping on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a retrospective cohort study comprising 251 patients with OSAS. OSAS was diagnosed by overnight polysomnography and all patients underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Non-dipping was diagnosed when reduction in sleep blood pressure was <10% of awake blood pressure. Over a mean 43-month follow-up period, 15 patients (6.0%) developed cardiovascular events including stroke, heart failure, and ischemic heart disease. Significantly higher cardiovascular events were observed in the non-dipping group than those without it by Kaplan-Meier analyses. Cox regression analysis revealed that the presence of non-dipping was significantly and independently associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 3.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-17.41; p < 0.05), after adjusting for severity of OSAS, and CPAP therapy. Thus, non-dipping was a marker for a poor prognosis in patients with OSAS.

  2. [Effect of positive pressure respiration on diurnal catecholamine excretion by patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Cieślicki, J; Wocial, B; Koziej, M; Pałasiewicz, G; Zieliński, J

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate effects of CPAP treatment on diurnal catecholamine excretion in urine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 12 males with severe OSA (mean AHI = 63) were measured in 3 separate 8 hour samples by fluorimetric method. NA levels were higher in OSA patients in all urine samples than in obese, mildly hypertensive males (control group = C). In C group patients NA levels were significantly lower at night than during the day contrary to OSA patients in whom NA levels dropped insignificantly during sleep. In OSA patients NA levels during sleep correlated with severity of apneas (r = 0.42) and night hypoxaemia (r = -0.46). CPAP treatment resulted in significant fall in NA levels during sleep (p < 0.01). A levels did not change after CPAP treatment. We conclude that abnormally high NA level during sleep in OSA patients may be related to sleep fragmentation and hypoxia. CPAP treatment restores normal circadian rhythm of NA excretion.

  3. The different clinical faces of obstructive sleep apnoea: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lichuan; Pien, Grace W; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Björnsdottir, Erla; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Pack, Allan I; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2014-12-01

    Although commonly observed in clinical practice, the heterogeneity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) clinical presentation has not been formally characterised. This study was the first to apply cluster analysis to identify subtypes of patients with OSA who experience distinct combinations of symptoms and comorbidities. An analysis of baseline data from the Icelandic Sleep Apnoea Cohort (822 patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSA) was performed. Three distinct clusters were identified. They were classified as the "disturbed sleep group" (cluster 1), "minimally symptomatic group" (cluster 2) and "excessive daytime sleepiness group" (cluster 3), consisting of 32.7%, 24.7% and 42.6% of the entire cohort, respectively. The probabilities of having comorbid hypertension and cardiovascular disease were highest in cluster 2 but lowest in cluster 3. The clusters did not differ significantly in terms of sex, body mass index or apnoea-hypopnoea index. Patients with OSA have different patterns of clinical presentation, which need to be communicated to both the lay public and the professional community with the goal of facilitating care-seeking and early identification of OSA. Identifying distinct clinical profiles of OSA creates a foundation for offering more personalised therapies in the future.

  4. The impacts of open-mouth breathing on upper airway space in obstructive sleep apnea: 3-D MDCT analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joong; Choi, Ji Ho; Kim, Kang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Heung Man; Shin, Chol; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-04-01

    Open-mouth breathing during sleep is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is associated with increased disease severity and upper airway collapsibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of open-mouth breathing on the upper airway space in patients with OSA using three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3-D MDCT). The study design included a case-control study with planned data collection. The study was performed at a tertiary medical center. 3-D MDCT analysis was conducted on 52 patients with OSA under two experimental conditions: mouth closed and mouth open. Under these conditions, we measured the minimal cross-sectional area of the retropalatal and retroglossal regions (mXSA-RP, mXSA-RG), as well as the upper airway length (UAL), defined as the vertical dimension from hard palate to hyoid. We also computed the volume of the upper airway space by 3-D reconstruction of both conditions. When the mouth was open, mXSA-RP and mXSA-RG significantly decreased and the UAL significantly increased, irrespective of the severity of OSA. However, between the closed- and open-mouth states, there was no significant change in upper airway volume at any severity of OSA. Results suggest that the more elongated and narrow upper airway during open-mouth breathing may aggravate the collapsibility of the upper airway and, thus, negatively affect OSA severity.

  5. Developing policy regarding obstructive sleep apnea and driving among commercial drivers in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    FILOMENO, Ronald; IKEDA, Ai; TANIGAWA, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) has emerged as a global public health problem. OSAS is largely recognized as a factor for increased risk of vehicular related accidents for those diagnosed and undiagnosed. This article serves as a country report that reviews current and potential policies regarding OSAS induced drowsy driving in both Japan and the United States of America. In addition to reviewing policies, various case finding techniques are also explored as methods to reduce accidents due to OSAS induced drowsy driving. Evaluation of the effectiveness of methods used in the United States of America and Japan for safe driving among commercial drivers is a key step to decreasing vehicular related accidents through stronger policy development and subsequent enforcement. Case finding has emerged as one of the most effective and realistic methods to detect OSAS in the driving population based on research done in the U.S. and Japan. Subsequently, case finding can lead to treatment to further prevent future accidents from occurring due to OSAS drowsy driving. PMID:27151306

  6. Continuing the Original Stanford Sleep Surgery Protocol From Upper Airway Reconstruction to Upper Airway Stimulation: Our First Successful Case.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley Yung; Riley, Robert Wayne

    2017-02-20

    In 1993, a surgical protocol for dynamic upper airway reconstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was published, and it became commonly known as the Stanford phase 1 and 2 sleep surgery protocol. It served as a platform on which research and clinical studies have continued to perfect the surgical care of patients with OSA. However, relapse is inevitable in a chronic condition such as OSA, and a subset of previously cured surgical patients return with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness. This report describes a patient who was successfully treated with phase 1 and 2 operations more than a decade previously. He returned at 65 years of age with relapse of moderate OSA, and after workup with polysomnography and drug-induced sleep endoscopy, he underwent upper airway stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve that resulted in a cure of OSA. This case shows why upper airway stimulation is an appropriate option for patients with OSA relapse, after previously successful maxillomandibular advancement.

  7. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T.; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D.; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  8. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Is Increased in Hypertensive Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heizhati, Mulalibieke; Sun, Chao; Abulikemu, Suofeiya; Shao, Liang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Wang, Yingchun; Hong, Jing; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate alteration in serum TSH in hypertensives with OSA and its relation with cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods. 517 hypertensives were cross-sectionally studied. OSA was determined by polysomnography and thyroid function by standard methods. Results. OSA was diagnosed in 373 hypertensives (72.15%). Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism was significantly higher in OSA hypertensives than in non-OSA ones (15.0% versus 6.9%, P = 0.014). Serum LnTSH in hypertensives with severe OSA was significantly higher (0.99 ± 0.81 versus 0.74 ± 0.77 μIU/mL, P < 0.05) than in those without OSA. AHI, LSaO2, ODI3, and ODI4 were independently associated with serum TSH for those aged 30–65 years. Dividing subjects into four groups as TSH < 1.0 μIU/mL, 1.0 ≤ THS ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL, 1.91 ≤ TSH < 4.5 μIU/mL, and TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL, only 26.3% of OSA subjects exhibited TSH between 1.0 and 1.9 μIU/mL, significantly less than non-OSA subjects (26.3% versus 38.2%, P = 0.01). DBP and serum LDL-c elevated with TSH increasing and were only significantly higher in TSH ≥ 4.5 μIU/mL group than in 1.0 ≤ TSH ≤ 1.9 μIU/mL group (96.32 ± 14.19 versus 92.31 ± 12.86 mmHg; P = 0.040; 0.99 ± 0.60 versus 0.87 ± 0.34 mmol/L, P = 0.023). Conclusion. OSA might be a risk factor for increased TSH even within reference range in hypertensive population. PMID:27882050

  9. Meta-analysis of effects of obstructive sleep apnea on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ze-Ning; Wei, Yong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common cause of resistant hypertension, which has been proposed to result from activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). We meta-analyzed the effects of OSA on plasma levels of RAAS components. Methods Full-text studies published on MEDLINE and EMBASE analyzing fasting plasma levels of at least one RAAS component in adults with OSA with or without hypertension. OSA was diagnosed as an apnea-hypopnea index or respiratory disturbance index ≥ 5. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Results from individual studies were synthesized using inverse variance and pooled using a random-effects model. Subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression were performed, and risk of publication bias was assessed. Results The meta-analysis included 13 studies, of which 10 reported results on renin (n = 470 cases and controls), 7 on angiotensin II (AngII, n = 384), and 9 on aldosterone (n = 439). AngII levels were significantly higher in OSA than in controls [mean differences = 3.39 ng/L, 95% CI: 2.00–4.79, P < 0.00001], while aldosterone levels were significantly higher in OSA with hypertension than OSA but not with hypertension (mean differences = 1.32 ng/dL, 95% CI: 0.58–2.07, P = 0.0005). Meta-analysis of all studies suggested no significant differences in aldosterone between OSA and controls, but a significant pooled mean difference of 1.35 ng/mL (95% CI: 0.88–1.82, P < 0.00001) emerged after excluding one small-sample study. No significant risk of publication bias was detected among all included studies. Conclusions OSA is associated with higher AngII and aldosterone levels, especially in hypertensive patients. OSA may cause hypertension, at least in part, by stimulating RAAS activity. PMID:27403143

  10. Physical Inactivity Is Associated with Moderate-Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laila; McArdle, Nigel; Eastwood, Peter R.; Ward, Kim L.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Wilson, Annette C.; Hillman, David R.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether low levels of physical activity were associated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), OSA-related symptoms, and cardiometabolic risk. Methods: A case-control study design was used. OSA cases were patients referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA (n = 2,340). Controls comprised participants from the Busselton community (n = 1,931). Exercise and occupational activity were derived from questionnaire data. Associations were modelled using logistic and linear regression and adjusted for confounders. Results: In comparison with moderate exercise, the high, low, and nil exercise groups had an odds ratio (OR) for moderate-severe OSA of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5–0.8), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2–2.0), and 2.7 (95% CI 1.9–3.7), respectively. Relative to men in heavy activity occupations, men in medium, light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1–2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 1.4–3.2), and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2–2.8), respectively. Relative to women in medium activity occupations, women in light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 4.2 (95% CI 2.6–7.2) and 3.5 (2.0–6.0). OSA patients who adequately exercised had lower: levels of doctor-diagnosed depression (p = 0.047); symptoms of fatigue (p < 0.0001); systolic (p = 0.015) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015); and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Low levels of physical activity were associated with moderate-severe OSA. Exercise in individuals with OSA is associated with lower levels of depression, fatigue, blood pressure and CRP. Citation: Simpson L, McArdle N, Eastwood PR, Ward KL, Cooper MN, Wilson AC, Hillman DR, Palmer LJ, Mukherjee S. Physical inactivity is associated with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1091–1099. PMID:26285117

  11. Impaired cerebral autoregulation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Fred; Roux, Francoise; Schindler, Joseph; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2008-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases the risk of stroke independent of known vascular and metabolic risk factors. Although patients with OSA have higher prevalence of hypertension and evidence of hypercoagulability, the mechanism of this increased risk is unknown. Obstructive apnea events are associated with surges in blood pressure, hypercapnia, and fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. These perturbations can adversely affect the cerebral circulation. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have impaired cerebral autoregulation, which may contribute to the increased risk of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We examined cerebral autoregulation in patients with and without OSA by measuring cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and arterial blood pressure using finger pulse photoplethysmography during orthostatic hypotension and recovery as well as during 5% CO(2) inhalation. Cerebral vascular conductance and reactivity were determined. Forty-eight subjects, 26 controls (age 41.0+/-2.3 yr) and 22 OSA (age 46.8+/-2.3 yr) free of cerebrovascular and active coronary artery disease participated in this study. OSA patients had a mean apnea-hypopnea index of 78.4+/-7.1 vs. 1.8+/-0.3 events/h in controls. The oxygen saturation during sleep was significantly lower in the OSA group (78+/-2%) vs. 91+/-1% in controls. The dynamic vascular analysis showed mean CBFV was significantly lower in OSA patients compared with controls (48+/-3 vs. 55+/-2 cm/s; P <0.05, respectively). The OSA group had a lower rate of recovery of cerebrovascular conductance for a given drop in blood pressure compared with controls (0.06+/-0.02 vs. 0.20+/-0.06 cm.s(-2).mmHg(-1); P <0.05). There was no difference in cerebrovascular vasodilatation in response to CO(2). The findings showed that patients with OSA have decreased CBFV at baseline and delayed cerebrovascular compensatory response to changes in blood pressure but not to CO(2). These perturbations may

  12. Presence of Fragmented QRS Complexes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Muhammet Rasit; Altuntas, Murat; Aktop, Ziyaeddin; Oz, Ibrahim I; Yavuz, Nesimi; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Sagatli, Erol; Karabag, Turgut; Aydin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disease with increasing prevalence, which is mainly characterized by increased cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity. It is well-known that OSAS patients have increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of prolonged and fragmented QRS complexes, which have previously been associated with cardiovascular mortality, in OSAS patients. Methods: Our study included 51 patients (mean age 41.6 ± 10.1 years) who were recently diagnosed with OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5 events/h) and never received therapy. The control group consisted of 34 volunteers (mean age 43.1 ± 11.6 years) in whom OSAS was excluded (AHI <5 events/h). The longest QRS complexes was measured in the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and the presence of fragmentation in QRS complexes was investigated. Results: Fragmented QRS frequency was significantly higher in patients with OSAS (n = 31 [61%] vs. n = 12 [35%], P = 0.021). QRS and QTc durations were also significantly longer in OSAS patients than controls (99.8 ± 13.9 ms vs. 84.7 ± 14.3 ms, P < 0.001; 411.4 ± 26.9 ms vs. 390.1 ± 32.2 ms, P = 0.001, respectively). Analysis of the patient and controls groups combined revealed a weak-moderate correlation between AHI and QRS duration (r = 0.292, P = 0.070). OSAS group had no correlation between AHI and QRS duration (r = −0.231, P = 0.203). Conclusions: In our study fragmented QRS frequency and QRS duration were found to increase in OSAS patients. Both parameters are related with increased cardiovascular mortality. Considering the prognostic importance of ECG parameters, it may be reasonable to recommend more detailed evaluation of OSAS patients with fragmented or prolonged QRS complexes with respect to presence of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26265605

  13. Establishment of a Rabbit Model of Chronic Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Application in Cardiovascular Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Fang; Zhou, Xiu-Fang; Hu, Ke; Tang, Si; Luo, Yu-Chuan; Lu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular complications and its clinical features are well characterized, it is difficult to replicate the OSA hypoxic model in humans. We aimed to establish an experimental rabbit model for chronic OSA and to explore its application to measure blood pressure (BP), myocardial systolic function, and oxidative stress. Methods: The rabbit model for OSA was established by repeatedly closing the airway and then reopening it. A tube specially designed with a bag that could be alternately inflated and deflated according to a predetermined time schedule, resulting in recurrent airway occlusions and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) imitating OSA patterns in humans, was used. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into obstruction, sham, and control groups, and their upper airways were alternately closed for 15 s and then reopened for 105 s in a 120-s-long cycle, for 8 h each day over 12 consecutive weeks. Before and after the experiment, the BP of each rabbit was monitored. Levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the serum, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, as well as Na+-K+-ATPase/Ca2+-ATPase activities in cardiac muscle were examined. In addition, cardiac functional parameters were measured using echocardiography. Results: After 3 months, all rabbits in the obstruction group manifested sleepiness performance similar to that observed in OSA patients. Traces of airflow and SpO2 showed that this model mimicked the respiratory events involved in OSA, including increased respiratory effort and decreased oxygen saturation. Gradually, the BP rose each month. CIH led to obvious oxidative stress and injured myocardial systolic performance. The serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α increased significantly (64.75 ± 9.05 pg/ml vs. 147.00 ± 19.24 pg/ml and 59.38 ± 8.21 pg/ml vs. 264

  14. The relation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D levels with severity of obstructive sleep apnea and glucose metabolism abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, N Colak; Cakal, E; Sahin, M; Ozkaya, E Cakir; Firat, H; Delibasi, T

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 25-hydroxyvitamin-D₃ (25-OH-D) deficiency are two separate disorders associating with obesity, inflammation, and impaired glucose metabolism. We aimed to investigate the vitamin D status of OSA patients regarding to potential links between lower vitamin D levels and abnormal glucose metabolism, which is one of the main adverse outcomes of OSA. Study group is composed of 190 non-diabetic subjects who were suspected of having OSA. Subjects undergone polysomnography and were grouped due to apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) as controls (AHI < 5, n = 47), mild OSA (5 ≤ AHI < 15, n = 46), moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI < 30, n = 47), and severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30, n = 50). Serum 25-OH-D, HbA₁c, insulin levels were measured and 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Serum 25-OH-D level (ng/ml) of OSA patients were lower than control subjects (17.4 ± 6.9 vs. 19.9 ± 7.8), and decrement was parallel to severity of OSA; as 18.2 ± 6.4 (5 ≤ AHI < 15), 17.5 ± 7.4 (15 ≤ AHI < 30), and 16.3 ± 6.9 (AHI > 30), respectively (P = 0.097, r = -0.13). However, severe female OSA patients had significantly lower 25-OH-D levels (11.55 ng/ml), while control males had the highest mean value (21.7 ng/ml) (P < 0.001). Frequency of insulin resistance (IR) was 48%, prediabetes 41%, diabetes 16% in OSA patients. Mean 25-OH-D level of insulin resistant subjects (HOMA-IR ≥ 2.7, n = 77, AHI = 35.5) was lower than non-insulin resistant subjects (HOMA-IR < 2.7, n = 113, AHI = 19.8) as 16.18 ± 7.81 versus 19.2 ± 6.6, respectively (P = 0.004). 25-OH-D level of 91 non-diabetic subjects (n = 91, AHI = 19.7) was 19.5 ± 7.4, prediabetics (n = 75, AHI = 28.7) was 17.45 ± 6.9, and diabetics (n = 24, AHI = 46.3) was 13.8 ± 5.3 (P = 0.02). We showed that subjects with more severe OSA indices (AHI ≥ 15) tended to present lower vitamin D levels correlated to increased prevalence of IR, prediabetes, and diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency may play a role and/or worsen

  15. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    PubMed Central

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

  16. Impact of rail medical standard on obstructive sleep apnoea prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 2004 edition of the National Standard for Health Assessment of Rail Safety Workers (the standard) used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to screen for excessive daytime sleepiness related to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The 2012 edition of the standard expanded the OSA screening matrix to include body mass index, comorbid hypertension and type 2 diabetes as triggers requiring a sleep study to be undertaken irrespective of the ESS. Aims To assess the impact of the new standard on the estimated prevalence of OSA in railway workers. Methods An analysis of data on safety critical employees referred for rail safety health assessment during the 2013 calendar year and meeting the criteria for sleep study referral. Sleep study outcomes were used to assess the predictive value of screening under the new standard. Results A total of 200/4311 workers were investigated with a sleep study. One hundred and ninety-three met the new risk factor criteria and 182 (91%) were newly diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in the study population was 7%, compared with 2% in 2009. No worker reported an elevated ESS. The false positive to true positive ratio was 0.1 (95% CI 0.06–0.16). Conclusions The new medical standard has resulted in an increased estimate of the prevalence of OSA in rail workers. This study supports the use of objective clinical risk factors to select workers for further investigation, aiming to minimize the risk of accidents associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and other comorbid conditions of OSA. PMID:26276756

  17. Screening for sleep-disordered breathing in a bariatric population

    PubMed Central

    Pengo, Martino F.; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing frequently associated with obesity. Obese subjects undergoing elective surgical procedures with general anesthesia are potentially at risk if this condition is not identified. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of bariatric patients with undiagnosed OSA following pre-operative assessment and who could benefit from peri-procedural respiratory management. Methods Patients who were referred for prospective bariatric surgery were screened using the STOP-BANG questionnaire. If patients scored >4 points they underwent a home-based nocturnal pulse oximetry. Severity of OSA was defined by the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) combined with a physician’s review. Data were compared using unpaired two-tailed t-test and Chi-square test. Linear regression models were used to assess associations between clinical parameters. Results Sleep-disordered breathing of any degree was evident in 103 of 141 patients (73%). Thirteen (9%) patients had severe, 19 (13%) moderate, and 34 (24%) mild OSA, 38 (27%) patients had no OSA. 34 (24%) patients were initiated on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) prior to the surgical procedure, 15 (11%) were admitted for further respiratory assessment and two of them were given CPAP following inpatient sleep study. Thirteen (9%) patients were advised to use a mandibular advancement device for mild but symptomatic OSA. Out of all patients, 76 (54%) were advised that no treatment was required. Conclusions OSA is highly prevalent in a cohort of bariatric surgery patients screened with STOP-BANG questionnaires. Almost 3/4 of this cohort have at least some degree of sleep-disordered breathing, and approximately half of them require a plan for the respiratory management perioperatively. PMID:26904267

  18. Decision Modeling in Sleep Apnea: The Critical Roles of Pretest Probability, Cost of Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Time Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Marilyn; Westover, M. Brandon; Kelly, Jessica; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) is cost-effective. However, the optimal diagnostic strategy remains a subject of debate. Prior modeling studies have not consistently supported the widely held assumption that home sleep testing (HST) is cost-effective. Methods: We modeled four strategies: (1) treat no one; (2) treat everyone empirically; (3) treat those testing positive during in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) via in-laboratory titration; and (4) treat those testing positive during HST with auto-PAP. The population was assumed to lack independent reasons for in-laboratory PSG (such as insomnia, periodic limb movements in sleep, complex apnea). We considered the third-party payer perspective, via both standard (quality-adjusted) and pure cost methods. Results: The preferred strategy depended on three key factors: pretest probability of OSA, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. At low prevalence and low cost of untreated OSA, the treat no one strategy was favored, whereas empiric treatment was favored for high prevalence and high cost of untreated OSA. In-laboratory backup for failures in the at-home strategy increased the preference for the at-home strategy. Without laboratory backup in the at-home arm, the in-laboratory strategy was increasingly preferred at longer time horizons. Conclusion: Using a model framework that captures a broad range of clinical possibilities, the optimal diagnostic approach to uncomplicated OSA depends on pretest probability, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. Estimating each of these critical factors remains a challenge warranting further investigation. Citation: Moro M, Westover MB, Kelly J, Bianchi MT. Decision modeling in sleep apnea: the critical roles of pretest probability, cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnea, and time horizon. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):409–418. PMID:26518699

  19. Screening for sleep-disordered breathing in a bariatric population

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Kate; Pengo, Martino F.; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing frequently associated with obesity. Obese subjects undergoing elective surgical procedures with general anaesthesia are potentially at risk if this condition is not identified. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of bariatric patients with undiagnosed OSA following pre-operative assessment and who could benefit from peri-procedural respiratory management. Methods Patients who were referred for prospective bariatric surgery were screened using the STOP-BANG questionnaire. If patients scored >4 points they underwent a home-based nocturnal pulse oximetry. Severity of OSA was defined by the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) combined with a physician’s review. Data were compared using unpaired two-tailed t-test and chi-square test. Linear regression models were used to assess associations between clinical parameters. Results Sleep-disordered breathing of any degree was evident in 103 of 141 patients (73%). Thirteen (9%) patients had severe, 19 (13%) moderate, and 34 (24%) mild OSA, 38 (27%) patients had no OSA. Thirty-four (24%) patients were initiated on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) prior to the surgical procedure, 15 (11%) were admitted for further respiratory assessment and two of them were given CPAP following inpatient sleep study. Thirteen (9%) patients were advised to use a mandibular advancement device for mild but symptomatic OSA. Out of all patients, 76 (54%) were advised that no treatment was required. Conclusions OSA is highly prevalent in a cohort of bariatric surgery patients screened with STOP-BANG questionnaires. Almost 3/4 of this cohort have at least some degree of sleep-disordered breathing, and approximately half of them require a plan for the respiratory management perioperatively.

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun Jung

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is approximately 3% in children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common cause of OSAS in children, and obesity, hypotonic neuromuscular diseases, and craniofacial anomalies are other major risk factors. Snoring is the most common presenting complaint in children with OSAS, but the clinical presentation varies according to age. Agitated sleep with frequent postural changes, excessive sweating, or abnormal sleep positions such as hyperextension of neck or abnormal prone position may suggest a sleep-disordered breathing. Night terror, sleepwalking, and enuresis are frequently associated, during slow-wave sleep, with sleep-disordered breathing. Excessive daytime sleepiness becomes apparent in older children, whereas hyperactivity or inattention is usually predominant in younger children. Morning headache and poor appetite may also be present. As the cortical arousal threshold is higher in children, arousals are not easily developed and their sleep architectures are usually more conserved than those of adults. Untreated OSAS in children may result in various problems such as cognitive deficits, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and emotional instability. Mild pulmonary hypertension is not uncommon. Rarely, cardiovascular complications such as cor pulmonale, heart failure, and systemic hypertension may develop in untreated cases. Failure to thrive and delayed development are serious problems in younger children with OSAS. Diagnosis of pediatric OSAS should be based on snoring, relevant history of sleep disruption, findings of any narrow or collapsible portions of upper airway, and confirmed by polysomnography. Early diagnosis of pediatric OSAS is critical to prevent complications with appropriate interventions. PMID:21189956

  1. Membrane Level of Omega-3 Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Associated with Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ladesich, James B.; Pottala, James V.; Romaker, Ann; Harris, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a major component of neural tissues, and supplementation with fish oils improves autonomic tone and reduces risk for CVD. A link between low DHA status and less mature sleep patterns was observed in newborns. Methods: We investigated the relations between red blood cell (RBC) levels of DHA and OSA severity in 350 sequential patients undergoing sleep studies. Severity categories were defined as none/mild, moderate, and severe, based on apnea hypopnea index (AHI) scores of 0 to 14, 15 to 34, and > 34, respectively. Results: After controlling for age, sex, race, smoking, BMI, alcohol intake, fish intake, and omega-3 supplementation, RBC DHA was inversely related with OSA severity. For each 1-SD increase in DHA levels, a patient was about 50% less likely to be classified with severe OSA. The odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.47 (0.28 to 0.80) and 0.55 (0.31 to 0.99) for being in the severe group versus the none/mild or moderate groups, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that disordered membrane fatty acid patterns may play a causal role in OSA and that the assessment of RBC DHA levels might help in the diagnosis of OSA. The effects of DHA supplementation on OSA should be explored. Citation: Ladesich JB; Pottala JV; Romaker A; Harris WS. Membrane level of omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(4):391-396. PMID:21897776

  2. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea on ischemia-modified albumin levels and carotid intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Karamanli, Harun; Kiyici, Aysel; Arik, Bilal; Efe, Duran; Akgedik, Recep

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is strongly associated with the presence of significant risk factors for cardiovascular disturbances. A disturbance in the oxidative/antioxidative balance is involved in the pathogenesis of OSA and cardiovascular diseases. Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is suggested as a novel marker of oxidative stress; IMA can be defined as decreased binding of transitional metal ions to serum albumin in oxidative status. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the influence of OSA on IMA levels and CIMT. In total, 61 individuals with OSA with no comorbidities and 24 healthy controls with a similar body mass index and age were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of IMA, CIMT (estimated radiologically), and polysomnographic parameters, were determined and interpreted. Serum IMA levels were significantly higher in individuals with OSA compared with the control group (p=0.0003). CIMT was significantly higher in the OSA group compared with the control group (0.88± 0.26 mm vs 0.75±0.17 mm, p=0.005). The CIMT and serum IMA levels were positively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (r=0.35 and r=0.32, respectively), and with the oxygen desaturation index (r=0.34 and r=0.29, respectively) at baseline. Increased IMA levels and CIMT may be related to increased oxidative stress and risk of atherosclerosis in individuals with OSA.

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Obesity, and the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central