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  1. Surgical management of OSA in adults.

    PubMed

    Smith, David F; Cohen, Aliza P; Ishman, Stacey L

    2015-06-01

    OSA is a common, often chronic, condition requiring long-term therapy. Given the prevalence of OSA, as well as its significant health-related sequelae, a range of medical and surgical treatments have been developed and used with varying success depending on individual anatomy and patient compliance. Although CPAP is the primary treatment, many patients cannot tolerate this treatment and require alternative therapies. In this clinical scenario, surgery is often warranted and useful. Surgical management is aimed at addressing obstruction in the nasal, retropalatal, and retroglossal/hypopharyngeal regions, and many patients have multiple levels of obstruction. This review presents a comprehensive overview of research findings on a wide spectrum of surgical approaches currently used by sleep clinicians when other therapeutic modalities fail to achieve positive outcomes.

  2. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  3. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas.

  4. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  5. Colloid Characteristics and Emulsifying Properties of OSA Starches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokić, Petar; Dokić, Ljubica; Dapčević, Tamara; Krstonošić, Veljko

    The objective of this paper was to characterize commercially available octenyl-succinate starches (OSA starches), Purity Gum 2000 and Hi-cap 100, by determining their viscous behaviour and characteristics and molecular mass, as well as to examine their emulsifying properties in corn oil-in-water emulsion system.

  6. Home Sleep Tests for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA).

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mukesh; Greenough, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a fairly common condition that, if left untreated, can lead to complications such as high blood pressure and heart disease. Polysomnography (PSG) is the most accurate method for diagnosing OSA, but it is a cumbersome and expensive test. A well-validated, easier to perform and less expensive alternative is the home sleep test (HST). The purpose of this review is to educate the primary care provider about the important differences between PSG and HSTs, the advantages and limitations of both modalities, identifying patients who are appropriate candidates for the HST, identifying patients in whom the HST should not be performed, and further evaluation of patients who have a negative HST.

  7. Using an OSAE to Learn about Life in Two New Delhi Hutments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Kay E.

    2005-01-01

    This manuscript is a description of personal observations of two hutments in New Delhi, India. Data was gathered from my hotel window using the OSAE method of landscape observation. The OSAE is the method I use to understand processes that can be seen when studying a landscape. It is the most useful tool I have ever used when teaching geography.…

  8. Mathematical Objects through the Lens of Two Different Theoretical Perspectives: APOS and OSA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Font Moll, Vicenç; Trigueros, María; Badillo, Edelmira; Rubio, Norma

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a networking of two theories, the APOS Theory and the ontosemiotic approach (OSA), to compare and contrast how they conceptualize the notion of a mathematical object. As context of reflection, we designed an APOS genetic decomposition for the derivative and analyzed it from the point of view of OSA. Results of this study show…

  9. The WOPR Domain Protein OsaA Orchestrates Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Alkahyyat, Fahad; Ni, Min; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Orchestration of cellular growth and development occurs during the life cycle of Aspergillus nidulans. A multi-copy genetic screen intended to unveil novel regulators of development identified the AN6578 locus predicted to encode a protein with the WOPR domain, which is a broadly present fungi-specific DNA-binding motif. Multi-copy of AN6578 disrupted the normal life cycle of the fungus leading to enhanced proliferation of vegetative cells, whereas the deletion resulted in hyper-active sexual fruiting with reduced asexual development (conidiation), thus named as osaA (Orchestrator of Sex and Asex). Further genetic studies indicate that OsaA balances development mainly by repressing sexual development downstream of the velvet regulator VeA. The absence of osaA is sufficient to suppress the veA1 allele leading to the sporulation levels comparable to veA+ wild type (WT). Genome-wide transcriptomic analyses of WT, veA1, and ΔosaA veA1 strains by RNA-Seq further corroborate that OsaA functions in repressing sexual development downstream of VeA. However, OsaA also plays additional roles in controlling development, as the ΔosaA veA1 mutant exhibits precocious and enhanced formation of Hülle cells compared to WT. The OsaA orthologue of Aspergillus flavus is able to complement the osaA null phenotype in A. nidulans, suggesting a conserved role of this group of WOPR domain proteins. In summary, OsaA is an upstream orchestrator of morphological and chemical development in Aspergillus that functions downstream of VeA. PMID:26359867

  10. Comparative Emulsifying Properties of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA)-Modified Starch: Granular Form vs Dissolved State

    PubMed Central

    Marefati, Ali; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying ability of OSA-modified and native starch in the granular form, in the dissolved state and a combination of both was compared. This study aims to understand mixed systems of particles and dissolved starch with respect to what species dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by addition of one of the species to already formed emulsions. It was possible to create emulsions with OSA-modified starch isolated from Quinoa as sole emulsifier. Similar droplet sizes were obtained with emulsions prepared at 7% (w/w) oil content using OSA-modified starch in the granular form or molecularly dissolved but large differences were observed regarding stability. Pickering emulsions kept their droplet size constant after one month while emulsions formulated with OSA-modified starch dissolved exhibited coalescence. All emulsions stabilized combining OSA-modified starch in granular form and in solution showed larger mean droplet sizes with no significant differences with respect to the order of addition. These emulsions were unstable due to coalescence regarding presence of free oil. Similar results were obtained when emulsions were prepared by combining OSA-modified granules with native starch in solution. The degree of surface coverage of starch granules was much lower in presence of starch in solution which indicates that OSA-starch is more surface active in the dissolved state than in granular form, although it led to unstable systems compared to starch granule stabilized Pickering emulsions, which demonstrated to be extremely stable. PMID:27479315

  11. Development of emulsifying property in Persian gum using octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, S; Abbasi, S; Scanlon, M G

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the influence of octenyle succinic anhydride (OSA),gum concentration, pH, temperature and reaction time on esterification of Persian gum (PG), and its soluble (SFPG) and insoluble (IFPG) fractions, were investigated by response surface methodology (RSM) in order to optimize the reaction conditions based on the degree of substitution (DS). The individual effect of all independent variables as well as the interactive effects of temperature-OSA concentration, and OSA-PG concentrations on DS was significant. However, the latter interactive effect (OSA-SFPG) was not significant in case of SFPG. The IFPG did not have any esterification reaction with OSA. The highest DS for PG and SFPG were 0.0285 and 0.0303 at the optimal conditions, respectively. The FTIR spectrums also confirmed the carbonyl group attachment in OSA-PG and OSA-SFPG. The enhancement of emulsifying capability was also confirmed by ECI and EAI values, microscopic images as well as rheological measurements. PMID:27138859

  12. Comparative Emulsifying Properties of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride (OSA)-Modified Starch: Granular Form vs Dissolved State.

    PubMed

    Matos, María; Marefati, Ali; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Wahlgren, Marie; Rayner, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying ability of OSA-modified and native starch in the granular form, in the dissolved state and a combination of both was compared. This study aims to understand mixed systems of particles and dissolved starch with respect to what species dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by addition of one of the species to already formed emulsions. It was possible to create emulsions with OSA-modified starch isolated from Quinoa as sole emulsifier. Similar droplet sizes were obtained with emulsions prepared at 7% (w/w) oil content using OSA-modified starch in the granular form or molecularly dissolved but large differences were observed regarding stability. Pickering emulsions kept their droplet size constant after one month while emulsions formulated with OSA-modified starch dissolved exhibited coalescence. All emulsions stabilized combining OSA-modified starch in granular form and in solution showed larger mean droplet sizes with no significant differences with respect to the order of addition. These emulsions were unstable due to coalescence regarding presence of free oil. Similar results were obtained when emulsions were prepared by combining OSA-modified granules with native starch in solution. The degree of surface coverage of starch granules was much lower in presence of starch in solution which indicates that OSA-starch is more surface active in the dissolved state than in granular form, although it led to unstable systems compared to starch granule stabilized Pickering emulsions, which demonstrated to be extremely stable. PMID:27479315

  13. The investigation of the sludge reduction efficiency and mechanisms in oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process.

    PubMed

    Demir, Özlem; Filibeli, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a full understanding of the sludge reduction mechanisms in the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA) process and presents an evaluation of the sludge reduction efficiencies and sludge characteristics in this process compared to the conventional activated sludge process. Fifty-eight percent reduction in observed yield in the OSA process was achieved compared to the control system at the end of the operational period with no deterioration of effluent quality. The settleability of sludge in the OSA process was also found to be better than that of the control system in terms of sludge volume index. In long-term operation, capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration values confirmed that the OSA process showed good filterability characteristics. The results of batch experiments showed that higher endogenous respiration in the systems might lead to lower sludge production and that energy uncoupling had only a limited impact on sludge reduction. PMID:27191551

  14. Executive Dysfunction in OSA Before and After Treatment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Olaithe, Michelle; Bucks, Romola S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent and often underdiagnosed condition that is associated with upper airway collapse, oxygen desaturation, and sleep fragmentation leading to cognitive dysfunction. There is meta-analytic evidence that subdomains of attention and memory are affected by OSA. However, a thorough investigation of the impact of OSA on different subdomains of executive function is yet to be conducted. This report investigates the impact of OSA and its treatment, in adult patients, on 5 theorized subdomains of executive function. Design: An extensive literature search was conducted of published and unpublished materials, returning 35 studies that matched selection criteria. Meta-analysis was used to synthesize the results from studies examining the impact of OSA on executive functioning compared to controls (21 studies), and before and after treatment (19 studies); 5 studies met inclusion in both categories. Measurements: Research papers were selected which assessed 5 subdomains of executive function: Shifting, Updating, Inhibition, Generativity, and Fluid Reasoning. Results: All 5 domains of executive function demonstrated medium to very large impairments in OSA independent of age and disease severity. Furthermore, all subdomains of executive function demonstrated small to medium improvements with CPAP treatment. Discussion: Executive function is impaired across all five domains in OSA; these difficulties improved with CPAP treatment. Age and disease severity did not moderate the effects found; however, further studies are needed to explore the extent of primary and secondary effects, and the impact of age and premorbid intellectual ability (cognitive reserve). Citation: Olaithe M; Bucks RS. Executive dysfunction in OSA before and after treatment: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1297-1305. PMID:23997362

  15. Treatment outcomes of mandibular advancement devices in positional and non-positional OSA patients

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin Woo; Enciso, Reyes; Levendowski, Daniel J.; Morgan, Todd D.; Westbrook, Philip R.; Clark, Glenn T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate treatment outcome of mandibular advancement devices (MADs) for positional and non-positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Study design Forty-two positional (supine apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 2x’s lateral AHI) and 30 non-positional (supine AHI < 2x’s lateral AHI) OSA patients performed two-nights of sleep study before and after insertion of MADs. Results The decreases in apnea severity based on a reduction in the overall and supine AHI values after MADs therapy were significantly greater for the positional OSA than non-positional OSA group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that decrease in overall AHI was significantly associated with being in the positional group (standardized coefficient=0.505). Age, body mass index, gender, and time in supine position during sleep did not show significant associations with decrease in overall AHI after MAD therapy. Conclusion Our data suggest that MADs are more effective in positional OSA than non-positional OSA patients. PMID:20299246

  16. Prevalence, Treatment, and Outcomes Associated With OSA Among Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Mihaela S.; Johnson, Karin G.; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S.; Rothberg, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: OSA is associated with increased risks of respiratory complications following surgery. However, its relationship to the outcomes of hospitalized medical patients is unknown. Methods: We carried out a retrospective cohort study of patients with pneumonia at 347 US hospitals. We compared the characteristics, treatment, and risk of complications and mortality among patients with and without a diagnosis of OSA while adjusting for other patient and hospital factors. Results: Of the 250,907 patients studied, 15,569 (6.2%) had a diagnosis of OSA. Patients with OSA were younger (63 years vs 72 years), more likely to be men (53% vs 46%), more likely to be married (46% vs 38%), and had a higher prevalence of obesity (38% vs 6%), chronic pulmonary disease (68% vs 47%), and heart failure (28% vs 19%). Patients with OSA were more likely to receive invasive (18.1% vs 9.3%) and noninvasive (28.8% vs 6.8%) forms of ventilation upon hospital admission. After multivariable adjustment, OSA was associated with an increased risk of transfer to intensive care (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.42-1.68) and intubation (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.55-1.81) on or after the third hospital day, longer hospital stays (risk ratio [RR], 1.14; 95% CI, 1.13-1.15), and higher costs (RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.21-1.23) among survivors, but lower mortality (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98). Conclusion: Among patients hospitalized for pneumonia, OSA is associated with higher initial rates of mechanical ventilation, increased risk of clinical deterioration, and higher resource use, yet a modestly lower risk of inpatient mortality. PMID:24371839

  17. [Genetic predisposition to ischemic heart disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)].

    PubMed

    Bielicki, Piotr; Brzóska, Kamil; Pływaczewski, Robert; Barnaś, Małgorzata; Kumor, Marta; Stepkowski, Tomasz; Jończak, Luiza; Chazan, Ryszarda; Kruszewski, Marcin; Sliwiński, Paweł

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in patients with OSAS is estimated at around 20%. This greatly affect a common risk factors for both diseases: male gender, obesity, age and diabetes and hypertension. Attention is drawn to the possibility of genetic determinants of IHD. The aim of study was to answer the question whether the presence of polymorphisms of selected genes possibly related to IHD may be useful to isolate the group of patients with OSAS, especially vulnerable as a complication of IHD. Materials and methods. The study included 600 people with OSAS, which was isolated in patients with IHD (127 people). The remaining 473 individuals were observed as a control group. The polymorphism of three genes were evaluated to find possible influence on the occurrence of IHD or myocardial infarction as follows: SREBF1 (sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1), REBF2 (sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2) and HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor 1, alpha subunit). Results. Analysis of relationship between polymorphisms of selected genes and the diagnosis of IHD in the whole group of patients with OSAS showed a relationship only for the gene SREBF1 finding the lowest frequency of its occurrence in AA homozygotes (at 13.6%) and twice with GG homozygotes (26.1%). Conclusions. Rating polymorphisms studied genes did not reveal their relationship to the occurrence of IHD in patients with OSAS, both in the whole group as well as separate subgroups.

  18. OSAS-related inflammatory mechanisms of liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paschetta, Elena; Belci, Paola; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Cutrera, Renato; Musso, Giovanni; Nobili, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder, affecting over 4% of the general population, and is associated with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, independent of obesity and traditional risk factors. OSAS has been recently connected to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common chronic liver disease in the world, which can be found in 30% of the general adult population. Several studies suggest that the chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) of OSAS patients may per se trigger liver injury, inflammation, and fibrogenesis, promoting NAFLD development and the progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In NAFLD patients, liver disease may be caused by hypoxia both indirectly by promoting inflammation and insulin resistance and directly by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and metabolic dysregulation in liver cells. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms linking OSAS to NAFLD, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), YKL-40, unfolded protein response, and hypoxic adipose tissue inflammation, which all could provide novel potential therapeutic approaches for the management of NAFLD patients with OSAS. PMID:25873773

  19. Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with tonsil colonisation by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Viciani, Elisa; Montagnani, Francesca; Tavarini, Simona; Tordini, Giacinta; Maccari, Silvia; Morandi, Matteo; Faenzi, Elisa; Biagini, Cesare; Romano, Antonio; Salerni, Lorenzo; Finco, Oretta; Lazzi, Stefano; Ruggiero, Paolo; De Luca, Andrea; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Manetti, Andrea G. O.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of pathogenic bacteria in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) has yet to be elucidated. We investigated the possible role of group A streptococcus (GAS) in OSAS pathogenesis. In 40 tonsillectomized patients affected by OSAS and 80 healthy controls, significant (p < 0.0001) association of GAS with paediatric OSAS was found. Supernatant from streptolysin O (SLO)-producing GAS induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) in tonsil mononuclear cells (TMCs). CysLTs-treated TMCs showed significant (p < 0.05) proliferation of CD4+ T, CD19+ and CD19+CD27+CD38+ B lymphocytes. We discovered a SLO-dependent activation of CysLTs production through a pathway involving TOLL-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and p38 MAP Kinase. In conclusion, we hypothesise that GAS may contribute to paediatric tonsillar hyperplasia through CysLTs production induced by SLO, and this might explain its association with OSAS. PMID:26860261

  20. MR image analytics to characterize upper airway architecture in children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.; Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms leading to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) in obese children are not well understood. We previously analyzed polysomnographic and demographic data to study the anatomical characteristics of the upper airway and body composition in two groups of obese children with and without OSAS, where object volume was evaluated. In this paper, in order to better understand the disease we expand the analysis considering a variety of features that include object-specific features such as size, surface area, sphericity, and image intensity properties of fourteen objects in the vicinity of the upper airway, as well as inter-object relationships such as distance between objects. Our preliminary results indicate several interesting phenomena: volumes and surface areas of adenoid and tonsils increase statistically significantly in OSAS. Standardized T2-weighted MR image intensities differ statistically significantly between the two groups, implying that perhaps intrinsic tissue composition undergoes changes in OSAS. Inter-object distances are significantly different between the two groups for object pairs (skin, oropharynx), (skin, fat pad), (skin, soft palate), (mandible, tongue), (oropharynx, soft palate), (left tonsil, oropharynx), (left tonsil, fat pad) and (left tonsil, right tonsil). We conclude that treatment methods for OSAS such as adenotonsillectomy should respect proportional object size relationships and spatial arrangement of objects as they exist in control subjects.

  1. Italian recommendations on dental support in the treatment of adult obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Sacchi, Franco; Milano, Francesca; Polimeni, Antonella; Cozza, Paolo; Bernkopf, Edoardo; Segù, Marzia; Zucconi, Marco; Vicini, Claudio; Brunello, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of the present article is to present a set of proposed clinical recommendations aimed at Italian dentists involved in the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or snoring. Methods With the purpose of creating a study group, some of the most important Italian scientific societies operating in fields relevant to the issue of sleep medicine in dentistry were asked to appoint a representative. Each member of the study group was required to answer questions regarding the clinical management of OSAS and snoring. Results Oral appliances can be used to treat: - simple snoring, in patients who do not respond to, or do not appear to be suitable candidates for behavioral measures such as weight loss or positional therapy; - mild or moderate OSAS, in patients who prefer OAs to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or who are not suitable candidates for CPAP, because of its failure or failure of behavioral approaches like weight loss or positional therapy; - severe OSAS, in patients who do not respond to or do not tolerate CPAP and in whom no indication for either maxillofacial or ENT surgery appears applicable. Conclusions The application of oral appliances is highly desirable in cases of simple snoring or mild to moderate OSAS, whereas considerable caution is warranted when treating severe OSAS. It is fundamental to ensure that the patient understands his problem and, at the same time, to present all the various treatment options. PMID:26941893

  2. Genetic analysis of candidate SNPs for metabolic syndrome in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

    PubMed

    Grilo, Antonio; Ruiz-Granados, Elena S; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Rivera, Jose M; Ruiz, Agustin; Real, Luis M; Sáez, Maria E

    2013-05-25

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by the reduction or complete cessation in airflow resulting from an obstruction of the upper airway. Several studies have observed an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among OSA patients. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors characterized by the presence of insulin resistance, is often found in patients with OSA, but the complex interplay between these two syndromes is not well understood. In this study, we present the results of a genetic association analysis of 373 candidate SNPs for MetS selected in a previous genome wide association analysis (GWAS). The 384 selected SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina VeraCode Technology in 387 subjects retrospectively assessed at the Internal Medicine Unit of the "Virgen de Valme" University Hospital (Seville, Spain). In order to increase the power of this study and to validate our findings in an independent population, we used data from the Framingham Sleep Study which comprises 368 individuals. Only the rs11211631 polymorphism was associated with OSA in both populations, with an estimated OR=0.57 (0.42-0.79) in the joint analysis (p=7.21×10(-4)). This SNP was selected in the previous GWAS for MetS components using a digenic approach, but was not significant in the monogenic study. We have also identified two SNPs (rs2687855 and rs4299396) with a protective effect from OSA only in the subpopulation with abdominal obesity. As a whole, our study does not support the idea that OSA and MetS share major genetic determinants, although both syndromes share common epidemiological and clinical features. PMID:23524009

  3. Genetic analysis of candidate SNPs for metabolic syndrome in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Antonio; Ruiz-Granados, Elena S.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Rivera, Jose M.; Ruiz, Agustin; Real, Luis M.; Sáez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by the reduction or complete cessation in airflow resulting from an obstruction of the upper airway. Several studies have observed an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among OSA patients. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors characterized by the presence of insulin resistance, is often found in patients with OSA, but the complex interplay between these two syndromes is not well understood. In this study, we present the results of a genetic association analysis of 373 candidate SNPs for MetS selected in a previous genome wide association analysis (GWAS). The 384 selected SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina VeraCode Technology in 387 subjects retrospectively assessed at the Internal Medicine Unit of the “Virgen de Valme” University Hospital (Seville, Spain). In order to increase the power of this study and to validate our findings in an independent population, we used data from the Framingham Sleep study which comprises 368 individuals. Only the rs11211631 polymorphism was associated with OSA in both populations, with an estimated OR=0.57 (0.42-0.79) in the joint analysis (p=7.21 × 10-4). This SNP was selected in the previous GWAS for MetS components using a digenic approach, but was not significant in the monogenic study. We have also identified two SNPs (rs2687855 and rs4299396) with a protective effect from OSA only in the abdominal obese subpopulation. As a whole, our study does not support that OSA and MetS share major genetic determinants, although both syndromes share common epidemiological and clinical features. PMID:23524009

  4. Comparison of the effects of sleep deprivation, alcohol and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on simulated steering performance.

    PubMed

    Hack, M A; Choi, S J; Vijayapalan, P; Davies, R J; Stradling, J R

    2001-07-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are reported to have an increased risk of road traffic accidents. This study examines the nature of the impairment during simulated steering in patients with OSA, compared to normal subjects following either sleep deprivation or alcohol ingestion. Twenty-six patients with OSA and 12 normal subjects, either deprived of one night's sleep or following alcohol ingestion [mean (SD) alcohol blood level 71.6 mg dl(-1) (19.6)], performed a simulated steering task for a total of 90 min. Performance was measured using the tendency to wander (SD), deterioration across the task, number of 'off-road' events and the reaction time to peripheral events. Control data for OSA, sleep deprivation and alcohol were obtained following treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP), after a normal night of sleep, and following no alcohol, respectively. Patients with untreated OSA, and sleep-deprived or alcohol-intoxicated normal subjects performed significantly less well, compared to their respective controls (P<0.01 for all tests), with untreated OSA lying between that of alcohol intoxication and sleep deprivation. Alcohol impaired steering error equally throughout the whole drive, whilst sleep deprivation caused progressive deterioration through the drive, but not initially. Untreated OSA was more like sleep deprivation than alcohol, although there was a wide spread of data. This suggests that the driving impairment in patients with OSA is more compatible with sleep deprivation or fragmentation as the cause, rather than abnormal cognitive or motor skills.

  5. Is There a Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed

    Ekin, Selami; Turan, Mahfuz; Arısoy, Ahmet; Gunbatar, Hulya; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Asker, Selvi; Yıldız, Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 2-5%. Its main clinical features are loud snoring and breathing stoppage during sleep. Ischemia could be a consequence of noise-induced hearing loss because cochlear oxygen tension is reduced during and after noise exposure. In this study, we evaluated auditory function in patients affected by OSA and simple snoring. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 66 participants (male to female ratio: 40:26) were included in the study, of which 21 were in the control group, 18 were in the simple snoring group, and 27 were in the OSA patient group. Polysomnography and audiometric examination were performed in all participants. RESULTS The mean ages of the participants in the control, simple snoring, and OSA groups were 39.14±9.9, 37.28±8.2, and 41.56±8.99 years, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences among groups regarding age or sex; however, there were statistically significant differences among groups in body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index scores, mean saturation, and duration under 90% saturation. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the patient group and the control and simple snoring groups concerning the mean saturation, duration under 90% saturation, and the extended high frequency of hearing. CONCLUSIONS These data show that snoring may cause hearing loss at extended high frequencies. PMID:27588548

  6. Is There a Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Selami; Turan, Mahfuz; Arısoy, Ahmet; Gunbatar, Hulya; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Asker, Selvi; Yıldız, Hanifi

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 2–5%. Its main clinical features are loud snoring and breathing stoppage during sleep. Ischemia could be a consequence of noise-induced hearing loss because cochlear oxygen tension is reduced during and after noise exposure. In this study, we evaluated auditory function in patients affected by OSA and simple snoring. Material/Methods A total of 66 participants (male to female ratio: 40:26) were included in the study, of which 21 were in the control group, 18 were in the simple snoring group, and 27 were in the OSA patient group. Polysomnography and audiometric examination were performed in all participants. Results The mean ages of the participants in the control, simple snoring, and OSA groups were 39.14±9.9, 37.28±8.2, and 41.56±8.99 years, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences among groups regarding age or sex; however, there were statistically significant differences among groups in body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index scores, mean saturation, and duration under 90% saturation. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the patient group and the control and simple snoring groups concerning the mean saturation, duration under 90% saturation, and the extended high frequency of hearing. Conclusions These data show that snoring may cause hearing loss at extended high frequencies. PMID:27588548

  7. Cardiorespiratory Phase Synchronization in OSA subjects during wake and sleep states.

    PubMed

    Sola-Soler, Jordi; Giraldo, Beatriz F; Fiz, Jose A; Jane, Raimon

    2015-08-01

    Cardiorespiratory Phase Synchronization (CRPS) is a manifestation of coupling between cardiac and respiratory systems complementary to Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia. In this work, we investigated CRPS during wake and sleep stages in Polysomnographic (PSG) recordings of 30 subjects suspected from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The population was classified into three severity groups according to the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI): G1 (AHI<;15), G2 (15<;=AHI<;30) and G3 (AHI>30). The synchrogram between single lead ECG and respiratory abdominal band signals from PSG was computed with the Hilbert transform technique. The different phase locking ratios (PLR) m:n were monitored throughout the night. Ratio 4:1 was the most frequent and it became more dominant as OSA severity increased. CRPS was characterized by the percentage of synchronized time (%Sync) and the average duration of synchronized epochs (AvDurSync) using three different thresholds. Globally, we observed that %Sync significantly decreased and AvDurSync slightly increased with OSA severity. A high synchronization threshold enhanced these population differences. %Sync was significantly higher in NREM than in REM sleep in G2 and G3 groups. Population differences observed during sleep did not translate to the initial wake state. Reduced CRPS could be an early marker of OSA severity during sleep, but further studies are needed to determine whether CRPS is also present during wakefulness. PMID:26738078

  8. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  9. The USC-OSA Student Chapter: goals and benefits for the optics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Gargallo, Ana; González Núñez, Héctor; Delgado-García, Tamara; Almaguer-Gómez, Citlalli; Cambronero-López, F.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter has been constituted in March 2013 by members of the University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) in Spain and sponsored by The Optical Society of America (OSA). It is formed by five graduate and one undergraduate students with the common interest in Optics and Photonics research and a professor of the USC is also involved as a faculty advisor. We decided to start this group with the aim of involving kids, precollege and undergraduate students in the world of Optics and Photonics. The activities that the USC-OSA Student Chapter members intend to realize are mainly educational tasks for the spreading of knowledge in Photonics by means of basic experiments, demonstrations and lectures by leading researchers and teachers. Most of the needed resources to accomplish these activities are provided by the OSA, such as educational posters and a portable kit for demonstrating Optics to students. At this moment the USC-OSA Student Chapter is carrying out several activities, as educational journeys at the Santiago de Compostela University Hospital Complex (CHUS), where hospitalized children can approach to Optics through some simple experiments and games. A teaching program is also being organized in collaboration with Galician secondary schools in order to show students the importance and uses of Optics and Photonics and to arouse their interest in this field, as well as encouraging them to develop their scientific thinking. Another activity will take place in November during the Science Week, which includes a program of lectures targeted to undergraduate students and an exposition of several demonstrations

  10. Psychotic depression induced by Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS): a case reported.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Rey, María C; Sánchez-Muñoz, María; Gutiérrez-López, María I; Trujillo-Borrego, Alejandra; Sánchez-Bonome, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep disorder that is frequently associated with a large variety of conditions, such as hypertension, cardiovascular, neuropsychological or metabolic diseases. The most common and prominent symptoms of apnea is excessive diurnal drowsiness, as well asin addition to alterations of the memory and concentration, irritability, headache, and depression, among others. To date, no known studies have related OSAS with another type of more serious psychiatric disorder, such as psychotic symptoms. The case of a 51-year-old man who was diagnosed of SAOS after presenting psychotic and affective symptoms that did not respond to any medication is presentedreported. The treatment resulted in complete remission of the psychiatric symptoms mentioned.

  11. [Specific features of wounds with a self-defense traumatic weapon "Osa"].

    PubMed

    Khodov, A M; Zolotov, A S; Filipchenkov, L S

    2012-01-01

    Specific features and outcomes of wounds with a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" were analyzed in 24 patients. Mean age of the wounded was from 21 to76 years. In 20 patients there was a single wound, in 4 patients it was multiple, in 7--blunt, in 12--perforating and 5 patients had gutter wounds. All the patients were treated according to the principles of field military surgery. Five patients had severe wounds: penetrating fracture of the skull (2 of them died), fracture of the shoulder (1 case), injury of the main artery (1 case), of the pleura (1 case). The wounds were closed up by primary intention in 19 patients, by second intention in 4 patients. The authors' experience shows that a traumatic weapon of self-defense "Osa" rather often caused permanent harm to health and can be mortal. Active surgical strategy in treatment of such patients prevents the development of serious infectious complications.

  12. A 45-Year-Old Man With Delayed Onset of OSA Events During Polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-04-01

    A 45-year-old man with a medical history that included asthma and chronic nasal congestion presented for an evaluation of possible OSA. He reported loud snoring, witnessed apneas in sleep, and daytime sleepiness. The patient's score on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was 12 of 24, indicating excessive sleepiness. His nasal congestion had been treated with frequent use of an over-the-counter nasal decongestant.

  13. Expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty for the treatment of OSA: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kenny P; Pang, Edward B; Win, Ma Thin Mar; Pang, Kathleen A; Woodson, B Tucker

    2016-09-01

    This study seeks to determine the success rates of the expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty and its variants on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two independent searches of MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews to identify publications relevant to OSA and expansion pharyngoplasty. All relevant studies published before 31 March 2015 were included. Five studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The numbers of patients in each paper ranged from 10 to 85 (total = 155), and mean age ranged from 8 to 56 years. Substantial and consistent improvement in PSG outcomes were observed post-expansion pharyngoplasty patients, with or without multilevel surgery groups. The results showed that the expansion pharyngoplasty technique has significantly lower AHI than control group [Standardised mean difference -7.32, 95 %CI (-11.11, -3.52), p = 0.0002]; however, substantial heterogeneity between these studies were observed. The mean pre-operative AHI (in the five papers) improved from 40.0 ± 12.6 to 8.3 ± 5.2 post-operatively. The overall pro-rated pooled success rate for all the patients was 86.3 %. The expansion pharyngoplasty is effective in the management of patients with OSA.

  14. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment. PMID:26901714

  15. The impact of modified tongue base suspension on CPAP levels in patients with severe OSA.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Murat; Bostanci, Asli; Akdag, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of modified tongue base suspension (mTBS) procedure on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) levels in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). From November 2011 to December 2012, a total of 31 patients with severe OSA who underwent mTBS were included into this prospective case series with planned data collection. Prior to surgery, all the patients were subjected to a polysomnography (PSG) and CPAP titration on two separate nights. Following the surgery, patients were subjected to a control PSG and CPAP titration at the sixth month of follow-up period. The preoperative and postoperative mean apnea hypopnea index (AHI), CPAP titration values, AHI during CPAP use and amount of sleeping time with CPAP were compared. Median age was 48 years (range 31-66), and most patients were male (87.0 %). Postoperative mean AHI (44.73 ± 17.05 vs. 19.96 ± 19.52), optimal CPAP value (12.64 ± 1.60 vs. 8.00 ± 1.77) and AHI during CPAP use (3.79 ± 1.78 vs. 2.25 ± 1.81) were decreased, and the amount of sleeping time with CPAP (5.29 ± 0.84 vs. 6.52 ± 0.89) was increased significantly (p < 0.001 for all parameters). The surgery was considered to be successful when 50 % reduction in the mean AHI and/or the decrease of AHI below 20/h were obtained. A total of 24 patients (77.4 %) met the surgical success criteria. The mTBS is a safe and feasible procedure with favorable effects on CPAP levels in patients with severe OSA.

  16. Recognition of upper airway and surrounding structures at MRI in pediatric PCOS and OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is common in obese children with risk being 4.5 fold compared to normal control subjects. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has recently been shown to be associated with OSAS that may further lead to significant cardiovascular and neuro-cognitive deficits. We are investigating image-based biomarkers to understand the architectural and dynamic changes in the upper airway and the surrounding hard and soft tissue structures via MRI in obese teenage children to study OSAS. At the previous SPIE conferences, we presented methods underlying Fuzzy Object Models (FOMs) for Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) based on CT images of the thorax and the abdomen. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AAR approach is applicable to a different body region and image modality combination, namely in the study of upper airway structures via MRI. FOMs were built hierarchically, the smaller sub-objects forming the offspring of larger parent objects. FOMs encode the uncertainty and variability present in the form and relationships among the objects over a study population. Totally 11 basic objects (17 including composite) were modeled. Automatic recognition for the best pose of FOMs in a given image was implemented by using four methods - a one-shot method that does not require search, another three searching methods that include Fisher Linear Discriminate (FLD), a b-scale energy optimization strategy, and optimum threshold recognition method. In all, 30 multi-fold cross validation experiments based on 15 patient MRI data sets were carried out to assess the accuracy of recognition. The results indicate that the objects can be recognized with an average location error of less than 5 mm or 2-3 voxels. Then the iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was adopted for delineation of the target organs based on the recognized results. The delineation results showed an overall FP and TP volume fraction of 0.02 and 0.93.

  17. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  18. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Linda C.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity. PMID:25995345

  19. An automatic rules extraction approach to support OSA events detection in an mHealth system.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; De Falco, Ivanoe; De Pietro, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Detection and real time monitoring of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) episodes are very important tasks in healthcare. To suitably face them, this paper proposes an easy-to-use, cheap mobile-based approach relying on three steps. First, single-channel ECG data from a patient are collected by a wearable sensor and are recorded on a mobile device. Second, the automatic extraction of knowledge about that patient takes place offline, and a set of IF…THEN rules containing heart-rate variability (HRV) parameters is achieved. Third, these rules are used in our real-time mobile monitoring system: the same wearable sensor collects the single-channel ECG data and sends them to the same mobile device, which now processes those data online to compute HRV-related parameter values. If these values activate one of the rules found for that patient, an alarm is immediately produced. This approach has been tested on a literature database with 35 OSA patients. A comparison against five well-known classifiers has been carried out. PMID:25192565

  20. An automatic rules extraction approach to support OSA events detection in an mHealth system.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; De Falco, Ivanoe; De Pietro, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Detection and real time monitoring of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) episodes are very important tasks in healthcare. To suitably face them, this paper proposes an easy-to-use, cheap mobile-based approach relying on three steps. First, single-channel ECG data from a patient are collected by a wearable sensor and are recorded on a mobile device. Second, the automatic extraction of knowledge about that patient takes place offline, and a set of IF…THEN rules containing heart-rate variability (HRV) parameters is achieved. Third, these rules are used in our real-time mobile monitoring system: the same wearable sensor collects the single-channel ECG data and sends them to the same mobile device, which now processes those data online to compute HRV-related parameter values. If these values activate one of the rules found for that patient, an alarm is immediately produced. This approach has been tested on a literature database with 35 OSA patients. A comparison against five well-known classifiers has been carried out.

  1. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  2. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H+-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H+-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H+-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H+-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H+-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H+-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H+-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  3. OsWS1 involved in cuticular wax biosynthesis is regulated by osa-miR1848.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kuaifei; Ou, Xiaojin; Gao, Chunzhi; Tang, Huadan; Jia, Yongxia; Deng, Rufang; Xu, Xinlan; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-12-01

    Cuticular wax forms a hydrophobic layer covering aerial plant organs and acting as a protective barrier against biotic and abiotic stresses. Compared with well-known wax biosynthetic pathway, molecular regulation of wax biosynthesis is less known. Here, we show that rice OsWS1, a member of the membrane-bound O-acyl transferase gene family, involved in wax biosynthesis and was regulated by an osa-miR1848. OsWS1-tagged green fluorescent protein localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Compared with wild-type rice, OsWS1 overexpression plants displayed a 3% increase in total wax, especially a 35% increase in very long-chain fatty acids, denser wax papillae around the stoma, more cuticular wax crystals formed on leaf and stem surfaces, pollen coats were thicker and more seedlings survived after water-deficit treatment. In contrast, OsWS1-RNAi and osa-miR1848 overexpression plants exhibited opposing changes. Gene expression analysis showed that overexpression of osa-miR1848 down-regulated OsWS1 transcripts; furthermore, expression profiles of OsWS1 and osa-miR1848 were inversely correlated in the leaf, panicle and stem, and upon water-deficit treatment. These results suggest that OsWS1 is regulated by osa-miR1848 and participates in cuticular wax formation.

  4. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species.

  5. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2013-09-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors.

  6. Impact of CPAP on Activity Patterns and Diet in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    PubMed Central

    Batool-Anwar, Salma; Goodwin, James L.; Drescher, Amy A.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with severe OSA consume greater amounts of cholesterol, protein, and fat as well as have greater caloric expenditure. However, it is not known whether their activity levels or diet change after treatment with CPAP. To investigate this issue, serial assessments of activity and dietary intake were performed in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES); a 6-month randomized controlled study of CPAP vs. sham CPAP on neurocognitive outcomes. Methods: Subjects were recruited into APPLES at 5 sites through clinic encounters or public advertisement. After undergoing a diagnostic polysomnogram, subjects were randomized to CPAP or sham if their AHI was ≥ 10. Adherence was assessed using data cards from the devices. At the Tucson and Walla Walla sites, subjects were asked to complete validated activity and food frequency questionnaires at baseline and their 4-month visit. Results: Activity and diet data were available at baseline and after 4 months treatment with CPAP or sham in up to 231 subjects (117 CPAP, 114 Sham). Mean age, AHI, BMI, and Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) for this cohort were 55 ± 13 [SD] years, 44 ± 27 /h, 33 ± 7.8 kg/m2, and 10 ± 4, respectively. The participants lacking activity and diet data were younger, had lower AHI and arousal index, and had better sleep efficiency (p < 0.05). The BMI was higher among women in both CPAP and Sham groups. However, compared to women, men had higher AHI only in the CPAP group (50 vs. 34). Similarly, the arousal index was higher among men in CPAP group. Level of adherence defined as hours of device usage per night at 4 months was significantly higher among men in CPAP group (4.0 ± 2.9 vs. 2.6 ± 2.6). No changes in consumption of total calories, protein, carbohydrate or fat were noted after 4 months. Except for a modest increase in recreational activity in women (268 ± 85 vs. 170 ± 47 calories, p < 0.05), there also were no changes in activity patterns. Conclusion

  7. The effect of sex and age on the comorbidity burden of OSA: an observational analysis from a large nationwide US health claims database.

    PubMed

    Mokhlesi, Babak; Ham, Sandra A; Gozal, David

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition but studies exploring the burden of OSA-associated comorbidities have been limited by small sample sizes with underrepresentation of women.We queried the Truven Health MarketScan Research Databases 2003-2012, which is a collection of health insurance claims for working adults and retirees with employer-sponsored health insurance. Adults with a diagnostic code for OSA with at least 12 months of follow-up from the index date of OSA diagnosis were compared to a matched random sample. Comorbidities were assessed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, codes. A logistic regression model was constructed to test the independent association between OSA and comorbidities.Our cohort included 1,704,905 patients with OSA and 1,704,417 matched controls. All comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in OSA patients. Type 2 diabetes and ischaemic heart disease were more prevalent in men but hypertension and depression were more prevalent in women with OSA. In contrast, the sex differences in the prevalence of congestive heart failure, arrhythmias and stroke were less pronounced. The prevalence of comorbidities increased with age but the effect of age varied based on the specific comorbidity. The divergence between OSA and controls was more pronounced after the sixth decade of life for most cardiovascular diseases (i.e.heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, stroke and arrhythmias), while depression exhibited an opposite trend. In a fully adjusted model, the odds of all comorbidities were significantly increased in OSA patients.In a large, nationally representative sample of working and retired people, OSA is strongly associated with significant comorbidities in both men and women with unique sex differences emerging. PMID:26797029

  8. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  9. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  10. Landscape-Scale Controls on Aboveground Forest Carbon Stocks on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Philip; Asner, Gregory; Dahlin, Kyla; Anderson, Christopher; Knapp, David; Martin, Roberta; Mascaro, Joseph; Chazdon, Robin; Cole, Rebecca; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Malavassi, Edgar; Vilchez-Alvarado, Braulio; Townsend, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of carbon in tree biomass, although the environmental controls on forest carbon stocks remain poorly resolved. Emerging airborne remote sensing techniques offer a powerful approach to understand how aboveground carbon density (ACD) varies across tropical landscapes. In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system to detect top-of-canopy tree height (TCH) and ACD across the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. LiDAR and field-estimated TCH and ACD were highly correlated across a wide range of forest ages and types. Top-of-canopy height (TCH) reached 67 m, and ACD surpassed 225 Mg C ha-1, indicating both that airborne CAO LiDAR-based estimates of ACD are accurate in tall, high-biomass forests and that the Osa Peninsula harbors some of the most carbon-rich forests in the Neotropics. We also examined the relative influence of lithologic, topoedaphic and climatic factors on regional patterns in ACD, which are known to influence ACD by regulating forest productivity and turnover. Analyses revealed a spatially nested set of factors controlling ACD patterns, with geologic variation explaining up to 16% of the mapped ACD variation at the regional scale, while local variation in topographic slope explained an additional 18%. Lithologic and topoedaphic factors also explained more ACD variation at 30-m than at 100-m spatial resolution, suggesting that environmental filtering depends on the spatial scale of terrain variation. Our result indicate that patterns in ACD are partially controlled by spatial variation in geologic history and geomorphic processes underpinning topographic diversity across landscapes. ACD also exhibited spatial autocorrelation, which may reflect biological processes that influence ACD, such as the assembly of species or phenotypes across the landscape, but additional research is needed to resolve how abiotic and biotic factors contribute to ACD

  11. Performance of a color-difference formula based on OSA-UCS space using small-medium color differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, Rafael; Melgosa, Manuel; Oleari, Claudio

    2006-09-01

    An investigation of the color metrics and the complexity of the CIEDE2000 formula shows that CIELAB space is inadequate to represent small-medium color differences. The OSA-UCS (Uniform Color Space) Committee has shown that no space with uniform scale for large color differences exists. Therefore the practical way for color-difference specification is a color-difference formula in a nonuniform space. First, the BFD (Bradford University) ellipses are considered in the OSA-UCS space, and their very high regularity suggests a new and very simple color-difference formula at constant luminance. Then the COM (combined) data set used for the development of the CIEDE2000 formula is considered in the OSA-UCS space, and the color-difference formula is extended to sample pairs with a different luminance factor. The value of the performance factor PF/3 for the proposed OSA-UCS-based formula shows that the formula performs like the more complex CIEDE2000 formula for small-medium color differences.

  12. Improved stability and controlled release of CLA with spray-dried microcapsules of OSA-modified starch and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    He, Huizi; Hong, Yan; Gu, Zhengbiao; Liu, Guodong; Cheng, Li; Li, Zhaofeng

    2016-08-20

    The objective of this investigation was to improve the stability of CLA and to allow for its controlled release by encapsulating it with combinations of octenyl-succinic anhydride (OSA) starch and xanthan gum (XG) in three ratios (OSA/XG: 60/1, 80/1, and 100/1, w/w). The wall material was examined using FTIR and TGA. The microcapsules were characterized by laser particle size analysis (LPS) and SEM. Oxidation of the microcapsules was monitored by headspace method. The results revealed that microcapsules created with an OSA/XG ratio of 60/1 provided superior protection to CLA against oxidation. When CLA-microcapsules were subjected to conditions simulating those in the human gastrointestinal system, 12.1%-50.1% of the CLA was released. CLA encapsulation in spray-dried microcapsules of OSA/XG appears to be an effective technique that provides good protection against oxidation and could be useful in the targeted delivery of functional lipids or other bioactive components to the small intestine. PMID:27178930

  13. CPAP Treatment Supported by Telemedicine Does Not Improve Blood Pressure in High Cardiovascular Risk OSA Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, Monique; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Tamisier, Renaud; Laplaud, David; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Laurent; Koltes, Christian; Chavez, Léonidas; De Lamberterie, Gilles; Herengt, Frédéric; Levy, Patrick; Flore, Patrice; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with hypertension, which is one of the intermediary mechanisms leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of a combination of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and telemedicine support on blood pressure (BP) reduction in high cardiovascular risk OSA patients. Design: A multi-center randomized controlled trial that compared standard CPAP care and CPAP care and a telemedicine intervention. Setting: Sleep clinics in France. Patients or Participants: 107 adult (18-65 years old) OSA patients (AHI > 15 events/h) with a high cardiovascular risk (cardiovascular SCORE > 5% or secondary prevention). Interventions: Patients were randomized to either standard care CPAP (n = 53) or CPAP and telemedicine (n = 54). Patients assigned to telemedicine were equipped with a smartphone for uploading BP measurements, CPAP adherence, sleepiness, and quality of life data; in return, they received pictograms containing health-related messages. Measurements: The main outcome was home self-measured BP and secondary outcomes were cardiovascular risk evolution, objective physical activity, CPAP adherence, sleepiness and quality of life. Results: Self-measured BP did not improve in either group (telemedicine or standard care). Patients in primary prevention showed greater BP reduction with CPAP treatment than those in secondary prevention. Conclusions: CPAP treatment supported by telemedicine alone did not improve blood pressure and cardiovascular risk in high cardiovascular risk OSA patients. This study emphasizes the need for diet and physical activity training programs in addition to CPAP when aiming at decreasing cardiometabolic risk factors in these patients. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01226641. Citation: Mendelson M, Vivodtzev I, Tamisier R, Laplaud D, Dias-Domingos S, Baguet JP, Moreau L, Koltes C, Chavez L, De Lamberterie G

  14. Phenolic compounds of 'Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa' olive oils along early ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Peres, Fátima; Martins, Luisa L; Mourato, Miguel; Vitorino, Conceição; Antunes, Paulo; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the lipophilic and hydrophilic phenol composition of virgin olive oils (VOO) obtained from olives from two of the most important Portuguese cultivars ('Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa'), harvested at different ripening stages and under two irrigation schemes (rain fed and irrigated), was evaluated. Phenolic alcohols (hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol), phenolic acids and derivatives and flavonoids (luteolin and apigenin), as well as tocopherols were quantified. Lipophilic (>300mgkg(-1)) and hydrophilic phenols (>600mgkg(-1)) were present in high contents in both VOO, for early ripening stages. Gamma-tocopherol content is higher in 'Galega Vulgar' VOO. Total phenols showed a decrease between ripening index 2.5 and 3.5. The dialdehydic form of elenolic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA), also known as oleacein, was the major phenolic compound identified in both oils. The concentration of free hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol in both VOO is very low while their esterified derivatives, like 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and p-HPEA-EDA, are much more abundant. PMID:27283606

  15. Phenolic compounds of 'Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa' olive oils along early ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Peres, Fátima; Martins, Luisa L; Mourato, Miguel; Vitorino, Conceição; Antunes, Paulo; Ferreira-Dias, Suzana

    2016-11-15

    In this study, the lipophilic and hydrophilic phenol composition of virgin olive oils (VOO) obtained from olives from two of the most important Portuguese cultivars ('Galega Vulgar' and 'Cobrançosa'), harvested at different ripening stages and under two irrigation schemes (rain fed and irrigated), was evaluated. Phenolic alcohols (hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol), phenolic acids and derivatives and flavonoids (luteolin and apigenin), as well as tocopherols were quantified. Lipophilic (>300mgkg(-1)) and hydrophilic phenols (>600mgkg(-1)) were present in high contents in both VOO, for early ripening stages. Gamma-tocopherol content is higher in 'Galega Vulgar' VOO. Total phenols showed a decrease between ripening index 2.5 and 3.5. The dialdehydic form of elenolic acid linked to hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA), also known as oleacein, was the major phenolic compound identified in both oils. The concentration of free hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol in both VOO is very low while their esterified derivatives, like 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and p-HPEA-EDA, are much more abundant.

  16. Topographic Distributions of Emergent Trees in Tropical Forests of the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzotti, C.; Asner, G. P.; Taylor, P.; Cole, R. J.; Osborne, B. B.; Cleveland, C. C.; Porder, S.; Townsend, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests are reservoirs of terrestrial carbon and biodiversity. Large and often emergent trees store disproportionately large amounts of aboveground carbon and greatly influence the structure and functioning of tropical rainforests. Despite their importance, controls on the abundance and distribution of emergent trees are largely unknown across tropical landscapes. Conventional field approaches are limited in their ability to characterize patterns in emergent trees across vast landscapes with varying environmental conditions and floristic composition. Here we used a high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor, aboard the Carnegie Airborne Observatory Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System (CAO-AToMS), to examine the abundance and distribution of tall emergent tree canopies (ETC) relative to surrounding tree canopies (STC), across the Osa Peninsula, a geologically and topographically diverse region of Costa Rica. The abundance of ETC was clearly influenced by fine-scale topographic variation, with distribution patterns that held across a variety of geologic substrates. Specifically, the density of ETC was much greater on lower slopes and in valleys, compared to upper slopes and ridges. Furthermore, using the CAO high-fidelity imaging spectrometer, ETC had a different spectral signature than that of the STC. Most notably, ETC had lower foliar N than STC, which was verified with an independent field survey of canopy leaf chemistry. The underlying mechanisms to explain the topographic-dependence of ETCs and linkages to canopy N are unknown, and remain an important area of research.

  17. Program for catenary-pantograph analysis, PrOSA statement of methods and validation according EN 50318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finner, Lars; Poetsch, Gero; Sarnes, Bernhard; Kolbe, Michael

    2015-03-01

    DB Systemtechnik is a high-performing, customer-driven service provider that, as well as authoritatively serving the Deutsche Bahn Group by dint of its specialist knowledge is also increasingly active on the global railway market. Development and testing of pantograph models and catenary systems have been part of the company's essential activity fields from the beginning. Therefore, an efficient and high-performing simulation tool is indispensable. That is why DB Systemtechnik spent high efforts to develop the program PrOSA in cooperation with the Heinz-Nixdorf-Institut (HNI) of the university Paderborn to simulate the interaction of pantograph and catenary. This article gives an overview of the most relevant properties of PrOSA. Furthermore, it is described how the benchmark requirements were implemented and processed.

  18. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was -14.78 events/hr [95% CI -19.12, -10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD -2.5 [95% CI -3.2, -1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  19. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  20. Fatigue, Tiredness, and Lack of Energy Improve with Treatment for OSA

    PubMed Central

    Chotinaiwattarakul, Wattanachai; O'Brien, Louise M.; Fan, Ludi; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Many patients with obstructive sleep apnea complain of fatigue, tiredness, or lack of energy in addition to sleepiness, or instead of sleepiness. We explored whether self-defined fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy improve, like sleepiness, after treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP). Methods: We conducted a prospective survey of adults referred to a University-based sleep disorders center and confirmed to have obstructive sleep apnea on polysomnography. Surveys were mailed to 1539 patients 6 months to 3 years after they were prescribed PAP for home use. Results: Participants (n = 313) included 183 who reported using PAP ≥ 5 hours per night, 96 who were considered inadequately treated because they had no active treatment or used PAP < 5 hours per night, and 34 treated by surgery or other means and therefore excluded from subsequent analysis. At follow-up in comparison to baseline, subjects adherent to PAP reported less fatigue, tiredness, lack of energy, and sleepiness (p < 0.05 for each). Improvement of each symptom except for lack of energy was significantly better (p < 0.05) among PAP-adherent subjects than among inadequately treated subjects. Conclusions: Patients' complaints of fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy, like sleepiness, can improve substantially with good adherence to PAP for obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, patients who prefer a range of common, related terms other than sleepiness to describe their problem may benefit from investigation and treatment for any underlying sleep-disordered breathing. Citation: Chotinaiwattarakul W; O'Brien LM; Fan L; Chervin RD. Fatigue, tiredness, and lack of energy improve with treatment for OSA. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):240-245. PMID:19960642

  1. Automatic anatomy recognition in post-tonsillectomy MR images of obese children with OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2015-03-01

    Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) is a recently developed approach for the automatic whole body wide organ segmentation. We previously tested that methodology on image cases with some pathology where the organs were not distorted significantly. In this paper, we present an advancement of AAR to handle organs which may have been modified or resected by surgical intervention. We focus on MRI of the neck in pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). The proposed method consists of an AAR step followed by support vector machine techniques to detect the presence/absence of organs. The AAR step employs a hierarchical organization of the organs for model building. For each organ, a fuzzy model over a population is built. The model of the body region is then described in terms of the fuzzy models and a host of other descriptors which include parent to offspring relationship estimated over the population. Organs are recognized following the organ hierarchy by using an optimal threshold based search. The SVM step subsequently checks for evidence of the presence of organs. Experimental results show that AAR techniques can be combined with machine learning strategies within the AAR recognition framework for good performance in recognizing missing organs, in our case missing tonsils in post-tonsillectomy images as well as in simulating tonsillectomy images. The previous recognition performance is maintained achieving an organ localization accuracy of within 1 voxel when the organ is actually not removed. To our knowledge, no methods have been reported to date for handling significantly deformed or missing organs, especially in neck MRI.

  2. [Nutritional status and associated factors among the elderly in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Clarissa de Matos; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Cotta, Rosângela Minardi Mitre; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study in 2009 focused on the prevalence of underweight and overweight and associated factors in a sample of 621 elderly individuals in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Data were obtained through home interviews on nutritional status and socio-demographic and health conditions. Of the total sample, 53.3% were females. Median BMI was 26.40 kg/m² (range = 15.20-46.82) and was lower for men than for women. Prevalence of overweight was high (45%; 95%CI: 40%-49%), decreased with age, was positively associated with female gender and history of arthritis/arthrosis, and was negatively associated with age 80 years or older and smoking. Prevalence of underweight was high in men (18.2%), increased with age, and was positively associated with worse self-rated health. The findings highlight the importance of health strategies that favor lifestyle changes and healthy eating habits.

  3. PREVALENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH VITAMIN B12 DEFICIENCY IN ELDERLY FROM VIÇOSA/MG, BRASIL.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Martinho, Karina; Luiz Araújo Tinôco, Adelson; Queiroz Ribeiro, Andréia

    2015-11-01

    La prevalencia de deficiencia nutricional de vitamina B12 aumenta con la edad y es especialmente común en la población mayor. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en determinar su prevalencia y los factores asociados a esta carencia en mayores no institucionalizados de Viçosa, Estado de Minas Gerais, Brasil. Métodos: estudio poblacional interseccional, realizado para identificar la prevalencia y los factores asociados a deficiencia de vitamina B12 entre la población de mayores en Viçosa (MG). Los datos fueron recopilados desde agosto de 2011 hasta junio de 2012 mediante una encuesta en los hogares y pruebas hematológicas y bioquímicas realizadas en 340 mayores. Resultados: la prevalencia de deficiencia de vitamina B12 en este grupo fue del 17,4% (95% CI, 13,4% - 21,4%). La deficiencia cognitiva se presenta como un factor importante relacionado con la deficiencia de vitamina B12. Conclusiones: el informe actual contribuye a los estudios que destacan ciertos factores que podrían afectar al rendimiento de las personas mayores en su proceso de envejecimiento natural, especialmente cuando estos factores están asociados con deficiencia cognitiva y dan lugar a una discapacidad significativa así como pérdida de calidad de vida. Así, los resultados aquí presentados han servido para aportar un conocimiento más comprensivo sobre la relación entre deficiencia de B12 y su impacto sobre este grupo de población. También han demostrado su relevancia de cara a la planificación de programas e iniciativas de salud pública centrados en este grupo de población.

  4. Osa protein constitutes a strong oncogenic suppression system that can block vir-dependent transfer of IncQ plasmids between Agrobacterium cells and the establishment of IncQ plasmids in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2004-11-01

    The osa (oncogenic suppressive activity) gene of the IncW group plasmid pSa is sufficient to suppress tumorigenesis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. osa confers oncogenic suppression by inhibiting VirE2 protein export. This result is similar, but not identical, to that of oncogenic suppression by the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. We conducted a series of experiments to compare oncogenic suppression by these two systems. Agrobacterium strains harboring plasmids containing osa are more able to effect oncogenic suppression than are similar strains containing various RSF1010 derivatives. When osa is present within a donor Agrobacterium strain that also carries a derivative of RSF1010, the transfer of RSF1010 derivatives to recipient bacteria and their establishment in plants are blocked. Oncogenic suppression is still effected when the osa gene is integrated into the Agrobacterium chromosome, suggesting that it is the osa gene product that is active in suppression and that suppression does not require a protein-nucleic acid intermediate like that described for IncQ plasmids. Extracellular complementation experiments with tobacco leaf disks indicated that Osa blocks stable transfer of RSF1010 to plant cells by inhibiting transfer of VirE2, which is essential for the transfer of RSF1010 into plant cells, and not by inhibiting the actual transfer of RSF1010 itself. Our results suggest that Osa and RSF1010 cause oncogenic suppression by using different mechanisms. PMID:15489437

  5. Two new species of genus Joruma McAtee (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luci Boa Nova; Da-Silva, Elidiomar Ribeiro; Ferreira, Paulo Sérgio Fiuza

    2016-01-01

    Joruma abernardesi sp.nov. and Joruma phrolfsi sp.nov. (Typhlocybinae: Jorumini) are described based on specimens from Mata do Paraíso, an Atlantic Forest reserve located at Viçosa municipality. This is the first record of the genus Joruma McAtee in Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil.

  6. Two new species of genus Joruma McAtee (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luci Boa Nova; Da-Silva, Elidiomar Ribeiro; Ferreira, Paulo Sérgio Fiuza

    2016-01-01

    Joruma abernardesi sp.nov. and Joruma phrolfsi sp.nov. (Typhlocybinae: Jorumini) are described based on specimens from Mata do Paraíso, an Atlantic Forest reserve located at Viçosa municipality. This is the first record of the genus Joruma McAtee in Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. PMID:27615975

  7. Hydrogeological and Seismic Responses to Incoming Materials at the Non-Accreting Margin, Offshore the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. N.; Kameda, J.; Shimizu, M.; Ujiie, K.; Tsutsumi, A.; Ikehara, M.; Uno, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Hamada, Y.; Namiki, Y.; Kimura, G.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between temperature and the updip limit of seismicity has been demonstrated for accretionary margins where the incoming sediment is thick relative to basement relief (e.g., Oleskevich et al., JGR 1999). Here we show an example offshore the Osa Peninsula where this relationship does not appear to hold. At this non-accreting margin, the incoming sediment thickness is thin and the basement relief is substantial. The MW 6.4, 16 June 2002, Osa, Costa Rica earthquake occurred along the plate interface, 25 km landward of the trench at a depth of approximately 5-10 km (Arroyo et al., G3, 2014). Two-dimensional thermal models indicate that the temperature at this position is approximately 70-90° C (Harris et al., G3, 2010), and is cooler than the reported correlation between temperature and the updip limit of seismicity. We estimate the incoming fluid budget based on the 100 m section from the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project reference site (IODP Exp. 334 Site U1381) using porosity and bulk mineral assemblage based on X-ray diffraction analysis of core samples. The porosity (76%) combined with the water content in smectite (~40 vol.%) and biogenic silica (~24 vol.%), leads to a total sedimentary water influx estimate of 6.9 m3/yr per m of trench length. The dehydration source term is calculated with respect to silica diagenesis and clay diagenesis using the thermal model. Peak mineral dehydration occurs at temperatures of approximately ~100 °C, 40-30 km landward of the trench and 5-10 km landward of the shallowest seismicity (Arroyo et al., G3, 2014). These results suggest that in this region the presence of subducting bathymetric relief may be more important in influencing the updip extent of seismicity than the thermal regime. This interpretation is consistent with the observed patchy seismicity (Bilek et al. Geology, 2003) and emphasizes the importance of frictional heterogeneities along the subduction thrust (Bilek and Lay, GRL, 2002).

  8. An adaptive detector of genioglossus EMG reflex using Berkner transform for time latency measurement in OSA pathophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Guméry, Pierre Yves; Roux-Buisson, Hervé; Meignen, Sylvain; Comyn, François Louis; Dematteis, Maurice; Wuyam, Bernard; Pépin, Jean Louis; Lévy, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    To investigate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome mechanisms, we developed a device to measure the surface electromyogram (EMG) time latency reflex of the genioglossus muscle stimulated by time and amplitude calibrated negative pharyngeal pressure drops. The reflex signals were found to be disturbed by transient signals that generate false alarms. Thus, to reduce false alarm occurrences we designed an adaptive multiscale method. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is widely used in biomedical signal event detection processes. The Berkner transform is an approximation of a CWT that is based on a hierarchical scheme similar to discrete wavelet transform. We used the Berkner transform to build a multiscale detector because it offers the possibility of maxima coefficients linkage that leads to good accuracy in reflex onset localization. As a contribution to this novel approach we used a reconstruction formula to develop an adaptive method for scale range determination in our surface EMG reflex detector. Finally, we characterized our detector in terms of accuracy and robustness, first on synthesized signals and second, on signals acquired on apneic patients and healthy subjects. Preliminary results showed a significant difference (p < 0.01) between the two populations regarding the genioglossus muscle mean latency time. These physiological findings may partly explain why the upper airway protective reflex occurring when a negative pressure is applied to the upper airway is ineffective in OSA patients, leading to pharyngeal collapse.

  9. Rice microRNA osa-miR1848 targets the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene OsCYP51G3 and mediates the biosynthesis of phytosterols and brassinosteroids during development and in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kuaifei; Ou, Xiaojing; Tang, Huadan; Wang, Ren; Wu, Ping; Jia, Yongxia; Wei, Xiaoyi; Xu, Xinlan; Kang, Seung-Hye; Kim, Seong-Ki; Zhang, Mingyong

    2015-11-01

    Phytosterols are membrane components or precursors for brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis. As they cannot be transported long distances, their homeostasis is tightly controlled through their biosynthesis and metabolism. However, it is unknown whether microRNAs are involved in their homeostatic regulation. Rice (Oryza sativa) plants transformed with microRNA osa-miR1848 and its target, the obtusifoliol 14α-demethylase gene, OsCYP51G3, were used to investigate the role of osa-miR1848 in the regulation of phytosterol biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 directs OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage to regulate phytosterol and BR biosynthesis in rice. The role of OsCYP51G3 as one of the osa-miR1848 targets is supported by the opposite expression patterns of osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 in transgenic rice plants, and by the identification of OsCYP51G3 mRNA cleavage sites. Increased osa-miR1848 and decreased OsCYP51G3 expression reduced phytosterol and BR concentrations, and caused typical phenotypic changes related to phytosterol and BR deficiency, including dwarf plants, erect leaves, semi-sterile pollen grains, and shorter cells. Circadian expression of osa-miR1848 regulated the diurnal abundance of OsCYP51G3 transcript in developing organs, and the response of OsCYP51G3 to salt stress. We propose that osa-miR1848 regulates OsCYP51G3 expression posttranscriptionally, and mediates phytosterol and BR biosynthesis. osa-miR1848 and OsCYP51G3 might have potential applications in rice breeding to modulate leaf angle, and the size and quality of seeds.

  10. Upper Plate Deformation in Response to Aseismic Ridge Subduction along a Convergent Margin - the Piano Player Model: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, T. W.; Fisher, D. M.; Morell, K. D.; Cupper, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Osa Peninsula, an outer forearc high ~20 km inboard of the Middle America Trench, is deforming in response to short wavelength variations in the bathymetry on the subducting aseismic Cocos Ridge, an elongate region of thickened crust ( up to 40% thicker) created by motion of the Cocos plate across the Galapagos Hotspot. Plate convergence is nearly orthogonal to the trench at ~90 mm/yr and the plate interface occurs at a depth ~5 km under the peninsula. Relief on the Cocos Ridge locally exceeds 1 km with the dominant topography expressed as two nearly parallel, but locally offset ridges separated by an axial graben. The strike of these features is sub-parallel to the convergence vector. Modern topography of the Osa Peninsula, elevation of the basement rocks (Early to Middle Tertiary Osa Mélange), elevations of late Quaternary marine deposits, and distribution of late Quaternary deformation rates directly mirror the bathymetry on the Cocos Ridge just outboard of the MAT. New geologic mapping, radiometric dating and fission track analysis constrain distribution and rates of deformation on the Osa Peninsula. The Osa Peninsula is fragmented into a complex set of blocks that vary in size from several kms on a side to <10 kms on a side. These blocks, which closely match the size, distribution and shape of bathymetric features on the incoming Cocos Ridge, are bounded by trench parallel and trench perpendicular, high angle, normal and reverse faults that extend to the plate interface, allowing for grossly different deformation histories over short distances. Fission track analyses of 4 sandstone samples from the Osa Mélange suggest that the basement rocks reached maximum burial temperatures of 60-80 ° C indicating burial depths of ~3-4 kms assuming a reasonable geothermal gradient of ~20 °/km. This suggests a very thin margin wedge prior to late Neogene unroofing. Rates of late Quaternary deformation are constrained by over 30 radiocarbon and 5 Optically Stimulated

  11. The geology, geochemistry and emplacement of the Cretaceous—Tertiary ophiolitic Nicoya Complex of the Osa Peninsula, southern Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrangé, J. P.; Thorpe, R. S.

    1988-04-01

    The Nicoya Complex of the Osa Peninsula is essentially an obducted segment of oceanic crust comprising basaltic lavas and associated intrusive dolerite and gabbro, interstratified with lesser amounts of pelagic limestones, cherts and argillites. The sediments contain a minor clastic component and were deposited on an ocean floor of considerable relief and distant from a major landmass. The extrusive and intrusive basaltic rocks have geochemical affinities to large ion lithophile (LIL) element-enriched oceanic crust, and are interpreted to have formed in a back-arc basin analagous to the Mariana Trough, Lau Basin or Gulf of California. One sample has distinctly different geochemical characteristics and may represent a younger within-plate seamount. In the Late Cretaceous, an E-W-trending intra-oceanic trench/volcanic/back-arc system developed in association with an active southward-dipping subduction zone located south of the present-day southern Central American isthmus. Pelagic sediments and basaltic lavas accumulated in the back-arc over a period of at least 34 Ma spanning the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary. During this period there were three major volcanic events dated respectively as Santonian-Campanian (78.0 ± 2 Ma), Palaeocene (60.2 ± 7.6 Ma) and Middle Eocene (44.0 ± 4.4 Ma). Continuing northward movement of the southern plate caused overthrusting of the volcanic arc onto the northern plate and production of a thickened embryonic continental crust. Inferred reorganization of crustal stress in the Late Eocene caused fragmentation of the single ancestral plate into the Caribbean and "East Pacific" plates, with a flipping of the subduction zone accompanying development of the NE-dipping Middle America subduction zone and andesitic volcanism. During the Oligocene, the ancestral East Pacific plate split into the NE-moving Cocos plate and the eastward-moving Nazca plate, separated by the E-W-trending Colón spreading ridge and a series of N

  12. In patients with minimally symptomatic OSA can baseline characteristics and early patterns of CPAP usage predict those who are likely to be longer-term users of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Bratton, Daniel J.; Craig, Sonya E.; Kohler, Malcolm; Stradling, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) usage varies between individuals. It would be of value to be able to identify those who are likely to benefit from CPAP (and use it long term), versus those who would not, and might therefore benefit from additional help early on. First, we explored whether baseline characteristics predicted CPAP usage in minimally symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients, a group who would be expected to have low usage. Second, we explored if early CPAP usage was predictive of longer-term usage, as has been shown in more symptomatic OSA patients. Methods The MOSAIC trial was a multi-centre randomised controlled trial where minimally symptomatic OSA patients were randomised to CPAP, or standard care, for 6 months. Here we have studied only those patients randomised to CPAP treatment. Baseline characteristics including symptoms, questionnaires [including the Epworth sleepiness score (ESS)] and sleep study parameters were recorded. CPAP usage was recorded at 2–4 weeks after initiation and after 6 months. The correlation and association between baseline characteristics and 6 months CPAP usage was assessed, as was the correlation between 2 and 4 weeks CPAP usage and 6 months CPAP usage. Results One hundred and ninety-five patients randomised to CPAP therapy had median [interquartile range (IQR)] CPAP usage of 2:49 (0:44, 5:13) h:min/night (h/n) at the 2–4 weeks visit, and 2:17 (0:08, 4:54) h/n at the 6 months follow-up visit. Only male gender was associated with increased long-term CPAP use (male usage 2:56 h/n, female 1:57 h/n; P=0.02). There was a moderate correlation between the usage of CPAP at 2–4 weeks and 6 months, with about 50% of the variability in long-term use being predicted by the short-term use. Conclusions In patients with minimally symptomatic OSA, our study has shown that male gender (and not OSA severity or symptom burden) is associated with increased long-term use of CPAP at 6 months

  13. LIPID PROFILE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE, ATTENDED AT THE FAMILY HEALTH STRATEGY, VIÇOSA/MG.

    PubMed

    Danésio de Souza, Jacqueline; Queiroz Ribeiro, Andréia; Oliveira Martinho, Karina; Silva Franco, Fernanda; Vidal Martins, Marcos; Gonçalves Rodrigues, Meirele; Wick, Jeannette Y; Araújo Tinôco, Adelson Luiz

    2015-08-01

    Introducción: el envejecimiento de la población ha ido acompañado de cambios epidemiológicos de la población brasileña, destacando el crecimiento continuo de la prevalencia de enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles, especialmente cardiovasculares o de la arteria coronaria, como resultado de los cambios en el perfil lipídico de las personas mayores. Objetivo: describir las variables antropométricas, estilo de vida y composición corporal como factores de comportamiento y su asociación con los cambios en el perfil lipídico de las personas de edad avanzada. Metodología: la muestra incluyó a 402 participantes que asistieron a la Estrategia Salud de la Familia, Viçosa (MG), a los que se aplicó un cuestionario con información socio-demográfica, de comportamiento y de estilo de vida. Se recogió una muestra de sangre para obtener las fracciones de lípidos, y se midió el porcentaje de peso, talla, circunferencia de la cintura y grasa corporal. La regresión lineal múltiple se realizó para identificar factores independientemente asociados con los cambios en cada una de las fracciones de lípidos seleccionados. Resultado: los factores asociados de forma independiente con un aumento de los niveles de colesterol total fueron la presencia de conducta sedentaria, un porcentaje de grasa corporal alto, mayor altura de la cintura y una mayor circunferencia de la cintura. El consumo de bebidas alcohólicas y una proporción cintura-cadera más alta se mantuvo asociado de forma independiente con la disminución de los niveles de lipoproteínas de alta densidad. El aumento de la circunferencia de la cintura se asoció de forma independiente con valores bajos de los niveles de lipoproteínas de baja densidad. El valor del aumento de triglicéridos se asocia de forma independiente con una mayor relación cintura-cadera, un mayor índice de masa corporal y tabaquismo. Conclusión: los factores de riesgo modificables asociados con un perfil lipídico cambiado deben

  14. Olive Volatiles from Portuguese Cultivars Cobrançosa, Madural and Verdeal Transmontana: Role in Oviposition Preference of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Malheiro, Ricardo; Casal, Susana; Cunha, Sara C.; Baptista, Paula; Pereira, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The olive fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), a serious threat to the olive crop worldwide, displays ovipositon preference for some olive cultivars but the causes are still unclear. In the present work, three Portuguese olive cultivars with different susceptibilities to olive fly (Cobrançosa, Madural, and Verdeal Transmontana) were studied, aiming to determine if the olive volatiles are implicated in this interaction. Olive volatiles were assessed by SPME-GC-MS in the three cultivars during maturation process to observe possible correlations with olive fly infestation levels. Overall, 34 volatiles were identified in the olives, from 7 chemical classes (alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, sesquiterpenes, and terpenes). Generally, total volatile amounts decrease during maturation but toluene, the main compound, increased in all cultivars, particularly in those with higher susceptibility to olive fly. Sesquiterpenes also raised, mainly α-copaene. Toluene and α-copaene, recognized oviposition promoters to olive fly, were correlated with the infestation level of cvs. Madural and Verdeal Trasnmontana (intermediate and highly susceptible cultivars respectively), while no correlations were established with cv. Cobrançosa (less susceptible). No volatiles with inverse correlation were observed. Volatile composition of olives may be a decisive factor in the olive fly choice to oviposit and this could be the basis for the development of new control strategies for this pest. PMID:25985460

  15. Characteristic changes in brain electrical activity due to chronic hypoxia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS): a combined EEG study using LORETA and omega complexity.

    PubMed

    Toth, Marton; Faludi, Bela; Wackermann, Jiri; Czopf, Jozsef; Kondakor, Istvan

    2009-11-01

    EEG background activity of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, N = 25) was compared to that of normal controls (N = 14) to reflect alterations of brain electrical activity caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia in OSAS. Global and regional (left vs. right, anterior vs. posterior) measures of spatial complexity (Omega) were used to characterize the degree of spatial synchrony of EEG. Low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was used to localize generators of EEG activity in separate frequency bands. Comparing patients to controls, lower Omega complexity was found globally and in the right hemisphere. Using LORETA, an increased medium frequency activity was seen bilaterally in the precuneus, paracentral and posterior cingulate cortex. These findings indicate that alterations caused by chronic hypoxia in brain electrical activity in regions associated with influencing emotional regulation, long-term memory and the default mode network. Global synchronization (lower Omega complexity) may indicate a significantly reduced number of relatively independent, parallel neural processes due to chronic global hypoxic state in apneic patients as well as over the right hemisphere.

  16. Frictional properties of sediments entering the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore the Osa Peninsula: implications for fault slip in shallow subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Yuka; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kameda, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We examined the frictional properties of sediments on the Cocos plate offshore the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica, and explored variations in the intrinsic frictional properties of the sediment inputs to the Costa Rica subduction zone. Sediment samples were collected at Site U1381A during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334, and include hemipelagic clay to silty clay material (Unit I) and pelagic silicic to calcareous ooze (Unit II). The frictional properties of the samples were tested at a normal stress of 5 MPa under water-saturated conditions and with slip velocities ranging from 0.0028 to 2.8 mm/s for up to 340 mm of displacement. The experimental results reveal that the steady-state friction coefficient values of clay to silty clay samples are as low as ~0.2, whereas those of silicic to calcareous ooze samples are as high as 0.6 to 0.8. The clay to silty clay samples show a positive dependence of friction on velocity for all tested slip velocities. In contrast, the silicic to calcareous ooze samples show a negative dependence of friction on velocity at velocities of 0.0028 to 0.28 mm/s and either neutral or positive dependence at velocities higher than 0.28 mm/s. Given the low frictional coefficient values observed for the clay to silty clay samples of Unit I, the décollement at the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project transect offshore the Osa Peninsula likely initiates in Unit I and is initially very weak. In addition, the velocity-strengthening behavior of the clay to silty clay suggests that faults in the very shallow portion of the Costa Rica subduction zone are stable and thus behave as creeping segments. In contrast, the velocity-weakening behavior of the silicic to calcareous ooze favors unstable slip along faults. The shallow seismicity occurred at a depth as shallow as ~9 km along the Costa Rica margin offshore the Osa Peninsula (Mw 6.4, June 2002), indicating that materials characterized by velocity-weakening behavior constitute the fault

  17. Interplate seismicity at the CRISP drilling site: The 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa Earthquake at the southeastern end of the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Ivonne G.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ranero, Cesar R.; von Huene, Roland

    2014-07-01

    investigate potential relations between variations in seafloor relief and age of the incoming plate and interplate seismicity. Westward from Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, a major change in the character of the incoming Cocos Plate is displayed by abrupt lateral variations in seafloor depth and thermal structure. Here a Mw 6.4 thrust earthquake was followed by three aftershock clusters in June 2002. Initial relocations indicate that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of OBH and land stations ˜80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent local stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocate this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach within both, a 1-D and a 3-D P wave velocity models. The main shock occurred ˜25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. We analyze teleseismic data to further constrain the rupture process of the main shock. The best depth estimates indicate that most of the seismic energy was radiated at shallow depth below the continental slope, supporting the nucleation of the Osa earthquake at ˜6 km depth. The location and depth coincide with the plate boundary imaged in prestack depth-migrated reflection lines shot near the nucleation area. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interplate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  18. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  19. Retinal Atherosclerosis, Ophthalmologically Reported and Documented with OSA in 1987, is now Totally Reversed, and Recorded, Photographically. The Supposition then was that Equivalent Cortical Damage could Respond to the same Healing Protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Paul N.; O., D.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-10-01

    Documented retinal atherosclerosis, ``silver streaking'' of retinal capillaries, was reported and documented with OSA, in October 1987. That retinal damage, despite claims it usually progresses and is nonreversible, is now completely cleared. The original OSA presentation proposed that equivalent cortical damage was probably present throughout the brain at that time, as attested by failing short-term memory performance and transient ischemic attacks, TIAs, brief vision strokes. The supposition then was that ophthalmologic access to the retina, by some accounts the progenitor of all brain evolution, could provide a means of monitoring the actual circulatory state of inaccessible parts of the brain. To the extent that retinal health was naturopathically restored, and memory performance seems also to have significantly kept pace, is it a tenable premise that such protocols have rather general importance? Can applied optics help establish more appropriate diagnoses, and evaluate treatments for dementia and Alzheimer's disease?

  20. Risky consumption habits and safety of fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Fabio Alessandro; Colombo, Monique; Merhi, Carolina Milner; Juliati, Vinícius Augusto; Ferreira, Marcello Sebe; Nero, Marcelo Antônio; Nero, Luis Augusto

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to assess raw milk consumption habits in the urban population of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and the microbiological safety and quality of the fluid milk available in retail sales outlets in the same region. A simplified questionnaire regarding raw milk consumption was applied to the persons responsible for food acquisition in 411 residences. The regular consumption of raw milk was observed by 18.5% of the interviewers, and lack of knowledge of possible risks related to this food product. Microbiological safety and quality were assessed for raw (n=69), pasteurized (n=80), and ultra-high-temperature (UHT)-treated milk (n=80) by analyzing the counts of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli, and detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.; raw milk samples were also subjected to enumeration of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus. Concerning raw milk, 59.4% of the samples were considered as produced in inadequate hygienic conditions, 5.8% of the samples presented counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus lower than 100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, and no samples presented with positive results for L. monocytogenes or Salmonella spp. All pasteurized and UHT milk samples presented with low counts of mesophilic aerobes and coliforms, while L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were absent. The data demonstrated that raw milk was consumed by the population studied. Despite the absence of potential hazards, raw milk was of poor hygienic quality, in contrast with the processed fluid milk available in retail sales outlets that was safe and of good hygienic quality, highlighting the suitability of pasteurized and UHT milk for human consumption.

  1. Physical property and Textural transition across the Unconformity and Major Seismic Reflectors in the Upper plate of the Costa Rica Subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    At the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula, the Cocos plate and Cocos Ridge subduct under the Caribbean plate along the Middle America Trench, creating active seismicity. In this region, the Caribbean plate is characterized by a well-consolidated, high velocity framework material beneath the slope sediments, but the nature of the upper plate material is yet unknown. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 334 and 344, the unconformity between the slope sediments (Unit 1) and upper plate material (Units 2 and 3) consisting of lithic sedimentary units was penetrated at mid-slope Site 1380. In the current study, to characterize the compaction behavior of the upper plate material, we investigate the physical properties, texture and composition of the sediments at Site 1380 by conducting microstructural observations, resistivity measurements, particle size analyses, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. The microstructures of sediments observed through the microscope tend to develop dense and cohesive textures in low porosity sediments, and particle size changes across several unconformities. In particular, the small particle-sized lithic fragments compose larger bodies and form cohesive structures. The cross correlation between measured particle size and shipboard porosity show negative correlation especially at Unit 2, indicating that larger sized particles form smaller or fewer pores. From the results of XRF and XRD analyses, we found that Al, K, Ti tend to concentrate in the higher porosity sediments of Unit 1, whereas Si, Ca, P, Mg, Na, and Mn concentrate in the lower porosity sediments of Unit 2 and 3. The higher concentration in Mg, Na, Mn, Si may be due to minerals such as chlorite, serpentine, amphibole, and sodium manganese. The crossplots between porosity and element concentration show negative correlations in Mg, Na, and Mn with porosity, suggesting that the minerals rich in these elements may relate with the

  2. Effects of CPAP-therapy on brain electrical activity in obstructive sleep apneic patients: a combined EEG study using LORETA and Omega complexity : reversible alterations of brain activity in OSAS.

    PubMed

    Toth, Marton; Faludi, Bela; Kondakor, Istvan

    2012-10-01

    Effects of initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on EEG background activity were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, N = 25) to test possible reversibility of alterations of brain electrical activity caused by chronic hypoxia. Normal control group (N = 14) was also examined. Two EEG examinations were done in each groups: at night and in the next morning. Global and regional (left vs. right, anterior vs. posterior) measures of spatial complexity (Omega complexity) were used to characterize the degree of spatial synchrony of EEG. Low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was used to localize generators of EEG activity in separate frequency bands. Before CPAP-treatment, a significantly lower Omega complexity was found globally and over the right hemisphere. Due to CPAP-treatment, these significant differences vanished. Significantly decreased Omega complexity was found in the anterior region after treatment. LORETA showed a decreased activity in all of the beta bands after therapy in the right hippocampus, premotor and temporo-parietal cortex, and bilaterally in the precuneus, paracentral and posterior cingulate cortex. No significant changes were seen in control group. Comparing controls and patients before sleep, an increased alpha2 band activity was seen bilaterally in the precuneus, paracentral and posterior cingulate cortex, while in the morning an increased beta3 band activity in the left precentral and bilateral premotor cortex and a decreased delta band activity in the right temporo-parietal cortex and insula were observed. These findings indicate that effect of sleep on EEG background activity is different in OSAS patients and normal controls. In OSAS patients, significant changes lead to a more normal EEG after a night under CPAP-treatment. Compensatory alterations of brain electrical activity in regions associated with influencing sympathetic outflow, visuospatial abilities, long

  3. Generalization of color-difference formulas for any illuminant and any observer by assuming perfect color constancy in a color-vision model based on the OSA-UCS system.

    PubMed

    Oleari, Claudio; Melgosa, Manuel; Huertas, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The most widely used color-difference formulas are based on color-difference data obtained under D65 illumination or similar and for a 10° visual field; i.e., these formulas hold true for the CIE 1964 observer adapted to D65 illuminant. This work considers the psychometric color-vision model based on the Optical Society of America-Uniform Color Scales (OSA-UCS) system previously published by the first author [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21, 677 (2004); Color Res. Appl. 30, 31 (2005)] with the additional hypothesis that complete illuminant adaptation with perfect color constancy exists in the visual evaluation of color differences. In this way a computational procedure is defined for color conversion between different illuminant adaptations, which is an alternative to the current chromatic adaptation transforms. This color conversion allows the passage between different observers, e.g., CIE 1964 and CIE 1931. An application of this color conversion is here made in the color-difference evaluation for any observer and in any illuminant adaptation: these transformations convert tristimulus values related to any observer and illuminant adaptation to those related to the observer and illuminant adaptation of the definition of the color-difference formulas, i.e., to the CIE 1964 observer adapted to the D65 illuminant, and then the known color-difference formulas can be applied. The adaptations to the illuminants A, C, F11, D50, Planckian and daylight at any color temperature and for CIE 1931 and CIE 1964 observers are considered as examples, and all the corresponding transformations are given for practical use.

  4. Constraining Source Locations of Shallow Subduction Megathrust Earthquakes in 1-D and 3-D Velocity Models - A Case Study of the 2002 Mw=6.4 Osa Earthquake, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake source locations are generally routinely constrained using a global 1-D Earth model. However, the source location might be associated with large uncertainties. This is definitively the case for earthquakes occurring at active continental margins were thin oceanic crust subducts below thick continental crust and hence large lateral changes in crustal thickness occur as a function of distance to the deep-sea trench. Here, we conducted a case study of the 2002 Mw 6.4 Osa thrust earthquake in Costa Rica that was followed by an aftershock sequence. Initial relocations indicated that the main shock occurred fairly trenchward of most large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench off central Costa Rica. The earthquake sequence occurred while a temporary network of ocean-bottom-hydrophones and land stations 80 km to the northwest were deployed. By adding readings from permanent Costa Rican stations, we obtain uncommon P wave coverage of a large subduction zone earthquake. We relocated this catalog using a nonlinear probabilistic approach using a 1-D and two 3-D P-wave velocity models. The 3-D model was either derived from 3-D tomography based on onshore stations and a priori model based on seismic refraction data. All epicentres occurred close to the trench axis, but depth estimates vary by several tens of kilometres. Based on the epicentres and constraints from seismic reflection data the main shock occurred 25 km from the trench and probably along the plate interface at 5-10 km depth. The source location that agreed best with the geology was based on the 3-D velocity model derived from a priori data. Aftershocks propagated downdip to the area of a 1999 Mw 6.9 sequence and partially overlapped it. The results indicate that underthrusting of the young and buoyant Cocos Ridge has created conditions for interpolate seismogenesis shallower and closer to the trench axis than elsewhere along the central Costa Rica margin.

  5. OSA proceedings on picosecond electronics and optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sollner, T.C.L.G. . Lincoln Lab.); Bloom, D.M. . Edward L. Ginzton Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to optical communications. Systems considerations of this important application of optoelectronics are used to provide the motivation for many of the papers that follow. The authors are also concerned with another optoelectronic application, the measurement of phenomena that take place on a picosecond time scale. Short optical or electrical pulses are used to sample the parameter of interest, usually electric fields, in electronic or optoelectronic devices and circuits. Several methods of sampling are described, as are improvements to components that make up these systems. The authors address the electronic and optoelectronic components that lay the foundation for the systems considered above. Diode laser chirping, picosecond optical pulse amplifiers, a spread-spectrum approach to modulation, and two novel methods of picosecond pulse synthesis are discussed. Papers on tunneling and resonant tunneling are presented. Devices based on these effects have promise in high-speed electronics. Several papers investigate the speed of electron tunneling between two reservoirs and the effect of speed on device performance. Resonant-tunneling diode switches are also considered. This book also covers transistors as well as studies of carrier transport on the picosecond time scale. Excellent results for silicon FETs are given, demonstrating the great flexibility of that established technology.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Azagra-Calero, Eva; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is characterized by repeated airway collapse during sleep. The li-terature describes multiple causes of the disease. The main cause is a reduction of the expansion forces of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, as in situations of genioglossal muscle dysfunction, and discoordination between the inspiratory activity of the muscle and respiratory effort, which play an important role in progression of the disease. Other described causes are soft tissue disorders, such as macroglossia or tonsillar hypertrophy, and skeletal structural alterations such as micrognathia and retrognathia. The syndrome is also more frequent in obese people, where the accumulation of fat in the neck region produces narrowing of the pharyngeal airway, thereby diminishing the passage of air. This review focuses on the pathogenesis, epidemiology, main features and diagnosis of the disease, and on its main forms of treatment. Key words:Sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:22549673

  7. Treatment of patients with OSAS using Nd-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    The authors present their clinical experience regarding the possibilities of application of Nd:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers for the treatment of disorders in the are of the upper respiratory tract. The patients with symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Aphnoe Syndrom need a various operations techniques. Lasers techniques makes it possible to perform a number of procedures in local anesthesia which considerably improves the economic effectiveness of the treatment. The surgeries performed using laser beam enabled very good effect of treatment.

  8. Gregor Mendel, OSA (1822-1884), founder of scientific genetics.

    PubMed

    Dunn, P M

    2003-11-01

    Gregor Mendel, an Augustinian monk and part-time school teacher, undertook a series of brilliant hybridisation experiments with garden peas between 1857 and 1864 in the monastery gardens and, using statistical methods for the first time in biology, established the laws of heredity, thereby establishing the discipline of genetics.

  9. Diagnostic and therapeutic iter in paediatric OSAS: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Piumetto, E; Sammartano, A M; Meinardi, G; Dagna, F; Gervasio, F C; Albera, R

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a child is characterized by prolonged episodes of obstructive hypopnoea and/or apnoea of upper airway leading to morbidity. The most common risk factor is adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome diagnosis is based on clinical ENT evaluation and an instrumental approach, such as pulse oximetry or the gold standard overnight polysomnography. The aim is to establish, in a population of children with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, the frequency of this disorder, the effect of adenotonsillectomy and the risk of post-operative complications. A total of 481 patients (297 male, 184 female) with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (aged 2-14 years) were evaluated between March 2007 and April 2010 and divided into 3 morphological phenotypes: classic, adult and congenital. All patients underwent ENT assessment and a pulse oximetry with 4 channels cardiopulmonary monitoring. The examination following the Brouillette criteria was defined as negative, positive or inconclusive; when positive, adenotonsillectomy was the first therapeutic approach. At 6 months after surgery, all patients underwent check-up pulse oximetry. Of the overall sample, 96% of the patients had a classical phenotype, 3% an adult type and 1% a congenital type. The monitoring resulted pathological in 19% (17% of them were at increased post-operative risk), negative in 61% and inconclusive in 20%. All 5 patients with congenital phenotype were positive. Of the positive patients, 86% underwent adenotonsillectomy and a control pulse oximetry 6 months thereafter, 96% resulted negative. Pulse oximetry was efficient in order to avoid incorrect surgery indications, improving appropriateness and safety of adenotonsillectomy in children with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Adenotonsillectomy showed a success rate of 96% and there were no episodes of post-surgery complications in particular in those patients at increased risk.

  10. First Image Products from EcoSAR - Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, SeungKuk; Rincon, Rafael; Fatuyinbo, Lola; Bollian, Tobias; Ranson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Designed especially for forest ecosystem studies, EcoSAR employs state-of-the-art digital beamforming technology to generate wide-swath, high-resolution imagery. EcoSARs dual antenna single-pass imaging capability eliminates temporal decorrelation from polarimetric and interferometric analysis, increasing the signal strength and simplifying models used to invert forest structure parameters. Antennae are physically separated by 25 meters providing single pass interferometry. In this mode the radar is most sensitive to topography. With 32 active transmit and receive channels, EcoSARs digital beamforming is an order of magnitude more versatile than the digital beamforming employed on the upcoming NISAR mission. EcoSARs long wavelength (P-band, 435 MHz, 69 cm) measurements can be used to simulate data products for ESAs future BIOMASS mission, allowing scientists to develop algorithms before the launch of the satellite. EcoSAR can also be deployed to collect much needed data where BIOMASS satellite wont be allowed to collect data (North America, Europe and Arctic), filling in the gaps to keep a watchful eye on the global carbon cycle. EcoSAR can play a vital role in monitoring, reporting and verification schemes of internationals programs such as UN-REDD (United Nations Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) benefiting global society. EcoSAR was developed and flown with support from NASA Earth Sciences Technology Offices Instrument Incubator Program.

  11. Two sisters with a syndrome of ocular, skeletal, and abdominal abnormalities (OSA syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Mingarelli, R; Castriota Scanderbeg, A; Dallapiccola, B

    1996-01-01

    Two adult sisters are described who had a unique association of facial, ocular, and skeletal defects, and abdominal muscle hypoplasia, indicating autosomal recessive inheritance. Many of these features overlap those previously found in other malformation syndromes. However, the constellation of defects observed in these patients appears to represent a previously unreported syndrome and autosomal recessive inheritance is likely. Images PMID:8933348

  12. Phenotypes of comorbidity in OSAS patients: combining categorical principal component analysis with cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Vavougios, George D; George D, George; Pastaka, Chaido; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2016-02-01

    Phenotyping obstructive sleep apnea syndrome's comorbidity has been attempted for the first time only recently. The aim of our study was to determine phenotypes of comorbidity in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients employing a data-driven approach. Data from 1472 consecutive patient records were recovered from our hospital's database. Categorical principal component analysis and two-step clustering were employed to detect distinct clusters in the data. Univariate comparisons between clusters included one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction and chi-square tests. Predictors of pairwise cluster membership were determined via a binary logistic regression model. The analyses revealed six distinct clusters: A, 'healthy, reporting sleeping related symptoms'; B, 'mild obstructive sleep apnea syndrome without significant comorbidities'; C1: 'moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, obesity, without significant comorbidities'; C2: 'moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with severe comorbidity, obesity and the exclusive inclusion of stroke'; D1: 'severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and obesity without comorbidity and a 33.8% prevalence of hypertension'; and D2: 'severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with severe comorbidities, along with the highest Epworth Sleepiness Scale score and highest body mass index'. Clusters differed significantly in apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index; arousal index; age, body mass index, minimum oxygen saturation and daytime oxygen saturation (one-way analysis of variance P < 0.0001). Binary logistic regression indicated that older age, greater body mass index, lower daytime oxygen saturation and hypertension were associated independently with an increased risk of belonging in a comorbid cluster. Six distinct phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its comorbidities were identified. Mapping the heterogeneity of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome may help the early identification of at-risk groups. Finally, determining predictors of comorbidity for the moderate and severe strata of these phenotypes implies a need to take these factors into account when considering obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treatment options. PMID:26365653

  13. Hydrogeological responses to incoming materials at the erosional subduction margin, offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Jun; Harris, Robert N.; Shimizu, Mayuko; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ikehara, Minoru; Uno, Masaoki; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Namiki, Yuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-09-01

    Bulk mineral assemblages of sediments and igneous basement rocks on the incoming Cocos Plate at the Costa Rica subduction zone are examined by X-ray diffraction analyses on core samples. These samples are from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334 reference Site U1381, ˜ 5 km seaward of the trench. Drilling recovered approximately 100 m of sediment and 70 m of igneous oceanic basement. The sediment includes two lithologic units: hemipelagic clayey mud and siliceous to calcareous pelagic ooze. The hemipelagic unit is composed of clay minerals (˜50 wt.%), quartz (˜5 wt.%), plagioclase (˜5 wt.%), calcite (˜15 wt.%) and ˜30 wt.% of amorphous materials, while the pelagic unit is mostly made up of biogenic amorphous silica (˜50 wt.%) and calcite (˜50 wt.%). The igneous basement rock consists of plagioclase (˜50-60 wt.%), clinopyroxene (˜>25 wt.%), and saponite (˜15-40 wt.%). Saponite is more abundant in pillow basalt than in the massive section, reflecting the variable intensity of alteration. We estimate the total water influx of the sedimentary package is 6.9 m3/yr per m of trench length. Fluid expulsion models indicate that sediment compaction during shallow subduction causes the release of pore water while peak mineral dehydration occurs at temperatures of approximately ˜100°C, 40-30 km landward of the trench. This region is landward of the observed updip extent of seismicity. We posit that in this region the presence of subducting bathymetric relief capped by velocity weakening nannofossil chalk is more important in influencing the updip extent of seismicity than the thermal regime.

  14. A 51-Year-Old Woman With Hypoacusia and Increased Respiratory Effort in the Supine Position and OSA.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Barriales, Marcos; Vázquez Marcos, Virginia; Álvarez, Ainhoa; Odriozola, Beatriz; Alonso, Juan; Egea Santaolalla, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman with a personal history of vitiligo, normal thyroid hormone studies, a simple hysterectomy for multiple uterine myomas at age 35 years, and childhood adenotonsillectomy was seen for progressive hearing loss. She reported mild asthenia, cold intolerance, mild dysphagia with frequent choking while eating and drinking, and a progressive increase in inspiratory effort, especially in the supine position. Her partner described a progressively worsening history of snoring and witnessed apneic episodes, mostly in the supine position. Mild to moderate daytime sleepiness was also present. PMID:27502995

  15. Tree Diversity and Dynamics of the Forest of Seu Nico, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leyh, Werner; Meira-Neto, João A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand future changes in community composition due to global changes, the knowledge about forest community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our understanding about processes and patterns involved in maintaining species rich Neotropical ecosystems, we provide here a dataset from the one hectare Forest of Seu Nico (FSN) Dynamics Plot from Southeastern Brazil. New information We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 2868 trees and treelets identified from two census spanning over a nine-year period. Furthermore, soil properties and understory light availability of all 100 10 x 10m subplots from the one hectare FSN Dynamics Plot during the second census are given. PMID:26312053

  16. Rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome coinciding with severe OSA following pharyngoplasty in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Gregory; Wainbergas, Natalie; McGlynn, Michael; Teng, Arthur

    2014-09-01

    Our patient with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) not only displayed many typical syndromic features but also presented several unique challenges, with gross velopharyngeal insufficiency necessitating repair and severe obstructive sleep apnea developing thereafter, requiring ongoing non-invasive ventilation. This coincided with development of a narcolepsy-like syndrome, treated with dexamphetamine. Cataplexy, hypnogogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis were absent and HLA-DQB1*06:02 was negative. Growth hormone (GH) therapy was commenced at 8 months of age and, as recommended, regular polysomnograms were conducted. Adenotonsillar growth on GH therapy is reported as well as several reports of sudden death in PWS patients on GH. Despite GH, lifestyle measures with regular dietician review, and an exercise program, there was progressive excessive weight gain. Our patient also developed moderate tonsil hypertrophy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of severe obstructive sleep apnea secondary to sphincter pharyngoplasty coinciding with rapidly evolving narcolepsy-like syndrome. PMID:25473585

  17. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  18. A Comparison of Official Transcripts and Operational Records for Fall, 1975 University of Minnesota Registered Students. OSA Research Bulletin, v17 n7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lele, Kaustubh T.; Armstrong, Roberta A.

    This study was undertaken to provide data for a review of the University of Minnesota's two-transcript system, which maintains an operational record (including all work taken) and an official transcript (record of accomplishment only) for each student. The sample included all students registered in fall 1975. Actual differences between the two…

  19. Sleep Apnea Research in Animals. Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Swati; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Jun, Jonathan C

    2016-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that describes recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Animal models have been pivotal to the understanding of OSA pathogenesis, consequences, and treatment. In this review, we highlight the history of OSA research in animals and include the discovery of animals with spontaneous OSA, the induction of OSA in animals, and the emulation of OSA using exposures to intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation.

  20. Comparison of Ricketts analysis and Downs-Northwestern analysis for the evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea cephalograms.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, N; Kikuchi, M; Miyazaki, S; Itasaka, Y

    2001-06-01

    To determine which analysis is suitable to examine the dentofacial skeletal pattern characteristics of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), we took lateral cephalograms of 44 Japanese OSAS patients and 34 Japanese non-OSAS controls. By Ricketts analysis, we found significant differences between OSAS patients and non-OSAS controls on facial axis, lower facial height and total facial height, which showed that Japanese OSAS patients have dolico facial patterns. However, by Downs-Northwestern analysis, we did not find any significant difference between OSAS patients and non-OSAS controls using the same cephalograms as the Ricketts analysis.

  1. Workplace worries: a preliminary look at online sexual activities at the office-emerging issues for clinicians and employers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Al; Safir, Marilyn P; Rosenmann, Amir

    2006-02-01

    Concerns about the impact of online sexual activities (OSA) on work-life are drastically increasing. This study examined 3,466 respondents who reported OSA, 18.5% of whom reported engaging in OSA at work. They were compared with the 81.5% who engaged in OSA at home, on average time spent in OSA, workplace policies regarding OSA, and relationship status. Two themes were identified and discussed: opportunity and sexual distress. Our findings indicate that participants are cognizant of issues of opportunity (e.g., the OSA from home group was more likely to indicate their workplace has established policies regarding OSA), and privacy, representing an important aspect of this theme (e.g., participants engaging in OSA at work were found to be twice as likely to have extra-marital affairs, compared with the OSA from home group). Secondly, our data suggests that many participants, especially from the OSA at work group, experience OSA-related distress. Engaging in OSA at the workplace may result in decreased productivity, issues of sexual harassment, and concerns about employee well-being. Clearly stated and consistently enforced policies regulating OSA are likely to mitigate workplace OSA. However, a significant minority of employees may have difficulties curbing OSA. Therefore, more sophisticated strategies to deal with workplace OSA should be established. Additional implications of importance for organizations and mental health professionals who support them are discussed.

  2. Evaluation of Cross-section Airway Configuration of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Takumi; Enciso, Reyes; Shintaku, Werner H.; Clark, Glenn T.

    2007-01-01

    Upper airway imaging techniques can be useful to identify the exact location and nature of the obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Methods Ten OSA patients and ten non-OSA control subjects were imaged using cone-beam computed tomography (Newtom QR-DVT9000) to compare their upper airway structure. Results The OSA subjects presented higher BMI (OSA: 29.5 ± 9.05 kg/m2; Non-OSA: 23.1 ± 3.05 kg/m2 [p=0.034]), lower total volume (mm3) of the airway (OSA: 4868.4 ± 1863.9; Non-OSA: 6051.7 ± 1756.4 [p =0.054]), statistically significantly smaller anterior-posterior dimension (mm) of the minimum cross-section segment (OSA: 4.6 ± 1.2; Non-OSA: 7.8 ± 3.31 [p =0.009]), and smaller minimum cross-section area (OSA: 45.8±17.5 mm2; Non-OSA: 146.9±111.7 mm2 [p=0.011]) positioned below the occlusal plane in 70% of the cases (OSA:7 out of 10; Non-OSA: 5 out of 10 [p=0.030]). The OSA group presented a concave or elliptic shaped airway and the non-OSA group presented a concave, round or square shaped airway. (156 words) PMID:17178502

  3. Mild obstructive sleep apnea does not modulate baroreflex sensitivity in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Blomster, Henry; Laitinen, Tomi P; Hartikainen, Juha EK; Laitinen, Tiina M; Vanninen, Esko; Gylling, Helena; Sahlman, Johanna; Kokkarinen, Jouko; Randell, Jukka; Seppä, Juha; Tuomilehto, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic and progressive disease. OSA is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, the risk being more frequently encountered with severe degrees of OSA. Increased sympathetic activation and impaired cardiac autonomic control as reflected by depressed baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) are possible mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular complications of OSA. However, it is not known at what stage of OSA that changes in BRS appear. The aim of this study was to evaluate BRS in patients with mild OSA. Methods The study population consisted of 81 overweight patients with mild OSA and 46 body weight-matched non-OSA subjects. BRS, apnea-hypopnea index, body mass index, and metabolic parameters were assessed. The phenylephrine test was used to measure BRS. Results Patients in the OSA group were slightly but significantly older than the non-OSA population (50.3±9.3 years vs 45.7±11.1 years, P=0.02). Body mass index, percentage body fat, blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin, and lipid levels did not differ between the OSA patients and non-OSA subjects. Absolute BRS values in patients with mild OSA and non-OSA subjects (9.97±6.70 ms/mmHg vs 10.51±7.16 ms/mmHg, P=0.67) and BRS values proportional to age-related and sex-related reference values (91.4%±22.7% vs 92.2%±21.8%, P=0.84) did not differ from each other. BRS <50% of the sex-specific reference value was found in 6% of patients with mild OSA and in 2% of non-OSA subjects (P=0.29). Conclusion Patients with mild OSA did not show evidence of disturbed BRS in comparison with weight-matched non-OSA controls. PMID:26203292

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Children.

    PubMed

    Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Shintani, Tomoko; Abe, Ayumi; Yajima, Ryoto; Takahashi, Nozomi; Ito, Fumie; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is important for children pertaining to their physical and mental growth. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children has been shown to have different effects as compared to OSAS in adults, including deficits in cognition and neuropsychological functions, hyperactivity, ADHD, behavior problems, aggressive behavior, learning problems and nocturnal enuresis. Hypertrophy of the adenoids and tonsils is a major cause of OSAS in children; therefore, adenotonsillectomy may decrease the effects of OSAS pertaining to physical and mental growth. It is important to accurately diagnose and appropriately treat OSAS in children to prevent OSAS in their adulthood. PMID:27115764

  5. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Atkeson, Amy; Jelic, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial activation and inflammation are important mediators of accelerated atherogenesis and consequent increased cardiovascular morbidity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Repetitive episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with transient cessation of breathing during sleep in OSA resemble ischemia/reperfusion injury and may be the main culprit underlying endothelial dysfunction in OSA. Additional factors such as repetitive arousals resulting in sleep fragmentation and deprivation and individual genetic susceptibility to vascular manifestations of OSA contribute to impaired endothelial function in OSA. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms that underlie endothelial activation and inflammation in OSA.

  6. Management of Hypertension in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sofia F; Braz, Caio V; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Drager, Luciano F

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be a secondary form of hypertension and in clinical practice OSA is frequently associated with hypertension, even if proof of causality cannot be established. Growing evidence suggests that OSA is associated with worse blood pressure control, alterations in night-time blood pressure dipping, increased target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in patients with hypertension. This review summarizes the current evidence for managing hypertension in patients with OSA. Particular focus will be devoted to discuss the impact of lifestyle changes, preferences for anti-hypertensive treatment in patients with OSA, and the effects of OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Pathological Characteristics of Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dal Molin, Marco; Brant, Aaron; Blackford, Amanda L.; Griffin, James F.; Shindo, Koji; Barkley, Thomas; Rezaee, Neda; Hruban, Ralph H.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Prospective studies have identified obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a risk factor for increased overall cancer incidence and mortality. The potential role of OSA in the risk or progression of specific cancers is not well known. We hypothesized that pathological differences in pancreatic cancers from OSA cases compared to non-OSA cases would implicate OSA in pancreatic cancer progression. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 1031 patients who underwent surgical resection without neoadjuvant therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2003 and 2014 and compared the TNM classification of their cancer and their overall survival by patient OSA status. Results OSA cases were significantly more likely than non-OSA cases to have lymph node-negative tumors (37.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.004). Differences in the prevalence of nodal involvement of OSA vs. non-OSA cases were not associated with differences in other pathological characteristics such as tumor size, tumor location, resection margin status, vascular or perineural invasion, or other comorbidities more common to OSA cases (BMI, smoking, diabetes). A logistic regression model found that a diagnosis of OSA was an independent predictor of lymph node status (hazard ratio, 0.051, p = 0.038). Patients with OSA had similar overall survival compared to those without OSA (HR, 0.89, (0.65–1.24), p = 0.41). Conclusion The observed pathological differences between OSA-associated and non-OSA-associated pancreatic cancers supports the hypothesis that OSA can influence the pathologic features of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27732623

  8. Inflammation in Sleep Apnea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jun, Jonathan; Polotsky, Vsevolod

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). One theory to explain this relationship proposes that OSA can induce systemic inflammation, thereby inducing CVD. This theory is based on the premise that obesity is a pro-inflammatory state, and that physiological derangements during sleep in subjects with OSA further aggravate inflammation. In support of this theory, some clinical studies have shown elevated inflammatory biomarkers in OSA subjects, or improvement in these markers following treatment of OSA. However, the data are inconsistent and often confounded by the effects of comorbid obesity. Animal models of OSA have been developed, which involve exposure of rodents or cells to intermittent hypoxia, a hallmark feature of OSA. Several of these experiments demonstrate that intermittent hypoxia can stimulate inflammatory pathways and lead to cardiovascular or metabolic pathology. In this review, we review relationships between OSA and inflammation, with particular attention to studies published within the last year. PMID:25502450

  9. Osteocytes serve as a progenitor cell of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sottnik, Joseph L; Campbell, Brittany; Mehra, Rohit; Behbahani-Nejad, Omid; Hall, Christopher L.; Keller, Evan T.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary bone tumor in humans. However, the cell of origin of OSA is not clearly defined although there is evidence that osteoblasts may serve as OSA progenitors. The role of osteocytes, terminally differentiated osteoblasts, as OSA progenitors has yet to be described. Analysis of patient cDNA from publicly available microarray data revealed that patients with OSA have increased expression of dentin matrix phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), a marker of osteocytes. Analysis of multiple murine, human, and canine OSA cell lines revealed DMP1 expression. To test the tumorigenic potential of osteocytes, MLO-Y4, an SV-40 immortalized murine osteocyte cell line, was injected into subcutaneous and orthotopic (intratibial) sites of mice. Tumor growth occurred in both locations. Orthotopic MLO-Y4 tumors produced mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic radiographic lesions; a hallmark of OSA. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that osteocytes can serve as OSA progenitors. PMID:24700678

  10. Ophthalmic Diseases in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Skorin, Leonid; Knutson, Rachel

    2016-08-01

    Symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 2% of women and 4% of men, but the prevalence of asymptomatic OSA is significantly higher. Several ophthalmic conditions are associated with OSA, including floppy eyelid syndrome, glaucoma, nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, papilledema, keratoconus, and central serous chorioretinopathy. The purpose of this review is to provide primary care physicians with a general knowledge of the signs, symptoms, and management of the ophthalmic diseases associated with OSA. PMID:27455101

  11. Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Schwengel, Deborah A; Dalesio, Nicholas M; Stierer, Tracey L

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder of airway obstruction with multisystem implications and associated complications. OSAS affects children from infancy to adulthood and is responsible for behavioral, cognitive, and growth impairment as well as cardiovascular and perioperative respiratory morbidity and mortality. OSAS is associated commonly with comorbid conditions, including obesity and asthma. Adenotonsillectomy is the most commonly used treatment option for OSAS in childhood, but efforts are underway to identify medical treatment options. PMID:24491659

  12. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  13. The economic impact of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    AlGhanim, Nayef; Comondore, Vikram R; Fleetham, John; Marra, Carlo A; Ayas, Najib T

    2008-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases healthcare utilization and is associated with reduced work performance and occupational injuries. The economic burden related to untreated OSA is substantial, accounting for billions of dollars per year. Furthermore, therapy of OSA is an extremely cost-efficient use of healthcare resources, comparing highly favorably with other commonly funded medical therapies. Governments, transportation agencies, industry, and insurance companies need to be better informed concerning the economic impact of untreated OSA and the benefits of therapy.

  14. Evidence of neurodegeneration in obstructive sleep apnea: Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and cognitive dysfunction in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of dementia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases with age. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease of the elderly characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The disease involves widespread synaptic loss in the neocortex and the hippocampus. Rodent and clinical studies suggest that OSA impairs the structural integrity of several brain regions, including the medial temporal lobe. Indeed, hypoxia, hypertension, hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress noted in OSA patients also occur in AD patients. This Review highlights pathological commonality, showing that OSA upregulates Aβ, tau hyperphosphorylation, and synaptic dysfunction. Indeed, OSA and hypertension trigger hypoperfusion and hypometabolism of brain regions, including cortex and hippocampus. Several studies show that hypertension-driven brain damage and pathogenic mechanisms lead to an Aβ increase. The pathophysiological mechanism by which OSA enhances hypertension may be linked to sympathoexcitation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. Strong pathophysiological similarities that exist between OSA and AD are underscored here. For example, the hippocampus is negatively impacted in both OSA and AD. OSA promotes hippocampal atrophy, which is associated with memory impairment. Cognitive impairment, even in the absence of manifest dementia, is an important independent predictor of mortality. However, several pathophysiological mechanisms in OSA are reversible with appropriate therapy. OSA, therefore, is a modifiable risk factor of cognitive dysfunction, and treating OSA prior to mild cognitive impairment may be an effective prevention strategy to reduce risk for cognitive decline and AD in middle-aged persons and the elderly. PMID:26301370

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Inell C

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common problem that plays a role in a number of other chronic health concerns including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and gastroesophageal reflux disease to name a few. In this article, we discuss the relationship between OSA and these conditions as well as how OSA is diagnosed and treated.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Related to Impaired Cognitive and Functional Status after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, decreased functional outcome, and recurrent stroke. Research on the effect of OSA on cognitive functioning following stroke is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to compare stroke patients with and without OSA on cognitive and functional status upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation. Design: Case-control study. Setting and Patients: 147 stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Interventions: N/A. Measurements: All patients underwent sleep examination for diagnosis of OSA. We assessed cognitive status by neuropsychological examination and functional status by two neurological scales and a measure of functional independence. Results: We included 80 stroke patients with OSA and 67 stroke patients without OSA. OSA patients were older and had a higher body mass index than patients without OSA. OSA patients performed worse on tests of attention, executive functioning, visuoperception, psychomotor ability, and intelligence than those without OSA. No differences were found for vigilance, memory, and language. OSA patients had a worse neurological status, lower functional independence scores, and a longer period of hospitalization in the neurorehabilitation unit than the patients without OSA. OSA status was not associated with stroke type or classification. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a lower cognitive and functional status in patients admitted for stroke rehabilitation. This underlines the importance of OSA as a probable prognostic factor, and calls for well-designed randomized controlled trials to study its treatability. Citation: Aaronson JA, van Bennekom CA, Hofman WF, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Obstructive sleep apnea is related to impaired cognitive and functional status after stroke. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1431–1437. PMID

  17. Sleep Endoscopy in the Evaluation of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aaron C.; Koltai, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is not always resolved or improved with adenotonsillectomy. Persistent or complex cases of pediatric OSA may be due to sites of obstruction in the airway other than the tonsils and adenoids. Identifying these areas in the past has been problematic, and therefore, therapy for OSA in children who have failed adenotonsillectomy has often been unsatisfactory. Sleep endoscopy is a technique that can enable the surgeon to determine the level of obstruction in a sleeping child with OSA. With this knowledge, site-specific surgical therapy for persistent and complex pediatric OSA may be possible. PMID:22518178

  18. Endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Atkeson, Amy; Yeh, Susie Yim; Malhotra, Atul; Jelic, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The repetitive hypoxia/reoxygenation and sleep fragmentation associated with OSA impair endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction, in turn, may mediate increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Specifically, in OSA, endothelial nitric oxide availability and repair capacity are reduced, whereas oxidative stress and inflammation are enhanced. Treatment of OSA improves endothelial vasomotor tone and reduces inflammation. We review the evidence and possible mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction as well as the effect of treatment on endothelial function in OSA.

  19. Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Cardiovascular Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Whether Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Reduces that Risk.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Rami; Pleister, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in up to 25% of otherwise healthy individuals. OSA is associated with intermittent hypoxia, oxidative stress, sympathetic activation, and an inflammatory response. These perturbations mediate the role of OSA as an independent and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA can induce CVD or accelerate the progression of CVD into an end-stage disorder, including heart failure and stroke. Current clinical recommendations are based on existing clinical trial data and the clinical experience of our program; current and future clinical trials will help to optimize management of OSA in the setting of CVD. PMID:27542874

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder which is characterized by recurrent upper closure with oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. OSA increases the risk of vascular disorders in the form of stroke, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and hypertension. The mechanisms underlying the vascular disorders are several and include intermittent hypoxia with release of cytokines, angiogenic inhibitors, free radicals, and adhesion molecules. During apneas, arterial blood pressure gradually rises and surges abruptly after the termination of apnea. Two thirds of patients with OSA will ultimately have diurnal hypertension. This review discusses the literature supporting the significant role of OSA in hypertension and the effect of OSA treatment on blood pressure.

  1. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  2. Correlation between hippocampal sulcus width and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akhan, Galip; Songu, Murat; Ayik, Sibel Oktem; Altay, Canan; Kalemci, Serdar

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) severity and the hippocampal sulcus width in a cohort of subjects with OSAS and controls. A total of 149 OSAS patients and 60 nonapneic controls were included in the study. Overnight polysomnograpy was performed in all patients. Hippocampal sulcus width of the patients was measured by a radiologist blinded to the diagnosis of the patients. Other variables noted for each patient were as follows: gender, age, body mass index, apnea hypopnea index, Epworth sleepiness scale, sleep efficacy, mean saturation, lowest O2 saturation, longest apnea duration, neck circumference, waist circumference, hip circumference. A total of 149 OSAS patients were divided into three groups: mild OSAS (n = 54), moderate OSAS (n = 40), severe OSAS (n = 55) groups. The control group consisted of patients with AHI <5 (n = 60). Hippocampal sulcus width was 1.6 ± 0.83 mm in the control group; while 1.9 ± 0.81 mm in mild OSAS, 2.1 ± 0.60 mm in moderate OSAS, and 2.9 ± 0.58 mm in severe OSAS groups (p < 0.001). Correlation analysis of variables revealed that apnea hypopnea index (rs = 0.483, p < 0.001) was positively correlated with hippocampal sulcus width. Our findings demonstrated that severity of OSAS might be associated with various pathologic mechanisms including increased hippocampal sulcus width.

  3. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Ganesh, Bhanu P; Cope, Julia L; Ajami, Nadim J; Phillips, Sharon C; Petrosino, Joseph F; Hollister, Emily B; Bryan, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    Individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk for systemic hypertension. The importance of a healthy gut microbiota, and detriment of a dysbiotic microbiota, on host physiology is becoming increasingly evident. We tested the hypothesis that gut dysbiosis contributes to hypertension observed with OSA. OSA was modeled in rats by inflating a tracheal balloon during the sleep cycle (10-s inflations, 60 per hour). On normal chow diet, OSA had no effect on blood pressure; however, in rats fed a high-fat diet, blood pressure increased 24 and 29 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively (P<0.05 each). Bacterial community characterization was performed on fecal pellets isolated before and after 14 days of OSA in chow and high-fat fed rats. High-fat diet and OSA led to significant alterations of the gut microbiota, including decreases in bacterial taxa known to produce the short chain fatty acid butyrate (P<0.05). Finally, transplant of dysbiotic cecal contents from hypertensive OSA rats on high-fat diet into OSA recipient rats on normal chow diet (shown to be normotensive) resulted in hypertension similar to that of the donor (increased 14 and 32 mm Hg after 7 and 14 days of OSA, respectively; P<0.05). These studies demonstrate a causal relationship between gut dysbiosis and hypertension, and suggest that manipulation of the microbiota may be a viable treatment for OSA-induced, and possibly other forms of, hypertension.

  4. An evaluation of the schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization in shortwave radiation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hailin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Qiang; Feng, Youbin; Li, Xiuhong; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli

    2015-12-01

    The ocean surface albedo (OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation (ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. On the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), this study discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we discussed the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. It is concluded that the SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in the afternoon, and PM86's is the best of all in the morning, which indicate that the more complicated OSA schemes reflect the temporal variation of OWA better than the simple ones.

  5. Metabolic disorders associated with obstructive sleep apnea in adults.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Alain

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between metabolic disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is multidirectional. Obesity is recognized as the strongest risk factor for OSA. It is unknown whether metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes mellitus contribute to the development or aggravation of OSA, although this is likely. Conversely, OSA may be a risk factor for metabolic disorders. Strong evidence suggests that OSA may increase the risk of developing insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. OSA has also been associated with the development and/or aggravation of obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome. In addition, metabolic disorders are confounding factors in OSA. Metabolic disorders and OSA share common intermediate pathogenic pathways, including alterations in autonomic nervous system regulation, increased inflammatory activity, and alterations in adipokine levels and endothelial dysfunction, which may be involved in the interplay between these conditions. Overall, this complexity makes it especially difficult to reveal and understand the links between OSA and metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The International Diabetes Federation has recently published clinical practice recommendations suggesting that OSA patients should be routinely screened for markers of metabolic disturbance and cardiovascular risk, such as waist circumference, blood pressure, and fasting lipid and glucose levels. It also recommends that the possibility of OSA should be considered in the assessment of all patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. PMID:22005190

  6. Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregates: Formation mechanism and fate in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Andrew; Shim, Won Joon; Ha, Sung Yong; Yim, Un Hyuk

    2014-12-01

    Oil suspended particulate matter (SPM) aggregates (OSA) are naturally occurring phenomena where oil droplets and particles interact to form aggregates. This aggregation could aid cleanup processes of oil contaminated waters. When OSA is formed, it makes oil less sticky and would facilitate the dispersion of oil into the water column. Increased oil-water surface contact by OSA formation enhances biodegradation of oil. Its applicability as a natural oil clean-up mechanism has been effectively demonstrated over past decades. There are many factors affecting the formation of OSA and its stability in the natural environment that need to be understood. This review provides a current understanding of (1) types of OSA that could be formed in the natural environment; (2) controlling factors and environmental parameters for the formation of OSA; (3) environmental parameters; and (4) fate of OSA and its applicability for oil spill remediation processes.

  7. The Link Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Fré; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Hertegonne, Katrien B C; Chirinos, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in the general population and highly prevalent in patients with cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we review (1) the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA that may causally contribute to cardiovascular disease; (2) current evidence regarding the association between OSA and hypertension, stroke, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and cardiovascular mortality; and (3) the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes. We emphasize the importance of obesity as a comorbidity of OSA and a confounder in the association between OSA and cardiovascular disease. We also discuss the importance of addressing obesity in patients with OSA, as a strategy to reduce the burden of cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Implications for the approach of patients' OSA in clinical practice and future research directions are discussed.

  8. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tie, Y X; Fu, Y Y; Xu, Z; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited 30 OSAS patients into the observation group (OSAS group), and subdivided them into mild, moderate and severe groups according to the apnea hypopnea index. In addition, 20 normal individuals were included in the control group. Plasma CRP levels of two groups were measured. As compared with the control group, the CRP levels in the OSAS group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). ANOVA showed that CRP levels in the three subgroups differ; statistically significant differences between the mild and severe OSA patients were observed (P < 0.05). It was hypothesized that OSAS patients show elevated serum CRP levels, and that serum CRP levels are associated with OSAS severity. PMID:27323094

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akre, Harriet; Øverland, Britt; Åsten, Pamela; Skogedal, Nina; Heimdal, Ketil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among the Norwegian population with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). A secondary aim was to establish whether TCS phenotype severity is associated with OSAS severity. A prospective case study design was used. Individuals who were 5 years old and above with a known diagnosis of TCS in Norway were invited to participate in a study. The study included genetic testing, medical and dental examinations and polysomnography. All participants demonstrated disturbed respiration during sleep; 18/19 met the diagnostic criteria for OSAS. Subjectively evaluated snoring was not a reliable predictor of OSAS. We found no significant association between TCS phenotype severity and the severity of OSAS. OSAS is common in TCS, but there is no association with the phenotype severity. Individuals diagnosed with TCS must undergo sleep studies to identify the presence of OSAS.

  10. Predictive factors warrant screening for obstructive sleep apnea in COPD: a Taiwan National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Liang-Wen; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Hao-Chien; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Chan, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) share similar pathological processes and cardiovascular sequelae. Coexisting OSA in COPD – “overlap syndrome” – has worse prognosis than either condition alone, and appropriate treatment improves survival. Our objectives were to ascertain the frequency at which COPD coexists with the risk of OSA in Taiwan and to compare the risk factors, COPD symptoms, and life quality metrics between COPD subgroups with versus without risk of OSA. Methods We conducted a random cross-sectional national telephone survey of adults >40 years old in Taiwan. Participants fulfilling an epidemiological case definition of COPD completed a questionnaire to assess COPD symptoms and OSA risk, comorbidities, and performance of daily activities. Data from COPD cohorts with and without risk of OSA were analyzed and compared. Results Of 6,600 interviews completed, 404 subjects fit the epidemiological case definition of COPD – an overall prevalence of 6.1% in this national sample. Data on OSA risk were available for 292 of this COPD cohort, of whom 29.5% were at risk of OSA. Compared to those without risk of OSA, those with risk of OSA were significantly more likely to have hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes, had significantly higher body mass index and COPD Assessment Test scores, and reported impaired work performance and leisure activities. Conclusion Among adults in Taiwan who fulfill epidemiologic criteria for COPD, 29.5% have coexisting risk of OSA. Comorbid hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes are common and significantly more prevalent among the COPD population at risk of OSA than those who are not. OSA screening is warranted in patients with COPD with those risk factors that are more prevalent in COPD with risk of OSA than without, to target early interventions to reduce adverse cardiovascular sequelae from overlap syndrome. PMID:27099484

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea with excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease regardless of visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji Hee; Ahn, Jae Hee; Yoo, Hye Jin; Seo, Ji A; Kim, Sin Gon; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Shin, Chol; Kim, Nan Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but it remains unclear whether the risk of NAFLD is independently related to OSA regardless of visceral obesity. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine whether OSA alone or in combination with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or short sleep duration was associated with NAFLD independent of visceral fat in Korean adults. Methods: A total of 621 participants were selected from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The abdominal visceral fat area (VFA) and hepatic fat components of the participants were assessed using computed tomography scans and they were then categorized into four groups depending on the presence of OSA and EDS. Results: The proportions of NAFLD were 21.1%, 18.5%, 32.4%, and 46.7% in participants without OSA/EDS, with only EDS, with only OSA, and with both OSA and EDS, respectively. A combination of OSA and EDS increased the odds ratio (OR) for developing NAFLD (OR, 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 6.28) compared to those without OSA/EDS, and this association remained significant (OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.01 to 5.59) even after adjusting for VFA. In short sleepers (< 5 hours) with OSA, the adjusted OR for NAFLD was 2.50 (95% CI, 1.08 to 5.75) compared to those sleeping longer than 5 hours without OSA. Conclusions: In the present study, OSA was closely associated with NAFLD in Korean adults. This association was particularly strong in those with EDS or short sleep duration regardless of VFA. PMID:26552460

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea related to rapid-eye-movement or non-rapid-eye-movement sleep: comparison of demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic features

    PubMed Central

    Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Sertogullarından, Bunyamin; Ozbay, Bulent; Gunbatar, Hulya; Ekin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine whether there are significant differences between rapid-eye-movement (REM)-related obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and non-REM (NREM)-related OSA, in terms of the demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic characteristics of the subjects. Methods : This was a retrospective study of 110 patients (75 males) with either REM-related OSA (n = 58) or NREM-related OSA (n = 52). To define REM-related and NREM-related OSA, we used a previously established criterion, based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): AHI-REM/AHI-NREM ratio > 2 and ≤ 2, respectively. Results : The mean age of the patients with REM-related OSA was 49.5 ± 11.9 years, whereas that of the patients with NREM-related OSA was 49.2 ± 12.6 years. The overall mean AHI (all sleep stages combined) was significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (38.6 ± 28.2 vs. 14.8 ± 9.2; p < 0.05). The mean AHI in the supine position (s-AHI) was also significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (49.0 ± 34.3 vs. 18.8 ± 14.9; p < 0.0001). In the NREM-related OSA group, the s-AHI was higher among the men. In both groups, oxygen desaturation was more severe among the women. We found that REM-related OSA was more common among the patients with mild-to-moderate OSA, whereas NREM-related OSA was more common among those with severe OSA. Conclusions : We found that the severity of NREM-related OSA was associated mainly with s-AHI. Our findings suggest that the s-AHI has a more significant effect on the severity of OSA than does the AHI-REM. When interpreting OSA severity and choosing among treatment modalities, physicians should take into consideration the sleep stage and the sleep posture. PMID:26982041

  13. Serum Vitamin D Is Significantly Inversely Associated with Disease Severity in Caucasian Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kerley, Conor P.; Hutchinson, Katrina; Bolger, Kenneth; McGowan, Aisling; Faul, John; Cormican, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and possible relationships to OSAS severity, sleepiness, lung function, nocturnal heart rate (HR), and body composition. We also aimed to compare the 25(OH)D status of a subset of OSAS patients compared to controls matched for important determinants of both OSAS and vitamin D deficiency (VDD). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at an urban, clinical sleep medicine outpatient center. We recruited newly diagnosed, Caucasian adults who had recently undergone nocturnal polysomnography. We compared body mass index (BMI), body composition (bioelectrical impedance analysis), neck circumference, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), lung function, and vitamin D status (serum 25-hydrpoxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) across OSAS severity categories and non-OSAS subjects. Next, using a case-control design, we compared measures of serum 25(OH)D from OSAS cases to non-OSAS controls who were matched for age, gender, skin pigmentation, sleepiness, season, and BMI. Results: 106 adults (77 male; median age = 54.5; median BMI = 34.3 kg/m2) resident in Dublin, Ireland (latitude 53°N) were recruited and categorized as non-OSAS or mild/moderate/severe OSAS. 98% of OSAS cases had insufficient 25(OH)D (< 75 nmol/L), including 72% with VDD (< 50 nmol/L). 25(OH)D levels decreased with OSAS severity (P = 0.003). 25(OH)D was inversely correlated with BMI, percent body fat, AHI, and nocturnal HR. Subsequent multivariate regression analysis revealed that 25(OH)D was independently associated with both AHI (P = 0.016) and nocturnal HR (P = 0.0419). Our separate case-control study revealed that 25(OH)D was significantly lower in OSAS cases than matched, non-OSAS subjects (P = 0.001). Conclusions: We observed widespread vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in a Caucasian, OSAS population. There were significant, independent, inverse relationships between 25(OH)D and AHI as well as

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypertension in Adolescents: Effect on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Madaeva, Irina; Polyakov, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data in regard to the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension and neurobehavioral and mental status in adolescence. The aim of our study was to evaluate neurobehavioral patterns and cognitive functions in adolescents with hypertension according to absence or presence of OSA. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study completed at the Scientific Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems. Participants included adolescents aged 14–17 years and referred for 24-hour ambulance blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and polysomnographic (PSG) studies between 2007 and 2009, inclusive. Results. 18 hypertensive OSA (the 1st group) and 20 hypertensive non-OSA adolescents (the 2nd group) were included in the study. Significant changes of neurobehavioral functioning in OSA patients were shown. Cognitive abilities also were impaired. Verbal and visual memory indexes and attention index were 2.1 and 2.2 times lower, accordingly, in the 1st group than in the 2nd group (P < 0.05). Speech index was significantly 2.8 times lower in OSA patients than in non-OSA patients (P < 0.05). In hypertensive OSA adolescents more significant Spearman correlations between classic sleep parameters and cognitive measures were found compared to patients without OSA. Conclusions. These results suggest that OSA is closely associated with neurobehavioral and cognitive functioning in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:27445534

  15. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Farajzadeh, Mohammad; Hosseini, Meimanat; Mohtashami, Jamileh; Chaibakhsh, Samira; Zagheri Tafreshi, Mansoureh; Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is the most frequent psychiatric disorder among the elderly. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic and prevalent disease that has an ambiguous role in triggering depression. Several researches with contradictory findings have been performed about the association between OSA and depression. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the association between OSA and depression among elderly. Patients and Methods A total of 350 home residing elderly took part in this case-control study. The participants were selected using clustering method. All cases were divided into two groups of depressed and non-depressed using the geriatric depression scale (GDS). Then they were matched in age, gender, education and body mass index (BMI). Berlin questionnaire (BQ) was used to diagnose OSA. Data analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U test, t-test, Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests and odds ratio. Results Totally, 60.6 % of depressed group and 18.9 % of non-depressed group were in high risk for OSA. A significant association was found between OSA and depression (P < 0.001, OR = 6.61, CI 95 % = 4.1 - 10.7). In addition, a significant association was found between gender and OSA (P = 0.008). Conclusions OSA was associated with depression among the elderly patients. Given the high prevalence of OSA in older adults, implementation of screening methods is necessary to identify people at high risk of OSA. PMID:27579333

  16. The Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients with Severe Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Benotti, Peter; Wood, G. Craig; Argyropoulos, George; Pack, Allan; Keenan, Brendan T.; Gao, Xiang; Gerhard, Glenn; Still, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among candidates for bariatric surgery. OSA and its associated intermittent hypoxia have been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. A large cohort of bariatric surgery patients was studied in an effort to explore the relationship between OSA severity, hypoxia, metabolic syndrome, and the severity of NAFLD. Methods Bariatric surgery candidates who underwent both polysomnography and liver biopsy were studied. The severity of OSA as determined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and parameters of hypoxia was studied in relation to extent of abnormalities of liver histology as measured by the presence of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Results The study cohort included 362 patients with a mean age of 46.2 years and BMI of 49.9 kg/m2. On the basis of AHI, 26% of the cohort had no OSA, 32% mild OSA, 22% moderate OSA, and 20% severe OSA. For the study subjects without metabolic syndrome, positive correlations were found between OSA severity, as measured by AHI, and parameters of hypoxia, with the severity of NAFLD. Conclusions OSA severity and its accompanying hypoxia are associated with the severity of NAFLD. PMID:26880657

  17. Inflammatory Markers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children: The NANOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Peris, Eduard; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Martinez, Mónica Gonzalez; Jurado-Luque, María José; Corral-Peñafiel, Jaime; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are common coexisting conditions associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state underlying some of the cognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular morbidities. Aim. To examine the levels of inflammatory markers in obese community-dwelling children with OSA, as compared to no-OSA, and their association with clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Methods. In this cross-sectional, prospective multicenter study, healthy obese Spanish children (ages 4–15 years) were randomly selected and underwent nocturnal PSG followed by a morning fasting blood draw. Plasma samples were assayed for multiple inflammatory markers. Results. 204 children were enrolled in the study; 75 had OSA, defined by an obstructive respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of 3 events/hour total sleep time (TST). BMI, gender, and age were similar in OSA and no-OSA children. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels were significantly higher in OSA children, with interleukin-6 concentrations being higher in moderate-severe OSA (i.e., AHI > 5/hrTST; P < 0.01), while MCP-1 levels were associated with more prolonged nocturnal hypercapnia (P < 0.001). Conclusion. IL-6, MCP-1, and PAI-1 are altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children further reinforcing the proinflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322763. PMID:24991089

  18. Bidirectional association between obstructive sleep apnea and depression: A population-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mei-Lien; Tsao, Hsiao-Mei; Hsu, Chien-Chi; Wu, Kun-Ming; Hsu, Tsan-Sheng; Wu, Yah-Ting; Hu, Gwo-Chi

    2016-09-01

    An association may exist between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and depression. However, results regarding this association are inconsistent, and the direction of the association between OSA and depression remains unknown. Therefore, we used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to investigate the bidirectional association between OSA and depression.A total of 6427 OSA patients and 32,135 age and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled to analyze the risk of depression among patients with OSA, where 27,073 patients with depression and 135,365 control subjects were enrolled to address the risk of OSA among patients with depression. All subjects were followed to identify their outcomes of interest from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2012.Cox proportional-hazards models, after adjusting for potential confounders, demonstrated that patients with OSA had an increased risk (adjusted hazard ratio 2.48, 95% confidence interval 2.20-2.79) of developing depression, whereas those with depression were associated with an increased risk of future OSA (adjusted hazard ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 2.11-2.50).Our results suggested that a strong bidirectional relationship exists between OSA and depression, with each disease influencing the development of the other. Health providers are recommended to ensure the early detection and management of depression among patients with OSA and vice versa. PMID:27631236

  19. Severe upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    PubMed

    Bonekat, H William; Hardin, Kimberly A

    2003-10-01

    Few disorders may manifest with predominantly sleep-related obstructive breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder, varies in severity and is associated with significant cardiovascular and neurocognitive morbidity. It is estimated that between 8 and 18 million people in the United States have at least mild OSA. Although the exact mechanism of OSA is not well-delineated, multiple factors contribute to the development of upper airway obstruction and include anatomic, mechanical, neurologic, and inflammatory changes in the pharynx. OSA may occur concomitantly with asthma. Approximately 74% of asthmatics experience nocturnal symptoms of airflow obstruction secondary to reactive airways disease. Similar cytokine, chemokine, and histologic changes are seen in both disorders. Sleep deprivation, chronic upper airway edema, and inflammation associated with OSA may further exacerbate nocturnal asthma symptoms. Allergic rhinitis may contribute to both OSA and asthma. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for OSA. Treatment with CPAP therapy has also been shown to improve both daytime and nighttime peak expiratory flow rates in patients with concomitant OSA and asthma. It is important for allergists to be aware of how OSA may complicate diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. A thorough sleep history and high clinical suspicion for OSA is indicated, particularly in asthma patients who are refractory to standard medication treatments.

  20. Diagnostic decision support of heart rate turbulence in sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Giovanni; De Felice, Alberto; Balzano, Giovanni; Zotti, Rita; Iannotti, Pellegrino; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repeated upper-airway obstruction during sleep. It is diagnosed by polysomnographic studies, scoring OSAS severity by an apneas/hypopneas index associated to worse prognosis, mainly for an increased cardiovascular morbidity. Cardiac autonomic impairments involved in the development of cardiovascular disease in OSAS can be assessed by heart rate turbulence (HRT) analysis and aim of the paper is to show the increased medical decision support by HRT evaluation in OSAS patients. HRT has been assessed in 274 polysomnographic recordings of mild-to-severe OSAS patients and an overall cardiorespiratory risk scoring (CRRIS) index has been proposed on the base of both OSAS severity and HRT assessment. Results showed that, while the only polysomnografic analysis would have equally ranked OSAS patients within their mild-to-severe classification, CRRIS index allows to identify a 19% of severe-OSAS patients at very high risk of sudden cardiac death, a 13% of moderate-OSAS patients with a risk level comparable to those of severe, and a 17% of mild-OSAS patients with evidence of an autonomic impairment. CRRIS index, detecting patients at greater probability of worsening could give to the physician a very useful medical decision support in the follow up of this particular chronic disease.

  1. Systolic pressure response to voluntary apnea predicts sympathetic tone in obstructive sleep apnea as a clinically useful index.

    PubMed

    Jouett, Noah P; Hardisty, Janelle M; Mason, J Ryan; Niv, Dorene; Romano, James J; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Burk, John R; Smith, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation tested the hypotheses that systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses to voluntary apnea (a) serve as a surrogate of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), (b) can distinguish Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) patients from control subjects and (c) can document autonomic effects of treatment. 9 OSA and 10 control subjects were recruited in a laboratory study; 44 OSA subjects and 78 control subjects were recruited in a clinical study; and 21 untreated OSA subjects and 14 well-treated OSA subjects were recruited into a treatment study. Each subject performed hypoxic and room air voluntary apneas in triplicate. Muscle SNA (MSNA) and continuous AP were measured during each apnea in the laboratory study, while systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses were measured continuously and by standard auscultation in the clinical and treatment studies. OSA subjects exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), SAP and MSNA responses to hypoxic apnea (all P<0.01) and the SAP response highly correlated with the MSNA response (R(2)=0.72, P<0.001). Clinical assessment confirmed that OSA subjects exhibited markedly elevated SAP responses (P<0.01), while treated OSA subjects had a decreased SAP response to apnea (P<0.04) compared to poorly treated subjects. These data indicate that (a) OSA subjects exhibit increased pressor and MSNA responses to apnea, and that (b) voluntary apnea may be a clinically useful assessment tool of autonomic dysregulation and treatment efficacy in OSA.

  2. Assessment of Multiple Health Risks in a Single Obstructive Sleep Apnea Population

    PubMed Central

    Hudgel, David W.; Lamerato, Lois E.; Jacobsen, Gordon R.; Drake, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: In order to provide a comprehensive estimate of the health risks for OSA patients, we analyzed multiple outcomes and independent predictors of these outcomes in an OSA population evaluated and followed at one sleep center. Methods: Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used in an 8-year follow-up analysis of consecutive OSA patients (N = 1025) and non-apneic snorers (apnea-hypopnea index < 5, N = 494). Results: In our fully adjusted model, independent variables predictive of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebral vascular accident, and pulmonary embolus were: older age, male gender, and history of cardiovascular diseases or procedures. In examining subgroups based on age and gender, severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30) was one of the independent predictors of mortality in males and in patients < 50 years old. Severe OSA interacted with maleness, age, and hypertension to predict mortality and myocardial infarction. CPAP use ≥ 4 h/night was associated with lower mortality rates in males and those ≥ 50 years old with severe OSA. Conclusions: Mortality and cardiovascular event outcomes were predicted by demographics and cardiovascular disease history more commonly than by OSA severity. OSA severity was an important predictor of mortality in male and young OSA patients. CPAP use appeared protective in older and male severe OSA patients. Citation: Hudgel DW; Lamerato LE; Jacobsen GR; Drake CL. Assessment of multiple health risks in a single obstructive sleep apnea population. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(1):9-18. PMID:22334803

  3. Prevalence and Diagnostic Approach to Sleep Apnea in Hemodialysis Patients: A Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Forni Ogna, Valentina; Ogna, Adam; Pruijm, Menno; Bassi, Isabelle; Zuercher, Emilie; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Bullani, Roberto; Teta, Daniel; Gauthier, Thierry; Cherpillod, Anne; Mathieu, Claudine; Mihalache, Alexandra; Cornette, Francoise; Haba-Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous observations found a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the hemodialysis population, but the best diagnostic approach remains undefined. We assessed OSA prevalence and performance of available screening tools to propose a specific diagnostic algorithm. Methods. 104 patients from 6 Swiss hemodialysis centers underwent polygraphy and completed 3 OSA screening scores: STOP-BANG, Berlin's Questionnaire, and Adjusted Neck Circumference. The OSA predictors were identified on a derivation population and used to develop the diagnostic algorithm, which was validated on an independent population. Results. We found 56% OSA prevalence (AHI ≥ 15/h), which was largely underdiagnosed. Screening scores showed poor performance for OSA screening (ROC areas 0.538 [SE 0.093] to 0.655 [SE 0.083]). Age, neck circumference, and time on renal replacement therapy were the best predictors of OSA and were used to develop a screening algorithm, with higher discriminatory performance than classical screening tools (ROC area 0.831 [0.066]). Conclusions. Our study confirms the high OSA prevalence and highlights the low diagnosis rate of this treatable cardiovascular risk factor in the hemodialysis population. Considering the poor performance of OSA screening tools, we propose and validate a specific algorithm to identify hemodialysis patients at risk for OSA for whom further sleep investigations should be considered. PMID:26229952

  4. Reaction of octenylsuccinic anhydride with a mixture of granular starch and soluble maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    The reaction of octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) with a mixture of granular waxy maize starch and soluble maltodextrin was investigated. OSA was reacted with a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of the granular starch and maltodextrin at OSA levels of 1.5, 3, 9, and 15% (wt% based on starch weight). After the first 0.5h of the reaction, degree of substitution (DS) on maltodextrin reached 0.021, 0.030, 0.080, and 0.10 for 1.5, 3, 9, and 15% OSA, respectively, whereas DS for granular starch was only 0.0020, 0.0087, 0.014, and 0.016. At 2h of the reaction, the bound OS ratio of maltodextrin to granular starch was 10.8 when OSA concentration was 1.5% and the ratio decreased to ca. 5 at higher OSA concentrations. OSA preferred to react with maltodextrin than semi-crystalline granular starch when both existed in the system. OSA reacted with maltodextrin at a much faster rate and to a greater extent than with granular starch, but a significant amount of OSA reacted with granular starch at 3-15% OSA concentrations.

  5. Bidirectional association between obstructive sleep apnea and depression: A population-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mei-Lien; Tsao, Hsiao-Mei; Hsu, Chien-Chi; Wu, Kun-Ming; Hsu, Tsan-Sheng; Wu, Yah-Ting; Hu, Gwo-Chi

    2016-09-01

    An association may exist between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and depression. However, results regarding this association are inconsistent, and the direction of the association between OSA and depression remains unknown. Therefore, we used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to investigate the bidirectional association between OSA and depression.A total of 6427 OSA patients and 32,135 age and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled to analyze the risk of depression among patients with OSA, where 27,073 patients with depression and 135,365 control subjects were enrolled to address the risk of OSA among patients with depression. All subjects were followed to identify their outcomes of interest from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2012.Cox proportional-hazards models, after adjusting for potential confounders, demonstrated that patients with OSA had an increased risk (adjusted hazard ratio 2.48, 95% confidence interval 2.20-2.79) of developing depression, whereas those with depression were associated with an increased risk of future OSA (adjusted hazard ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 2.11-2.50).Our results suggested that a strong bidirectional relationship exists between OSA and depression, with each disease influencing the development of the other. Health providers are recommended to ensure the early detection and management of depression among patients with OSA and vice versa.

  6. A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Micha T; Schoch, Otto D; Rickli, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA. PMID:27051291

  7. Systolic pressure response to voluntary apnea predicts sympathetic tone in obstructive sleep apnea as a clinically useful index.

    PubMed

    Jouett, Noah P; Hardisty, Janelle M; Mason, J Ryan; Niv, Dorene; Romano, James J; Watenpaugh, Donald E; Burk, John R; Smith, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation tested the hypotheses that systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses to voluntary apnea (a) serve as a surrogate of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), (b) can distinguish Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) patients from control subjects and (c) can document autonomic effects of treatment. 9 OSA and 10 control subjects were recruited in a laboratory study; 44 OSA subjects and 78 control subjects were recruited in a clinical study; and 21 untreated OSA subjects and 14 well-treated OSA subjects were recruited into a treatment study. Each subject performed hypoxic and room air voluntary apneas in triplicate. Muscle SNA (MSNA) and continuous AP were measured during each apnea in the laboratory study, while systolic arterial pressure (SAP) responses were measured continuously and by standard auscultation in the clinical and treatment studies. OSA subjects exhibited increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), SAP and MSNA responses to hypoxic apnea (all P<0.01) and the SAP response highly correlated with the MSNA response (R(2)=0.72, P<0.001). Clinical assessment confirmed that OSA subjects exhibited markedly elevated SAP responses (P<0.01), while treated OSA subjects had a decreased SAP response to apnea (P<0.04) compared to poorly treated subjects. These data indicate that (a) OSA subjects exhibit increased pressor and MSNA responses to apnea, and that (b) voluntary apnea may be a clinically useful assessment tool of autonomic dysregulation and treatment efficacy in OSA. PMID:26774324

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Hypertension in Adolescents: Effect on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Functioning.

    PubMed

    Madaeva, Irina; Berdina, Olga; Polyakov, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data in regard to the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension and neurobehavioral and mental status in adolescence. The aim of our study was to evaluate neurobehavioral patterns and cognitive functions in adolescents with hypertension according to absence or presence of OSA. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study completed at the Scientific Center for Family Health and Human Reproduction Problems. Participants included adolescents aged 14-17 years and referred for 24-hour ambulance blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and polysomnographic (PSG) studies between 2007 and 2009, inclusive. Results. 18 hypertensive OSA (the 1st group) and 20 hypertensive non-OSA adolescents (the 2nd group) were included in the study. Significant changes of neurobehavioral functioning in OSA patients were shown. Cognitive abilities also were impaired. Verbal and visual memory indexes and attention index were 2.1 and 2.2 times lower, accordingly, in the 1st group than in the 2nd group (P < 0.05). Speech index was significantly 2.8 times lower in OSA patients than in non-OSA patients (P < 0.05). In hypertensive OSA adolescents more significant Spearman correlations between classic sleep parameters and cognitive measures were found compared to patients without OSA. Conclusions. These results suggest that OSA is closely associated with neurobehavioral and cognitive functioning in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:27445534

  9. Pulse oximetry recorded from the Phone Oximeter for detection of obstructive sleep apnea events with and without oxygen desaturation in children.

    PubMed

    Garde, Ainara; Dehkordi, Parastoo; Wensley, David; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and can lead to serious health problems in children if left untreated. Polysomnography, the gold standard for OSA diagnosis, is resource intensive and requires a specialized laboratory. Thus, we proposed to use the Phone Oximeter™, a portable device integrating pulse oximetry with a smartphone, to detect OSA events. As a proportion of OSA events occur without oxygen desaturation (defined as SpO2 decreases ≥ 3%), we suggest combining SpO2 and pulse rate variability (PRV) analysis to identify all OSA events and provide a more detailed sleep analysis. We recruited 160 children and recorded pulse oximetry consisting of SpO2 and plethysmography (PPG) using the Phone Oximeter™, alongside standard polysomnography. A sleep technician visually scored all OSA events with and without oxygen desaturation from polysomnography. We divided pulse oximetry signals into 1-min signal segments and extracted several features from SpO2 and PPG analysis in the time and frequency domain. Segments with OSA, especially the ones with oxygen desaturation, presented greater SpO2 variability and modulation reflected in the spectral domain than segments without OSA. Segments with OSA also showed higher heart rate and sympathetic activity through the PRV analysis relative to segments without OSA. PRV analysis was more sensitive than SpO2 analysis for identification of OSA events without oxygen desaturation. Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis enhanced OSA event detection through a multiple logistic regression model. The area under the ROC curve increased from 81% to 87%. Thus, the Phone Oximeter™ might be useful to monitor sleep and identify OSA events with and without oxygen desaturation at home. PMID:26738074

  10. Pulse oximetry recorded from the Phone Oximeter for detection of obstructive sleep apnea events with and without oxygen desaturation in children.

    PubMed

    Garde, Ainara; Dehkordi, Parastoo; Wensley, David; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and can lead to serious health problems in children if left untreated. Polysomnography, the gold standard for OSA diagnosis, is resource intensive and requires a specialized laboratory. Thus, we proposed to use the Phone Oximeter™, a portable device integrating pulse oximetry with a smartphone, to detect OSA events. As a proportion of OSA events occur without oxygen desaturation (defined as SpO2 decreases ≥ 3%), we suggest combining SpO2 and pulse rate variability (PRV) analysis to identify all OSA events and provide a more detailed sleep analysis. We recruited 160 children and recorded pulse oximetry consisting of SpO2 and plethysmography (PPG) using the Phone Oximeter™, alongside standard polysomnography. A sleep technician visually scored all OSA events with and without oxygen desaturation from polysomnography. We divided pulse oximetry signals into 1-min signal segments and extracted several features from SpO2 and PPG analysis in the time and frequency domain. Segments with OSA, especially the ones with oxygen desaturation, presented greater SpO2 variability and modulation reflected in the spectral domain than segments without OSA. Segments with OSA also showed higher heart rate and sympathetic activity through the PRV analysis relative to segments without OSA. PRV analysis was more sensitive than SpO2 analysis for identification of OSA events without oxygen desaturation. Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis enhanced OSA event detection through a multiple logistic regression model. The area under the ROC curve increased from 81% to 87%. Thus, the Phone Oximeter™ might be useful to monitor sleep and identify OSA events with and without oxygen desaturation at home.

  11. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea in children: a critical update

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is a highly prevalent disorder caused by a conglomeration of complex pathophysiological processes, leading to recurrent upper airway dysfunction during sleep. The clinical relevance of OSA resides in its association with significant morbidities that affect the cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic systems. The American Academy of Pediatrics recently reiterated its recommendations that children with symptoms and signs suggestive of OSA should be investigated with polysomnography (PSG), and treated accordingly. However, treatment decisions should not only be guided by PSG results, but should also integrate the magnitude of symptoms and the presence or absence of risk factors and signs of OSA morbidity. The first-line therapy in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy is adenotonsillectomy, although there is increasing evidence that medical therapy, in the form of intranasal steroids or montelukast, may be considered in mild OSA. In this review, we delineate the major concepts regarding the pathophysiology of OSA, its morbidity, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24109201

  13. Preparation and characterization of octenylsuccinylated plantain starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, Maria C; San Martín-Gonzalez, María F; BeMiller, James N; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    Plantain starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at two concentrations (3 and 15% w/w) of OSA. The morphology, granule size distribution, pasting, gelatinization, swelling, and solubility of granules and structural features of the starch polymers were evaluated. Granules of the OSA-modified starches increased in size during cooking more than did the granules of the native starch, and the effect was greater at the higher OSA concentration. Pasting viscosities also increased, but gelatinization and pasting temperatures and enthalpy of gelatinization decreased in the OSA-modified starches. It was concluded that insertion of OS groups effected disorder in the granular structure. Solubility, weight average molar mass, Mw¯, and z-average radius of gyration, RGz, of the amylopectin decreased as the OSA concentration increased, indicating a decrease in molecular size.

  14. A Novel Class of Plant Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Orsellinic Acid Biosynthesis from Rhododendron dauricum

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Futoshi; Iijima, Miu; Yamanaka, Eriko; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Saeki, Haruna; Morimoto, Satoshi; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kurosaki, Fumiya; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhododendron dauricum L. produces daurichromenic acid, the anti-HIV meroterpenoid consisting of sesquiterpene and orsellinic acid (OSA) moieties. To characterize the enzyme responsible for OSA biosynthesis, a cDNA encoding a novel polyketide synthase (PKS), orcinol synthase (ORS), was cloned from young leaves of R. dauricum. The primary structure of ORS shared relatively low identities to those of PKSs from other plants, and the active site of ORS had a unique amino acid composition. The bacterially expressed, recombinant ORS accepted acetyl-CoA as the preferable starter substrate, and produced orcinol as the major reaction product, along with four minor products including OSA. The ORS identified in this study is the first plant PKS that generates acetate-derived aromatic tetraketides, such as orcinol and OSA. Interestingly, OSA production was clearly enhanced in the presence of Cannabis sativa olivetolic acid cyclase, suggesting that the ORS is involved in OSA biosynthesis together with an unidentified cyclase in R. dauricum. PMID:27729920

  15. Preparation and characterization of octenylsuccinylated plantain starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, Maria C; San Martín-Gonzalez, María F; BeMiller, James N; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    Plantain starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at two concentrations (3 and 15% w/w) of OSA. The morphology, granule size distribution, pasting, gelatinization, swelling, and solubility of granules and structural features of the starch polymers were evaluated. Granules of the OSA-modified starches increased in size during cooking more than did the granules of the native starch, and the effect was greater at the higher OSA concentration. Pasting viscosities also increased, but gelatinization and pasting temperatures and enthalpy of gelatinization decreased in the OSA-modified starches. It was concluded that insertion of OS groups effected disorder in the granular structure. Solubility, weight average molar mass, Mw¯, and z-average radius of gyration, RGz, of the amylopectin decreased as the OSA concentration increased, indicating a decrease in molecular size. PMID:25036604

  16. Consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome on left ventricular geometry and diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Bodez, Diane; Damy, Thibaud; Soulat-Dufour, Laurie; Meuleman, Catherine; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a frequent sleep disorder that is known to be an independent risk factor for arterial hypertension (AHT). Potential confounding factors associated with both OSAS and AHT, such as age, diabetes mellitus and obesity, have been explored extensively, and are considered as independent but additive factors. However, these factors are also contributors to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and LV diastolic dysfunction, both of which are important causes of cardiovascular morbidity, and have been reported to be associated with OSAS for decades. In this review, we present an overview of how OSAS may promote changes in LV geometry and diastolic dysfunction through its best-known cardiovascular complication, arterial hypertension. We also summarize the epidemiological links between OSAS and LVH, outline diastolic dysfunction in OSAS patients, and try to highlight the mechanisms responsible, focusing on the effect of confounding factors. PMID:27344377

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea in the obese.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Charuzi, I

    1998-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome occurs in 4% to 9% of middle-aged men and in 1% to 2% of middle-aged women. The incidence of OSA among morbidly obese patients is 12- to 30-fold higher. The pathophysiology of OSA is complex and incompletely understood. The important clinical symptoms of OSA include snoring, daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, morning fatigue, and headaches. The diagnosis is made by polysomnography. The possible sequelae of OSA are hypertension, left and right ventricular hypertrophy, sudden cardiovascular death, and increased risk for brain infarction. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) appears to be the recommended treatment for OSA. Morbidly obese patients may also benefit from weight reduction gastric surgery. PMID:9717428

  18. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  19. Functional Role of Neural Injury in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P.; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Eckert, Danny J.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are multifactorial. Neural injury affecting the upper airway muscles due to repetitive exposure to intermittent hypoxia and/or mechanical strain resulting from snoring and recurrent upper airway closure have been proposed to contribute to OSA disease progression. Multiple studies have demonstrated altered sensory and motor function in patients with OSA using a variety of neurophysiological and histological approaches. However, the extent to which the alterations contribute to impairments in upper airway muscle function, and thus OSA disease progression, remains uncertain. This brief review, primarily focused on data in humans, summarizes: (1) the evidence for upper airway sensorimotor injury in OSA and (2) current understanding of how these changes affect upper airway function and their potential to change OSA progression. Some unresolved questions including possible treatment targets are noted. PMID:22715333

  20. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Preethi; Greenberg, Harly

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic risk in several large epidemiologic studies. OSA leads to several physiologic disturbances such as intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increase in autonomic tone. These disturbances have been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in animal and human studies. Studies also suggest a bidirectional relationship between OSA and T2DM whereby T2DM itself might contribute to the features of OSA. Moreover, successful treatment of OSA may reduce these risks, although this is controversial. The purpose of this article is to review 1) the links and bidirectional associations between OSA and T2DM; 2) the pathogenic mechanisms that might link these two disease states; 3) the role of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in improving glucose tolerance, sensitivity, and resistance; and 4) the implications for clinical practice. PMID:26491377

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    PubMed

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26562000

  3. Frequency of distribution of inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha gene polymorphism in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Popko, K; Gorska, E; Potapinska, O; Wasik, M; Stoklosa, A; Plywaczewski, R; Winiarska, M; Gorecka, D; Sliwinski, P; Popko, M; Szwed, T; Demkow, U

    2008-12-01

    Obesity is one of the most commonly identified factors for the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Adipose tissue is the source of many cytokines, among them there are IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-alpha. The level of inflammatory cytokines increases in people with OSAS and obesity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of genotypes in inflammatory cytokine genes in people with obesity-related OSAS. The examined group consisted of 102 person with obesity related-OSAS and 77 normal weight person without OSAS. Genotyping of DNA sequence variation was carried out by restriction enzyme (IL-1: Taq I, IL-6: Lwe I, TNF-alpha: Nco I) analysis of PCR amplified DNA. The study revealed a significant correlation between polymorphism located in the promoter region of inflammatory cytokine genes and obesity-related OSAS.

  4. The burden of obstructive sleep apnea and associated excessive sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Pagel, James F

    2008-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent within the primary care community, and yet it is frequently undiagnosed. The most common symptom of OSA--excessive sleepiness (ES)--can negatively affect quality of life. Because the ES associated with OSA results in an increased risk of motor vehicle accidents, occupational accidents, and decreased daily functioning, the primary care provider (PCP) needs to be vigilant for risk factors and symptoms associated with this sleep disorder. Commercial drivers in particular need to be carefully assessed and monitored in collaboration with a sleep specialist. The economic costs of untreated OSA are high. Early diagnosis and treatment of OSA is cost-effective and is greatly aided by a high level of clinical suspicion and an awareness of risk factors for OSA on the part of PCPs.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Modulates Airway Inflammation and Remodelling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Taillé, Camille; Rouvel-Tallec, Anny; Stoica, Maria; Danel, Claire; Dehoux, Monique; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Pretolani, Marina; Aubier, Michel; d’Ortho, Marie-Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is frequently observed in severe asthma but the causal link between the 2 diseases remains hypothetical. The role of OSA-related systemic and airway neutrophilic inflammation in asthma bronchial inflammation or remodelling has been rarely investigated. The aim of this study was to compare hallmarks of inflammation in induced sputum and features of airway remodelling in bronchial biopsies from adult patients with severe asthma with and without OSA. Materials and Methods An overnight polygraphy was performed in 55 patients referred for difficult-to-treat asthma, who complained of nocturnal respiratory symptoms, poor sleep quality or fatigue. We compared sputum analysis, reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, smooth muscle area, vascular density and inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchial biopsies. Results In total, 27/55 patients (49%) had OSA diagnosed by overnight polygraphy. Despite a moderate increase in apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; 14.2±1.6 event/h [5–35]), the proportion of sputum neutrophils was higher and that of macrophages lower in OSA than non-OSA patients, with higher levels of interleukin 8 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. The RBM was significantly thinner in OSA than non-OSA patients (5.8±0.4 vs. 7.8±0.4 μm, p<0.05). RBM thickness and OSA severity assessed by the AHI were negatively correlated (rho = -0.65, p<0.05). OSA and non-OSA patients did not differ in age, sex, BMI, lung function, asthma control findings or treatment. Conclusion Mild OSA in patients with severe asthma is associated with increased proportion of neutrophils in sputum and changes in airway remodelling. PMID:26934051

  6. Sleep-related eating disorder as a cause of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eveloff, S E; Millman, R P

    1993-08-01

    A patient with obesity resulting from sleep-related eating disorder demonstrated signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Incarceration restricted access to food during the night, leading to weight loss and clinical improvement. Release from prison allowed recurrence of unrestricted sleep-eating, recurrent obesity, and documented OSA. Successful treatment of sleep-related eating disorder can result in improvement in coexisting OSA.

  7. Acoustic-integrated dynamic MR imaging for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunn-Jy; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Ying-Chieh; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Lo, Men-Tzung; Pham, Van-Truong; Lin, Chen; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by multi-level upper airway obstruction. Anatomic changes at the sites of obstruction may modify the physical or acoustic properties of snores. The surgical success of OSA depends upon precise localization of obstructed levels. We present a case of OSAS who received simultaneous dynamic MRI and snore acoustic recordings. The synchronized image and acoustic information successfully characterize the sites of temporal obstruction during sleep-disordered breathing events.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  9. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  10. Heart rate variability in childhood obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Ka-Li; Yung, Tak-Cheung; Ng, Daniel K; Chan, Chung-Hong; Lau, Wing-Fai; Fu, Yu-Ming

    2011-03-01

    The identification of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is important because of morbidities associated with OSA. A previous adult study demonstrated the use of heart rate variability (HRV) as a tool to identify patients with moderate to severe OSA. Either a reduction in time parameters or an increase in LF/HF ratio was seen at overnight or 24-hr studies suggestive of increased sympathetic modulation. To study the feasibility of daytime HRV as a screening tool, a short-term recording of HRV is studied. Since it was shown in adult study that increased normalized LF, decreased normalized HF and increased LF/HF ratio could be detectable during supine rest at daytime awake period, the authors hypothesize that the differences are also detectable in children. Children who underwent sleep polysomnography for suspected OSA were recruited. Subjects were classified OSA if apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 1.5/hr and non-OSA if AHI ≤ 1.5/hr. Continuous 1-hr electrocardiographic monitoring was recorded in awake children during the day. Parameters from time domain and frequency domain were analyzed. Seventy-four male and 17 female snoring subjects were included in this study. Fifty-one (56%) and 40 (44%) of them were classified as "non-OSA" and "OSA," respectively. pNN50, a parameter for parasympathetic modulation, was significantly reduced in the OSA group when compared with the non-OSA group. Using multiple regression, all time domain variables were shown to be decreased in OSA group. Our results suggest that 1-hr study of HRV may be a feasible tool in identifying children with OSA.

  11. Evaluation of Ocular Surface Health in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Emine Esra; Akçam, Hanife Tuba; Uzun, Feyzahan; Özdek, Şengül; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate ocular surface health in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to investigate the tendency of these patients toward dry eyes. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients who underwent polysomnography and were diagnosed with OSAS and 50 normal control subjects were compared with respect to ocular surface disease index (OSDI), Schirmer I test and tear film break-up time (TBUT) values. Results: Patients were grouped as mild (n=15, 30%), moderate (n=15, 30%) and severe (n=20, 40%) according to apnea-hypopnea index values. The right eyes of patients were included in both groups. OSDI values were as follows: control group, 18.7±8.5; mild OSAS group, 40.2±2.8; moderate OSAS group, 48.5±2.2 and severe OSAS group, 62.7±2.3 (p<0.001). TBUT values were as follows: control group, 12.3±4.9; mild OSAS group, 8.2±4.7; moderate OSAS group, 5.8±2.1 and severe OSAS group, 4.2±3.7 (p<0.001). Schirmer values were as follows: control group, 18±6.1 mm; mild OSAS group, 12.9±6.7 mm; moderate OSAS group, 8.5±5.2 mm and severe OSAS group, 7.9±4.7 mm (p<0.001). Conclusion: Patients with OSAS seem to have a tendency toward dry eyes. Clinicians should be aware of dry eye development in these patients. PMID:27800271

  12. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  13. Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A.G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M.S.; Kharbanda, O.P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P.R.; Mallick, B.N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S.C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J.C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V.K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive sleep apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:25366217

  14. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

  15. Distinct severity stages of obstructive sleep apnoea are correlated with unique dyslipidaemia: large-scale observational study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yang, Mingpo; Chen, Haoyan; Shi, Yongyong; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyslipidaemia is an intermediary exacerbation factor for various diseases but the impact of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on dyslipidaemia remains unclear. Methods A total of 3582 subjects with suspected OSA consecutively admitted to our hospital sleep centre were screened and 2983 (2422 with OSA) were included in the Shanghai Sleep Health Study. OSA severity was quantified using the apnoea–hypopnea index (AHI), the oxygen desaturation index and the arousal index. Biochemical indicators and anthropometric data were also collected. The relationship between OSA severity and the risk of dyslipidaemia was evaluated via ordinal logistic regression, restricted cubic spline (RCS) analysis and multivariate linear regressions. Results The RCS mapped a nonlinear dose–effect relationship between the risk of dyslipidaemia and OSA severity, and yielded knots of the AHI (9.4, 28.2, 54.4 and 80.2). After integrating the clinical definition and RCS-selected knots, all subjects were regrouped into four AHI severity stages. Following segmented multivariate linear modelling of each stage, distinguishable sets of OSA risk factors were quantified: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein E and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C); body mass index and/or waist to hip ratio; and HDL-C, LDL-C and triglycerides were specifically associated with stage I, stages II and III, and stages II–IV with different OSA indices. Conclusions Our study revealed the multistage and non-monotonic relationships between OSA and dyslipidaemia and quantified the relationships between OSA severity indexes and distinct risk factors for specific OSA severity stages. Our study suggests that a new interpretive and predictive strategy for dynamic assessment of the risk progression over the clinical course of OSA should be adopted. PMID:26883674

  16. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Collop, Nancy A.; Jacobowitz, Ofer; Thomas, Sherene M.; Quan, Stuart F.; Aronsky, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes when left untreated. There is significant heterogeneity in the evaluation and management of OSA resulting in variation in cost and outcomes. Thus, the goal for developing these measures was to have a way to evaluate the outcomes and reliability of the processes involved with the standard care approaches used in the diagnosis and management of OSA. The OSA quality care measures presented here focus on both outcomes and processes. The AASM commissioned the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup to develop quality care measures aimed at optimizing care for adult patients with OSA. These quality care measures developed by the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup are an extension of the original Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) measures group for OSA. The measures are based on the available scientific evidence, focus on public safety, and strive to improve quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes for individual OSA patients. The three outcomes that were selected were as follows: (1) improve disease detection and categorization; (2) improve quality of life; and (3) reduce cardiovascular risk. After selecting these relevant outcomes, a total of ten process measures were chosen that could be applied and assessed for the purpose of accomplishing these outcomes. In the future, the measures described in this document may be reported through the PQRS in addition to, or as a replacement for, the current OSA measures group. The overall objective for the development of these measures is that implementation of these quality measures will result in improved patient outcomes, reduce the public health burden of OSA, and provide a measurable standard for evaluating and managing OSA. Citation: Aurora RN, Collop NA, Jacobowitz O, Thomas SM, Quan SF, Aronsky AJ. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with

  17. Lack of Impact of Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleepiness, Mood and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Batool-Anwar, Salma; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Eichling, Phillip; Patel, Sanjay; Shen, Wei; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with sleepiness, depression and reduced quality of life. However, it is unclear whether mild OSA has these negative impacts. Using data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), this study determined whether participants with mild OSA had greater sleepiness, more depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. Methods 239 individuals evaluated for participation in APPLES with a baseline apnea hypopnea index (AHI) < 15 /hour were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: No OSA (N=40, AHI < 5 /hour) or Mild OSA (N=199, 5 to <15 /hour) based on their screening polysomnogram. Scores on their Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D), Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) were compared between groups. Results There were no significant differences between the No OSA and Mild OSA groups on any of the 5 measures: ESS (No OSA, 9.8 ± 3.5 vs Mild OSA, 10.6 ± 4.3, p=0.26), SSS,(2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.9 ± 1.0, p=0.52), HAM-D (4.6 ± 3.0 vs. 4.9 ± 4.7, p=0.27), POMS (33.5 ± 22.3 vs. 28.7 ± 22.0, p=0.70), SAQLI (4.5 ± 0.8 vs. 4.7 ± 0.7, p=0.39). Conclusion Individuals with mild OSA in this cohort do not have worse sleepiness, mood or quality of life in comparison to those without OSA. PMID:25232509

  18. Association of obstructive sleep apnea plus hypertension and prevalent cardiovascular diseases: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Cai, Anping; Zhang, Jiawei; Zhong, Qi; Wang, Rui; Chen, Jiyan; Zhou, Yingling

    2016-09-01

    Current study sought to evaluate the associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) plus hypertension (HTN) and prevalent cardiovascular diseases (CVD).This was a cross-sectional study and a total of 1889 subjects were enrolled. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was measured by polysomnography and OSA degree was classified as mild (AHI 5-14.9) and moderate-severe (AHI ≥ 15), and AHI < 5 was considered no-OSA. Mean and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) was detected by pulse oximetry. Between-group differences were assessed and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the association of OSA plus HTN and prevalent CVD.Compared to normotensive subjects, hypertensive subjects were older and had higher body mass index (BMI), neck girth, waist-hip ratio, AHI, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. Conversely, mean and lowest SaO2 levels were significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that in an unadjusted model, compared to subjects with no-OSA and no-HTN (reference group), the association of HTN plus moderate-severe-OSA and prevalent CVD was the most prominent (odds ratio [OR]: 2.638 and 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.942-3.583). In normotensive subjects, after adjusted for potential covariates, the associations of OSA (regardless of severity) and prevalent CVD were attenuated to nonsignificant. In hypertensive subjects, however, the associations remained significant but were reduced. Further adjusted for mean and lowest SaO2, the associations remained significant in HTN plus no-OSA (OR: 1.808, 95% CI: 1.207-2.707), HTN plus mild-OSA (OR: 2.003, 95% CI: 1.346-2.980), and HTN plus moderate-severe OSA (OR: 1.834, 95% CI: 1.214-2.770) groups.OSA plus HTN is associated with prevalent CVD, and OSA may potentiate the adverse cardiovascular effects on hypertensives patients but not normotensives. PMID:27684798

  19. Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or comorbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or comorbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

  20. Sleep-disordered breathing in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; White, David R; Joseph, Jane E; van Bakergem, Karen; LaRosa, Angela

    2015-02-01

    OSA is associated with significant adverse outcomes with far-reaching health-care implications. OSA is much more common and severe in patients with Down syndrome (DS) than in the general population, yet there is a striking lack of literature in this area. In this review article, we have summarized the current state of knowledge and presented the available data on OSA in DS. The higher prevalence and severity of OSA in patients with DS may be related to unique upper airway anatomic features as well as increased risk for obesity, hypothyroidism, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and generalized hypotonia. Although many of the manifestations of OSA in patients with DS are similar to those seen in the general population, the relative morbidity is significantly higher. For individuals with DS who already face cognitive challenges, the added impact of OSA on cognitive function may hinder their ability to function independently and reach their full potential. Screening and evaluation for OSA should be done in children and adults with DS. Treatment of OSA in DS involves the use of CPAP, upper airway surgery, and dental appliances, along with weight-reduction strategies, nasal steroids, and oral leukotriene modifiers as adjunctive treatments. The treatment plan should be individualized for each patient with DS, taking into account age, comorbid conditions, and barriers to treatment adherence. Future research should aim to better characterize OSA, further evaluate neurocognitive outcomes, and evaluate the efficacy of treatments in patients with DS. PMID:25644910

  1. Serum sLOX-1 Levels Are Correlated with the Presence and Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun-Yan; Li, Da-Ju; Wu, Chun-Ling; Lou, Han-Jian; Jiang, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Context: Inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) activation is involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory process-related disorders. Objective: This study aims to investigate whether serum soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) levels are associated with the presence and severity of OSA. Materials and Methods: A total of 137 OSA patients and 78 controls were recruited in this study. Serum sLOX-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The severity of OSA was assessed by the apnea–hypopnea index (AHI). Results: OSA patients had significantly higher serum sLOX-1 levels compared with controls. Serum sLOX-1 levels elevated with the increment of OSA severity. sLOX-1 was the independent predictor of OSA. Serum sLOX-1 levels were significantly correlated with AHI and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Conclusions: Serum sLOX-1 levels were independently correlated with the presence and severity of OSA. These findings revealed that sLOX-1 might function as a potential biomarker for monitoring the development and progression of OSA. PMID:25825846

  2. Oxidative stress parameters and their correlation with clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Asker, Selvi; Asker, Muntecep; Sarikaya, Eren; Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Aslan, Mehmet; Demir, Halit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of oxidative stress markers, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in severe OSAS and to investigate any correlation between oxidative stress markers and clinical, metabolic and polysomnographic parameters. A total of 30 patients with severe OSAS and 30 healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional, clinical study. Demographic data, polysomnographic, biochemical and clinical indices as well as serum levels of CAT, MDA and GPX were measured and compared in OSAS and control groups. Furthermore, OSAS patients with and without pulmonary hypertension (PHT) were evaluated in terms of levels of CAT, MDA and GPX. Patients with severe OSAS exhibited significantly lower serum levels of CAT (P<0.001) and GPX (P<0.001). Serum MDA levels were remarkably higher in OSAS group (P<0.001). Correlation analysis revealed that levels of CAT and GPX were correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and there was a correlation between serum levels of MDA and CRP. Severe OSAS patients with and without PHT did not reveal any differences for CAT (P=0.789), MDA (P=0.805) and GPX levels (P=0.281). Our results have shown that oxidative stress markers significantly changed in patients with severe OSAS. This information is noteworthy because documentation of the role of oxidative stress in OSAS may have important implications regarding diagnosis, monitoring, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26379962

  3. Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children.

    PubMed

    Blechner, Michael; Williamson, Ariel A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has various negative health and behavioral consequences in the pediatric population. As shown in adults, there are metabolic derangements such as obesity, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, as well as cardiovascular derangements like hypertension, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, ventricular size/function abnormalities, and even elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, that can be seen in children with OSAS. The first two sections will discuss the metabolic and cardiovascular consequences on OSAS in children. The last section summarizes selected studies and reviews on the behavioral, neurocognitive and academic consequences of OSAS in children. PMID:26631839

  4. Emerging co-morbidities of obstructive sleep apnea: cognition, kidney disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gildeh, Nadia; Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation. PMID:27747026

  5. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in symptomatic patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Inverso, G; Brustowicz, K A; Katz, E; Padwa, B L

    2016-02-01

    The reported prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) varies due to inconsistent definitions of OSA, lack of uniform diagnostic testing, and different mixes of syndromic diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients with SCS, and to determine whether this differs by phenotypic diagnosis. A retrospective cohort study of children with SCS was conducted. The primary outcome was presence of OSA diagnosed by polysomnography. The prevalence of OSA was calculated and stratified by diagnosis to compare differences in prevalence and severity (mild, moderate, or severe). The prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients was 74.2%. Patients with Apert syndrome had the highest prevalence (80.6%), followed by Pfeiffer, Crouzon with acanthosis nigricans, and Crouzon syndromes (72.7%, 66.7%, and 64.7%, respectively). Severe OSA was most common in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome (45.5%), while patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes were more likely to have moderate OSA (29.0% and 23.5%, respectively). Given that 56.4% of patients with SCS are symptomatic and that 74.2% of these symptomatic patients have OSA, it is recommended that a screening level I polysomnography be part of the clinical care for all patients with SCS. PMID:26602951

  6. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Metabolic Markers and Lipid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Te; Tsai, Su-Shan; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Ting, Hua; Wu, Trong-Neng; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and metabolic markers and whether the elevated risk of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is related to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 246 male bus drivers from one transportation company in Taiwan. Each participant was evaluated by a polysomnography (PSG) test and by blood lipids examination. Severity of OSA was categorized according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Results The results showed that a 73.3% prevalence of MetS in OSA (AHI > 15) and a 80.0% prevalence of MetS in severe OSA (AHI > 30) were found. After adjusting for confounding variables, an increased level of Body-Mass Index (BMI) and two non-MetS cardiovascular risk factors, total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and TG/HDL-C ratio was significantly associated with AHI in subjects with severe OSA. MetS was about three times to be present in subjects with severe OSA, even adjusted for BMI. Conclusions The findings showed a high prevalence of MetS in OSA among professional drivers, especially in the severe group category. BMI was the major contributing factor to OSA. However, the present study did not find a sensitive clinical marker of a detrimental metabolic profile in OSA patients. PMID:26115005

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Adolescents and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sara E.; Li, Zhuokai; Tu, Wanzhu; Jalou, Hasnaa; Brubaker, Jamie L.; Gupta, Sandeep; Huber, Jordan N.; Carroll, Aaron; Hannon, Tamara S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric studies examining the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insulin sensitivity/cardiometabolic risk are limited and conflicting. Objective To determine if cardiometabolic risk markers are increased among obese youth with obstructive sleep apnea as compared with their equally obese peers without OSA. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 patients (age 14.2 ± 1.4 years) who underwent polysomnography for suspected OSA. Fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were performed as part of routine clinical evaluation. Patients were categorized into two groups by degree of OSA as measured by the apnea hypopnea index (AHI): none or mild OSA (AHI < 5) and moderate or severe OSA (AHI ≥ 5). Results Despite similar degrees of obesity, patients with moderate or severe OSA had higher fasting insulin (p = 0.037) and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR (p = 0.0497)], as compared with those with mild or no OSA. After controlling for body mass index, there was a positive association between the AHI and log HOMA-IR (p = 0.005). There was a positive relationship between arousals plus awakenings during the polysomnography and fasting triglycerides. Conclusions OSA is linked with greater cardiometabolic risk markers in obese youth. PMID:24106092

  8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP)

    MedlinePlus

    Palate surgery; Uvulopalatal flap procedure; UPPP; Laser-assisted uvulopalaplasty; Radiofrequency palatoplasty; Velopharyngeal insufficiency - UPPP; Obstructive sleep apnea - uvulopalaplasty; OSA - uvulopalaplasty

  9. Perioperative sleep apnea: a real problem or did we invent a new disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba, Sebastian; Mojica, James E.; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the subpopulation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can affect more than 75% of surgical patients. An increasing body of evidence supports the association between OSA  and perioperative complications, but some data indicate important perioperative outcomes do not differ between patients with and without OSA. In this review we will provide an overview of the pathophysiology of sleep apnea and the risk factors for perioperative complications related to sleep apnea. We also discuss a clinical algorithm for the identification and management of OSA patients facing surgery. PMID:27006758

  10. Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with craniofacial syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is common in children. Craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate are among the most common congenital conditions. Children with a variety of craniofacial conditions, including cleft palate, micrognathia, craniosynostosis, and midface hypoplasia are at increased risk for OSAS. Available evidence, which is largely limited to surgical case series and retrospective studies, suggests that OSAS can be successfully managed in these children through both surgical and non-surgical techniques. Prospective studies using larger cohorts of patients and including polysomnograms are needed to better understand the risk factors for this patient population and the efficacy of treatment options for OSAS and their underlying conditions. PMID:25555676

  11. Beliefs and Attitudes Toward Obstructive Sleep Apnea Evaluation and Treatment Among Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Raphael; McKenzie, Sharon; Taylor, Tonya; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although blacks are at higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), they are not as likely as their white counterparts to receive OSA evaluation and treatment. This study assessed knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes towards OSA evaluation and treatment among blacks residing in Brooklyn, New York. Methods Five focus groups involving 39 black men and women (aged ≥18 years) were conducted at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn to ascertain barriers preventing or delaying OSA evaluation and treatment. Results Misconceptions about sleep apnea were a common theme that emerged from participants’ responses. Obstructive sleep apnea was often viewed as a type of insomnia, an age-related phenomenon, and as being caused by certain bedtime activities. The major theme that emerged about barriers to OSA evaluation was unfamiliarity with the study environment. Barriers were categorized as: problems sleeping in a strange and unfamiliar environment, unfamiliarity with the study protocol, and fear of being watched while sleeping. Barriers to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment adoption were related to the confining nature of the device, discomfort wearing a mask while they slept, and concerns about their partner’s perceptions of treatment. Conclusion Results of this study suggest potential avenues for interventions to increase adherence to recommended evaluation and treatment of OSA. Potential strategies include reducing misconceptions about OSA, increasing awareness of OSA in vulnerable communities, familiarizing patients and their partners with laboratory procedures used to diagnose and treat OSA. We propose that these strategies should be used to inform the development of culturally and linguistically tailored sleep apnea interventions to increase awareness of OSA among blacks who are at risk for OSA and associated comorbidities. PMID:23560353

  12. Comparison of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Imaging Between Subjects With Mild and Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Kwon; Shin, Hyun-Sil; Hong, Seok-Chan

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the regions of the brain associated with recurrent nocturnal chronic hypoxic episodes in patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) and quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Methods Nocturnal polysomnograph (NPSG) and subsequent morning electroencephalograph (EEG) were measured in 20 subjects with OSAS. Mild (n=10 ages 39.5±12.1 years) and severe (n=10 ages 41.7±13.6 years) right-handed male OSAS subjects were selected by interview and questionnaires including the NPSG, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The LORETA and QEEG were compared between the severe and mild OSAS groups by frequency bands (delta 1-3 Hz, theta 4-7 Hz, alpha 8-12 Hz, beta1 13-18 Hz, beta2 19-21 Hz, beta3 22-30 Hz, and total 1-30 Hz) made by spectral analysis during resting with the eyes closed. Results The LORETA analysis showed decreased alpha activity at the right posterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 23) in cases with severe OSAS compared to mild OSAS (p<0.05). For the QEEG, the absolute power of the alpha activity (8-12 Hz) was decreased in P3 (p=0.047), PZ (p=0.039) and O2 (p=0.04) in cases with severe OSAS compared to mild OSAS cases. The LORETA and QEEG analyses had similar results with regard to band, activation and location. Conclusion The decreased activity of the alpha frequency in the right posterior cingulate gyrus, in patients with severe OSAS compared to those with mild OSAS, suggests that chronic repeated short-term hypoxia during sleep, in OSAS, could provoke cortical brain dysfunction associated with cognitive dysfunction such as memory and attention. PMID:20046408

  13. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  14. A new approach for the assessment of sleepiness and predictivity of obstructive sleep apnea in drivers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Dragonieri, Silvano; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Carucci, Elisa; Ranieri, Teresa; Ventura, Valentina; Resta, Onofrio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falling asleep behind the wheel is one of the most relevant consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We created a new screening questionnaire, named the Driver Sleepiness Score (DSS), aiming to assess sleepiness in drivers with suspected OSA. The primary aim of our study was to evaluate sleepiness in drivers with a suspicion of OSA by the DSS in order to assess its correlation with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and total sleep time with oxyhemoglobin saturation below 90% (TST90). We also aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of DSS for three different cutoffs of AHI (AHI = 5, AHI = 15, AHI = 30), which allow stratification of the severity of OSA. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three driving patients at risk for OSA participated in the study. DSS and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were both administered in operator-dependent modality and in randomized sequence. Results: The DSS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with mild OSA [area under curve (AUC): 0.88 vs 0.74] and moderate OSA (AUC: 0.88 vs 0.79), whereas ESS showed higher accuracy in screening patients with severe OSA (AUC: 0.91 vs 0.78). A DSS score ≥ 7 is the optimal cutoff for distinguishing true positives from false positives for the presence of OSA and for its different severity levels. The administration of both questionnaires increases the accuracy for the detection of all OSA severity levels. Conclusions: If validated, DSS may qualify as a new screening tool specifically for drivers with the suspicion of having OSA, in combination with the ESS. PMID:26933301

  15. Pharyngeal chemosensitivity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Clemens; Zimmermann, Ingo; Sommer, J Ulrich; Hörmann, Karl; Herr, Raphael M; Stuck, Boris A

    2013-09-01

    Signs of pharyngeal neurodegeneration have been detected in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Along with this neurodegeneration, a decreased pharyngeal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation has been described. The decreased sensitivity may play a role in the pathophysiology of this disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the chemosensitivity of the pharyngeal mucosa in patients with OSA compared with controls. Healthy controls and patients with OSA (age: 30-60 years) were included. Testing of oropharyngeal chemosensitivity was performed with subjective intensity ratings of capsaicin (SIR, visual analogue scale 0-10), air puffs (presented with an olfactometer), and stimulation with CO2 at the posterior pharyngeal wall. A 2-point discrimination test at the soft palate, an intensity rating of capsaicin at the tongue, and a nasal lateralization test were performed. Twenty-six patients with OSA and 18 healthy controls were included. No differences were detected in the SIR of capsaicin at the tongue or in the nasal lateralization test. At the pharynx, a decreased sensitivity to capsaicin (OSA: 6.8 ± 2.3; healthy control: 8.6 ± 1.3), air puffs (OSA: 2.8 ± 1.9; healthy control: 4.2 ± 1.6), and stimulation with CO2 (OSA: 1.5 ± 1.7; healthy control: 2.8 ± 1.8) were demonstrated in patients with OSA (all P < 0.05). Two-point discrimination at the soft palate was reduced with statistical significance in the OSA group (OSA: 11.5 ± 5.4 mm; healthy control: 5.0 ± 2.4 mm). The results suggest reduced pharyngeal chemosensitivity in OSA patients in addition to the reduced mechanical pharyngeal sensitivity shown with 2-point discrimination. This demonstrates peripheral neurodegeneration in the context of this disease.

  16. Comparative evaluation of craniofacial anthropometric measurements in Indian adult patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Abhishek; Upadhyay, Snehal; Mathur, Somil; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap; Makwana, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The study aimed to compare the craniofacial features of North Indian patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to that of normal North Indian population. Materials and Methods: Selected 25 North Indian subjects (age: 18–65 years) were divided into two groups (OSA group [n = 14] and non-OSA group [n = 9]) according to the results of full night polysomnographic sleep study. Body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), and lateral cephalograms were recorded for each subject in both groups and total 22 parameters of craniofacial anthropometric features were measured on lateral cephalograms for each subject. The differences in BMI, NC, and craniofacial features between the OSA and non-OSA groups were compared statistically. Results: Independent sample t-test was used to compare the differences between OSA group and non-OSA group. The results showed that the BMI, NC, bulk of tongue (tongue length, tongue height, and tongue area) and length of the soft palate (PNS-U) were significantly higher in OSA group. OSA group was also found to have inferior positioning of hyoid bone (MP-H, ANS-H, PNS-H, ANS-Eb), narrower superior and middle airway space (SPAS and MAS), antero-inferior positioning of mandible (Gn-C3, ANS-Me, SNB, N-Me) and lower cranial base flexure angle (N-S-Ba). Conclusion: Craniofacial features, which play an important role in the pathophysiology of OSA, differ significantly between North Indian patients suffering from OSA and normal North Indian population. PMID:26929536

  17. Risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Lower in Double Reed Wind Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher P.; York, Kaki M.; McCoy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by a collapse of the upper airway. Respiratory muscle training with a wind instrument (didgeridoo) in patients with moderate OSA has been previously shown to improve OSA symptomology. However, a survey of orchestra members did not indicate a difference in OSA risk between wind and non-wind instrumentalist. The present study examines whether playing of different wind instrument types may affect the risk of OSA. Methods: A national sample of active musicians (n = 906) was surveyed through the internet. Participants' risk for OSA was determined by the Berlin Questionnaire. Additional survey items included questions about general health and musical experience. Results: A binary logistic regression was conducted to determine if OSA risk was predicted by gender, age, number of years playing instrument, number of hours per week playing instrument, and instrument type. Musicians who played a double reed instrument had a lower risk of OSA (p = 0.047) than non-wind instrumentalists. Additionally, in double reed instrumentalists, the number of hours spent playing the instrument predicted lower OSA risk (p = 0.020). The risk for OSA in other wind instruments (i.e., single reed, high brass, and low brass) was not significantly different from non-wind musicians. Conclusions: Playing a double reed musical instrument was associated with a lower risk of OSA. Citation: Ward CP; York KM; McCoy JG. Risk of obstructive sleep apnea lower in double reed wind musicians. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):251-255. PMID:22701381

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea in young infants with Down syndrome evaluated in a Down syndrome specialty clinic.

    PubMed

    Goffinski, Alida; Stanley, Maria A; Shepherd, Nicole; Duvall, Nichole; Jenkinson, Sandra B; Davis, Charlene; Bull, Marilyn J; Roper, Randall J

    2015-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) experience congenital and functional medical issues that predispose them to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Research utilizing stringent age criteria among samples of infants with DS and OSA is limited. This study examines clinical correlates of OSA among infants with DS. A retrospective chart review was conducted of infants ≤6 months of age referred to a DS clinic at a tertiary children's hospital over five-years (n = 177). Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression models were utilized to analyze the data. Fifty-nine infants underwent polysomnography, based on clinical concerns. Of these, 95% (56/59) had studies consistent with OSA. Among infants with OSA, 71% were identified as having severe OSA (40/56). The minimum overall prevalence of OSA among the larger group of infants was 31% (56/177). Significant relationships were found between OSA and dysphagia, congenital heart disease (CHD), prematurity, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and other functional and anatomic gastrointestinal (GI) conditions. Results indicate that odds of OSA in this group are higher among infants with GI conditions in comparison to those without. Co-occurring dysphagia and CHD predicted the occurrence of OSA in 36% of cases with an overall predictive accuracy rate of 71%. Obstructive sleep apnea is relatively common in young infants with DS and often severe. Medical factors including GI conditions, dysphagia and CHD may help to identify infants who are at greater risk and may warrant evaluation. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of OSA in infants with DS.

  19. Oxidative Stress-induced Telomere Length Shortening of Circulating Leukocyte in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Kwak, Jin Wook; Lim, Su Jin; Park, Yong Kyun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2016-01-01

    The main mechanism of pathogenesis which causes systemic complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is believed to be intermittent hypoxia-induced intermediary effect and it depends on the burden of oxidative stress during sleep. We aimed to search the predictive markers which reflect the burden of systemic oxidative stress in patients with OSA and whether excessive telomere length shortening is a characteristic feature that can assess oxidative stress levels. We used quantitative PCR to measure telomere length using peripheral blood genomic DNA. Telomere lengths were compared in an age- and body mass index (BMI)-dependent manner in 34 healthy volunteers and 43 OSA subjects. We also performed reactive oxygen species assay to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and OSA subjects. We found that the serum concentration of hydrogen peroxide was considerably higher in OSA patients, and that this was closely related with the severity of OSA. Significantly shortened telomere length was observed in the circulating leukocytes of the peripheral blood of OSA patients, and telomere length shortening was aggravated more acutely in an age- and BMI-dependent manner. An inverse correlation was observed between the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the telomere length of OSA patients and excessive telomere length shortening was also linked to severity of OSA. The results provided evidence that telomere length shortening or excessive cellular aging might be distinctive in circulating leukocyte of OSA patients and may be an predictive biomarker for reflect the burden of oxidative stress in the peripheral blood of OSA patients. PMID:27699083

  20. Oxidative Stress-induced Telomere Length Shortening of Circulating Leukocyte in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Kwak, Jin Wook; Lim, Su Jin; Park, Yong Kyun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2016-01-01

    The main mechanism of pathogenesis which causes systemic complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is believed to be intermittent hypoxia-induced intermediary effect and it depends on the burden of oxidative stress during sleep. We aimed to search the predictive markers which reflect the burden of systemic oxidative stress in patients with OSA and whether excessive telomere length shortening is a characteristic feature that can assess oxidative stress levels. We used quantitative PCR to measure telomere length using peripheral blood genomic DNA. Telomere lengths were compared in an age- and body mass index (BMI)-dependent manner in 34 healthy volunteers and 43 OSA subjects. We also performed reactive oxygen species assay to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and OSA subjects. We found that the serum concentration of hydrogen peroxide was considerably higher in OSA patients, and that this was closely related with the severity of OSA. Significantly shortened telomere length was observed in the circulating leukocytes of the peripheral blood of OSA patients, and telomere length shortening was aggravated more acutely in an age- and BMI-dependent manner. An inverse correlation was observed between the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the telomere length of OSA patients and excessive telomere length shortening was also linked to severity of OSA. The results provided evidence that telomere length shortening or excessive cellular aging might be distinctive in circulating leukocyte of OSA patients and may be an predictive biomarker for reflect the burden of oxidative stress in the peripheral blood of OSA patients.

  1. Molecular Signatures of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: A Review and Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Gislason, Thorarinn; Teff, Karen L.; Pack, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are largely mediated by chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. The primary molecular domains affected are sympathetic activity, oxidative stress and inflammation. Other affected domains include adipokines, adhesion molecules and molecules that respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Changes in molecular domains affected by OSA, assessed in blood and/or urine, can provide a molecular signature for OSA that could potentially be used diagnostically and to predict who is likely to develop different OSA-related comorbidities. High-throughput discovery strategies such as microarrays, assessing changes in gene expression in circulating blood cells, have the potential to find new candidates and pathways thereby expanding the molecular signatures for OSA. More research is needed to fully understand the pathophysiological significance of these molecular signatures and their relationship with OSA comorbidities. Many OSA subjects are obese, and obesity is an independent risk factor for many comorbidities associated with OSA. Moreover, obesity affects the same molecular pathways as OSA. Thus, a challenge to establishing a molecular signature for OSA is to separate the effects of OSA from obesity. We propose that the optimal strategy is to evaluate the temporal changes in relevant molecular pathways during sleep and, in particular, the alterations from before to after sleep when assessed in blood and/or urine. Such changes will be at least partly a consequence of chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that occurs during sleep. Citation: Arnardottir ES; Mackiewicz M; Gislason T; Teff KL; Pack AI. Molecular signatures of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: A review and perspective. SLEEP 2009;32(4):447–470. PMID:19413140

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Quality of Life: Comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Graciela E; Goodwin, James L; Vana, Kimberly D; Quan, Stuart F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The impact of sleep on quality of life (QoL) has been well documented; however, there is a great need for reliable QoL measures for persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared the QoL scores between the 36-Item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Survey (SF-36), Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), and Functional Outcomes Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) in persons with OSA. Methods A total of 884 participants from the Sleep Heart Health Study second examination, who completed the SF-36, FOSQ, and SAQLI, and in-home polysomnograms, were included. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI) at 4% desaturation was categorized as no OSA (<5 /hour), mild to moderate OSA (5–30 /hour) and severe OSA (>30 /hour). QoL scores for each questionnaire were determined and compared by OSA severity category and by gender. Results Participants were 47.6% male, 49.2% (n=435) had no OSA, 43.2% (n=382) had mild to moderate OSA, and 7.6% (n=67) had severe OSA. Participants with severe OSA were significantly older (mean age = 63.7 years, p <.0001), had higher BMI (mean = 34.3 kg/m2, p <.0001) and had lower SF-36 Physical Component scores (PCS) (45.1) than participants with no OSA (48.5) or those with mild to moderate OSA (46.5, p= .006). When analyzed according to gender, no significant differences were found in males for QoL by OSA severity categories. However, females with severe OSA had significantly lower mean scores for the SAQLI (5.4, p= .006), FOSQ (10.9, p= .02), and SF-36 PCS (37.7, p<.0001) compared to females with no OSA (6.0, 11.5, 44.6) and those with mild to moderate OSA (5.9, 11.4, 48, respectively). Females with severe OSA also had significantly higher mean BMI (41.8 kg/m2,) than females with no OSA (26.5 kg/m2) or females with mild to moderate OSA (30.6 kg/m2, p<.0001). The SF-36 PCS and Mental Component Scores (MCS) were correlated with the FOSQ and SAQLI (r=.37 PCS vs FOSQ; r=.31 MCS vs FOSQ; r=.42 PCS vs SAQLI; r=.52 MCS vs SAQLI; and r=.66 FOSQ

  3. To ED or not to ED--is erectile dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea related to endothelial dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Camilla M; Melehan, Kerri L; Phillips, Craig L; Grunstein, Ronald R; Liu, Peter Y

    2015-04-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and erectile dysfunction (ErectD) are highly prevalent and largely under diagnosed medical conditions. These disorders often co-exist, with about half of the male OSA population having ErectD and vice versa. OSA is strongly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality while ErectD has been proposed as a phenotypic marker of cardiovascular disease. This implies that the two conditions may be linked by a common pathophysiological mechanism. In this review we provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction (EndoD) may be the common pathophysiological mechanism linking OSA with both ErectD and cardiovascular complications. EndoD is one of the earliest markers of cardiovascular disease and substantial evidence suggests that OSA independently causes EndoD. There is also strong evidence that causally links EndoD with organic ErectD. Further research should be directed at determining the value of simultaneously assessing both ErectD and OSA in patients presenting with symptoms of either condition. In both ErectD and OSA clinics, identifying both conditions could improve overall cardiovascular risk stratification whilst treatment of OSA could reduce both ErectD and cardiovascular risk.

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  5. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pak, Victoria M; Grandner, Michael A; Pack, Allan I

    2014-02-01

    Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA.

  6. Genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Wang, Bin; Lang, Wei-Ya; Xue, Jing; Zhao, Da-Long; Li, Guo-Feng; Zheng, Li-Hong; Pan, Hong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We meta-analytically summarized the associations of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with ACE activity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to see whether ACE activity is causally associated with OSAS. Literature search and data abstraction were done in duplicate. Sixteen articles including 2060 OSAS patients and 1878 controls were summarized. Overall, no significance was observed for the association of I/D polymorphism with OSAS, whereas carriers of II genotype (weighted mean difference or WMD, 95% confidence interval or CI, P: -11.976, -17.168 to -6.783, <0.001) or I allele (-9.842, -14.766 to -4.918, <0.001) had a lower level of serum ACE activity compared with DD genotype carriers, respectively. In subgroup analyses, carriers of II genotype were 3.806 times more likely to develop OSAS (95% CI, P: 1.865 to 7.765, <0.001) in OSAS patients with hypertension, without heterogeneity. Mendelian randomization analysis indicated there was 37.4% (95% CI: 1.115 to 3.142) and 32.4% (1.106 to 2.845) increased risk of OSAS by a reduction of 1 U/L in ACE activity for the II genotype and I allele carriers versus DD genotype carriers, respectively. There was no observable publication bias. Collectively, genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for OSAS. PMID:26486181

  7. Effect of CPAP therapy on endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Esther I; Puhan, Milo A; Schlatzer, Christian; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep-related breathing disorder associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the proposed mechanistic links between OSA and the increased cardiovascular risk. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reverse this detrimental pathophysiological consequence of OSA. Most studies on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA are limited by their low sample size. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effect CPAP therapy on endothelial function in patients with OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis searching literature databases up to August 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other validated techniques. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis (DerSimonian/Laird random-effects method) was the treatment effect on FMD. Eight RCTs comparing the effects of therapeutic CPAP versus subtherapeutic CPAP (or no intervention) on endothelial function involving 245 OSA patients were included in the systematic review. The studies are consistent in effect direction, showing an improvement of endothelial function by CPAP. Four RCTs involving 150 patients could be used for the meta-analysis. Compared to the control group, CPAP therapy (range 2-24 weeks) significantly increased absolute % FMD by 3.87% (95% confidence interval: 1.93-5.80, P < 0.001). In patients with OSA, CPAP therapy improves endothelial function significantly and to a clinically important extent.

  8. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer’s Disease: A Meta-Analysis Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Emamian, Farnoosh; Khazaie, Habibolah; Tahmasian, Masoud; Leschziner, Guy D.; Morrell, Mary J.; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Sepehry, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are highly prevalent, chronic conditions with intriguing, yet poorly understood epidemiological overlap. To date, the amount of OSA syndrome present in patients with AD across literature remains unknown. To address this question, we collected all available published clinical data and analyzed them through a quantitative meta-analytical approach. The results of our quantitative meta-analysis suggest that the aggregate odds ratio for OSA in AD vs. healthy control was 5.05 and homogeneous. This reflects that patients with AD have a five times higher chance of presenting with OSA than cognitively non-impaired individuals of similar age. Moreover, these data suggest that around half of patients with AD have experienced OSA at some point after their initial diagnosis. The additive impact of progressive changes in sleep quality and structure, changes in cerebral blood flow and the cellular redox status in OSA patients may all be contributing factors to cognitive decline and may further aggravate AD progression. It is hoped that the high OSA rate in AD patients, as suggested by the findings of our meta-analysis, might provide a sufficient clinical incentive to alert clinicians the importance of screening patients for OSA in AD, and stimulate further research in this area. PMID:27148046

  9. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  10. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  11. Investigation of the kinetics of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Zhao, Dongfeng; Zhao, Chaocheng; Liu, Fang; Zheng, Xilai

    2013-11-15

    The process of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation (OSA) has been recognized by the oil spill remediation community to enhance the natural cleansing of oiled shorelines. A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the kinetics of OSA formation under various mixing intensities using the standard reference material 1941b and Arabian heavy crude oil. The results showed that formation of OSAs increased exponentially with mixing time and reached a maximum within 5h. The maximum oil trapping efficiency increased from 24% to 47%, and the required shaking time decreased from 4.5 to 1.2h as the sediment concentration and mixing energy increased. The maximum oil-to-sediment ratio reached 0.24-0.68 g oil/g sediment within 5h. Most of the formed OSAs were solid OSAs and single droplet OSAs with low mixing energies, and multi-droplet OSAs with high mixing energies. The sizes of the dispersed oil droplets and OSAs were also investigated.

  12. Brain Structure Network Analysis in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Kai; Weng, Jian; Guan, Yuefeng; Chan, Kate C. C.; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Shi, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleeping disorder commonly affecting school-aged children and is characterized by repeated episodes of blockage of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed a graph theoretical analysis on the brain morphometric correlation network in 25 OSA patients (OSA group; 5 female; mean age, 10.1 ± 1.8 years) and investigated the topological alterations in global and regional properties compared with 20 healthy control individuals (CON group; 6 females; mean age, 10.4 ± 1.8 years). A structural correlation network based on regional gray matter volume was constructed respectively for each group. Our results revealed a significantly decreased mean local efficiency in the OSA group over the density range of 0.32–0.44 (p < 0.05). Regionally, the OSAs showed a tendency of decreased betweenness centrality in the left angular gyrus, and a tendency of decreased degree in the right lingual and inferior frontal (orbital part) gyrus (p < 0.005, uncorrected). We also found that the network hubs in OSA and controls were distributed differently. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that characterizes the brain structure network in OSA patients and invests the alteration of topological properties of gray matter volume structural network. This study may help to provide new evidence for understanding the neuropathophysiology of OSA from a topological perspective. PMID:26413809

  13. The Effect of Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Kai Hsun; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy could differ from those in otherwise healthy children. We examined the effects of OSA treatment by comparing a group of children with cerebral palsy treated with adenotonsillectomy or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by nasal mask with controls who…

  14. PAHs in leachates from thermal power plant wastes and ash-based construction materials.

    PubMed

    Irha, Natalya; Reinik, Janek; Jefimova, Jekaterina; Koroljova, Arina; Raado, Lembi-Merike; Hain, Tiina; Uibu, Mai; Kuusik, Rein

    2015-08-01

    The focus of the current study is to characterise the leaching behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil shale ashes (OSAs) of pulverised firing (PF) and circulating fluidised-bed (CFB) boilers from Estonian Thermal Power Plant (Estonia) as well as from mortars and concrete based on OSAs. The target substances were 16 PAHs from the EPA priority pollutant list. OSA samples and OSA-based mortars were tested for leaching, according to European standard EN 12457-2 (2002). European standard CEN/TC 15862(2012) for monolithic matter was used for OSA-based concrete. Water extracts were analysed by GC-MS for the concentration of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were detected. Still, the release of PAHs was below the threshold limit value for inert waste. The amount of the finest fraction (particle size <0.045 mm), the content of the Al-Si glass phase and the surface characteristics were the main factors, which could affect the accessibility of PAHs for leaching. The mobility of PAHs from OSA of CFB and PF boilers was 20.2 and 9.9%, respectively. Hardening of OSA-based materials did not lead to the immobilisation of soluble PAHs. Release of PAHs from the monolith samples did not exceed 0.5 μg/m(2). In terms of leaching of PAHs, OSA is safe to be used for construction purposes.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease in blacks: a call to action from the Association of Black Cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Akinboboye, Olakunle; Mitchell, Judith E; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jean-Louis, Girardin

    2013-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has emerged as a new and important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Over the last decade, epidemiologic and clinical research has consistently supported the association of OSA with increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Such evidence prompted the American Heart Association to issue a scientific statement describing the need to recognize OSA as an important target for therapy in reducing CV risk. Emerging facts suggest that marked racial differences exist in the association of OSA with CVD. Although both conditions are more prevalent in blacks, almost all National Institutes of Health-funded research projects evaluating the relationship between OSA and CV risk have been conducted in predominantly white populations. There is an urgent need for research studies investigating the CV impact of OSA among high-risk minorities, especially blacks. This article first examines the evidence supporting the association between OSA and CVD and reviews the influence of ethnic/racial differences on this association. Public health implications of OSA and future directions, especially regarding minority populations, are discussed. PMID:23537962

  16. Analysis of octenylsuccinate rice and tapioca starches: Distribution of octenylsuccinic anhydride groups in starch granules.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kristin; Reuhs, Bradley L; Ovando Martinez, Maribel; Simsek, Senay

    2016-11-15

    Characterization of the fine structure of octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) starch would lead to a better understanding of functional properties. OSA rice and tapioca starches were analyzed using microscopy, liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Chain length distribution of amylopectin changed significantly (P<0.05) after OSA esterification. Weight averaged degree of polymerization (DPw) decreased significantly (P<0.05) from 16.47 to 13.29 and from 14.87 to 12.47 in native and OSA rice and tapioca starches, respectively. The chain length distribution of pure amylopectin fractions suggested that OSA groups were not present in the amylopectin portion of the starch. (1)H NMR analysis of pure amylose and amylopectin fractions indicated that OSA substitution was present only in amylose fractions of rice and tapioca starches. Esterification with 3% OSA results in starch that has OSA substituted mainly on amylose chains or possibly on amylopectin chains that have been hydrolyzed from the amylopectin molecules during esterification. PMID:27283674

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular disease: The influence of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Kallergis, Eleftherios M; Moniaki, Violeta; Mauroudi, Eleni; Schiza, Sophia E

    2015-05-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common medical condition, associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of this association have not been completely understood and may be multifactorial in origin. A number of studies suggest that inflammatory processes have emerged critical in the pathogenesis of CVD in OSAS. A range of circulating inflammatory molecules has been identified and measured, with a view to assess inflammation and predict vascular damage risk, such as plasma cytokines, adhesion molecules, and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a relevant marker worthy of further study, because not only is elevated in patients with OSAS, but also is rapidly becoming a risk factor for cardiac disease. Furthermore, in selected OSAS patients, aggressive treatment of the disorder may lead to retarding or even improvement of CVD progression. However, still there is a debate on the true correlation between CRP and OSAS, as well as the clinical effect of any reduction after OSAS treatment. Further research is required to define those OSAS patients who will have a considerable reduction with treatment, as well as to understand the significance of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factor and CRP reduction in patients with OSAS. PMID:25992322

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women: Specific Issues and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Holger; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ramanan, Dinesh; Armitstead, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been seen as a male disease. However, the importance of OSA in women is increasingly being recognized, along with a number of significant gender-related differences in the symptoms, diagnosis, consequences, and treatment of OSA. Women tend to have less severe OSA than males, with a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and shorter apneas and hypopneas. Episodes of upper airway resistance that do not meet the criteria for apneas are more common in women. Prevalence rates are lower in women, and proportionally fewer women receive a correct diagnosis. Research has also documented sex differences in the upper airway, fat distribution, and respiratory stability in OSA. Hormones are implicated in some gender-related variations, with differences between men and women in the prevalence of OSA decreasing as age increases. The limited data available suggest that although the prevalence and severity of OSA may be lower in women than in men, the consequences of the disease are at least the same, if not worse for comparable degrees of severity. Few studies have investigated gender differences in the effects of OSA treatment. However, given the differences in physiology and presentation, it is possible that personalized therapy may provide more optimal care.

  19. Long-term effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on vasodilatory endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duchna, Hans-W; Orth, Maritta; Schultze-Werninghaus, Gerhard; Guilleminault, Christian; Stoohs, Riccardo A

    2005-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with a dysfunction of vascular endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate long-term improvement of endothelial dysfunction in OSAS with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. We investigated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatory function in patients with OSAS using the hand vein compliance technique. Dose-response curves to endothelium-dependent vasodilator bradykinin were obtained in 16 subjects with OSAS before and after 6 months of nCPAP therapy and in 12 control subjects without OSAS. Maximum dilation (Emax) to bradykinin, being impaired in all OSAS patients, was completely restored with nCPAP. Mean Emax to bradykinin rose from 54.9+/-18.5 to 108.2+/-28.7% with 164.4+/-90.0 nights of nCPAP therapy (p<0.0001; Emax healthy controls, 94.8+/-9.5%). At treatment follow-up, endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity was not significantly different in nCPAP-treated OSAS patients vs healthy controls. Mean vasodilation with endothelium independently acting nitroglycerin was not altered initially and did not change with nCPAP therapy indicating that nCPAP restored endothelial cell function and not unspecific, endothelium-independent factors. These results suggest that regular nocturnal nCPAP treatment leads to a sustained restoration of OSAS-induced impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation, suggesting an improvement of systemic endothelial dysfunction in patients studied.

  20. Detection of Obstructive sleep apnea in awake subjects by exploiting body posture effects on the speech signal.

    PubMed

    Kriboy, M; Tarasiuk, A; Zigel, Y

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder. OSA is associated with several anatomical and functional abnormalities of the upper airway. It was shown that these abnormalities in the upper airway are also likely to be the reason for increased rate of apneic events in the supine position. Functional and structural changes in the vocal tract can affect the acoustic properties of speech. We hypothesize that acoustic properties of speech that are affected by body position may aid in distinguishing between OSA and non-OSA patients. We aimed to explore the possibility to differentiate OSA and non-OSA patients by analyzing the acoustic properties of their speech signal in upright sitting and supine positions. 35 awake patients were recorded while pronouncing sustained vowels in the upright sitting and supine positions. Using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier, accuracy of 84.6%, sensitivity of 92.7%, and specificity of 80.0% were achieved. This study provides the proof of concept that it is possible to screen for OSA by analyzing and comparing speech properties acquired in upright sitting vs. supine positions. An acoustic-based screening system during wakefulness may address the growing needs for a reliable OSA screening tool; further studies are needed to support these findings. PMID:25570924

  1. Metabolomics Profiling for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Simple Snorers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qian, Yingjun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Zhao, Aihua; Yin, Shankai; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Few clinical studies have explored altered urinary metabolite levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thus, we applied a metabolomics approach to analyze urinary metabolites in three groups of participants: patients with polysomnography (PSG)-confirmed OSA, simple snorers (SS), and normal subjects. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used. A total of 21 and 31 metabolites were differentially expressed in the SS and OSA groups, respectively. Patients with OSA had 18 metabolites different from those with SS. Of the 56 metabolites detected among the 3 groups, 24 were consistently higher or lower. A receiver operator curve analysis revealed that the combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, arabinose, glycochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate, isoleucine, serine, and xanthine produced a moderate diagnostic score with a sensitivity (specificity) of 75% (78%) for distinguishing OSA from those without OSA. The combination of 4-hydroxypentenoic acid, 5-dihydrotestosterone sulfate, serine, spermine, and xanthine distinguished OSA from SS with a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 80%. Multiple metabolites and metabolic pathways associated with SS and OSA were identified using the metabolomics approach, and the altered metabolite signatures could potentially serve as an alternative diagnostic method to PSG. PMID:27480913

  2. Self-appraisals of arousal-oriented online sexual activities in university and community samples.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Krystelle; Byers, E Sandra; Clowater, Sarah L; Kalinowski, Alana

    2014-08-01

    Arousal-oriented online sexual activities (OSAs) are any activities on the Internet that involve sexually explicit and/or sexually arousing stimuli. These can be solitary-arousal activities, requiring only one person be involved. They can also be partnered-arousal activities that involve at least two people interacting (Shaughnessy, Byers, & Walsh, 2011). Most researchers have focused on the negative outcomes of arousal-oriented OSAs on users' sexual life and life in general. Yet, these activities can also have positive outcomes. In two separate studies, we examined men's and women's perceptions of the positive and negative outcomes of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA experience. Study 1 included heterosexual university students (N = 191); Study 2 consisted of heterosexual and sexual minority individuals from the community (N = 316). Participants completed a background questionnaire and measures of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA experience and outcomes of these experiences. Overall, solitary- and partnered-arousal OSA was common among study participants. In both studies, participants reported significantly greater positive than negative outcomes of their solitary- and partnered-arousal OSAs, albeit the overall impact was small. We did not find significant gender differences or differences by sexual orientation in positive or negative outcomes of arousal-oriented OSAs. Our results suggest that, for most people, participating in solitary- and partnered-arousal OSAs has little impact on them. PMID:23740466

  3. A Comparison of Personality Characteristics and Psychiatric Symptomatology between Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    So, Soo-Jung; Kang, Seung-Gul; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the personality characteristics of patients with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and those of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods Eighty-eight patients with UARS and 365 patients with OSAS participated. All patients had a diagnostic full-night attended polysomnography (PSG) and completed the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Results The UARS group scored significantly higher than the OSAS group on the ESS, AIS, and PSQI (p<0.001). The scores of all SCL-90-R subscales in the UARS group were significantly higher than those in the OSA group (all p<0.001, except for somatization, p=0.016). Patients with UARS scored lower on EPQ-E (extroversion/introversion) (p=0.006) and EPQ-L (lie) (p<0.001) than those with OSA. UARS patients also showed higher scores on EPQ-P (psychoticism) (p=0.002) and EPQ-N (neuroticism) (p<0.001) than OSAS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that patients with UARS have worse subjective sleep quality than OSAS patients in spite of their better PSG findings. UARS patients tend to have more neurotic and sensitive personalities than patients with OSAS, which may be a cause of the clinical features of UARS. PMID:25866518

  4. Ocular surface area as an informative index of visual ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Sotoyama, M; Villanueva, M B; Jonai, H; Saito, S

    1995-01-01

    A large ocular surface area (OSA) is thought to be one of the causes of eye irritation and eye fatigue. Because ocular surface is very sensitive to various irritants such as dust, heat, dryness, air flow, etc., a large OSA increases the possibility of eye surface exposure to such irritants. Thus, OSA is one of the most important indices of visual ergonomics. This paper aims at making OSA an exact and practical index by first describing an accurate method of measuring it, and then clarifying the relationship between OSA, the width of the palpebral fissure, and vertical gaze direction, all of which are thought to be strongly correlated with each other. We derived the following equations: 1) y = 0.039x1 + 3.36, r = 0.99, 2) y = 3.05x2 - 0.39, r = 0.97, 3) x1 = 72.7x2 - 91.4, r = 0.97, where x1 = vertical gaze direction (degrees), x2 = width or the palpebral fissure (cm), y = OSA (cm2). Finally, this paper also introduces the practical applications of OSA measurement, and notes the differences between OSA when VDT work (word processing using a keyboard and drawing a picture using a mouse) is performed and when traditional office work without a VDT (reading, drawing, and writing) is performed.

  5. The Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer's Disease: A Meta-Analysis Perspective.

    PubMed

    Emamian, Farnoosh; Khazaie, Habibolah; Tahmasian, Masoud; Leschziner, Guy D; Morrell, Mary J; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Sepehry, Amir A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are highly prevalent, chronic conditions with intriguing, yet poorly understood epidemiological overlap. To date, the amount of OSA syndrome present in patients with AD across literature remains unknown. To address this question, we collected all available published clinical data and analyzed them through a quantitative meta-analytical approach. The results of our quantitative meta-analysis suggest that the aggregate odds ratio for OSA in AD vs. healthy control was 5.05 and homogeneous. This reflects that patients with AD have a five times higher chance of presenting with OSA than cognitively non-impaired individuals of similar age. Moreover, these data suggest that around half of patients with AD have experienced OSA at some point after their initial diagnosis. The additive impact of progressive changes in sleep quality and structure, changes in cerebral blood flow and the cellular redox status in OSA patients may all be contributing factors to cognitive decline and may further aggravate AD progression. It is hoped that the high OSA rate in AD patients, as suggested by the findings of our meta-analysis, might provide a sufficient clinical incentive to alert clinicians the importance of screening patients for OSA in AD, and stimulate further research in this area. PMID:27148046

  6. Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Vascular Perfusion Map Findings in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Li, Daniel Q; Golding, John; Choudhry, Netan

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent chronic sleep disorder associated with considerable systemic and ophthalmic consequences. The authors present the retinal vascular findings of a visually asymptomatic 56-year-old man clinically diagnosed with OSA using swept-source optical coherence tomography and vascular perfusion mapping. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:880-884.]. PMID:27631487

  7. Resolution of severe obstructive sleep apnea after treatment of anti-muscle kinase receptor-positive myasthenia gravis despite 60-pound weight gain.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Michael; Singas, Effie; Zleik, Bashar; Greenberg, Harly

    2014-07-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be caused by reduced pharyngeal dilator muscle activity. We report a patient with anti-muscle kinase receptor MG with severe OSA and hypoventilation that resolved upon successful treatment of MG despite a 60-lb weight gain.

  8. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea--clinical significance of weight loss.

    PubMed

    Tuomilehto, Henri; Seppä, Juha; Uusitupa, Matti

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is a major health burden that contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Obesity is also the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); at least 70% of patients are obese. OSA as such, has been linked with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and OSA patients often display metabolic syndrome. The exact underlying mechanisms behind these associations are complex and not fully understood. In obese individuals, weight reduction and increased physical activity form cornerstones for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome, and recent controlled intervention trials strongly suggest that weight reduction together with a healthy diet and increased physical activity may correct or at least improve the symptoms of OSA. However, regardless of promising results in terms of symptoms of OSA and the undoubted metabolic benefits of changing lifestyles, weight reduction as a treatment of OSA is still underrated by many clinicians. Based on the current knowledge, clinicians should revise their previous attitudes, including suspicions about weight reduction as an effective treatment for OSA patients. Nevertheless, we also need large well-controlled trials on the effects of different weight reduction programs among OSA patients to determine the overall efficacy of different treatment modalities and their long-term success.

  9. New Data Pre-processing on Assessing of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Güneş, Salih; Yosunkaya, Şebnem

    Sleep disorders are a very common unawareness illness among public. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized with decreased oxygen saturation level and repetitive upper respiratory tract obstruction episodes during full night sleep. In the present study, we have proposed a novel data normalization method called Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM) to evaluate OSAS using real data set obtained from Polysomnography device as a diagnostic tool in patients and clinically suspected of suffering OSAS. Here, we have combined the LBNM and classification methods comprising C4.5 decision tree classifier and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose the OSAS. Firstly, each clinical feature in OSAS dataset is scaled by LBNM method in the range of [0,1]. Secondly, normalized OSAS dataset is classified using different classifier algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier and ANN, respectively. The proposed normalization method was compared with min-max normalization, z-score normalization, and decimal scaling methods existing in literature on the diagnosis of OSAS. LBNM has produced very promising results on the assessing of OSAS. Also, this method could be applied to other biomedical datasets.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women: Specific Issues and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Holger; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ramanan, Dinesh; Armitstead, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been seen as a male disease. However, the importance of OSA in women is increasingly being recognized, along with a number of significant gender-related differences in the symptoms, diagnosis, consequences, and treatment of OSA. Women tend to have less severe OSA than males, with a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and shorter apneas and hypopneas. Episodes of upper airway resistance that do not meet the criteria for apneas are more common in women. Prevalence rates are lower in women, and proportionally fewer women receive a correct diagnosis. Research has also documented sex differences in the upper airway, fat distribution, and respiratory stability in OSA. Hormones are implicated in some gender-related variations, with differences between men and women in the prevalence of OSA decreasing as age increases. The limited data available suggest that although the prevalence and severity of OSA may be lower in women than in men, the consequences of the disease are at least the same, if not worse for comparable degrees of severity. Few studies have investigated gender differences in the effects of OSA treatment. However, given the differences in physiology and presentation, it is possible that personalized therapy may provide more optimal care. PMID:27699167

  11. Iowa gambling task performance in overweight children and adolescents at risk for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kelly A; Shear, Paula K; Tlustos, Sarah; Amin, Raouf S; Beebe, Dean W

    2012-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a nocturnal respiratory disorder associated with cognitive and behavioral sequelae, including impairments in executive functioning (EF). Previous literature has focused on "cool" EF, meaning abilities such as working memory and planning that do not involve affective control requirements. Little is known about the impact OSA may have on "hot" EF that involves regulation of affect and risk-related decision-making, and that may be particularly salient during adolescence, when these skills are rapidly developing. This study examined performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), a task believed to assess aspects of "hot" EF, in overweight adolescents at risk for OSA. Consistent with hypotheses, individuals without OSA made more beneficial decisions on the IGT over time, but participants with OSA did not benefit from feedback and continued to make choices associated with higher initial rewards, but greater long-term losses. The relationship between developmental level and IGT performance was moderated by OSA status. Individuals with OSA did not demonstrate the expected developmental gains in performance during the IGT. This finding suggests that OSA may impact the development of critical aspects of EF, or at least the expression of these skills during the developmentally important period of adolescence. PMID:22300670

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Elevated High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels Independent of Obesity: Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkwan; Lee, Seok Jun; Choi, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Lee, Seung Gwan; Shin, Chol

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) has been recognized as a common health problem, and increasing obesity rates have led to further remarkable increases in the prevalence of OSA, along with more prominent cardiovascular morbidities. Though previous studies have reported an independent relationship between elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and OSA, the issue remains controversial owing to inadequate consideration of obesity and various confounding factors. So far, few population based studies of association between OSA and hsCRP levels have been published. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether OSA is associated with increased hsCRP levels independent of obesity in a large population-based study. A total of 1,835 subjects (968 men and 867 women) were selected from a larger cohort of the ongoing Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). Overnight polysomnography was performed on each participant. All participants underwent anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses, including analysis of lipid profiles and hsCRP levels. Based on anthropometric data, body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) were calculated and fat mass (FM) were measured by means of multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Mild OSA and moderate to severe OSA were defined by an AHI >5 and ≥15, respectively. The population was sub-divided into 3 groups based on the tertile cut-points for the distribution of hsCRP levels. The percentage of participants in the highest tertile of hsCRP increased dose-dependently according to the severity of OSA. After adjustment for potential confounders and obesity-related variables (BMI, WHR, and body fat) in a multiple logistic model, participants with moderate to severe OSA had 1.73-, 2.01-, and 1.61-fold greater risks of being in the highest tertile of hsCRP levels than participants with non-OSA, respectively. Interaction between obesity (BMI ≥25kg/m2) and the

  13. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years), and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years). We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05). In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males), OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males), slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males); for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males); for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males), and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males). Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in females. The

  14. Sleep Apnea in Patients with and without a Right-to-Left Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Mojadidi, Mohammad Khalid; Bokhoor, Pooya Isaac; Gevorgyan, Rubine; Noureddin, Nabil; MacLellan, W. Cameron; Wen, Eugenia; Aysola, Ravi; Tobis, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the presence of right-to-left shunting (RLS) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and compare clinical characteristics and parameters of the sleep studies of patients with and without RLS. Background: The most common cause of RLS is due to intermittent flow through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). PFO occurs more frequently in patients with OSA and may be involved in the exacerbation of OSA. Methods: Patients with an abnormal polysomnogram seen at UCLA-Santa Monica Sleep Medicine Clinic were enrolled. A diagnosis of RLS was made using a transcranial Doppler (TCD) bubble study. Gender and age-matched controls were drawn from patients referred for cardiac catheterization who underwent a TCD. The frequency of RLS in OSA patients and the controls was evaluated. Clinical characteristics and polysomnogram parameters were compared between OSA patients with and without a RLS. Results: A total of 100 OSA patients and 200 controls participated in the study. The prevalence of RLS was higher in patients with OSA compared to the control group (42% versus 19%; p < 0.0001). Patients with OSA and a RLS had a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), less obstructive apnea, and fewer hypopnea episodes than patients with OSA without a RLS. The baseline and nadir SpO2 were similar in both groups and did not correlate with the level of RLS assessed by TCD. The degree of desaturation for a given respiratory disturbance, as measured by oxygen desaturation index (ODI)/AHI ratio, was higher in OSA patients with RLS versus OSA patients without RLS (0.85 ± 0.07 versus 0.68 ± 0.04; p < 0.0001). Conclusion: RLS, most commonly due to a PFO, occurs 2.2 times more frequently in OSA patients compared to a control population that was matched for age and gender. The severity of sleep apnea is not greater in OSA patients who have a PFO. However, patients with OSA and a PFO are more likely to become symptomatic at a younger age with an equivalent decrease in nocturnal SpO2

  15. Perinatal Outcomes Associated With Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Judette; Auckley, Dennis; Miladinovic, Branko; Shepherd, Anna; Mencin, Patricia; Kumar, Deepak; Mercer, Brian; Redline, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and maternal and neonatal morbidities in a cohort of obese gravid women. Methods Participants were enrolled in a prospective observational study designed to screen for OSA and describe the possible risk factors for and outcomes of OSA among obese (BMI 30 kg/m2 or higher) pregnant women. Women underwent an overnight sleep study using a portable home monitor. Studies were manually scored by a central masked Sleep Reading Center using American Academy of Sleep Medicine diagnostic criteria. An apnea hypopnea index of 5 or greater was considered diagnostic of OSA. Perinatal outcomes were compared between women with and without OSA. Results Among 175 women, OSA prevalence was 15.4% (13 mild, 9 moderate, 5 severe). Compared with no-OSA (AHI<5), the OSA group had a higher BMI (46.8 ±12.2 vs. 38.1± 7.5 kg/m2, p=0.002) and more chronic hypertension (55.6 vs. 32.4%, p=0.02). Maternal complications included: maternal death (n=1, amniotic fluid embolus [no-OSA group]) and cardiac arrest (n=1, intraoperative at cesarean delivery [OSA group]). One previable birth and two stillbirths occurred in the no-OSA group. Among live births, OSA was associated with more frequent cesarean delivery (65.4 vs. 32.8%, p=0.003), preeclampsia (42.3 vs. 16.9, p=0.005), and NICU admission (46.1 vs. 17.8, p=0.002). After controlling for BMI, maternal age, and diabetes, OSA (OR 3.55 [1.1–11.3]), prior preeclampsia (OR 2.79 [1.09–7.19]), and hypertension (4.25 [1.67–10.77]) were associated with developing preeclampsia. Conclusion OSA among obese pregnant women is associated with more frequent preeclampsia, neonatal intensive care unit admissions, and cesarean delivery. PMID:23090526

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Impairs Postexercise Sympathovagal Balance in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Felipe X.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Rondon, Maria Urbana P.B.; Alves, Maria Janieire N.N.; Braga, Ana Maria F.W.; Martinez, Daniel G.; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrao, Carlos E.; Trombetta, Ivani C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise (ΔHRR) is independently impaired by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Therefore, we tested the hypotheses: (1) MetS + OSA restrains ΔHRR; and (2) Sympathetic hyperactivation is involved in this impairment. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: We studied 60 outpatients in whom MetS had been newly diagnosed (ATP III), divided according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h in MetS + OSA (n = 30, 49 ± 1.7 y) and AHI < 15 events/h in MetS - OSA (n = 30, 46 ± 1.4 y). Normal age-matched healthy control subjects (C) without MetS and OSA were also enrolled (n = 16, 46 ± 1.7 y). Interventions: Polysomnography, microneurography, cardiopulmonary exercise test. Measurements and Results: We evaluated OSA (AHI - polysomnography), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA - microneurography) and cardiac autonomic activity (LF = low frequency, HF = high frequency, LF/HF = sympathovagal balance) based on spectral analysis of heart rate (HR) variability. ΔHRR was calculated (peak HR minus HR at first, second, and fourth minute of recovery) after cardiopulmonary exercise test. MetS + OSA had higher MSNA and LF, and lower HF than MetS - OSA and C. Similar impairment occurred in MetS - OSA versus C (interaction, P < 0.01). MetS + OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at first, second, and at fourth minute than did C, and attenuated ΔHRR at fourth minute than did MetS - OSA (interaction, P < 0.001). Compared with C, MetS - OSA had attenuated ΔHRR at second and fourth min (interaction, P < 0.001). Further analysis showed association of the ΔHRR (first, second, and fourth minute) and AHI, MSNA, LF and HF components (P < 0.05 for all associations). Conclusions: The attenuation of heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is impaired to a greater degree where metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) than by MetS with no or

  17. Night eating, binge eating and related features in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Katharina; Mühlhans, Barbara; Allison, Kelly C; Hahn, Eckhart G; Schahin, Simin Pour; de Zwaan, Martina

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the nature and extent of the association between night eating, other forms of disordered eating and obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS).Eighty-one participants (20 women and 61 men), mean age 53.7 years diagnosed with OSAS were assessed prior to starting treatment. Using a cut-off of > or =25 on the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ), 8.6% of the participants screened positive for night eating syndrome (NES). In addition, 7.5% met criteria for a daytime eating disorder. NES was significantly associated with diagnoses of depression, anxiety and eating disorders and was significantly correlated with an impairment of mental quality of life. No associations were found between NES and gender, BMI and the severity of the OSAS. NES does not appear to be closely linked to OSAS; however, in patients with OSAS and NES a significant co-morbidity with psychiatric disorders can be expected which might require additional treatment.

  18. Influence of smoking on sleep and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, Oana-Claudia; Pocora, Diana; Mihălcuţă, Stefan; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Zaharie, Ana-Maria; Mihălţan, Florin Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The various ill effects that tobacco smoking has on health have been largely studied, particularly on vascular, neoplastic, and respiratory diseases. Lately, the discussion about the negative impact of cigarette smoking moved towards sleep medicine. Tobacco consumption has been associated with sleep disordered architecture, both during regular intake and after withdrawal. Its effects on sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) still remain a matter of debate. It is unclear whether smoking represents a risk factor for OSAS or whether smoking cessation has any beneficial effects on OSAS and its therapy. There seems to be a synergistic effect between smoking and OSAS, both causing an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Future studies are needed in order to establish the strength of this association. We aim to review the literature regarding the consequences of smoking on sleep architecture and SDB, adding emphasis on OSAS clinical implications and treatment.

  19. Physiological Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Hiren; Arens, Raanan

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing in children refers to a group of respiratory disorders that occur or are exacerbated during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is one of the most significant disorders in this group. OSAS can present in all age groups from early infancy to adolescent years. The cardinal feature of OSAS is limitation of inspiratory flow and volume during sleep resulting in abnormal gas exchange and/or alteration of sleep patterns. When OSAS is a chronic condition it often results in adverse physiological effects that impact on health and development. The present review discusses genesis of OSAS in children and consequent end organ injury with special emphasis on behavior and cognition, cardiovascular function, autonomic regulation, inflammation, endothelial function and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23707879

  20. Withdrawal of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy after Malar Advancement and Le Fort II Distraction in a Case of Apert Syndrome with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Nobuto; Chiba, Shintaro; Moriwaki, Hiroto; Sawai, Rika; Yoshigoe, Akira; Watanabe, Subaru; Ando, Yuji; Uchida, Ryo; Miyawaki, Takeshi; Wada, Kota

    2015-01-01

    Apert syndrome is a congenital syndrome characterized by craniosynostosis and craniofacial dysostosis, among other features, and is reported to cause obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because of upper airway narrowing associated with midfacial dysplasia. We recently encountered a case involving a patient with Apert syndrome complicated by OSA who began to receive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy at the age of 4. OSA resolved after maxillofacial surgery performed at the age of 11, and CPAP was eventually withdrawn. In pediatric patients with maxillofacial dysplasia complicated by OSA, a long-term treatment plan including CPAP in addition to maxillofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery should be considered in view of the effects of OSA on growth. PMID:26473084

  1. Update on sleep and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Pack, Allan I; Pien, Grace W

    2011-01-01

    Inadequate sleep and sleep disorders have important adverse consequences on multiple systems. This review covers three areas: (a) Genetic determinants of sleep disorders. Common gene variants with small effects have been identified for both restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy with cataplexy. Rare variants with large effects have been found in familial phase advance syndrome and in subjects with short sleep durations. (b) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is an oxidative stress disorder. Prospective cohort studies show an increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with untreated severe OSA. (c) The impact of sleep disorders on obesity and diabetes. Inadequate sleep results in changes in insulin resistance and in hormone levels leading to increases in appetite. Hence, inadequate sleep is associated with development of obesity. OSA is also an independent risk factor for insulin resistance; treatment of OSA can improve insulin sensitivity. PMID:21073334

  2. Translational approaches to understanding metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cravo, Sergio L.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Machado, Benedito H.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be independently associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. To determine how OSA can increase cardiovascular risk, animal models have been developed to explore the underlying mechanisms and the cellular and end-organ targets of the predominant pathophysiological disturbance in OSA–intermittent hypoxia. Despite several limitations in translating data from animal models to the clinical arena, significant progress has been made in our understanding of how OSA confers increased cardiovascular risk. It is clear now that the hypoxic stress associated with OSA can elicit a broad spectrum of pathological systemic events including sympathetic activation, systemic inflammation, impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, and endothelial dysfunction, among others. This review provides an update of the basic, clinical, and translational advances in our understanding of the metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular consequences of OSA and highlights the most recent findings and perspectives in the field. PMID:26232233

  3. Where There Is Smoke…There Is Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Williams, Sherrie; Thornton, J. Daryl

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and OSA are widely prevalent and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has been hypothesized that each of these conditions adversely affects the other, leading to increased comorbidity while altering the efficacy of existing therapies. However, while the association between smoking and OSA is plausible, the evidence is less than conclusive. Cigarette smoking may increase the severity of OSA through alterations in sleep architecture, upper airway neuromuscular function, arousal mechanisms, and upper airway inflammation. Conversely, some evidence links untreated OSA with smoking addiction. Smoking cessation should improve OSA, but the evidence to support this is also limited. This article reviews the current evidence linking both conditions and the efficacy of various treatments. Limitations of the current evidence and areas in need of future investigation are also addressed. PMID:25451354

  4. Prevalence and correlates of insomnia and excessive sleepiness in adults with obstructive sleep apnea symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle; Grønli, Janne; Sivertsen, Børge; Lehmann, Sverre

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and excessive sleepiness in adults presenting symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the general population. Randomly selected participants (N = 1,502; 50.7% men, 49.3% women), ages 40 to 70 yr. (M = 53.6, SD = 8.5) were interviewed over the telephone. Insomnia and excessive sleepiness (hypersomnia) were assessed with the Bergen Insomnia Scale and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, respectively. OSA symptoms were identified by self- or spouse reports on snoring, breathing cessations during sleep, and being tired or sleepy. The prevalence of OSA was 6.2%. Among these participants with OSA, 57.6% reported insomnia and 30.1% reported excessive sleepiness. Furthermore, OSA symptoms were associated with self-reported obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and depression, but only in participants with comorbid insomnia or excessive sleepiness.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea in North American commercial drivers.

    PubMed

    Kales, Stefanos N; Straubel, Madeleine G

    2014-01-01

    The most common medical cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Specifically, among an estimated 14 million US commercial drivers, 17-28% or 2.4 to 3.9 million are expected to have OSA. Based on existing epidemiologic evidence, most of these drivers are undiagnosed and not adequately treated. Untreated OSA increases the risk of vehicular crashes as documented in multiple independent studies and by meta-analysis. Therefore, identifying commercial drivers with OSA and having them effectively treated should decrease crash-related fatalities and injuries. Several strategies are available for screening and identifying drivers with OSA. The simplest and most effective objective strategies use body mass index (BMI) cutoffs for obesity. Functional screens are promising adjuncts to other objective tests. The most effective approach will likely be a combination of a good questionnaire; BMI measures; and a careful physician-obtained history complemented by a functional screen. PMID:24317450

  6. Update on paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is one of the most common causes of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children. It is associated with significant morbidity, potentially impacting on long-term neurocognitive and behavioural development, as well as cardiovascular outcomes and metabolic homeostasis. The low grade systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress seen in this condition are believed to underpin the development of these OSA-related morbidities. The significant variance in degree of end organ morbidity in patients with the same severity of OSA highlights the importance of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in determining the overall OSA phenotype. This review seeks to summarize the current understanding of the aetiology and mechanisms underlying OSA, its risk factors, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26904263

  7. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome associated with stroke.

    PubMed

    Mello-Fujita, Luciane; Kim, Lenise Jihe; Palombini, Luciana de Oliveira; Rizzi, Camila; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho

    2015-06-01

    The association between sleep-disordered breathing and stroke has been a subject of increased interest and research. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important risk factor for stroke incidence and mortality. Moreover, OSA is a common clinical outcome after stroke, directly influencing the patient's recovery. The treatment of choice for OSA is positive airway pressure (PAP) support and the PAP appliance is considered the most recommended clinical management for the treatment of patients with cardiovascular complications. However, the implementation of PAP in stroke patients remains a challenge, considering the increased frequency of motor and language impairments associated with the cerebrovascular event. In the present study, we reviewed the main findings describing the association between stroke and OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. We also discussed the types of OSA treatment, the different options and indications of PAP treatment, PAP adherence and the clinical outcomes after treatment.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  9. Nocturnal Hypoxemia Is Associated with White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients with a Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shiel K.; Hanly, Patrick J.; Smith, Eric E.; Chan, Wesley; Coutts, Shelagh B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for stroke, which is modulated by accompanying nocturnal hypoxemia. White matter hyperintensities (WMH) share many of the same risk factors as stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether OSA and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with white matter disease in patients with minor stroke and transient ischemic attack. Methods: Patients with minor stroke or TIA were recruited. Level 3 diagnostic sleep testing was used to diagnose OSA and quantify nocturnal hypoxemia. Significant OSA was defined as respiratory disturbance index ≥ 15, and nocturnal hypoxemia was defined as oxyhemoglobin saturation < 90% for ≥ 12% of total monitoring time. WMH were assessed and quantified on FLAIR MRI. The volume of WMH was compared between those with and without significant OSA and between those with and without nocturnal hypoxemia. Results: One hundred nine patients were included. Thirty-four (31%) had OSA and 37 (34%) had nocturnal hypoxemia. Total WMH volume was significantly greater in the OSA than in the non-OSA groups (p = 0.04). WMH volume was also significantly higher in the hypoxic than the non-hypoxic groups (p = 0.001). Mutivariable analysis with adjustment for age, hypertension, and diabetes showed that nocturnal hypoxemia was independently associated with WMH volume (p = 0.03) but OSA was not (p = 0.29). Conclusions: We conclude that nocturnal hypoxemia, predominantly related to OSA, is independently associated with WMH in patients who present with minor ischemic stroke and TIA and may contribute to its pathogenesis. Citation: Patel SK, Hanly PJ, Smith EE, Chan W, Coutts SB. Nocturnal hypoxemia is associated with white matter hyperintensities in patients with a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1417–1424. PMID:26194729

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed pathways related to the metastatic characteristics of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun; Shen, Jiakang; Yin, Fei; Wang, Chongren; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gene expression data of osteosarcoma (OSA) were analyzed to identify metastasis-related biological pathways. Four gene expression data sets (GSE21257, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). An analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was performed using the Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) method. Gene expression levels were converted into scores of pathways by the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression (FAIME) algorithm and the differentially expressed pathways (DEPs) were then disclosed by a t-test. The distinguishing and prediction ability of the DEPs for metastatic and non-metastatic OSA was further confirmed using the principal component analysis (PCA) method and 3 gene expression data sets (GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) based on the support vector machines (SVM) model. A total of 616 downregulated and 681 upregulated genes were identified in the data set, GSE21257. The DEGs could not be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA, as shown by PCA. Thus, an analysis of DEPs was further performed, resulting in 14 DEPs, such as NRAS signaling, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) regulation of cytokines and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-mediated interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation. Cluster analysis indicated that these pathways could be used to distinguish between metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. The prediction accuracy was 91, 66.7 and 87.5% for the data sets, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673, respectively. The results of PCA further validated that the DEPs could be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. On the whole, several DEPs were identified in metastatic OSA compared with non-metastatic OSA. Further studies on these pathways and relevant genes may help to enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis and may thus aid in

  11. Cardiac arrhythmias in obstructive sleep apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project).

    PubMed

    Namtvedt, Silje K; Randby, Anna; Einvik, Gunnar; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Somers, Virend K; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2011-10-15

    Increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but this may not be generalizable to patients from the general population with a milder form of the condition. The aim of this study was to assess the association between cardiac arrhythmias and OSA of mainly mild and moderate severity. In total, 486 subjects (mean age 49 years, 55% men) recruited from a population-based study in Norway underwent polysomnography for OSA assessment and Holter recordings for arrhythmia assessment. Of these, 271 patients were diagnosed with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5, median AHI 16.8, quartiles 1 to 3 8.9 to 32.6). Mean nadir oxygen saturations were 82% and 89% in patients with and without OSA, respectively. Ventricular premature complexes (≥5/hour) were more prevalent in subjects with OSA compared to subjects without OSA (median AHI 1.4, quartiles 1 to 3 0.5 to 3.0) during the night (12.2% vs 4.7%, p = 0.005) and day (14% vs 5.1%, p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis after adjusting for relevant confounders, AHI was independently associated with an increased prevalence of ventricular premature complexes at night (odds ratio per 1-U increase of log-transformed AHI 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p = 0.008) and during the day (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.8, p = 0.035). In conclusion, the prevalence of ventricular premature complexes is increased in middle-aged patients with mainly mild or moderate OSA, suggesting an association between OSA and ventricular arrhythmias even in mild OSA.

  12. pSa causes oncogenic suppression of Agrobacterium by inhibiting VirE2 protein export.

    PubMed

    Lee, L Y; Gelvin, S B; Kado, C I

    1999-01-01

    When coresident with the Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid, the 21-kDa product of the osa gene of the plasmid pSa can suppress crown gall tumorigenesis incited by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Neither T-DNA processing nor vir (virulence) gene induction is affected by the presence of osa in the bacterium. We used Arabidopsis thaliana root segments and tobacco leaf discs to demonstrate that Osa inhibits A. tumefaciens from transforming these plants to the stable phenotypes of tumorigenesis, kanamycin resistance, and stable beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression. When A. tumefaciens contained osa, the lack of expression of transient GUS activity in infected plant tissues, as well as the lack of systemic viral symptoms following agroinfection of Nicotiana benthamiana by tomato mottle virus, suggested that oncogenic suppression by Osa occurs before T-DNA enters the plant nucleus. The extracellular complementation of an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant (the T-DNA donor strain) by an A. tumefaciens strain lacking T-DNA but containing a wild-type virE2 gene (the VirE2 donor strain) was blocked when osa was present in the VirE2 donor strain, but not when osa was present in the T-DNA donor strain. These data indicate that osa inhibits VirE2 protein, but not T-DNA export from A. tumefaciens. These data further suggest that VirE2 protein and T-DNA are separately exported from the bacterium. The successful infection of Datura stramonium plants and leaf discs of transgenic tobacco plants expressing VirE2 protein by an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant carrying osa confirmed that oncogenic suppression by osa does not occur by blocking T-DNA transfer. Overexpression of virB9, virB10, and virB11 in A. tumefaciens did not overcome oncogenic suppression by osa. The finding that the expression of the osa gene by itself, rather than the formation of a conjugal intermediate with pSa, blocks transformation suggests that the mechanism of oncogenic suppression by osa may differ from that of the IncQ plasmid RSF

  13. Morning cortisol levels and glucose metabolism parameters in moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Josko; Galic, Tea; Supe-Domic, Daniela; Ivkovic, Natalija; Ticinovic Kurir, Tina; Valic, Zoran; Lesko, Josip; Dogas, Zoran

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alterations in glucose metabolism with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to compare morning plasma cortisol levels and glucose metabolism parameters between moderate (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): 15-30 events/h) and severe OSA patients (AHI >30 events/h), with respective controls. A total of 56 male OSA patients, 24 moderate (AHI = 21.1 ± 5.3) and 32 severe (AHI = 49.7 ± 18.1), underwent a full-night polysomnography, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and measurement of morning plasma cortisol levels. These groups were compared to 20 matched subjects in a control group. Morning plasma cortisol levels were statistically lower in severe OSA group than in moderate OSA and control groups (303.7 ± 93.5 vs. 423.9 ± 145.1 vs. 417.5 ± 99.8 pmol/L, P < 0.001). Significant negative correlations were found between morning plasma cortisol levels and AHI (r = -0.444, P = 0.002), as well as oxygen desaturation index (r = -0.381, P = 0.011). Fasting plasma glucose (5.0 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7 vs. 4.9 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.009) was higher in the severe OSA group compared to moderate OSA and controls. Homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was higher in the severe OSA group compared to moderate OSA and controls (4.6 ± 3.7 vs. 2.7 ± 2.0 and 2.2 ± 1.8, respectively, P = 0.006). In conclusion, our study showed that morning plasma cortisol levels measured at 8 a.m. were significantly lower in severe OSA patients than those in moderate OSA group and controls. Morning plasma cortisol levels showed a negative correlation with AHI and oxygen desaturation index. Additionally, this study confirmed the evidence of glucose metabolism impairment in moderate and severe OSA patients, with more pronounced effect in the severe OSA patients group. PMID:27000083

  14. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  15. HW 03-2 EFFECT OF CPAP ON THE TREATMENT OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes at optimal dosing, of which one should be a diuretic. Accordingly, it is not synonymous with uncontrolled hypertension. Among a variety of risk factors, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common type of sleep-disordered breathing, has been recognized a well-established risk factor for resistant hypertension. Indeed, both European and American guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension stated that OSA is a modifiable cause of resistant hypertension. Although the true incidence of resistance hypertension remains unknown, a significant portion of patients with resistant hypertension are thought to have OSA because of an increasing trend in the incidence of OSA worldwide. OSA is very common in hypertensive patients (up to 50%), and also difficult to reach the target blood pressure. According to The Sleep Heart Health Study, the patients with moderate to severe OSA had three times higher odds of having hypertension. In addition, because other large population-based studies have confirmed that OSA is a risk factor for resistant hypertension, a polysomnography examination (a sleep study) should be tested in patients with resistant hypertension. Even in some OSA patients, resistant hypertension could be the first sign without typical symptoms without a history of snoring, witnessed apnea, or excessive daytime sleepiness. The main pathologic mechanisms on how OSA contributes to the development of resistant hypertension include the downstream physiologic effects of recurrent hypoxia, endothelial dysfunction, autonomic nervous dysfunction, increased SNS activity, nocturnal fluid shifts, and overactivation of the renin-angiotensin system. These processes are directly and indirectly interrelated to the development of resistant hypertension. Although various treatment modalities for OSA in

  16. Reduced Systemic Levels of IL-10 Are Associated with the Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Insulin Resistance in Morbidly Obese Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Cabrera, Sonia; Arana-Lechuga, Yoaly; Esqueda-León, Enrique; Terán-Pérez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Chavez, Antonio; Velázquez Moctezuma, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been related to elevation of inflammatory cytokines and development of insulin resistance in morbidly obese (MO) subjects. However, it is still unclear whether the systemic concentration of anti-inflammatory mediators is also affected in MO subjects directly related to the severity of OSA and level of insulin resistance. Normal weight and MO subjects were subjected to overnight polysomnography in order to establish the severity of OSA, according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Blood samples were obtained for estimation of total cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interleukin 10 (IL-10). Serum levels of IL-10 were significantly lower in MO subjects with OSA than in MO and control individuals without OSA. Besides being inversely associated with serum TNF-α and IL-12, decreased IL-10 levels were significantly related to increased AHI, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Serum IL-10 is significantly reduced in morbidly obese subjects with severe OSA while also showing a clear relationship with a state of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance probably regardless of obesity in the present sample. It may be of potential clinical interest to identify the stimulatory mechanisms of IL-10 in obese individuals with OSA. PMID:25944984

  17. Could the thromboxane A2 pathway be a therapeutic target for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-induced atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Gautier-Veyret, Elodie; Van Noolen, Laetitia; Lévy, Patrick; Pepin, Jean Louis; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent nocturnal episodes of intermittent hypoxia. This disease is associated with premature atherosclerosis and consequently with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the activation of some components of the cyclooxygenase pathway. In particular, OSA is associated with activation of the thromboxane A2 (TXA2)-pathway, in which obesity seems to be a major confounding factor. Moreover, TXA2-pathway activation is related to the vascular remodeling associated with OSA. In view of the modest effect of the conventional treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure on the cardiovascular risk in obese OSA patients, the identification of new therapeutic targets to treat OSA-induced atherosclerosis seems essential. As disruption of the TXA2-pathway has been suggested to be of potential interest to prevent atherosclerosis progression, we have reviewed the recent findings on the intricate interaction between the TXA2-pathway, chronic intermittent hypoxia and atherosclerosis and suggest promising therapeutic strategies to treat OSA-related atherogenesis, including pharmacological and/or nutritional approaches.

  18. Met interacts with EGFR and Ron in canine osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    McCleese, J K; Bear, M D; Kulp, S K; Mazcko, C; Khanna, C; London, C A

    2013-06-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Met is known to be over-expressed in canine osteosarcoma (OSA). In human cancers, the RTKs Met, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Ron are frequently co-expressed and engage in heterodimerization, altering signal transduction and promoting resistance to targeted therapeutics. We found that EGFR and Ron are expressed in canine OSA cell lines and primary tissues, EGFR and Ron are frequently phosphorylated in OSA tumour samples, and Met is co-associated with EGFR and Ron in canine OSA cell lines. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation induced amplification of ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation in OSA cells and Met was phosphorylated following TGFα stimulation providing evidence for receptor cross-talk. Lastly, treatment of OSA cells with combined gefitinib and crizotinib inhibited cell proliferation in an additive manner. Together, these data support the notion that Met, EGFR and Ron interact in OSA cells and as such, may represent viable targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Met interacts with EGFR and Ron in canine osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    McCleese, J. K.; Bear, M. D.; Kulp, S. K.; Mazcko, C.; Khanna, C.; London, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Met is known to be over-expressed in canine osteosarcoma (OSA). In human cancers, the RTKs Met, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Ron are frequently co-expressed and engage in heterodimerization, altering signal transduction and promoting resistance to targeted therapeutics. We found that EGFR and Ron are expressed in canine OSA cell lines and primary tissues, EGFR and Ron are frequently phosphorylated in OSA tumour samples, and Met is co-associated with EGFR and Ron in canine OSA cell lines. Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation induced amplification of ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation in OSA cells and Met was phosphorylated following TGFα stimulation providing evidence for receptor cross-talk. Lastly, treatment of OSA cells with combined gefitinib and crizotinib inhibited cell proliferation in an additive manner. Together, these data support the notion that Met, EGFR and Ron interact in OSA cells and as such, may represent viable targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22235915

  20. Sleeping too close together: obesity and obstructive sleep apnea in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Joseph L; Narang, Indra

    2014-09-01

    To review the current available literature exploring the prevalence, severity, consequences and treatments for obesity related OSA in children and adolescents. The published literature was searched through EMBASE and Pubmed using a pre-defined search strategy. There is evidence showing that OSA occurs more frequently and may be more severe in children and adolescents who are overweight or obese compared with lean children. Obesity and OSA are independently associated with adverse cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuropsychological consequences. The magnitude of these abnormalities when obesity and OSA co-exist is not well established. Treatment options for obesity related OSA includes adenotonsillectomy, but it does not cure OSA in over 50% of obese children. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy delivered through continuous or bi-level modes is successful, but limited by generally poor compliance. There is increasing experience with bariatric surgical techniques which are effective for the treatment of obesity and its related complications. As obesity related OSA is highly prevalent, more research is needed to understand the interaction of these two conditions with regards to pathophysiology, adverse consequences and optimal management strategies.

  1. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of octenyl succinic anhydride modified inulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Ye-Wang; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Wang, Haiying; Zhang, Guochao

    2015-01-01

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified inulin (In-OSA) was synthesized via chemical modification of inulin with octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). The esterification of inulin with OSA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and degree of substitution (DS) calculation. Antibacterial activity of In-OSA against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and inhibition rate determination. The results showed that inhibition rates against both E.coli and S. aureus increased with the increase of the In-OSA concentration. And the MICs against E. coli and S. aureus were 1% and 0.5% (w/v), respectively. The antibacterial mechanism was analyzed with the results of the proteins and nucleic acids leakage, SEM and negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both the leakages of proteins and nucleic acids increased with the increase of the In-OSA concentration. The leakage occurred mainly in the early stage which indicated that cell membrane and wall were destroyed by In-OSA quickly. The images of SEM and negative staining TEM suggested that the cell membranes and cell walls of S. aureus were damaged more severely and even destroyed completely; but only pores appeared on the surface of E. coli.

  2. Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarkers in the Field of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Jia, Wei; Yin, Shankai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biomarker assessment is based on quantifying several proteins and metabolites. Recent developments in proteomics and metabolomics have enabled detection of these small molecules in biological samples and exploration of the underlying disease mechanisms in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This systemic review was performed to identify biomarkers, which were only detected by chromatography and/or mass spectrometry (MS) and to discuss the role of these biomarkers in the field of OSA. We systemically reviewed relevant articles from PubMed and EMBASE referring to proteins and metabolite profiles of biological samples in patients with OSA. The analytical platforms in this review were focused on chromatography and/or MS. In total, 30 studies evaluating biomarkers in patients with OSA using chromatography and/or MS methods were included. Numerous proteins and metabolites, including lipid profiles, adrenergic/dopaminergic biomarkers and derivatives, amino acids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and other micromolecules were identified in patients with OSA. Applying chromatography and/or MS methods to detect biomarkers helps develop an understanding of OSA mechanisms. More proteomic and metabolomic studies are warranted to develop potential diagnostic and clinical monitoring methods for OSA. PMID:26448002

  3. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    PubMed Central

    Maranate, Thaya; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG) queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%). PMID:26221183

  4. New frontiers in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Najib T; Hirsch, Allen A J; Laher, Ismail; Bradley, T Douglas; Malhotra, Atul; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Tasali, Esra

    2014-08-01

    OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea), the most common respiratory disorder of sleep, is caused by the loss of upper airway dilating muscle activity during sleep superimposed on a narrow upper airway. This results in recurrent nocturnal asphyxia. Termination of these events usually requires arousal from sleep and results in sleep fragmentation and hypoxaemia, which leads to poor quality sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, reduced quality of life and numerous other serious health consequences. Furthermore, patients with untreated sleep apnoea are at an increased risk of hypertension, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Although there are many predisposing risk factors for OSA, including male gender, endocrine disorders, use of muscle relaxants, smoking, fluid retention and increased age, the strongest risk factor is obesity. The aim of the present review is to focus on three cutting-edge topics with respect to OSA. The section on animal models covers various strategies used to simulate the physiology or the effects of OSA in animals, and how these have helped to understand some of the underlying mechanisms of OSA. The section on diabetes discusses current evidence in both humans and animal models demonstrating that intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation has a negative impact on glucose tolerance. Finally, the section on cardiovascular biomarkers reviews the evidence supporting the use of these biomarkers to both measure some of the negative consequences of OSA, as well as the potential benefits of OSA therapies. PMID:24780001

  5. Metabolic dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: A critical examination of underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    MESARWI, Omar A.; SHARMA, Ellora V.; JUN, Jonathan C.; POLOTSKY, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    It has recently become clear that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, a disorder of defective energy storage and use. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this finding, drawing upon the characteristics that define OSA. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, elevated sympathetic tone, and oxidative stress – all consequences of OSA – have been implicated in the progression of poor metabolic outcomes in OSA. In this review we examine the evidence to support each of these disease manifestations of OSA as a unique risk for metabolic dysfunction. Tissue hypoxia and sleep fragmentation are each directly connected to insulin resistance and hypertension, and each of these also may increase sympathetic tone, resulting in defective glucose homeostasis, excessive lipolysis, and elevated blood pressure. Oxidative stress further worsens insulin resistance and in turn, metabolic dysfunction also increases oxidative stress. However, despite many studies linking each of these individual components of OSA to the development of metabolic syndrome, there are very few reports that actually provide a coherent narrative about the mechanism underlying metabolic dysfunction in OSA. PMID:26412981

  6. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea on type 2 diabetes mellitus: A comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nannapaneni, Srikant; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequently associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Also frequently associated with metabolic syndrome is type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, it is common to find OSA and T2DM together in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Additionally, both OSA and T2DM have a common pathophysiological link with development of insulin resistance. Individuals with severe insulin resistance are likely to have inadequate glycemic control. Long standing poorly controlled T2DM is associated with debilitating microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and macrovascular complications such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. There is extensively published literature exploring the cause-effect relationship between OSA and T2DM. In this article we provide an in-depth review of the complex pathophysiological mechanisms linking OSA to T2DM. Specifically, this review focusses on the effect of OSA on the microvascular complications of T2DM such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Additionally, we review the current literature on the effect of continuous positive airway pressure use in individuals with T2DM and OSA. PMID:24379913

  7. Simplified Berlin Questionnaire for Screening of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Thai Male Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Arunsurat, Itthiphat; Luengyosluechakul, Swita; Prateephoungrat, Krittin; Siripaupradist, Pittayapoom; Khemtong, Sukanya; Jamcharoensup, Kunranan; Thanapatkaiporn, Narin; Limpawattana, Panita; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disease associated with major cardiovascular diseases. Male subjects are more at higher risk for OSA than female subjects. The Berlin questionnaire is a beneficial screening tool for OSA and has 14 items. The Berlin questionnaire may need some adjustment for Thai or Asian populations. We aimed to find items that should be asked in the Berlin questionnaire to identify high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Thai male healthcare workers. This study was performed in Thai male healthcare workers over the age of 35 and currently working at the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University. The Thai version of the Berlin questionnaire was randomly distributed. A study population of 273 subjects was required to provide a confidence value of 95%. An item analysis of the Berlin questionnaire was evaluated as independent factors for being high risk of OSA by using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of the 273 distributed questionnaires, 135 subjects returned then (49.5% response rate). Of those, 41 (30.4%) were identified as being at high risk of OSA. Only three items of the Berlin questionnaire, including frequent snoring, high body mass index and hypertension, were independently associated with being at high risk for OSA. In conclusion, the Berlin questionnaire can be shortened to identify high risk for OSA by itself; not polysomnography. PMID:27627967

  8. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced (“bigdata”) preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  9. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced ("bigdata") preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow).

  10. Hydrophobic derivatives of guar gum hydrolyzate and gum Arabic as matrices for microencapsulation of mint oil.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shatabhisa; Gupta, Sumit; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun; Singhal, Rekha S

    2013-06-01

    Guar gum hydrolyzate (GGH) modified with n-octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) and oleic acid having induced hydrophobicity was evaluated for encapsulation of mint oil and compared with gum Arabic (GA) and GA-OSA as wall material. Spray dried microcapsules prepared with these wall materials were evaluated for qualitative changes by principal component analysis and for percent retention of mint oil during 8-week storage. Results revealed that microcapsules with GGH-OSA and GGH-oleate showed slightly lower retention of mint oil as compared to GA. GA-OSA microcapsules showed better retention of mint oil than GA itself, as observed from the t1/2, the time required for the mint oil to come down to 50% of its original content. The t1/2 of mint oil in microcapsules of GA, GGH-oleate, GGH-OSA and GA-OSA was 26.12, 23.50, 24.11 and 29.67 weeks, respectively. The results suggested that GGH-OSA has the potential to replace gum Arabic for encapsulation of mint oil.

  11. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-01

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types.

  12. Chronic intermittent hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea: an experimental and clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Emilia; Roche, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder considered as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular consequences, such as systemic arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, metabolic disorders, and cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of OSA-related consequence is assumed to be chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) inducing alterations at the molecular level, oxidative stress, persistent systemic inflammation, oxygen sensor activation, and increase of sympathetic activity. Overall, these mechanisms have an effect on vessel permeability and are considered to be important factors for explaining vascular, metabolic, and cognitive OSA-related consequences. The present review attempts to examine together the research paradigms and clinical studies on the effect of acute and chronic IH and the potential link with OSA. We firstly describe the literature data on the mechanisms activated by acute and chronic IH at the experimental level, which are very helpful and beneficial to explaining OSA consequences. Then, we describe in detail the effect of IH in patients with OSA that we can consider “the human model” of chronic IH. In this way, we can better understand the specific pathophysiological mechanisms proposed to explain the consequences of IH in OSA. PMID:27800512

  13. Hippocampal hypertrophy and sleep apnea: a role for the ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Ivana; Kempton, Matthew J; Crum, William R; Glasser, Martin; Milosevic, Milan; Beniczky, Sandor; Corfield, Douglas R; Williams, Steven C; Morrell, Mary J

    2013-01-01

    The full impact of multisystem disease such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on regions of the central nervous system is debated, as the subsequent neurocognitive sequelae are unclear. Several preclinical studies suggest that its purported major culprits, intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, can differentially affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Although the prospective biphasic nature of chronic intermittent hypoxia in animal models of OSA has been acknowledged, so far the evidence for increased 'compensatory' neurogenesis in humans is uncertain. In a cross-sectional study of 32 patients with mixed severity OSA and 32 non-apnoeic matched controls inferential analysis showed bilateral enlargement of hippocampi in the OSA group. Conversely, a trend for smaller thalami in the OSA group was noted. Furthermore, aberrant connectivity between the hippocampus and the cerebellum in the OSA group was also suggested by the correlation analysis. The role for the ischemia/hypoxia preconditioning in the neuropathology of OSA is herein indicated, with possible further reaching clinical implications. PMID:24349453

  14. Central and Peripheral factors contributing to Obstructive Sleep Apneas

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Garcia, Alfredo J.; Anderson, Tatiana M.; Koschnitzky, Jenna E.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh; Prabhakar, Nanduri

    2013-01-01

    Apnea, the cessation of breathing, is a common physiological and pathophysiological phenomenon with many basic scientific and clinical implications. Among the different forms of apnea, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is clinically the most prominent manifestation. OSA is characterized by repetitive airway occlusions that are typically associated with peripheral airway obstructions. However, it would be a gross oversimplification to conclude that OSA is caused by peripheral obstructions. OSA is the result of a dynamic interplay between chemo- and mechanosensory reflexes, neuromodulation, behavioral state and the differential activation of the central respiratory network and its motor outputs. This interplay has numerous neuronal and cardiovascular consequences that are initially adaptive but in the long-term become major contributors to the morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. However, not only OSA, but all forms of apnea have multiple, and partly overlapping mechanisms. In all cases the underlying mechanisms are neither “exclusively peripheral” nor “exclusively central” in origin. While the emphasis has long been on the role of peripheral reflex pathways in the case of OSA, and central mechanisms in the case of central apneas, we are learning that such a separation is inconsistent with the integration of these mechanisms in all cases of apneas. This review discusses the complex interplay of peripheral and central nervous components that characterizes the cessation of breathing. PMID:23770311

  15. Effect of obstructive sleep apnea on type 2 diabetes mellitus: A comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Nannapaneni, Srikant; Ramar, Kannan; Surani, Salim

    2013-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequently associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Also frequently associated with metabolic syndrome is type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, it is common to find OSA and T2DM together in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Additionally, both OSA and T2DM have a common pathophysiological link with development of insulin resistance. Individuals with severe insulin resistance are likely to have inadequate glycemic control. Long standing poorly controlled T2DM is associated with debilitating microvascular complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and macrovascular complications such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. There is extensively published literature exploring the cause-effect relationship between OSA and T2DM. In this article we provide an in-depth review of the complex pathophysiological mechanisms linking OSA to T2DM. Specifically, this review focusses on the effect of OSA on the microvascular complications of T2DM such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Additionally, we review the current literature on the effect of continuous positive airway pressure use in individuals with T2DM and OSA. PMID:24379913

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Linked to Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Nancy A; Roose, Steven P

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent but very frequently undiagnosed. OSA is an independent risk factor for depression and cognitive impairment/dementia. Herein the authors review studies in the literature pertinent to the effects of OSA on the cerebral microvascular and neurovascular systems and present a model to describe the key pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie the associations, including hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation. Intermittent hypoxia plays a critical role in initiating and amplifying these pathologic processes. Hypoperfusion and impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity lead to the development or progression of cerebral small vessel disease (C-SVD). Hypoxemia exacerbates these processes, resulting in white matter lesions, white matter integrity abnormalities, and gray matter loss. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability and neuroinflammation lead to altered synaptic plasticity, neuronal damage, and worsening C-SVD. Thus, OSA may initiate or amplify the pathologic processes of C-SVD and BBB dysfunction, resulting in the development or exacerbation of depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits. Given the evidence that adequate treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves depression and neurocognitive functions, it is important to identify OSA when assessing patients with depression or cognitive impairment. Whether treatment of OSA changes the deteriorating trajectory of elderly patients with already-diagnosed vascular depression and cognitive impairment/dementia remains to be determined in randomized controlled trials. PMID:27139243

  17. Obstructive sleep apnoea in adults: a common chronic condition in need of a comprehensive chronic condition management approach.

    PubMed

    Heatley, Emer M; Harris, Melanie; Battersby, Malcolm; McEvoy, R Doug; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Antic, Nicholas A

    2013-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder that has all the characteristics of a chronic condition. As with other chronic conditions, OSA requires ongoing management of treatments and problems, such as residual symptoms, deficits and co-morbidities. Also, many OSA patients have modifiable lifestyle factors that contribute to their disease, which could be improved with intervention. As health systems are in the process of developing more comprehensive chronic care structures and supports, tools such as chronic condition management programs are available to enable OSA patients and their health care providers to further engage and collaborate in health management. This review explains why the OSA patient group requires a more comprehensive approach to disease management, describes the chronic care model as a platform for management of chronic conditions, and assesses the suitability of particular chronic disease management programs in relation to the needs of the OSA population. Implementation of an evidence-based health-professional-led chronic condition management program into OSA patient care is likely to provide a context in which health risks are properly acknowledged and addressed. Such programs present an important opportunity to enable more optimal health outcomes than is possible by device-focused management alone.

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is Linked to Depression and Cognitive Impairment: Evidence and Potential Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Nancy A; Roose, Steven P

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent but very frequently undiagnosed. OSA is an independent risk factor for depression and cognitive impairment/dementia. Herein the authors review studies in the literature pertinent to the effects of OSA on the cerebral microvascular and neurovascular systems and present a model to describe the key pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie the associations, including hypoperfusion, endothelial dysfunction, and neuroinflammation. Intermittent hypoxia plays a critical role in initiating and amplifying these pathologic processes. Hypoperfusion and impaired cerebral vasomotor reactivity lead to the development or progression of cerebral small vessel disease (C-SVD). Hypoxemia exacerbates these processes, resulting in white matter lesions, white matter integrity abnormalities, and gray matter loss. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) hyperpermeability and neuroinflammation lead to altered synaptic plasticity, neuronal damage, and worsening C-SVD. Thus, OSA may initiate or amplify the pathologic processes of C-SVD and BBB dysfunction, resulting in the development or exacerbation of depressive symptoms and cognitive deficits. Given the evidence that adequate treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure improves depression and neurocognitive functions, it is important to identify OSA when assessing patients with depression or cognitive impairment. Whether treatment of OSA changes the deteriorating trajectory of elderly patients with already-diagnosed vascular depression and cognitive impairment/dementia remains to be determined in randomized controlled trials.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnoea in Treacher Collins syndrome: prevalence, severity and cause.

    PubMed

    Plomp, R G; Bredero-Boelhouwer, H H; Joosten, K F M; Wolvius, E B; Hoeve, H L J; Poublon, R M L; Mathijssen, I M J

    2012-06-01

    This cohort study in 35 patients (13 children) evaluates the prevalence, severity and anatomical cause of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Ambulatory polysomnography was performed cross-sectionally to determine OSAS prevalence and severity. All upper airway related surgical interventions were evaluated retrospectively. In 11 patients, sleep endoscopy, and flexible and rigid endoscopy were applied to determine the level of anatomical obstruction of the upper airway. The overall prevalence of OSAS in Treacher Collins patients was 46% (54% in children; 41% in adults). Thirty-eight upper airway related surgical interventions were performed in 17 patients. Examination of the upper airway revealed various anatomical levels of obstruction, from the nasal septum to the trachea. Most significant obstruction was found at the level of the oro/hypopharynx. OSAS in Treacher Collins patients is an important problem so all patients should be screened for OSAS by polysomnography. Endoscopy of the upper airways was helpful in determining the level of obstruction. Surgical treatment at one level will not resolve OSAS in most patients because OSAS in Treacher Collins has a multilevel origin. Non-invasive ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure or bilevel positive airway pressure) or tracheotomy should be considered as a treatment modality.

  20. Effect of the degree of substitution of octenyl succinic anhydride-banana starch on emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Bello-Flores, Christopher A; Nuñez-Santiago, María del Carmen; Coronel-Aguilera, Claudia P; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-11-01

    Banana starch was esterified with octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA) at different degree substitution (DS) and used to stabilize emulsions. Morphology, emulsion stability, emulsification index, rheological properties and particle size distribution of the emulsions were tested. Emulsions dyed with Solvent Red 26 showed affinity for the oil phase. Backscattering light showed three regions in the emulsion where the emulsified region was present. Starch concentration had higher effect in the emulsification index (EI) than the DS used in the study because similar values were found with OSA-banana and native starches. However, OSA-banana presented greater stability of the emulsified region. Rheological tests in emulsions with OSA-banana showed G'>G" values and low dependence of G' with the frequency, indicating a dominant elastic response to shear. When emulsions were prepared under high-pressure conditions, the emulsions with OSA-banana starch with different DS showed a bimodal distribution of particle size. The emulsion with OSA-banana starch and the low DS showed similar mean droplet diameter than its native counterpart. In contrast, the highest DS led to the highest mean droplet diameter. It is concluded that OSA-banana starch with DS can be used to stabilize specific emulsion types. PMID:26256319

  1. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced ("bigdata") preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow). PMID:27170854

  2. Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarkers in the Field of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huajun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Jia, Wei; Yin, Shankai

    2015-10-01

    Biomarker assessment is based on quantifying several proteins and metabolites. Recent developments in proteomics and metabolomics have enabled detection of these small molecules in biological samples and exploration of the underlying disease mechanisms in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This systemic review was performed to identify biomarkers, which were only detected by chromatography and/or mass spectrometry (MS) and to discuss the role of these biomarkers in the field of OSA. We systemically reviewed relevant articles from PubMed and EMBASE referring to proteins and metabolite profiles of biological samples in patients with OSA. The analytical platforms in this review were focused on chromatography and/or MS. In total, 30 studies evaluating biomarkers in patients with OSA using chromatography and/or MS methods were included. Numerous proteins and metabolites, including lipid profiles, adrenergic/dopaminergic biomarkers and derivatives, amino acids, oxidative stress biomarkers, and other micromolecules were identified in patients with OSA. Applying chromatography and/or MS methods to detect biomarkers helps develop an understanding of OSA mechanisms. More proteomic and metabolomic studies are warranted to develop potential diagnostic and clinical monitoring methods for OSA. PMID:26448002

  3. An Obstructive Sleep Apnea Detection Approach Using a Discriminative Hidden Markov Model From ECG Signals.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyue; Liu, Kaibo; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Lili; Xian, Xiaochen

    2016-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a common sleep disorder suffered by an increasing number of people worldwide. As an alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for OSA diagnosis, the automatic OSA detection methods used in the current practice mainly concentrate on feature extraction and classifier selection based on collected physiological signals. However, one common limitation in these methods is that the temporal dependence of signals are usually ignored, which may result in critical information loss for OSA diagnosis. In this study, we propose a novel OSA detection approach based on ECG signals by considering temporal dependence within segmented signals. A discriminative hidden Markov model (HMM) and corresponding parameter estimation algorithms are provided. In addition, subject-specific transition probabilities within the model are employed to characterize the subject-to-subject differences of potential OSA patients. To validate our approach, 70 recordings obtained from the Physionet Apnea-ECG database were used. Accuracies of 97.1% for per-recording classification and 86.2% for per-segment OSA detection with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity were achieved. Compared with other existing methods that simply ignore the temporal dependence of signals, the proposed HMM-based detection approach delivers more satisfactory detection performance and could be extended to other disease diagnosis applications. PMID:26560867

  4. Physical exercise related improvement in obstructive sleep apnea. Look for the rostral fluid shift.

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E

    2013-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and underdiagnosed medical disorder. OSA is associated with the symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). These patients typically follow a sedentary lifestyle, and sedentary behavior is related to impaired fluid dynamics in the lower body, particularly the legs. In a supine position this fluid can move towards the neck, with a subsequent increase in upper airway (UA) resistance and UA collapse. Several studies have shown that rostral fluid shift worsens OSA; however, whether physical activity can influence this has not been tested. Physical activity related improvement in OSA severity cannot be fully explained by a weight loss in the performed studies, which is of particular importance. One of the potential additional pathways is via an improvement in leg fluid dynamics, with a subsequent decrease in the supine fluid shift toward the neck, since physical activity improves leg fluid dynamics. It is likely that patients with fluid overload states such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease and resistant arterial hypertension, as well as patients with EDS are likely to benefit the most from physical exercise in terms of better leg fluid clearance, and potentially in terms of OSA severity. However, none of the studies have directly assessed the potential effect of physical activity on the leg fluid volume, and more importantly on the supine fluid shift and OSA severity. These questions should be addressed in future studies of the effects of physical exercise on OSA severity.

  5. Simplified Berlin Questionnaire for Screening of High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Thai Male Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Arunsurat, Itthiphat; Luengyosluechakul, Swita; Prateephoungrat, Krittin; Siripaupradist, Pittayapoom; Khemtong, Sukanya; Jamcharoensup, Kunranan; Thanapatkaiporn, Narin; Limpawattana, Panita; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a common disease associated with major cardiovascular diseases. Male subjects are more at higher risk for OSA than female subjects. The Berlin questionnaire is a beneficial screening tool for OSA and has 14 items. The Berlin questionnaire may need some adjustment for Thai or Asian populations. We aimed to find items that should be asked in the Berlin questionnaire to identify high risk for obstructive sleep apnea among Thai male healthcare workers. This study was performed in Thai male healthcare workers over the age of 35 and currently working at the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University. The Thai version of the Berlin questionnaire was randomly distributed. A study population of 273 subjects was required to provide a confidence value of 95%. An item analysis of the Berlin questionnaire was evaluated as independent factors for being high risk of OSA by using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of the 273 distributed questionnaires, 135 subjects returned then (49.5% response rate). Of those, 41 (30.4%) were identified as being at high risk of OSA. Only three items of the Berlin questionnaire, including frequent snoring, high body mass index and hypertension, were independently associated with being at high risk for OSA. In conclusion, the Berlin questionnaire can be shortened to identify high risk for OSA by itself; not polysomnography.

  6. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF.

  7. Sleep clinical record: what differences in school and preschool children?

    PubMed Central

    Shafiek, Hanaa; Evangelisti, Melania; Rabasco, Jole; Cecili, Manuela; Montesano, Marilisa; Barreto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The sleep clinical record (SCR) may be a valid method for detecting children with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This study aimed to evaluate whether there were differences in SCR depending on age and to identify the possible risk factors for OSA development. We enrolled children with sleep disordered breathing between 2013 and 2015, and divided them according to age into preschool- and school-age groups. All patients underwent SCR and polysomnography. OSA was detected in 81.1% and 83.6% of preschool- and school-age groups, respectively. Obesity, malocclusions, nasal septal deviation and inferior turbinate hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent in school-age children (p<0.05); however, only tonsillar hypertrophy had significant hazard ratio (2.3) for OSA development. Saddle nose, nasal hypotonia, oral breathing and tonsillar hypertrophy were significantly more prevalent for development of OSA in preschoolers (p<0.03). The SCR score was significantly higher among preschool children than in school-age children (8.4±2.22 versus 7.9±2.6; p=0.044). Further, SCR score >6.5 had a sensitivity of 74% in predicting OSA in preschool children with positive predictive value of 86% (p=0.0001). Our study confirms the validity of the SCR as a screening tool for patient candidates for a PSG study for suspected OSA, in both school and preschool children. PMID:27730168

  8. A Novel Echocardiographic Method for Assessing Arterial Stiffness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Gunbatar, Hulya; Asker, Muntecep; Babat, Naci; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Yaman, Mehmet; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether the color M-mode-derived propagation velocity of the descending thoracic aorta (aortic velocity propagation, AVP) was an echocardiographic marker for arterial stiffness in OSAS. Subjects and Methods The study population included 116 patients with OSAS and 90 age and gender-matched control subjects. The patients with OSAS were categorized according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as follows: mild to moderate degree (AHI 5-30) and severe degree (AHI≥30). Aortofemoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and AVP were measured to assess arterial stiffness. Results AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to controls (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were increased in the OSAS group compared to controls (p<0.001). Moreover, AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in the severe OSAS group compared to the mild to moderate OSAS group (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were significantly increased in the severe group compared to the mild to moderate group (p<0.001). AVP was significantly positively correlated with FMD (r=0.564, p<0.001). However, it was found to be significantly inversely related to PWV (r=-0.580, p<0.001) and CIMT (r=-0.251, p<0.001). Conclusion The measurement of AVP is a novel and practical echocardiographic method, which may be used to identify arterial stiffness in OSAS. PMID:26617653

  9. COMPARISON OF CBCT PARAMETERS AND SLEEP QUESTIONNAIRES IN SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS AND CONTROLS

    PubMed Central

    Enciso, Reyes; Nguyen, Manuel; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi; Clark, Glenn T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) scan measurements between patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and snorers to develop a prediction model for OSA based on CBCT imaging and the Berlin Questionnaire. Materials and methods 80 subjects (46 OSA patients with Apnea-Hypoapnea Index [AHI]≥ 10 and 34 snorers AHI<10 based on ambulatory somnographic assessment) were recruited through flyers and mail at USC School of Dentistry and at a private practice. Each patient answered the Berlin Questionnaire, and was imaged with CBCT in supine position. Linear and volumetric measurements of the upper airway were performed by one blinded operator and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for OSA. Results OSA patients were predominantly male, older, had a larger neck size and larger Body Mass index than the snorers. The minimum cross-sectional area of the upper airway and its lateral dimension were significantly smaller in the cases. Airway uniformity defined as the minimum cross-sectional area divided by the average area was significantly smaller in the OSA patients. Conclusions Age>57 years, male gender, a “high risk” Berlin Questionnaire and narrow upper airway lateral dimension (<17mm) were identified as significant risk factors for OSA. The results of this study indicate that 3-dimensional CBCT airway analysis could be used as a tool to assess the presence and severity of OSA. The presence and severity (as measured by the RDI) of OSA is associated with a narrow lateral dimension of the airway, increasing age, male gender, and the Berlin questionnaire. PMID:20123412

  10. Associations between brain white matter integrity and disease severity in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Roy, Bhaswati; Park, Bumhee; Kang, Daniel W; Woo, Mary A; Harper, Ronald M; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent upper airway blockage, with continued diaphragmatic efforts to breathe during sleep. Brain structural changes in OSA appear in various regions, including white matter sites that mediate autonomic, mood, cognitive, and respiratory control. However, the relationships between brain white matter changes and disease severity in OSA are unclear. This study examines associations between an index of tissue integrity, magnetization transfer (MT) ratio values (which show MT between free and proton pools associated with tissue membranes and macromolecules), and disease severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) in OSA subjects. We collected whole-brain MT imaging data from 19 newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve OSA subjects (50.4 ± 8.6 years of age, 13 males, AHI 39.7 ± 24.3 events/hr], using a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. With these data, whole-brain MT ratio maps were calculated, normalized to common space, smoothed, and correlated with AHI scores by using partial correlation analyses (covariates, age and gender; P < 0.005). Multiple brain sites in OSA subjects, including superior and inferior frontal regions, ventral medial prefrontal cortex and nearby white matter, midfrontal white matter, insula, cingulate and cingulum bundle, internal and external capsules, caudate nuclei and putamen, basal forebrain, hypothalamus, corpus callosum, and temporal regions, showed principally lateralized negative correlations (P < 0.005). These regions showed significant correlations even with correction for multiple comparisons (cluster-level, family-wise error, P < 0.05), except for a few superior frontal areas. Predominantly negative correlations emerged between local MT values and OSA disease severity, indicating potential usefulness of MT imaging for examining the OSA condition. These findings indicate that OSA severity plays a significant role in white matter injury. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Interest in Bariatric Surgery Among Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Katherine A.; Tavakkoli, Ali; Andrews, Robert A.; Seiger, Ashley N.; Bakker, Jessie P.; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Standard obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) therapies are poorly tolerated. Bariatric surgery is a potential alternative but the level of interest in this intervention among OSA patients is unknown. Objectives Determine the proportion of OSA patients who would be interested in bariatric surgery. Setting Sleep clinics, United States. Methods Consecutive adult patients with untreated severe OSA and a body mass index of 35–45 kg/m2 were approached. Patients at low peri-operative risk and no urgent indication for OSA treatment were invited to a separate informational visit about bariatric surgery as primary treatment for OSA. Results Of 767 eligible patients, 230 (30.0%) were not at low peri-operative risk, 49 (6.4%) had drowsy driving, and 16 (2.1%) had no insurance coverage for bariatric surgery. Of the remaining 482 patients, over one-third (35.5%) were interested in bariatric surgery. Surgical interest was 47.2% in women vs. 27.6% in men (p <0.01) and 67.3% in diabetics vs. 31.0% in non-diabetics (p<0.01). In multivariable adjusted models, female gender (odds ratio 1.89, 95% CI [1.10–3.25]) and diabetes (odds ratio 3.97, 95% CI [1.97–8.01]) remained highly predictive of bariatric surgery interest. Conclusions Nearly two-thirds of obese patients with severe OSA are good candidates for bariatric surgery. Among candidates, over one-third are interested in this treatment. Interest rates are highest among women and diabetics, indicating that metabolic improvements continue to be a major driver of surgery even in patients with severe OSA. Given patient interest, the role of bariatric surgery should be routinely discussed with obese OSA patients. PMID:25892349

  12. Prevalence and risks of habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in adult dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Nazir, Mohammed A.; Al-Masoud, Naif N.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of habitual snoring and risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among dental patients and investigate factors associated with high-risk OSA. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between October and December 2014. A total of 200 consecutive female and male dental patients were included in this study. Subjective and objective assessments were carried out. Habitual snoring and risk of OSA were assessed using the Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Two trained investigators carried out the objective measurements of anthropometric data, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and clinical examination of upper-airway, and dental occlusion. Results: Habitual snoring was present in 18.2% of the females and 81.8% of the males (p<0.05). Breathing pauses during sleep of more than once a week occurred in 9% (n=17) of the sample. Of the males, 78.3% were at high risk of OSA compared with 21.7% of the females. Multivariate analysis for risk of OSA revealed that obese patients were almost 10 times more likely to report OSA symptoms than their non-obese counterparts (odds ratio: 9.9, 95% confidence intervals: 4.4-22.1). Tongue indentations, tonsil size, and a high Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were also independent risks of OSA. Conclusion: Tongue indentations and tonsil grades III and IV were significantly associated with risk of OSA. This validates the important role of dentists in the recognition of the signs and symptoms of OSA. PMID:26837402

  13. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Impaired Exercise Capacity: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Beitler, Jeremy R.; Awad, Karim M.; Bakker, Jessie P.; Edwards, Bradley A.; DeYoung, Pam; Djonlagic, Ina; Forman, Daniel E.; Quan, Stuart F.; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Because cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) aids in prognostic assessment of heart disease, there is rising interest in its utility for cardiovascular risk stratification of patients with OSA. However, the relationship between OSA and exercise capacity is unclear. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that OSA is associated with impaired exercise capacity. Methods: Fifteen subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA (apneahypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events/h) and 19 controls with mild or no OSA (AHI < 15 events/h) were enrolled. Subjects underwent standard polysomnography to determine AHI and exclude other sleep disorders. Resting metabolic rate was measured via indirect calorimetry, followed by maximum, symptom-limited CPET. Subjects completed a sleep diary and physical activity questionnaire characterizing behaviors in the week prior to testing. Results: Percent predicted peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2) was significantly lower in OSA subjects than controls (70.1% ± 17.5% vs 83.8% ± 13.9%; p = 0.02). Each 1-unit increase in log-transformed AHI was associated with a decrease in percent predicted peak O2 of 3.20 (95% CI 0.53-5.88; p = 0.02). After adjusting for baseline differences, this association remained significant (p < 0.01). AHI alone explained 16.1% of the variability observed in percent predicted peak O2 (p = 0.02). Conclusions: OSA is associated with impaired exercise capacity. Further study is needed to evaluate the utility of CPET for prognostic assessment of patients with OSA. Citation: Beitler JR, Awad KM, Bakker JP, Edwards BA, DeYoung P, Djonlagic I, Forman DE, Quan SF, Malhotra A. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with impaired exercise capacity: a cross-sectional study. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(11):1199-1204. PMID:25325602

  15. Comparison of Anthropometric Data Between Asian and Caucasian Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Hoon; Choi, Ji Ho; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is considered to be one of the most important risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) but less is known about the role of ethnicity in OSA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interethnic difference of obesity-related phenotypes in OSA and to reveal the role of ethnicity in OSA. Methods We searched MEDLINE, LILACS, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library using the key words “sleep apnea,” “body mass index,” “neck circumference,” “waist circumference,” “waist to hip ratio,” etc. Inclusion criteria were adults over 18 years of age, and studies that included polysomnography, obesity-related parameters, and a clear demarcation of ethnicity in the patient population. Included studies were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. The following information was collected for controls and OSA: number, age, gender, country, ethnicity (Asian or Caucasian), study design, apnea-hypopnea index/respiratory disturbance index, body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist circumference (WC), and/or waist to hip ratio (WHR). Results A total of 8,312 publications were retrieved with a subsequent 19 manuscripts that met the selection criteria. A total of 2,966 patients were included for analysis. The main findings were as follows: There was no difference in BMI, WC, and WHR between patients with OSA and controls after accounting for publication bias; Patients with OSA have greater NC than controls (standard mean difference, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 1.14); and There was no difference in NC between Asian and Caucasians patients (P=0.178). Conclusion OSA might not be related with BMI, WC, and WHR. Only NC demonstrated a strong association with OSA, and this finding was not different between Asians and Caucasians. PMID:26976019

  16. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  17. Treatments for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Review of the literature. Results OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The current “gold standard” treatment for OSA is continuous positive air pressure (CPAP), which pneumatically stabilizes the upper airways. CPAP has proven efficacy and potential cost savings via decreases in health comorbidities and/or motor-vehicle crashes. However, CPAP treatment is not well-tolerated due to various side effects, and adherence among OSA subjects can be as low as 50% in certain populations. Other treatment options for OSA include improving CPAP tolerability, increasing CPAP adherence through patient interventions, weight loss/exercise, positional therapy, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, oral pressure therapy, oral appliances, surgery, hypoglossal nerve stimulation, drug treatment, and combining 2 or more of the aforementioned treatments. Despite the many options available to treat OSA, none of them are as efficacious as CPAP. However, many of these treatments are tolerable, and adherence rates are higher than those of the CPAP, making them a more viable treatment option for long-term use. Conclusion Patients need to weigh the benefits and risks of available treatments for OSA. More large randomized controlled studies on treatments or combination of treatments for OSA are needed that measure parameters such as treatment adherence, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation, subjective sleepiness, quality of life, and adverse events. PMID:27134515

  18. Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Nai-Cheng; Tien, Kai-Jen; Yang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by repetitive episodes of apnea/hypopnea and hypoxia, is associated with systemic inflammation and induces metabolic, endocrine, and cardiovascular diseases. Inflammation might have an impact on neurodegenerative diseases. This study investigates the possible association between OSA and Parkinson's disease (PD). Random samples out of 1 million individuals were collected from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. A total of 16,730 patients with newly diagnosed OSA from 2002 to 2008 were recruited and compared with a cohort of 16,730 patients without OSA matched for age, gender, and comorbidities using propensity scoring. All patients were tracked until a diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of 2011.During the mean 5.6-year follow-up period, the incidence rates of PD were 2.30 per 1000 person-years in the OSA cohort and 1.71per 1000 person-years in the comparison group. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for PD was greater in older patients (≧ 65 years) and male patients with OSA than the controls, respective IRRs being 1.34 and 1.47. After adjustment for the comorbidities, patients with OSA were 1.37 times more likely to have PD than patients without (95% CI = 1.12-1.68, P < 0.05). Subgroup analysis showed that older patients and patients with coronary artery disease, stroke, or chronic kidney disease had a higher risk for PD than their counter parts. Log-rank analysis revealed that patients with OSA had significantly higher cumulative incidence rates of PD than the comparison group (P = 0.0048). Patients with OSA are at an increased risk for subsequent PD, especially elderly male patients. PMID:26765405

  19. The cardiovascular effects of obstructive sleep apnoeas: analysis of pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, M R; Marrone, O; Insalaco, G; Bonsignore, G

    1994-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoeas (OSA) exert immediate marked cardiovascular effects, and may favour the development of systemic and pulmonary hypertension in the long-term. As for the pathogenesis of the acute cardiovascular changes, the first studies high-lighted the role of OSA-induced hypoxia and mechanical changes. However, more recent work pointed to the role played by the arousal reaction terminating OSA, and to the activity of the autonomic nervous system during apnoea and inter-apnoeic phase. As for the pathogenesis of chronic cardiovascular changes, recent findings suggest that the link between OSA and systemic hypertension may be through an abnormal function of the carotid body and underline the importance of chronic intermittent hypoxia versus continuous hypoxia in the development of stable systemic hypertension. On the other hand, OSA do not appear to enhance strongly the development of stable pulmonary hypertension. In this review, we analyze OSA-induced cardiovascular changes with particular emphasis on to the interplay of the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved. Acute OSA-induced cardiovascular alterations during the apnoeic phase appear to result mainly from the mechanical effects of OSA, while during the interapnoeic phase they seem mostly determined by chemical factors (hypoxia, hypercapnia) and by the arousal reaction. In addition, the role of reflex changes elicited by resumption of ventilation should be reconsidered, since lung inflation seems to exert a positive effect on the cardiovascular changes occurring at the end of OSA. This would be in contrast with the inhibitory effects described as "lung inflation reflex", and deserves further study. PMID:8005263

  20. Risk of Common Mental Disorders in Relation to Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome among Ethiopian College Students

    PubMed Central

    Rutagarama, Ornella; Gelaye, Bizu; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    Background The Berlin and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are simple, validated, and widely used questionnaires designed to assess symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) a common but often unrecognized cause of morbidity and mortality. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,639 college students to examine the extent to which symptoms of OSAS are associated with the odds of common mental disorders (CMDs). The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to evaluate the presence of CMDs while the Berlin and ESS were used to assess high-risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness, respectively. Logistic regression procedures were used to derive odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) assessing the independent and joint associations of high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness with odds of CMDs. Results Approximately 19% of students had high-risk for OSA while 26.4% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Compared to students without high-risk for OSA and without excessive daytime sleepiness (referent group), students with excessive daytime sleepiness only (OR=2.01; 95%CI: 1.60-2.52) had increased odds of CMDs. The odds of CMDs for students with high-risk OSA only was 1.26 (OR=1.26; 95%CI 0.94-1.68). Students with both high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness, compared to the referent group, had the highest odds of CMDs (OR=2.45; 95%CI: 1.69-3.56). Conclusion Our findings indicate that symptoms of OSAS are associated with increased risk of CMDs. These findings emphasize the comorbidity of sleep disorders and CMDs and suggest that there may be benefits to investing in educational programs that extend the knowledge of sleep disorders in young adults. PMID:26925424

  1. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities in obstructive sleep apnea and associations with subcutaneous fat distributions.

    PubMed

    Ucok, Kagan; Aycicek, Abdullah; Sezer, Murat; Genc, Abdurrahman; Akkaya, Muzaffer; Caglar, Veli; Fidan, Fatma; Unlu, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for the development and progression of sleep apnea. Responses to exercise by patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are clinically relevant to reducing body weight and cardiovascular risk factors. This study aimed to clarify the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities and their possible relationships with other findings in patients with OSAS. Forty patients (30 males, 10 females) and 40 controls (30 males, 10 females) were enrolled in this study. Questionnaires (excessive daytime sleepiness, daytime tiredness, morning headache, waking unrefreshed, and imbalance), overnight polysomnography, indirect laryngoscopy, and aerobic and anaerobic exercise tests were performed. Triceps, subscapular, abdomen, and thigh skinfold thicknesses were measured. Subcutaneous abdominal fat (abdomen skinfold) was significantly higher in OSAS patients than in controls. Maximal anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity were not different significantly between the patients and controls. We found that aerobic capacity was significantly lower in OSAS patients than in controls. Aerobic capacity was negatively correlated with upper-body subcutaneous fat (triceps and subscapular skinfolds) but not correlated with subcutaneous abdominal fat in OSAS patients. In multivariate analyses using all patients, the apnea-hypopnea index remained a significant independent predictor of aerobic capacity after controlling for a variety of potential confounders including body mass index. Our data confirm that central obesity (subcutaneous abdominal fat) is prominent in patients with OSAS. Our results suggest that lower aerobic exercise capacity in patients with OSAS might be due to daily physical activity that is restricted by OSA itself. This study also suggests that the degree of subcutaneous abdominal fat cannot be used for predicting aerobic capacity level. We think that upper-body subcutaneous fat might be suitable for determining the physical fitness of

  2. Parental Analgesic Knowledge and Decision Making for Children With and Without Obstructive Sleep Apnea After Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Schymik, Frank A; Lavoie Smith, Ellen M; Voepel-Lewis, Terri

    2015-12-01

    Tonsillectomy is a common and painful procedure often indicated for children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at risk for opioid-related toxicity. Whether parents whose children have OSA understand the risks of opioids is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine whether parents whose children have OSA have greater opioid risk understanding and would be less likely to give an opioid to a child exhibiting oversedation compared to parents whose children do not have OSA. The study design was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study. The study was conducted in a large academic, tertiary care children's hospital in the Midwest. 224 parents whose children with or without OSA underwent tonsillectomy with/without adenoidectomy were included. Parents were assessed for opioid adverse event understanding and then made decisions to give/withhold opioids for a child exhibiting adverse effects. After discharge, parents recorded all opioid doses they gave their child. There were no differences in opioid understanding between OSA and non-OSA groups, and nearly half in both would give an opioid to the child exhibiting oversedation. Similar amounts of opioids were given at home. OSA did not predict parents' opioid decisions; however, around-the-clock instruction predicted greater opioid use at home. Parents whose children had OSA had a similar understanding of opioid-related oversedation compared to other parents, and half would give a prescribed opioid when signs of oversedation were present, suggesting a need for improved understanding and recognition of this sign of toxicity, and of what to do should this symptom present.

  3. Atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model of obstructive sleep apnea: mechanisms and prevention by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background OSA increases atrial fibrillation (AF) risk and is associated with poor AF treatment outcomes. However, a causal association is not firmly established and the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aims of this work were to determine whether chronic obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) induces an atrial pro-arrhythmogenic substrate and to explore whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to prevent it in a rat model of OSA. Methods A custom-made setup was used to mimic recurrent OSA-like airway obstructions in rats. OSA-rats (n = 16) were subjected to 15-second obstructions, 60 apneas/hour, 6 hours/day during 21 consecutive days. Sham rats (n = 14) were placed in the setup but no obstructions were applied. In a second series of rats, MSC were administered to OSA-rats and saline to Sham-rats. Myocardial collagen deposit was evaluated in Picrosirius-red stained samples. mRNA expression of genes involved in collagen turnover, inflammation and oxidative stress were quantified by real time PCR. MMP-2 protein levels were quantified by Western Blot. Results A 43% greater interstitial collagen fraction was observed in the atria, but not in the ventricles, of OSA-rats compared to Sham-rats (Sham 8.32 ± 0.46% vs OSA 11.90 ± 0.59%, P < 0.01). Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression were significantly increased in both atria, while Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression was decreased. MSC administration blunted OSA-induced atrial fibrosis (Sham + Saline 8.39 ± 0.56% vs OSA + MSC 9.57 ± 0.31%, P = 0.11), as well as changes in MMP-2 and IL-6 expression. Interleukin 1-β (IL-1β) plasma concentration correlated to atrial but not ventricular fibrosis. Notably, a 2.5-fold increase in IL-1β plasma levels was observed in the OSA group, which was prevented in rats receiving MSC. Conclusions OSA induces selective atrial fibrosis in a chronic murine model, which can be mediated in part

  4. Cardiopulmonary consequences of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Caples, Sean M; Kara, Tomas; Somers, Virend K

    2005-02-01

    Ongoing research in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) suggests strong associations with cardiopulmonary disorders. There is an abundance of studies describing physiological pathways in OSA that acutely impact the cardiovascular system. These mechanisms, if proven to carry over into the daytime hours, could form the basis for clinical disease. The challenge remains in disentangling these mechanistic processes from the many comorbid conditions often present in patients with OSA. Examples include male gender, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, all of which exert their own influence on the development of cardiopulmonary disease. This review discusses some of the physiological mechanisms associated with disordered breathing during sleep and explores putative cardiopulmonary disease associations.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children: Implications for the Developing Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, David

    2008-01-01

    Recent increases in our awareness to the high prevalence of sleep disorders in general, and of sleep-disordered breathing among children, in particular, has led to concentrated efforts aiming to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical manifestations and potential consequences of such conditions. In this review, I will briefly elaborate on some of the pathogenetic elements leading to the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children, focus on the psycho-behavioral consequences of pediatric OSA, and review the evidence on the potential mechanisms underlying the close association between CNS morbidity and the episodic hypoxia and sleep fragmentation that characterize OSA. PMID:18555196

  6. Comprehensive evaluation of functional and anatomical disorders of the patients with distal occlusion and accompanying obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiev, F. H.; Dobrodeev, A. S.; Libin, P. V.; Kotov, I. I.; Ovsyannikov, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper defines the therapeutic and rehabilitation approach to the patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies, accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with posterior occlusion, accompanied by OSA, allows for objective evaluation of intensity of a dento-facial anomaly and accompanying respiratory disorders in the nasal and oral pharynx, which allows for the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA to be identified, and an optimal plan for surgical procedures to be developed. The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies provides high functional and aesthetic results.

  7. A novel derivative of doxorubicin, AD198, inhibits canine transitional cell carcinoma and osteosarcoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic treatments for a wide range of cancers. N-benzyladriamycin-14-valerate (AD198) is a lipophilic anthracycline that has been shown to target conventional and novel isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) in cytoplasm of cells. Because of the adverse effects of DOX, including hair loss, nausea, vomiting, liver dysfunction, and cardiotoxicity, novel derivatives of DOX have been synthesized and validated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of DOX and its derivative, AD198, on cell viability of three canine transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) (K9TCC#1-Lillie, K9TCC#2-Dakota, K9TCC#4-Molly) and three canine osteosarcoma (K9OSA) (K9OSA#1-Zoe, K9OSA#2-Nashville, K9OSA#3-JJ) primary cancer cell lines. DOX and AD198 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. AD198 inhibited cell viability of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines more efficiently as compared to DOX at the same concentration using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2h-tetrazolium) assay. AD198 had lower IC50 values as compared to DOX for all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. In addition, AD198 increased apoptosis in all tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. AD198 increased the caspase activity in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines, which was confirmed by caspase-3/7 assay, and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, AD198 cleaved PKC-δ, which subsequently activated the p38 signaling pathway, resulting in the apoptosis of tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Inhibition of the p38 signaling pathway by SB203580 rescued DOX- and AD198-induced apoptosis in tested K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines. Our in vitro results suggest that AD198 might be considered as a new treatment option for K9TCC and K9OSA cell lines cancers in vivo. PMID:26451087

  8. Cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fusetti, M; Fioretti, A B; Valenti, M; Masedu, F; Lauriello, M; Pagliarella, M

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between severity of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. We recruited 1185 patients with OSAS who underwent a complete ENT examination, including nasolaryngeal fibre optic endoscopy with Müller's manoeuvre, overnight cardio-respiratory monitoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to measure daytime sleepiness, body mass index (BMI), measurement of blood pressure and blood tests.SUBSEQUENTLY, SUBJECTS WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE SUBGROUPS ACCORDING TO THE APNOEA HYPOPNOEA INDEX (AHI): mild OSAS (AHI 5-15), moderate OSAS (AHI 15-30) and severe OSAS (AHI > 30). In the sample collected, 347 (262 males and 85 females) of 1185 patients suffered from mild OSAS, 363 (269 males and 94 females) from moderate OSAS and 475 (330 males and 145 females) from severe OSAS. In the group suffering from mild OSAS, we found: 127 patients affected by hypertension, 48 with diabetes, 11 with dyslipidaemia and 32 with metabolic syndrome. In the group with moderate OSAS there were 157 patients with hypertension, 63 with diabetes, 72 with dyslipidaemia and 47 with metabolic syndrome. In the group suffering from severe OSAS there were 244 patients with hypertension, 138 with diabetes, 47 with dyslipidaemia and 90 with metabolic syndrome. For data analysis, we used the Spearman correlation test adjusted according to Sidak between the dependent variable AHI and the independent variables BMI, ESS, average SO2 (SO(2med)), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. The results show different patterns of correlation in terms of statistical significance: BMI ρ(s) = 0.26, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0:51, hypertension ρ(s) = -0.05, dyslipidaemia ρ(s) = 0.22 for women, and BMI ρ(s) = 0.53, ESS ρ(s) = 0.28, SO(2med) ρ(s) = -0.50, hypertension ρ(s) = 0.17, diabetes mellitus ρ(s) = 0.28 and metabolic syndrome ρ(s) = 0.26 for men. The results of the study confirm the

  9. Residual Daytime Sleepiness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea After Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Optimization: Causes and Management.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Julia L; Serinel, Yasmina; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2016-09-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but it is also common in the general population. When sleepiness remains after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA, comorbid conditions or permanent brain injury before CPAP therapy may be the cause of the residual sleepiness. There is currently no broad approach to treating residual EDS in patients with OSA. Individual assessment must be made of comorbid conditions and medications, and of lifestyle factors that may be contributing to the sleepiness. Modafinil and armodafinil are the only pharmacologic agents indicated for residual sleepiness in these patients. PMID:27542881

  10. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea–hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  11. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  12. Sex differences in sleep apnea predictors and outcomes from home sleep apnea testing

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Alyssa; Poulos, Greg; Bogan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Study objectives To evaluate sex differences in predictors of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as per outcomes from home sleep apnea testing. Design This was a retrospective analysis of a large repository of anonymous test results and pretest risk factors for OSA. Setting and patients A total of 272,705 patients were referred for home sleep apnea testing from a variety of clinical practices for suspected sleep disordered breathing across North America from 2009 to 2013. Interventions Not applicable. Measurements and results Predictors of OSA (apnea hypopnea index4%≥5) were evaluated by multiple logistic regression; sex differences were evaluated by interaction effects. Middle age was the single most robust predictor of OSA for both sexes and was particularly foretelling for females (P<0.001) even after controlling for measures of adiposity and medical conditions. Females over the age of 45 years were much more likely to have OSA compared to their younger counterparts (78.7% vs 42.5%, respectively; odds ratio: 5.0) versus males (88.1% vs 68.8%, respectively; odds ratio: 3.4). Snoring, although more frequently reported by males, was similarly predictive of OSA for both sexes. Witnessed apneas and measures of adiposity were better predictors of OSA for males than females. Insomnia, depression, and use of sleep medication, although more commonly reported in females, did not predict OSA. Hypertension, although equally reported by both sexes, performed better as a predictor in females (P<0.001), even after controlling for age, measures of adiposity, and other medical conditions. Diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and sleepiness did not contribute unique variance in OSA in adjusted models. Conclusion This study found that males and females report different symptoms upon clinical evaluation for suspected sleep apnea, with some of the “classic” OSA features to be more common in and robustly predictive for males. The finding that advancing age uniquely and robustly

  13. PubMed Central

    PASSÀLI, D.; TATTI, P.; TORALDO, M.; DE BENEDETTO, M.; PEVERINI, F.; CARUSO, G.; MARZETTI, A.; PASSÀLI, F.M.; BELLUSSI, L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This draft of the Official Round Table held during the 99th SIO National Congress is an updated review on the diagnostic tools, the importance of polysomnographic recording and a critical analysis of the surgical techniques in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The review and analysis of available publications is the premise along with a specific analysis of the relationship between OSAS and metabolic and vascular disorders. In addition, the most recent investigations on sleep disorders and altered glucose metabolism are summarised and discussed together with the results of a study by the authors involving a fairly large number of patients with OSAS and diabetes. PMID:24882924

  14. [Successful treatment of diaphragm pacing-induced obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with nasal CPAP].

    PubMed

    Moue, Y; Kamio, K; Tanigaki, T; Hayashi, Y; Kuwahira, I; Takasaki, Y; Ohta, Y; Yamabayashi, H

    1993-08-01

    We report a 71-year-old female patient with primary alveolar hypoventilation syndrome who received diaphragm pacing (DP) and developed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Application of nCPAP markedly improved her nocturnal hypoxemia. The monitored polygrams before and after the application strongly suggested that the main mechanism of OSAS was an imbalance of activity between upper airway dilator muscles and pump muscles. Moreover, paradoxical movement of the rib cage is not necessarily due to upper airway obstruction. Monitoring of tidal volume and arterial oxygen saturation is essential for the diagnosis of DP-induced OSAS.

  15. Sleep-disordered breathing and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Haider A; Wang, David; Glozier, Nicholas; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2014-12-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing, the commonest form of which is obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly recognised as a treatable cause of morbidity. It shares many risk factors with psychiatric disorders including behaviours such as smoking and physical comorbidity. Many symptoms of the two overlap, leaving OSA often undetected and undertreated. In the few studies that assess the two, OSA is commonly comorbid with depression (17-45%) and schizophrenia (up to 55%) and possibly bipolar. There is some limited evidence that treating OSA can ameliorate psychiatric symptoms. Some psychotropics, such as narcotics, cause sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), whilst weight-inducing neuroleptics may exacerbate it. An extreme form of SDB, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is a risk in mothers with substance abuse. Being aware of these common comorbidities may help improve psychiatric patient's treatment and quality of life. PMID:25308389

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea and insight into mechanisms of sympathetic overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, François; Kumar, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, we evaluated ten patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We determined that alarming nocturnal oscillations in arterial pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were caused by regulatory coupling and neural interactions among SNA, apnea, and ventilation. Patients with OSA exhibited high levels of SNA when awake, during normal ventilation, and during normoxia, which contributed to hypertension and organ damage. Additionally, we achieved a beneficial and potentially lifesaving reduction in SNA through the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which remains a primary therapeutic approach for patients with OSA. With these results in hindsight, we herein discuss three concepts with functional and therapeutic relevance to the integrative neurobiology of autonomic cardiovascular control and to the mechanisms involved in excessive sympathoexcitation in OSA. PMID:24691480

  18. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation rescue surgery after multiple multilevel procedures for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Madeleine; Strohl, Kingman; Palomo, J Martin; Ponsky, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) is a new procedure offered for the treatment of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that has been shown to decrease the severity and symptoms of OSA in select patients. We report on a case of a patient with persistent symptoms and findings of OSA despite a history of multiple multilevel procedures, including an uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) with revision, a genioglossus advancement, and a maxillomandibular advancement. The patient then underwent HNS with significant improvement of his symptoms and severity. The success of this patient's HNS surgery demonstrates that we need to examine where HNS fits into the approach to surgery for OSA. There could be benefit to considering cranial nerve stimulation earlier than conventional approaches for select patients. PMID:26700261

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  20. [Obstruction of the upper airways in humans and animal models].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R

    2010-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by repetitive collapse of a narrow upper airway during sleep with the main risk factor being obesity. Apneas are followed by hypoxia, sympathetic activation, intrathoracic pressure swings and arousals. In most animal studies, only the cyclical pattern of hypoxia characteristic of OSA is simulated, however, more complex models have also been developed which additionally reflect the other pathophysiological changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing. These models have contributed to a deeper understanding of the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of OSA. From other experiments the concept of the pharynx behaving like a collapsible tube, i. e. a Starling resistor, has emerged. Finally, the neurotransmitter modulation of upper airway muscle tone has been elucidated by using IN VIVO microdialysis of the caudal medulla of rats. It is hoped that findings from animal studies will in the future impact on the management of patients with OSA, in particular if they are non-compliant with CPAP therapy. PMID:20632239

  1. Focus issue introduction: renewable energy and the environment.

    PubMed

    Seassal, Christian; Koshel, John

    2013-05-01

    This focus issue highlights selected contributions from authors who presented promising concepts at OSA's Renewable Energy and the Environment Optics and Photonics Congress held 11-15 November 2012 in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems. PMID:26918568

  3. New developments in the use of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Boeder, Schafer; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder which afflicts a large number of individuals around the world. OSA causes sleepiness and is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Since its inception in the early 1980’s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as the major treatment of OSA, and it has been shown to improve sleepiness, hypertension, and a number of cardiovascular indices. Despite its successes, adherence with treatment remains a major limitation. Herein we will review the evidence behind the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, its various modes, and the methods employed to improve adherence. We will also discuss the future of PAP therapy in OSA and personalization of care. PMID:26380760

  4. [Experimental study of non-invasive percutaneous electrical stimulator for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its clinical effect].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing

    2006-08-01

    To study the stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic current pulses as a new therapeutical method to treat the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), polysomnography (PSG) was used to synchronously monitor the patient. When OSAS was occurring, the stimulation with the optimal parameter was given in time to make the tongue move forward, the glossopharyngeal airway dilated, the resistance of the upper respiratory tract reduced, the hypoxia at night to be improved and the sleeping structure to be ameliorated because of the function of the dilated muscle of the upper airway. The results of the clinical therapeutic effect indicated that 17 of 22 patients with OSAS had cured effects, 2 of whom improved and 3 of whom were without effect. The effective rate was 77.27%. It is preliminarily proved that this is a new method in the treatment of patients suffered from OSAS. PMID:17002124

  5. New developments in the use of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Lucas M; Boeder, Schafer; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder which afflicts a large number of individuals around the world. OSA causes sleepiness and is a major cardiovascular risk factor. Since its inception in the early 1980's, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as the major treatment of OSA, and it has been shown to improve sleepiness, hypertension, and a number of cardiovascular indices. Despite its successes, adherence with treatment remains a major limitation. Herein we will review the evidence behind the use of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, its various modes, and the methods employed to improve adherence. We will also discuss the future of PAP therapy in OSA and personalization of care. PMID:26380760

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Octenyl Succinic Anhydride Modified Taro Starch Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Suisui; Dai, Lei; Qin, Yang; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-01-01

    The polar surface and hydrophilicity of starch nanoparticles (SNPs) result in their poor dispersibility in nonpolar solvent and poor compatibility with hydrophobic polymers, which limited the application in hydrophobic system. To improve their hydrophobicity, SNPs prepared through self-assembly of short chain amylose debranched from cooked taro starch, were modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). Size via dynamic light scattering of OSA-SNPs increased compared with SNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the OSA-SNPs had a new absorption peak at 1727 cm-1, which was the characteristic peak of carbonyl, indicating the formation of the ester bond. The dispersibility of the modified SNPs in the mixture of water with nonpolar solvent increased with increasing of degree of substitution (DS). OSA-SNPs appear to be a potential agent to stabilize the oil-water systems. PMID:26918568

  7. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation rescue surgery after multiple multilevel procedures for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Madeleine; Strohl, Kingman; Palomo, J Martin; Ponsky, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) is a new procedure offered for the treatment of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that has been shown to decrease the severity and symptoms of OSA in select patients. We report on a case of a patient with persistent symptoms and findings of OSA despite a history of multiple multilevel procedures, including an uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) with revision, a genioglossus advancement, and a maxillomandibular advancement. The patient then underwent HNS with significant improvement of his symptoms and severity. The success of this patient's HNS surgery demonstrates that we need to examine where HNS fits into the approach to surgery for OSA. There could be benefit to considering cranial nerve stimulation earlier than conventional approaches for select patients.

  8. [Experimental study of non-invasive percutaneous electrical stimulator for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and its clinical effect].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianggang; Xu, Xiaomei; Gong, Yongsheng; Fan, Xiaofang; Wang, Liangxing

    2006-08-01

    To study the stimulation of the genioglossus with percutaneous biphasic current pulses as a new therapeutical method to treat the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), polysomnography (PSG) was used to synchronously monitor the patient. When OSAS was occurring, the stimulation with the optimal parameter was given in time to make the tongue move forward, the glossopharyngeal airway dilated, the resistance of the upper respiratory tract reduced, the hypoxia at night to be improved and the sleeping structure to be ameliorated because of the function of the dilated muscle of the upper airway. The results of the clinical therapeutic effect indicated that 17 of 22 patients with OSAS had cured effects, 2 of whom improved and 3 of whom were without effect. The effective rate was 77.27%. It is preliminarily proved that this is a new method in the treatment of patients suffered from OSAS.

  9. The sympathetic nervous system and catecholamines metabolism in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valeria; Pengo, Martino F.; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder of breathing in middle-aged and overweight subjects. It features recurrent episodes of upper airway total (apnoea) o partial (hypopnea) collapse during sleep, which are associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and with arousal from sleep to re-establish airway patency. An association of OSA with dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system (ANS) and altered catecholamines (CAs) metabolism has been contended for years. However, the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying these alterations remain to be fully clarified. Nonetheless, these alterations are deemed to play a key pathogenic role in the established association of OSA with several conditions besides arterial hypertension (HT), including coronary artery disease, stroke, and, more in general, with increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. Hence, in this review we will analyse the relationship between the sleep disturbances associated with OSA and the altered function of the ANS, including CAs metabolism. PMID:26904265

  10. A comparison to schemes of ocean surface albedo parameterization and their impact on shortwave radiatation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, H.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Feng, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Cai, E.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean covers 71% of the Earth's surface and plays a pivotal role in the earth radiation energy balance. The ocean surface albedo(OSA) is a deciding factor on ocean net surface shortwave radiation(ONSSR) estimation. Several OSA schemes have been proposed successively, but there is not a conclusion for the best OSA scheme of estimating the ONSSR. This study, on the base of analyzing currently existing OSA parameterization, including Briegleb et al.(B), Taylor et al.(T), Hansen et al.(H), Jin et al.(J), Preisendorfer and Mobley(PM86), Feng's scheme(F), discusses the difference of OSA's impact on ONSSR estimation in condition of actual downward shortwave radiation(DSR). Then we evaluate the necessity and applicability for the climate models to integrate the more complicated OSA scheme. We got some conclusions: The SZA and the wind speed are the two most significant effect factor to broadband OSA, thus the different OSA parameterizations varies violently in the regions of both high latitudes and strong winds. In the summer, the Northern Hemisphere(NH) is high ONSSR, but small deviations compared with Northern Hemisphere(SH),and contrary in the winter. The OSA schemes can lead the ONSSR results difference of the order of 20 w m-2 by the analysis of the ONSSR reanalysis dataset, the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA).The simple scheme of Taylor and the more complicate schemes of Jin and Feng is very similar, and the scheme B and H is close to each other, the PM86 is more close to MERRA. We use the COVE ocean platform observation data to validate the several scheme result, and the RMSE is 10.96 w m-2, 5.24 w m-2, 12.88 w m-2, 6.52 w m-2, 6.33 w m-2, 6.30 w m-2 for B,T,H,J,PM86,F, respectively. The Taylor's scheme shows the best estimate, and Feng's result just following Taylor's. However, the accuracy of the estimated instantaneous OSA changes at different local time. Jin's scheme has the best performance generally at noon and in

  11. Derived Arterial Stiffness is Increased in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Pengo, Martino F.; Kent, Brian D.; Muza, Rex; Karkoulias, Kiriakos; Leschziner, Guy; Williams, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Both periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA has also been linked to increased large arterial stiffness, which is considered an independent risk factor for CVD. We utilized a previously validated index of large artery stiffness (SIDVP) derived from the digital volume pulse (DVP) to seek comparison in patients with PLMS and OSA. Methods: Forty-nine adult male subjects, without known comorbidities that could affect arterial stiffness or on vasoactive medication, were retrospectively identified and categorized into controls (n = 8), PLMS (n = 13), OSA (n = 17), and OSA/PLMS (n = 11). The cutoff for PLMS was a periodic limb movement index (PLMI) > 15 events/h, and for OSA an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10 events/h. SIDVP was derived from the raw data of photoplethysmography of the nocturnal polysomnography, averaged for 2 min prior to sleep study initiation (baseline), after completion in the morning, and every half hour after sleep onset. Results: The groups were age/body mass index-matched. Controls showed lower baseline, morning, and overall SIDVP compared to the other groups (p < 0.01). Patients with PLMS (PLMI: 50.69 ± 9.7 events/h) and the OSA group (AHI: 29.7 ± 2 events/h) demonstrated similar overall SIDVP (6.78 ± 0.08 versus 6.94 ± 0.04, respectively, p = 0.5), whereas the OSA/PLMS (AHI: 29.35 ± 8, PLMI: 50.63 ± 7.2) group demonstrated the highest (7.40 ± 0.06, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on an easily reproducible and applicable marker of large arterial stiffness, patients with significant PLMS had higher SIDVP when compared to controls and comparable to those with moderate/severe OSA. The OSA/PLMS group had the highest SIDVP, implying a possible additive effect of OSA and PLMS on arterial stiffness. Citation: Drakatos P, Higgins S, Pengo MF, Kent BD, Muza R, Karkoulias K, Leschziner G, Williams A. Derived arterial

  12. Morning pentraxin3 levels reflect obstructive sleep apnea–related acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kobukai, Yusuke; Koyama, Takashi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated morning levels of pentraxin3 (PTX3) as a sensitive biomarker for acute inflammation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A total of 61 consecutive patients with OSA were divided into two groups: non-to-mild (n = 20) and moderate-to-severe (n = 41) OSA based on their apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score. Those patients with moderate-to-severe OSA were further divided into continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treated (n = 21) and non-CPAP-treated (n = 20) groups. Morning and evening serum PTX3 and high-sensitivity (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after 3 mo of CPAP therapy. The baseline hs-CRP and PTX3 levels were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe OSA than in those with non-to-mild OSA. Moreover, the serum PTX3 levels, but not the hs-CRP levels, were significantly higher after than before sleep in the moderate-to-severe OSA group (morning PTX3, 1.96 ± 0.52; evening PTX3, 1.71 ± 0.44 ng/ml). OSA severity as judged using the AHI was significantly correlated with serum PTX3 levels but not hs-CRP levels. The highest level of correlation was found between the AHI and morning PTX3 levels (r = 0.563, P < 0.001). CPAP therapy reduced evening and morning serum hs-CRP and PTX3 levels in patients with moderate-to-severe OSA; however, the reduction in PTX3 levels in the morning was greater than that in the evening (morning −29.8 ± 16.7% vs. evening −12.6 ± 26.8%, P = 0.029). Improvement in the AHI score following CPAP therapy was strongly correlated with reduced morning PTX3 levels(r = 0.727, P < 0.001). Based on these results, morning PTX3 levels reflect OSA-related acute inflammation and are a useful marker for improvement in OSA following CPAP therapy. PMID:25237185

  13. Decreased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Lin; Zhou, Li-Xiao; Dang, Yalong; Huo, Yin-Ping; Shi, Lei; Chang, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the changes of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Methods: Relevant studies were selected from 3 major literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) without language restriction. Main inclusion criteria is that a case-control study in which RNFL thickness was measured by a commercial available optical coherence tomography (OCT) in OSAS patients. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Efficacy estimates were evaluated by weighted mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcome evaluations were: the average changes of RNFL thickness in total OSAS patients, subgroup analysis of RNFL thickness changes in patients of different OSAS stages, and subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant RNFL thickness changes in total OSAS patients. Results: Of the initial 327 literatures, 8 case-control studies with 763 eyes of OSA patients and 474 eyes of healthy controls were included (NOS scores ≥6). For the people of total OSAS, there had an average 2.92 μm decreased RNFL thickness compared with controls (95% CI: −4.61 to −1.24, P = 0.001). For subgroup analysis of OSAS in different stages, the average changes of RNFL thickness in mild, moderate, severe, and moderate to severe OSAS were 2.05 (95% CI: −4.40 to 0.30, P = 0.088), 2.32 (95% CI: −5.04 to 0.40, P = 0.094), 4.21 (95% CI: −8.36 to −0.06, P = 0.047), and 4.02 (95% CI: −7.65 to −0.40, P = 0.03), respectively. For subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant, the average changes of RNFL thickness in Superior, Nasal, Inferior, and Temporal quadrant were 2.43 (95% CI: −4.28 to −0.57, P = 0.01), 1.41 (95% CI: −3.33 to 0.51, P = 0.151), 3.75 (95% CI: −6.92 to −0.59, P = 0.02), and 0.98 (95% CI: −2.49 to 0.53, P = 0.203), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that RNFL thickness in OSAS patients is much thinner than

  14. The role of obesity and obstructive sleep apnea in the pathogenesis and treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Jonathan A; Pothineni, Aravind; Marcus, Carolina Z; Bisognano, John D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of resistant hypertension, obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), three highly prevalent conditions in the United States, is rising. Approximately one in three adults in the US has hypertension, and a significant proportion of these individuals have hypertension that is difficult to treat, or resistant. Obesity and OSA are well-established risk factors for resistant hypertension, a condition that portends significant cardiovascular risk. Awareness of the various mechanisms by which obesity and OSA impact systemic blood pressure is essential to better understand how best to effectively care for patients with resistant hypertension. In this review, we discuss the clinical and pathophysiologic associations between obesity, OSA, and resistant hypertension. Furthermore, we will explore the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) and other therapeutic interventions on blood pressure control in patients with resistant hypertension.Key Points• Obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and resistant hypertension are highly prevalent conditions, with increasing overall incidence [1-3].• Both obesity and obstructive sleep apnea are independent risk factors for the development of resistant hypertension.• OSA is characterized by a physiologic cascade of collapse of the upper airway, which can lead to intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, significant negative intra-thoracic pressure, and increased SNS output.• Intermittent hypoxia leads to activation of the endothelin system [17, 18, 19•], which can lead to the development of resistant hypertension.• Intermittent hypoxia can lead to the over activation of the SNS, which can also contribute to the development of resistant hypertension [20, 21].• OSA leads to state of elevated adrenergic tone, which in turn may contribute to resistant hypertension [25-27].• OSA patients have a higher incidence of "non-dipping" of nocturnal systolic blood pressure, a marker of increased adrenergic tone

  15. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia consensus statement on preoperative selection of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea scheduled for ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Girish P; Ankichetty, Saravanan P; Gan, Tong J; Chung, Frances

    2012-11-01

    The suitability of ambulatory surgery for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remains controversial because of concerns of increased perioperative complications including postdischarge death. Therefore, a Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia task force on practice guidelines developed a consensus statement for the selection of patients with OSA scheduled for ambulatory surgery. A systematic review of the literature was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Although the studies evaluating perioperative outcome in OSA patients undergoing ambulatory surgery are sparse and of limited quality, they do provide useful information that can guide clinical practice. Patients with a known diagnosis of OSA and optimized comorbid medical conditions can be considered for ambulatory surgery, if they are able to use a continuous positive airway pressure device in the postoperative period. Patients with a presumed diagnosis of OSA, based on screening tools such as the STOP-Bang questionnaire, and with optimized comorbid conditions, can be considered for ambulatory surgery, if postoperative pain can be managed predominantly with nonopioid analgesic techniques. On the other hand, OSA patients with nonoptimized comorbid medical conditions may not be good candidates for ambulatory surgery. What other guidelines are available on this topic? The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) practice guidelines for management of surgical patients with OSA published in 2006. Why was this guideline developed? The ASA guidelines are outdated because several recent studies provide new information such as validated screening tools for clinical diagnosis of OSA and safety of ambulatory laparoscopic bariatric surgery in OSA patients. Therefore, an update on the selection of patients with OSA undergoing ambulatory surgery is warranted. How does this guideline differ from existing guidelines? Unlike the ASA guidelines, this

  16. Urinary Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a well-established risk factor for hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. More recently, OSA has been implicated as an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-accepted early biomarker of subclinical kidney tubular injury, preceding an increase in serum creatinine. The goal of this study was to determine if an association exists between OSA and increased urinary NGAL levels. Methods We prospectively enrolled adult patients from the sleep clinic of an academic medical center. Each underwent polysomnography and submitted a urine specimen upon enrollment. We measured NGAL and creatinine levels on all urine samples before participants received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and, in a subset of OSA patients, after CPAP therapy. We compared the urinary NGAL/creatinine ratio between untreated participants with and without OSA, and within a subset of 11 OSA patients also after CPAP therapy. Results A total of 49 subjects were enrolled: 16 controls based on an apnea-hypopnea index (events with at least 4% oxygen desaturation; AHI-4%) <5 events/hour (mean AHI-4% = 0.59 +/- 0.60); 33 OSA patients based on an AHI-4% >5 events/hour (mean AHI-4% = 43.3 +/- 28.1). OSA patients had a higher mean body-mass index than the control group (36.58 +/- 11.02 kg/m2 vs. 26.81 +/- 6.55 kg/m2, respectively; p = 0.0005) and were more likely to be treated for hypertension (54.5% vs. 6.25% of group members, respectively; p = 0.0014). The groups were otherwise similar in demographics, and there was no difference in the number of diabetic subjects or in the mean serum creatinine concentration (control = 0.86 +/- 0.15 mg/dl, OSA = 0.87 +/- 0.19 mg/dl; p = 0.7956). We found no difference between the urinary NGAL-to-creatinine ratios among untreated OSA patients versus control subjects (median NGAL/creatinine = 6.34 ng/mg vs. 6.41 ng

  17. Assessment of regional right ventricular systolic function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using velocity vector imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Junfang; Wang, Zhibing; Li, Yong; Meng, Yuanyuan; Li, Rong; Wang, Wugang; Fu, Xiuxiu

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common type of sleep disorder which is associated with a series of cardiovascular disorders, including right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. However, it is difficult to assess the RV function systematically using a conventional echocardiography because RV has a complex geometrical shape. A case-control study was performed to assess the regional right ventricular potential dysfunction in patients with OSAS using velocity vector imaging (VVI) from March 2014 to October 2015.Sixty-nine patients with OSAS were divided into 3 groups: mild, moderate, and severe according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). A total of 31 cases of healthy subjects were enrolled as the control group. Digital images of apex 4-chamber views were acquired to measure the peak systolic velocity (V), strain (ST), and strain rate (STR) of right ventricular free wall (RVFW) basal, middle, and apical segments using VVI.The peak systolic velocity of RVFW basal segments in the mild OSAS group increased (t = 2.22, P = 0.049) and gradually reduced in the moderate and severe groups compared with the controls. The values of systolic ST and STR of apical segments decreased in the mild OSAS group compared with the normal control group (t = 3.30, P = 0.02; t = 3.75, P = 0.01, respectively), and decreased furthermore in the moderate and severe OSAS groups.The change in the right ventricular regional systolic function starts before the development of heart dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. At the early stage of OSAS, the deformation decreases in the RVFW apical segment, and the peak systolic velocities increase in the RVFW basal segment. The VVI is a sensitive method which is expected to be a worthy technique for early clinical therapy in patients with OSAS. PMID:27631230

  18. Abnormal Intrinsic Functional Hubs in Severe Male Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Evidence from a Voxel-Wise Degree Centrality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi; Gong, Honghan; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xianjun; Ye, Chenglong; Nie, Si; Chen, Liting; Peng, Dechang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with changes in brain structure and regional function in certain brain areas. However, the functional features of network organization in the whole brain remain largely uncertain. The purpose of this study was to identify the OSA-related spatial centrality distribution of the whole brain functional network and to investigate the potential altered intrinsic functional hubs. Methods Forty male patients with newly confirmed severe OSA on polysomnography, and well-matched good sleepers, participated in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and clinical and cognitive evaluation. Voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) was measured across the whole brain, and group difference in DC was compared. The relationship between the abnormal DC value and clinical variables was assessed using a linear correlation analysis. Results Remarkably similar spatial distributions of the functional hubs (high DC) were found in both groups. However, OSA patients exhibited a pattern of significantly reduced regional DC in the left middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and DC was increased in the right orbital frontal cortex, bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, and bilateral lentiform nucleus, including the putamen, extending to the hippocampus, and the inferior temporal gyrus, which overlapped with the functional hubs. Furthermore, a linear correlation analysis revealed that the DC value in the posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus were positively correlated with Montreal cognitive assessment scores, The DC value in the left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobule were negatively correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and arousal index in OSA patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OSA patients exhibited specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs including relatively

  19. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity in hypertensive and normotensive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Rångemark, C; Hedner, J A; Carlson, J T; Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1995-04-01

    Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity was studied during rest and after ergometric exercise in 13 hypertensive or normotensive patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 10 sex- and weight-matched controls. All patients had undergone a complete polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA. The controls did not undergo any sleep investigation but had no history of snoring or witnessed apneas during sleep. On antihypertensive drug wash-out, two of the patients were normotensive, whereas 11 had mild to moderate hypertension. Platelet aggregation measured by adenosine 5'-diphosphate- or adrenaline-induced aggregation, platelet factor-4 or beta-thromboglobulin did not differ between patients and controls. During exercise beta-thromboglobulin decreased significantly in both OSA patients and controls. Plasma tissue plasminogen activator activity was similar in OSA patients and controls and increased significantly in both groups after exercise. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) was 18.4 +/- 3.6 IU/ml in OSA patients compared with 8.2 +/- 1.7 IU/ml in controls (p < 0.029) during rest, indicating decreased fibrinolytic activity. The difference between groups remained after exercise (p < 0.017). Blood pressure elevation was more common and body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with OSA, but there was no direct relation between blood pressure level or BMI and PAI-1. Nevertheless, differences between groups were smaller when blood pressure and obesity were accounted for. It is concluded that patients with OSA may exhibit decreased fibrinolytic activity. Low fibrinolytic activity may represent a confounding pathophysiological mechanism behind the high incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with OSA.

  20. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Exercise Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Carla A.; Selvadurai, Hiran; Baur, Louise A.; Waters, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evaluate the relative contributions of weight status and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to cardiopulmonary exercise responses in children. Design: Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, spirometry, cardiopulmonary exercise function testing on a cycle ergometer, and cardiac doppler imaging. OSA was defined as ≥ 1 obstructive apnea or hypopnea per hour of sleep (OAHI). The effect of OSA on exercise function was evaluated after the parameters were corrected for body mass index (BMI) z-scores. Similarly, the effect of obesity on exercise function was examined when the variables were adjusted for OAHI. Setting: Tertiary pediatric hospital. Participants: Healthy weight and obese children, aged 7–12 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Seventy-one children were studied. In comparison with weight-matched children without OSA, children with OSA had a lower cardiac output, stroke volume index, heart rate, and oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) at peak exercise capacity. After adjusting for BMI z-score, children with OSA had 1.5 L/min (95% confidence interval -2.3 to -0.6 L/min; P = 0.001) lower cardiac output at peak exercise capacity, but minute ventilation and ventilatory responses to exercise were not affected. Obesity was only associated with physical deconditioning. Cardiac dysfunction was associated with the frequency of respiratory-related arousals, the severity of hypoxia, and heart rate during sleep. Conclusions: Children with OSA are exercise limited due to a reduced cardiac output and VO2 peak at peak exercise capacity, independent of their weight status. Comorbid OSA can further decrease exercise performance in obese children. Citation: Evans CA, Selvadurai H, Baur LA, Waters KA. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity on exercise function in children. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1103-1110. PMID:24882905

  1. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Polysomnography after a Technically Inadequate or Normal Home Sleep Test

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, Michelle R.; Santiago, Vicente; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Michael N.; Santiago, Silverio; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Home sleep testing (HST) is an accepted alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in high-risk populations. Clinical guidelines recommend PSG in cases where the HST is technically inadequate (TI) or fails to establish the diagnosis of OSA in patients with high pretest probability. This retrospective study evaluated predictors of OSA on PSG within patients who had a TI or normal HST. Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed on 1,157 patients referred for HST at our sleep center. Two hundred thirty-eight patients had a TI or normal HST with subsequent PSG. Age, BMI, Epworth score, HST result, and PSG-based apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were abstracted. Results: Two hundred thirty-eight consecutive patients with either a normal HST (n = 127) or TI HST (n = 111) underwent subsequent PSG. Of 127 who had a normal HST, 76% had a normal PSG and 24% had OSA (23 mild, 6 moderate, 1 severe). Of 111 who had a TI HST, 29% had a normal PSG and 71% had OSA (43 mild, 19 moderate, 17 severe). Individuals younger than 50 years old with a normal HST were more likely to have a normal PSG. Older age predicted diagnosis of OSA on PSG among individuals with a TI HST. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis of a clinical sample, when the HST is interpreted as normal in a younger patient population, the subsequent PSG is likewise normal in majority of the patients, although significant OSA is sometimes discovered. When a HST is read as TI, the majority of patients have OSA. Citation: Zeidler MR, Santiago V, Dzierzewski JM, Mitchell MN, Santiago S, Martin JL. Predictors of obstructive sleep apnea on polysomnography after a technically inadequate or normal home sleep test. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(11):1313–1318. PMID:26156951

  2. Heterogeneous recurrence analysis of heartbeat dynamics for the identification of sleep apnea events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Changqing; Kan, Chen; Yang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder that affects 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. It occurs due to the occlusion of the upper airway during sleep, thereby leading to a decrease of blood oxygen level that triggers arousals and sleep fragmentation. OSA significantly impacts the quality of sleep and it is known to be responsible for a number of health complications, such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Traditional diagnosis of OSA relies on polysomnography, which is expensive, time-consuming and inaccessible to the general population. Recent advancement of sensing provides an unprecedented opportunity for the screening of OSA events using single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG). However, existing approaches are limited in their ability to characterize nonlinear dynamics underlying ECG signals. As such, hidden patterns of OSA-altered cardiac electrical activity cannot be fully revealed and understood. This paper presents a new heterogeneous recurrence model to characterize the heart rate variability for the identification of OSA. A nonlinear state space is firstly reconstructed from a time series of RR intervals that are extracted from single-channel ECGs. Further, the state space is recursively partitioned into a hierarchical structure of local recurrence regions. A new fractal representation is designed to efficiently characterize state transitions among segmented sub-regions. Statistical measures are then developed to quantify heterogeneous recurrence patterns. In addition, we integrate classification models with heterogeneous recurrence features to differentiate healthy subjects from OSA patients. Experimental results show that the proposed approach captures heterogeneous recurrence patterns in the transformed space and provides an effective tool to detect OSA using one-lead ECG signals. PMID:27228436

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Liver Damage and Atherosclerosis in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petta, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Torres, Daniele; Buttacavoli, Maria; Cammà, Calogero; Di Marco, Vito; Licata, Anna; Lo Bue, Anna; Parrinello, Gaspare; Pinto, Antonio; Salvaggio, Adriana; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Craxì, Antonio; Bonsignore, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We assessed whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and low prevalence of morbid obesity. Secondary aim was to explore the association of OSA and hypoxemia with NASH and severity of liver pathological changes. Methods Consecutive patients (n = 126) with chronically elevated ALT and NAFLD underwent STOP-BANG questionnaire to estimate OSA risk and ultrasonographic carotid assessment. In patients accepting to perform cardiorespiratory polygraphy (PG, n = 50), OSA was defined as an apnea/hypopnea index ≥5. A carotid atherosclerotic plaque was defined as a focal thickening >1.3 mm. Results Prevalence of high OSA risk was similar in patients refusing or accepting PG (76% vs 68%, p = 0.17). Among those accepting PG, overall OSA prevalence was significantly higher in patients with F2-F4 fibrosis compared to those without (72% vs 44%; p = 0.04). Significant fibrosis was independently associated with mean nocturnal oxygen saturation (SaO2)<95% (OR 3.21, 95%C.I. 1.02–7.34; p = 0.04). Prevalence of OSA tended to be higher in patients with, than in those without, carotid plaques (64% vs 40%; p = 0.08). Carotid plaques were independently associated with %time at SaO2<90% >1 (OR 6.30, 95%C.I. 1.02–12.3; p = 0.01). Conclusions In NAFLD patients with chronically elevated ALT at low prevalence of morbid obesity, OSA was highly prevalent and indexes of SaO2 resulted independently associated with severity of liver fibrosis and carotid atherosclerosis. These data suggest to consider sleep disordered breathing as a potential additional therapeutic target in severe NAFLD patients. PMID:26672595

  4. Tooth loss and obstructive sleep apnea signs and symptoms in the US population

    PubMed Central

    Akinkugbe, Aderonke A.; Slade, Gary D.; Essick, Greg K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between tooth loss and signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a representative sample of the general US population. Methods Data were from 7305 men and women aged ≥25 years participating in the 2005–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tooth loss, occlusal contacts, and denture use were determined by dental examination. Four cardinal OSA signs and symptoms were evaluated by questions based on American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Adults with ≥2 signs/symptoms of OSA were classified at high-risk of OSA. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % confidence limits (CL) from log binomial regression models estimated the strength of association between tooth loss and high-risk for OSA, adjusting for demographic characteristics, body mass index, dentures, and sleep duration. Results Prevalence of high-risk for OSA increased 2 % for each additional lost tooth (PR = 1.02, 95 % CL, 1.01, 1.03) among adults aged 25 to 65 years. When tooth loss was modeled as an ordinal variable with 0–4 lost teeth as the referent category, adjusted prevalence of high-risk for OSA was as follows: 25 % greater in those missing 5–8 teeth (PR = 1.25, 95 % CL, 1.07, 1.46); 36 % greater in those missing 9–31 teeth (PR = 1.36, 95 % CL, 1.06, 1.73); and 61 % greater in the edentulous (PR = 1.61, 95 % CL, 1.11, 2.33). Conclusion Tooth loss may be an independent risk factor for OSA. PMID:26779902

  5. The Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Self-Reported Stroke or Coronary Heart Disease in Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Thomas B.; Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Unruh, Mark; Reboussin, David; Kuna, Samuel T.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Wing, Rena R.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Newman, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are common, increasingly recognized as comorbid conditions, and individually implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We sought to determine the association between OSA and CVD in an overweight and obese population with T2DM. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Ancillary study to the Look AHEAD trial. Participants: Three hundred five participants of the Sleep AHEAD study who underwent unattended full polysomnography at home with measurement of the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Measurements and Results: Self-reported prevalent CVD was obtained at the initial assessment of the parent study and included a history of the following conditions: stroke, carotid endarterectomy, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and percutaneous coronary intervention. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of OSA, measured continuously and categorically, with prevalent CVD. OSA was present (AHI ≥ 5) in 86% of the population, whereas the prevalence of all forms of CVD was just 14%. The AHI was associated with stroke with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.57 (1.03, 6.42). Neither the continuously measured AHI nor the categories of OSA severity were significantly associated with the other forms of CVD assessed. Conclusions: We found suggestive evidence of a greater prevalence of stroke at greater values of the AHI. OSA was not associated with prevalent coronary heart disease in the Sleep AHEAD trial. Future studies should confirm the link between OSA and stroke and examine mechanisms that link OSA to stroke in adults with T2DM. Citation: Rice TB; Foster GD; Sanders MH; Unruh M; Reboussin D; Kuna ST; Millman R; Zammit G; Wing RR; Wadden TA; Kelley D; Pi-Sunyer X; Newman AB. The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and self-reported stroke or coronary heart disease in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  6. Perceived consequences of casual online sexual activities on heterosexual relationships: a u.s. Online survey.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Royce, Tracy; Lever, Janet

    2011-04-01

    Some researchers have illustrated how the Internet can provide users with an ideal atmosphere to explore sexuality; however, most have stressed the Internet's negative impact on intimate relationships. Notably, much of this research has focused on the small minority of men who compulsively engage in online sexual activities (OSA), overlooking the majority of men and women who use OSA recreationally (either individually or with a partner). Addressing these limitations, data on heterosexual adults in committed relationships were taken from the 2004 "ELLE/msnbc.com Cyber-sex and Romance Survey" (n = 8,376). In quantitative analyses, men were less likely than women to express concerns and more likely to hold favorable attitudes about their partner's OSA. With regard to the impact of OSA on intimate relationships, men and women did not differ in becoming "more open to new things," and finding it easier "to talk about what [they] want sexually." Negative impacts were also identified, with women more likely to indicate they had less sex as a result of a partner's OSA, and men more likely to indicate they were less aroused by real sex as a result of their own OSA. Generally, qualitative results mirrored quantitative ones. Additionally, qualitative data suggested that moderate or light amounts of OSA yield relationship benefits for both female and male users, including increases in the quality and frequency of sex, and increased intimacy with real partners. In addition, men who used the Internet moderately, and men and women who reported being light users, stated that engaging in tandem OSA fostered better sexual communication with partners. Findings underscore the need to explore further the impact that online sexual activities can have on real-life committed relationships.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea in severe mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Szaulińska, Katarzyna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Sikorska, Olga; Holka-Pokorska, Justyna; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Wichniak, Adam; Śliwiński, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is estimated to be 3-7.5% in men and 2-3% in women. In mentally ill population it is even higher, as these patients are a high risk OSA group. The aim of the paper was a review of literature about the prevalence of sleep apnoea in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder.The available data show that OSA is present in 15-48% of patients with schizophrenia, 21-43% of patients with bipolar disorder and 11-18% of patients with recurrent depressive disorder. The lack of diagnosis of OSA in people with mental illnesses has multiple negative consequences. The symptoms of sleep apnoea might imitate the symptoms of mental illnesses such as negative symptoms of schizophrenia and symptoms of depression, they might as well aggravate the cognitive impairment. A number of the drugs used in mental disorders may aggravate the symptoms of OSA. OSA is as well the risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases which are a serious clinical problem in mentally ill people and contribute to shortening of their expected lifespan. From the point of view of the physicians treating OSA it is important to pay attention to the fact that co-existing depression is the most common reason for resistant daytime sleepiness in OSA patients treated effectively with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). CPAP therapy leads to significant improvement of mood. However, in schizophrenia and bipolar patients it may rarely lead to acute worsening of mental state, exacerbation of psychotic symptoms or phase shift from depression to mania. PMID:26688840

  8. Sitting and Television Viewing

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Christopher E.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Phillips, Barbara; Tulio de Mello, Marco; Hirshkowitz, Max

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excess sitting is emerging as a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, mental illness, and all-cause mortality. Physical activity, distinct from sitting, is associated with better sleep and lower risk for OSA, yet relationships among sitting behaviors and sleep/OSA remain unknown. We examined whether total sitting time and sitting while viewing television were associated with sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and sleepiness. METHODS: The 2013 National Sleep Foundation Sleep in America Poll was a cross-sectional study of 1,000 adults aged 23 to 60 years. Total sitting time, time watching television while sitting, sleep duration and quality, OSA risk, and daytime sleepiness were assessed. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounding factors (including BMI and physical activity), each additional hour per day of total sitting was associated with greater odds of poor sleep quality (OR [95% CI] = 1.06 [1.01, 1.11]) but not with other sleep metrics (including sleep duration), OSA risk, or daytime sleepiness. For television viewing while sitting, each additional hour per day was associated with greater odds of long sleep onset latency (≥ 30 min) (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.27]), waking up too early in the morning (OR = 1.12 [1.03, 1.23]), poor sleep quality (OR = 1.12 [1.02, 1.24]), and “high risk” for OSA (OR = 1.15 [1.04, 1.28]). Based upon an interaction analysis, regular physical activity was protective against OSA risk associated with television viewing (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Excess sitting was associated with relatively poor sleep quality. Sitting while watching television was associated with relatively poor sleep quality and OSA risk and may be an important risk factor for sleep disturbance and apnea risk. PMID:25633255

  9. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  10. Perceived consequences of casual online sexual activities on heterosexual relationships: a u.s. Online survey.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Royce, Tracy; Lever, Janet

    2011-04-01

    Some researchers have illustrated how the Internet can provide users with an ideal atmosphere to explore sexuality; however, most have stressed the Internet's negative impact on intimate relationships. Notably, much of this research has focused on the small minority of men who compulsively engage in online sexual activities (OSA), overlooking the majority of men and women who use OSA recreationally (either individually or with a partner). Addressing these limitations, data on heterosexual adults in committed relationships were taken from the 2004 "ELLE/msnbc.com Cyber-sex and Romance Survey" (n = 8,376). In quantitative analyses, men were less likely than women to express concerns and more likely to hold favorable attitudes about their partner's OSA. With regard to the impact of OSA on intimate relationships, men and women did not differ in becoming "more open to new things," and finding it easier "to talk about what [they] want sexually." Negative impacts were also identified, with women more likely to indicate they had less sex as a result of a partner's OSA, and men more likely to indicate they were less aroused by real sex as a result of their own OSA. Generally, qualitative results mirrored quantitative ones. Additionally, qualitative data suggested that moderate or light amounts of OSA yield relationship benefits for both female and male users, including increases in the quality and frequency of sex, and increased intimacy with real partners. In addition, men who used the Internet moderately, and men and women who reported being light users, stated that engaging in tandem OSA fostered better sexual communication with partners. Findings underscore the need to explore further the impact that online sexual activities can have on real-life committed relationships. PMID:20174862

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea in severe mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Szaulińska, Katarzyna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Sikorska, Olga; Holka-Pokorska, Justyna; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Wichniak, Adam; Śliwiński, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is estimated to be 3-7.5% in men and 2-3% in women. In mentally ill population it is even higher, as these patients are a high risk OSA group. The aim of the paper was a review of literature about the prevalence of sleep apnoea in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder.The available data show that OSA is present in 15-48% of patients with schizophrenia, 21-43% of patients with bipolar disorder and 11-18% of patients with recurrent depressive disorder. The lack of diagnosis of OSA in people with mental illnesses has multiple negative consequences. The symptoms of sleep apnoea might imitate the symptoms of mental illnesses such as negative symptoms of schizophrenia and symptoms of depression, they might as well aggravate the cognitive impairment. A number of the drugs used in mental disorders may aggravate the symptoms of OSA. OSA is as well the risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases which are a serious clinical problem in mentally ill people and contribute to shortening of their expected lifespan. From the point of view of the physicians treating OSA it is important to pay attention to the fact that co-existing depression is the most common reason for resistant daytime sleepiness in OSA patients treated effectively with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). CPAP therapy leads to significant improvement of mood. However, in schizophrenia and bipolar patients it may rarely lead to acute worsening of mental state, exacerbation of psychotic symptoms or phase shift from depression to mania.

  12. Genetic variants in interleukin-6 modified risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuqin; Liu, Reng-Yun; Lei, Zhe; Zhu, Yehan; Huang, Jian-An; Jiang, Xiefang; Liu, Zeyi; Liu, Xia; Peng, Xiaobei; Hu, Huacheng; Zhang, Hong-Tao

    2009-04-01

    Obesity and inflammation are known to correlate with the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Interleukin (IL)-6, an important regulator of obesity and inflammation, was reported to phenotypically increase in patients with OSAS. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic variants in IL-6 confer susceptibility to OSAS. The study population consisted of 151 patients with OSAS and 75 healthy controls from Southeast China. Five haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) were selected across 21 kb of the IL-6 locus using Haploview software V4.1. The tSNPs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyped by restriction enzyme digestion followed by gel electrophoresis. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype reconstruction were carried out by means of a SHEsis program. No distribution difference of any of the five tSNPs between OSAS patients and controls was observed. However, in non-obese individuals (n=117), the minor allele G (rs1800796) decreased risk of OSAS compared with the major allele C [odds ratio (OR), 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26-0.86; p=0.014], and the haplotype TG (rs1880242, rs1800796) conferred a significantly decreased risk of OSAS than single allele G (rs1800796) (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20-0.74; p=0.003). Moreover, the severity of sleep-disordered breathing (measured by apnea hypopnea index) increased linearly in carriers of the C variant of IL-6 -572G/C polymorphism (14.3+/-5.1, 22.0+/-3.6 and 34.8+/-3.5 for GG, CG and CC, respectively; p=0.012). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to suggest that genetic variants in IL-6 could modify OSAS susceptibility. SNP genotyping of IL-6 is a potential strategy for detecting the risk of breathing disordered diseases in non-obese individuals.

  13. Screening for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea before Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ishman, Stacey L.; Tawfik, Kareem O.; Smith, David F.; Cheung, Kristin; Pringle, Lauren M.; Stephen, Matthew J.; Everett, Tiffany L.; Stierer, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Results: One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9 ± 5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1 ± 14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p < 0.001), known OSA (p = 0.006), and a scheduled adenotonsillectomy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: OSA was not routinely screened for by anesthesia providers prior to ambulatory pediatric surgery. When screening did occur, “snoring” was the most commonly recorded symptom. Paradoxically, patients with undiagnosed OSA who would benefit the most from screening were the least likely to be screened. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 697. Citation: Ishman SL, Tawfik KO, Smith DF, Cheung K, Pringle LM, Stephen MJ, Everett TL, Stierer TL. Screening for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea before ambulatory surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):751–755. PMID:25902820

  14. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density by Computed Tomography in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Satoshi; Ikezoe, Kohei; Hirai, Toyohiro; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Handa, Tomohiro; Oga, Toru; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Clinical studies have investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can modulate bone metabolism but data are conflicting. Bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the standard technique for quantifying bone strength but has limitations in overweight patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m2). The aim of this study was to examine the association between OSA and BMD by examining CT images that allow true volumetric measurements of the bone regardless of BMI. Methods: Lumbar vertebrae BMD was evaluated in 234 persons (180 males and 54 females) by CT scan. The method was calibrated by a phantom containing a known concentration of hydroxyapatite. Results: BMD was lower in male patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 30/h) than non OSA (AHI < 5; p < 0.05), while OSA and BMD had no association in females. Linear and multiple regression analyses revealed that age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.52), hypertension (p = 0.0068, β = −0.17), and the alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure difference (A-aDO2) (p = 0.012, β = −0.15) in males were associated with BMD, while only age (p < 0.0001, β = −0.68) was associated with BMD in females. Conclusion: Males with severe OSA had a significantly lower BMD than non OSA participants. Age, hypertension, and elevation of A-aDO2 were significant factors for BMD by CT imaging. The usefulness of measuring BMD in OSA patients by CT scanning should be studied in future. Citation: Hamada S, Ikezoe K, Hirai T, Oguma T, Tanizawa K, Inouchi M, Handa T, Oga T, Mishima M, Chin K. Evaluation of bone mineral density by computed tomography in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):25–34. PMID:26235157

  15. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    BRODIE, FRANK L.; CHARLSON, EMILY S.; ALEMAN, TOMAS S.; SALVO, REBECCA T.; GEWAILY, DINA Y.; LAU, MARISA K.; FARREN, NEIL D.; ENGELHARD, STEPHANIE B.; PISTILLI, MAXWELL; BRUCKER, ALEXANDER J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Methods Patients with CSCR without a history of steroid use or secondary retinal disease were matched based on age/gender/body mass index with control patients and administered the Berlin Questionnaire to assess for OSA risk. Patients were scored “OSA+” if they were at “high risk” on the Berlin Questionnaire or reported a previous OSA diagnosis. Rates of OSA+ were compared between the 2 groups, odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval was calculated using exact conditional logistic regression. Results Forty-eight qualifying patients with CSCR were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the CSCR and control groups by age (mean = 55 years), gender (79% male), body mass index (mean = 28.2), history of diabetes, or hypertension. Within the CSCR group, 22 patients (45.8%) were OSA+ versus 21 control patients (43.8%) (difference = 2.1%; 95% confidence interval, −18.2% to 22.2%; exact odds ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval, 0.47–2.49; P = 1.00). Conclusion When compared with matched controls, patients with CSCR did not have statistically significant higher rates of OSA risk or previous diagnosis. This finding contrasts with previous work showing a strong association between the diseases. The divergence is likely due to our matching controls for body mass index, a significant risk factor for OSA. PMID:25127049

  16. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Levels of Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and Their Value for Predicting Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Antonia; Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; Gomez, Cristina; de la Peña, Monica; Pierola, Javier; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Abad, Jorge; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria Jose; Teran, Joaquin; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Mayos, Mercè; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental growth factor (PlGF) induces angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair, and plasma PlGF levels change markedly during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with AMI is a subject of debate. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between PlGF levels and both the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and short-term outcomes after ACS in patients with and without OSA. Methods A total of 538 consecutive patients (312 OSA patients and 226 controls) admitted for ACS were included in this study. All patients underwent polygraphy in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. The severity of disease and short-term prognoses were evaluated during the hospitalization period. Plasma PlGF levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results Patients with OSA were significantly older and more frequently hypertensive and had higher BMIs than those without OSA. After adjusting for age, smoking status, BMI and hypertension, PlGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with OSA compared with patients without OSA (19.9 pg/mL, interquartile range: 16.6–24.5 pg/mL; 18.5 pg/mL, interquartile range: 14.7–22.7 pg/mL; p<0.001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was associated with higher PlGF concentrations (p<0.003). Patients with higher levels of PlGF had also an increased odds ratio for the presence of 3 or more diseased vessels and for a Killip score>1, even after adjustment. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with ACS, elevated plasma levels of PlGF are associated with the presence of OSA and with adverse outcomes during short-term follow-up. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01335087 PMID:26930634

  17. Epigenetics modifications and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: The EPIOSA study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological and animal models studies generate hypotheses for innovative strategies in OSA management by interfering intermediates mechanisms associated with cardiovascular complications. We have thus initiated the Epigenetics modification in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (EPIOSA) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02131610). Methods/design EPIOSA is a prospective cohort study aiming to recruit 350 participants of caucasian ethnicity and free of other chronic or inflammatory diseases: 300 patients with prevalent OSA and 50 non-OSA subjects. All of them will be follow-up for at least 5 years. Recruitment and study visits are performed in single University-based sleep clinic using standard operating procedures. At baseline and at each one year follow-up examination, patients are subjected to a core phenotyping protocol. This includes a standardized questionnaire and physical examination to determine incident comorbidities and health resources utilization, with a primary focus on cardiovascular events. Confirmatory outcomes information is requested from patient records and the regional Department of Health Services. Every year, OSA status will be assessed by full sleep study and blood samples will be obtained for immediate standard biochemistry, hematology, inflammatory cytokines and cytometry analysis. For biobanking, aliquots of serum, plasma, urine, mRNA and DNA are also obtained. Bilateral carotid echography will be performed to assess subclinical atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis progression. OSA patients are treated according with national guidelines. Discussion EPIOSA will enable the prospective evaluation of inflammatory and epigenetics mechanism involved in cardiovascular complication of treated and non-treated patients with OSA compared with non OSA subjects. PMID:25016368

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, continuous positive airway pressure and treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Floras, John S

    2015-09-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), present in ~15% of the general population, increases the risks of stroke, heart failure, and premature death. Importantly, individuals with cardiovascular disease have a higher prevalence yet they often have few symptoms to alert clinicians to its presence. OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15 events/hour is present in ≥30% of patients with primary hypertension and in up to 80% of those with drug resistant hypertension, suggesting that the neural, hormonal, inflammatory and vascular cascades triggered by OSA may elevate blood pressure chronically. The purpose of this review is to summarize: (1) the epidemiology of OSA and its relation to cardiovascular risk; (2) potential mechanisms by which OSA could promote conditions known to increase the risk of hypertension or contribute to its development and progression; (3) evidence for and against a pro-hypertensive effect of OSA; and, (4) the impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure and blood pressure-related morbidities. The prevailing view that the effect of treatment on blood pressure is modest arises from the inability of most contemporary technology to measure accurately the true impact of CPAP on OSA-entrained surges in nocturnal blood pressure. Moreover the exclusive focus on blood pressure, as if this is the principal determinant of cardiovascular event rates in this population, is naïve. The capacity to reduce cardiovascular risk by treating OSA with CPAP likely transcends a simple blood pressure effect; formal testing of this hypothesis will require adequately powered randomized clinical trials.

  19. Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Self-assessed Oral Health Status: An Internet Survey.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Seitaro; Kojima, Yuki; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Yoshino, Koichi; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Satou, Ryouichi; Takahashi, Naoko; Tazaki, Masakazu; Kamijo, Hideyuki; Sugihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study based on a cross-sectional internet survey was to investigate the relationship between risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and self-assessed oral health status. The participants, who comprised individuals registered with an online research company, were required to complete a self-reported questionnaire. Those answering in the affirmative to both of the following two questions were placed in the OSA-risk group, while those answering in the negative were assigned to the control group: 'Have other people noticed pauses in your breathing while you are sleeping?' and 'Do you feel excessively sleepy during the daytime?'. A total of 493 were included in the OSA-risk group and 2,560 in the control group. Among the total 3,053 respondents, the highest prevalence for OSA risk in men was in the 50-59-year age range, although this tended to level off after age 60 years. No such trend was observed in women, however. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the relationship between risk of OSA and self-assessed oral health status. Significant correlations were observed with the following parameters: difficulty in opening mouth (odds ratio [OR]: 2.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.647-4.311), dry mouth (OR: 2.11; CI: 1.544-2.876), bad breath (OR: 1.69; CI: 1.309-2.186), gingival bleeding (OR: 1.48; CI: 1.134-1.932), and gingival swelling (OR: 1.44; CI: 1.046-1.981). These results suggest a relationship between risk of OSA and self-assessed oral health status, indicating that treating OSA might improve oral health status. Further study is needed to demonstrate a causal relationship between OSA and self-assessed oral health status, however. PMID:27665695

  20. Interrelationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Medarov, Boris I; Judson, Marc A

    2015-10-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has a high prevalence in sarcoidosis. This high prevalence may be the result of increased upper airways resistance from sarcoidosis of the upper respiratory tract, corticosteroid-induced obesity, or parenchymal lung involvement from sarcoidosis. OSA is a form of SDB that is particularly common in patients with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis and SDB share many similar symptoms and clinical findings, including fatigue, gas exchange abnormalities, and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Sarcoidosis-associated fatigue is a common entity for which stimulants may be beneficial. Sarcoidosis-associated fatigue is a diagnosis of exclusion that requires an evaluation for the possibility of OSA. Hypercapnia is unusual in a patient with sarcoidosis without severe pulmonary dysfunction and, in this situation, should prompt evaluation for alternative causes of hypercapnia, such as SDB. PH is usually mild when associated with OSA, whereas the severity of sarcoidosis-associated PH is related to the severity of sarcoidosis. PH caused by OSA usually responds to CPAP, whereas sarcoidosis-associated PH commonly requires the use of vasodilators. Management of OSA in sarcoidosis is problematic because corticosteroid treatment of sarcoidosis may worsen OSA. Aggressive efforts should be made to place the patient on the lowest effective dose of corticosteroids, which involves early consideration of corticosteroid-sparing agents. Because of the significant morbidity associated with SDB, early recognition and treatment of SDB in patients with sarcoidosis may improve their overall quality of life.

  1. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of periventricular white matter and hippocampus in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Kızılgöz, Volkan; Aydın, Hasan; Tatar, İdil Güneş; Hekimoğlu, Baki; Ardıç, Sadık; Fırat, Hikmet; Dönmez, Cem

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of this study was to diagnose the hypoxic impairment by Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), an advanced MR imaging technique, which could not be visualised by routine imaging methods in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Material/Methods 20 OSA patients and 5 controls were included in this prospective research. MRS was performed on these 25 subjects to examine cerebral hypoxemia in specific regions (periventricular white matter and both hippocampi). Polysomnography was assumed as the gold standard. Statistical analysis was assessed by Mann-Whitney U test and Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve for NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios. Results In the periventricular white matter, NAA/Cho ratio in OSA patients was significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05). There were no statistical differences between the OSA and the control group for NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios for both hippocampal regions. Additionally, Cho/Cr ratio in the periventricular white matter region of OSA group was higher than in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusions Hypoxic impairment induced by repeated episodes of apnea leads to significant neuronal damage in OSA patients. MRS provides valuable information in the assessment of hypoxic ischemic impairment by revealing important metabolite ratios for the specific areas of the brain. PMID:24505219

  3. Prevalence of Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Association With Risk Factors in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kenia Vieira; Rosa, Maria Luiza Garcia; Jorge, Antônio José Lagoeiro; Leite, Adson Renato; Correia, Dayse Mary Silva; Silva, Davi de Sá; Cetto, Diego Bragatto; Brum, Andreia da Paz; Netto, Pedro Silveira; Rodrigues, Gustavo Domingos

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic, progressive disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed, especially among women. Objective To study the prevalence of high risk for OSAS globally and for the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) categories, and to evaluate the reliability of the BQ use in the population studied. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study with individuals from the Niterói Family Doctor Program, randomly selected, aged between 45 and 99 years. The visits occurred between August/2011 and December/2012. Variables associated with each BQ category and with high risk for OSAS (global) were included in logistic regression models (p < 0.05). Results Of the total (616), 403 individuals (65.4%) reported snoring. The prevalence of high risk for OSA was 42.4%, being 49.7% for category I, 10.2% for category II and 77.6% for category III. Conclusion BQ showed an acceptable reliability after excluding the questions Has anyone noticed that you stop breathing during your sleep? and Have you ever dozed off or fallen asleep while driving?. This should be tested in further studies with samples mostly comprised of women and low educational level individuals. Given the burden of OSAS-related diseases and risks, studies should be conducted to validate new tools and to adapt BQ to better screen OSAS. PMID:27142651

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is More Common than Central Sleep Apnea in Methadone Maintenance Patients with Subjective Sleep Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Katherine M.; Kurth, Megan E.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Corso, Richard P.; Millman, Richard P.; Stein, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Opioid-dependent patients treated with methadone have subjective sleep complaints and disrupted sleep on polysomnography (PSG). Previous studies of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in this population have focused on central sleep apnea (CSA). Our objectives were to: (1) characterize obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and CSA in patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid dependence; (2) examine factors associated with SDB in this population; and (3) investigate whether SDB was related to severity of subjective sleep complaints in MMT patients with subjective sleep disturbances. Methods We analyzed OSA and CSA from one night of home PSG in 71 patients who were in MMT for at least 3 months and had a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI) score > 5. Results OSA (defined as obstructive apnea-hypoponea index (OAHI) ≥ 5) was observed in 35.2% of our sample. OSA was associated with higher body mass index, longer duration in MMT, and non-Caucasian race. CSA (defined as central apnea index (CAI) ≥ 5) was observed in 14.1% of the sample. CSA was not associated with methadone dose or concomitant drug use. Subjective sleep disturbance measured with the PSQI was not related to OSA or CSA. Conclusions SDB was common in this sample of MMT patients and OSA was more common than CSA. Given the lack of association between presence of SDB and severity of subjective sleep difficulties, factors other than sleep apnea must account for complaints of disturbed sleep in this population. PMID:20079978

  5. MRI of the pharynx in ischemic stroke patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Devin L.; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Concannon, Maryann; Helman, Joseph I.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common after stroke and associated with poor stroke outcomes. Whether OSA after acute stroke is caused by anatomic, physiologic, or both etiologies has not been studied. We therefore used brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to assess oropharyngeal anatomy in stroke patients with and without OSA. Methods Patients within 7 days of ischemic stroke underwent nocturnal polysomnography. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI performed for clinical purposes was used to measure retropalatal distance, soft palatal length, soft palatal thickness, retroglossal space, and tongue length. Nasopharyngeal area and high retropharyngeal area were measured from axial T2-weighted images, and lateral pharyngeal wall thickness from coronal T1-weighted images. Results Among 27 subjects, 18 (67%) had OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5). Demographics, vascular risk factors, and stroke severity were similar in the two groups. Median retropalatal distance was shorter in subjects with OSA (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p= 0.03). Shorter retropalatal distance was associated with higher AHI (linear regression, p=0.04). None of the other morphological characteristics differed. Conclusions Anatomic difference between awake acute stroke patients with and without OSA shows that the sleep disorder cannot be attributed solely to sleep, sleeping position, or changes in neuromuscular control that are specific to the sleep state. PMID:20466584

  6. Early cardiovascular abnormalities in newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Nadra, Marie; Barone-Rochette, Gilles; Ormezzano, Olivier; Pierre, Hélène; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have shown that it is associated with atherosclerosis and left ventricular dysfunction markers. The aim of this study was to assess the cardiovascular effects of OSA depending on its severity, in patients without clinically diagnosed cardiovascular disease. One hundred thirty newly diagnosed, nondiabetic OSA patients (mean age 49 ± 10 years), without vasoactive treatment were included. They underwent clinical and ambulatory blood pressure measurements, echocardiography, carotid ultrasound examination, and a carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement. Seventy-five percent of the subjects were hypertensive according to the clinical or ambulatory measurement. More patients with the most severe forms (respiratory disturbance index >37/hour) had a nondipper profile (52% vs 34%; P = 0.025) and their left ventricular mass was higher (40 ± 7 vs 36 ± 8 g/m, p = 0.014). This last parameter was independently and inversely associated with mean nocturnal oxygen saturation (P = 0.004). PWV and carotid intima-media thickness did not differ between one OSA severity group to another, but the prevalence of carotid hypertrophy was higher when mean SaO2 was below 93.5% (29.5 vs 16%; P = 0.05). Our study shows that in OSA patients without clinically diagnosed cardiovascular disease, there is a significant left ventricular and arterial effect, which is even more marked when OSA is severe. PMID:20057899

  7. Brain function in obstructive sleep apnea: results from the Brain Resource International Database.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith K H; Grunstein, Ronald R; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Gordon, Evian

    2006-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is expected to impair vigilance and executive functioning, owing to the sensitivity of the prefrontal cortex to the effects of sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. Studies examining the pattern of cognitive dysfunction show variable results, with the heterogeneity in part due to small sample sizes in current studies and little consistency of the tests used. We examined a group of fifty subjects from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID), predicted to have OSA on the basis of the Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index, and compared them with 200 matched controls. On electrophysiological tests, the OSA group showed reduced eyes closed alpha power, increased auditory oddball N100 and P200 amplitude, but reduced N200 and P300 amplitude. The latency to P300 was not significantly different between groups, but latencies to N200 and P200 were prolonged in the OSA group. Performance testing of the executive function found that verbal interference and the switching of attention were impaired in the OSA group. We have demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on apnea symptoms and demographic factors can be used to select a group with likely OSA manifesting deficits in information processing and executive function.

  8. Childhood obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Hiren

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in children seems to be associated with an increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to this association include the following: adenotonsillar hypertrophy due to increased somatic growth, increased critical airway closing pressure, altered chest wall mechanics, and abnormalities of ventilatory control. However, the details of these mechanisms and their interactions have not been elucidated. In addition, obesity and OSAS are both associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a constellation of features such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, and prothrombotic and proinflammatory states. There is some evidence that OSAS may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome with a potential for significant morbidity. The treatment of OSAS in obese children has not been standardized. Adenotonsillectomy is considered the primary intervention followed by continuous positive airway pressure treatment if OSAS persists. Other methods such as oral appliances, surgery, positional therapy, and weight loss may be beneficial for individual subjects. The present review discusses these issues and suggests an approach to the management of obese children with snoring and possible OSAS. PMID:19875714

  9. SleepAp: an automated obstructive sleep apnoea screening application for smartphones.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Roebuck, Aoife; Shahid, Mohammed; Daly, Jonathan; Hallack, Andre; Palmius, Niclas; Stradling, John; Clifford, Gari D

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a sleep disorder with long-term consequences. Long-term effects include sleep-related issues and cardiovascular diseases. OSA is often diagnosed with an overnight sleep test called a polysomnogram. Monitoring can be costly with long wait times for diagnosis. In this paper, a novel OSA screening framework and prototype phone application are introduced. A database of 856 patients that underwent at-home polygraphy was collected. Features were derived from audio, actigraphy, photoplethysmography (PPG), and demographics, and used as the inputs of a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The SVM was trained on 735 patients and tested on 121 patients. Classification on the test set had an accuracy of up to 92.2% when classifying subjects as having moderate or severe OSA versus being healthy or a snorer based on the clinicians' diagnoses. The signal processing and machine learning algorithms were ported to Java and integrated into the phone application-SleepAp. SleepAp records the body position, audio, actigraphy and PPG signals, and implements the clinically validated STOP-BANG questionnaire. It derives features from the signals and classifies the user as having OSA or not using the SVM trained on the clinical database. The resulting software could provide a new, easy-to-use, low-cost, and widely available modality for OSA screening. PMID:25561453

  10. Developing policy regarding obstructive sleep apnea and driving among commercial drivers in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    FILOMENO, Ronald; IKEDA, Ai; TANIGAWA, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) has emerged as a global public health problem. OSAS is largely recognized as a factor for increased risk of vehicular related accidents for those diagnosed and undiagnosed. This article serves as a country report that reviews current and potential policies regarding OSAS induced drowsy driving in both Japan and the United States of America. In addition to reviewing policies, various case finding techniques are also explored as methods to reduce accidents due to OSAS induced drowsy driving. Evaluation of the effectiveness of methods used in the United States of America and Japan for safe driving among commercial drivers is a key step to decreasing vehicular related accidents through stronger policy development and subsequent enforcement. Case finding has emerged as one of the most effective and realistic methods to detect OSAS in the driving population based on research done in the U.S. and Japan. Subsequently, case finding can lead to treatment to further prevent future accidents from occurring due to OSAS drowsy driving. PMID:27151306

  11. Predicting compliance for mandible advancement splint therapy in 96 obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Tuula; Arte, Sirpa; Bachour, Adel; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Mandible advancement splint (MAS) offers an option for patients with mild or moderate OSA, who refuse or are unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of the study was to find predictive factors in OSA for MAS therapy. The study group comprised 96 consecutive OSA patients who were sent for MAS therapy during 2008. Data were collected on the patients' general and dental condition, diagnosis, and treatment for OSA. Panoramic and cephalometric radiographs were analysed. The treatment compliance rate and problems with the use of the MAS were recorded. This rate was 57% and the significant affecting factors were protrusion of the mandible with MAS during the adaptation to the appliance as well as shorter maxillary and mandible lengths. The compliance of the MAS therapy was best in patients with short maxilla and mandible, which should be taken into consideration when planning MAS therapy for OSA patients. Finally, a sleep study should be part of the follow-up in this patient population. PMID:23159421

  12. The bidirectional interactions between psoriasis and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Camila; Nogueira, Heloisa; Albuquerque, Rachel G; Tomimori, Jane; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder which can impair general routine activities and has been closely related to poor quality of life. Pruritus and scratching are frequently observed, occurring mainly during sleep and precipitating nighttime arousals. Indeed, sleep quality has been shown to be negatively affected in psoriatic patients, in a close relationship with stress exposure and immune response. Although psoriasis is known to impair sleep, leading to insomnia, its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is controversial. Similarly, OSA is considered a multifactorial inflammatory disease, characterized by intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation and autonomic dysfunction, with important outcomes on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, immunological activities and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a prominent role in both OSA and psoriasis. Currently it is not clear whether OSA is a risk factor for psoriasis development or if psoriasis is a possible predictor of OSA. Thus, our main purpose is to provide an overview of this intriguing relationship and show the current link between psoriasis and OSA in a bidirectional relationship.

  13. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs.

  14. Comparison of pulse rate variability with heart rate variability during obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Karmakar, Chandan K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate whether pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from finger photo-plethysmography (Pleth) waveforms can be the substitute of heart rate variability (HRV) from RR intervals of ECG signals during obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Simultaneous measurements (ECG and Pleth) were taken from 29 healthy subjects during normal (undisturbed sleep) breathing and 22 patients with OSA during OSA events. Highly significant (p<0.01) correlations (1.0>r>0.95) were found between heart rate (HR) and pulse rate (PR). Bland-Altman plot of HR and PR shows good agreement (<5% difference). Comparison of 2 min recording epochs demonstrated significant differences (p<0.01) in time, frequency domains and complexity analysis, between normal and OSA events using PRV as well as HRV measures. Results suggest that both HRV and PRV indices could be used to distinguish OSA events from normal breathing during sleep. However, several variability measures (SDNN, RMSSD, HF power, LF/HF and sample entropy) of PR and HR were found to be significantly (p<0.01) different during OSA events. Therefore, we conclude that PRV provides accurate inter-pulse variability to measure heart rate variability under normal breathing in sleep but does not precisely reflect HRV in sleep disordered breathing.

  15. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs. PMID:27506084

  16. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Fernández-Pozo, Rubén; Toledano, Doroteo T.; Alcázar-Ramírez, José D.; López-Gonzalo, Eduardo; Hernández-Gómez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA). OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients' facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition), over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets). Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs). Support vector regression (SVR) is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI. PMID:26664493

  17. Is continuous positive airway pressure necessarily an everyday therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina A; Schwarz, Esther I; Bloch, Konrad E; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-05-01

    There are limited data on the evolution of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy and whether this treatment is required every night. 125 OSA patients with an original oxygen desaturation index (ODI) >10 events per hour, established on CPAP, were asked to withdraw CPAP for four nights and performed ambulatory nocturnal pulse oximetry on the fourth night of CPAP withdrawal. An ODI >10 events per hour during pulse oximetry was considered to indicate persistent OSA. Patients not experiencing recurrence of OSA underwent repeat ambulatory pulse oximetry after a further 2-week period off CPAP. In 71% of the patients, OSA recurred after four nights of CPAP withdrawal (group 1); thus, OSA did not recur in 29% (group 2). 55% of group 2 had an ODI >10 events per hour after 2 weeks off CPAP; thus, 45% remained without a recurrence. In multivariate analysis, higher original ODI, longer duration of CPAP therapy, current smoking status and larger neck circumference were independently associated with a higher ODI after four nights of CPAP withdrawal (all p<0.05). Following CPAP withdrawal, a third of CPAP-treated patients do not experience significant recurrence of oxygen desaturations after 4 days and ∼10% do not after 2 weeks. Thus, a significant proportion of patients may be able to stop CPAP for short periods.

  18. The impacts of open-mouth breathing on upper airway space in obstructive sleep apnea: 3-D MDCT analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joong; Choi, Ji Ho; Kim, Kang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Heung Man; Shin, Chol; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-04-01

    Open-mouth breathing during sleep is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is associated with increased disease severity and upper airway collapsibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of open-mouth breathing on the upper airway space in patients with OSA using three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3-D MDCT). The study design included a case-control study with planned data collection. The study was performed at a tertiary medical center. 3-D MDCT analysis was conducted on 52 patients with OSA under two experimental conditions: mouth closed and mouth open. Under these conditions, we measured the minimal cross-sectional area of the retropalatal and retroglossal regions (mXSA-RP, mXSA-RG), as well as the upper airway length (UAL), defined as the vertical dimension from hard palate to hyoid. We also computed the volume of the upper airway space by 3-D reconstruction of both conditions. When the mouth was open, mXSA-RP and mXSA-RG significantly decreased and the UAL significantly increased, irrespective of the severity of OSA. However, between the closed- and open-mouth states, there was no significant change in upper airway volume at any severity of OSA. Results suggest that the more elongated and narrow upper airway during open-mouth breathing may aggravate the collapsibility of the upper airway and, thus, negatively affect OSA severity.

  19. Effect of low ORP in anoxic sludge zone on excess sludge production in oxic-settling-anoxic activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Saby, Sébastien; Djafer, Malik; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2003-01-01

    This paper studied the effect of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the anoxic sludge zone on the excess sludge production in the oxic-settling-anoxic process (OSA process), a modified activated sludge process. Two pilot-scale activated sludge systems were employed in this study: (1) an OSA process that was modified from a conventional activated sludge process by inserting a sludge holding tank or namely the "anoxic" tank in the sludge return line; and (2) a conventional process used as the reference system. Each was composed of a membrane bioreactor to serve the aeration tank and solid/liquid separator. Both systems were operated with synthetic wastewater for 9 months. During the operation, the OSA system was operated with different ORP levels (+100 to -250 mV) in its anoxic tank. It has been confirmed that the OSA system produced much less excess sludge than the reference system. A lower ORP level than +100 mV in the anoxic tank is in favor of the excess sludge reduction. When the ORP level decreased from +100 to -250 mV the sludge reduction efficiency was increased from 23% to 58%. It has also been found that the OSA system performed better than the reference system with respect to the chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency and sludge settleability. The OSA process may present a potential low-cost solution to the excess sludge problem in an activated sludge process because addition of a sludge holding tank is only needed.

  20. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  1. Pathogenesis of Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Hypothesis with Emphasis on the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

    PubMed Central

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2012-01-01

    OSA is characterized by the quintessential triad of intermittent apnea, hypoxia, and hypoxemia due to pharyngeal collapse. This paper highlights the upstream mechanisms that may trigger cognitive decline in OSA. Three interrelated steps underpin cognitive dysfunction in OSA patients. First, several risk factors upregulate peripheral inflammation; these crucial factors promote neuroinflammation, cerebrovascular endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in OSA. Secondly, the neuroinflammation exerts negative impact globally on the CNS, and thirdly, important foci in the neocortex and brainstem are rendered inflamed and dysfunctional. A strong link is known to exist between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. A unique perspective delineated here underscores the importance of dysfunctional brainstem nuclei in etiopathogenesis of cognitive decline in OSA patients. Nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration hub for afferents from upper airway (somatosensory/gustatory), respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular (baroreceptor and chemoreceptor) and other systems. The NTS has an essential role in sympathetic and parasympathetic systems also; it projects to most key brain regions and modulates numerous physiological functions. Inflamed and dysfunctional NTS and other key brainstem nuclei may play a pivotal role in triggering memory and cognitive dysfunction in OSA. Attenuation of upstream factors and amelioration of the NTS dysfunction remain important challenges. PMID:23470865

  2. Sleep-disordered breathing, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seetho, Ian W; Wilding, John P H

    2014-11-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that can lead to altered sleep homeostasis. In particular, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of SDB and is associated with adverse cardiometabolic manifestations including hypertension, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, ultimately increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiological basis of these associations may relate to repeated intermittent hypoxia and fragmented sleep episodes that characterize OSA which drive further mechanisms with adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences. The associations of OSA with type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome have been described in studies ranging from epidemiological and observational studies to controlled trials investigating the effects of OSA therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In recent years, there have been rising prevalence rates of diabetes and obesity worldwide. Given the established links between SDB (in particular OSA) with both conditions, understanding the potential influence of OSA on the components of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes and the underlying mechanisms by which such interactions may contribute to metabolic dysregulation are important in order to effectively and holistically manage patients with SDB, type 2 diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. In this article, we review the literature describing the associations, the possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms linking these conditions and the effects of interventions including CPAP treatment and weight loss.

  3. Estrogen/ERR-α signaling axis is associated with fiber-type conversion of upper airway muscles in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H. H.; Lu, J.; Guan, Y. F.; Li, S. J.; Hu, T. T.; Xie, Z. S.; Wang, F.; Peng, X. H.; Liu, X.; Xu, X.; Zhao, F. P.; Yu, B. L.; Li, X. P.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen is related with the low morbidity associated with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAS) in women, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the relationship between OSAS and estrogen related receptor-α (ERR-α). We found that the expression levels of ERR-α and Myh7 were both downregulated in palatopharyngeal tissues from OSAS patients. In addition, we report that ERR-α is dynamically expressed during differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Knockdown of ERR-α via instant siRNA resulted in reduced expression of Myh7, but not Myh4. Furthermore, differentiation of C2C12 cells under 3% chronic intermittent hypoxia, a model resembling human OSAS, was impaired and accompanied by a obvious reduction in Myh7 expression levels. Moreover, activation of ERR-α with 17β-estradiol (E2) increased the expression of Myh7, whereas pretreatment with the ERR-α antagonist XCT790 reversed the E2-induced slow fiber-type switch. A rat ovariectomy model also demonstrated the switch to fast fiber type. Collectively, our findings suggest that ERR-α is involved in estrogen-mediated OSAS by regulating Myhc-slow expression. The present study illustrates an important role of the estrogen/ERR-α axis in the pathogenesis of OSAS, and may represent an attractive therapeutic target, especially in postmenopausal women. PMID:27250523

  4. Sleep apnoea, anxiety, depression and somatoform pain: a community-based high-risk sample.

    PubMed

    Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Einvik, Gunnar; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Randby, Anna; Pallesen, Ståle; Moum, Torbjørn; Omland, Torbjørn; Dammen, Toril

    2012-08-01

    Community-based studies that measure both psychiatric diagnoses and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are lacking. This study reports current psychiatric disorders in community-dwelling adults at high risk for OSA identified by the Berlin Questionnaire. Furthermore, associations between OSA and current psychiatric disorders, unadjusted and adjusted for putative confounders, are reported. A subsample of the Akershus Sleep Apnoea Project consisting of 290 adults, aged 30-65 yrs, with positive Berlin Questionnaire screening underwent the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, version IV and polysomnography. Auxiliary analyses of depression are provided. The median apnoea/hypopnoea index score in the sample was 7.7 (interquartile range 2.4-22.2). Major depressive disorder, current anxiety and somatoform pain disorder were diagnosed in 12.4%, 14.8% and 19.3% of participants, respectively. At least one psychiatric disorder was diagnosed in 110 participants. The odds ratio of participants with OSA having a psychiatric disorder compared with participants without OSA was 0.54 (95% CI 0.33-0.88). A negative association did not exist among Berlin Questionnaire low-risk participants. In conclusion, more than one-third of participants in a community-based, Berlin Questionnaire high-risk sample were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. A negative association between OSA and psychiatric morbidity was found.

  5. The bidirectional interactions between psoriasis and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Camila; Nogueira, Heloisa; Albuquerque, Rachel G; Tomimori, Jane; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder which can impair general routine activities and has been closely related to poor quality of life. Pruritus and scratching are frequently observed, occurring mainly during sleep and precipitating nighttime arousals. Indeed, sleep quality has been shown to be negatively affected in psoriatic patients, in a close relationship with stress exposure and immune response. Although psoriasis is known to impair sleep, leading to insomnia, its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is controversial. Similarly, OSA is considered a multifactorial inflammatory disease, characterized by intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation and autonomic dysfunction, with important outcomes on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, immunological activities and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a prominent role in both OSA and psoriasis. Currently it is not clear whether OSA is a risk factor for psoriasis development or if psoriasis is a possible predictor of OSA. Thus, our main purpose is to provide an overview of this intriguing relationship and show the current link between psoriasis and OSA in a bidirectional relationship. PMID:26220730

  6. Impact of non-dipping on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Ozono, Ryoji; Edahiro, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Kiyomi; Seto, Ayako; Okita, Tomomi; Teramen, Kazushi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. However, it is unclear how OSAS contributes to the events. We investigated the impact of non-dipping on the incidence of cardiovascular events in a retrospective cohort study comprising 251 patients with OSAS. OSAS was diagnosed by overnight polysomnography and all patients underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Non-dipping was diagnosed when reduction in sleep blood pressure was <10% of awake blood pressure. Over a mean 43-month follow-up period, 15 patients (6.0%) developed cardiovascular events including stroke, heart failure, and ischemic heart disease. Significantly higher cardiovascular events were observed in the non-dipping group than those without it by Kaplan-Meier analyses. Cox regression analysis revealed that the presence of non-dipping was significantly and independently associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 3.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-17.41; p < 0.05), after adjusting for severity of OSAS, and CPAP therapy. Thus, non-dipping was a marker for a poor prognosis in patients with OSAS. PMID:26395950

  7. Reconfigurable smart multifunction displays in an all-glass cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeyne, Alan L.

    1999-08-01

    Litton Guidance & Control Systems (G&CS) is the developer and supplier of Smart Multi-Function Display (SMFD) Systems. These programs include the UH-60Q, the SH-2G, the SH-60R, the CH-60, the EH-101, and others. The SMFD meets the all-glass cockpit requirements for the SH-2G(A), the SH-60R, and the CH-60 helicopters. The basic architectures for all-glass cockpit display systems are the centralized (dumb display or video monitor) and the distributed (smart display). Litton's SMFD has the flexibility to support either of these architectures as well as others. Litton's advantage comes from deploying a display system that provides Open System Architecture (OSA) for both hardware and software. With the OSA design philosophy, Litton's SMFD is easily customized by using a set of basic hardware modules which can be configured to provide the different functionality required by each aircraft type. The OSA design philosophy also accommodates future expansion and technological developments. This paper, showing the easy adaptation of the SH-2G display to meet the SH-60R and CH-60 requirements, demonstrates the advantages of Litton's OSA design philosophy. OSA is the key to providing the mix-and- match/plug-and-play of the existing modules, which also permits future growth. It is the versatility of the OSA framework that meets the bipolar requirements of the two system architecture types.

  8. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixteen control subjects were compared. The average area, average volume, total volume, and total length of the upper airway were computed. Width and anterior-posterior (AP) measurements were obtained on the smallest axial slice. Results OSA subjects had a significantly smaller average airway area, average airway volume, total airway volume, and mean airway width. OSA subjects had a significantly larger airway length measurement. The mean A-P distance was not significantly different between groups. Conclusion OSA subjects have a smaller upper airway compared to controls with the exception of airway length. The lack of a significant difference in the mean A-P distance may indicate that patient position during imaging (upright vs. supine) can affect this measurement. Comparison of this study with a future prospective study design will allow for validation of these results. PMID:27051634

  9. Brain function in obstructive sleep apnea: results from the Brain Resource International Database.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keith K H; Grunstein, Ronald R; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Gordon, Evian

    2006-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is expected to impair vigilance and executive functioning, owing to the sensitivity of the prefrontal cortex to the effects of sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. Studies examining the pattern of cognitive dysfunction show variable results, with the heterogeneity in part due to small sample sizes in current studies and little consistency of the tests used. We examined a group of fifty subjects from the Brain Resource International Database (BRID), predicted to have OSA on the basis of the Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index, and compared them with 200 matched controls. On electrophysiological tests, the OSA group showed reduced eyes closed alpha power, increased auditory oddball N100 and P200 amplitude, but reduced N200 and P300 amplitude. The latency to P300 was not significantly different between groups, but latencies to N200 and P200 were prolonged in the OSA group. Performance testing of the executive function found that verbal interference and the switching of attention were impaired in the OSA group. We have demonstrated that a diagnostic algorithm based on apnea symptoms and demographic factors can be used to select a group with likely OSA manifesting deficits in information processing and executive function. PMID:16544369

  10. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  11. Different heart rate patterns in obstructive apneas during NREM sleep.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, M R; Romano, S; Marrone, O; Chiodi, M; Bonsignore, G

    1997-12-01

    Both bradycardia and a trend to tachycardia have been reported in obstructive sleep apneas (OSA). Because heart rate (HR) behavior may yield information on parasympathetic activity during OSA, we analyzed HR in samples of consecutive apneic cycles in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, recorded in normotensive patients breathing room air (n = 7) and supplemental O2 (n = 4). In air, the patients showed different HR trends during apnea, as HR decreased (HR decreased), remained constant (HR=), or increased (HR increased). By multiple regression analysis, development of HR trends correlated with the HR fall in the late interapneic period, HR at first effort, the decrease in esophageal pressure, and the lengthening of inspiration during apnea (R2 = 0.42). O2 abolished HR decreased-OSA, whereas HR= and HR increased-OSA still occurred but at higher HR than in air. In both the air and O2 series, the HR fall preceding apnea correlated significantly with the degree of hypoxia reached in the previous apneic cycle. These data indicate a complex modulation of HR during OSA, with the HR fall in the late interapneic period possibly reflecting the effectiveness of parasympathetic cardiac control in OSA patients during sleep. PMID:9493928

  12. Pulmonary haemodynamics in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Oreste; Bonsignore, Maria Rosaria

    2002-06-01

    In patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), pulmonary haemodynamics can show both transient perturbations during sleep and permanent alterations. During sleep, repeated fluctuations in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure, coincident with apnoeas, can be observed. Calculation of transmural pressure values is preferable to intravascular pressures in OSAS, due to the marked swings in intrathoracic pressure associated with obstructive apnoeas. Pulmonary artery pressure may progressively increase during sleep, particularly in close sequences of highly desaturating apnoeas. Apnoea-induced hypoxia appears as the most important determinant of this pulmonary artery pressure behaviour. Stroke volume and cardiac output during obstructive apnoeas show changes mainly related to intrathoracic pressure variations. Permanent precapillary pulmonary hypertension at rest is observed in <50% OSAS patients, and is poorly reversible after OSAS treatment. It correlates best with diurnal respiratory function parameters. However, the finding of pulmonary hypertension in some patients with near normal diurnal lung function led to suggest that sleep respiratory disorders may contribute to permanent pulmonary haemodynamic impairment in predisposed subjects. Knowledge on right ventricle hypertrophy in OSAS is inconsistent. As to right ventricle failure, it is clinically evident in subjects with associated lung disease or morbid obesity, while it may be detected instrumentally in subjects without such alterations, presumably as effect of apnoeas themselves. Besides, it appears more fully reversible after long-term OSAS treatment than pulmonary hypertension. PMID:12531120

  13. Predicting compliance for mandible advancement splint therapy in 96 obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Tuula; Arte, Sirpa; Bachour, Adel; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Mandible advancement splint (MAS) offers an option for patients with mild or moderate OSA, who refuse or are unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of the study was to find predictive factors in OSA for MAS therapy. The study group comprised 96 consecutive OSA patients who were sent for MAS therapy during 2008. Data were collected on the patients' general and dental condition, diagnosis, and treatment for OSA. Panoramic and cephalometric radiographs were analysed. The treatment compliance rate and problems with the use of the MAS were recorded. This rate was 57% and the significant affecting factors were protrusion of the mandible with MAS during the adaptation to the appliance as well as shorter maxillary and mandible lengths. The compliance of the MAS therapy was best in patients with short maxilla and mandible, which should be taken into consideration when planning MAS therapy for OSA patients. Finally, a sleep study should be part of the follow-up in this patient population.

  14. Relationship between growth of facial morphology and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Shigeto; Ueda, Koichiro; Shinohara, Mitsuyo; Mano, Mikiko; Kanegae, Haruhide; Namaki, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between facial morphology using cephalometry and chronologic age in preschool children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods From a group of lateral cephalometric radiographs taken of 35 children with OSA for diagnostic purposes, 15 were selected for the present investigation based on head position. The subjects consisted of preschool children with both OSA and primary dentition, all of them with a lowest documented SpO2 <90% and a lowest 0 OSA children had a narrower pharyngeal airway space related to OSA. In addition, we found that, although there were direct correlations between heights, nasal floor and corpus length, with chronologic age in the controls, there was no significant correlation between height, nasal floor length or corpus length with age in the OSA children. Conclusion Obstructive sleep apnea in children may be associated with growth disturbances of the nasal floor and corpus length. PMID:25756027

  15. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  16. Increased cerebrovascular sensitivity to endothelin-1 in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea: a role for endothelin receptor B.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Crossland, Randy F; Lloyd, Eric E; Phillips, Sharon C; Bryan, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with cerebrovascular diseases. However, little is known regarding the effects of OSA on the cerebrovascular wall. We tested the hypothesis that OSA augments endothelin-1 (ET-1) constrictions of cerebral arteries. Repeated apneas (30 or 60 per hour) were produced in rats during the sleep cycle (8 hours) by remotely inflating a balloon implanted in the trachea. Four weeks of apneas produced a 23-fold increase in ET-1 sensitivity in isolated and pressurized posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs) compared with PCAs from sham-operated rats (EC50=10(-9.2) mol/L versus 10(-10.6) mol/L; P<0.001). This increased sensitivity was abolished by the ET-B receptor antagonist, BQ-788. Constrictions to the ET-B receptor agonist, IRL-1620, were greater in PCAs from rats after 2 or 4 weeks of apneas compared with that from sham-operated rats (P=0.013). Increased IRL-1620 constrictions in PCAs from OSA rats were normalized with the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) blocker, SKF96365, or the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. These data show that OSA increases the sensitivity of PCAs to ET-1 through enhanced ET-B activity, and enhanced activity of TRPCs and ROCK. We conclude that enhanced ET-1 signaling is part of a pathologic mechanism associated with adverse cerebrovascular outcomes of OSA.

  17. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea: awakening the hidden truth.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, A; Ramamurthy, J; Dinesh, S P S; Srinivas, A

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common type of sleep apnea and is caused by obstruction of upper airway. Sleep apnea is clinically defined as frequent episodes of apnea, hypopnea and symptoms of functional impairment, which could be life-threatening and associated with extreme daytime hyper somnolence, dysfunction, discrements in health-related quality of life, automobile accidents, and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Etiopathogenic factors that contribute to OSA include reduced upper-airway dilator muscle activity during sleep, upper-airway anatomical features, ventilatory control insufficiency, lung volume, and rostral fluid shifts. The presence of risk factors such as age, gender and obesity increases the incidence of OSA. The repetitive nocturnal hypoxemia experienced by patients with OSA is associated with activation of a number of neural, humoral, thrombotic, metabolic, and inflammatory disease mechanisms, all of which have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of various systemic diseases. This article summarizes the etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, associated systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and dental diseases with OSA and the influence of tongue on oropharyngeal airway in OSA patients.

  19. Mechanism of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Airway Obstruction or Obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Kelly; Orr, William

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: This is the first study to compare reflux events during wake and sleep in obese and non-obese individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obese individuals without OSA. The primary aim of the study was to investigate any additive effect of OSA on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) above that of obesity. Methods: Twenty obese individuals (body mass index, BMI > 30 kg/m2), 9 non-obese individuals (BMI < 30 kg/m2) with moderate-to-severe OSA, and 17 obese control subjects (BMI > 30 kg/m2) underwent high-resolution esophageal manometry, 24-h esophageal pH-impedance monitoring, and in-laboratory polysomnography. Results: Mean body mass index was 40 ± 6 and 27 ± 4 kg/m2 for the obese and non-obese OSA groups, respectively, and 34 ± 5 kg/m2 for the obese control group. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 50 ± 30 and 30 ± 25 per hour for the obese and non-obese OSA groups (p > 0.05), significantly higher than that of the obese control group (3 ± 3 per hour, p < 0.05). The two obese groups did not show any significant differences in the total number of acidic reflux events (41 ± 20 vs 28 ± 16); however, the obese OSA group had a greater number of acidic reflux events compared to the non-obese OSA group (22 ± 12 events, p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, BMI significantly predicted number of acidic reflux events (r2 = 0.16, p = 0.01) during the 24-h period; however, AHI showed no significant association with any measure of GER severity. Conclusions: This study confirms an important role for obesity, rather than OSA per se in the relationship between OSA and GER. Citation: Shepherd K, Orr W. Mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux in obstructive sleep apnea: airway obstruction or obesity? J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):87–94. PMID:26446244

  20. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed pathways related to the metastatic characteristics of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun; Shen, Jiakang; Yin, Fei; Wang, Chongren; Cai, Zhengdong

    2016-08-01

    In this study, gene expression data of osteosarcoma (OSA) were analyzed to identify metastasis-related biological pathways. Four gene expression data sets (GSE21257, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). An analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was performed using the Significance Analysis of Microarray (SAM) method. Gene expression levels were converted into scores of pathways by the Functional Analysis of Individual Microarray Expression (FAIME) algorithm and the differentially expressed pathways (DEPs) were then disclosed by a t-test. The distinguishing and prediction ability of the DEPs for metastatic and non-metastatic OSA was further confirmed using the principal component analysis (PCA) method and 3 gene expression data sets (GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673) based on the support vector machines (SVM) model. A total of 616 downregulated and 681 upregulated genes were identified in the data set, GSE21257. The DEGs could not be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA, as shown by PCA. Thus, an analysis of DEPs was further performed, resulting in 14 DEPs, such as NRAS signaling, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) regulation of cytokines and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-mediated interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation. Cluster analysis indicated that these pathways could be used to distinguish between metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. The prediction accuracy was 91, 66.7 and 87.5% for the data sets, GSE9508, GSE49003 and GSE66673, respectively. The results of PCA further validated that the DEPs could be used to distinguish metastatic OSA from non-metastatic OSA. On the whole, several DEPs were identified in metastatic OSA compared with non-metastatic OSA. Further studies on these pathways and relevant genes may help to enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying metastasis

  1. Physical Inactivity Is Associated with Moderate-Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laila; McArdle, Nigel; Eastwood, Peter R.; Ward, Kim L.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Wilson, Annette C.; Hillman, David R.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether low levels of physical activity were associated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), OSA-related symptoms, and cardiometabolic risk. Methods: A case-control study design was used. OSA cases were patients referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA (n = 2,340). Controls comprised participants from the Busselton community (n = 1,931). Exercise and occupational activity were derived from questionnaire data. Associations were modelled using logistic and linear regression and adjusted for confounders. Results: In comparison with moderate exercise, the high, low, and nil exercise groups had an odds ratio (OR) for moderate-severe OSA of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5–0.8), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2–2.0), and 2.7 (95% CI 1.9–3.7), respectively. Relative to men in heavy activity occupations, men in medium, light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 1.7 (95% CI 1.1–2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 1.4–3.2), and 1.8 (95% CI 1.2–2.8), respectively. Relative to women in medium activity occupations, women in light and sedentary occupations had an OR for moderate-severe OSA of 4.2 (95% CI 2.6–7.2) and 3.5 (2.0–6.0). OSA patients who adequately exercised had lower: levels of doctor-diagnosed depression (p = 0.047); symptoms of fatigue (p < 0.0001); systolic (p = 0.015) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015); and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Low levels of physical activity were associated with moderate-severe OSA. Exercise in individuals with OSA is associated with lower levels of depression, fatigue, blood pressure and CRP. Citation: Simpson L, McArdle N, Eastwood PR, Ward KL, Cooper MN, Wilson AC, Hillman DR, Palmer LJ, Mukherjee S. Physical inactivity is associated with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1091–1099. PMID:26285117

  2. A 5-Year Follow-up Study on the Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kao, Li-Ting; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. However, no large epidemiological data regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Parkinson disease have been reported. The goal of this study was to investigate the risk for Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period after a diagnosis of OSA using a population-based dataset. Methods: The data for this retrospective longitudinal cohort study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 1,532 patients with OSA as the study cohort and randomly selected 7,660 patients as the comparison cohort. Each subject was individually followed up for a 5-y period to identify those in whom Parkinson disease subsequently developed. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions were performed as a means of comparing the 5-y risk of subsequent Parkinson disease between the study cohort and comparison cohort. Results: Of the 9,192 total patients, Parkinson disease developed in 0.73% during the 5-y follow-up period: 1.24% and 0.63% in the OSA and control cohorts, respectively. After censoring patients who died during the follow-up period and adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the hazard ratio (HR) of Parkinson disease during the 5-y follow-up period for patients with OSA was 2.26 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32–3.88) compared with comparison patients. In addition, among females, the adjusted HR of Parkinson disease was 3.54 (95% CI = 1.50–8.34) for patients with OSA compared to patients without OSA. However, among males, there was no significantly increased hazard of Parkinson disease for patients with OSA compared to those without OSA. Conclusions: Female patients with OSA were found to be at a significant risk of subsequent Parkinson disease during a 5-y follow-up period. Citation: Sheu JJ, Lee HC, Lin HC, Kao LT, Chung SD. A 5-year follow-up study on the relationship between

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Risk of Motor Vehicle Crash: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tregear, Stephen; Reston, James; Schoelles, Karen; Phillips, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: We performed a systematic review of the OSA-related risk of crash in commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers. The primary objective involved determining whether individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at an increased risk for a motor vehicle crash when compared to comparable individuals who do not have the disorder. A secondary objective involved determining what factors are associated with an increased motor vehicle crash risk among individuals with OSA. Design/Setting: Seven electronic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed (PreMEDLINE), EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, TRIS, and the Cochrane library) were searched (through May 27, 2009), as well as the reference lists of all obtained articles. We included controlled studies (case-control or cohort) that evaluated crash risk in individuals with OSA. We evaluated the quality of each study and the interplay between the quality, quantity, robustness, and consistency of the body of evidence, and tested for publication bias. Data were extracted by 2 independent analysts. When appropriate, data from different studies were combined in a fixed- or random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Individuals with OSA are clearly at increased risk for crash. The mean crash-rate ratio associated with OSA is likely to fall within the range of 1.21 to 4.89. Characteristics that may predict crash in drivers with OSA include BMI, apnea plus hypopnea index, oxygen saturation, and possibly daytime sleepiness. Conclusions: Untreated sleep apnea is a significant contributor to motor vehicle crashes. Citation: Tregear S; Reston J; Schoelles K; Phillips B. Obstructive sleep apnea and risk of motor vehicle crash: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(6):573-581. PMID:20465027

  4. Asparagine synthetase1, but not asparagine synthetase2, is responsible for the biosynthesis of asparagine following the supply of ammonium to rice roots.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Miwa; Ishiyama, Keiki; Kojima, Soichi; Konishi, Noriyuki; Nakano, Kentaro; Kanno, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Yamaya, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Asparagine is synthesized from glutamine by the reaction of asparagine synthetase (AS) and is the major nitrogen form in both xylem and phloem sap in rice (Oryza sativa L.). There are two genes encoding AS, OsAS1 and OsAS2, in rice, but the functions of individual AS isoenzymes are largely unknown. Cell type- and NH4(+)-inducible expression of OsAS1 as well as analyses of knockout mutants were carried out in this study to characterize AS1. OsAS1 was mainly expressed in the roots, with in situ hybridization showing that the corresponding mRNA was specifically accumulated in the three cell layers of the root surface (epidermis, exodermis and sclerenchyma) in an NH4(+)-dependent manner. Conversely, OsAS2 mRNA was abundant in leaf blades and sheathes of rice. Although OsAS2 mRNA was detectable in the roots, its content decreased when NH4(+) was supplied. Retrotransposon-mediated knockout mutants lacking AS1 showed slight stimulation of shoot length and slight reduction in root length at the seedling stage. On the other hand, the mutation caused an approximately 80-90% reduction in free asparagine content in both roots and xylem sap. These results suggest that AS1 is responsible for the synthesis of asparagine in rice roots following the supply of NH4(+). Characteristics of the NH4(+)-dependent increase and the root surface cell-specific expression of OsAS1 gene are very similar to our previous results on cytosolic glutamine synthetase1;2 and NADH-glutamate synthase1 in rice roots. Thus, AS1 is apparently coupled with the primary assimilation of NH4(+) in rice roots. PMID:25634963

  5. Reliability of Home Respiratory Polygraphy for the Diagnosis of Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Ordax Carbajo, Estrella; Cordero-Guevara, José Aurelio; Navazo-Egüia, Ana Isabel; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of home respiratory polygraphy (HRP) in children with a clinical suspicion of OSA-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS). METHODS: A prospective blind evaluation was performed. Children between the ages of 2 to 14 years with clinical suspicion of OSAS who were referred to the Sleep Unit were included. An initial HRP followed by a later date, same night, in-laboratory overnight respiratory polygraphy and polysomnography (PSG) in the sleep laboratory were performed. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)-HRP was compared with AHI-PSG, and therapeutic decisions based on AHI-HRP and AHI-PSG were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots, and receiver operator curves (ROCs). RESULTS: Twenty-seven boys and 23 girls, with a mean age of 5.3 ± 2.5 years, were studied, and 66% were diagnosed with OSAS based on a PSG-defined obstructive respiratory disturbance index ≥ 3/h total sleep time. Based on the availability of concurrent HRP-PSG recordings, the optimal AHI-HRP corresponding to the PSG-defined OSAS criterion was established as ≥ 5.6/h The latter exhibited a sensitivity of 90.9% (95% CI, 79.6%-100%) and a specificity of 94.1% (95% CI, 80%-100%). CONCLUSIONS: HRP recordings emerge as a potentially useful and reliable approach for the diagnosis of OSAS in children. However, more research is required for the diagnosis of mild OSAS using HRP in children. PMID:25539419

  6. Clinical Effect of Surgical Correction for Nasal Pathology on the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Yoon; Hong, Joon Hyeong; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Kyu Eun; Cho, Hyun Sang; Lim, Su Jin; Kwak, Jin Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that relief of nasal obstruction in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) would lead to reduce OSA severity and to discuss the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of nasal surgery as a treatment modality for OSA. Study Design Twenty-five subjects who had reduced patency of nasal cavity and narrowing of retroglossal or retropalatal airways were diagnosed with OSA and underwent nasal surgery, such as septoplasty or turbinoplasty to correct nasal pathologies. The effect of the surgery on nasal patency was quantified by measuring minimal cross-sectional area (MCA) using acoustic rhinometry. The watch-PAT-derived respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation, and valid sleep time were measured before and after nasal surgery. Results The present study shows that the AHI and RDI decreased significantly and the lowest oxygen saturation and valid sleep time rose after nasal surgery in 25 OSA subjects. In addition, a reduction in subjective symptoms was observed in subjects and mean MCA increased after nasal surgery. Fourteen subjects were classified as responders and 11 subjects as non-responders. Responders showed considerable improvement of their subjective symptoms and the AHI and RDI were significantly lower after surgery. We found that the changes between pre- and post-operative AHI and RDI values were minimal in 11 non-responders. However, daytime somnolence and REM sleep time improved after nasal surgery in non-responders. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that the surgical treatment of nasal pathology improves nasal airway patency and reduces OSA severity in 56% subjects. Furthermore, correction of nasal pathology appears to result in improved sleep quality in both responder and non-responders OSA subjects. PMID:24896824

  7. The D3 bacteriophage α-polymerase inhibitor (Iap) peptide disrupts O-antigen biosynthesis through mimicry of the chain length regulator Wzz in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Véronique L; Udaskin, Molly L; Islam, Salim T; Lam, Joseph S

    2013-10-01

    Lysogenic bacteriophage D3 causes seroconversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 from serotype O5 to O16 by inverting the linkage between O-specific antigen (OSA) repeat units from α to β. The OSA units are polymerized by Wzy to modal lengths regulated by Wzz1 and Wzz2. A key component of the D3 seroconversion machinery is the inhibitor of α-polymerase (Iap) peptide, which is able to solely suppress α-linked long-chain OSA production in P. aeruginosa PAO1. To establish the target specificity of Iap for Wzyα, changes in OSA phenotypes were examined via Western immunoblotting for wzz1 and wzz2 single-knockout strains, as well as a wzz1 wzz2 double knockout, following the expression of iap from a tuneable vector. Increased induction of Iap expression completely abrogated OSA production in the wzz1 wzz2 double mutant, while background levels of OSA production were still observed in either of the single mutants. Therefore, Iap inhibition of OSA biosynthesis was most effective in the absence of both Wzz proteins. Sequence alignment analyses revealed a high degree of similarity between Iap and the first transmembrane segment (TMS) of either Wzz1 or Wzz2. Various topology prediction analyses of the Iap sequence consistently predicted the presence of a single TMS, suggesting a propensity for Iap to insert itself into the inner membrane (IM). The compromised ability of Iap to abrogate Wzyα function in the presence of Wzz1 or Wzz2 provides compelling evidence that inhibition occurs after Wzyα inserts itself into the IM and is achieved through mimicry of the first TMS from the Wzz proteins of P. aeruginosa PAO1. PMID:23955007

  8. Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Rosen, Carol L.; Lloyd, Robin M.; Paruthi, Shalini; Thomas, Sherene M.; Troester, Matthew M.; Carden, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, obstructive sleep apnea in children, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation of these quality measures in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. This document describes measurement methods for five desirable process measures: assessment of symptoms and risk factors of OSA, initiation of an evidence-based action plan, objective evaluation of high-risk children with OSA by obtaining a polysomnogram (PSG), reassessment of signs and symptoms of OSA within 12 months, and documentation of objective assessment of positive airway pressure adherence. When these five process measures are met, clinicians should be able to achieve the two defined outcomes: improve detection of childhood OSA and reduce signs and symptoms of OSA after initiation of a management plan. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with childhood OSA. Citation: Kothare SV, Rosen CL, Lloyd RM, Paruthi S, Thomas SM, Troester MM, Carden KA. Quality measures for the care of pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):385–404. PMID:25700879

  9. Clinical Prediction Models for Sleep Apnea: The Importance of Medical History over Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Berk; Westover, M. Brandon; Rudin, Cynthia; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable contributor to morbidity and mortality. However, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. We used a new machine learning method known as SLIM (Supersparse Linear Integer Models) to test the hypothesis that a diagnostic screening tool based on routinely available medical information would be superior to one based solely on patient-reported sleep-related symptoms. Methods: We analyzed polysomnography (PSG) and self-reported clinical information from 1,922 patients tested in our clinical sleep laboratory. We used SLIM and 7 state-of-the-art classification methods to produce predictive models for OSA screening using features from: (i) self-reported symptoms; (ii) self-reported medical information that could, in principle, be extracted from electronic health records (demographics, comorbidities), or (iii) both. Results: For diagnosing OSA, we found that model performance using only medical history features was superior to model performance using symptoms alone, and similar to model performance using all features. Performance was similar to that reported for other widely used tools: sensitivity 64.2% and specificity 77%. SLIM accuracy was similar to state-of-the-art classification models applied to this dataset, but with the benefit of full transparency, allowing for hands-on prediction using yes/no answers to a small number of clinical queries. Conclusion: To predict OSA, variables such as age, sex, BMI, and medical history are superior to the symptom variables we examined for predicting OSA. SLIM produces an actionable clinical tool that can be applied to data that is routinely available in modern electronic health records, which may facilitate automated, rather than manual, OSA screening. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 159. Citation: Ustun B, Westover MB, Rudin C, Bianchi MT. Clinical prediction models for sleep apnea: the importance of medical history over symptoms

  10. Effects of Adenotonsillectomy on Plasma Inflammatory Biomarkers in Obese Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Alonso-Álvarez, María Luz; Peris, Eduard; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Terán-Santos, Joaquin; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Gozal, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are highly prevalent and frequently overlapping conditions in children that lead to systemic inflammation, the latter being implicated in the various end-organ morbidities associated with these conditions. Aim To examine the effects of adenotonsillectomy (T&A) on plasma levels of inflammatory markers in obese children with polysomnographically diagnosed OSA who were prospectively recruited from the community. Methods Obese children prospectively diagnosed with OSA, underwent T&A and a second overnight polysomnogram (PSG) after surgery. Plasma fasting morning samples obtained after each of the 2 PSG were assayed for multiple inflammatory and metabolic markers including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-9), adiponectin, apelin C, leptin and osteocrin. Results Out of 122 potential candidates, 100 obese children with OSA completed the study with only 1/3 exhibiting normalization of their PSG after T&A (i.e., AHI≤1/hrTST). However, overall significant decreases in MCP-1, PAI-1, MMP-9, IL-18 and IL-6, and increases in adropin and osteocrin plasma concentrations occurred after T&A. Several of the T&A responsive biomarkers exhibited excellent sensitivity and moderate specificity to predict residual OSA (i.e., AHI≥/hrTST). Conclusions A defined subset of systemic inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers is reversibly altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children, further reinforcing the concept on the interactive pro-inflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA and obesity contributing to downstream end-organ morbidities. PMID:25801692

  11. Overnight heart rate variability in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: a time and frequency domain study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kaixian; Chemla, Denis; Roisman, Gabriel; Mao, Wenyuan; Bazizi, Samir; Lefevre, Amaury; Escourrou, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Heightened sympathetic activity plays a role in the cardiovascular sequelae of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Cardiac autonomic function may be assessed non-invasively by studying heart rate variability (HRV). The aim of the present study was to compare overnight HRV between a control group and a group of subjects with severe OSA. The potential confounding effects of age, sex, baseline autonomic status and sleep stage distribution were taken into account. Our prospective Holter study compared overnight (0030-0530 hours) HRV in 23 controls (apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) = 5 ± 3 /h) and 23 subjects with severe OSA (AHI = 65 ± 23 /h), matched for age and sex and with a similar percentage of rapid eye movement sleep. The mean normal-to-normal RR interval (NN) was shorter in the OSA compared with control group (903 vs 1039 ms, respectively), whereas the other time-domain indices of HRV, as well as the classic frequency-domain indices, were similar. Essentially similar results were obtained hourly and when only subjects with high mean values of the standard deviation of all NN (≥ 90 ms) were evaluated. In the 0.01-0.06 Hz range corresponding to the typical OSA pattern of bradycardia-tachycardia termed cyclic variation of heart rate (CVHR), higher power was documented hourly in OSA, with a significant correlation between overnight power and both AHI and mean oxyhaemoglobin saturation. The percentage of NN > x ms different from the previous one (pNNx family) had no diagnostic value. The results of the present study suggest that NN may be the best index to quantify the overnight sympathovagal balance in OSA and that a spectral band overlapping the apnoea-related pattern of CVHR slightly improved the characterization of the apnoea-related HRV patterns.

  12. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery for Middle-Aged Men with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Intolerant of CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kelvin B.; Toh, Song Tar; Guilleminault, Christian; Holty, Jon-Erik C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Conventional OSA therapy necessitates indefinite continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Although CPAP is an effective treatment modality, up to 50% of OSA patients are intolerant of CPAP. We explore whether surgical modalities developed for those intolerant of CPAP are cost-effective. Methods: We construct a lifetime semi-Markov model of OSA that accounts for observed increased risks of stroke, cardiovascular disease, and motor vehicle collisions for a 50-year-old male with untreated severe OSA. Using this model, we compare the cost-effectiveness of (1) no treatment, (2) CPAP only, and (3) CPAP followed by surgery (either palatopharyngeal reconstructive surgery [PPRS] or multilevel surgery [MLS]) for those intolerant to CPAP. Results: Compared with the CPAP only strategy, CPAP followed by PPRS (CPAP-PPRS) adds 0.265 quality adjusted life years (QALYs) for an increase of $2,767 (discounted 2010 dollars) and is highly cost effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $10,421/QALY for a 50-year-old male with severe OSA. Compared to a CPAP-PPRS strategy, the CPAP-MLS strategy adds 0.07 QALYs at an increase of $6,213 for an ICER of $84,199/QALY. The CPAP-PPRS strategy appears cost-effective over a wide range of parameter estimates. Conclusions: Palatopharyngeal reconstructive surgery appears cost-effective in middle-aged men with severe OSA intolerant of CPAP. Further research is warranted to better define surgical candidacy as well as short-term and long-term surgical outcomes. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 509. Citation: Tan KB, Toh ST, Guilleminault C, Holty JE. A cost-effectiveness analysis of surgery for middle-aged men with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of CPAP. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):525–535. PMID:25700871

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea predicts risk of metabolic syndrome independently of obesity: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yingjun; Xu, Huajun; Wang, Yuyu; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested to be associated with a high risk of metabolic syndrome (MS). However, results on whether the association between OSA and risk of MS is independent of obesity, and the effect of nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (IH) on MS, are conflicting. Our purpose was to estimate the magnitude of the independent association between OSA and risk of MS and further explore whether nocturnal IH in OSA plays a role in MS risk. Material and methods The PubMed and EMBASE databases were systematically searched (until January 21, 2015) for available observational evidence. Unadjusted and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) for MS in OSA or higher nocturnal IH were calculated using fixed or random models. Tests of homogeneity, publication bias, and robustness of the results were performed. Results A total of 13 independent studies (involving 857 participants in 3 case-control studies and 7077 participants in 10 cross-sectional studies) were included. The OSA was significantly associated with an increased risk of MS in a meta-analysis of 10 studies (pooled OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.31–2.26, p < 0.001), with a BMI-adjusted pooled OR of 1.97 (95% CI: 1.34–2.88, p < 0.001). Pooled results from 3 studies on the oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and MS risk (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.73–2.22, p < 0.001) and 3 studies on the cumulative percentage of sleep time with SpO2 below 90% (CT90) and MS risk (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.07, p < 0.001) were also significant. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated a significant association between OSA and increased MS risk independent of BMI, and further indicated a role of nocturnal IH in this association.

  14. Trazodone Effects on Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-REM Arousal Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Bradley A.; Deyoung, Pam N.; McSharry, David G.; Wellman, Andrew; Velasquez, Adrian; Owens, Robert; Orr, Jeremy E.; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A low respiratory arousal threshold is a physiological trait involved in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. Trazodone may increase arousal threshold without compromising upper airway muscles, which should improve OSA. Objectives: We aimed to examine how trazodone alters OSA severity and arousal threshold. We hypothesized that trazodone would increase the arousal threshold and improve the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) in selected patients with OSA. Methods: Subjects were studied on two separate nights in a randomized crossover design. Fifteen unselected subjects with OSA (AHI ≥ 10/h) underwent a standard polysomnogram plus an epiglottic catheter to measure the arousal threshold. Subjects were studied after receiving trazodone (100 mg) and placebo, with 1 week between conditions. The arousal threshold was calculated as the nadir pressure before electrocortical arousal from approximately 20 spontaneous respiratory events selected randomly. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with placebo, trazodone resulted in a significant reduction in AHI (38.7 vs. 28.5 events/h, P = 0.041), without worsening oxygen saturation or respiratory event duration. Trazodone was not associated with a significant change in the non-REM arousal threshold (−20.3 vs. −19.3 cm H2O, P = 0.51) compared with placebo. In subgroup analysis, responders to trazodone spent less time in N1 sleep (20.1% placebo vs. 9.0% trazodone, P = 0.052) and had an accompanying reduction in arousal index, whereas nonresponders were not observed to have a change in sleep parameters. Conclusions: These findings suggest that trazodone could be effective therapy for patients with OSA without worsening hypoxemia. Future studies should focus on underlying mechanisms and combination therapies to eliminate OSA. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01817907). PMID:25719754

  15. Effect of eplerenone on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and arterial stiffness in patients with resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Beata; Miazga, Angelika; Cofta, Szczepan; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Trafas, Tomasz; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-27

    INTRODUCTION    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be one of the major causes of resistant arterial hypertension (RAH). Apnea episodes cause hypoxia, which triggers the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This leads to water retention and swelling in the neck region, exacerbating OSA symptoms. It is assumed that the use of eplerenone may reduce the swelling and thus alleviate the severity of OSA. OBJECTIVES    We aimed to prospectively assess the impact of eplerenone on the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 31 patients with RAH and OSA. The exclusion criteria were as follows: secondary hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke 6 months prior to the study, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney failure, alcohol or drug addiction, and active cancer. In all patients, the following tests were performed: blood pressure (BP) measurement (traditionally and using ambulatory BP measuring [ABPM]), applanation tonometry, polysomnography, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) calculation. The tests were done before and after 3 months of eplerenone therapy. Patients received 50 mg of oral eplerenone daily, along with other hypertensive drugs. RESULTS    The mean age of participants was 57.76 ±6.16 years. After 3 months of eplerenone therapy, we observed a significant reduction in the AHI, neck circumference, BP, aortic pulse wave, and arterial wall stiffness. There were significant correlations between the AHI and mean BP measured by ABPM and between the AHI and arterial stiffness parameters. CONCLUSIONS    Our results provide evidence for the clinical significance of eplerenone, not only as an antihypertensive medication but also as a drug that may reduce the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH and OSA.

  16. Sleep Apnea Symptoms as a Predictor of Fatigue in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Umesh; Baker, Jason V; Wang, Qi; Khalil, Wajahat; Kunisaki, Ken M

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is common among persons living with HIV (PLWH), and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) such as older age and obesity are increasingly prevalent. Studies of OSA among PLWH are lacking, so we aimed to characterize OSA symptoms and associated clinical consequences (e.g., fatigue) among a contemporary population of PLWH. Self-administered surveys containing 23 items that included self-reported snoring, witnessed apneas, estimated sleep duration, the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), and the FACIT-Fatigue score were mailed to PLWH receiving care at an urban HIV clinic. Clinical/demographic data were collected from the medical record. Multivariable linear regression models were created to study relationships between fatigue, clinical variables, and OSA symptoms. Of 535 surveys, 203 (38%) responded. Eight patients (3.9%) had known OSA. Among those without known OSA, mean respondent characteristics included: age 47 years; 80% male, 41% African American, 48% Caucasian, BMI 26.4 kg/m(2), duration of HIV diagnosis 12 years, 93% on antiretroviral therapy, and 81% with <50 HIV RNA copies/mL. 27% reported snoring, 24% reported witnessed apneas, and 38% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Witnessed apnea was the strongest independent predictor of fatigue (lower FACIT-Fatigue score; β = -6.49; p < 0.001); this difference of 6.49 points exceeds the accepted minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 points. Other predictors included opioid use (β = -5.53; p < 0.001), depression (β = -4.18; p = 0.02), antidepressant use (β = -4.25; p = 0.02), and sleep duration < 6 h (β = -3.42; p = 0.02). Our data strongly support the need for increased efforts directed at OSA screening and treatment in PLWH.

  17. Brain putamen volume changes in newly-diagnosed patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Farahvar, Salar; Ogren, Jennifer A; Macey, Paul M; Thompson, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by cognitive, motor, autonomic, learning, and affective abnormalities. The putamen serves several of these functions, especially motor and autonomic behaviors, but whether global and specific sub-regions of that structure are damaged is unclear. We assessed global and regional putamen volumes in 43 recently-diagnosed, treatment-naïve OSA (age, 46.4 ± 8.8 years; 31 male) and 61 control subjects (47.6 ± 8.8 years; 39 male) using high-resolution T1-weighted images collected with a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. Global putamen volumes were calculated, and group differences evaluated with independent samples t-tests, as well as with analysis of covariance (covariates; age, gender, and total intracranial volume). Regional differences between groups were visualized with 3D surface morphometry-based group ratio maps. OSA subjects showed significantly higher global putamen volumes, relative to controls. Regional analyses showed putamen areas with increased and decreased tissue volumes in OSA relative to control subjects, including increases in caudal, mid-dorsal, mid-ventral portions, and ventral regions, while areas with decreased volumes appeared in rostral, mid-dorsal, medial-caudal, and mid-ventral sites. Global putamen volumes were significantly higher in the OSA subjects, but local sites showed both higher and lower volumes. The appearance of localized volume alterations points to differential hypoxic or perfusion action on glia and other tissues within the structure, and may reflect a stage in progression of injury in these newly-diagnosed patients toward the overall volume loss found in patients with chronic OSA. The regional changes may underlie some of the specific deficits in motor, autonomic, and neuropsychologic functions in OSA.

  18. Action-Monitoring Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea - A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ping-Song; Hsu, Chung-Yao; Wu, Meng-Ni; Liou, Li-Min; Lu, Shinag-Ru; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with a broad range of frontal lobe dysfunctions. However, no study has investigated action monitoring, a crucial domain of frontal cognitive functions, in patients with OSA. By using the modified Flanker task, we tested the hypothesis that patients with OSA have an impaired action monitoring function. We recruited 25 untreated patients with moderate–severe OSA and 12 control participants who were matched for age, sex, apolipoprotein E4, and education level. Every enrolled participant underwent a standard overnight laboratory-based polysomnography and completed a modified Flanker task. Compared with the controls, the patients with OSA presented a significantly lower correct response rate in all trials (78.9% vs 95.9%, P = .008), congruent trials (84.7% vs 98.3%, P = .016), and incongruent trials (77.4% vs 94.7%, P = .009). The post-error correction rate was significantly lower in the patients with OSA than in the controls (74.9% vs 93.8%, P = .005). Furthermore, strong significant correlations were observed between the arousal index and correct rate in all trials (r = −0.390, P < .05) and in the incongruent trials (r = −0.429, P < .01), as well as between the arousal index and rate of post-error correction (r = −0.435, P < .01). We concluded that the action monitoring function was impaired in the patients with OSA. Sleep fragmentation was a major determinant of impaired action monitoring in these patients. PMID:27300504

  19. Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Claudio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Cesareo, Massimo; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Oliva, Corrado; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Placidi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the integrity of the visual system in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Methods: We performed electrophysiological study of the visual system in a population of severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea events/time in bed ≥ 30/h) patients without medical comorbidities compared to a group of healthy controls similar for age, sex, and body mass index. Patients and controls did not have visual impairment or systemic disorders with known influence on the visual system. ERG and VEP were elicited by a reversal pattern generated on a television monitor at low (55') and high (15') spatial frequencies stimulation. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both patients and controls. Results: In comparison with healthy controls (n = 27), patients with OSA (n = 27) showed a significant latency delay coupled with a significant amplitude reduction of P100 wave of VEP at all spatial frequencies in both eyes. No significant differences between groups were detected as concerning ERG components. No correlations were found between polygraphic parameters, ESS scores, or VEP and ERG components in OSA patients. Conclusions: This study documented that patients with OSA, without medical comorbidities, present VEP alteration as documented by lower amplitude and longer latency of the P100 component than healthy controls. These altered electrophysiological findings may be the expression of optic nerve dysfunction provoked by hypoxia, acidosis, hypercarbia and airway obstruction, frequently observed in patients with OSA. Hence, we hypothesize that OSA per se may impair optic nerve function. Citation: Liguori C, Palmieri MG, Pierantozzi M, Cesareo M, Romigi A, Izzi F, Marciani MG, Oliva C, Mercuri NB, Placidi F. Optic nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: an electrophysiological study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):19–23. PMID

  20. Craniocervical Posture in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Piccin, Chaiane Facco; Pozzebon, Daniela; Scapini, Fabricio; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Objective  The objective of this study is to verify the craniofacial characteristics and craniocervical posture of OSA and healthy subjects, determining possible relationships with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI). Methods  This case-control study evaluated 21 subjects with OSA, who comprised the OSA group (OSAG), and 21 healthy subjects, who constituted the control group (CG). Cephalometry analyzed head posture measurements, craniofacial measurements, and air space. Head posture was also assessed by means of photogrammetry. Results  The groups were homogeneous regarding gender (12 men and 9 women in each group), age (OSAG = 41.86 ± 11.26 years; GC = 41.19 ± 11.20 years), and body mass index (OSAG = 25.65 ± 2.46 kg/m2; CG = 24.72 ± 3.01 kg/m2). We found significant differences between the groups, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance between the hyoid bone and the mandibular plane in OSAG, when compared with CG. A positive correlation was found between higher head hyperextension and head anteriorization, with greater severity of OSA as assessed by AHI. Conclusion  OSAG subjects showed changes in craniofacial morphology, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane, as compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, in OSA subjects, the greater the severity of OSA, the greater the head hyperextension and anteriorization. PMID:27413397

  1. Towards an understanding of Internet-based problem shopping behaviour: The concept of online shopping addiction and its proposed predictors

    PubMed Central

    ROSE, SUSAN; DHANDAYUDHAM, ARUN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compulsive and addictive forms of consumption and buying behaviour have been researched in both business and medical literature. Shopping enabled via the Internet now introduces new features to the shopping experience that translate to positive benefits for the shopper. Evidence now suggests that this new shopping experience may lead to problematic online shopping behaviour. This paper provides a theoretical review of the literature relevant to online shopping addiction (OSA). Based on this selective review, a conceptual model of OSA is presented. Method: The selective review of the literature draws on searches within databases relevant to both clinical and consumer behaviour literature including EBSCO, ABI Pro-Quest, Web of Science – Social Citations Index, Medline, PsycINFO and Pubmed. The article reviews current thinking on problematic, and specifically addictive, behaviour in relation to online shopping. Results: The review of the literature enables the extension of existing knowledge into the Internet-context. A conceptual model of OSA is developed with theoretical support provided for the inclusion of 7 predictor variables: low self-esteem, low self-regulation; negative emotional state; enjoyment; female gender; social anonymity and cognitive overload. The construct of OSA is defined and six component criteria of OSA are proposed based on established technological addiction criteria. Conclusions: Current Internet-based shopping experiences may trigger problematic behaviours which can be classified on a spectrum which at the extreme end incorporates OSA. The development of a conceptual model provides a basis for the future measurement and testing of proposed predictor variables and the outcome variable OSA. PMID:25215218

  2. Thyroid Hormone Levels and TSH Activity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, P; Przybyłowski, T; Kumor, M; Barnaś, M; Wiercioch, M; Chazan, R

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by complete cessation of inspiratory flow (apnea) or upper airway airflow limitation (hypopnea) with increased respiratory muscle activity, which is repeatedly observed during sleep. Hypothyroidism has been described as a rare cause of OSAS, but it is considered to be the main cause of breathing disorders during sleep in patients in whom an improvement of OSAS is observed after thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Nevertheless, euthyreosis due to thyroxine replacement in patients with OSAS often does not improve the breathing disorder and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is usually applied. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid function in patients with OSAS. We studied 813 patients in whom severe OSAS was diagnosed; the mean apnea-hypopnea index was 44.0. Most of the patients were obese (mean BMI 33.1 ± 6.6 kg/m2) and had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS 12.8 ± 6.6). With the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration as the major criterion, hypothyroidism was diagnosed in 38 (4.7%) and hyperthyroidism was diagnosed in 31 (3.8%) patients. Analysis of basic anthropometric data, selected polysomnography results, and TSH, fT3, and fT4 values did not reveal any significant correlations. In conclusion, the incidence of thyroid function disorders seems to be no different in OSAS than that in the general population. We did not find correlations between TSH activity and the severity of breathing disorders during sleep. PMID:26542600

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea predicts risk of metabolic syndrome independently of obesity: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yingjun; Xu, Huajun; Wang, Yuyu; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested to be associated with a high risk of metabolic syndrome (MS). However, results on whether the association between OSA and risk of MS is independent of obesity, and the effect of nocturnal intermittent hypoxia (IH) on MS, are conflicting. Our purpose was to estimate the magnitude of the independent association between OSA and risk of MS and further explore whether nocturnal IH in OSA plays a role in MS risk. Material and methods The PubMed and EMBASE databases were systematically searched (until January 21, 2015) for available observational evidence. Unadjusted and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) for MS in OSA or higher nocturnal IH were calculated using fixed or random models. Tests of homogeneity, publication bias, and robustness of the results were performed. Results A total of 13 independent studies (involving 857 participants in 3 case-control studies and 7077 participants in 10 cross-sectional studies) were included. The OSA was significantly associated with an increased risk of MS in a meta-analysis of 10 studies (pooled OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.31–2.26, p < 0.001), with a BMI-adjusted pooled OR of 1.97 (95% CI: 1.34–2.88, p < 0.001). Pooled results from 3 studies on the oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and MS risk (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.73–2.22, p < 0.001) and 3 studies on the cumulative percentage of sleep time with SpO2 below 90% (CT90) and MS risk (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.07, p < 0.001) were also significant. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated a significant association between OSA and increased MS risk independent of BMI, and further indicated a role of nocturnal IH in this association. PMID:27695500

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and sequelae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Jung; Chae, Kyu Young

    2010-10-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is approximately 3% in children. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most common cause of OSAS in children, and obesity, hypotonic neuromuscular diseases, and craniofacial anomalies are other major risk factors. Snoring is the most common presenting complaint in children with OSAS, but the clinical presentation varies according to age. Agitated sleep with frequent postural changes, excessive sweating, or abnormal sleep positions such as hyperextension of neck or abnormal prone position may suggest a sleep-disordered breathing. Night terror, sleepwalking, and enuresis are frequently associated, during slow-wave sleep, with sleep-disordered breathing. Excessive daytime sleepiness becomes apparent in older children, whereas hyperactivity or inattention is usually predominant in younger children. Morning headache and poor appetite may also be present. As the cortical arousal threshold is higher in children, arousals are not easily developed and their sleep architectures are usually more conserved than those of adults. Untreated OSAS in children may result in various problems such as cognitive deficits, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, poor academic achievement, and emotional instability. Mild pulmonary hypertension is not uncommon. Rarely, cardiovascular complications such as cor pulmonale, heart failure, and systemic hypertension may develop in untreated cases. Failure to thrive and delayed development are serious problems in younger children with OSAS. Diagnosis of pediatric OSAS should be based on snoring, relevant history of sleep disruption, findings of any narrow or collapsible portions of upper airway, and confirmed by polysomnography. Early diagnosis of pediatric OSAS is critical to prevent complications with appropriate interventions. PMID:21189956

  5. The effect of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on microelements and silicon concentration, photosynthesis activity and yield of tomato grown under Mn stress.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Tomasz; Calomme, Mario; Borowiak, Klaudia

    2015-11-01

    The aim of experiments was to assess the efficiency of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid (ch-OSA; complex of orthosilicic acid with choline and a bioavailable source of silicon) application under increasing manganese (Mn) stress on the micronutritional composition and yielding of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cvs. 'Alboney F1' and 'Emotion F1'). Plants were grown in rockwool with the application of a nutrient solution varied the Mn concentrations (in mg dm(-3)): 9.6 and 19.2 which cause strong oxidative stress of plants comparing with optimal concentration of that microelement in nutrient solution. The effect of ch-OSA application (at Si concentration of 0.3 mg dm(-3) nutrient solution) was investigated at both Mn-levels. Increasing Mn stress modified the concentration of microelements and silicon (Si) in tomato leaves. Application of ch-OSA also influenced the concentration of nutrients, but the determined changes were generally multidirectional and varied depending on Mn-level and cultivar. Under the increasing Mn stress a significant downward trend was observed for the mean concentration of Fe (in both cultivars) in fruits--but changes of Mn, Zn and Cu were varied depend on cultivar. In the case of cv. 'Alboney F1' ch-OSA application caused an increase the mean concentrations of Fe, Zn and Cu, while in the case of cv. 'Emotion F1' the reduction of mean concentrations of Zn and Cu was recorded. Ch-OSA treatment did not influence on the Mn concentrations in fruits. A beneficial role of ch-OSA was also found in photosynthesis activity. This was especially valid for lower levels of Mn. Application of ch-OSA improved significantly the marketable yield of tomato under stress by a low Mn level.

  6. Rapid maxillary expansion and obstructive sleep apnea: A review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zancanella, Edilson; Crespo, Agrício-Nubiato

    2016-01-01

    Background OSAS during childhood leads to significant physical and neuropsychomotor impairment. Thus, it needs to be recognized and treated early in order to avoid or attenuate the chronic problems associated with OSAS, which are deleterious to a child’s development. Adenotonsillectomy and, in select cases, continuous positive airwaypressure (CPAP) have been the preferred treatments for OSAS in children, and yet they are ineffective at fully ameliorating the disease. Minimally invasive treatments have recently been proposed, comprising intra-oral and extra-oral devices as well as speech therapy. Objetive: to conduct a meta-analysis on studies from around the world that used rapid maxillary expansion (RME) to treat OSAS in children. Material and Methods We performed a meta-analysis of studies using RME for OSA treatment in children. A literature survey was conductedusing PubMed and Medline for English articles published up to December 2014 with the following descriptors: Sleep Apnea, Obstructive, Children, Treatment, Orthodontic, Othopaedic, Maxillaryexpansion. Studies were included in the meta-analysisif they were case-controlled studies, randomized, and involved non-syndromic children aged 0 to 12years old diagnosed with OSA by the polysomnography apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) before and after the intervention, submitted RME only. Results In all, 10 articles conformed to the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The total sample size across all these articles was 215 children, having a mean age of 6.7 years,of whom58.6%were male. The mean AHI during the follow-up was -6.86 (p <0.0001). Conclusions We concluded that rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in children with OSAS appears to be an effective treatment for this syndrome. Further randomized clinical studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of RME in adults. Key words:Rapid maxillary expansión, obstructive sleep apnea, meta-analysis. PMID:27031063

  7. The status of cephalometry in the prediction of non-CPAP treatment outcome in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Denolf, Petra L; Vanderveken, Olivier M; Marklund, Marie E; Braem, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common sleep disordered breathing disorder (SDB) in adults and is characterized by a recurrent partial or complete collapse of the upper airway during sleep. This can be caused by many factors, sometimes interacting, such as skeletal malformations, soft tissue crowding, respiratory instability and the various effects of aging, obesity and gender that dictate craniofacial and upper airway anatomy. Research has demonstrated that the majority of patients exhibit at least one anatomical component such as retrognathia or a narrow posterior airway space that predisposes to the development of OSAS. Within the predisposing elements for OSAS many seem to point to anatomical characteristics. A standardized and relatively simple radiologic technique to evaluate anatomical craniofacial relationships is cephalometry. This has been used already for a long time in orthodontics, but is now gradually being introduced in OSAS treatment to envisage optimal treatment selection as well as to predict treatment outcomes. The purpose of the present review is to evaluate the contribution of cephalometry in the prediction of outcomes from OSAS treatments that depend on the upper airway morphology in their mechanisms of action such as oral appliances that advance the mandible as well as various surgical methods. In addition, an overview of imaging modalities and methods that currently are being used in cephalometric analysis in OSAS patients is provided. The findings indicate that isolated cephalometric parameters cannot be used to reliably predict treatment outcomes from mandibular advancement devices and surgical methods for OSAS. Extreme or outlying values of cephalometric parameters may rather be used as contra-indicators or 'red flags' instead of predictors.

  8. Circadian Variability of Fibrinolytic Markers and Endothelial Function in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Bagai, Kanika; Muldowney, James A. S.; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily; Bagai, Jayant; Artibee, Kay J.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Malow, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease, including stroke and acute coronary syndromes. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the principal inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), has a pronounced circadian rhythm and is elevated in both OSA and cardiovascular disease and may be an important link between the two conditions. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular disease, and may be altered in OSA. Our primary aim was to compare circadian variability of PAI-1 and t-PA in patients with OSA and normal controls by determining the amplitude (peak level) and mesor (rhythm adjusted mean) of PAI-1 and t-PA in serial blood samples over a 24-h period. The secondary aim was to measure markers of endothelial function (brachial and radial artery flow) in patients with OSA compared with normal controls. Setting: Cross-sectional cohort study. Patients or Participants: Subjects age 18 y or older, with a body mass index of 25-45 kg/m2, with or without evidence of untreated OSA. Interventions: Plasma samples were collected every 2 h, in OSA patients and matched controls, over a 24-h period. PAI-1 and t-PA antigen and activity were measured. The presence or absence of OSA (apnea-hypopnea index of 5 or greater) was confirmed by overnight polysomnography. Endothelial function was measured via brachial artery flow mediated vasodilatation and computerized arterial pulse waveform analysis. Measurements and Results: The rhythm-adjusted mean levels of PAI-1 antigen levels in the OSA group (21.8 ng/mL, 95% confidence level [CI], 18 to 25.7) were significantly higher as compared to the non-OSA group (16 ng/mL, 95% CI, 12.2 to 19.8; P = 0.03). The rhythm-adjusted mean levels of PAI-1 activity levels in the OSA group (23.9 IU/mL, 95% CI, 21.4 to 26.5) were also significantly higher than in the non-OSA group (17.2 IU/ mL, 95% CI, 14.6 to 19.9; P < 0.001).There

  9. Increased Inflammatory Activity in Nonobese Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Thunström, Erik; Glantz, Helena; Fu, Michael; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Petzold, Max; Lindberg, Kristin; Peker, Yüksel

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Enhanced vascular inflammation is implicated as a pathophysiologic mechanism but obesity is confounding. We aimed to address the association of OSA with inflammatory biomarkers in a nonobese cohort of revascularized patients with CAD and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline investigations of a randomized controlled trial. Setting: Clinic-based. Participants: There were 329 nonobese patients with CAD, of whom 234 with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events/h) and 95 without OSA (AHI < 5 events/h). Obese patients with CAD and OSA (N = 105) were chosen as an additional control group. Interventions: None. Measurements: Circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α were assessed in relation to OSA diagnosis based on AHI ≥ 15 events/h as well as oxygen desaturation index (ODI) ≥ 5 events/h. Results: Nonobese patients with OSA had significantly higher levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 than those without OSA. The values did not differ significantly between obese and nonobese patients with OSA. In bivariate regression analysis, AHI ≥ 15 events/h was associated with all four biomarkers but not so in the multivariate model after adjustment for confounders. ODI ≥ 5 events/h was associated with hs-CRP (odds ratio [OR] 1.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–1.99) and IL-6 (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.05–1.60) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea with oxygen desaturation index ≥ 5 was independently associated with increased inflammatory activity in this nonobese coronary artery disease cohort. The intermittent hypoxemia, rather than the number of apneas and hypopneas, appears to be primarily associated with enhanced inflammation. Citation: Thunström E, Glantz H, Fu M, Yucel-Lindberg T, Petzold M, Lindberg K, Peker Y

  10. Clinical factors associated with extreme sleep apnoea [AHI>100 events per hour] in Peruvian patients: A case-control study–A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rey de Castro, Jorge; Huamaní, Charles; Escobar-Córdoba, Franklin; Liendo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The severity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) ranges from mild or moderate to severe sleep apnoea. However, there is no information available on the clinical characteristics associated with cases involving more than 100 events per hour. This is a preliminary report and our goal was to characterise the demographics and sleep characteristics of patients with Extreme OSA and compare with patients with sleep apnoea of lesser severity. We hypothesised that patients with Extreme OSA (AHI>100) is associated with an increased comorbidities and/or risk factors. Methods We carried out a case-control study on male patients with OSA who were seen in a private hospital in Lima, Peru between 2006 and 2012. Cases were identified if their apnoea/hypopnea index (AHI) was higher than 100 (Extreme OSA), and four controls were selected per case: two with 15–29 AHI and two with 30–50 AHI, matched according to case diagnosis dates. We evaluated demographic, past medical history, and oxygen saturation variables Results We identified 19 cases that were matched with 54 controls. In the multivariate model, only arterial hypertension, neck circumference, age, and over 10% in SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time (T90) were associated with Extreme OSA. Arterial hypertension had an OR=6.31 (CI95%: 1.71–23.23) of Extreme OSA. Each 5-cm increment in neck circumference was associated with an increase of OR=4.34 (CI95%: 1.32–14.33), while T90>10% had an OR=19.68 (CI95%: 4.33–89.49). Age had a marginal relevance (OR=0.95; CI95%: 0.92–0.99) Conclusion Our results suggest that arterial hypertension, neck circumference, and over 10% SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time were associated with a higher probability of Extreme OSA. We recommend investigators to study this population of Extreme OSA looking for an early diagnosis and the identification of prognostic factors in comparison with moderate to severe levels. PMID:26483940

  11. Cost Minimization Using an Artificial Neural Network Sleep Apnea Prediction Tool for Sleep Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teferra, Rahel A.; Grant, Brydon J. B.; Mindel, Jesse W.; Siddiqi, Tauseef A.; Iftikhar, Imran H.; Ajaz, Fatima; Aliling, Jose P.; Khan, Meena S.; Hoffmann, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: More than a million polysomnograms (PSGs) are performed annually in the United States to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Third-party payers now advocate a home sleep test (HST), rather than an in-laboratory PSG, as the diagnostic study for OSA regardless of clinical probability, but the economic benefit of this approach is not known. Objectives: We determined the diagnostic performance of OSA prediction tools including the newly developed OSUNet, based on an artificial neural network, and performed a cost-minimization analysis when the prediction tools are used to identify patients who should undergo HST. Methods: The OSUNet was trained to predict the presence of OSA in a derivation group of patients who underwent an in-laboratory PSG (n = 383). Validation group 1 consisted of in-laboratory PSG patients (n = 149). The network was trained further in 33 patients who underwent HST and then was validated in a separate group of 100 HST patients (validation group 2). Likelihood ratios (LRs) were compared with two previously published prediction tools. The total costs from the use of the three prediction tools and the third-party approach within a clinical algorithm were compared. Measurements and Main Results: The OSUNet had a higher +LR in all groups compared with the STOP-BANG and the modified neck circumference (MNC) prediction tools. The +LRs for STOP-BANG, MNC, and OSUNet in validation group 1 were 1.1 (1.0–1.2), 1.3 (1.1–1.5), and 2.1 (1.4–3.1); and in validation group 2 they were 1.4 (1.1–1.7), 1.7 (1.3–2.2), and 3.4 (1.8–6.1), respectively. With an OSA prevalence less than 52%, the use of all three clinical prediction tools resulted in cost savings compared with the third-party approach. Conclusions: The routine requirement of an HST to diagnose OSA regardless of clinical probability is more costly compared with the use of OSA clinical prediction tools that identify patients who should undergo this procedure when OSA is expected to

  12. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu L.; Saboisky, Julian P.; Jordan, Amy S.; White, David P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (−0.68 ± 1.0 vs. −0.80 ± 2.0 cmH2O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  13. Epiglottis cross-sectional area and oropharyngeal airway length in male and female obstructive sleep apnea patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Melinda A; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Yan-Go, Frisca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a male-predominant condition, characterized by repeated upper-airway collapse with continued diaphragmatic efforts during sleep, and is accompanied by severe physiological consequences. Multiple morphological aspects, including epiglottis cross-sectional area (CSA) and oropharyngeal airway length (OPAL), can contribute to airway collapsibility in the condition. This study focused on the effects of OSA severity, sex, and race on OPA dimensions. Materials and methods Two high-resolution T1-weighted image series were collected from 40 mild-to-severe OSA subjects (age 46.9±9 years, body mass index 30.4±5.4 kg/m2, Apnea–Hypopnea Index score 32.8±22.5, 28 males) and 54 control subjects (47±9 years, 24.7±3.8 kg/m2, 32 males) using a 3 T magnetic resonance-imaging scanner. Caucasian, Asian, African-American, and “other” subjects constituted the study pool. Both image series were realigned and averaged, and reoriented to a common space. CSA and OPAL were measured, normalized for subject height, and compared between sexes and disease-severity levels in OSA and control subjects. Results Significantly reduced epiglottis CSA appeared only in severe OSA vs controls (P=0.009). OPAL increased significantly with OSA severity vs controls (mild, P=0.027; moderate, P<0.001; severe, P<0.001). OSA males showed increased CSA and greater OPAL than OSA females, which may underlie the increased proportion of affected males with higher apnea–hypopnea index scores. However, no significant differences appeared between CSA and OPAL measures for male and female controls, suggesting that airway morphology may not be the sole contributor for airway collapse. No ethnic or racial differences appeared for CSA or OPAL measures. Conclusion Sex-based reductions in epiglottis CSA and increased OPAL in OSA subjects may enhance airway-collapse vulnerability, more so with greater disease severity, and partially underlie male vs female susceptibility

  14. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels.

  15. Analysis of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kun-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Pei-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, we aimed to verify associations between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a hospital-based population. This was a cross-sectional observational study on children aged 4 to 16 years with OSA-related symptoms from a tertiary referral medical center. All children received overnight polysomnography and 24-hour recording of ABP. Severity of the disease was classified as primary snoring (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI <1), mild OSA (AHI 1–5), and moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI >5). For 195 children enrolled in this study (mean age, 7.8 ± 3.4 years; 69% boy), ABP increased as severity of OSA increased. During daytime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (BP) (117.0 ± 12.7 vs 110.5 ± 9.3 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (85.6 ± 8.1 vs 81.6 ± 6.8 mmHg), and diastolic BP load (12.0 ± 9.6 vs 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg) compared with children with primary snoring. During nighttime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic BP (108.6 ± 15.0 vs 100.0 ± 9.4 mmHg), MAP (75.9 ± 9.6 vs 71.1 ± 7.0 mmHg), systolic BP load (44.0 ± 32.6 vs 26.8 ± 24.5 mmHg), systolic BP index (0.5 ± 13.1 vs −6.8 ± 8.5 mmHg), and higher prevalence of systolic hypertension (47.6% vs 14.7 %) compared with children with primary snoring. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed an independent association between AHI and nighttime systolic BP and MAP after adjusting for adiposity variables. This large hospital-based study showed that children with moderate-to-severe OSA had a higher ABP compared with children who were primary snorers. As elevated BP in childhood predicts future cardiovascular risks, children with severe OSA should be treated properly to prevent further adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26448004

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment and Atrial Fibrillation: A Need for Definitive Evidence.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Chrishan J; Sanders, Prashanthan; Kalman, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Prevalence rates of atrial fibrillation (AF) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are rising on a global scale. Epidemiological data have consistently demonstrated an independent association between the 2 conditions. Investigators pose that pathophysiologic features of OSA enable progression of the AF substrate; these features include abnormalities of gas exchange, autonomic remodeling, atrial stretch, and inflammation. Furthermore, many of the mechanistic perturbations that impact the AF substrate in OSA can be substantially attenuated by effective treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Clear associations of OSA treatment and improved AF control have been observed across multiple clinical contexts. However, the precision and generalizability of these findings are unclear in view of the data's observational nature. Although risk factor management has emerged as a critical component of AF treatment, effective control of many AF risk factors can be challenging in the longer term. In view of the efficacy and sustainability of CPAP therapy, OSA raises its profile as a prime candidate for intervention. However, translation of this strategy to the broader framework for AF management requires robust data from randomized controlled trials.

  17. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children is a frequent disease for which optimal diagnostic methods are still being defined. Treatment of OSA in children should include providing space, improving craniofacial growth, resolving all symptoms, and preventing the development of the disease in the adult years. Adenotonsillectomy (T&A) has been the treatment of choice and thought to solve young patient's OSA problem, which is not the case for most adults. Recent reports showed success rates that vary from 27.2% to 82.9%. Children snoring regularly generally have a narrow maxilla compared to children who do not snore. The impairment of nasal breathing with increased nasal resistance has a well-documented negative impact on early childhood maxilla-mandibular development, making the upper airway smaller and might lead to adult OSA. Surgery in young children should be performed as early as possible to prevent the resulting morphologic changes and neurobehavioral, cardiovascular, endocrine, and metabolic complications. Close postoperative follow-up to monitor for residual disease is equally important. As the proportion of obese children has been increasing recently, parents should be informed about the weight gain after T&A. Multidisciplinary evaluation of the anatomic abnormalities in children with OSA leads to better overall treatment outcome. PMID:21189957

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period. PMID:26957384

  19. The Relationship between High Risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnea and General and Central Obesity: Findings from a Sample of Chilean College Students

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Clarita; Andrade, Asterio; Frye, Megan; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and extent to which high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with general obesity and central obesity among college students in Punta Arenas, Chile. Risk for OSA was assessed using the Berlin Questionnaire and trained research nurses measured anthropometric indices. Overweight was defined as body mass index (BMI) of 25–29.9 kg/m2 and general obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2. Central obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥90 centimeters (cm) for males and ≥80 cm for females. Multivariate logistic regression models were fit to obtain adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Prevalence of high risk for OSA, general obesity, and central obesity were 7.8%, 12.8%, and 42.7%, respectively. Students at high risk for OSA had greater odds of general obesity (OR 9.96; 95% CI: 4.42–22.45) and central obesity (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.43–5.40). Findings support a strong positive association of high risk for OSA with obesity. PMID:24944841

  20. Biosolids reduction by the oxic-settling-anoxic process: Impact of sludge interchange rate.

    PubMed

    Semblante, Galilee U; Hai, Faisal I; Bustamante, Heriberto; Guevara, Nelly; Price, William E; Nghiem, Long D

    2016-06-01

    The impact of sludge interchange rate (SIR) on sludge reduction by oxic-settling-anoxic (OSA) process was investigated. The sludge yield of an OSA system (a sequencing batch reactor, SBR, integrated with external anoxic reactors) was compared to that of a control (an SBR attached to a single-pass aerobic digester). SIR (%) is the percentage by volume of sludge returned from the external reactor into the main bioreactor of the OSA, and was varied from 0% to 22%. OSA achieved greater sludge reduction when fed with unsettled sewage (sCOD=113mg/L) rather than settled sewage (sCOD=60mg/L). The SIR of 11% resulted in the highest OSA performance. At the optimum SIR, higher volatile solids destruction and nitrification/denitrification (i.e., conversion of destroyed volatile solids into inert forms) were observed in the external anoxic and intermittently aerated (i.e., aerobic/anoxic) reactors, respectively. Denitrification in the aerobic/anoxic reactor was inefficient without SIR. Effluent quality and sludge settleability of the main SBR were unaffected by SIR. PMID:26810193

  1. Bone Loss in Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakhtoura, Marlene; Nasrallah, Mona; Chami, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related respiratory disorder. It is associated with many endocrinopathies including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolism, and glucose intolerance that may lead to bone loss with secondary osteoporosis. Methods: We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with bilateral 9th rib fractures and was found to have obstructive sleep apnea and osteoporosis. We also present a literature review on this topic. Results: OSA can lead to bone loss through various mechanisms. Some are shared with obesity, including hypogonadism, altered adrenergic tone, inflammation, oxidative stress, vitamin D deficiency and diabetes mellitus; others are specific to OSA, such as hypoxia and altered glucocorticoids regulation. Conclusion: There are no guidelines on screening for osteoporosis in OSA. Further research is needed to assess the incidence of bone loss and fractures in OSA. Citation: Chakhtoura M, Nasrallah M, Chami H. Bone loss in obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: a review of literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):575–580. PMID:25580607

  2. Computed tomographic cephalometric analysis of Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C; Ip, M S; Chu, F S; Chung, K F

    2000-11-01

    Variations of craniofacial and upper airway structures are recognized to contribute to the phenomenon of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Most previous cephalometric studies were performed using erect lateral radiographs in Caucasian patients. The present project aims to determine cephalometric measurements, utilizing CT, in normal Chinese subjects and in Chinese patients with OSA. Computed tomography of 25 patients with OSA (proven using overnight polysomnography), and of 25 age-, sex-, height-, bodyweight- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were prospectively performed. Thirteen standard bony and soft-tissue measurements were obtained from the CT lateral scout view of the head and neck, taken with each subject in the neutral supine position. The cross-sectional area was calculated at two axial levels (velopharynx and hypopharynx). The measurements in the two groups, OSA and control subjects, were compared. The measurements for hyoid position (P = 0.00), nasal cavity length (P = 0.01), mandibular prognathism (P = 0.05), tongue size (P = 0.02), oropharyngeal airway space (P = 0.02), posterior tongue airway space (P = 0.04) and cross-sectional areas at the level of the velopharynx (P = 0.00) and hypopharynx (P = 0.01) differed significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, CT cephalometric measurements show that certain anatomical variations in the head and neck are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of OSA in Chinese patients.

  3. Effect of CPAP on Endothelial Function in Subjects With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huajun; Wang, Yuyu; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is related to endothelial dysfunction. CPAP is the first-line treatment for OSA. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. The overall effects were measured by the weighted mean difference with a 95% CI. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity. Eleven studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. A random-effects model revealed that CPAP significantly improved endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilation (weighted mean difference of 2.92, 95% CI 2.21-3.63, P < .001), whereas there was no significant improvement in endothelial function in response to nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (weighted mean difference of 0.90, 95% CI -1.63 to 3.43, P = .48). Age, sex, CPAP compliance and duration, and sleep-related variables had no effect on reduction in arterial stiffness after CPAP. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the protective effect of CPAP on endothelial function was robust. CPAP significantly improved flow-mediated dilation in subjects with OSA. Long-term randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the positive effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA.

  4. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea treatment by continuous positive airway pressure on cardiometabolic biomarkers: a systematic review from sham CPAP randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Jullian-Desayes, Ingrid; Joyeux-Faure, Marie; Tamisier, Renaud; Launois, Sandrine; Borel, Anne-Laure; Levy, Patrick; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-01

    Reducing cardiometabolic risk may represent an important target for effective obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment. The impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the first line therapy of OSA, on metabolic or inflammatory markers is still debated. A systematic literature search using several databases was performed. We provide a systematic analysis of randomized studies comparing therapeutic versus sham CPAP intervention and also include studies using a CPAP withdrawal design. We addressed the impact of CPAP on the following cardiometabolic biomarkers: 1) plasma and urine catecholamines and their metabolites that reflect sympathetic activity; 2) insulin resistance and lipid metabolism biomarkers; 3) oxidative stress, systemic and vascular inflammation biomarkers; 4) liver enzymes highlighting the association between OSA and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); 5) coagulation biomarkers. The impact of CPAP on sympathetic activity is robust across studies and occurs rapidly. In contrast to sympathetic activity, the well-designed studies included in this review failed to demonstrate that CPAP alters metabolic or inflammatory markers in OSA. CPAP did not change glucose, lipids, insulin resistance levels or the ratio of patients with metabolic syndrome. In unselected OSA patients, it is not realistic to expect a clinically relevant decrease in cardiometabolic biomarkers with CPAP therapy.

  5. Comparison of Cone-Beam CT Incidental Findings between Moderate/Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea patients and Mild/Normal patients

    PubMed Central

    Enciso, Reyes; Shigeta, Yuko; Nguyen, Manuel; Clark, Glenn T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidental radiographic findings in the maxillofacial structures and the pharyngeal airway between moderate/severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) subjects and mild OSA/normal subjects using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans. Study Design 53 moderate/severe OSA subjects (with a Respiratory Disturbance Index [RDI]≥15 events/hr) and 33 mild OSA/normal subjects, (RDI<15) based on ambulatory somnographic assessment were recruited. Supine CBCT’s were taken and sent for radiological report. The incidental findings were compared between the two groups. Results Moderate/severe subjects had larger prevalence of conchae bullosa, hypertrophic turbinates, hypertrophic tonsils, elongated or posteriorly placed soft palate, narrower airway, enlarged tongue, and focal calcifications, though no significant differences were found. Conclusions CBCT is useful in identifying maxillofacial and airway anomalies that could interfere with normal breathing. However, no significant difference was found in prevalence of incidental findings between moderate/severe OSA and mild/normal subjects. Further studies are necessary to generalize our results. PMID:22862979

  6. Utility of portable monitoring in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, U; Aneja, A; Kumar, R Mohan; Kumar, T Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, which is associated with systemic consequences such as hypertension, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. Nocturnal laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard test for diagnosis of OSA. PSG consists of a simultaneous recording of multiple physiologic parameters related to sleep and wakefulness including electroencephalography (EEG), electrooculography (EOG), surface electromyography (EMG), airflow measurement using thermistor and nasal pressure transducer, pulse oximetry and respiratory effort (thoracic and abdominal). Multiple alternative and simpler methods that record respiratory parameters alone for diagnosing OSA have been developed in the past two decades. These devices are called portable monitors (PMs) and enable performing sleep studies at a lower cost with shorter waiting times. It has been observed and reported that comprehensive sleep evaluation coupled with the use of PMs can fulfill the unmet need for diagnostic testing in various out-of-hospital settings in patients with suspected OSA. This article reviews the available medical literature on PMs in order to justify the utility of PMs in the diagnosis of OSA, especially in resource-poor, high-disease burden settings. The published practice parameters for the use of these devices have also been reviewed with respect to their relevance in the Indian setting. PMID:26440391

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea as an independent stroke risk factor: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Jaime; Mellado, Patricio; Tapia, Jorge; Santín, Julia

    2009-03-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disease that has emerged as a new cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, which is independent of its association to hypertension, age and other known conditions that increase CVD. The mechanisms involved in this relation are most likely induced by the periodic hypoxia/reoxygenation that characteristically occurs in OSA, which results in oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and activation of the inflammatory cascade, all of which favor atherogenesis. Numerous markers of these changes have been reported in OSA patients, including increased circulating free radicals, increased lipid peroxidation, decreased antioxidant capacity, elevation of tumor necrosis factor and interleukines, increased levels of proinflammatory nuclear transcription factor kappa B, decreased circulating nitric oxide, elevation of vascular adhesion molecules and vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, several authors have described that Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, the standard OSA therapy, reverts these abnormalities. Further research is needed in order to better clarify the complex mechanisms that underlie the relation between OSA, atherogenesis and CVD which most likely will have significant clinical impact.

  8. Chronic intermittent hypoxia activates nuclear factor-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Harly; Ye Xiaobing; Wilson, David; Htoo, Aung K.; Hendersen, Todd; Liu Shufang . E-mail: sliu@lij.edu

    2006-05-05

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms through which OSA promotes the development of cardiovascular disease are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation (CIH) is a major pathologic factor causing cardiovascular inflammation, and that CIH-induces cardiovascular inflammation and pathology by activating the NF-{kappa}B pathway. We demonstrated that exposure of mice to CIH activated NF-{kappa}B in cardiovascular tissues, and that OSA patients had markedly elevated monocyte NF-{kappa}B activity, which was significantly decreased when obstructive apneas and their resultant CIH were eliminated by nocturnal CPAP therapy. The elevated NF-{kappa}B activity induced by CIH is accompanied by and temporally correlated to the increased expression of iNOS protein, a putative and important NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene product. Thus, CIH-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation may be a molecular mechanism linking OSA and cardiovascular pathologies seen in OSA patients.

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia creates the perfect storm with calamitous consequences for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a common respiratory disorder with devastating consequences for integrative body systems. A picture is emerging to illustrate wide-ranging deleterious consequences of disordered breathing during sleep for major homeostatic control systems, with considerable interest in cardiorespiratory and autonomic morbidity underpinning the development of hypertension. The vista is bleak when one also considers the link between OSAS and a host of other maladies. Exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), resulting from repeated obstructions of the pharyngeal airway, is a hallmark feature of OSAS that appears, in animal models, to drive the development and maintenance of several key morbidities. A growing body of evidence now points to aberrant respiratory plasticity at multiple levels following exposure to CIH. Herein, we review the experimental data revealing that CIH causes: respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue; impaired motor control of the upper airway; and, discordant respiratory rhythm and pattern generation. This multifaceted conspiracy creates the perfect storm with the potential to exacerbate OSAS-serving to establish an inescapable cycle of respiratory morbidity. Several pharmacological interventions in animal models appear wholly effective in preventing the calamitous consequences of CIH and may have application as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of OSAS. PMID:26528897

  10. Impact of corticotherapy, nutrition, and sleep disorder on quality of life of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Giovanna; Nozoe, Karen T; Polesel, Daniel N; Moreira, Gustavo A; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the second most common hereditary genetic disease in humans and has elevated mortality. DMD is an X-linked, life-limiting progressive muscle-wasting disease found predominantly in boys and young men. One of the main treatments for patients with DMD is corticosteroids. However, long-term use may cause major side effects such as obesity, a reduction in vitamin D, and osteoporosis. Sleep-disordered breathing is a common condition among patients with DMD, especially obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In children, OSA is associated with obesity and a reduction of vitamin D concentration. In this article we aim to explore the interrelationship that exists between corticosteroids, obesity, OSA, and the risk of osteoporosis. Our main hypothesis is that factors such as nutrition and sleep are related to obesity and OSA, respectively. In addition, the chronic use of corticosteroids, obesity, and OSA are factors that can reduce serum levels of vitamin D, triggering osteoporosis. Thus, these factors play a key role in affecting the quality of life for patients with DMD and intervention based on these aspects may improve survival. PMID:26701140

  11. [Association between the serum level of testosterone and other comorbidities in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Bercea, Raluca; Bercea, Bogdan; Mihăescu, Traian

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone seems to play a role in the pathophysiology of OSAS but the mechanisms are not yet well defined. Research of this relationship has focused on two main assumptions: first case support the emergence of OSAS or augmentation of OSAS severity in men treated with testosterone for symptomatic hypogonadism; the second hypothesis suggest that serum testosterone deficiency is due to hypoxia and microarousals generated by OSAS with direct impact on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The correlation between sleep apnea and androgenic disorders should be considered in the light of the intervention of many other factors which can act as confounding factors: age, obesity and other associated pathologies (chronic lung disease, smoking status). Many studies conducted so far on this interrelation (sleep apnea, endocrine system) have ignored these factors. In most cases CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) therapy revert low serum testosterone levels to normal levels. Depressive status and fatigue, as OSAS consequences associated with hypogonadism have been reported in the literature and may have clinically significant aspects due to summary effect, with notable improvement after CPAP therapy avoiding adverse effects of hormonal or antidepressant treatment. The clinical implications and major consequences of association between androgen dysfunction and sleep apnea syndrome require a correct management in the recognition and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome associated with comorbidities.

  12. Sleep and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, David A; Harding, Susan M

    2010-08-01

    Ambulatory BP studies indicate that even small increases in BP, particularly nighttime BP levels, are associated with significant increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, sleep-related diseases that induce increases in BP would be anticipated to substantially affect cardiovascular risk. Both sleep deprivation and insomnia have been linked to increases in incidence and prevalence of hypertension. Likewise, sleep disruption attributable to restless legs syndrome increases the likelihood of having hypertension. Observational studies demonstrate a strong correlation between the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the risk and severity of hypertension, whereas prospective studies of patients with OSA demonstrate a positive relationship between OSA and risk of incident hypertension. Intervention trials with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) indicate a modest, but inconsistent effect on BP in patients with severe OSA and a greater likelihood of benefit in patients with most CPAP adherence. Additional prospective studies are needed to reconcile observational studies suggesting that OSA is a strong risk factor for hypertension with the modest antihypertensive effects of CPAP observed in intervention studies.

  13. Dynamic Drug-Induced Sleep Computed Tomography in Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lo, Yu-Lun; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Surgical success for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) depends on identifying sites of obstruction in the upper airway. In this study, we investigated sites of obstruction by evaluating dynamic changes in the upper airway using drug-induced sleep computed tomography (DI-SCT) in patients with OSA. Thirty-five adult patients with OSA were prospectively enrolled. Sleep was induced with propofol under light sedation (bispectral index 70–75), and low-dose 320-detector row CT was performed for 10 seconds over a span of 2–3 respiratory cycles with supporting a continuous positive airway pressure model. Most (89%) of the patients had multi-level obstructions. Total obstruction most commonly occurred in the velum (86%), followed by the tongue (57%), oropharyngeal lateral wall (49%), and epiglottis (26%). There were two types of anterior-posterior obstruction of the soft palate, uvular (94%) and velar (6%), and three types of tongue obstruction, upper (30%), lower (37%), and upper plus lower obstruction (33%). DI-SCT is a fast and safe tool to identify simulated sleep airway obstruction in patients with OSA. It provides data on dynamic airway movement in the sagittal view which can be used to differentiate palate and tongue obstructions, and this can be helpful when planning surgery for patients with OSA. PMID:27762308

  14. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    PubMed

    Garvey, John F; McNicholas, Walter T

    2010-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management. PMID:20308751

  15. Continuous positive airway pressure increases heart rate variability in heart failure patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Matthew P; Floras, John S; Usui, Kengo; Kaneko, Yasuyuki; Leung, Richard S T; Bradley, T Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Patients with heart failure or OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea) have reduced HF-HRV (high-frequency heart rate variability), indicating reduced cardiac vagal modulation, a marker of poor prognosis. CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) abolishes OSA in patients with heart failure, but effects on daytime HF-HRV have not been determined. We hypothesized that, in patients with heart failure, treatment of coexisting OSA by CPAP would increase morning HF-HRV. In 19 patients with heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction <45%) and OSA (>/=20 apnoeas and hypopnoeas/h of sleep), HF-HRV was quantified before and 1 month after randomization to a control or CPAP-treated group. In the control group (n=7), there were no changes in HF-HRV over the 1 month study during wakefulness in the morning. In the CPAP-treated group (n=12) HF-HRV increased significantly during wakefulness in the morning [from 2.43+/-0.55 to 2.82+/-0.50 log(ms(2)/Hz); P=0.002] due to an increase in transfer function between changes in lung volume and changes in HF-HRV (92.37+/-96.03 to 219.07+/-177.14 ms/l; P=0.01). In conclusion, treatment of coexisting OSA by nocturnal CPAP in patients with heart failure increases HF-HRV during morning wakefulness, indicating improved vagal modulation of heart rate. This may contribute to improved prognosis.

  16. Laboratory investigation of oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation under different mixing conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Khelifa, Ali; Zhao, Chaocheng; Zhao, Dongfeng; Wang, Zhendi

    2014-03-01

    Oil-suspended particulate matter aggregation (OSA) has been recognized by the oil spill remediation community to effectively enhance the cleansing of spilled oil in the marine environment. While studies have investigated the application of mineral fines as an effective method to facilitate oil dispersion, decision-makers still lack information on the role of mixing energy in OSA formation and its significance to oil dispersion in real spills. This work studied the effect of level and duration of mixing energy on OSA formation using the standard reference material 1,941 b and Arabian light crude oil. The results showed that dispersed small oil droplets increased with an increase of both the level and duration of mixing energy to form multi-droplet OSAs. The sizes of the dispersed droplets varied between 5 and 10 μm under different conditions studied. The maximum oil trapping efficiency increased from 23% to 33%, the oil to sediment ratio increased from 0.30 to 0.43 g oil/g sediment, and the required shaking time decreased from 2.3 to 1.1h as the shaking rate increased from 2.0 to 2.3 Hz. Based on the size measurement results, a breakage effect on the formed OSAs and sediment flocs was confirmed under high mixing energy level.

  17. Chlorhexidine markedly potentiates the oxidants scavenging abilities of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, I; Koren, E; Feuerstein, O; Zogakis, I P; Shalish, M; Gorelik, S

    2015-10-01

    The oxidant scavenging ability (OSA) of catalase-rich Candida albicans is markedly enhanced by chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), polymyxin B, the bile salt ursodeoxycholate and by lysophosphatidylcholine, which all act as detergents facilitating the penetration of oxidants and their intracellular decomposition. Quantifications of the OSA of Candida albicans were measured by a highly sensitive luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay and by the Thurman's assay, to quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The OSA enhancing activity by CHX depends to some extent on the media on which candida grew. The OSA of candida treated by CHX was modulated by whole human saliva, red blood cells, lysozyme, cationic peptides and by polyphenols. Concentrations of CHX, which killed over 95 % of Candida albicans cells, did not affect the cells' abilities to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). The OSA of Candida cells treated by CHX is highly refractory to H2O2 (50 mM) but is strongly inhibited by hypochlorous acid, lecithin, trypan blue and by heparin. We speculate that similarly to catalase-rich red blood cells, Candida albicans and additional catalase-rich microbiota may also have the ability to scavenge oxidants and thus can protect catalase-negative anaerobes and facultative anaerobes cariogenic streptococci against peroxide and thus secure their survival in the oral cavity.

  18. Cephalometric analysis and long-term outcomes of orthognathic surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Ubaldo, E D; Greenlee, G M; Moore, J; Sommers, E; Bollen, A-M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe skeletal and posterior airway changes after orthodontic treatment and surgical jaw advancement, and to evaluate whether there is a correlation between increasing advancement and a long-term reduction in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Lateral cephalograms and polysomnography (apnoea-hypopnoea index, AHI) were collected from patients treated with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) or maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) in combination with orthodontics. Patients completed a questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) to assess long-term outcomes. Descriptive statistics for cephalometric measurements and linear regression were performed to find estimates of the final OSA (AHI and ESS) as a function of mandibular advancement. Forty-three patients with surgical advancement of the maxilla (5.2mm) and mandible (8.3mm) had a 4-mm increase in posterior airway. Thirty-three patients completed the long-term survey (6.3±2.6 years after treatment); 91% reported a reduction of OSA and were pleased with their facial appearance. The maxillomandibular and posterior airway increased. There was no evidence of a linear relationship between greater amounts of mandibular advancement and improvement of OSA. Patients with less than 10mm advancement had successful objective short-term and subjective long-term OSA reduction. PMID:25703596

  19. Chemoreflexes, Sleep Apnea, and Sympathetic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Mansukhani, Meghna P.; Kara, Tomas; Caples, Sean; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension are closely linked conditions. Disordered breathing events in OSA are characterized by increasing efforts against an occluded airway whilst asleep, resulting in a marked sympathetic response. This is predominantly due to hypoxemia activating the chemoreflexes, resulting in reflex increases in sympathetic neural outflow. In addition, apnea, and the consequent lack of inhibition of the sympathetic system that occurs with lung inflation during normal breathing, potentiates central sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic activation persists into the daytime, and is thought to contribute to hypertension and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This review discusses chemoreflex physiology and sympathetic modulation during normal sleep, as well as the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, its extension into wakefulness, and changes after treatment. Evidence supporting the role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, including in the context of co-morbid obesity, metabolic syndrome and systemic hypertension is reviewed. Finally, alterations in cardiovascular variability and other potential mechanisms that might play a role in the autonomic imbalance seen in OSA are also discussed. PMID:25097113

  20. Tongue Protrusion Strength in Arousal State Is Predictive of the Airway Patency in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Kanezaki, Masashi; Ogawa, Teruhiro; Izumi, Tadafumi

    2015-01-01

    Contraction of the genioglossus affects either tongue protrusion strength or dilating forces of the upper airway. The upper airway in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is thought to collapse during sleep, at least in part because of a sleep related reduction in genioglossus muscle activity. Thus, although tongue protrusion strength by genioglossus activity during sleep contributes to the maintenance of airway patency in patients with