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Sample records for oscillator strengths

  1. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The present calculation, in a close-coupled approximation for the energy range up to 1,000,000 K, yields collision strengths for the electron impact excitation of S III from the ground 3p2 3P state to the excited states 3s3p3 3D0, 3P0, 3S0, 3d 3D0, 3P0, and 4s 3P0. Also obtained are those transitions' oscillator strengths, and strengths for others involving 3p2 1D and 1S. Configuration-interaction target wave functions yielding oscillator strengths that are accurate to 20 percent are used in collision strength calculations.

  2. Oscillator strengths and collision strengths for S v

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyngaarden, W. L.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the optical extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the Jupiter planetary system during the Voyager space mission revealed bright emission lines of some sulfur ions. The spectra of the torus at the orbit of Io are likely to contain S V lines. The described investigation provides oscillator strengths and collision strengths for the first four UV lines. The collision strengths from the ground state to four other excited states are also obtained. Use is made of a two-state calculation which is checked for convergence for some transitions by employing a three-state or a four-state approximation. Target wave functions for S V are calculated so that the oscillator strengths calculated in dipole length and dipole velocity approximations agree within 5%.

  3. Observationally determined Fe II oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. M.; van Steenberg, M.; Seab, C. G.

    1983-08-01

    Absorption oscillator strengths for 21 Fe II resonance lines, have been determined using a curve-of-growth analysis of interstellar data from the Copernicus and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellites. In addition to slight changes in strengths of the far-UV lines, new f-values are reported for wavelength 1608.45, a prominent line in interstellar and quasar absorption spectra, and for wavelength 2260.08, a weak, newly identified linen in IUE interstellar spectra. An upper limit on the strength of the undetected line at 2366.867 A (UV multiplet 2) is set. Using revised oscillator strengths, Fe II column densities toward 13 OB stars are derived. The interstellar depletions, (Fe/H), relative to solar values range between factors of 10 and 120.

  4. Where Is the Electronic Oscillator Strength? Mapping Oscillator Strength across Molecular Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lianjun; Polizzi, Nicholas F; Dave, Adarsh R; Migliore, Agostino; Beratan, David N

    2016-03-24

    The effectiveness of solar energy capture and conversion materials derives from their ability to absorb light and to transform the excitation energy into energy stored in free carriers or chemical bonds. The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn (TRK) sum rule mandates that the integrated (electronic) oscillator strength of an absorber equals the total number of electrons in the structure. Typical molecular chromophores place only about 1% of their oscillator strength in the UV-vis window, so individual chromophores operate at about 1% of their theoretical limit. We explore the distribution of oscillator strength as a function of excitation energy to understand this circumstance. To this aim, we use familiar independent-electron model Hamiltonians as well as first-principles electronic structure methods. While model Hamiltonians capture the qualitative electronic spectra associated with π electron chromophores, these Hamiltonians mistakenly focus the oscillator strength in the fewest low-energy transitions. Advanced electronic structure methods, in contrast, spread the oscillator strength over a very wide excitation energy range, including transitions to Rydberg and continuum states, consistent with experiment. Our analysis rationalizes the low oscillator strength in the UV-vis spectral region in molecules, a step toward the goal of oscillator strength manipulation and focusing.

  5. Atomic Oscillator Strengths for Stellar Atmosphere Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffoni, Matthew; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2015-08-01

    In order to correctly model stellar atmospheres, fundamental atomic data must be available to describe atomic lines observed in their spectra. Accurate, laboratory-measured oscillator strengths (f-values) for Fe peak elements in neutral or low-ionisation states are particularly important for determining chemical abundances.However, advances in astronomical spectroscopy in recent decades have outpaced those in laboratory astrophysics, with the latter frequently being overlooked at the planning stages of new projects. As a result, numerous big-budget astronomy projects have been, and continue to be hindered by a lack of suitable, accurately-measured reference data to permit the analysis of expensive astronomical spectra; a problem only likely to worsen in the coming decades as spectrographs at new facilities increasingly move to infrared wavelengths.At Imperial College London - and in collaboration with NIST, Wisconsin University and Lund University - we have been working with the astronomy community in an effort to provide new accurately-measured f-values for a range of projects. In particular, we have been working closely with the Gaia-ESO (GES) and SDSS-III/APOGEE surveys, both of which have discovered that many lines that would make ideal candidates for inclusion in their analyses have poorly defined f-values, or are simply absent from the database. Using high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy (R ~ 2,000,000) to provide atomic branching fractions, and combining these with level lifetimes measured with laser induced fluorescence, we have provided new laboratory-measured f-values for a range of Fe-peak elements, most recently including Fe I, Fe II, and V I. For strong, unblended lines, uncertainties are as low as ±0.02 dex.In this presentation, I will describe how experimental f-values are obtained in the laboratory and present our recent work for GES and APOGEE. In particular, I will also discuss the strengths and limitations of current laboratory

  6. Pulse-coupled BZ oscillators with unequal coupling strengths.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Viktor; Kutner, Daniel J; Chavis, John T; Epstein, Irving R

    2015-02-14

    Coupled chemical oscillators are usually studied with symmetric coupling, either between identical oscillators or between oscillators whose frequencies differ. Asymmetric connectivity is important in neuroscience, where synaptic strength inequality in neural networks commonly occurs. While the properties of the individual oscillators in some coupled chemical systems may be readily changed, enforcing inequality between the connection strengths in a reciprocal coupling is more challenging. We recently demonstrated a novel way of coupling chemical oscillators, which allows for manipulation of individual connection strengths. Here we study two identical, pulse-coupled Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillators with unequal connection strengths. When the pulse perturbations contain KBr (inhibitor), this system exhibits simple out-of-phase and complex oscillations, oscillatory-suppressed states as well as temporally periodic patterns (N : M) in which the two oscillators exhibit different numbers of peaks per cycle. The N : M patterns emerge due to the long-term effect of the inhibitory pulse-perturbations, a feature that has not been considered in earlier works. Time delay was previously shown to have a profound effect on the system's behaviour when pulse coupling was inhibitory and the coupling strengths were equal. When the coupling is asymmetric, however, delay produces no qualitative change in behaviour, though the 1 : 2 temporal pattern becomes more robust. Asymmetry in instantaneous excitatory coupling via AgNO3 injection produces a previously unseen temporal pattern (1 : N patterns starting with a double peak) with time delay and high [AgNO3]. Numerical simulations of the behaviour agree well with theoretical predictions in asymmetrical pulse-coupled systems.

  7. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  8. Oscillator strengths for ionized iron and manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Pottasch, S. R.; Morton, D. C.; York, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The observed strengths of interstellar absorption lines of Fe II and Mn II in the spectra of alpha Vir, beta Cen, pi Sco, and zeta Oph along with laboratory f values of some of these lines between 2343 and 2606 A have been used to determine curves of growth for these ions and the f-values of ten lines of Fe II and three lines of Mn II between 1055 and 1261 A. The Fe and Mn abundances are derived.

  9. Measurement of Atomic Oscillator Strength Distribution from the Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, M.; Baig, M. A.

    2008-10-22

    Saturation technique has been employed to measure the oscillator strength distribution in spectra of helium lithium using an electrical discharge cell a thermionic diode ion detector respectively. The photoabsorption cross sections in the discrete or bound region (commonly known as f-values) have been determined form the Rydberg series accessed from a particular excited state calibrating it with the absolute value of the photoionization cross section measured at the ionization threshold. The extracted discrete f-values merge into the oscillator strength densities, estimated from the measured photoionization cross sections at different photon energies above the first ionization threshold. The experimental data on helium and lithium show continuity between the discrete and the continuous oscillator strengths across the ionization threshold.

  10. PREFACE: Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9) Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths (ASOS9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy by Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and Physics Department of Lund University, 7-10 August 2007, and was attended by 99 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume of Physica Scripta contains contributions from the invited presentations of the conference. For the first time, papers from the ASOS9 poster presentations have been made feely available online in a complementary volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more evident, and together they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy, where both the providers and the users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, which includes fusion energy and lighting research. The oral presentations, all but one of which are presented in this volume, provided an extensive synopsis of techniques currently in use and those that are being planned. New to ASOS9 was the extent to which techniques such as cold, trapped atoms and molecules and frequency combs are

  11. Determining the Strength of an Electromagnet through Damped Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a project designed to extend sixth-form pupils looking to further their knowledge and skill base in physics. This project involves a quantitative analysis of the decaying amplitude of a metal plate oscillating in a strong magnetic field; the decay of the amplitude is used to make estimates of the strength of the magnetic…

  12. Weighted oscillator strengths for the Xe IV spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Raineri, M. Lagorio, C.; Padilla, S.; Gallardo, M.; Reyna Almandos, J.

    2008-01-15

    The weighted oscillator strengths, gf, of 769 previously reported classified spectral lines, and 49 new observed and also classified lines belonging to the 5s{sup 2}5p{sup 3}, 5s5p{sup 4}, 5s{sup 2}5p{sup 2}(6p + 4f), and 5s{sup 2}5p{sup 2}(5d + 6s) transitions array in Xe IV, were determined through a multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock relativistic approach. In this calculation, the electrostatic parameters were optimized by a least-square procedure in order to improve the adjustment to experimental energy levels.

  13. Accurate oscillator strengths for interstellar ultraviolet lines of Cl I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schectman, R. M.; Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Ellis, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses on the abundance of interstellar chlorine rely on accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet transitions. Beam-foil spectroscopy was used to obtain f-values for the astrophysically important lines of Cl I at 1088, 1097, and 1347 A. In addition, the line at 1363 A was studied. Our f-values for 1088, 1097 A represent the first laboratory measurements for these lines; the values are f(1088)=0.081 +/- 0.007 (1 sigma) and f(1097) = 0.0088 +/- 0.0013 (1 sigma). These results resolve the issue regarding the relative strengths for 1088, 1097 A in favor of those suggested by astronomical measurements. For the other lines, our results of f(1347) = 0.153 +/- 0.011 (1 sigma) and f(1363) = 0.055 +/- 0.004 (1 sigma) are the most precisely measured values available. The f-values are somewhat greater than previous experimental and theoretical determinations.

  14. Oscillator Strength Determinations of Diatomic Molecular Transitions of Astrophysical Interest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Glenn

    Lifetimes of six individual rotational levels in the (nu) = 0 vibrational level of the d('3)(PI)(,g) state of C(,2) were measured by monitoring the fluorescent decay after pulsed laser excitation. A value of 92 (+OR -) 5 nanoseconds was obtained, 25% lower than previous measurements. The corresponding oscillator strength for the Swan (0-0) band is f(,0,0) = 0.032 (+OR-) 0.002, in agreement with recent theoretical work. Attempts were made to measure the oscillator strengths of transitions in the C(,2)D('1)(SIGMA)(,u)('+) - X('1)(SIGMA)(,g)('+) Mulliken system. Absorption measurements were unsuccessful, primarily due to low number densities in the C(,2) absorption cell (a high temperature King-type furnace) and to the inadequacies of continuum radiation sources in the 230 nm region. The Mulliken system was photographed in emission from a vacuum carbon arc. A rotational analysis of the 0-0, 1-1, and 2-2 bands yielded improved molecular constants for the D('1)(SIGMA)(,u)('+) state. The radiative lifetime of a single rotational level in the (nu) = 0 vibrational level of the B('2)(SIGMA)('+) state of the CN molecule was determined by observation of fluorescent decay following pulsed laser excitation. A value of 62 (+OR-) 6 nanoseconds was obtained, consistent with previous experimental determinations.

  15. Photoionization cross sections and oscillator strengths of neutral cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali; Nawaz, M.

    2012-11-01

    The absolute photoionization cross sections from the 6p 2P1/2 excited state of cesium at threshold and above the threshold region have been measured using the saturation absorption technique. The photoionization cross section at the ionization threshold is determined as 22.6±3.6 Mb, whereas in the region above threshold its value ranges from 22 to 20 Mb for photoelectron energies up to 0.1 eV. A comparison of the photoionization cross sections with earlier reported theoretical and experimental data have been presented and are in good agreement within the uncertainty. In addition, the oscillator strengths of the 6p 2P1/2→n d 2D3/2 (21≤n≤60) Rydberg transitions of cesium have been calibrated using the threshold value of the photoionization cross section. A complete picture of the oscillator strengths from the present work and previously reported data from n=5-60 is presented.

  16. B-spline calculations of oscillator strengths in noble gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2006-05-01

    The B-spline box-based close-coupling method [1] was applied for extensive calculations of the transition probabilities in the noble gases Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe for energy levels up to n = 12. An individually optimized, term-dependent set of non-orthogonal one-electron radial functions was used to account for the strong term dependence in the valence orbitals. The core-valence correlation was introduced through multi-channel expansions, which include the ns^2np^5, nsnp^6 and ns^2np^4(n+1)l target states. The inner-core correlation was accounted for by employing multi-configuration target states. Energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions from the np^6 ground-state configuration as well as transitions between excited states were computed in the Breit-Pauli approximation. The inner-core correlation was found to be very important for most of the transitions considered. The good agreement with the available experimental data shows that the B-spline method can be used for accurate calculations of oscillator strengths for states with intermediate n-values, i.e. exactly the region where it is difficult to apply standard MCHF methods. At the same time the accuracy for the low-lying states is close to the accuracy obtained in large-scale MCHF calculations [2]. [1] O. Zatsarinny and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 35, 4669 (2002). [2] A. Irimia and C. Froese Fischer, J. Phys. B 37, 1659 (2004).

  17. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  18. Oscillator strengths of selected resonance transitions in neutral sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beideck, D. J.; Schectman, R. M.; Federman, S. R.; Ellis, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    Mean lives and branching ratios for the 4s (3)S(sup 0 sub 1) and 4s(double prime) (3)P(sup 0 sub 1, 2) levels of neutral sulfur were determined at the Toledo Heavy Ion Accelerator using beam-foil spectroscopic techniques. The mean lives obtained for the 4s (3)S(sup 0 sub 1) 4s(double prime) (3)P(sup 0 sub 1), and (3)P(sup 0 sub 2) levels, 1.875 +/- 0.094 ns, 2.034 +/- 0.102 ns, and 2.146 +/- 0.129 ns, respectively, represent the most accurate results available to date. Oscillator strengths for the transitions 3p(sup 4)(3)P(sub 2, 1, 0)-4s (3)S(sup 0 sub 1) and 3p(sup 4)(3)P(sub 2, 1, 0)-4s(double prime) (3)P(sup 0 sub 1, 2) were derived from these mean lives together with the measured branching ratios. For comparison with published results which present only multiplet f-values, such f-values were computed from the measured individual line oscillator strengths. The value obtained for the 3p(sup 4)(3)P-4s(sup 3)S(sup 0) multiplet at 1814 A is 0.088 +/- 0.005, in good agreement with the mean of previous experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. With the mean life for the 4s(double prime) 3P(sup 0 sub 0) level set equal to the mean of our determination for the other two 4s(double prime) (3)P(sup 0) levels (a valid assumption for LS coupling conditions, and consistent with the observed equality of the mean lives within the accuracy of our measurement), an oscillator strength for the 1299 A multiplet of 0.121 +/- 0.004 was found. Both results are in good agreement with recent large-scale theoretical calculations that incorporate the effects of configuration interaction.

  19. Oscillator Strengths of Allowed and Intercombination Transitions in Neutral Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of electric-dipole allowed and intercombination transitions from fine-structure levels of the ground 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 4) configuration to the levels belonging to configurations 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)4s, 3s(sup 2) 3p(sup 3)5s, 3(sup 2)3p(sup 3)3d, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)4d of neutral sulfur. Extensive configuration-interaction wave functions are used to represent these levels. The relativistic corrections have been included through the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The results are compared with previous theoretical calculations and with measurements.

  20. Relative Band Oscillator Strengths for Carbon Monoxide: Alpha (1)Pi-Chi (1)Sigma(+) Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Menningen, K. L.; Lee, Wei; Stoll, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    Band oscillator strengths for CO transitions between the electronic states A (l)Pi and X(1)Sigma(+) were measured via absorption with a synchrotron radiation source. When referenced to the well-characterized (5,0) band oscillator strength, our relative values for the (7,0) to (11,0) bands are most consistent with the recent experiments of Chan et al. and the theoretical predictions of Kirby & Cooper. Since the results from various laboratory techniques and theory now agree, analyses of interstellar CO based on absorption from A-X bands are no longer hindered by uncertainties in oscillator strength.

  1. Cement oscillation increases interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, with commentary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Han, Pengfei; Gu, Wenguang; Shi, Zuowei; Li, Dabin; Wang, Changli

    2009-05-01

    Modern cementing techniques aim to improve the interlock between bone and cement and to establish a durable interface. Cement penetration is generally believed to influence interface failure, but current methods for improving the cement-bone interface are inadequate. Oscillation is the reciprocated movement of an object through its balanced position, or the quantum physics of systematic fluctuation back and forth near an average value (or trimmed value). To increase the interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, we designed a cement oscillator according to the principles of vibrational mechanics. To evaluate the effect of oscillation on the quality of interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, we randomly divided 156 femoral bones of adult pigs into 2 groups, oscillated and control, and performed mechanical tests to assess interlock strength at the cement-bone interface. The filling effect of bone cement was observed and analyzed under a stereomicroscope, and then each oscillated femur was compared with a control femur. The interlock strength at the cement-bone interface in the oscillated group was significantly greater than in the control group (P<.05), and the filling effect in the oscillated group was also better than that in the control group (P<.05). Our findings show that oscillation of bone cement significantly increases interlock strength at the cement-bone interface, point the way for clinicians to develop a high-performance and pragmatic fixation technique for prostheses to increase interlock strength, and will be of considerable practical importance in helping to prevent aseptic loosening of cemented prostheses.

  2. Core excitation effects on oscillator strengths for transitions in four electron atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. N.; Luo, Yuxiang

    2007-06-01

    By including explicitly the electronic configurations with two and three simultaneously excited electronic orbital, we have extended the BSCI (B-spline based configuration interaction) method [1] to estimate directly the effect of inner shell core excitation to oscillator strengths for transitions in four-electron atomic systems. We will present explicitly the change in oscillator strengths due to core excitations, especially for transitions involving doubly excited states and those with very small oscillator strengths. The length and velocity results are typically in agreement better than 1% or less. [1] Tu-nan Chang, in Many-body Theory of Atomic Structure and Photoionization, edited by T. N. Chang (World Scientific, Singapore, 1993), p. 213-47; and T. N. Chang and T. K. Fang, Elsevier Radiation Physics and Chemistry 70, 173-190 (2004).

  3. Cesium oscillator strengths measured with a multiple-path-length absorption cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption-oscillator-strength measurements for the principal series in cesium were measured using a multiple-path-length cell. The optical arrangement included a movable transverse path for checking the uniformity of the alkali density along the length of the cell and which also allowed strength measurements to be made simultaneously on both strong and weak lines. The strengths measured on the first 10 doublets indicate an increasing trend in the doublet ratio. The individual line strengths are in close agreement with the high resolution measurements of Pichler (1974) and with the calculations of Norcross (1973).

  4. Level Energies, Oscillator Strengths and Lifetimes for Transitions in Pb IV

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Zanon, A.; Albeniz, J.

    2008-10-22

    Oscillator strengths for several lines of astrophysical interest arising from some configurations and some levels radiative lifetimes of Pb IV have been calculated. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. Transition Probabilities and oscillator strengths obtained, although in general agreement with the rare experimental data, do present some noticeable discrepancies that are studied in the text.

  5. Oscillator Strengths and Predissociation Widths for Rydberg Transitions in Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, Steven R.; Sheffer, Y.; Eidelsberg, Michele; Lemaire, Jean-Louis; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Rostas, Francois; Ruiz, J.

    2006-01-01

    CO is used as a probe of astronomical environments ranging from planetary atmospheres and comets to interstellar clouds and the envelopes surrounding stars near the end of their lives. One of the processes controlling the CO abundance and the ratio of its isotopomers is photodissociation. Accurate oscillator strengths for Rydberg transitions are needed for modeling this process. Absorption bands were analyzed by synthesizing the profiles with codes developed independently in Meudon and Toledo. Each synthetic spectrum was adjusted to match the experimental one in a non-linear least-squares fitting procedure with the band oscillator strength, the line width (instrumental and predissociation.

  6. Observationally determined Fe II oscillator strengths. [interstellar and quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Steenberg, M.; Shull, J. M.; Seab, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    Absorption oscillator strengths for 21 Fe II resonance lines, have been determined using a curve-of-growth analysis of interstellar data from the Copernicus and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellites. In addition to slight changes in strengths of the far-UV lines, new f-values are reported for wavelength 1608.45, a prominent line in interstellar and quasar absorption spectra, and for wavelength 2260.08, a weak, newly identified linen in IUE interstellar spectra. An upper limit on the strength of the undetected line at 2366.867 A (UV multiplet 2) is set. Using revised oscillator strengths, Fe II column densities toward 13 OB stars are derived. The interstellar depletions, (Fe/H), relative to solar values range between factors of 10 and 120.

  7. Assessment of the Accuracy of the Bethe-Salpeter (BSE/GW) Oscillator Strengths.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Duchemin, Ivan; Blondel, Aymeric; Blase, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Aiming to assess the accuracy of the oscillator strengths determined at the BSE/GW level, we performed benchmark calculations using three complementary sets of molecules. In the first, we considered ∼80 states in Thiel's set of compounds and compared the BSE/GW oscillator strengths to recently determined ADC(3/2) and CC3 reference values. The second set includes the oscillator strengths of the low-lying states of 80 medium to large dyes for which we have determined CC2/aug-cc-pVTZ values. The third set contains 30 anthraquinones for which experimental oscillator strengths are available. We find that BSE/GW accurately reproduces the trends for all series with excellent correlation coefficients to the benchmark data and generally very small errors. Indeed, for Thiel's sets, the BSE/GW values are more accurate (using CC3 references) than both CC2 and ADC(3/2) values on both absolute and relative scales. For all three sets, BSE/GW errors also tend to be nicely spread with almost equal numbers of positive and negative deviations as compared to reference values.

  8. Generalized oscillator strengths for some higher valence-shell excitations of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yuan, Hui; Jiang, Wei-Chun; Zhang, Fang-Xin; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Cheng, Hua-Dong; Xu, Ke-Zun

    2007-03-15

    The valence shell excitations of argon were investigated by an angle-resolved fast-electron energy-loss spectrometer at an incident electron energy of 2500 eV, and the transition multipolarities for the excitations of 3p{yields}3d, 4d, 5s, and 5p were elucidated with the help of the calculated intermediate coupling coefficients using the COWAN code. The generalized oscillator strengths for the excitations to 3p{sup 5}(3d,3d{sup '}), 3p{sup 5}(5p,5p{sup '}), and 3p{sup 5}(5s,4d) were measured, and the profiles of these generalized oscillator strength were analyzed. Furthermore, although the present experimental positions of the maxima for the electric-monopole and electric-quadrupole excitations in 3p{yields}5p are in agreement with the theoretical calculations [Amusia et al., Phys. Rev. A 67, 022703 (2003)], the generalized oscillator strength profiles show obvious differences. In addition, the experimental generalized oscillator strength ratios for the electric-octupole transitions in 3p{yields}3d are different from the theoretical prediction calculated by the COWAN code.

  9. Oscillator strengths for Y I and Y II and the solar abundance of yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hannaford, P.; Lowe, R.M.; Grevesse, N.; Biemont, E.; Whaling, W.

    1982-10-15

    Oscillator strengths have been determined from measurements of radiative lifetimes and branching ratios for 154 lines of Y I and 66 lines of Y II. These data are used, together with equivalent widths measured on the Jungfraujoch solar atlas, to perform a new determination of the solar abundance of yttrium: A/sub Y/ = 2.24 +- 0.03.

  10. Experimental branching fractions, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths in Eu I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shuang; Wang, Qian; Shang, Xue; Tian, Yanshan; Dai, Zhenwen

    2014-11-01

    Branching fractions (BFs) of 64 spectral lines for 27 levels in Eu I were measured by the emission spectrum of a hollow cathode lamp (HCL). The transition probabilities and oscillator strengths of these lines were determined by using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique to combine the BFs with experimental radiative lifetimes of the relative levels reported in the literature.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths (Rauch+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Biemont, E.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-08-01

    Calculated HFR oscillator strengths (log gf) and transition probabilities (gA, in 1/s) in Ge V (table2.dat) and Ge VI (table4.dat). CF is the cancellation factor as defined by Cowan (1981, 1981tass.book.....C). In columns 3 and 6, e is written for even and o for odd. (2 data files).

  12. Assessment of the Accuracy of the Bethe-Salpeter (BSE/GW) Oscillator Strengths.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Duchemin, Ivan; Blondel, Aymeric; Blase, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Aiming to assess the accuracy of the oscillator strengths determined at the BSE/GW level, we performed benchmark calculations using three complementary sets of molecules. In the first, we considered ∼80 states in Thiel's set of compounds and compared the BSE/GW oscillator strengths to recently determined ADC(3/2) and CC3 reference values. The second set includes the oscillator strengths of the low-lying states of 80 medium to large dyes for which we have determined CC2/aug-cc-pVTZ values. The third set contains 30 anthraquinones for which experimental oscillator strengths are available. We find that BSE/GW accurately reproduces the trends for all series with excellent correlation coefficients to the benchmark data and generally very small errors. Indeed, for Thiel's sets, the BSE/GW values are more accurate (using CC3 references) than both CC2 and ADC(3/2) values on both absolute and relative scales. For all three sets, BSE/GW errors also tend to be nicely spread with almost equal numbers of positive and negative deviations as compared to reference values. PMID:27403612

  13. Ultrafast zero balance of the oscillator-strength sum rule in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeseok; Lim, Seong Chu; Chae, Seung Jin; Maeng, Inhee; Choi, Younghwan; Cha, Soonyoung; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Hyunyong

    2013-01-01

    Oscillator-strength sum rule in light-induced transitions is one general form of quantum-mechanical identities. Although this sum rule is well established in equilibrium photo-physics, an experimental corroboration for the validation of the sum rule in a nonequilibrium regime has been a long-standing unexplored question. The simple band structure of graphene is an ideal system for investigating this question due to the linear Dirac-like energy dispersion. Here, we employed both ultrafast terahertz and optical spectroscopy to directly monitor the transient oscillator-strength balancing between quasi-free low-energy oscillators and high-energy Fermi-edge ones. Upon photo-excitation of hot Dirac fermions, we observed that the ultrafast depletion of high-energy oscillators precisely complements the increased terahertz absorption oscillators. Our results may provide an experimental priori to understand, for example, the intrinsic free-carrier dynamics to the high-energy photo-excitation, responsible for optoelectronic operation such as graphene-based phototransistor or solar-energy harvesting devices. PMID:24036567

  14. Ionic strength and pH as control parameters for spontaneous surface oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Pimienta, V; Tadmouri, R; Miller, R; Vollhardt, D

    2012-05-01

    A system far from equilibrium, where the surfactant transfer from a small drop located in the aqueous bulk to the air-water interface results in spontaneous nonlinear oscillations of surface tension, is theoretically and experimentally considered. The oscillations in this system are the result of periodically arising and terminating Marangoni instability. The surfactant under consideration is octanoic acid, the dissociated form of which is much less surface-active than the protonated form. Numerical simulations show how the system behavior can be controlled by changes in pH and ionic strength of the aqueous phase. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. The Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths of the Alkalis and Alkaline Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekki, Mohammed Ali

    Lifetimes, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths were calculated ab initio for Strontium and Magnesium using a combination of the R-matrix Method and the Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT). The values of lifetimes and transition probabilities were then compared with other calculations and with experimental measurements and the agreement with both is very good. We have also modified the calculation to study transitions from relatively high initial states and we also correlate our results for Sr and Mg. We have also used the Coulomb Approximation Method with Model Potential (CAMP) to calculate the lifetimes and oscillator strengths in the Li sequence and the results were compared with the literature. We also report on our efforts to calculate the mixing coefficients in Be by the ab initio MQDT and the semiempirical MQDT. Finally, we present our conclusions about our data and about the method of calculation and the possible future work that will complement this effort.

  16. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions in Sn ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard; Federman, Steven; Ellis, David; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry

    2016-05-01

    In order to understand the atomic structure for atomic ions, experimental lifetimes are necessary to confirm theoretical predictions. Also, interpreting astronomical observations of atomic ions requires knowledge of their oscillator strengths and transition rates. We present the results of lifetime measurements taken with the Toledo Heavy-Ion Accelerator using beam-foil techniques on levels of interest in Sn ii producing lines at 1811.2 Å and 1699.4 Å (5 s 5p2 2D5 / 2 and 5 s 5p2 2D3 / 2 , respectively). Oscillator strengths are derived from the lifetimes, and our experimental results will be compared with our MCDHF calculations using the development version of the GRASP2K package as well as the latest calculations done by others. This work was supported by Grant HST-AR-12123.001-A from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  17. Accurate Calculation of Oscillator Strengths for CI II Lines Using Non-orthogonal Wavefunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    Non-orthogonal orbitals technique in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for allowed and intercombination lines in Cl II. The relativistic corrections are included through the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The Cl II wave functions show strong term dependence. The non-orthogonal orbitals are used to describe the term dependence of radial functions. Large sets of spectroscopic and correlation functions are chosen to describe adequately strong interactions in the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)nl (sup 3)Po, (sup 1)Po and (sup 3)Do Rydberg series and to properly account for the important correlation and relaxation effects. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strength show good agreement for most transitions. The calculated radiative lifetime for the 3s3p(sup 5) (sup 3)Po state is in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet lines of Ar I - Implications for interstellar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Schectman, R. M.; York, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of absorption from interstellar Ar I in lightly reddened lines of sight provides information on the warm and hot components of the interstellar medium near the sun. The details of the analysis are limited by the quality of the atomic data. Accurate oscillator strengths for the Ar I lines at 1048 and 1067 A and the astrophysical implications are presented. From lifetimes measured with beam-foil spectroscopy, an f-value for 1048 A of 0.257 +/- 0.013 is obtained. Through the use of a semiempirical formalism for treating singlet-triplet mixing, an oscillator strength of 0.064 +/- 0.003 is derived for 1067 A. Because of the accuracy of the results, the conclusions of York and colleagues from spectra taken with the Copernicus satellite are strengthened. In particular, for interstellar gas in the solar neighborhood, argon has a solar abundance, and the warm, neutral material is not pervasive.

  19. Oscillator strengths of neutral yttrium (Y I) from hook-method measurements in a furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, B.L.; Parkinson, W.H.; Tomkins, F.S.

    1980-11-01

    Relative oscillator strengths for 33 neutral yttrium (Y I) transitions between 2723 and 4761 A have been measured by the hook method. The data have been analyzed and placed on an absolute scale by using a numerical procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling and the published absolute lifetimes of Beer, and Andersen, Ramanujam, and Bahr. The z/sup 2/F/sup 0//sub 5/2/ level lifetime of Beer is found to be in error. The absolute lifetime of the level y/sup 2/P/sup 0//sub 3/2/ is determined to be 36 +- 4 ns. The total uncertainties in the absolute oscillator strengths are between 9% and 14%.

  20. Radiative lifetimes, branching fractions, transition probabilities and oscillator strengths of some levels for neutral yttrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xue; Wang, Qian; Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2015-04-01

    The radiative lifetime measurements using the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique are reported for 34 levels of Y I between 27 824.50 and 50 254.0 cm-1, among which 27 lifetimes are reported for the first time. The branching fraction (BF) measurements based on the emission spectrum of a hollow cathode lamp (HCL) were performed for 12 of these levels, and the results of 64 lines between 274.250 and 670.063 nm were obtained. By combining them with lifetime values, the transition probabilities and absolute oscillator strengths of these lines were determined. The lifetime and oscillator strength results are in general good agreement with the data by Hannaford et al (Hannaford et al 1982 ApJ 261 736).

  1. Calibration of oscillator-strength measurements for the principal-series transitions of potassium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.; Shirinzadeh, B.

    1983-01-01

    Oscillator-strength measurements have been calibrated against the radiative lifetime for the 4s-4p transition of potassium. This yields a value of (8.1 + or - 0.5) times 10 to the -21 sq cm for the photoionization cross section at the series limit, and implies a value for the cross-section minimum in good quantitative agreement with that calculated by Seaton (1951).

  2. Oscillator strength measurements in samarium(II), neodymium(II) and praseodymium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruohong

    A knowledge of the abundances of lanthanide ions in stellar photospheres is valuable in astrophysics, especially for chemically peculiar stars. However, the determination of elemental abundances is often limited by inadequate knowledge of oscillator strengths. Combining independently measured values of radiative lifetimes and branching fractions is an effective and precise method to measure oscillator strengths. It avoids absolute intensity measurements, requiring a knowledge of the absolute number density of particles and absolute measurements of intensity, and furthermore decreases the systematic error greatly. In the previous work of our group, the lifetimes of Sm II, Nd II and Pr II were obtained. In this thesis work, we measured the corresponding branching fractions of these lanthanide ions using a fast-ion-beam laser-induced- fluorescence technique. The power of this technique is that ions are selectively excited by a laser, which ensures that every branch comes from a single upper level and gets rid of spectral blends. Besides, the low ion-beam density ensures that the systematic errors due to collisions and radiation trapping are negligible. Combining the branching fractions with our previously measured lifetimes, we obtained 608, 430 and 260 oscillator strength values for Sm II, Nd II and Pr II transitions, respectively, over the wavelength range 350-850 nm. These transitions originate from 69 upper levels in the range 21 655 cm -1 -29 388 cm -1 for Sm II, 46 upper levels in the range 22 697 cm -1 -29 955 cm -1 for Nd II, and 32 levels in the range 22 040 cm -1 -28 577 cm -1 for Pr II. Of the 260 measured oscillator strength values of Pr II, 183 have been determined accurately for the first time. The uncertainties arise principally from systematic uncertainties of the efficiency calibration of the optical detection system (7.1%), with smaller statistical contributions (1.5%). Comparisons are made to prior measurements.

  3. Improved and Expanded Near-IR Oscillator Strengths for Ti I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael P.; Sneden, Chris; Nave, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    We report on recent work to produce an improved and expanded set of near-IR oscillator strengths for Ti I. Emission branching fractions are measured from several spectra recorded with the NIST 2-m FTS covering the region from 4000 Å to 5.5 μm. Traditionally, branching fractions are combined with level lifetimes measured using laser-induced fluorescence; however, this technique becomes problematic for near-IR oscillator strength studies. Instead, we employ thorough and robust reverse stellar analyses of the Sun and Arcturus to obtain lifetimes for new levels of interest. This work makes use of an extensive set of previously reported laboratory Ti I oscillator strengths in the visible to better understand uncertainties and check for systematic effects in the reverse stellar analyses. This method will soon be applied to other species to help address the scarcity of near-IR Fe-group atomic data and support the growing interests of the near-IR astronomical community.

  4. The International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugar, J.; Leckrone, D.

    1993-01-01

    This was the fourth in a series of colloquia begun at the University of Lund, Sweden in 1983 and subsequently held in Toledo, Ohio and Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The purpose of these meetings is to provide an international forum for communication between major users of atomic spectroscopic data and the providers of these data. These data include atomic wavelengths, line shapes, energy levels, lifetimes, and oscillator strengths. Speakers were selected from a wide variety of disciplines including astrophysics, laboratory plasma research, spectrochemistry, and theoretical and experimental atomic physics.

  5. Absolute oscillator strengths for 108 lines of Si I between 163 and 410 nanometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Griesinger, Harriet E.; Cardon, Bartley L.; Huber, Martin C. E.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of neutral silicon oscillator strengths (f-values) obtained by absorption and emission techniques have been combined using the numerical procedure of Cardon et al. (1979) to produce 108 f-values for the Si I lines between 163 and 410 nm. Beam-foil-lifetime measurements were employed to determine the absolute scale. The present measurements have uncertainties of about 0.07 dex (+ or - 16 percent) at the 1-sigma level of confidence. Good agreement is obtained between the results and previous data. The data also provide upper limits for the f-values of 22 other lines and information on the lifetimes for 36 levels in Si I.

  6. Oscillator strength of the peptide bond {pi}* resonances at all relevant x-ray absorption edges

    SciTech Connect

    Kummer, K.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Sivkov, V. N.; Nekipelov, S. V.; Maslyuk, V. V.; Mertig, I.; Blueher, A.; Mertig, M.; Bredow, T.

    2009-10-15

    Absolute x-ray absorption cross sections of a regular bacterial surface-layer protein deposited on a naturally oxidized silicon substrate were determined experimentally. Upon separation of the partial cross sections of the three relevant 1s absorption edges, the oscillator strengths of the 1s{yields}{pi}* excitations within the peptide-backbone unit were extracted. Comparison with results of first-principles calculations revealed their close correlation to the topology of {pi}{sub peptide}* orbitals of the peptide backbone.

  7. Reduced oscillator strength in the lithium atom, clusters, and the bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellert, Christoph; Schmidt, Martin; Schmitt, Christina; Haberland, Hellmut; Guet, Claude

    1999-03-01

    Absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been measured for small lithium cluster ions in the optical range and a significantly smaller oscillator strength than for sodium has been found. This reduction is reproduced in jellium type calculations only if nonlocal effects in the electron-ion interaction are included. It is shown that this reduction is an atomic property which persists throughout the cluster region and into the bulk regime, where it manifests itself as an increased effective electronic mass. The optical spectra of the closed shell clusters are in good agreement with calculations based on the nonlocal jellium model. The smallest cluster, Li+4, is well described by a quantum chemical calculation.

  8. Theoretical oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and radiative lifetimes of levels in Pb V

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, C.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Porcher, P.

    2014-01-15

    Theoretical values of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for 306 spectral lines arising from the 5d{sup 9}ns(n=7,8,9),5d{sup 9}np(n=6,7),5d{sup 9}6d, and 5d{sup 9} 5f configurations, and radiative lifetimes of 9 levels, of Pb V have been obtained. These values were obtained in intermediate coupling (IC) and using ab initio relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations including core-polarization effects. We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least squares fitting of experimental energy levels by means of computer codes from Cowan. We included in these calculations the 5d{sup 8}6s6p and 5d{sup 8}6s{sup 2} configurations. These calculations have facilitated the identification of the 214.25, 216.79, and 227.66 nm spectral lines of Pb V. In the absence of experimental results of oscillator strengths and transition probabilities, we could not make a direct comparison with our results. However, the Stark broadening parameters calculated from these values are in excellent agreement with experimental widening found in the literature. -- Highlights: •Theoretical values of transition probabilities of Pb V have been obtained. •We use for the IC calculations the standard method of least square. •The parameters calculated from these values are in agreement with the experimental values.

  9. The consequences of improperly describing oscillator strengths beyond the electric dipole approximation.

    PubMed

    Lestrange, Patrick J; Egidi, Franco; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-12-21

    The interaction between a quantum mechanical system and plane wave light is usually modeled within the electric dipole approximation. This assumes that the intensity of the incident field is constant over the length of the system and transition probabilities are described in terms of the electric dipole transition moment. For short wavelength spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption, the electric dipole approximation often breaks down. Higher order multipoles are then included to describe transition probabilities. The square of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole are often included, but this results in an origin-dependent expression for the oscillator strength. The oscillator strength can be made origin-independent if all terms through the same order in the wave vector are retained. We will show the consequences and potential pitfalls of using either of these two expressions. It is shown that the origin-dependent expression may violate the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule and the origin-independent expression can result in negative transition probabilities.

  10. The consequences of improperly describing oscillator strengths beyond the electric dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lestrange, Patrick J.; Egidi, Franco; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-12-21

    The interaction between a quantum mechanical system and plane wave light is usually modeled within the electric dipole approximation. This assumes that the intensity of the incident field is constant over the length of the system and transition probabilities are described in terms of the electric dipole transition moment. For short wavelength spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption, the electric dipole approximation often breaks down. Higher order multipoles are then included to describe transition probabilities. The square of the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole are often included, but this results in an origin-dependent expression for the oscillator strength. The oscillator strength can be made origin-independent if all terms through the same order in the wave vector are retained. We will show the consequences and potential pitfalls of using either of these two expressions. It is shown that the origin-dependent expression may violate the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule and the origin-independent expression can result in negative transition probabilities.

  11. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  12. Revisiting an old concept: the coupled oscillator model for VCD. Part 1: the generalised coupled oscillator mechanism and its intrinsic connection to the strength of VCD signals.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Valentin Paul

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the renewed interest in the coupled oscillator (CO) model for VCD, in this work a generalised coupled oscillator (GCO) expression is derived by introducing the concept of a coupled oscillator origin. Unlike the standard CO expression, the GCO expression is exact within the harmonic approximation. Using two illustrative example molecules, the theoretical concepts introduced here are demonstrated by performing a GCO decomposition of the rotational strengths computed using DFT. This analysis shows that: (1) the contributions to the rotational strengths that are normally neglected in the standard CO model can be comparable to or larger than the CO contribution, and (2) the GCO mechanism introduced here can affect the VCD intensities of all types of modes in symmetric and asymmetric molecules.

  13. Observation of strong direct-like oscillator strength in the photoluminescence of Si nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A.; Yamani, Z. H.; Roberts, N.; Turner, J.; Habbal, S. R.; Granick, S.; Nayfeh, M. H.

    2005-11-01

    We have performed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on suspensions of silicon nanoparticles using near-infrared two-photon femtosecond excitation. Our results for 1 nm particles show wide bandwidth but indicate full conversion to directlike behavior, with a few nanosecond time characteristic, corresponding to oscillator strength comparable to those in direct semiconductors. In addition to fast nanosecond decay, the photoluminescence from 2.85 nm nanoparticle suspension exhibits considerably slower decay, consistent with a transition regime to directlike behavior. The quantum yield is measured to be ˜0.48 , 0.82, and 0.56 for excitation at 254, 310 and 365 nm, respectively, for the blue 1 nm particles, and ˜0.22 , 0.36, and 0.50 for the red 2.85 nm particles. The directlike characteristics are discussed in terms of localization on radiative deep molecularlike Si-Si traps with size-dependent depth.

  14. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-07

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  15. Generalized oscillator strengths for 5s, 5s{sup '}, and 5p excitations of krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenbin; Zhu Linfan; Yuan Zhensheng; Sun Jianmin; Cheng Huadong; Xu Kezun; Zhong Zhiping; Liu Xiaojing

    2003-06-01

    The absolute generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) for 5s, 5s{sup '}, 5p [5/2]{sub 3,2}, 5p [3/2]{sub 1,2}, and 5p [1/2]{sub 0} transitions of krypton have been determined in a large K{sup 2} region at a high electron-impact energy of 2500 eV. The positions of the minima and maxima of these GOSs have been determined. The present results show that the angular resolution and pressure effect have great influence on the position and the amplitude of the minimum for the GOS of 5s+5s{sup '} transitions. When these effects are considered, the measured minimum position for the GOS of 5s+5s{sup '} transitions is in excellent agreement with the calculation of Chen and Msezane [J. Phys. B 33, 5397 (2000)].

  16. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2).

    PubMed

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  17. Fe I OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS FOR TRANSITIONS FROM HIGH-LYING EVEN-PARITY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Brewer, N. R.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.; Lind, K.

    2015-01-01

    New radiative lifetimes, measured to ±5% accuracy, are reported for 31 even-parity levels of Fe I ranging from 45061 cm{sup –1} to 56842 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes have been measured using single-step and two-step time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam of iron atoms. Branching fractions have been attempted for all of these levels, and completed for 20 levels. This set of levels represents an extension of the collaborative work reported in Ruffoni et al. The radiative lifetimes combined with the branching fractions yields new oscillator strengths for 203 lines of Fe I. Utilizing a 1D-LTE model of the solar photosphere, spectral syntheses for a subset of these lines which are unblended in the solar spectrum yields a mean iron abundance of (log[ε(Fe)]) = 7.45 ± 0.06.

  18. Atomic data for opacity calculations. X - Oscillator strengths and photoionisation cross sections for O III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, D.; Pradhan, A. K.; Saraph, H. E.; Storey, P. J.; Yu, Yan

    1989-01-01

    Energy levels and electric dipole radiative transitions were determined for O III. The wavefunctions for the bound and continuum states were derived by solving coupled integrodifferential equations in the close-coupling approximation with the aid of two methods, the R-matrix and linear algebraic methods. Configuration interaction wavefunctions are presented for eight states of the O IV target with configurations of 2s(x)sp(y) (x + y = 3). Oscillator strengths are calculated for the transitions between, and photoionization cross sections from, bound states of O III with configurations of 2s(x)2p(y)nl (for n of not greater than 10 and l of not greater than 3).

  19. Rational Improvement of Molar Absorptivity Guided by Oscillator Strength: A Case Study with Furoindolizine-Based Core Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjun; Jo, Ala; Park, Seung Bum

    2015-12-21

    The rational improvement of photophysical properties can be highly valuable for the discovery of novel organic fluorophores. Using our new design strategy guided by the oscillator strength, we developed a series of full-color-tunable furoindolizine analogs with improved molar absorptivity through the fusion of a furan ring into the indolizine-based Seoul fluorophore. The excellent correlation between the computable values (oscillator strength and theoretical S0 -S1 energy gap) and photophysical properties (molar absorptivity and emission wavelength) confirmed the effectualness of our design strategy.

  20. New method for determining relative oscillator strengths of atoms through combined absorption and emission measurements - Application to titanium /Ti I/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Whaling, W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces a procedure that combines measurements of absorption and emission by atoms to obtain relative oscillator strengths that are independent of temperature determination in the sources and of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium. The experimental observations are formed into sets of transitions and required to satisfy defined ratios. The procedure is illustrated with the published data of Whaling et al. and Smith and Kuehne for 16 transitions in Ti I. It is shown that the relative oscillator strengths resulting from this procedure have calculated uncertainties between 5 and 17% (about 95% confidence level). Evidence is presented to suggest that these uncertainties have been overestimated.

  1. Interband optical transition energy and oscillator strength in a lead based CdSe quantum dot quantum well heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanamoorthy, S. N.; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-24

    Binding energies of the exciton and the interband optical transition energies are studied in a CdSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Se/CdSe spherical quantum dot-quantum well nanostructure taking into account the geometrical confinement effect. The core and shell are taken as the same material. The initial and final states of energy and the overlap integrals of electron and hole wave functions are determined by the oscillator strength. The oscillator strength and the radiative transition life time with the dot radius are investigated for various Cd alloy content in the core and shell materials.

  2. Relativistic oscillator strengths of the rubidium isoelectronic sequence in the vicinity of the d orbital collapse region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdalek, J.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of valence–core electron local and nonlocal exchange and valence–core electron correlation (core polarization) on oscillator strengths is studied along the Rb isoelectronic sequence in the vicinity of the d orbital collapse region using model potential and Dirac–Fock methods.

  3. Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative rates for Si-like Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2014-01-15

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p and 3s{sup 2}3p4d configurations of silicon-like ions (Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX) have been calculated using the configuration-interaction code CIV3. The calculations have been carried out in the intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels have also been calculated. -- Highlights: •We have calculated the fine-structure energy levels of Si-like Zn, Ga, Ge and As. •The calculations are performed using the configuration interaction method (CIV3). •We have calculated the oscillator strengths, line strengths and transition rates. •The wavelengths of the transitions are listed in this article. •We also have made comparisons between our data and other calculations.

  4. Laboratory astrophysics under the ultraviolet, visible, and gravitational astrophysics research program: Oscillator strengths for ultraviolet atomic transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, Steven R.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions within astrophysical environments can be derived from observational data on atomic and molecular lines. For instance, the density and temperature of the gas are obtained from relative populations among energy levels. Information on populations comes about only when the correspondence between line strength and abundance is well determined. The conversion from line strength to abundance involves knowledge of meanlives and oscillator strengths. For many ultraviolet atomic transitions, unfortunately, the necessary data are either relatively imprecise or not available. Because of the need for more and better atomic oscillator strengths, our program was initiated. Through beam-foil spectroscopy, meanlives of ultraviolet atomic transitions are studied. In this technique, a nearly isotopically pure ion beam of the desired element is accelerated. The beam passes through a thin carbon foil (2 mg/cu cm), where neutralization, ionization, and excitation take place. The dominant process depends on the energy of the beam. Upon exiting the foil, the decay of excited states is monitored via single-photon-counting techniques. The resulting decay curve yields a meanlife. The oscillator strength is easily obtained from the meanlife when no other decay channels are presented. When other channels are present, additional measurements or theoretical calculations are performed in order to extract an oscillator strength. During the past year, three atomic systems have been studied experimentally and/or theoretically; they are Ar, I, Cl I, and N II. The results for the first two are important for studies of interstellar space, while the work on N II bears on processes occurring in planetary atmospheres.

  5. Trends in correlation and confinement impacts on the e-Xe@C60 generalized oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmatov, Valeriy; Amusia, Miron; Chernysheva, Larissa

    2012-06-01

    The response of endohedral Xe@C60 to fast electron impact ionization is theoretically studied by calculating its 4d, 5s and 5p generalized oscillators strengths (GOS). The calculation methodology combines the plane wave Born approximation, single-electron Hartree-Fock approximation, and multi-electron random phase approximation with exchange, all in the presence of the C60 confinement. The confinement is accounted for in the framework of both a spherical δ-potential [1] and square-well-potential [2] models to evaluate the effect of the finite thickness of the C60 cage on said GOS's. Impressive confinement brought impact on the latter is revealed. Vitality of accounting for electron correlation in calculations of the Xe@C60 5s and 5p GOS's is demonstrated. Trends in contributions of multipolar transitions beyond dipole transitions in the calculated GOS's are unraveled. We challenge experimentalists to conduct corresponding measurements.[4pt] [1] M.Ya. Amusia, A. S. Baltenkov, and B. G. Krakov, Phys. Lett. A, 243, 99 (1998).[0pt] [2] V. K. Dolmatov, Adv. Quant. Chem. 58, 13 (2009).

  6. Confinement and correlation effects in the Xe@C60 generalized oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.; Dolmatov, V. K.

    2011-12-01

    The impact of both confinement and electron correlation on generalized oscillator strengths (GOS's) of endohedral atoms, A@C60, is theoretically studied choosing the Xe@C60 4d, 5s, and 5p fast electron impact ionization as the case study. Calculations are performed in the transferred to the atom energy region beyond the 4d threshold, ω=75-175 eV. The calculation methodology combines the plane-wave Born approximation, Hartree-Fock approximation, and random-phase approximation with exchange in the presence of the C60 confinement. The confinement is modeled by a spherical δ-function-like potential as well as by a square well potential to evaluate the effect of the finite thickness of the C60 cage on the Xe@C60 GOS's. Dramatic distortion of the 4d, 5p, and 5s GOS's by the confinement is demonstrated, compared to the free atom. Considerable contributions of multipolar transitions beyond dipole transitions in the calculated GOS's are revealed, in some instances. The vitality of accounting for electron correlation in calculation of the Xe@C60 5s and 5p GOS's is shown.

  7. Oscillator strengths for high-excitation Ti II from laboratory measurements and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, H.; Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Persson, A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes of six 3d2(3F)5s levels in singly ionized titanium, with an energy around 63 000 cm-1 and four 3d2(3F)4p odd parity levels where we confirm previous investigations. Combining the new 5s lifetimes with branching fractions measured previously by Pickering et al., we report 57 experimental log gf values for transitions from the 5s levels. The lifetime measurements are performed using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions produced by laser ablation. One- and two-step photon excitation is employed to reach the 4p and 5s levels, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels as well as of oscillator strengths for 3336 transitions from these levels are reported. The calculations are carried out by a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account core-polarization effects. The theoretical results are in a good agreement with the experiments and are needed for accurate abundance determinations in astronomical objects.

  8. Confinement and correlation effects in the Xe-C{sub 60} generalized oscillator strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.; Dolmatov, V. K.

    2011-12-15

    The impact of both confinement and electron correlation on generalized oscillator strengths (GOS's) of endohedral atoms, A-C{sub 60}, is theoretically studied choosing the Xe-C{sub 60} 4d, 5s, and 5p fast electron impact ionization as the case study. Calculations are performed in the transferred to the atom energy region beyond the 4d threshold, {omega}=75-175 eV. The calculation methodology combines the plane-wave Born approximation, Hartree-Fock approximation, and random-phase approximation with exchange in the presence of the C{sub 60} confinement. The confinement is modeled by a spherical {delta}-function-like potential as well as by a square well potential to evaluate the effect of the finite thickness of the C{sub 60} cage on the Xe-C{sub 60} GOS's. Dramatic distortion of the 4d, 5p, and 5s GOS's by the confinement is demonstrated, compared to the free atom. Considerable contributions of multipolar transitions beyond dipole transitions in the calculated GOS's are revealed, in some instances. The vitality of accounting for electron correlation in calculation of the Xe-C{sub 60} 5s and 5p GOS's is shown.

  9. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions in P II, Cl II and Cl III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, S.; Federman, S. R.; Schectman, R. M.; Brown, M.; Irving, R. E.; Fritts, M. C.; Gibson, N. D.

    2006-01-01

    Oscillator strengths for transitions in P II, Cl II and Cl III are derived from lifetimes and branching factions measured with beam-foil techniques. The focus is on the multiplets with a prominent interstellar line at 1153 A in P II which is seen in spectra of hot stars, and the lines at 1071 A in Cl II and 1011 A in Cl III whose lines are seen in spectra of diffuse interstellar clouds and the Io torus acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. These data represent the first complete set of experimental f-values for the lines in the multiplets. Our results for P II (lambda)1153 agree well with Curtis semi-empirical predictions, as well as the large scale computations by Hibbert and by Tayal. The data for Cl II (lambda)1071 also agree very well with the most recent theoretical effort and with Morton s newest recommendations. For Cl III, however, our f-values are significantly larger than those given by Morton; instead, they are more consistent with recent large-scale theoretical calculations. Extensive tests provide confirmation that LS coupling rules apply to the transitions for the multiplets in Cl II and Cl III.

  10. Improved and Expanded Near-IR Oscillator Strengths for Fe-group Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael P.; Nave, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of modern experimental techniques, including LIF lifetime and FTS branching fraction measurements, has significantly increased the scope and reliability of laboratory atomic transition probabilities in the UV and visible. However, the combination of these techniques is problematic in the IR, a region of increasing importance due to improved detector, spectrometer, and telescope technologies. The result is a significant gap between the capabilities to record new IR astronomical spectra and the data needed to sufficiently understand and analyze them. To aid in closing this gap, we are developing new laboratory techniques to measure improved and expanded sets of oscillator strengths in the near-IR (λ ≈ 1-5 μm), with a primary focus on the Fe-group elements. A description of the methods proposed and their applicability will be presented. Input from the astronomical community is essential in order to focus the research on those lines and atomic species representing the greatest near-IR atomic data needs.

  11. Unified calculation of generalized oscillator strength of argon ranging from bound to continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Zeng, De-Ling; Han, Xiao-Ying; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The electron and photon scattering data of an atom are crucial for many scientific fields, including plasma physics, astrophysics, and so on. For high enough but nonrelativistic incident energies, the first Born approximation is applicable for calculating these data, in which the key physics quantity is the generalized oscillator strength (GOS). In high-energy electron impact excitation processes, atoms will be excited into various excited states including strongly perturbed Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. How to calculate these quantities of a nontrivial many-electron atom rapidly and accurately is still a great challenge. Based on our eigenchannel R -matrix method R -eigen, we further extend it to calculate the GOS of a whole channel in an atom, which includes all Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. The Jπ=1- states of argon are chosen as an illustrating example. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available benchmark absolute experimental measurements. The calculated eigenchannel GOS matrix elements are smooth functions of the excitation energy and momentum transfer. From such smooth eigenchannel GOS matrix elements, we can obtain the GOS of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g., infinite Rydberg (including a strongly perturbed one), autoionization, and continuum states.

  12. Term classifications and Breit-Pauli oscillator strengths of neutral tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2008-05-01

    Spectroscopic observation of embedded tin impurity is being investigated as a potential diagnostic for monitoring the erosion of vessel wall tiles in fusion power plants [1], requiring accurate estimates of the oscillator strengths (OS) of the neutral and near-neutral lines. In response to this, we have undertaken (to our knowledge) the first extensive Breit-Pauli configuration interaction (CI) calculation of transitions among the lower-lying levels in Sn I, using the atomic structure code CIV3 [2]. One-electron functions have been carefully optimised to represent accurately the main configurations, accounting for the LS-dependency of the orbitals, and all important correlation and polarisation effects. We present our assigned energy level term classifications, highlighting the significant inconsistencies in the literature. Present results agree favourably with other sparsely available experimental and theoretical work (mostly focusing on transitions involving the 5p^2 ground configuration). We observe excellent agreement in the length and velocity forms of the OS. [1]0pt0pt0pt0pt *[[1

  13. Energy level classifications and Breit Pauli oscillator strengths in neutral tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, P.; Hibbert, A.

    2008-08-01

    Spectroscopic observation of embedded tin impurity is currently being investigated as a potential diagnostic for monitoring the erosion of vessel wall tiles in fusion power plants (Foster et al 2007 J. Nucl. Mater. 363-5 152), requiring accurate estimates of the oscillator strengths (OS) of the neutral and near-neutral lines. In response to this, we have undertaken (to our knowledge) the first extensive Breit-Pauli configuration-interaction (CI) calculation of transitions in Sn I using the atomic structure code CIV3. Our one-electron functions and configuration basis sets have been carefully selected to represent accurately all important valence and core-valence correlation effects. The reassignments of several LS spectroscopic labels based on our ab initio CI coefficients are suggested, highlighting the substantial inconsistencies in the literature. We invoke various internal checks to demonstrate the accuracy of our ab initio results, validating the decision not to apply our customary fine-tuning technique due to extreme CI mixing of multiple CSFs in a number of LSJ-coupled wavefunctions. The highlighted deficiencies in the results of previous theoretical compilations and the significant scatter observed in the OS measurements obtained from independent experimental methods increase the impetus for own CI calculation, which represents a major improvement in accuracy.

  14. Performance of SOPPA-based methods in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Pitzner-Frydendahl, Henrik F.; Buse, Mogens; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Thiel, Walter

    2015-07-01

    We present two new modifications of the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA), SOPPA(SCS-MP2) and SOPPA(SOS-MP2), which employ either spin-component-scaled or scaled opposite-spin MP2 correlation coefficients instead of the regular MP2 coefficients. The performance of these two methods, the original SOPPA method as well as SOPPA(CCSD) and RPA(D) in the calculation of vertical electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths is investigated for a large benchmark set of 28 medium-sized molecules with 139 singlet and 71 triplet excited states. The results are compared with the corresponding CC3 and CASPT2 results from the literature for both the TZVP set and the larger and more diffuse aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. In addition, the results with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set are compared with the theoretical best estimates for this benchmark set. We find that the original SOPPA method gives overall the smallest mean deviations from the reference values and the most consistent results.

  15. Atomic Physics with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. No. 1; Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar spectra toward zeta Oph acquired with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph were used to obtain oscillator strengths for approximately two dozen S I lines. This analysis was possible because precisely determined experimental oscillator strengths are available for several multiplets, including one with a weak interstellar line. The self-consistent set of oscillator strengths then was obtained from a curve of growth based on line strengths spanning a range of a factor of 100. The derived f-values for a number of multiplets differ from values quoted by Morton (1991) but are generally consistent with the suite of available experimental and theoretical results.

  16. Photoionization Energies and Oscillator Strengths of Helium and Helium-like Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, N. A. B.; Ndao, A. S.; Konte, A.; Biaye, M.; Wague, A.

    2005-10-01

    We first studied the resonant photoionization of helium-like ions, such as C4+, N5+, and O6+, and determined the wave functions, the excitation energies, and the partial and total widths of the autoionizing states of these ions lying under the n = 3 thresholds of the residual ion. For more detailed analysis of the theory, and a better comprehension of the internal dynamics of atomic resonances and electronic phenomena of correlation, we extended these calculations to other helium-like ions, under higher thresholds (n = 4 and 5) of the hydrogen ions H-, and of Li+, C4+, N5+, and O6+. We were also interested in oscillator strengths. These parameters are important for interpreting the spectra and diagnosing astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, as well as for analyzing the spectra coming from space and determining the composition and relative abundance from the various elements of the stellar and interstellar environment. We sought a better comprehension of the coupling between autoionizing and continuum states and of the phenomena of electronic correlations. We used the method of diagonalization that has been used below the n = 2 threshold of the residual ion. The results are important for astrophysicists and physicists studying matter-radiation interaction and for the invention of new laser systems. We also measured laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) emission spectra of the leaves of some tropical plants using a compact fiber-optic fluorosensor with a continuous-wave violet diode laser as the exciting source and an integrated digital spectrometer to analyze the state of stress of the plants.

  17. Energies of Maxima and Oscillator Strengths of CaO Elementary Transition Bands Over a Wide Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Merzlyakov, D. A.; Sobolev, V. Val.

    2016-09-01

    Integral spectra of the imaginary parts of the dielectric permittivity ɛ2(E) and characteristic volume (-Im ɛ-1) and surface [-Im (1 + ɛ)-1] energy losses of calcium oxide were deconvoluted into elementary components in the range 6-40 eV. The main component parameters including the energies of maxima and oscillator strengths were determined using an improved non-parametric method of united Argand diagrams and the method of the effective number of valence electrons participating in the transitions. A total of 41 components with oscillator strengths in the range 0.001-0.22 were identified instead of the 14 maxima and shoulders of the integral spectra. They were caused by transverse and longitudinal exciton and interband transitions.

  18. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Model Potential Calculations of Oscillator Strength Spectra of Rydberg Li Atoms in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2009-08-01

    By combining the B-spline basis set with model potential (B-spline + MP), we present oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg Li atoms in external fields. The photoabsorption spectra are analyzed. Over the narrow energy ranges considered in this paper, the structure of the spectra can be independent of the initial state chosen for a given atom. Our results are in good agreement with previous high-precision experimental data and theoretical calculations, where the R-matrix approach together with multichannel quantum defect theory (R-matrix+MQDT) was used. It is suggested that the present methods can be applied to deal with the oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  19. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the electronic excitation of atoms at high resolution: Experimental methods and measurements for helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.F.; Cooper, G.; Brion, C.E. )

    1991-07-01

    An alternative method is described for the measurement of absolute optical oscillator strengths (cross sections) for electronic excitation of free atoms and molecules throughout the discrete region of the valence-shell spectrum at high energy resolution (full width at half maximum of 0.048 eV). The technique, utilizing the virtual-photon field of a fast electron inelastically scattered at negligible momentum transfer, avoids many of the difficulties associated with the various direct optical techniques that have traditionally been used for absolute optical oscillator strength measurements. The method is also free of the bandwidth (line saturation) effects that can seriously limit the accuracy of photoabsorption cross-section measurements for discrete transitions of narrow linewidth obtained using the Beer-Lambert law ({ital I}{sub 0}/{ital I}=exp({ital nl}{sigma}{sub {ital p}})). Since the line-saturation effects are not widely appreciated and are only usually considered in the context of peak heights, a detailed analysis of this problem is presented, with consideration of the integrated cross section (oscillator strength) over the profile of each discrete peak.

  20. The realization of the dipole (γ, γ) method and its application to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Long-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wei; Kang, Xu; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2015-12-01

    The dipole (γ, γ) method, which is the inelastic x-ray scattering operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer, is proposed and realized to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the vanlence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. Compared with the conventionally used photoabsorption method, this new method is free from the line saturation effect, which can seriously limit the accuracies of the measured photoabsorption cross sections for discrete transitions with narrow natural linewidths. Furthermore, the Bethe-Born conversion factor of the dipole (γ, γ) method varies much more slowly with the excitation energy than does that of the dipole (e, e) method. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the excitations of 1s2 → 1 snp(n = 3 - 7) of atomic helium have been determined using the high-resolution dipole (γ, γ) method, and the excellent agreement of the present measurements with both those measured by the dipole (e, e) method and the previous theoretical calculations indicates that the dipole (γ, γ) method is a powerful tool to measure the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules.

  1. The realization of the dipole (γ, γ) method and its application to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of helium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wei; Kang, Xu; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The dipole (γ, γ) method, which is the inelastic x-ray scattering operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer, is proposed and realized to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the vanlence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. Compared with the conventionally used photoabsorption method, this new method is free from the line saturation effect, which can seriously limit the accuracies of the measured photoabsorption cross sections for discrete transitions with narrow natural linewidths. Furthermore, the Bethe-Born conversion factor of the dipole (γ, γ) method varies much more slowly with the excitation energy than does that of the dipole (e, e) method. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the excitations of 1s(2) → 1 snp(n = 3-7) of atomic helium have been determined using the high-resolution dipole (γ, γ) method, and the excellent agreement of the present measurements with both those measured by the dipole (e, e) method and the previous theoretical calculations indicates that the dipole (γ, γ) method is a powerful tool to measure the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules.

  2. The realization of the dipole (γ, γ) method and its application to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of helium

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Long-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wei; Kang, Xu; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The dipole (γ, γ) method, which is the inelastic x-ray scattering operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer, is proposed and realized to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the vanlence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. Compared with the conventionally used photoabsorption method, this new method is free from the line saturation effect, which can seriously limit the accuracies of the measured photoabsorption cross sections for discrete transitions with narrow natural linewidths. Furthermore, the Bethe-Born conversion factor of the dipole (γ, γ) method varies much more slowly with the excitation energy than does that of the dipole (e, e) method. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the excitations of 1s2 → 1 snp(n = 3 − 7) of atomic helium have been determined using the high-resolution dipole (γ, γ) method, and the excellent agreement of the present measurements with both those measured by the dipole (e, e) method and the previous theoretical calculations indicates that the dipole (γ, γ) method is a powerful tool to measure the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. PMID:26678298

  3. The realization of the dipole (γ, γ) method and its application to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of helium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long-Quan; Liu, Ya-Wei; Kang, Xu; Ni, Dong-Dong; Yang, Ke; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Zhu, Lin-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The dipole (γ, γ) method, which is the inelastic x-ray scattering operated at a negligibly small momentum transfer, is proposed and realized to determine the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the vanlence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. Compared with the conventionally used photoabsorption method, this new method is free from the line saturation effect, which can seriously limit the accuracies of the measured photoabsorption cross sections for discrete transitions with narrow natural linewidths. Furthermore, the Bethe-Born conversion factor of the dipole (γ, γ) method varies much more slowly with the excitation energy than does that of the dipole (e, e) method. Absolute optical oscillator strengths for the excitations of 1s(2) → 1 snp(n = 3-7) of atomic helium have been determined using the high-resolution dipole (γ, γ) method, and the excellent agreement of the present measurements with both those measured by the dipole (e, e) method and the previous theoretical calculations indicates that the dipole (γ, γ) method is a powerful tool to measure the absolute optical oscillator strengths of the valence-shell excitations of atoms and molecules. PMID:26678298

  4. Excitation energies, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Mg-like vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    Excitation energies from the ground state for 86 fine-structure levels as well as oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all fine-structure transitions among the levels of the terms (1s22s22p6)3s2(1S), 3s3p(1,3Po), 3s3d(1,3D), 3s4s(1,3S), 3s4p(1,3Po), 3s4d(1,3D), 3s4f(1,3Fo), 3p2(1S, 3P, 1D), 3p3d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4s(1,3Po), 3p4p(1,3S, 1,3P, 1,3D), 3p4d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4f(1,3D, 1,3F, 1,3G) and 3d2(1S, 3P, 1D,3F,1G) of V XII are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions obtained with the configuration-interaction version 3 computer code of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the corresponding experimental values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. Our fine-tuned excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement (better than 0.25%) with the available experimental results. From our calculated radiative decay rates, we have also calculated the radiative lifetimes of fine-structure levels. Generally, our calculated data for the excitation energies and radiative decay rates are found to agree reasonably well with other available calculations. However, significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from the calculation of Froese Fischer et al (2006 At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 92 607) for a few fine-structure levels, mainly those belonging to the 3p4d configuration, are noted and discussed. Also, our calculated lifetime for the longer-lived level 3s3p(3P1) is found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding value of Curtis (1991 Phys. Scr. 43 137). ) for all 1108 transitions in V XII are available with the first author ().

  5. SO_2 Absorption Cross Sections and N_2 VUV Oscillator Strengths for Planetary Atmosphere Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Stark, G.; Rufus, J.; Pickering, J. C.; Cox, G.; Huber, K. P.

    1998-09-01

    The determination of the chemical composition of the atmosphere of Io from Hubble Space Telescope observations in the 190-220 nm wavelength region requires knowledge of the photoabsorption cross sections of SO_2 at temperatures ranging from about 110 K to 300 K. We are engaged in a laboratory program to measure SO_2 absorption cross sections with very high resolving power (lambda /delta lambda =~ 450,000) and at a range of temperatures appropriate to the Io atmosphere. Previous photoabsorption measurements, with lambda /delta lambda =~ 100,000, have been unable to resolve the very congested SO_2 spectrum, and, thus, to elucidate the temperature dependence of the cross sections. Our measurements are being performed at Imperial College, London, using an ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. We will present our recently completed room temperature measurements of SO_2 cross sections in the 190-220 nm region and plans for extending these to ~ 195 K. Analyses of Voyager VUV occultation measurements of the N_2-rich atmospheres of Titan and Triton have been hampered by the lack of fundamental spectroscopic data for N_2, in particular, by the lack of reliable f-values and line widths for electronic bands of N_2 in the 80-100 nm wavelength region. We are continuing our program of measurements of band oscillator strengths for the many (approximately 100) N_2 bands between 80 and 100 nm. We report new f-values, derived from data obtained at the Photon Factory (Tsukuba, Japan) synchrotron radiation facility with lambda /delta lambda =~ 130,000, of 37 bands in the 80-86 nm region and 21 bands in the 90-95 nm region. We have also begun the compilation of a searchable archive of N_2 data on the World Wide Web; see http://cfa-www.harvard. edu/amp/data/n2/n2home.html. The archive, covering the spectroscopy of N_2 between 80 and 100 nm, will include published and unpublished (14) N_2, (14) N(15) N, and (15) N_2 line lists and spectroscopic identifications, excited state energy

  6. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jun; Mitroy, J.; Cheng, Yongjun; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2015-01-15

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations.

  7. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  8. Effect of exciton oscillator strength on upconversion photoluminescence in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Osamu Okumura, Shouhei; Kita, Takashi; Akahane, Kouichi

    2014-11-03

    We report upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL) in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells. UCPL from the AlAs barrier is caused by the resonant excitation of the excitons in the GaAs well. When the quantum well has sufficient miniband width, UCPL is hardly observed because of the small exciton oscillator strength. The excitation-energy and excitation-density dependences of UCPL intensity show the exciton resonant profile and a linear increase, respectively. These results demonstrate that the observed UCPL caused by the saturated two-step excitation process requires a large number of excitons.

  9. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  10. The calculation of generalized oscillator strength densities of Argon by using an eigenchannel R-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions is of fundamental importance to various plasma applications in the fields of astrophysics, fusion energy researches and so on. Theoretical computations should play indispensable role to satisfy needs. Using our modified R-matrix code R-Eigen, we can directly calculate the short-range scattering matrices with good analytical properties in the whole energy regions, from which we can obtain all energy levels and the related scattering cross sections with accuracies comparable with spectroscopic precision. With the corresponding high-quality eigenchannel wavefunctions, various transition matrix elements can be readily calculated, such as the generalized oscillator strength densities (GOSD). The GOSD is directly related with the high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections. In eigenchannel representation, the GOSD curves of the excited states in an eigenchannel form a surface, which is a smooth function of the momentum transfers and the excitation energies. From such smooth GOSDs, we can obtain the generalized oscillator strength of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g. infinite Rydberg(including strongly perturbed one), autoionization and continuum states. As an example, we will present our recent calculation results of Ar, which are in good agreement with available benchmark experiments.

  11. Correlation strength and Tc: quantum oscillations in YBa2Cu4O8 under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzke, C.; Malone, L.; Badoux, S.; Vignolle, B.; Vignolles, D.; Tabis, W.; Walmsley, P.; Bird, M.; Hussey, N. E.; Proust, C.; Carrington, A.

    The unusual normal state electronic structure of the cuprates is widely believed to be at the heart of understanding high-temperature superconductivity in these materials. Recent quantum oscillation measurements in YBa2Cu3O7-d (Y123) have found a strong increase in the quasiparticle effective mass close to two separate critical points in the temperature-doping phase diagram. Here we present a study of quantum oscillations in the double chain cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu4O8 (Y124). Instead of varying the doping by changing d (in Y123) we study the evolution of the quantum oscillations under hydrostatic pressure. Pressure increases Tc by around 0.6K/kbar, primarily, it is thought, by increasing charge transfer between the chains and planes. Unlike in Y123, where the increase in Tc close to optimal doping is accompanied by a strong increase in quasiparticle mass, in Y124 we find that the mass decreases. Our results suggest that the mechanism that leads to the mass enhancement in the cuprates (most likely the emergence of a competing charge density wave instability) does not directly lead to an enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature.

  12. Registration of weak ULF/ELF oscillations of the surface electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, A. I.; Vyazilov, A. E.; Ivanov, V. N.; Kemaev, R. V.; Korovin, V. Ya.; Melyashinskii, A. V.; Pamukhin, K. V.; Panov, V. N.; Shvyrev, Yu. N.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric electric field strength made by an electrostatic fluxmeter with a unique threshold sensitivity for such devices (6 × 10-2-10-3 V m-1 Hz-1/2 in the 10-3-25 Hz frequency range) and wide dynamic (120 dB) and spectral (0-25 Hz) ranges, are presented. The device parameters make it possible to observe the electric component of global electromagnetic Schumann resonances and long-period fluctuations in the atmospheric electric field strength.

  13. Image Charge and Electric Field Effects on Hydrogen-like Impurity-bound Polaron Energies and Oscillator Strengths in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, L. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Asatryan, A. L.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    By using Landau-Pekar variational method, the ground and the first excited state energies and the transition frequencies between the ground and the first excited states of a hydrogen-like impurity-bound polaron in a spherical quantum dot (QD) have been studied by taking into account the image charge effect (ICE). We employ the dielectric continuum model to describe the phonon confinement effects. The oscillator strengths (OSs) of transitions from the 1 s-like state to excited states of 2 s, 2 p x , and 2 p z symmetries are calculated as functions of the applied electric field and strength of the confinement potential. We have shown that with and without image charge effect, the increase of the strength of the parabolic confinement potential leads to the increase of the oscillator strengths of 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s - 2 p z transitions. This indicates that the energy differences between 1 s- and 2 p x - as well as 1 s- and 2 p z -like states have a dominant role determining the oscillator strength. Although there is almost no difference in the oscillator strengths for transitions 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s -2 p z when the image charge effect is not taken into account, it becomes significant with the image charge effect.

  14. Influence of excitonic oscillator strengths on the optical properties of GaN and ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, E.; Réveret, F.; Disseix, P.; Shubina, T. V.; Leymarie, J.

    2014-07-01

    We report on an extensive study of the excitonic properties of GaN and ZnO bulk samples with an accurate determination of excitonic parameters by linear and nonlinear spectroscopies. The in-depth comparative study is carried out between these two competitive wide band gap semiconductors for a better understanding of damping processes. In GaN, it is shown that due to microscopic disorder, such as lattice strain fluctuations, inhomogeneous broadening prevails over homogeneous broadening at low temperature. The opposite situation occurs in ZnO, where the homogeneous broadening dominates due to resonant Rayleigh scattering of exciton polaritons and their interaction with acoustic phonons. This comparative study also allows us to highlight the influence of oscillator strengths on spectrally resolved four-wave mixing and time-integrated four-wave mixing.

  15. Significant Redistribution of Ce 4d Oscillator Strength Observed in Photoionization of Endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Habibi, M.; Esteves, D.; Wang, J. C.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Dunsch, L.

    2008-09-26

    Mass-selected beams of atomic Ce{sup q+} ions (q=2, 3, 4), of C{sub 82}{sup +} and of endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} ions were employed to study photoionization of free and encaged cerium atoms. The Ce 4d inner-shell contributions to single and double ionization of the endohedral Ce-C{sub 82}{sup +} fullerene have been extracted from the data and compared with expectations based on theory and the experiments with atomic Ce ions. Dramatic reduction and redistribution of the ionization contributions to 4d photoabsorption is observed. More than half of the Ce 4d oscillator strength appears to be diverted to the additional decay channels opened by the fullerene cage surrounding the Ce atom.

  16. Statistics of equivalent width data and new oscillator strengths for Si II, Fe II, and Mn II. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Dave

    1986-01-01

    Equivalent width data from Copernicus and IUE appear to have an exponential, rather than a Gaussian distribution of errors. This is probably because there is one dominant source of error: the assignment of the background continuum shape. The maximum likelihood method of parameter estimation is presented for the case of exponential statistics, in enough generality for application to many problems. The method is applied to global fitting of Si II, Fe II, and Mn II oscillator strengths and interstellar gas parameters along many lines of sight. The new values agree in general with previous determinations but are usually much more tightly constrained. Finally, it is shown that care must be taken in deriving acceptable regions of parameter space because the probability contours are not generally ellipses whose axes are parallel to the coordinate axes.

  17. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S.H.

    2014-05-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}, 3s3p{sup 5}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4s, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4p, and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin–orbit, spin–other-orbit, and spin–spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications. -- Highlights: •Accurate atomic data of iron ions are needed for identification of solar corona. •Extensive configuration interaction wavefunctions including 123 fine-structure levels have been calculated. •The relativistic effects by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms are incorporated. •This incorporation adjusts the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to experimental values.

  18. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Qu, Yizhi; Li, Jiguang; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    The multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method was employed to calculate the total and excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants for low-lying levels of Sm i. In the first-order perturbation approximation, we systematically analyzed correlation effects from individual electrons and electron pairs. It was found that the core correlations are of importance for the physical quantities concerned. Based on the analysis, the important configuration state wave functions were selected to constitute atomic state wave functions. By using this computational model, our excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and hyperfine structure constants are in better agreement with experimental values than earlier theoretical works.

  19. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, B.L.; Smith, P.L.; Scalo, J.M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 A and 9357 A. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are +- 15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s/sup -1/. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log +12 = 4.92 +- 0.08 ( +- 19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  20. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Scalo, J. M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 Å and 9357 Å. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are ±15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s-1. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log Co/NH> + 12 = 4.92 ± 0.08 (±19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. The splitting and oscillator strengths for the 2S/2/S-2p/2/P/0/ doublet in lithium-like sulfur. [during Skylab observed solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Forester, J. P.; Elston, S. B.; Griffin, P. M.; Peterson, R. S.; Thoe, R. S.; Vane, C. R.; Sellin, I. A.; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1977-01-01

    The beam-foil technique has been used to study the 2S(2)S-2p(2)P(0) doublet in S XIV. The results confirm the doublet splitting measured aboard Skylab during solar flare events. In addition, the oscillator strengths for the resonance transitions comprising this doublet have been measured and found to agree well with recent relativistic f-value calculations.

  2. FOREWORD: The 9th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Wiese, Wolfgang L.; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2008-07-01

    For the first time since its inaugural meeting in Lund in 1983, the triennial international conference on Atomic Spectroscopy and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas (ASOS) returned to Lund, Sweden. Lund has been a home to atomic spectroscopy since the time of Janne Rydberg, and included the pioneering work in laboratory and solar spectroscopy of Bengt Edlén, who presented the initial ASOS talk in 1983. The ninth ASOS was hosted by the Lund Observatory and the Physics Department of Lund University during from 8 to 10 August 2007 and was attended by nearly 100 registrants. An encouraging sign for the field was the number of young researchers in attendance. This volume contains the submitted contributions from the poster presentations of the conference, and represents approximately forty percent of the presented posters. A complementary volume of Physica Scripta provides the written transactions of the ASOS9 invited presentations. With these two volumes the character of ASOS9 is more fully evident, and they serve as a review of the state of atomic spectroscopy for spectrum analysis and the determination of oscillator strengths and their applications. The goal of ASOS is to be a forum for atomic spectroscopy where both the providers and users of atomic data, which includes wavelengths, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths, and line shape parameters, can meet to discuss recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques and their application to understanding the physical processes that are responsible for producing observed spectra. The applications mainly originate from the fields of astrophysics and plasma physics, the latter including fusion energy and lighting research. As a part of ASOS9 we were honored to celebrate the retirement of Professor Sveneric Johansson. At a special session on the spectroscopy of iron, which was conducted in his honor, he presented his insights into the Fe II term system and his most recent

  3. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  4. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  5. Refractive index effects on the oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Jyotirmayee; Nau, Werner M

    2004-01-01

    The photophysical properties of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) were determined in 15 solvents, two supramolecular hosts (cucurbit[7]uril and beta-cyclodextrin) as well as in the gas phase. The oscillator strength and radiative decay rate of DBO as a function of refractive index i.e. polarizability have been analyzed. The oscillator strength increases by a factor of 10 upon going from the gas phase to the most polarizable carbon disulfide, while the corresponding radiative decay rates increase by a factor of 40. There is a good empirical correlation between the oscillator strength of the weakly allowed n,pi* transition of DBO and the reciprocal bulk polarizability, which can be employed to assess the polarizability of unknown microheterogeneous environments. A satisfactory correlation between the radiative decay rate and the square of the refractive index is also found, as previously documented for chromophores with allowed transitions. However, the correlation improves significantly when the oscillator strength is included in the correlation, which demonstrates the importance of this factor in the Strickler-Berg equation for chromophores with forbidden or weakly allowed transitions, for which the oscillator strength may be strongly solvent dependent. The radiative decay rate of DBO in two supramolecular assemblies has been determined, confirming the very low polarizability inside the cucurbituril cavity, in between perfluorohexane and the gas phase. The fluorescence quantum yield of DBO in the gas phase has been remeasured (5.1 +/- 0.5%) and was found to fall one full order of magnitude below a previously reported value.

  6. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions Involving 6s26d 2D and 6s6p3 2D Levels in Pb II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard; Ritchey, Adam M.; Ellis, David; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry; Furman, Walter

    2016-06-01

    We conducted beam-foil measurements on levels producing Pb II lines at 1203.6 and 1433.9 Å. These were supplemented by archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) covering the Pb II transitions. The oscillator strengths derived from our experimental lifetimes are generally consistent with recent large-scale theoretical results, as well as our own relativistic calculations. Our analysis of the HST spectra confirms the relative strengths of the two lines. However, the oscillator strength obtained for the line at 1433 Å is significantly smaller than earlier theoretical values used to derive the interstellar lead abundance, leading to an increase of 0.43 dex in this quantity. We will present our results for Pb II and compare them with others from the literature.

  7. Suppression of fine-structure splitting and oscillator strength of sodium D-line in a Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Joyee Ray, Debasis

    2014-01-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of static plasma screening on relativistic spin-orbit interaction-induced fine-structure splitting of the D-line doublet arising from the transitions 3p{sub 1/2}–3s{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2}–3s{sub 1/2} of the valence electron of a sodium atom embedded in a model plasma environment. The many-electron atomic problem is formulated first as an effective one-electron problem in which the interaction between the optically active valence electron and the atomic ion core is represented by an accurate parametric model potential including core-polarization correction, and then the plasma effect on the atomic system is simulated by the Debye-screening model for the valence-core interaction. It is observed that the magnitude of spin-orbit energy shift reduces for both the upper component 3p{sub 3/2} and the lower component 3p{sub 1/2} with increasing plasma screening strength, thereby reducing the spin-orbit energy separation between these two components as the screening becomes stronger. As a consequence, the magnitude of fine-structure splitting between the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line energies of sodium drops significantly with stronger plasma screening. The optical (absorption) oscillator strength for 3s → 3p transition is seen to reduce with stronger screening and this leads to a screening-induced gradual suppression of the 3p → 3s spontaneous decay rate.

  8. Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities from the Breit–Pauli R-matrix method: Ne IV

    SciTech Connect

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2014-09-15

    The atomic parameters–oscillator strengths, line strengths, radiative decay rates (A), and lifetimes–for fine structure transitions of electric dipole (E1) type for the astrophysically abundant ion Ne IV are presented. The results include 868 fine structure levels with n≤ 10, l≤ 9, and 1/2≤J≤ 19/2 of even and odd parities, and the corresponding 83,767 E1 transitions. The calculations were carried out using the relativistic Breit–Pauli R-matrix method in the close coupling approximation. The transitions have been identified spectroscopically using an algorithm based on quantum defect analysis and other criteria. The calculated energies agree with the 103 observed and identified energies to within 3% or better for most of the levels. Some larger differences are also noted. The A-values show good to fair agreement with the very limited number of available transitions in the table compiled by NIST, but show very good agreement with the latest published multi-configuration Hartree–Fock calculations. The present transitions should be useful for diagnostics as well as for precise and complete spectral modeling in the soft X-ray to infra-red regions of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. -- Highlights: •The first application of BPRM method for accurate E1 transitions in Ne IV is reported. •Amount of atomic data (n going up to 10) is complete for most practical applications. •The calculated energies are in very good agreement with most observed levels. •Very good agreement of A-values and lifetimes with other relativistic calculations. •The results should provide precise nebular abundances, chemical evolution etc.

  9. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreement with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.

  10. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreementmore » with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.« less

  11. Assessment of time-dependent density functional schemes for computing the oscillator strengths of benzene, phenol, aniline, and fluorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masanori; Aoki, Yuriko; Champagne, Benoît

    2007-08-01

    In present study the relevance of using the time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) within the adiabatic approximation for computing oscillator strengths (f) is assessed using different LDA, GGA, and hybrid exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. In particular, we focus on the lowest-energy valence excitations, dominating the UV/visible absorption spectra and originating from benzenelike HOMO (π)→LUMO(π*) transitions, of several aromatic molecules: benzene, phenol, aniline, and fluorobenzene. The TDDFT values are compared to both experimental results obtained from gas phase measurements and to results determined using several ab initio schemes: random phase approximation (RPA), configuration interaction single (CIS), and a series of linear response coupled-cluster calculations, CCS, CC2, and CCSD. In particular, the effect of the amount of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange in the functional is highlighted, whereas a basis set investigation demonstrates the need of including diffuse functions. So, the hybrid XC functionals—and particularly BHandHLYP—provide f values in good agreement with the highly correlated CCSD scheme while these can be strongly underestimated using pure DFT functionals. These results also display systematic behaviors: (i) larger f and squares of the transition dipole moments (∣μ∣2) are associated with larger excitation energies (ΔE); (ii) these relationships present generally a linear character with R >0.9 in least-squares fit procedures; (iii) larger amounts of HF exchange in the XC functional lead to larger f, ∣μ∣2, as well as ΔE values; (iv) these increases in f, ∣μ ∣2, and ΔE are related to increased HOMO-LUMO character; and (v) these relationships are, however, not universal since the linear regression parameters (the slopes and the intercepts at the origin) depend on the system under investigation as well as on the nature of the excited state.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Tc IV, Tc V and Tc VI oscillator strengths (Werner+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kucas, S.; Kruk, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of technetium (Tc) in the atmospheres of red giants by Merrill (1952ApJ...116...21M) constituted convincing proof that s-process nucleosynthesis is indeed occurring in evolved stars. In principle, Tc should still be present in the atmospheres of hot post-AGB stars and (pre-) white dwarfs although, due to radioactive decay, it should be present in decreasing quantities along post-AGB evolution. The recent discovery of a large number of trans-iron group elements in hot white dwarfs with atomic numbers in the range A=30-56 (Zn to Ba) raises the prospect that Tc (A=43) may also be detected. However, this is currently not feasible because no atomic data exist for ionization stages beyond TcII. As an initial step, we calculated atomic energy levels and oscillator strengths of Tc IV-VI and used these data to compute non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres to estimate at which minimum abundance level Tc could be detected. We show that Tc lines can be found in ultraviolet spectra of hot white dwarfs provided Tc is as abundant as other detected trans-Fe elements. We find that radiative levitation can keep Tc in large, easily detectable quantities in the atmosphere. A direct identification of Tc lines is still not feasible because wavelength positions cannot be computed with necessary precision. Laboratory measurements are necessary to overcome this problem. Our results suggest that such efforts are beneficial to the astrophysical community. (6 data files).

  13. Length and velocity form calculations of generalized oscillator strengths of dipole, quadrupole and monopole excitations of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Diallo, S.; Tall, M. S.; Diedhiou, I.; Hibbert, A.; Daul, C. A.; Diatta, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The quadrupole, monopole and dipole generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) as a function of momentum transfer are respectively calculated for these 3p6 → 3p5 (4p, 5p, 6p) and 3p6 → 3p5 (4s, 5s, 6s) transitions. Configuration interaction (CI) and random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) methods are used in the determination of these GOS, in the length and velocity forms. The code of Hibbert has been used to generate the wavefunctions from which a partial of argon GOSs are been computed. The present work has reduced the gap between the absolute values of the theoretical calculations of GOSs and those of the experimental results of Zhu et al for the quadrupole excitations to 3p5 (4p, 5p). The profile of our quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p55p transition agrees well with the experimental result of Zhu. The best agreement (0.7%) is observed between the (length) first maximum position and the experimental one for the quadrupole GOS 3p6 → 3p54p transition. The present velocity GOS minimum position for the dipole excitation in 3p6 → 3p54s and the calculated velocity GOS maximum position of the monopole 3p6 → 3p54p transition are in good agreement with the experimental observations (differences of 1.82% and 3.08%, respectively). Correlation effects decrease with increasing of the excited state principal quantum number and have no great influence on the extrema positions.

  14. Experimental radiative lifetimes for highly excited states and calculated oscillator strengths for lines of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt (Co II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.

    2016-11-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt. More precisely, 19 radiative lifetimes in Co+ have been measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique using one- and two-step excitations. Out of these, seven belonging to the high lying 3d7(4F)4d configuration in the energy range 90 697-93 738 cm-1 are new, and the other 12 from the 3d7(4F)4p configuration with energies between 45 972 and 49 328 cm-1 are compared with previous measurements. In addition, a relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects has been employed to compute transition rates. Supported by the good agreement between theory and experiment for the lifetimes, new reliable transition probabilities and oscillator strengths have been deduced for 5080 Co II transitions in the spectral range 114-8744 nm.

  15. Impact of ex situ rapid thermal annealing on magneto-optical properties and oscillator strength of In(Ga)As quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, T.; Betzold, S.; Lundt, N.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Schneider, C.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the influence of a rapid thermal annealing step on the magneto-optical emission properties of In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots. We map out a strong influence of the growth and annealing parameters on the excitons' effective Landé g factors and in particular on their diamagnetic coefficients, which we directly correlate with the modification of the emitters' shape and material composition. In addition, we study the excitons' spontaneous emission lifetime as a function of the annealing temperature and the dot height and observe a strong increase of the emission rate with the quantum dot volume. The corresponding increase in oscillator strength yields fully consistent results with the analysis of the diamagnetic behavior. Specifically, we demonstrate that a rapid thermal annealing step of 850 ∘C can be employed to increase the oscillator strength of as-grown InAs/GaAs QDs by more than a factor of 2.

  16. Calculation of the oscillator strengths and of the Judd-Ofelt parameters for Eu +3 ion in solutions taking the transitions from the first excited state into consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendziewicz, J.; Oczko, G.; Strȩk, W.

    1984-03-01

    The oscillator strengths of the f-f transitions for the europium perchlorate, chloride and nitrate in mono- and disubstituted amides have been measured at 25°C. The obtained values were used for the computation of the Judd-Ofelt parameters, not only from the 7F 0 ground state, but also from the 7F 1 excited state. Using the enlarged number of the electron transitions, we have found a set of the good estimated Ω λ parameters.

  17. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-15

    A systematic study of Ca{sup +} atomic properties is carried out using a high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n=7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p{sub j}, 5p{sub j}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p{sub 3/2}, 5p{sub 3/2}, 3d{sub j}, and 4d{sub j} states in Ca{sup +} are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in the accuracy of the 3d{sub 5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3)a{sub 0}{sup 3}, in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007).]. The blackbody radiation shift of the 4s-3d{sub 5/2} clock transition in Ca{sup +} is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300 K. Electric-quadrupole 4s-nd and electric-octupole 4s-nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground-state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. Excitation energies of the ns, np, nd, nf, and ng states with n{<=} 7 in are evaluated and compared with experiment. Recommended values are provided for the 7p{sub 1/2}, 7p{sub 3/2}, 8p{sub 1/2}, and 8p{sub 3/2} removal energies for which experimental measurements are not available. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n=7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of {sup 43}Ca{sup +} ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca{sup +} atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of

  18. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Hg{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.; Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-11-15

    Excitation energies of the [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}ns, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}np{sub j}, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}nd{sub j}, [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}n{sup '}f{sub j}, and [Xe]4f{sup 14}5d{sup 10}n{sup '}g{sub j} states in Hg{sup +} are evaluated (n{<=}10, n{sup '}{<=}9, and [Xe]=1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}4p{sup 6}4d{sup 10}5s{sup 2}5p{sup 6}). First-, second-, third-, and all-order Coulomb energies and first- and second-order Coulomb-Breit energies are calculated. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, and transition rates are determined for electric-dipole transitions, including the ns (n=6-11), np (n=6-10), nd (n=6-10), nf (n=5-9), and ng (n=5-9) states. Lifetime values are determined for all above-mentioned states. The ground state E1, E2, and E3 polarizabilities are evaluated. The hyperfine structure in {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ions is investigated. The hyperfine A and B values are determined for the first low-lying levels up to n = 7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ground states is investigated. The calculated shift for the {sup 199}Hg{sup +} (F = 1, M = 0) {r_reversible} (F = 0, M = 0) transition is -0.0597(2) Hz/(kV/cm){sup 2}, in agreement with previous theoretical result -0.060(3) Hz/(kV/cm){sup 2}. These calculations provide a theoretical benchmark for comparison with experiment and theory and provide values of blackbody radiation shifts for microwave frequency standards with {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and {sup 201}Hg{sup +} ions.

  19. FOREWORD: The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchang-Brillet, Wad Lydia; Wyart, Jean-François; Zeippen, Claude

    1996-01-01

    The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas was held in Meudon, France, from August 28 to 31 1995. It was the fifth in a series started by the Atomic Spectroscopic Group at the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1983. Then followed the meetings in Toledo, USA, Amsterdam, The Nether- lands and Gaithersburg, USA, with a three year period. The original title of the series ended with "... for Astrophysics and Fusion Research" and became more general with the 4th colloquium in Gaithersburg. The purpose of the present meeting was, in line with tradition, to bring together "producers" and "users" of atomic data so as to ensure optimal coordination. Atomic physicists who study the structure of atoms and their radiative and collisional properties were invited to explain the development of their work, emphasizing the possibilities of producing precise transition wavelengths and relative line intensities. Astrophysicists and laboratory plasma physicists were invited to review their present research interests and the context in which atomic data are needed. The number of participants was about 70 for the first three meetings, then exploded to 170 at Gaithersburg. About 140 participants, coming from 13 countries, attended the colloquium in Meudon. This large gathering was partly due to a number of participants from Eastern Europe larger than in the past, and it certainly showed a steady interest for interdisciplinary exchanges between different communities of scientists. This volume includes all the invited papers given at the conference and, in the appendix, practical information on access to some databases. All invited speakers presented their talks aiming at good communication between scientists from different backgrounds. A separate bound volume containing extended abstracts of the poster papers has been published by the Publications de l'Observatoire de Paris, (Meudon 1996), under the responsibility of

  20. Stellar Laboratories: New GeV and Ge VI Oscillator Strengths and their Validation in the Hot White Dwarf RE0503-289

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Biemont, E.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art spectral analysis of hot stars by means of non-LTE model-atmosphere techniques has arrived at a high level of sophistication. The analysis of high-resolution and high-S/N spectra, however, is strongly restricted by the lack of reliable atomic data for highly ionized species from intermediate-mass metals to trans-iron elements. Especially data for the latter has only been sparsely calculated. Many of their lines are identified in spectra of extremely hot, hydrogen-deficient post-AGB stars. A reliable determination of their abundances establishes crucial constraints for AGB nucleosynthesis simulations and, thus, for stellar evolutionary theory. Aims. In a previous analysis of the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, spectral lines of highly ionized Ga, Ge, As, Se, Kr, Mo, Sn, Te, I, and Xe were identified. Individual abundance determinations are hampered by the lack of reliable oscillator strengths. Most of these identified lines stem from Ge V. In addition, we identified Ge VI lines for the first time. We calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths in order to reproduce the observed spectrum. Methods. We newly calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our non-LTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of the Ge IV-VI spectrum exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N FUV (FUSE) and UV (ORFEUS/BEFS, IUE) observations of RE 0503-289. Results. In the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, we identify four Ge IV, 37 Ge V, and seven Ge VI lines. Most of these lines are identified for the first time in any star. We can reproduce almost all Ge IV, GeV, and Ge VI lines in the observed spectrum of RE 0503-289 (T(sub eff) = 70 kK, log g = 7.5) at log Ge = -3.8 +/- 0.3 (mass fraction, about 650 times solar). The Ge IV/V/VI ionization equilibrium, that is a very sensitive T(sub eff) indicator, is reproduced well. Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a

  1. Wavelengths, transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths for M-shell transitions in Co-, Ni-, Cu-, Zn-, Ga-, Ge-, and Se-like Au ions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Jiang, Gang; Deng, Banglin; Bian, Guojie

    2014-11-15

    Wavelengths, transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths have been calculated for M-shell electric dipole transitions in Co-, Ni-, Cu-, Zn-, Ga-, Ge-, and Se-like Au ions. The fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method, taking quantum electrodynamical effects and the Breit correction into account, was used in the calculations. Calculated energy levels of M-shell excited states for Cu-, Zn-, Ga-, Ge-, and Se-like Au ions from the method were compared with available theoretical and experimental results, and good agreement with them was achieved.

  2. Astrophysical oscillator strengths for TiO and VO bands from spectrum synthesis of spectral types M1 III to M7 III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, J. M.

    1990-05-01

    For application to differential studies of molecular bandstrengths in red giant atmospheres, a comprehensive set of straight mean opacity data for O-rich stars was compiled. This includes original opacities for the TiO and VO A-X and B-X band systems. This paper reports the calibration of the opacity code which has produced a set of self-consistent astrophysical oscillator strengths for the TiO gamma, delta, phi, epsilon, and VO A-X and B-X systems. By combining these values with the known laboratory values of f(e) for the TiO delta system, estimates of the absolute value of f(e) for the TiO epsilon and VO bands are made. These estimates will be useful until laboratory measurements of the transition strengths of these astrophysically important band systems are available.

  3. A comparative study between semi-empirical oscillator strength parametrization and relativistic Hartree-Fock methods for computing the radiative parameters in Zr II spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinet, P.; Bouazza, S.; Palmeri, P.

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we compare the radiative transition rates computed by two different semi-empirical approaches, based on a parametrization of the oscillator strengths and on a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects, for spectral lines in singly ionized zirconium. A detailed comparison with available experimental results is also reported and an overall good agreement is observed between all sets of data allowing us to provide new reliable oscillator strengths for a large amount of Zr II lines in the wavelength region from 1616 to 14746 Å. Moreover, we give radial integral values of the main atomic transitions deduced in this study: <4d25p|r1|4d25s>=-3.1522 (0.0161), <4d25p|r1|4d3>=1.7605 (0.0107), <4d25p|r1|4d26s>=-1.481 (0.794) and<4d25p|r1|4d25d>=2.289 (0.014).

  4. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  5. Spatial Noise in Coupling Strength and Natural Frequency within a Pacemaker Network; Consequences for Development of Intestinal Motor Patterns According to a Weakly Coupled Phase Oscillator Model.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    Pacemaker activities generated by networks of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), in conjunction with the enteric nervous system, orchestrate most motor patterns in the gastrointestinal tract. It was our objective to understand the role of network features of ICC associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) in the shaping of motor patterns of the small intestine. To that end, a model of weakly coupled oscillators (oscillators influence each other's phase but not amplitude) was created with most parameters derived from experimental data. The ICC network is a uniform two dimensional network coupled by gap junctions. All ICC generate pacemaker (slow wave) activity with a frequency gradient in mice from 50/min at the proximal end of the intestine to 40/min at the distal end. Key features of motor patterns, directly related to the underlying pacemaker activity, are frequency steps and dislocations. These were accurately mimicked by reduction of coupling strength at a point in the chain of oscillators. When coupling strength was expressed as a product of gap junction density and conductance, and gap junction density was varied randomly along the chain (i.e., spatial noise) with a long-tailed distribution, plateau steps occurred at pointsof low density. As gap junction conductance was decreased, the number of plateaus increased, mimicking the effect of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone. When spatial noise was added to the natural interval gradient, as gap junction conductance decreased, the number of plateaus increased as before but in addition the phase waves frequently changed direction of apparent propagation, again mimicking the effect of carbenoxolone. In summary, key features of the motor patterns that are governed by pacemaker activity may be a direct consequence of biological noise, specifically spatial noise in gap junction coupling and pacemaker frequency. PMID:26869875

  6. Spatial Noise in Coupling Strength and Natural Frequency within a Pacemaker Network; Consequences for Development of Intestinal Motor Patterns According to a Weakly Coupled Phase Oscillator Model

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sean P.; Huizinga, Jan D.

    2016-01-01

    Pacemaker activities generated by networks of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), in conjunction with the enteric nervous system, orchestrate most motor patterns in the gastrointestinal tract. It was our objective to understand the role of network features of ICC associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) in the shaping of motor patterns of the small intestine. To that end, a model of weakly coupled oscillators (oscillators influence each other's phase but not amplitude) was created with most parameters derived from experimental data. The ICC network is a uniform two dimensional network coupled by gap junctions. All ICC generate pacemaker (slow wave) activity with a frequency gradient in mice from 50/min at the proximal end of the intestine to 40/min at the distal end. Key features of motor patterns, directly related to the underlying pacemaker activity, are frequency steps and dislocations. These were accurately mimicked by reduction of coupling strength at a point in the chain of oscillators. When coupling strength was expressed as a product of gap junction density and conductance, and gap junction density was varied randomly along the chain (i.e., spatial noise) with a long-tailed distribution, plateau steps occurred at pointsof low density. As gap junction conductance was decreased, the number of plateaus increased, mimicking the effect of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone. When spatial noise was added to the natural interval gradient, as gap junction conductance decreased, the number of plateaus increased as before but in addition the phase waves frequently changed direction of apparent propagation, again mimicking the effect of carbenoxolone. In summary, key features of the motor patterns that are governed by pacemaker activity may be a direct consequence of biological noise, specifically spatial noise in gap junction coupling and pacemaker frequency. PMID:26869875

  7. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali

  8. QED Approach to Modeling Spectra of the Multicharged Ions in a Plasma: Oscillator and Electron-ion Collision Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.; Ignatenko, A.; Svinarenko, A.; Korchevsky, D.; Lovett, L.

    2008-10-22

    The uniform energy approach, formally based on the QED theory with using gauge invariant scheme of generation of the optimal one-electron representation, is used for the description of spectra of the multicharged ions in a laser plasma, calculation of electron-ion collision strengths, cross-sections in Ne-like and Ar-like ions.

  9. Contributions to the generalized oscillator strength for the inner-shell C 1s{yields}3s{sigma}{sub g} transition in CO{sub 2} from the vibronic coupling mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Alexandre B.; Bielschowsky, Carlos E.

    2002-11-01

    An approach is proposed to account for the general effect of the nuclei motion in the intensity of electronic transitions caused by fast electron collision with molecular targets, following a similar procedure that has recently been used by our group to determine the optical oscillator strength of symmetry-forbidden transition, and which consists of expanding the (squared) transition moment along the normal coordinates of vibration. It is shown that the profile of total generalized oscillator strength as a function of the squared transferred moment can be significantly changed by the inclusion of terms that depend explicitly on the normal coordinates of vibration. The generalized oscillator strength for the inner-shell C 1s{yields}3s{sigma}{sub g} transition in CO{sub 2} is calculated within this approach and compared with experimental results.

  10. Stellar laboratories: new Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths and their validation in the hot white dwarf RE 0503-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Biémont, É.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-10-01

    Context. State-of-the-art spectral analysis of hot stars by means of non-LTE model-atmosphere techniques has arrived at a high level of sophistication. The analysis of high-resolution and high-S/N spectra, however, is strongly restricted by the lack of reliable atomic data for highly ionized species from intermediate-mass metals to trans-iron elements. Especially data for the latter has only been sparsely calculated. Many of their lines are identified in spectra of extremely hot, hydrogen-deficient post-AGB stars. A reliable determination of their abundances establishes crucial constraints for AGB nucleosynthesis simulations and, thus, for stellar evolutionary theory. Aims: In a previous analysis of the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, spectral lines of highly ionized Ga, Ge, As, Se, Kr, Mo, Sn, Te, I, and Xe were identified. Individual abundance determinations are hampered by the lack of reliable oscillator strengths. Most of these identified lines stem from Ge V. In addition, we identified Ge VI lines for the first time. We calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths in order to reproduce the observed spectrum. Methods: We newly calculated Ge V and Ge VI oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our non-LTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of the Ge iv-vi spectrum exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N FUV (FUSE) and UV (ORFEUS/BEFS, IUE) observations of RE 0503-289. Results: In the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289, we identify four Ge IV, 37 Ge V, and seven Ge VI lines. Most of these lines are identified for the first time in any star. We can reproduce almost all Ge IV, Ge V, and Ge VI lines in the observed spectrum of RE 0503-289 (Teff = 70 kK, log g = 7.5) at log Ge = -3.8 ± 0.3 (mass fraction, about 650 times solar). The Ge iv/v/vi ionization equilibrium, that is a very sensitive Teff indicator, is reproduced well. Conclusions: Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a

  11. The Interstellar Abundance of Lead: Experimental Oscillator Strengths for Pb II λ1203 and λ1433 and New Detections of Pb II in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam Michael; Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard E.; Federman, Steven R.; Ellis, David G.; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry J.; Furman, W. A.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate gas-phase abundances of ions in the interstellar medium may be obtained through the analysis of interstellar absorption lines, but only if the oscillator strengths (f-values) of the relevant transitions are well known. For dominant ions, comparison of the gas-phase abundance with the appropriate solar reference abundance yields the degree to which the element is incorporated into interstellar dust grains. Singly-ionized lead is the dominant form of this element in the neutral interstellar medium. However, while Pb II has several strong resonance lines in the ultraviolet, the f-values for these transitions are uncertain. Here, we present the first experimentally determined oscillator strengths for the Pb II transitions at 1203.6 Å and 1433.9 Å, obtained from lifetime measurements made using beam-foil techniques. We also present new detections of these lines in the interstellar medium from an analysis of archival spectra acquired by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Notably, our observations of the Pb II λ1203 line represent the first detection of this transition in interstellar gas. Our experimental f-values for the Pb II λ1203 and λ1433 transitions are consistent with recent theoretical results, including our own relativistic calculations, but are significantly smaller than previous values based on older calculations. For the Pb II λ1433 line, in particular, our new f-value yields an increase in the interstellar abundance of Pb of 0.43 dex over estimates based on the f-value listed by Morton. With our revised f-values, and with our new detections of Pb II λ1203 and λ1433, we find that the depletion of Pb onto interstellar grains is not nearly as severe as previously thought, and is very similar to the depletions seen for elements such as Zn and Sn, which have similar condensation temperatures.

  12. Improved automatic steam distillation combined with oscillation-type densimetry for determining alcoholic strength in spirits and liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Plato, Leander; Suessmann, Manuela; Di Carmine, Matthew; Krueger, Bjoern; Kukuck, Armin; Kranz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the alcoholic strength in spirits and liqueurs is required to control the labelling of alcoholic beverages. The reference methodology prescribes a distillation step followed by densimetric measurement. The classic distillation using a Vigreux rectifying column and a West condenser is time consuming and error-prone, especially for liqueurs that may have problems with entrainment and charring. For this reason, this methodology suggests the use of an automated steam distillation device as alternative. The novel instrument comprises an increased steam power, a redesigned geometry of the condenser and a larger cooling coil with controllable flow, compared to previously available devices. Method optimization applying D-optimal and central composite designs showed significant influence of sample volume, distillation time and coolant flow, while other investigated parameters such as steam power, receiver volume, or the use of pipettes or flasks for sample measurement did not significantly influence the results. The method validation was conducted using the following settings: steam power 70 %, sample volume 25 mL transferred using pipettes, receiver volume 50 mL, coolant flow 7 L/min, and distillation time as long as possible just below the calibration mark. For four different liqueurs covering the typical range of these products between 15 and 35 % vol, the method showed an adequate precision, with relative standard deviations below 0.4 % (intraday) and below 0.6 % (interday). The absolute standard deviations were between 0.06 % vol and 0.08 % vol (intraday) and between 0.07 % vol and 0.10 % vol (interday). The improved automatic steam distillation devices offer an excellent alternative for sample cleanup of volatiles from complex matrices. A major advantage are the low costs for consumables per analysis (only distilled water is needed). For alcoholic strength determination, the method has become more rugged than before, and there are only

  13. Improved automatic steam distillation combined with oscillation-type densimetry for determining alcoholic strength in spirits and liqueurs.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Plato, Leander; Suessmann, Manuela; Di Carmine, Matthew; Krueger, Bjoern; Kukuck, Armin; Kranz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the alcoholic strength in spirits and liqueurs is required to control the labelling of alcoholic beverages. The reference methodology prescribes a distillation step followed by densimetric measurement. The classic distillation using a Vigreux rectifying column and a West condenser is time consuming and error-prone, especially for liqueurs that may have problems with entrainment and charring. For this reason, this methodology suggests the use of an automated steam distillation device as alternative. The novel instrument comprises an increased steam power, a redesigned geometry of the condenser and a larger cooling coil with controllable flow, compared to previously available devices. Method optimization applying D-optimal and central composite designs showed significant influence of sample volume, distillation time and coolant flow, while other investigated parameters such as steam power, receiver volume, or the use of pipettes or flasks for sample measurement did not significantly influence the results. The method validation was conducted using the following settings: steam power 70 %, sample volume 25 mL transferred using pipettes, receiver volume 50 mL, coolant flow 7 L/min, and distillation time as long as possible just below the calibration mark. For four different liqueurs covering the typical range of these products between 15 and 35 % vol, the method showed an adequate precision, with relative standard deviations below 0.4 % (intraday) and below 0.6 % (interday). The absolute standard deviations were between 0.06 % vol and 0.08 % vol (intraday) and between 0.07 % vol and 0.10 % vol (interday). The improved automatic steam distillation devices offer an excellent alternative for sample cleanup of volatiles from complex matrices. A major advantage are the low costs for consumables per analysis (only distilled water is needed). For alcoholic strength determination, the method has become more rugged than before, and there are only

  14. Convergent series representation for the generalized oscillator strength of electron-impact ionization and an improved binary-encounter-dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    2001-10-01

    The use of the Bethe cross section in the binary-encounter-dipole (BED) model for electron-impact ionization is studied. While the dipole contribution in the Born approximation accounts for the longest-range interaction in electron-neutral atom/molecule inelastic collisions at any incident energy, the Bethe formula is applicable only at high energies. To derive a suitable representation of the Born cross section for dipole-allowed transitions, a convergent series representation for the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) of electron- impact ionization is studied. It is shown that by transforming to a new variable determined by the location of the singularities of the GOS on the complex plane of momentum transfer K, a series representation for the GOS is obtained that is convergent at all physically attainable values of K. An approximate representation of the GOS that truncates the series representation to the first three terms is also given. The approximate GOS describes the interaction of the electron with a shielded dipole potential and satisfies both Lassettre's limit theorem at K=0 and the asymptotic behavior at large K derived by Rau and Fano [A. R. P. Rau and U. Fano, Phys. Rev. 162, 68 (1967)]. The dipole-Born cross section so obtained is applicable at all incident energies and goes to the Bethe cross section at the high-energy limit. It provides a more suitable representation of the dipole contribution in the BED model than the Bethe cross section and is valid over the entire energy range. A similar analysis of the optical-oscillator strength (OOS) as a function of the complex momentum for the ejected electron kp, plus the requirement that the OOS satisfies both the low- and high-kp limits produces an analogous series representation for the OOS. An approximate one-term representation of the OOS is also developed that can be used in modeling calculations. Numerical examples of total ionization cross sections of N2, H2O, CO2, CH4, and CF4 using the new

  15. Absolute oscillator strengths for the iron group - A correction to the data of Warner for the second spectra and a comment on some of the semiempirical results of Kurucz and Peytremann

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    It has already been shown that the Fe II absolute oscillator strengths (f-values) measured by Warner (1967) contain a systematic error, the magnitude of which depends on the energy of the transition's upper level. The present paper demonstrates that this error affects all of Warner's oscillator strengths for the second spectra of the iron group and develops a correction formula for Warner's results. A comparison of the corrected f-values with other measured f-values for Ti II, V II, and Fe II indicates that the correction improves the usefulness of Warner's data and that the corrected f-values have no large systematic dependence on wavelength, level energy, or line strength. Solar abundances for iron-group elements computed using the original and corrected f-values are compared with recently suggested abundances, and it is found that the corrected f-values yield more consistent results. Semiempirical oscillator strengths calculated by Kurucz and Peytremann (1975) for Fe I, Ti II, and V II are also compared with measured data to evaluate the accuracy of the calculations. It is found that the absolute scales of these results are roughly correct, but some of them are subject to very large errors.

  16. Relativistic many-body calculations of electric-dipole lifetimes, rates, and oscillator strengths of Delta(n) = 0 transitions between 3l^-1 4l' states in Ni-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U I; Safronova, A S; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-01-05

    Transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are calculated for electric-dipole (E1) transitions between odd-parity 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4{ell}{sub 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4{ell}{sub 2}, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4{ell}{sub 1} states and even-parity 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4{ell}{sub 2}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4{ell}{sub 1}, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4{ell}{sub 2} (with 4{ell}{sub 1} = 4p; 4f and 4{ell}{sub 2} = 4s; 4d) in Ni-like ions with the nuclear charges ranging from Z = 34 to 100. Relativistic many-body perturbation theory (RMBPT), including the Breit interaction, is used to evaluate retarded E1 matrix elements in length and velocity forms. The calculations start from a 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10} Dirac-Fock potential. First-order RMBPT is used to obtain intermediate coupling coefficients and second-order RMBPT is used to calculate transition matrix elements. Contributions from negative-energy states are included in the second-order E1 matrix elements to ensure the gauge independence of transition amplitudes. Transition energies used in the calculation of oscillator strengths and transition rates are from second-order RMBPT. Lifetimes of the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4d levels are given for Z = 34-100. Transition rates, line strengths, and oscillator strengths are compared with critically evaluated experimental values and with results from other recent calculations. These atomic data are important in modeling of M-shell radiation spectra of heavy ions generated in electron beam ion trap experiments and in M-shell diagnostics of plasmas.

  17. Oscillator strengths for lines of the F/0, 0, 0/-X/0, 0, 0/ band of H2O at 111.5 nanometers and the abundance of H2O in diffuse interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.; Griesinger, H. E.; Black, J. H.

    1981-11-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths (f-values) for rotational lines of the F˜ (0, 0, 0)-X˜(0, 0, 0) band of H2O at 111.5 nm have been measured with an uncertainty of ±40% using quantitative photographic techniques. The f-value for the 111-000 line, the one most likely to be seen in absorption in interstellar clouds, is (3.0 ± 1.2) × 10-2 This value is combined with a measured upper limit for absorption by this line in the ζ Oph cloud to show that the column density of H2O in the 000 level is less than 5.3 × 1012 cm-2. This upper limit is larger than the predictions of gas-phase, chemical models of this cloud. We show that definite detection of H2O in diffuse clouds at the level of this upper limit would be in conflict with models of molecular formation in shock-heated gas. The data analysis produced additional results: the absolute scale of the oscillator strengths for lines of the C˜(0, 0, 0)-X˜(0, 0, 0) band of H2O at 124 nm is reduced by 10%; the integrated absorption coefficients for P - and C-k bands are compared to calculated and measured values and agree within the experimental uncertainties.

  18. High-resolution oscillator strength measurements of the v' = 0,1 bands of the B-X, C-X, and E-X systems in five isotopologues of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, G.; Heays, A. N.; Lyons, J. R.; Smith, P. L.; Eidelsberg, M.; Lemaire, J. L.; Gavilan, L.; Federman, S. R.; De Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.

    2014-06-10

    We report oscillator strengths for six strong vibrational bands between 105.0 and 115.2 nm, associated with transitions from the v = 0 level of the X {sup 1}Σ{sup +} ground state to the v = 0 and 1 levels of the B {sup 1}Σ{sup +}, C {sup 1}Σ{sup +}, and E {sup 1}Π states, in {sup 12}C{sup 16}O, {sup 12}C{sup 17}O, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O, {sup 13}C{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C{sup 18}O. These measurements extend the development of a comprehensive database of line positions, oscillator strengths, and linewidths of photodissociating transitions for all astrophysically relevant CO isotopologues. The E-X bands, in particular, play central roles in CO photodissociation and fractionation models of interstellar clouds and circumstellar disks including the early solar nebula. The resolving powers of the room-temperature measurements, R = 300,000-400,000, allow for the analysis of individual line strengths within bands; the measurements reveal J-dependences in the branch intensities of the C(v = 0,1)-X(0) and E(v = 0,1)-X(0) bands in all isotopologues. Minimal or no isotopologue dependence was found in the f-values of the C(v = 0,1)-X(0) and E(v = 0,1)-X(0) bands at a ∼5% uncertainty level. Revised dissociation branching ratios for the C(v = 0,1) and E(v = 0,1) levels are computed based on these f-values. The weak isotopologue dependence of the f-values presented here eliminates this mechanism as an explanation for the large {sup 17}O enrichments seen in recent laboratory photolysis experiments on CO at wavelengths from 105 to 108 nm.

  19. Stellar laboratories. VII. New Kr iv - vii oscillator strengths and an improved spectral analysis of the hot, hydrogen-deficient DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Quinet, P.; Hoyer, D.; Werner, K.; Richter, P.; Kruk, J. W.; Demleitner, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. Aims: New Kr iv-vii oscillator strengths for a large number of lines enable us to construct more detailed model atoms for our NLTE model-atmosphere calculations. This enables us to search for additional Kr lines in observed spectra and to improve Kr abundance determinations. Methods: We calculated Kr iv-vii oscillator strengths to consider radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of Kr lines that are exhibited in high-resolution and high S/N ultraviolet (UV) observations of the hot white dwarf RE 0503-289. Results: We reanalyzed the effective temperature and surface gravity and determined Teff = 70000 ± 2000 K and log (g/ cm s-2) = 7.5 ± 0.1. We newly identified ten Kr v lines and one Kr vi line in the spectrum of RE 0503-289. We measured a Kr abundance of -3.3 ± 0.3 (logarithmic mass fraction). We discovered that the interstellar absorption toward RE 0503-289 has a multi-velocity structure within a radial-velocity interval of -40 km s-1oscillator strengths. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26666. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Based on

  20. Stellar Laboratories: 3. New Ba 5, Ba 6, and Ba 7 Oscillator Strengths and the Barium Abundance in the Hot White Dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, Jeffrey Walter

    2014-01-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. Aims. Reliable Ba 5-7 oscillator strengths are used to identify Ba lines in the spectra of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289 and to determine their photospheric Ba abundances. Methods. We newly calculated Ba v-vii oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of Ba lines exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N UV observations of G191-B2B and RE 0503-289. Results. For the first time, we identified highly ionized Ba in the spectra of hot white dwarfs. We detected Ba vi and Ba vii lines in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of RE 0503-289. The Ba vi/Ba vii ionization equilibrium is well reproduced with the previously determined effective temperature of 70 000 K and surface gravity of log g=7.5. The Ba abundance is 3.5 +/- 0.5 × 10(exp-4) (mass fraction, about 23 000 times the solar value). In the FUSE spectrum of G191-B2B, we identified the strongest Ba vii line (at 993.41 Å) only, and determined a Ba abundance of 4.0 +/- 0.5 × 10(exp-6) (about 265 times solar). Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a pre-requisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Ba vi-vii line profiles in two white dwarfs' (G191-B2B and RE 0503-289) far-ultraviolet spectra were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. This allowed to determine the photospheric Ba abundance of these two stars precisely.

  1. Stellar Laboratories II. New Zn Iv and Zn v Oscillator Strengths and Their Validation in the Hot White Dwarfs G191-B2B and RE0503-289

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise (SN) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. In a recent analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the DA-type white dwarf G191B2B,21 Zn iv lines were newly identified. Because of the lack of Zn iv data, transition probabilities of the isoelectronic Ge vi were adapted for a first, coarse determination of the photospheric Zn abundance.Aims. Reliable Zn iv and Zn v oscillator strengths are used to improve the Zn abundance determination and to identify more Zn lines in the spectra of G191B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503289. Methods. We performed new calculations of Zn iv and Zn v oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of the Zn iv v spectrum exhibited in high-resolution and high-SN UV observations of G191B2B and RE 0503289. Results. In the UV spectrum of G191B2B, we identify 31 Zn iv and 16 Zn v lines. Most of these are identified for the first time in any star. We can reproduce well almost all of them at log Zn 5.52 0.2 (mass fraction, about 1.7 times solar). In particular, the Zn iv Zn v ionization equilibrium, which is a very sensitive Teff indicator, is well reproduced with the previously determined Teff 60 000 2000 K and log g 7.60 0.05. In the spectrum of RE 0503289, we identified 128 Zn v lines for the first time and determined log Zn 3.57 0.2 (155 times solar). Conclusions. Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a pre-requisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Zn iv and Zn v line profiles in two white dwarf (G191B2B and RE 0503289) ultraviolet spectra were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. This allowed us to determine the

  2. Control of Oscillation Patterns in a Symmetric Coupled Biological Oscillator System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-08-01

    A chain of three-oscillator system was constructed with living biological oscillators of phasmodial slime mold, Physarum polycehalum and the oscillation patterns were analyzed by the symmetric Hopf bifurcation theory using group theory. Multi-stability of oscillation patterns was observed, even when the coupling strength was fixed. This suggests that the coupling strength is not an effective parameter to obtain a desired oscillation pattern among the multiple patterns. Here we propose a method to control oscillation patterns using resonance to external stimulus and demonstrate pattern switching induced by frequency resonance given to only one of oscillators in the system.

  3. Stellar laboratories. VI. New Mo iv-vii oscillator strengths and the molybdenum abundance in the hot white dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Quinet, P.; Hoyer, D.; Werner, K.; Demleitner, M.; Kruk, J. W.

    2016-03-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. Aims: To identify molybdenum lines in the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289 and, to determine their photospheric Mo abundances, reliable Mo iv-vii oscillator strengths are used. Methods: We newly calculated Mo iv-vii oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of Mo lines exhibited in high-resolution and high S/N UV observations of RE 0503-289. Results: We identified 12 Mo v and 9 Mo vi lines in the UV spectrum of RE 0503-289 and measured a photospheric Mo abundance of 1.2-3.0 × 10-4 (mass fraction, 22 500-56 400 times the solar abundance). In addition, from the As v and Sn iv resonance lines, we measured mass fractions of arsenic (0.5-1.3 × 10-5, about 300-1200 times solar) and tin (1.3-3.2 × 10-4, about 14 300-35 200 times solar). For G191-B2B, upper limits were determined for the abundances of Mo (5.3 × 10-7, 100 times solar) and, in addition, for Kr (1.1 × 10-6, 10 times solar) and Xe (1.7 × 10-7, 10 times solar). The arsenic abundance was determined (2.3-5.9 × 10-7, about 21-53 times solar). A new, registered German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (GAVO) service, TOSS, has been constructed to provide weighted oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. Conclusions: Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a prerequisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Mo v-vi line profiles in the UV spectrum of the white dwarf RE 0503-289 were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. For the first time, this allowed the photospheric Mo

  4. Chimera States in populations of nonlocally coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Nkomo, Simbarashe; Tinsley, Mark R; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-06-14

    Chimera states occur spontaneously in populations of coupled photosensitive chemical oscillators. Experiments and simulations are carried out on nonlocally coupled oscillators, with the coupling strength decreasing exponentially with distance. Chimera states with synchronized oscillators, phase waves, and phase clusters coexisting with unsynchronized oscillators are analyzed. Irregular motion of the cores of asynchronous oscillators is found in spiral-wave chimeras.

  5. Braided oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A.

    2002-03-01

    A generalized oscillator algebra is proposed and the braided Hopf algebra structure for this generalized oscillator is investigated. Using the solutions for the braided Hopf algebra structure, two types of braided Fibonacci oscillators are introduced. This leads to two types of braided Biedenharn-Macfarlane oscillators as special cases of the Fibonacci oscillators. We also find the braided Hopf algebra solutions for the three dimensional braided space. One of these, as a special case, gives the Hopf algebra given in the literature.

  6. Long-Range Temporal Correlations in the amplitude of alpha oscillations predict and reflect strength of intracortical facilitation: Combined TMS and EEG study.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Tommaso; Blagovechtchenski, Evgeny; Nazarova, Maria; Iscan, Zafer; Moiseeva, Victoria; Nikulin, Vadim V

    2016-09-01

    While variability of the motor responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is widely acknowledged, little is known about its central origin. One plausible explanation for such variability may relate to different neuronal states defining the reactivity of the cortex to TMS. In this study intrinsic spatio-temporal neuronal dynamics were estimated with Long-Range Temporal Correlations (LRTC) in order to predict the inter-individual differences in the strength of intra-cortical facilitation (ICF) and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) produced by paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS) of the left primary motor cortex. LRTC in the alpha frequency range were assessed from multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) obtained at rest before and after the application of and single-pulse TMS (spTMS) and ppTMS protocols. For the EEG session, preceding TMS application, we showed a positive correlation across subjects between the strength of ICF and LRTC in the fronto-central and parietal areas. This in turn attests to the existence of subject-specific neuronal phenotypes defining the reactivity of the brain to ppTMS. In addition, we also showed that ICF was associated with the changes in neuronal dynamics in the EEG session after the application of the stimulation. This result provides a complementary evidence for the recent findings demonstrating that the cortical stimulation with sparse non-regular stimuli might have considerable long-lasting effects on the cortical activity.

  7. Stellar laboratories. IV. New Ga iv, Ga v, and Ga vi oscillator strengths and the gallium abundance in the hot white dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2015-05-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, advanced non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These atmospheres are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that are used to calculate them. Aims: Reliable Ga iv-vi oscillator strengths are used to identify Ga lines in the spectra of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289 and to determine their photospheric Ga abundances. Methods: We newly calculated Ga iv-vi oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for analyzing of Ga lines exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N UV observations of G191-B2B and RE 0503-289. Results: We unambiguously detected 20 isolated and 6 blended (with lines of other species) Ga v lines in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectrum of RE 0503-289. The identification of Ga iv and Ga vi lines is uncertain because they are weak and partly blended by other lines. The determined Ga abundance is 3.5 ± 0.5 × 10-5 (mass fraction, about 625 times the solar value). The Ga iv/Ga v ionization equilibrium, which is a very sensitive indicator for the effective temperature, is well reproduced in RE 0503-289. We identified the strongest Ga iv lines (at 1258.801, 1338.129 Å) in the HST/STIS spectrum of G191-B2B and measured a Ga abundance of 2.0 ± 0.5 × 10-6 (about 22 times solar). Conclusions: Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a prerequisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. The observed Ga iv-v line profiles in two white dwarf (G191-B2B and RE 0503-289) ultraviolet spectra were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. For the first time, this allowed us to determine the photospheric Ga abundance in white dwarfs. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space

  8. Stellar laboratories. II. New Zn iv and Zn v oscillator strengths and their validation in the hot white dwarfs G191-B2B and RE 0503-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Quinet, P.; Kruk, J. W.

    2014-04-01

    Context. For the spectral analysis of high-resolution and high-signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of hot stars, state-of-the-art non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres are mandatory. These are strongly dependent on the reliability of the atomic data that is used for their calculation. In a recent analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B, 21 Zn iv lines were newly identified. Because of the lack of Zn iv data, transition probabilities of the isoelectronic Ge vi were adapted for a first, coarse determination of the photospheric Zn abundance. Aims: Reliable Zn iv and Zn v oscillator strengths are used to improve the Zn abundance determination and to identify more Zn lines in the spectra of G191-B2B and the DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289. Methods: We performed new calculations of Zn iv and Zn v oscillator strengths to consider their radiative and collisional bound-bound transitions in detail in our NLTE stellar-atmosphere models for the analysis of the Zn iv - v spectrum exhibited in high-resolution and high-S/N UV observations of G191-B2B and RE 0503-289. Results: In the UV spectrum of G191-B2B, we identify 31 Zn iv and 16 Zn v lines. Most of these are identified for the first time in any star. We can reproduce well almost all of them at log Zn = -5.52 ± 0.2 (mass fraction, about 1.7 times solar). In particular, the Zn iv / Zn v ionization equilibrium, which is a very sensitive Teff indicator, is well reproduced with the previously determined and log g = 7.60 ± 0.05. In the spectrum of RE 0503-289, we identified 128 Zn v lines for the first time and determined log Zn = -3.57 ± 0.2 (155 times solar). Conclusions: Reliable measurements and calculations of atomic data are a pre-requisite for stellar-atmosphere modeling. Observed Zn iv and Zn v line profiles in two white dwarf (G191-B2B and RE 0503-289) ultraviolet spectra were well reproduced with our newly calculated oscillator strengths. This allowed us to

  9. Neurodynamic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, Ismael; Gonzalez, Hortensia; Quiza, Jorge; Gonazalez, J. Jesus; Arroyo, Ruben; Lara, Ritaluz

    1995-01-01

    Oscillation of electrical activity has been found in many nervous systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates including man. There exists experimental evidence of very simple circuits with the capability of oscillation. Neurons with intrinsic oscillation have been found and also neural circuits where oscillation is a property of the network. These two types of oscillations coexist in many instances. It is nowadays hypothesized that behind synchronization and oscillation there is a system of coupled oscillators responsible for activities that range from locomotion and feature binding in vision to control of sleep and circadian rhythms. The huge knowledge that has been acquired on oscillators from the times of Lord Rayleigh has made the simulation of neural oscillators a very active endeavor. This has been enhanced with more recent physiological findings about small neural circuits by means of intracellular and extracellular recordings as well as imaging methods. The future of this interdisciplinary field looks very promising; some researchers are going into quantum mechanics with the idea of trying to provide a quantum description of the brain. In this work we describe some simulations using neuron models by means of which we form simple neural networks that have the capability of oscillation. We analyze the oscillatory activity with root locus method, cross-correlation histograms, and phase planes. In the more complicated neural network models there is the possibility of chaotic oscillatory activity and we study that by means of Lyapunov exponents. The companion paper shows an example of that kind.

  10. Stochastic switching in delay-coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Otti; Jüngling, Thomas; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    A delay is known to induce multistability in periodic systems. Under influence of noise, coupled oscillators can switch between coexistent orbits with different frequencies and different oscillation patterns. For coupled phase oscillators we reduce the delay system to a nondelayed Langevin equation, which allows us to analytically compute the distribution of frequencies and their corresponding residence times. The number of stable periodic orbits scales with the roundtrip delay time and coupling strength, but the noisy system visits only a fraction of the orbits, which scales with the square root of the delay time and is independent of the coupling strength. In contrast, the residence time in the different orbits is mainly determined by the coupling strength and the number of oscillators, and only weakly dependent on the coupling delay. Finally we investigate the effect of a detuning between the oscillators. We demonstrate the generality of our results with delay-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators.

  11. Atomic Oscillator Strengths in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Szabo, Csilla I.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed techniques to measure branching fractions in the vacuum ultraviolet using diffraction grating spectroscopy and phosphor image plates as detectors. These techniques have been used to measure branching fractions in Fe II that give prominent emission lines in astrophysical objects.

  12. LINE ABSORPTION OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS FOR THE c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0-5) BANDS IN N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, C.; Velasco, A. M.

    2011-09-20

    Theoretical absorption oscillator strengths and emission branching ratios for rotational lines of the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0-5) bands of molecular nitrogen are reported. The calculations have been performed with the molecular quantum defect orbital method, which has proved to be reliable in previous studies of rovibronic transitions in diatomic molecules. The strong interaction between c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3) and b' {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(10) states has been analyzed through an interaction matrix that includes rotational terms. Owing to the perturbation, the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0), c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(1), and c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(5) bands are not weak, in contrast to what would be expected on the basis of the Franck-Condon principle. Moreover, the intensity distribution of the rotational lines within each of the vibronic bands deviates from considerations based on Hoenl-London factors. In this work, we provide data that may be useful to interpret spectra from atmospheres of the Earth, Titan, and Triton, in which transitions from the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3) level have been detected.

  13. Hydrodynamic synchronization of colloidal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Kotar, Jurij; Leoni, Marco; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Cicuta, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Two colloidal spheres are maintained in oscillation by switching the position of an optical trap when a sphere reaches a limit position, leading to oscillations that are bounded in amplitude but free in phase and period. The interaction between the oscillators is only through the hydrodynamic flow induced by their motion. We prove that in the absence of stochastic noise the antiphase dynamical state is stable, and we show how the period depends on coupling strength. Both features are observed experimentally. As the natural frequencies of the oscillators are made progressively different, the coordination is quickly lost. These results help one to understand the origin of hydrodynamic synchronization and how the dynamics can be tuned. Cilia and flagella are biological systems coupled hydrodynamically, exhibiting dramatic collective motions. We propose that weakly correlated phase fluctuations, with one of the oscillators typically precessing the other, are characteristic of hydrodynamically coupled systems in the presence of thermal noise. PMID:20385848

  14. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  15. Raindrop oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the change in shape of a raindrop is presented. Raindrops measured by two orthogonal cameras were classified by shape and orientation to determine the nature of the oscillation. A physical model based on potential energy was then developed to study the amplitude variation of oscillating drops. The model results show that oscillations occur about the equilibrium axis ratio, but the time average axis ratio if significantly more spherical for large amplitudes because of asymmetry in the surface potential energy. A generalization of the model to oscillations produced by turbulence yields average axis ratios that are consistent with the camera measurements. The model results for average axis ratios were applied to rainfall studies with a dual polarized radar.

  16. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  17. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  18. Programmable Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Lee, Clement G.; Nguyen, Huy

    2011-01-01

    A programmable oscillator is a frequency synthesizer with an output phase that tracks an arbitrary function. An offset, phase-locked loop circuit is used in combination with an error control feedback loop to precisely control the output phase of the oscillator. To down-convert the received signal, several stages of mixing may be employed with the compensation for the time-base distortion of the carrier occurring at any one of those stages. In the Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), the compensation occurs in the mixing from an intermediate frequency (IF), whose value is dependent on the station and band, to a common IF used in the final stage of down-conversion to baseband. The programmable oscillator (PO) is used in the final stage of down-conversion to generate the IF, along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier, thus removing it from the final down-converted signal.

  19. Magnetic Torsional Oscillations in Magnetars

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2009-05-01

    We investigate torsional Alfven oscillations of relativistic stars with a global dipole magnetic field, via 2D numerical simulations. We find that a) there exist two families of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with harmonics at integer multiples of the fundamental frequency, b) the QPOs are long-lived, c) for the chosen form of dipolar magnetic field, the frequency ratio of the lower to upper fundamental QPOs is about 0.6, independent of the equilibrium model or of the strength of the magnetic field, and d) within a representative sample of EOS and of various magnetar masses, the Alfven QPO frequencies are given by accurate empirical relations that depend only on the compactness of the star and on the magnetic field strength. Compared to the observational frequencies, we also obtain an upper limit on the strength of magnetic field of SGR 1806-20 (if is dominated by a dipolar component) between {approx}3 and 7x10{sup 15} Gauss.

  20. Reentrant transition in coupled noisy oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a synchronization-breaking instability observed in a noisy oscillator unidirectionally coupled to a pacemaker. Using a phase oscillator model, we find that, as the coupling strength is increased, the noisy oscillator lags behind the pacemaker more frequently and the phase slip rate increases, which may not be observed in averaged phase models such as the Kuramoto model. Investigation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation enables us to obtain the reentrant transition line between the synchronized state and the phase slip state. We verify our theory using the Brusselator model, suggesting that this reentrant transition can be found in a wide range of limit cycle oscillators.

  1. Reentrant transition in coupled noisy oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We report on a synchronization-breaking instability observed in a noisy oscillator unidirectionally coupled to a pacemaker. Using a phase oscillator model, we find that, as the coupling strength is increased, the noisy oscillator lags behind the pacemaker more frequently and the phase slip rate increases, which may not be observed in averaged phase models such as the Kuramoto model. Investigation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation enables us to obtain the reentrant transition line between the synchronized state and the phase slip state. We verify our theory using the Brusselator model, suggesting that this reentrant transition can be found in a wide range of limit cycle oscillators. PMID:25679676

  2. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  3. Antiperiodic oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Joana G.; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo; Pöschel, Thorsten; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of regular and irregular patterns in nonlinear oscillators is an outstanding problem in physics and in all natural sciences. In general, regularity is understood as tantamount to periodicity. However, there is now a flurry of works proving the existence of “antiperiodicity”, an unfamiliar type of regularity. Here we report the experimental observation and numerical corroboration of antiperiodic oscillations. In contrast to the isolated solutions presently known, we report infinite hierarchies of antiperiodic waveforms that can be tuned continuously and that form wide spiral-shaped stability phases in the control parameter plane. The waveform complexity increases towards the focal point common to all spirals, a key hub interconnecting them all. PMID:23739041

  4. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  5. Neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mark

    2002-05-15

    The wave theory of light, and in particular the principle of interference, was formulated by Thomas Young in 1801. In the 20th century, the principle of interference was extended to the quantum mechanical wave functions describing matter. The phenomenon of quantum mechanical interference of different neutrino states, neutrino oscillations, has provided one of the most exciting developments in high energy particle physics of the last decade. Observations of the flavour oscillations of neutrinos produced by distant sources, such as from the core of the Sun, provide compelling evidence that neutrinos have mass. This article describes the main features and the most significant experimental observations of this unusual application of the principle of interference.

  6. Spike oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, J. Mark; Uggla, Claes; Lim, Woei Chet

    2012-11-01

    According to Belinskiǐ, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz (BKL), a generic spacelike singularity is characterized by asymptotic locality: Asymptotically, toward the singularity, each spatial point evolves independently from its neighbors, in an oscillatory manner that is represented by a sequence of Bianchi type I and II vacuum models. Recent investigations support this conjecture but with a modification: Apart from local BKL behavior there also exists formation of spatial structures (“spikes”) at, and in the neighborhood of, certain spatial surfaces that break asymptotic locality; the complete description of a generic spacelike singularity involves spike oscillations, which are described by sequences of Bianchi type I and certain inhomogeneous vacuum models. In this paper we describe how BKL and spike oscillations arise from concatenations of exact solutions in a Hubble-normalized state space setting, suggesting the existence of hidden symmetries and showing that the results of BKL are part of a greater picture.

  7. Solar Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Oscillations were first detected in the solar photosphere in 1962 by Leighton and students. In 1970 it was calculated that these oscillations, with a period near five minutes, were the manifestations of acoustic waves trapped in the interior. The subsequent measurements of the frequencies of global oscillation modes from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the waves made possible the refinement of solar interior models. Over the years, increased understanding of the nuclear reaction rates, the opacity, the equation of state, convection, and gravitational settling have resulted. Mass flows shift the frequencies of modes leading to very accurate measurements of the interior rotation as a function of radius and latitude. In recent years, analogues of terrestrial seismology have led to a tomography of the interior, including measurements of global north-south flows and flow and wave speed measurements below features such as sunspots. The future of helioseismology seems bright with the approval of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, to be launched in 2008.

  8. Transitory behaviors in diffusively coupled nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Satoru; Yamaguti, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Ichiro

    2011-03-01

    We study collective behaviors of diffusively coupled oscillators which exhibit out-of-phase synchrony for the case of weakly interacting two oscillators. In large populations of such oscillators interacting via one-dimensionally nearest neighbor couplings, there appear various collective behaviors depending on the coupling strength, regardless of the number of oscillators. Among others, we focus on an intermittent behavior consisting of the all-synchronized state, a weakly chaotic state and some sorts of metachronal waves. Here, a metachronal wave means a wave with orderly phase shifts of oscillations. Such phase shifts are produced by the dephasing interaction which produces the out-of-phase synchronized states in two coupled oscillators. We also show that the abovementioned intermittent behavior can be interpreted as in-out intermittency where two saddles on an invariant subspace, the all-synchronized state and one of the metachronal waves play an important role.

  9. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  10. Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Large-amplitude Oscillations in prominences are spectacular manifestations of the solar activity. In such events nearby energetic disturbances induce periodic motions on filaments with displacements comparable to the size of the filaments themselves and with velocities larger than 20 km/s. Recent studies have shown that such oscillations open a new window on coronal connectivity, as well as novel diagnostics for hard-to-measure prominence properties such as magnetic field strength and geometry. In addition, this oscillation could be related with activation of filaments prior to eruptions. In this talk I will show past and current research on this subject in order to understand the nature of the solar prominences. Additionally, a large catalogue of such events will be presented.

  11. High-resolution spectroscopy of the {A}^{1}{\\rm{\\Pi }}(v^{\\prime} =0{--}10){--}{X}^{1}{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}^{+}(v^{\\prime\\prime} =0) bands in 13C18O: term values, ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, J. L.; Eidelsberg, M.; Heays, A. N.; Gavilan, L.; Federman, S. R.; Stark, G.; Lyons, J. R.; de Oliveira, N.; Joyeux, D.

    2016-08-01

    Our knowledge of astronomical environments containing CO depends on accurate molecular data to reproduce and interpret observations. The constant improvement in UV space instrumentation, both in sensitivity and resolution, requires increasingly detailed laboratory data. Following a long-term experimental campaign at the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility, we have acquired complete datasets on the CO isotopologues in the vacuum ultraviolet. Absorption spectra were recorded using the Fourier-transform spectrometer installed on the DESIRS beamline, providing a resolving power R > 106 in the 8–12 eV range. Such resolution allows the analysis of individual line positions and strengths in electronic transitions and the location of perturbations. We continue our previous work on A–X bands of 12C16O and 13C16O, reporting here measurements for the 13C18O isotopologue. Gas column densities in the differentially-pumped system were calibrated using the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+({v}\\prime =0,v\\prime\\prime =0) band. Absorption bands are analyzed by synthesizing line and band profiles and fitting them to measured spectra. New results for A {}1{{\\Pi }}({v}\\prime =0{--}10)–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(v\\prime\\prime =0) bands include precise line assignments, term values, band-integrated oscillator strengths as well as individual ro-vibrational oscillator strengths and Hönl–London corrections. For ({v}\\prime =1) our results are compared with earlier studies. The interpretation of mixed perturbing bands, complementing an earlier study, is also presented as well as precise line assignments and term values for the B {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) band calibrator, and the nearby B–X (1–0) and C {}1{{{Σ }}}+–X {}1{{{Σ }}}+(0–0) bands.

  12. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  13. Magnetospheric Sawtooth Oscillations Induced by Ionospheric Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambles, O. J.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims to address why sawtooth oscillations occur and what factors affect their periodicity. We use a multifluid version of the LFM global simulation model, driven by a steady solar wind to examine the effects of ion outflow on convection in the magnetosphere. In the simulation model, the properties of cusp and auroral region O+ outflow are causally regulated by electron precipitation and electromagnetic power flowing into the ionosphere. It is found that when ion outflow is included in the simulation, the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction can generate periodic substorms which appear as sawtooth-like oscillations in the geostationary magnetic field. The ion outflow enhances plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere and the associated diamagnetic ring current stretches the field lines throughout the nightside, essentially from dawn to dusk. If the field lines are sufficiently stretched they reconnect and dipolarize, ejecting a plasmoid downtail. This cycle repeats forming multiple sawtooth oscillations. The periodicity of the sawtooth oscillation depends largely upon the strength of the outflow. The strength of outflow is varied in the simulation by changing both the driving conditions (which affects the power flowing into the ionosphere) and through direct modification of the constants in the empirical relationships. Higher outflow fluences produce oscillations with shorter periods. The period of the oscillation is found to vary in the simulations from approximately 2 hours to 6 hours depending upon the strength of the outflow. For a smaller solar wind electric field the outflow fluence is not large enough to stretch the nightside field lines enough for sawtooth oscillations to form and the magnetosphere goes into a steady magnetosphere convection (SMC) mode. As the solar wind electric field increases the outflow fluence becomes sufficiently large to affect the convection in the magnetosphere and generate sawtooth oscillations. The strength

  14. Generalizing the transition from amplitude to oscillation death in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Senthilkumar, D V; Koseska, Aneta; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD) are two structurally different oscillation quenching types in coupled nonlinear oscillators. The transition from AD to OD has been recently realized due to the interplay between heterogeneity and coupling strength [A. Koseska et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 024103 (2013)]. We identify here the transition from AD to OD in nonlinear oscillators with couplings of distinct natures. It is demonstrated that the presence of time delay in the coupling cannot induce such a transition in identical oscillators, but it can indeed facilitate its occurrence with a low degree of heterogeneity. Moreover, it is further shown that the AD to OD transition is reliably observed in identical oscillators with dynamic and conjugate couplings. The coexistence of AD and OD and rich stable OD configurations after the transition are revealed, which are of great significance for potential applications in physics, biology, and control studies.

  15. Strength nutrition.

    PubMed

    Volek, Jeff S

    2003-08-01

    Muscle strength is determined by muscle size and factors related to neural recruitment. Resistance training is a potent stimulus for increasing muscle size and strength. These increases are, to a large extent, influenced and mediated by changes in hormones that regulate important events during the recovery process following exercise. Provision of nutrients in the appropriate amounts and at the appropriate times is necessary to optimize the recovery process. This review discusses the results of research that has examined the potential for nutrition and dietary supplements to impact the acute response to resistance exercise and chronic adaptations to resistance training. To date, the most promising strategies to augment gains in muscle size and strength appear to be consumption of protein-carbohydrate calories before and after resistance exercise, and creatine supplementation.

  16. Global dynamics of a stochastic neuronal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanobe, Takanobu

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear oscillators have been used to model neurons that fire periodically in the absence of input. These oscillators, which are called neuronal oscillators, share some common response structures with other biological oscillations such as cardiac cells. In this study, we analyze the dependence of the global dynamics of an impulse-driven stochastic neuronal oscillator on the relaxation rate to the limit cycle, the strength of the intrinsic noise, and the impulsive input parameters. To do this, we use a Markov operator that both reflects the density evolution of the oscillator and is an extension of the phase transition curve, which describes the phase shift due to a single isolated impulse. Previously, we derived the Markov operator for the finite relaxation rate that describes the dynamics of the entire phase plane. Here, we construct a Markov operator for the infinite relaxation rate that describes the stochastic dynamics restricted to the limit cycle. In both cases, the response of the stochastic neuronal oscillator to time-varying impulses is described by a product of Markov operators. Furthermore, we calculate the number of spikes between two consecutive impulses to relate the dynamics of the oscillator to the number of spikes per unit time and the interspike interval density. Specifically, we analyze the dynamics of the number of spikes per unit time based on the properties of the Markov operators. Each Markov operator can be decomposed into stationary and transient components based on the properties of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. This allows us to evaluate the difference in the number of spikes per unit time between the stationary and transient responses of the oscillator, which we show to be based on the dependence of the oscillator on past activity. Our analysis shows how the duration of the past neuronal activity depends on the relaxation rate, the noise strength, and the impulsive input parameters.

  17. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  18. Time Delay Effect in a Living Coupled Oscillator System with the Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Fujii, Teruo; Endo, Isao

    2000-08-01

    A living coupled oscillator system was constructed by a cell patterning method with a plasmodial slime mold, in which parameters such as coupling strength and distance between the oscillators can be systematically controlled. Rich oscillation phenomena between the two-coupled oscillators, namely, desynchronizing and antiphase/in-phase synchronization were observed according to these parameters. Both experimental and theoretical approaches showed that these phenomena are closely related to the time delay effect in interactions between the oscillators.

  19. Oscillation death in asymmetrically delay-coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Tang, Yang; Li, Lixiang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Symmetrically coupled oscillators represent a limiting case for studying the dynamics of natural systems. Therefore, we here investigate the effect of coupling asymmetry on delay-induced oscillation death (OD) in coupled nonlinear oscillators. It is found that the asymmetrical coupling substantially enlarges the domain of the OD island in the parameter space. Specifically, when the intensity of asymmetry is enhanced by turning down the value of the coupling asymmetry parameter α, the OD island gradually expands along two directions of both the coupling delay and the coupling strength. The expansion behavior of the OD region is well characterized by a power law scaling, R=α(γ) with γ≈-1.19. The minimum value of the intrinsic frequency, for which OD is possible, monotonically decreases with decreasing α and saturates around a constant value in the limit of α→0. The generality of the conducive effect of coupling asymmetry is confirmed in a numerical study of two delay-coupled chaotic Rössler oscillators. Our findings shed an improved light on the understanding of dynamics in asymmetrically delay-coupled systems.

  20. Suppression and revival of oscillation in indirectly coupled limit cycle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. R.; Kamal, N. K.; Verma, U. K.; Suresh, K.; Thamilmaran, K.; Shrimali, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    We study the phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations in a system of limit cycle oscillators coupled indirectly via a dynamic local environment. The dynamics of the environment is assumed to decay exponentially with time. We show that for appropriate coupling strength, the decay parameter of the environment plays a crucial role in the emergent dynamics such as amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). We also show that introducing a feedback factor in the diffusion term revives the oscillations in this system. The critical curves for the regions of different emergent states as a function of coupling strength, decay parameter of the environment and feedback factor in the coupling are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. These results are found to be consistent with the numerics and are also observed experimentally.

  1. The Magnetic Torque Oscillator and the Magnetic Piston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Martin; Al-Shamali, Farook

    2007-01-01

    A magnet suspended in a uniform magnetic field like that of the Earth can be made to oscillate about the field. The frequency of oscillation depends on the strength (magnetic moment) of the magnet, that of the external field, and the moment of inertia of the magnet. It is easily shown and verified by experiment that a simple but nontrivial…

  2. Intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Simone; Hocke, Klemens; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    GROMOS, the ground-based millimeter-wave ozone spectrometer, continuously measures the stratospheric ozone profile between the altitudes of 20 and 65 km above Bern (46°57‧N, 7°27‧E) since November 1994. Characteristics of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone are derived from the long-term data set. Spectral analysis gives evidence for a dominant oscillation period of about 20 days in the lower and middle stratosphere during winter time. A strong 20-day wave is also found in collocated geopotential height measurements of the microwave limb sounder onboard the Aura satellite (Aura/MLS) confirming the ground-based observations of GROMOS and underlining the link between ozone and dynamics. Remarkably, the ozone series of GROMOS show an interannual variability of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone. The interannual variability of ozone fluctuations is possibly due to influences of planetary wave forcing and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the meridional Brewer-Dobson circulation of the middle atmosphere. In detail, time series of the mean amplitude of ozone fluctuations with periods ranging from 10 to 60 days are derived at fixed pressure levels. The mean amplitude series are regarded as a measure of the strength of intraseasonal oscillations of stratospheric ozone above Bern. After deseasonalizing the mean amplitude series, we find QBO-like amplitude modulations of the intraseasonal oscillations of ozone. The amplitudes of the intraseasonal oscillations are enhanced by a factor of 2 in 1997, 2001, 2003, and 2005. QBO-like variations of intraseasonal oscillations are also present in wind, temperature and other parameters above Bern as indicated by meteorological reanalyses of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Further, intercomparisons of interannual variability of intraseasonal tropospheric and stratospheric oscillations are performed where the NAO index (North-Atlantic oscillation

  3. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  4. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-01

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  5. Spatial density oscillations in trapped dipolar condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-Y.; Zhang, J.-N.; Qiu, R.-Z.; Yi, S.; Lu, H.; Pu, H.

    2010-08-15

    We investigated the ground-state wave function and the free expansion of a trapped dipolar condensate. We find that dipolar interaction may induce both biconcave and dumbbell density profiles in the pancake- and cigar-shaped traps, respectively. In the parameter plane of the interaction strengths, the oscillating density profile in a harmonically trapped dipolar condensate occurs only when the interaction parameters fall into certain isolated areas. The relation between the positions of these areas and the trap geometry is explored. When a box potential is used to confine the condensate, spatial density oscillation becomes a generic feature. By studying the free expansion of the condensate with an oscillating density profile, we show that the spatial density oscillation is detectable from the time-of-flight image.

  6. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  7. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions. PMID:26429035

  8. Pair creation and plasma oscillations.

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-12-15

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses.

  9. Voltage-controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Oscillator generates symmetrical triangular waveform when inverting and noninverting inputs are equal. Oscillator portion of circuit has integrated circuit, high-performance operational amplifier wired as differential integrator, and two silicon controlled rectifiers.

  10. Saturation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Ahmed; Hanna, James

    2015-03-01

    We consider a weakly nonlinear system consisting of a resonantly forced oscillator coupled to an unforced oscillator. It has long been known that, for quadratic nonlinearities and a 2:1 resonance between the oscillators, a perturbative solution of the dynamics exhibits a phenomenon known as saturation. At low forcing, the forced oscillator responds, while the unforced oscillator is quiescent. Above a critical value of the forcing, the forced oscillator's steady-state amplitude reaches a plateau, while that of the unforced oscillator increases without bound. We show that, contrary to established folklore, saturation is not unique to quadratically nonlinear systems. We present conditions on the form of the nonlinear couplings and resonance that lead to saturation. Our results elucidate a mechanism for localization or diversion of energy in systems of coupled oscillators, and suggest new approaches for the control or suppression of vibrations in engineered systems.

  11. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  12. Synchronization of coupled Boolean phase oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rosin, David P; Rontani, Damien; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2014-04-01

    We design, characterize, and couple Boolean phase oscillators that include state-dependent feedback delay. The state-dependent delay allows us to realize an adjustable coupling strength, even though only Boolean signals are exchanged. Specifically, increasing the coupling strength via the range of state-dependent delay leads to larger locking ranges in uni- and bidirectional coupling of oscillators in both experiment and numerical simulation with a piecewise switching model. In the unidirectional coupling scheme, we unveil asymmetric triangular-shaped locking regions (Arnold tongues) that appear at multiples of the natural frequency of the oscillators. This extends observations of a single locking region reported in previous studies. In the bidirectional coupling scheme, we map out a symmetric locking region in the parameter space of frequency detuning and coupling strength. Because of the large scalability of our setup, our observations constitute a first step towards realizing large-scale networks of coupled oscillators to address fundamental questions on the dynamical properties of networks in a new experimental setting.

  13. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  14. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  15. Coherent magneto-elastic oscillations in superfluid magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, Michael; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Font, José A.; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of superfluidity on torsional oscillations of highly magnetised neutron stars (magnetars) with a microphysical equation of state by means of two-dimensional, magneto-hydrodynamical-elastic simulations. The superfluid properties of the neutrons in the neutron star core are treated in a parametric way in which we effectively decouple part of the core matter from the oscillations. Our simulations confirm the existence of two groups of oscillations, namely continuum oscillations that are confined to the neutron star core and are of Alfvénic character, and global oscillations with constant phase and that are of mixed magneto-elastic type. The latter might explain the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in magnetar giant flares, since they do not suffer from the additional damping mechanism due to phase mixing, contrary to what happens for continuum oscillations. However, we cannot prove rigorously that the coherent oscillations with constant phase are normal modes. Moreover, we find no crustal shear modes for the magnetic field strengths typical for magnetars. We provide fits to our numerical simulations that give the oscillation frequencies as functions of magnetic field strength and proton fraction in the core.

  16. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  17. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  18. Axion induced oscillating electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the axion electromagnetic anomaly induces an oscillating electric dipole for any magnetic dipole. This is a low energy theorem which is a consequence of the space-time dependent cosmic background field of the axion. The electron will acquire an oscillating electric dipole of frequency ma and strength ~ 10-32 e-cm, within four orders of magnitude of the present standard model DC limit, and two orders of magnitude above the nucleon, assuming standard axion model and dark matter parameters. This may suggest sensitive new experimental venues for the axion dark matter search.

  19. Frequency-locked chaotic opto-RF oscillator.

    PubMed

    Thorette, Aurélien; Romanelli, Marco; Brunel, Marc; Vallet, Marc

    2016-06-15

    A driven opto-RF oscillator, consisting of a dual-frequency laser (DFL) submitted to frequency-shifted feedback, is experimentally and numerically studied in a chaotic regime. Precise control of the reinjection strength and detuning permits isolation of a parameter region of bounded-phase chaos, where the opto-RF oscillator is frequency-locked to the master oscillator, in spite of chaotic phase and intensity oscillations. Robust experimental evidence of this synchronization regime is found, and phase noise spectra allow us to compare phase-locking and bounded-phase chaos regimes. In particular, it is found that the long-term phase stability of the master oscillator is well transferred to the opto-RF oscillator, even in the chaotic regime.

  20. Symmetric coordinates in solids: magnetic Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    There has recently been a revival of the Bloch theory of energy bands in solids. This revival was caused, on one hand, by the discovery of topological insulators and the discovery of graphene, and, on the other end, by a very efficient new technique that was developed for creating artificial solids. These are the cold atoms in optical lattices. Last year geometric phases were measured in energy bands of cold atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice by using Bloch oscillations. These phases are related to the Wyckoff positions, or the symmetry centers in the Bravais lattice. In this lecture a theoretical frame is developed for magnetic Bloch oscillations, meaning oscillations in the presence of a magnetic field. The theory is based on the kq-representation and the symmetric coordinates in solids. It is shown that for a Bloch electron in a magnetic field the orbit quasi-center is a conserved quantity. This is similar to the conservation of the quasi-momentum for an electron in a periodic potential. When an electric field is turned on, the orbit quasi-center oscillates in a similar way to the Bloch oscillations in the absence of a magnetic field. But there is a difference because the magnetic Brillouin zone is different. It depends on the strength of the magnetic field. An analogy is drawn between Bloch oscillations and magnetic Bloch oscillations. By using the magnetic translations it is indicated that a magnetic Wannier-Stark ladder appears in the spectrum of a Bloch electron in crossed magnetic and electric fields. The geometric phases for magnetic Bloch oscillations should be magnetic field dependent.

  1. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  3. Self-oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Physicists are very familiar with forced and parametric resonance, but usually not with self-oscillation, a property of certain dynamical systems that gives rise to a great variety of vibrations, both useful and destructive. In a self-oscillator, the driving force is controlled by the oscillation itself so that it acts in phase with the velocity, causing a negative damping that feeds energy into the vibration: no external rate needs to be adjusted to the resonant frequency. The famous collapse of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in 1940, often attributed by introductory physics texts to forced resonance, was actually a self-oscillation, as was the swaying of the London Millennium Footbridge in 2000. Clocks are self-oscillators, as are bowed and wind musical instruments. The heart is a “relaxation oscillator”, i.e., a non-sinusoidal self-oscillator whose period is determined by sudden, nonlinear switching at thresholds. We review the general criterion that determines whether a linear system can self-oscillate. We then describe the limiting cycles of the simplest nonlinear self-oscillators, as well as the ability of two or more coupled self-oscillators to become spontaneously synchronized (“entrained”). We characterize the operation of motors as self-oscillation and prove a theorem about their limit efficiency, of which Carnot’s theorem for heat engines appears as a special case. We briefly discuss how self-oscillation applies to servomechanisms, Cepheid variable stars, lasers, and the macroeconomic business cycle, among other applications. Our emphasis throughout is on the energetics of self-oscillation, often neglected by the literature on nonlinear dynamical systems.

  4. Workshop on Harmonic Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D. (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Zachary, W. W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Proceedings of a workshop on Harmonic Oscillators held at the College Park Campus of the University of Maryland on March 25 - 28, 1992 are presented. The harmonic oscillator formalism is playing an important role in many branches of physics. This is the simplest mathematical device which can connect the basic principle of physics with what is observed in the real world. The harmonic oscillator is the bridge between pure and applied physics.

  5. Terahertz Antiferromagnetic Spin Hall Nano-Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Xiao, Di; Brataas, Arne

    2016-05-01

    We consider the current-induced dynamics of insulating antiferromagnets in a spin Hall geometry. Sufficiently large in-plane currents perpendicular to the Néel order trigger spontaneous oscillations at frequencies between the acoustic and the optical eigenmodes. The direction of the driving current determines the chirality of the excitation. When the current exceeds a threshold, the combined effect of spin pumping and current-induced torques introduces a dynamic feedback that sustains steady-state oscillations with amplitudes controllable via the applied current. The ac voltage output is calculated numerically as a function of the dc current input for different feedback strengths. Our findings open a route towards terahertz antiferromagnetic spin-torque oscillators.

  6. SOLAR H{alpha} OSCILLATIONS FROM INTENSITY AND DOPPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2013-03-01

    Chromospheric wave activity around flares and filaments has been a research focus for years, and could provide indirect measurements of local conditions that are not otherwise accessible. One interesting observed phenomenon is oscillations in filaments, activated by distant flares and the large-scale waves they produce. Characteristics of these oscillations, such as periods, amplitudes, and lifetimes, can provide unique information about the filament. We measure oscillation properties in flares and filaments from H{alpha} chromospheric data using a new method that provides important spatial and frequency content of the dynamics. We apply the method to two flare events where filaments are observed to oscillate and determine their properties. We find strong oscillatory signal in flaring active regions in the chromosphere over a range of frequencies. Two filaments are found to oscillate without any detectable chromospheric wave acting as an activation mechanism. We find that filaments oscillate with periods of tens of minutes, but variations are significant at small spatial scales along the filamentary region. The results suggest that there is a frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude, as well as a spatial dependence along single filaments that is more difficult to quantify. It also appears that the strength of the oscillations does not necessarily depend on the strength of the trigger, although there are other possible effects that make this conclusion preliminary. Applications of this technique to other events and different data sets will provide important new insights into the local energy densities and magnetic fields associated with dynamic chromospheric structures.

  7. Active Emulsions: Synchronization of Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraden, Seth

    2012-02-01

    We explore the dynamical behavior of emulsions consisting of nanoliter volume droplets of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction separated by a continuous oil phase. Some of the aqueous BZ reactants partition into the oil leading to chemical coupling of the drops. We use microfluidics to vary the size, composition and topology of the drops in 1D and 2D. Addition of a light sensitive catalyst to the drops and illumination with a computer projector allows each drop to be individually perturbed. A variety of synchronous regimes are found that systematically vary with the coupling strength and whether coupling is dominated by activatory or inhibitory species. In 1D we observe in- and anti-phase oscillations, stationary Turing patterns in which drops stop oscillating, but form spatially periodic patterns of drops in the oxidized and reduced states, and more complex combinations of stationary and oscillatory drops. In 2D, the attractors are more complex and vary with network topology and coupling strength. For hexagonal lattices as a function of increasing coupling strength we observe right and left handed rotating oscillations, mixed oscillatory and Turing states and finally full Turing states. Reaction -- diffusion models based on a simplified description of the BZ chemistry and diffusion of messenger species reproduce a number of the experimental results. For a range of parameters, a simplified phase oscillator model provides an intuitive understanding of the complex synchronization patterns. [4pt] ``Coupled oscillations in a 1D emulsion of Belousov--Zhabotinsky droplets,'' Jorge Delgado, Ning Li, Marcin Leda, Hector O. Gonzalez-Ochoa, Seth Fraden and Irving R. Epstein, Soft Matter, 7, 3155 (2011).

  8. Aligning Plasma-Arc Welding Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Fairley, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Tool aids in alignment of oscillator probe on variable-polarity plasma-arc welding torch. Probe magnetically pulls arc from side to side as it moves along joint. Tensile strength of joint depends on alignment of weld bead and on alignment of probe. Operator installs new tool on front of torch body, levels it with built-in bubble glass, inserts probe in slot on tool, and locks probe in place. Procedure faster and easier and resulting alignment more accurate and repeatable.

  9. Must Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths be accurate at threshold?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zenghui; Burke, Kieron; Faassen, Meta van

    2009-09-21

    The exact ground-state Kohn-Sham (KS) potential for the helium atom is known from accurate wave function calculations of the ground-state density. The threshold for photoabsorption from this potential matches the physical system exactly. By carefully studying its absorption spectrum, we show the answer to the title question is no. To address this problem in detail, we generate a highly accurate simple fit of a two-electron spectrum near the threshold, and apply the method to both the experimental spectrum and that of the exact ground-state Kohn-Sham potential.

  10. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  11. Investigating Magnetic Oscillations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies magnetic oscillation using an air track. Ceramic magnets are attached to the cart and also are used as dampeners in place of the springs. The resulting oscillations are fairly sinusoidal and is a good example of simple harmonic motion. (MVL)

  12. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  13. Transition from amplitude to oscillation death in a network of oscillators.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Mauparna; Hens, C R; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2014-12-01

    We report a transition from a homogeneous steady state (HSS) to inhomogeneous steady states (IHSSs) in a network of globally coupled identical oscillators. We perturb a synchronized population of oscillators in the network with a few local negative or repulsive mean field links. The whole population splits into two clusters for a certain number of repulsive mean field links and a range of coupling strength. For further increase of the strength of interaction, these clusters collapse into a HSS followed by a transition to IHSSs where all the oscillators populate either of the two stable steady states. We analytically determine the origin of HSS and its transition to IHSS in relation to the number of repulsive mean-field links and the strength of interaction using a reductionism approach to the model network. We verify the results with numerical examples of the paradigmatic Landau-Stuart limit cycle system and the chaotic Rössler oscillator as dynamical nodes. During the transition from HSS to IHSSs, the network follows the Turing type symmetry breaking pitchfork or transcritical bifurcation depending upon the system dynamics. PMID:25554023

  14. Transition from amplitude to oscillation death in a network of oscillators.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Mauparna; Hens, C R; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2014-12-01

    We report a transition from a homogeneous steady state (HSS) to inhomogeneous steady states (IHSSs) in a network of globally coupled identical oscillators. We perturb a synchronized population of oscillators in the network with a few local negative or repulsive mean field links. The whole population splits into two clusters for a certain number of repulsive mean field links and a range of coupling strength. For further increase of the strength of interaction, these clusters collapse into a HSS followed by a transition to IHSSs where all the oscillators populate either of the two stable steady states. We analytically determine the origin of HSS and its transition to IHSS in relation to the number of repulsive mean-field links and the strength of interaction using a reductionism approach to the model network. We verify the results with numerical examples of the paradigmatic Landau-Stuart limit cycle system and the chaotic Rössler oscillator as dynamical nodes. During the transition from HSS to IHSSs, the network follows the Turing type symmetry breaking pitchfork or transcritical bifurcation depending upon the system dynamics.

  15. Transition from amplitude to oscillation death in a network of oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Nandan, Mauparna; Hens, C. R.; Dana, Syamal K.; Pal, Pinaki

    2014-12-01

    We report a transition from a homogeneous steady state (HSS) to inhomogeneous steady states (IHSSs) in a network of globally coupled identical oscillators. We perturb a synchronized population of oscillators in the network with a few local negative or repulsive mean field links. The whole population splits into two clusters for a certain number of repulsive mean field links and a range of coupling strength. For further increase of the strength of interaction, these clusters collapse into a HSS followed by a transition to IHSSs where all the oscillators populate either of the two stable steady states. We analytically determine the origin of HSS and its transition to IHSS in relation to the number of repulsive mean-field links and the strength of interaction using a reductionism approach to the model network. We verify the results with numerical examples of the paradigmatic Landau-Stuart limit cycle system and the chaotic Rössler oscillator as dynamical nodes. During the transition from HSS to IHSSs, the network follows the Turing type symmetry breaking pitchfork or transcritical bifurcation depending upon the system dynamics.

  16. Application of Strength Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Dugan, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the various strength qualities (maximum strength, high- and low-load speed strength, reactive strength, rate of force development, and skill performance), noting why a training program design based on strength diagnosis can lead to greater efficacy and better performance gains for the athlete. Examples of tests used to assess strength…

  17. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  18. Ultrastable Cryogenic Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Anthony G.

    Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are secondary frequency standards in the microwave domain. The best of these oscillators have demonstrated a short term frequency stability in the range 10-14 to a few times 10-16. The main application for these oscillators is as flywheel oscillators for the next generation of passive atomic frequency standards, and as local oscillators in space telemetry ground stations to clean up the transmitter close in phase noise. Fractional frequency stabilities of passive atomic frequency standards are now approaching 3 x10^-14 /τ where τ is the measurement time, limited only by the number of atoms that are being interrogated. This requires an interrogation oscillator whose short-term stability is of the order of 10-14 or better, which cannot be provided by present-day quartz technology. Ultrastable cryogenic microwave oscillators are based on resonators which have very high electrical Q-factors. The resolution of the resonator's linewidth is typically limited by electronics noise to about 1ppm and hence Q-factors in excess of 108 are required. As these are only attained in superconducting cavities or sapphire resonators at low temperatures, use of liquid helium cooling is mandatory, which has so far restricted these oscillators to the research or metrology laboratory. Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make compact flywheel oscillators for the new generation of primary frequency standards. Work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The best cryogenic oscillators developed to date are the ``whispering gallery'' (WG) mode sapphire resonator-oscillators of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the University of Western Australia (UWA), as well as Stanford University's superconducting cavity stabilized oscillator (SCSO). All of these oscillators have demonstrated frequency

  19. Deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic oscillators with frequency mismatch.

    PubMed

    Pisarchik, A N; Jaimes-Reátegui, R

    2015-11-01

    A small mismatch between natural frequencies of unidirectionally coupled chaotic oscillators can induce coherence resonance in the slave oscillator for a certain coupling strength. This surprising phenomenon resembles "stabilization of chaos by chaos," i.e., the chaotic driving applied to the chaotic system makes its dynamics more regular when the natural frequency of the slave oscillator is a little different than the natural frequency of the master oscillator. The coherence is characterized with the dominant component in the power spectrum of the slave oscillator, normalized standard deviations of both the peak amplitude and the interpeak interval, and Lyapunov exponents. The enhanced coherence is associated with increasing negative both the third and the fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the first and second exponents are always positive and zero, respectively.

  20. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Sabarathinam, S.; Thamilmaran, K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K.

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling.

  1. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Suresh, K; Sabarathinam, S; Thamilmaran, K; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling. PMID:27586600

  2. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Suresh, K; Sabarathinam, S; Thamilmaran, K; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling.

  3. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  4. Low-frequency oscillations of forced barotropic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, Terrence R.; Barcilon, Albert

    1994-01-01

    Jin and Ghil demonstrate that for topographically resonant flow, low-frequency finite-amplitude oscillations may arise from wave -- wave interactions and topographic form drag. Their model is extended to include a zonally asymmetric vorticity source, which is shown to interact with the perturbation field to produce zonally rectified wave fluxes that dramatically alter the Hopf bifurcation from stationary solutions to low-frequency oscillations. The frequency, intensity, and general character of these oscillations are shown to depend crucially upon the phasing and relative strength of the forcings.

  5. Low-frequency oscillations of forced barotropic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, T.R.; Barcilon, A. The Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL )

    1994-02-01

    Jin and Ghil demonstrate that for topographically resonant flow, low-frequency finite-amplitude oscillations may arise from wave -- wave interactions and topographic form drag. Their model is extended to include a zonally asymmetric vorticity source, which is shown to interact with the perturbation field to produce zonally rectified wave fluxes that dramatically alter the Hopf bifurcation from stationary solutions to low-frequency oscillations. The frequency, intensity, and general character of these oscillations are shown to depend crucially upon the phasing and relative strength of the forcings.

  6. Coevolution of synchronous activity and connectivity in coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Qiu, Can; Huang, Hongbin; Qi, Guanxiao; Wang, Haijun

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the coevolution dynamics of node activities and coupling strengths in coupled chaotic oscillators via a simple threshold adaptive scheme. The coupling strength is synchronous activity regulated, which in turn is able to boost the synchronization remarkably. In the case of weak coupling, the globally coupled oscillators present a highly clustered functional connectivity with a power-law distribution in the tail with γ≃3.1 , while for strong coupling, they self-organize into a network with a heterogeneously rich connectivity at the onset of synchronization but exhibit rather sparse structure to maintain the synchronization in noisy environment. The relevance of the results is briefly discussed.

  7. Emergence of amplitude death scenario in a network of oscillators under repulsive delay interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Hens, Chittaranjan; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-07-01

    We report the existence of amplitude death in a network of identical oscillators under repulsive mean coupling. Amplitude death appears in a globally coupled network of identical oscillators with instantaneous repulsive mean coupling only when the number of oscillators is more than two. We further investigate that, amplitude death may emerge even in two coupled oscillators as well as network of oscillators if we introduce delay time in the repulsive mean coupling. We have analytically derived the region of amplitude death island and find out how strength of delay controls the death regime in two coupled or a large network of coupled oscillators. We have verified our results on network of delayed Mackey-Glass systems where parameters are set in hyperchaotic regime. We have also tested our coupling approach in two paradigmatic limit cycle oscillators: Stuart-Landau and Van der Pol oscillators.

  8. Chemical oscillators in structured media.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Irving R; Vanag, Vladimir K; Balazs, Anna C; Kuksenok, Olga; Dayal, Pratyush; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2012-12-18

    Evolution is a characteristic feature of living systems, and many fundamental processes in life, including the cell cycle, take place in a periodic fashion. From a chemistry perspective, these repeating phenomena suggest the question of whether reactions in which concentrations oscillate could provide a basis and/or useful models for the behavior of organisms, and perhaps even their ability to evolve. In this Account, we examine several aspects of the behavior of the prototype oscillating chemical reaction, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) system, carried out in microemulsions, arrays of micrometer-sized aqueous droplets suspended in oil, or hydrogels. Each of these environments contains elements of the compartmentalization that likely played a role in the development of the first living cells, and within them we observe behaviors not found in the BZ reaction in simple aqueous solution. Several of these phenomena resemble traits displayed by living organisms. For example, the nanodroplets in a BZ microemulsion "communicate" with each other through a phenomenon analogous to quorum sensing in bacteria to produce a remarkable variety of patterns and waves on length scales 10(5) times the size of a single droplet. A photosensitive version can "remember" an imposed image. Larger, micrometer-sized droplets exhibit similarly rich behavior and allow for the observation and control of individual droplets. These droplets offer promise for building arrays capable of computation by varying the strength and sign of the coupling between drops. Gels that incorporate a BZ catalyst and are immersed in a solution containing the BZ reactants change their shape and volume in oscillations that follow the variation in the redox state of the catalyst. Using this phenomenon, we can construct phototactic gel "worms" or segments of gel that attract one another. Whether such systems will provide more realistic caricatures of life, and whether they can serve as useful materials will largely

  9. Oscillations of Quasars.

    PubMed

    McVittie, G C

    1964-10-01

    Rotation in addition to free gravitational motion can produce oscillations in a large spherical mass of gas. The theory may provide an explanation of the variations of brightness in such objects as 3C273.

  10. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  11. Entraining synthetic genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemakers, Alexandre; Buldú, Javier M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; de Luis, Oscar; Izquierdo, Adriana; Coloma, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new approach for synchronizing a population of synthetic genetic oscillators, which consists in the entrainment of a colony of repressilators by external modulation. We present a model where the repressilator dynamics is affected by periodic changes in temperature. We introduce an additional plasmid in the bacteria in order to correlate the temperature variations with the enhancement of the transcription rate of a certain gene. This can be done by introducing a promoter that is related to the heat shock response. This way, the expression of that gene results in a protein that enhances the overall oscillations. Numerical results show coherent oscillations of the population for a certain range of the external frequency, which is in turn related to the natural oscillation frequency of the modified repressilator. Finally we study the transient times related with the loss of synchronization and we discuss possible applications in biotechnology of large-scale production coupled to synchronization events induced by heat shock.

  12. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  13. A nonlinear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlin, R.

    1990-01-27

    A nonlinear oscillator design was imported from Cornell modified, and built for the purpose of simulating the chaotic states of a forced pendulum. Similar circuits have been investigated in the recent nonlinear explosion.

  14. Oscillating fluid power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  15. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  16. Current oscillations in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, Brittany

    We develop a simple phenomenological model to describe current oscillations in single, conically shaped nanopores. The model utilizes aspects of reaction rate theory, electrochemical oscillators, and nonlinear dynamical systems. Time series of experimental data were analyzed and compared to time series simulated using the model equations. There is good qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation, though the model needs to be improved in order to obtain better quantitative agreement.

  17. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  18. Periodically oscillating plasma sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Nebel, R.A.; Stange, S.; Murali, S. Krupakar

    2005-05-15

    The periodically oscillating plasma sphere, or POPS, is a novel fusion concept first proposed by D. C. Barnes and R. A. Nebel [Fusion Technol. 38, 28 (1998)]. POPS utilizes the self-similar collapse of an oscillating ion cloud in a spherical harmonic oscillator potential well formed by electron injection. Once the ions have been phase-locked, their coherent motion simultaneously produces very high densities and temperatures during the collapse phase of the oscillation. A requirement for POPS is that the electron injection produces a stable harmonic oscillator potential. This has been demonstrated in a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device and verified by particle simulation. Also, the POPS oscillation has been confirmed experimentally through observation that the ions in the potential well exhibit resonance behavior when driven at the POPS frequency. Excellent agreement between the observed POPS frequencies and the theoretical predictions has been observed for a wide range of potential well depths and three different ion species. Practical applications of POPS require large plasma compressions. These large compressions have been observed in particle simulations, although space charge neutralization remains a major issue.

  19. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  20. The active-bridge oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes the Active-Bridge Oscillator (ABO), a new concept in high-stability oscillator design. The ABO is ab ridge-type oscillator design that is easly to design and overcomes many of the operational and design difficulties associated with standard bridge oscillator designs. The ABO will oscillate with a very stable output amplitude over a wide range of operating conditions without the use of an automatic-level-control (ALC). A standard bridge oscillator design requires an ALC to maintain the desired amplitude of oscillation. for this and other reasons, bridge oscilaltors are not used in mainstream designs. Bridge oscillators are generally relegated to relatively low-volume, high-performance applications. The Colpitts and Pierce designs are the most popular oscillators but are typically less stable than a bridge-type oscillator.

  1. Role of Spontaneous Current Oscillations during High-Efficiency Electrotransformation of Thermophilic Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Michael V.; Sullivan, Charles R.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    Current oscillations at about 24 MHz were observed during electrotransformation (ET) of the thermophilic anaerobes Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405, C. thermocellum DSM 1313, and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum YS 485, using a pulse gated by a square signal generated by a custom generator. In experiments in which only the field strength was varied, all three of these strains resulted in a one-to-one correspondence between the appearance of current oscillations and successful ET. Oscillations accompanied ET of both C. thermocellum strains only at field strengths of ≥12 kV/cm, and ET was only observed above the same threshold. Similarly, for T. saccharolyticum, oscillations were only observed at field strengths of ≥10 kV/cm, and ET was only observed above the same threshold. When a passive electrical filter consisting of an inductor and resistor in parallel was added to the system to prevent the development of oscillations, ET efficiencies were reduced dramatically for all three strains at all field strengths tested. The maximum tested field strength, 25 kV/cm, resulted in the maximum measured transformation efficiency for all three strains. At this field strength, the efficiency of ET in the absence of oscillations was decreased compared to that observed in the presence of oscillations by 500-fold for C. thermocellum ATCC 27405, 2,500-fold for C. thermocellum DSM 1313, and 280-fold for T. saccharolyticum. Controls using the same apparatus with Escherichia coli cells or a resistor with a value representative of the direct current resistance of typical cell samples did not develop oscillations, and ET efficiencies obtained with E. coli were the same with or without the electrical filter included in the pulse generator circuit. The results are interpreted to indicate that spontaneously arising oscillations have a large beneficial effect on transformation efficiency in the system employed here and that the development of oscillations in this system is

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  3. Driven synchronization in random networks of oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hindes, Jason; Myers, Christopher R

    2015-07-01

    Synchronization is a universal phenomenon found in many non-equilibrium systems. Much recent interest in this area has overlapped with the study of complex networks, where a major focus is determining how a system's connectivity patterns affect the types of behavior that it can produce. Thus far, modeling efforts have focused on the tendency of networks of oscillators to mutually synchronize themselves, with less emphasis on the effects of external driving. In this work, we discuss the interplay between mutual and driven synchronization in networks of phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, and explore how the structure and emergence of such states depend on the underlying network topology for simple random networks with a given degree distribution. We find a variety of interesting dynamical behaviors, including bifurcations and bistability patterns that are qualitatively different for heterogeneous and homogeneous networks, and which are separated by a Takens-Bogdanov-Cusp singularity in the parameter region where the coupling strength between oscillators is weak. Our analysis is connected to the underlying dynamics of oscillator clusters for important states and transitions. PMID:26232970

  4. Reviving oscillation with optimal spatial period of frequency distribution in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongfa; Liu, Weiqing; Zhu, Yun; Xiao, Jinghua; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The spatial distributions of system's frequencies have significant influences on the critical coupling strengths for amplitude death (AD) in coupled oscillators. We find that the left and right critical coupling strengths for AD have quite different relations to the increasing spatial period m of the frequency distribution in coupled oscillators. The left one has a negative linear relationship with m in log-log axis for small initial frequency mismatches while remains constant for large initial frequency mismatches. The right one is in quadratic function relation with spatial period m of the frequency distribution in log-log axis. There is an optimal spatial period m0 of frequency distribution with which the coupled system has a minimal critical strength to transit from an AD regime to reviving oscillation. Moreover, the optimal spatial period m0 of the frequency distribution is found to be related to the system size √{ N } . Numerical examples are explored to reveal the inner regimes of effects of the spatial frequency distribution on AD.

  5. Anharmonic Oscillations of a Spring-Magnet System inside a Magnetic Coil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear oscillations of a simple spring-magnet system that oscillates in the magnetic field of an inductive coil excited with a dc current. Using the relations for the interaction of a coil and a magnet we obtain the motion equation of the system. The relative strengths of the terms of this equation can be adjusted easily by…

  6. Finite q-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  7. Oscillations of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornek, U.; Müller, F.; Harth, K.; Hahn, A.; Ganesan, S.; Tobiska, L.; Stannarius, R.

    2010-07-01

    Oscillations of droplets or bubbles of a confined fluid in a fluid environment are found in various situations in everyday life, in technological processing and in natural phenomena on different length scales. Air bubbles in liquids or liquid droplets in air are well-known examples. Soap bubbles represent a particularly simple, beautiful and attractive system to study the dynamics of a closed gas volume embedded in the same or a different gas. Their dynamics is governed by the densities and viscosities of the gases and by the film tension. Dynamic equations describing their oscillations under simplifying assumptions have been well known since the beginning of the 20th century. Both analytical description and numerical modeling have made considerable progress since then, but quantitative experiments have been lacking so far. On the other hand, a soap bubble represents an easily manageable paradigm for the study of oscillations of fluid spheres. We use a technique to create axisymmetric initial non-equilibrium states, and we observe damped oscillations into equilibrium by means of a fast video camera. Symmetries of the oscillations, frequencies and damping rates of the eigenmodes as well as the coupling of modes are analyzed. They are compared to analytical models from the literature and to numerical calculations from the literature and this work.

  8. Magnetosphere sawtooth oscillations induced by ionospheric outflow.

    PubMed

    Brambles, O J; Lotko, W; Zhang, B; Wiltberger, M; Lyon, J; Strangeway, R J

    2011-06-01

    The sawtooth mode of convection of Earth's magnetosphere is a 2- to 4-hour planetary-scale oscillation powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (SW-M-I) interaction. Using global simulations of geospace, we have shown that ionospheric O(+) outflows can generate sawtooth oscillations. As the outflowing ions fill the inner magnetosphere, their pressure distends the nightside magnetic field. When the outflow fluence exceeds a threshold, magnetic field tension cannot confine the accumulating fluid; an O(+)-rich plasmoid is ejected, and the field dipolarizes. Below the threshold, the magnetosphere undergoes quasi-steady convection. Repetition and the sawtooth period are controlled by the strength of the SW-M-I interaction, which regulates the outflow fluence. PMID:21636770

  9. Magnetosphere sawtooth oscillations induced by ionospheric outflow.

    PubMed

    Brambles, O J; Lotko, W; Zhang, B; Wiltberger, M; Lyon, J; Strangeway, R J

    2011-06-01

    The sawtooth mode of convection of Earth's magnetosphere is a 2- to 4-hour planetary-scale oscillation powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (SW-M-I) interaction. Using global simulations of geospace, we have shown that ionospheric O(+) outflows can generate sawtooth oscillations. As the outflowing ions fill the inner magnetosphere, their pressure distends the nightside magnetic field. When the outflow fluence exceeds a threshold, magnetic field tension cannot confine the accumulating fluid; an O(+)-rich plasmoid is ejected, and the field dipolarizes. Below the threshold, the magnetosphere undergoes quasi-steady convection. Repetition and the sawtooth period are controlled by the strength of the SW-M-I interaction, which regulates the outflow fluence.

  10. Phase-lag synchronization in networks of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Totz, Jan F; Snari, Razan; Yengi, Desmond; Tinsley, Mark R; Engel, Harald; Showalter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Chemical oscillators with a broad frequency distribution are photochemically coupled in network topologies. Experiments and simulations show that the network synchronization occurs by phase-lag synchronization of clusters of oscillators with zero- or nearly zero-lag synchronization. Symmetry also plays a role in the synchronization, the extent of which is explored as a function of coupling strength, frequency distribution, and the highest frequency oscillator location. The phase-lag synchronization occurs through connected synchronized clusters, with the highest frequency node or nodes setting the frequency of the entire network. The synchronized clusters successively "fire," with a constant phase difference between them. For low heterogeneity and high coupling strength, the synchronized clusters are made up of one or more clusters of nodes with the same permutation symmetries. As heterogeneity is increased or coupling strength decreased, the phase-lag synchronization occurs partially through clusters of nodes sharing the same permutation symmetries. As heterogeneity is further increased or coupling strength decreased, partial synchronization and, finally, independent unsynchronized oscillations are observed. The relationships between these classes of behavior are explored with numerical simulations, which agree well with the experimentally observed behavior.

  11. Digital numerically controlled oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Huey, D. C.; Ma, L. N. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The frequency and phase of an output signal from an oscillator circuit are controlled with accuracy by a digital input word. Positive and negative alterations in output frequency are both provided for by translating all values of input words so that they are positive. The oscillator reference frequency is corrected only in one direction, by adding phase to the output frequency of the oscillator. The input control word is translated to a single algebraic sign and the digital 1 is added thereto. The translated input control word is then accumulated. A reference clock signal having a frequency at an integer multiple of the desired frequency of the output signal is generated. The accumulated control word is then compared with a threshold level. The output signal is adjusted in a single direction by dividing the frequency of the reference clock signal by a first integer or by an integer different from the first integer.

  12. The Fastest Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at frequencies near 1000 Hz have been detected from a umber of neutron star x-ray binaries using RXTE. These fast oscillations are likely associated with rbital motion very close to the neutron star and and, thus, give us information about the behavior of the accretion disk in the strong gravitational field near the neutron star. The oscillation frequencies can also be used to place constraints on the properties of the neutron stars with the highest detected frequencies being the most constraining. We propose TOOs observations of selected neutron star x-ray binaries when found to be in states likely to produce kHz QPOs with frequencies exceeding 1200 Hz.

  13. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  14. Gamma Oscillation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Brian F.; Youn, Soyoung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional neural circuitry has been found to be involved in abnormalities of perception and cognition in patients with schizophrenia. Gamma oscillations are essential for integrating information within neural circuits and have therefore been associated with many perceptual and cognitive processes in healthy human subjects and animals. This review presents an overview of the neural basis of gamma oscillations and the abnormalities in the GABAergic interneuronal system thought to be responsible for gamma-range deficits in schizophrenia. We also review studies of gamma activity in sensory and cognitive processes, including auditory steady state response, attention, object representation, and working memory, in animals, healthy humans and patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22216037

  15. Advances in optoelectronic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguimdo, Romain M.; Saleh, Khaldoun; Lin, Guoping; Matinenghi, Romain; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-02-01

    Optoelectronic oscillators are used for a wide variety of applications in microwave photonics. We here report the latest advances in this technology from our research group, with emphasis on the analysis of phase noise performance. We present a stochastic modelling approach for phase noise performance analysis of optoelectronic oscillators based on whispering gallery mode resonators and/or optical fiber delay lines, and the theory is complemented with experimental measurements. We provide a detailed theoretical analysis which enables us to find the stationary states of the system as well as their stability. Our calculations also permit to find explicit formulas for the phase noise spectra, thereby allowing for their optimization.

  16. Micromechanical Oscillating Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A micromechanical oscillating mass balance and method adapted for measuring minute quantities of material deposited at a selected location, such as during a vapor deposition process. The invention comprises a vibratory composite beam which includes a dielectric layer sandwiched between two conductive layers. The beam is positioned in a magnetic field. An alternating current passes through one conductive layers, the beam oscillates, inducing an output current in the second conductive layer, which is analyzed to determine the resonant frequency of the beam. As material is deposited on the beam, the mass of the beam increases and the resonant frequency of the beam shifts, and the mass added is determined.

  17. Anharmonic effects on a phonon-number measurement of a quantum-mesoscopic-mechanical oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Santamore, D.H.; Goan Hsisheng; Milburn, G.J.; Roukes, M.L.

    2004-11-01

    We generalize a proposal for detecting single-phonon transitions in a single nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) to include the intrinsic anharmonicity of each mechanical oscillator. In this scheme two NEMS oscillators are coupled via a term quadratic in the amplitude of oscillation for each oscillator. One NEMS oscillator is driven and strongly damped and becomes a transducer for phonon number in the other measured oscillator. We derive the conditions for this measurement scheme to be quantum limited and find a condition on the size of the anharmonicity. We also derive the relation between the phase diffusion back-action noise due to number measurement and the localization time for the measured system to enter a phonon-number eigenstate. We relate both these time scales to the strength of the measured signal, which is an induced current proportional to the position of the read-out oscillator.

  18. Coupled opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coupled opto-electronic oscillator that directly couples a laser oscillation with an electronic oscillation to simultaneously achieve a stable RF oscillation at a high frequency and ultra-short optical pulsation by mode locking with a high repetition rate and stability. Single-mode selection can be achieved even with a very long opto-electronic loop. A multimode laser can be used to pump the electronic oscillation, resulting in a high operation efficiency. The optical and the RF oscillations are correlated to each other.

  19. What Is a Strength?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolin, Sybil

    2003-01-01

    As the strength-based perspective gains recognition, it is important to describe what constitutes strengths and to develop a specific vocabulary to name them. This article draws on resilience research to help identify specific competencies and areas of strengths in youth. (Contains 1 table.)

  20. Strength Training for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaughton, Daniel; Connaughton, Angela; Poor, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Strength training can be fun, safe, and appropriate for young girls and women and is an important component of any fitness program when combined with appropriate cardiovascular and flexibility activities. Concerns and misconceptions regarding girls' strength training are discussed, presenting general principles of strength training for children…

  1. Stable and transient multicluster oscillation death in nonlocally coupled networks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Isabelle; Kapeller, Marie; Loos, Sarah; Zakharova, Anna; Fiedler, Bernold; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-11-01

    In a network of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with symmetry-breaking coupling, we study numerically, and explain analytically, a family of inhomogeneous steady states (oscillation death). They exhibit multicluster patterns, depending on the cluster distribution prescribed by the initial conditions. Besides stable oscillation death, we also find a regime of long transients asymptotically approaching synchronized oscillations. To explain these phenomena analytically in dependence on the coupling range and the coupling strength, we first use a mean-field approximation, which works well for large coupling ranges but fails for coupling ranges, which are small compared to the cluster size. Going beyond standard mean-field theory, we predict the boundaries of the different stability regimes as well as the transient times analytically in excellent agreement with numerical results. PMID:26651770

  2. Networks of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators: A general treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M. A. de; Mizrahi, S. S.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2007-09-15

    We present a general treatment of a bosonic dissipative network: a chain of coupled dissipative harmonic oscillators whatever its topology--i.e., whichever the way the oscillators are coupled together, the strength of their couplings, and their natural frequencies. Starting with a general more realistic scenario where each oscillator is coupled to its own reservoir, we also discuss the case where all the network oscillators are coupled to a common reservoir. We obtain the master equation governing the dynamic of the network states and the associated evolution equation of the Glauber-Sudarshan P function. With these instruments we briefly show how to analyze the decoherence and the evolution of the linear entropy of general states of the network. We also show how to obtain the master equation for the case of distinct reservoirs from that of a common one.

  3. Peculiarity of the Oscillation Stratification in Sunspot Penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kobanov, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    Spatial distributions of the dominant oscillation frequency obtained for four sunspots show a feature shared by all the analysed levels of the solar atmosphere in these sunspots. This feature located in the inner penumbrae indicates that this region has favourable conditions for 2.5 - 4 mHz oscillation propagation. This agrees with the fact that the spectral composition of the oscillations at three atmospheric heights (Fe uc(i) 6173 Å, 1700 Å, and He uc(ii) 304 Å) in this region are similar. There has been previous evidence of particular similarities along the height of the photospheric magnetic field strength, line-of-sight velocity, and temperature profile in the inner penumbra, where the internal boundary of the Evershed flow is located. The finding of the same dominant oscillation frequency at a range of altitudes from the chromosphere up to the transition region extends the height range, suggesting similarities in physical conditions.

  4. Stable and transient multicluster oscillation death in nonlocally coupled networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Isabelle; Kapeller, Marie; Loos, Sarah; Zakharova, Anna; Fiedler, Bernold; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-11-01

    In a network of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators with symmetry-breaking coupling, we study numerically, and explain analytically, a family of inhomogeneous steady states (oscillation death). They exhibit multicluster patterns, depending on the cluster distribution prescribed by the initial conditions. Besides stable oscillation death, we also find a regime of long transients asymptotically approaching synchronized oscillations. To explain these phenomena analytically in dependence on the coupling range and the coupling strength, we first use a mean-field approximation, which works well for large coupling ranges but fails for coupling ranges, which are small compared to the cluster size. Going beyond standard mean-field theory, we predict the boundaries of the different stability regimes as well as the transient times analytically in excellent agreement with numerical results.

  5. Spatial coexistence of synchronized oscillation and death: A chimeralike state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-10-01

    We report an interesting spatiotemporal state, namely the chimeralike incongruous coexistence of synchronized oscillation and stable steady state (CSOD) in a network of nonlocally coupled oscillators. Unlike the chimera and chimera death state, in the CSOD state identical oscillators are self-organized into two coexisting spatially separated domains: In one domain neighboring oscillators show synchronized oscillation and in another domain the neighboring oscillators randomly populate either a synchronized oscillating state or a stable steady state (we call it a death state). We consider a realistic ecological network and show that the interplay of nonlocality and coupling strength results in two routes to the CSOD state: One is from a coexisting mixed state of amplitude chimera and death, and another one is from a globally synchronized state. We provide a qualitative explanation of the origin of this state. We further explore the importance of this study in ecology that gives insight into the relationship between spatial synchrony and global extinction of species. We believe this study will improve our understanding of chimera and chimeralike states.

  6. Wein bridge oscillator circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipoma, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit with minimum number of components provides stable outputs of 2 to 8 volts at frequencies of .001 to 100 kHz. Oscillator exhibits low power consumption, portability, simplicity, and drive capability, it has application as loudspeaker tester and audible alarm, as well as in laboratory and test generators.

  7. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  8. Voltage-Controlled Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Integrated Component Systems, Inc. incorporated information from a NASA Tech Briefs article into a voltage-controlled oscillator it designed for a customer. The company then applied the technology to its series of phase-locked loop synthesizers, which offer superior phase noise performance.

  9. Frequency modulated oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A frequency modulated push-pull oscillator in which the non-linear characteristic of varactors producing frequency modulation is compensated for by an opposite non-linear characteristic of a field effect transistor providing modulating bias to the varactors is described.

  10. A simple violin oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    For acoustic tests the violin is driven laterally at the bridge by a small speaker of the type commonly found in pocket transistor radios. An audio oscillator excites the tone which is picked up by a sound level meter. Gross patterns of vibration modes are obtained by the Chladni method.

  11. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  12. Relativistic harmonic oscillator revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak

    2009-02-15

    The familiar Fock space commonly used to describe the relativistic harmonic oscillator, for example, as part of string theory, is insufficient to describe all the states of the relativistic oscillator. We find that there are three different vacua leading to three disconnected Fock sectors, all constructed with the same creation-annihilation operators. These have different spacetime geometric properties as well as different algebraic symmetry properties or different quantum numbers. Two of these Fock spaces include negative norm ghosts (as in string theory), while the third one is completely free of ghosts. We discuss a gauge symmetry in a worldline theory approach that supplies appropriate constraints to remove all the ghosts from all Fock sectors of the single oscillator. The resulting ghost-free quantum spectrum in d+1 dimensions is then classified in unitary representations of the Lorentz group SO(d,1). Moreover, all states of the single oscillator put together make up a single infinite dimensional unitary representation of a hidden global symmetry SU(d,1), whose Casimir eigenvalues are computed. Possible applications of these new results in string theory and other areas of physics and mathematics are briefly mentioned.

  13. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  14. [Oscillating physiotherapy for secretolysis].

    PubMed

    Brückner, U

    2008-03-01

    Assisted coughing and mechanical cough aids compensate for the weak cough flow in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). In cases with preserved respiratory muscles also breathing techniques and special devices, e. g., flutter or acapella can be used for secretion mobilisation during infections of the airways. These means are summarised as oscillating physiotherapy. Their mechanisms are believed to depend on separation of the mucus from the bronchial wall by vibration, thus facilitating mucus transport from the peripheral to the central airways. In mucoviscidosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease their application is established, but there is a paucity of data regarding the commitment in patients with neuromuscular diseases. The effective adoption of simple oscillation physiotherapeutic interventions demands usually a sufficient force of the respiratory muscles--exceptions are the application of the percussionaire (intrapulmonary percussive ventilator, IPV) or high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO). In daily practice there is evidence that patients with weak respiratory muscles are overstrained with the use of these physiotherapeutic means, or get exhausted. A general recommendation for the adoption of simple oscillating physiotherapeutic interventions cannot be made in patients with NMDs. Perhaps in the future devices such as IPV or HFCWO will prove to be more effective in NMD patients.

  15. Oscillation propagation in neural networks with different topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun

    2011-03-01

    In light of the issue of oscillation propagation in neural networks, various topologies of FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron populations are investigated. External Gaussian white noise is injected into the first neuron only. Before the oscillation spreads to the other neurons in the network, some of the inherent stochasticity within the noise-induced oscillation of the first neuron is filtered out due to the neuron's nonlinear dynamics. Both the temporal and the spatial coherence of the evoked activity's propagation are analyzed in conjunction with the network topology randomness p, the coupling strength between neurons g, and the noise amplitude D. The temporal periodicity of the global neural network presents a typical coherence biresonance (CBR) characteristic with regard to the noise intensity. The network topology randomness exerts different influences on the resonance effects for different coupling strength regimes. At an intermediate coupling strength, the random shortcuts reinforce the interactions between the neurons, and then more stochasticity in the firings of the first neuron spreads within the network. Consequently, CBR is decreased with the increase of the network topology randomness. At a large coupling strength, the random shortcuts assist the nonlinearity in impairing the stochastic components, and consequently help to enhance the resonance effects, which differed significantly from previous related work. However, the degree of the spatial synchronization of the systems increases monotonically as the network topology randomness increases at any coupling strength.

  16. Strength Modeling Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Lee, P.; Wong, S.

    1985-01-01

    Strength modeling is a complex and multi-dimensional issue. There are numerous parameters to the problem of characterizing human strength, most notably: (1) position and orientation of body joints; (2) isometric versus dynamic strength; (3) effector force versus joint torque; (4) instantaneous versus steady force; (5) active force versus reactive force; (6) presence or absence of gravity; (7) body somatotype and composition; (8) body (segment) masses; (9) muscle group envolvement; (10) muscle size; (11) fatigue; and (12) practice (training) or familiarity. In surveying the available literature on strength measurement and modeling an attempt was made to examine as many of these parameters as possible. The conclusions reached at this point toward the feasibility of implementing computationally reasonable human strength models. The assessment of accuracy of any model against a specific individual, however, will probably not be possible on any realistic scale. Taken statistically, strength modeling may be an effective tool for general questions of task feasibility and strength requirements.

  17. Effect of mixed coupling on relay-coupled Rössler and Lorenz oscillators.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Shrimali, Manish Dev; Aihara, K

    2014-12-01

    The complete synchronization between the outermost oscillators using the mixed coupling in relay coupled systems is studied. Mixed coupling has two types of coupling functions: coupling between similar or dissimilar variables. We examine the complete synchronization in relay-coupled systems by the largest transverse Lyapunov exponent and synchronization error. We show numerically for Rössler and Lorenz oscillators that the combination of these two types of coupling functions is able to decrease the critical coupling strength for complete synchronization as well as it also suppress oscillations for larger coupling strength.

  18. Monolithic Millimeter Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan-Lei

    There is an increasing interest in the millimeter -wave spectrum for use in communications and for military and scientific applications. The concept of monolithic integration aims to produce very-high-frequency circuits in a more reliable, reproducible way than conventional electronics, and also at lower cost, with smaller size and lighter weight. In this thesis, a negative resistance device is integrated monolithically with a resonator to produce an effective oscillator. This work fills the void resulting from the exclusion of the local oscillator from the monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMMIC) receiver design. For convenience a microwave frequency model was used to design the resonator circuit. A 5 GHz hybrid oscillator was first fabricated to test the design; the necessary GaAs process technology was developed for the fabrication. Negative resistance devices and oscillator theory were studied, and a simple but practical model of the Gunn diode was devised to solve the impedance matching problem. Monolithic oscillators at the Ka band (35 GHz) were built and refined. All devices operated in CW mode. By means of an electric-field probe, the output power was coupled into a metallic waveguide for measurement purposes. The best result was 3.63 mW of power output, the highest efficiency was 0.43% and the frequency stability was better than 10-4. In the future, an IMPATT diode could replace the Gunn device to give much higher power and efficiency. A varactor-tuned circuit also suitable for large-scale integration is under study.

  19. Orthogonal polynomials and deformed oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, V. V.; Damaskinsky, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    In the example of the Fibonacci oscillator, we discuss the construction of oscillator-like systems associated with orthogonal polynomials. We also consider the question of the dimensions of the corresponding Lie algebras.

  20. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  1. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and ν ,bar{ν } oscillations are examined.

  2. Polaritonic Rabi and Josephson Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Amir; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of coupled condensates is a wide-encompassing problem with relevance to superconductors, BECs in traps, superfluids, etc. Here, we provide a unified picture of this fundamental problem that includes i) detuning of the free energies, ii) different self-interaction strengths and iii) finite lifetime of the modes. At such, this is particularly relevant for the dynamics of polaritons, both for their internal dynamics between their light and matter constituents, as well as for the more conventional dynamics of two spatially separated condensates. Polaritons are short-lived, interact only through their material fraction and are easily detuned. At such, they bring several variations to their atomic counterpart. We show that the combination of these parameters results in important twists to the phenomenology of the Josephson effect, such as the behaviour of the relative phase (running or oscillating) or the occurence of self-trapping. We undertake a comprehensive stability analysis of the fixed points on a normalized Bloch sphere, that allows us to provide a generalized criterion to identify the Rabi and Josephson regimes in presence of detuning and decay.

  3. Polaritonic Rabi and Josephson Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Amir; Laussy, Fabrice P

    2016-07-25

    The dynamics of coupled condensates is a wide-encompassing problem with relevance to superconductors, BECs in traps, superfluids, etc. Here, we provide a unified picture of this fundamental problem that includes i) detuning of the free energies, ii) different self-interaction strengths and iii) finite lifetime of the modes. At such, this is particularly relevant for the dynamics of polaritons, both for their internal dynamics between their light and matter constituents, as well as for the more conventional dynamics of two spatially separated condensates. Polaritons are short-lived, interact only through their material fraction and are easily detuned. At such, they bring several variations to their atomic counterpart. We show that the combination of these parameters results in important twists to the phenomenology of the Josephson effect, such as the behaviour of the relative phase (running or oscillating) or the occurence of self-trapping. We undertake a comprehensive stability analysis of the fixed points on a normalized Bloch sphere, that allows us to provide a generalized criterion to identify the Rabi and Josephson regimes in presence of detuning and decay.

  4. Polaritonic Rabi and Josephson Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Amir; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of coupled condensates is a wide-encompassing problem with relevance to superconductors, BECs in traps, superfluids, etc. Here, we provide a unified picture of this fundamental problem that includes i) detuning of the free energies, ii) different self-interaction strengths and iii) finite lifetime of the modes. At such, this is particularly relevant for the dynamics of polaritons, both for their internal dynamics between their light and matter constituents, as well as for the more conventional dynamics of two spatially separated condensates. Polaritons are short-lived, interact only through their material fraction and are easily detuned. At such, they bring several variations to their atomic counterpart. We show that the combination of these parameters results in important twists to the phenomenology of the Josephson effect, such as the behaviour of the relative phase (running or oscillating) or the occurence of self-trapping. We undertake a comprehensive stability analysis of the fixed points on a normalized Bloch sphere, that allows us to provide a generalized criterion to identify the Rabi and Josephson regimes in presence of detuning and decay. PMID:27452872

  5. Decoherence in a system of strongly coupled quantum oscillators. I. Symmetric network

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M.A. de; Oliveira, M.C. de; Moussa, M.H.Y.

    2004-08-01

    In this work we analyze the coherence dynamics and estimate decoherence times of quantum states in a network composed of N coupled dissipative quantum oscillators. We assume a symmetric network where all oscillators are coupled to each other with the same coupling strength. Master equations are derived for regimes of both weak and strong coupling between the oscillators. The strong coupling regime is characterized by the coupling strength between the oscillators or by the number of oscillators in the network. The decoherence times of particular states of the network are computed and the results are clarified by analyzing the processes of state swap and recurrence of reduced states of the network together with the linear entropies of the joint and reduced systems.

  6. Oscillation death in diffusively coupled oscillators by local repulsive link.

    PubMed

    Hens, C R; Olusola, Olasunkanmi I; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2013-09-01

    A death of oscillation is reported in a network of coupled synchronized oscillators in the presence of additional repulsive coupling. The repulsive link evolves as an averaging effect of mutual interaction between two neighboring oscillators due to a local fault and the number of repulsive links grows in time when the death scenario emerges. Analytical condition for oscillation death is derived for two coupled Landau-Stuart systems. Numerical results also confirm oscillation death in chaotic systems such as a Sprott system and the Rössler oscillator. We explore the effect in large networks of globally coupled oscillators and find that the number of repulsive links is always fewer than the size of the network.

  7. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  8. THz Local Oscillator Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran

    2004-01-01

    The last decade has seen a number of technological advancements that have now made it possible to implement fully solid state local oscillator chains up to 2 THz. These chains are composed of cascaded planar multiplier stages that are pumped with W-band high power sources. The high power W-band sources are achieved by power combining MMIC amplifiers and can provide in access of 150 mW with about 10% bandwidth. Planar diode technology has also enabled novel circuit topologies that can take advantage of the high input power and demonstrate significant efficiencies well into the THz range. Cascaded chains to 1.9 THz have now been demonstrated with enough output power to successfully pump hot-electron bolometer mixers in this frequency range. An overview of the current State-of-the-Art of the local oscillator technology will be presented along with highlighting future trends and challenges.

  9. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  10. Network oscillations of inferior olive neurons: entrainment and phase-locking of locally-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Thomas; Goldman, Mark S.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Although the inferior olive is known to contribute to the generation of timing and error signals for motor control, the specific role of its distinctive spatiotemporal activity patterns is still controversial. Olivary neurons display regular, sometimes synchronized oscillations of subthreshold membrane potential, driven in part by the highest density of electrical coupling of any brain region. We show that a reduced model of coupled phase oscillators is sufficient to reproduce and study experimental observations previously only demonstrated in more complex models. These include stable phase differences, variability of entrainment frequency, wave propagation, and cluster formation. Using the phase-response curve (PRC) of a conductance-based model of olivary neurons, we derive our phase model according to the theory of weakly-coupled oscillators. We retain the heterogeneity of intrinsic frequencies and heterogeneous, spatially constrained coupling as weak perturbations to the limit-cycle dynamics. Generalizing this model to an ensemble of coupled oscillator lattices with frequency and coupling disorder, we study the onset of entrainment and phase-locking as coupling is strengthened, including the scaling of cluster sizes with coupling strength near each phase transition.

  11. Polychromatic optical Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    Bloch oscillations (BOs) of polychromatic beams in circularly curved optical waveguide arrays are smeared out owing to the dependence of the BO spatial period on the wavelength. Here it is shown that restoring of the self-imaging property of the array and approximate BOs over relatively broad spectral ranges can be achieved by the insertion of suitable lumped phase slips uniformly applied across the array.

  12. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  13. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  14. Entangled mechanical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Jost, J D; Home, J P; Amini, J M; Hanneke, D; Ozeri, R; Langer, C; Bollinger, J J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2009-06-01

    Hallmarks of quantum mechanics include superposition and entanglement. In the context of large complex systems, these features should lead to situations as envisaged in the 'Schrödinger's cat' thought experiment (where the cat exists in a superposition of alive and dead states entangled with a radioactive nucleus). Such situations are not observed in nature. This may be simply due to our inability to sufficiently isolate the system of interest from the surrounding environment-a technical limitation. Another possibility is some as-yet-undiscovered mechanism that prevents the formation of macroscopic entangled states. Such a limitation might depend on the number of elementary constituents in the system or on the types of degrees of freedom that are entangled. Tests of the latter possibility have been made with photons, atoms and condensed matter devices. One system ubiquitous to nature where entanglement has not been previously demonstrated consists of distinct mechanical oscillators. Here we demonstrate deterministic entanglement of separated mechanical oscillators, consisting of the vibrational states of two pairs of atomic ions held in different locations. We also demonstrate entanglement of the internal states of an atomic ion with a distant mechanical oscillator. These results show quantum entanglement in a degree of freedom that pervades the classical world. Such experiments may lead to the generation of entangled states of larger-scale mechanical oscillators, and offer possibilities for testing non-locality with mesoscopic systems. In addition, the control developed here is an important ingredient for scaling-up quantum information processing with trapped atomic ions.

  15. Relative Visual Oscillation Can Facilitate Visually Induced Self-Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Palmisano, Stephen; Kim, Juno

    2016-01-01

    Adding simulated viewpoint jitter or oscillation to displays enhances visually induced illusions of self-motion (vection). The cause of this enhancement is yet to be fully understood. Here, we conducted psychophysical experiments to investigate the effects of different types of simulated oscillation on vertical vection. Observers viewed horizontally oscillating and nonoscillating optic flow fields simulating downward self-motion through an aperture. The aperture was visually simulated to be nearer to the observer and was stationary or oscillating in-phase or counter-phase to the direction of background horizontal oscillations of optic flow. Results showed that vection strength was modulated by the oscillation of the aperture relative to the background optic flow. Vertical vection strength increased as the relative oscillatory horizontal motion between the flow and the aperture increased. However, such increases in vection were only generated when the added oscillations were orthogonal to the principal direction of the optic flow pattern, and not when they occurred in the same direction. The oscillation effects observed in this investigation could not be explained by motion adaptation or different (motion parallax based) effects on depth perception. Instead, these results suggest that the oscillation advantage for vection depends on relative visual motion. PMID:27698982

  16. Relative Visual Oscillation Can Facilitate Visually Induced Self-Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Palmisano, Stephen; Kim, Juno

    2016-01-01

    Adding simulated viewpoint jitter or oscillation to displays enhances visually induced illusions of self-motion (vection). The cause of this enhancement is yet to be fully understood. Here, we conducted psychophysical experiments to investigate the effects of different types of simulated oscillation on vertical vection. Observers viewed horizontally oscillating and nonoscillating optic flow fields simulating downward self-motion through an aperture. The aperture was visually simulated to be nearer to the observer and was stationary or oscillating in-phase or counter-phase to the direction of background horizontal oscillations of optic flow. Results showed that vection strength was modulated by the oscillation of the aperture relative to the background optic flow. Vertical vection strength increased as the relative oscillatory horizontal motion between the flow and the aperture increased. However, such increases in vection were only generated when the added oscillations were orthogonal to the principal direction of the optic flow pattern, and not when they occurred in the same direction. The oscillation effects observed in this investigation could not be explained by motion adaptation or different (motion parallax based) effects on depth perception. Instead, these results suggest that the oscillation advantage for vection depends on relative visual motion.

  17. Prominence formation and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    Prominences, or filaments, are a striking phenomenon in the solar atmosphere. Besides their own rich features and dynamics, they are related to many other activities, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the past several years we have been investigating the prominence formation, oscillations, and eruptions through both data analysis and radiative hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This paper reviews our progress on these topics, which includes: (1) With updated radiative cooling function, the coronal condensation becomes a little faster than previous work; (2) Once a seed condensation is formed, it can grow via siphon flow spontaneously even if the evaporation stops; (3) A scaling law was obtained to relate the length of the prominence thread to various parameters, indicating that higher prominences tend to have shorter threads, which is consistent with the fact that threads are long in active region prominences and short in quiescent prominences; (4) It was proposed that long-time prominence oscillations out of phase might serve as a precursor for prominence eruptions and CMEs; (5) An ensemble of oscillating prominence threads may explain the counter-streaming motion.

  18. Temperature sensitive oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An oscillator circuit for sensing and indicating temperature by changing oscillator frequency with temperature comprises a programmable operational amplifier which is operated on the roll-off portion of its gain versus frequency curve and has its output directly connected to the inverting input to place the amplifier in a follower configuration. Its output is also connected to the non-inverting input by a capacitor with a crystal or other tuned circuit also being connected to the non-inverting input. A resistor is connected to the program input of the amplifier to produce a given set current at a given temperature, the set current varying with temperature. As the set current changes, the gain-bandwidth of the amplifier changes and, in turn, the reflected capacitance across the crystal changes, thereby providing the desired change in oscillator frequency by pulling the crystal. There is no requirement that a crystal employed with this circuit display either a linear frequency change with temperature or a substantial frequency change with temperature.

  19. Nonlinear Oscillators in Space Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester,Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    We discuss dynamical systems that produce an oscillation without an external time dependent source. Numerical results are presented for nonlinear oscillators in the Em1h's atmosphere, foremost the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBOl. These fluid dynamical oscillators, like the solar dynamo, have in common that one of the variables in a governing equation is strongly nonlinear and that the nonlinearity, to first order, has particular form. of 3rd or odd power. It is shown that this form of nonlinearity can produce the fundamental li'equency of the internal oscillation. which has a period that is favored by the dynamical condition of the fluid. The fundamental frequency maintains the oscillation, with no energy input to the system at that particular frequency. Nonlinearities of 2nd or even power could not maintain the oscillation.

  20. Control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, M; Haller, E; Mark, M J; Danzl, J G; Rojas-Kopeinig, G; Nägerl, H-C

    2008-02-29

    We report on the control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations for an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice. We quantify the dephasing in terms of the width of the quasimomentum distribution and measure its dependence on time for different interaction strengths which we control by means of a Feshbach resonance. For minimal interaction, the dephasing time is increased from a few to more than 20 thousand Bloch oscillation periods, allowing us to realize a BEC-based atom interferometer in the noninteracting limit.

  1. Control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, M; Haller, E; Mark, M J; Danzl, J G; Rojas-Kopeinig, G; Nägerl, H-C

    2008-02-29

    We report on the control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations for an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice. We quantify the dephasing in terms of the width of the quasimomentum distribution and measure its dependence on time for different interaction strengths which we control by means of a Feshbach resonance. For minimal interaction, the dephasing time is increased from a few to more than 20 thousand Bloch oscillation periods, allowing us to realize a BEC-based atom interferometer in the noninteracting limit. PMID:18352606

  2. Strength Training and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Strength Training and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Strength Training ... help prevent injuries and speed up recovery. About Strength Training Strength training is the practice of using free ...

  3. Disruptions of El Niño–Southern Oscillation teleconnections by the Madden–Julian Oscillation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoell, Andrew; Barlow, Mathew; Wheeler, Mathew; Funk, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the leading mode of interannual variability, with global impacts on weather and climate that have seasonal predictability. Research on the link between interannual ENSO variability and the leading mode of intraseasonal variability, the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), has focused mainly on the role of MJO initiating or terminating ENSO. We use observational analysis and modeling to show that the MJO has an important simultaneous link to ENSO: strong MJO activity significantly weakens the atmospheric branch of ENSO. For weak MJO conditions relative to strong MJO conditions, the average magnitude of ENSO-associated tropical precipitation anomalies increases by 63%, and the strength of hemispheric teleconnections increases by 58%. Since the MJO has predictability beyond three weeks, the relationships shown here suggest that there may be subseasonal predictability of the ENSO teleconnections to continental circulation and precipitation.

  4. Good vibrations switch attention: an affective function for network oscillations in evolutionary simulations.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Phaf, R Hans

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a new hypothesis on the neural mechanisms linking affect to attention was brought forward by evolutionary simulations on agents navigating a virtual environment while collecting food and avoiding predation. The connection strengths between nodes in the networks controlling the agents were subjected to random variation, and the fittest agents were selected for reproduction. Unexpectedly, oscillations of node activations emerged, which drastically enhanced the agent's fitness. We analyzed the mechanisms involved in the modulation of attention and found that oscillations acted on competitive networks. Response selection depended on the connection structure, but the speed and efficacy of switching between selections was modulated by oscillation frequency. The main focus of the present study was the differential emergence of stimulus-specific oscillation frequencies. Oscillations had a higher frequency in an appetitive motivational state than in an aversive state. We suggest that oscillations in biological networks also mediate the affective modulation of attention. PMID:20498346

  5. Building on Our Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Comments on the feeling that the American family is disintegrating, and that many criticisms traditionally made about Black families are now made about White families. Suggests that people need to stress family strengths. As an example, five major strengths of Black families are described: flexibility, work and achievement ethics, religiosity, and…

  6. Strengths of Remarried Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaub, Patricia Kain; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on remarried families' (N=80) perceptions of family strengths, marital satisfaction, and adjustment to the remarried situation. Results indicated that although most would like to make some changes, scores on the measurements used were high. A supportive environment was the most important predictor of family strength and success. (JAC)

  7. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  8. Kravchuk oscillator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyeva, Mesuma K.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2014-05-01

    The study of irreducible representations of Lie algebras and groups has traditionally considered their action on functions of a continuous manifold (e.g. the 'rotation' Lie algebra so(3) on functions on the sphere). Here we argue that functions of a discrete variable -Kravchuk functions- are on equal footing for that study in the case of so(3). They lead to a discrete quantum model of the harmonic oscillator, and offer a corresponding set of special function relations. The technique is applicable to other special function families of a discrete variable, which stem from low-dimensional Lie algebras and are stationary solutions for the corresponding discrete quantum models.

  9. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  10. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  11. Scaling and synchronization in a ring of diffusively coupled nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, D V; Muruganandam, P; Lakshmanan, M; Kurths, J

    2010-06-01

    Chaos synchronization in a ring of diffusively coupled nonlinear oscillators driven by an external identical oscillator is studied. Based on numerical simulations we show that by introducing additional couplings at (mN(c)+1)-th oscillators in the ring, where m is an integer and N(c) is the maximum number of synchronized oscillators in the ring with a single coupling, the maximum number of oscillators that can be synchronized can be increased considerably beyond the limit restricted by size instability. We also demonstrate that there exists an exponential relation between the number of oscillators that can support stable synchronization in the ring with the external drive and the critical coupling strength ε(c) with a scaling exponent γ. The critical coupling strength is calculated by numerically estimating the synchronization error and is also confirmed from the conditional Lyapunov exponents of the coupled systems. We find that the same scaling relation exists for m couplings between the drive and the ring. Further, we have examined the robustness of the synchronous states against Gaussian white noise and found that the synchronization error exhibits a power-law decay as a function of the noise intensity indicating the existence of both noise-enhanced and noise-induced synchronizations depending on the value of the coupling strength ε. In addition, we have found that ε(c) shows an exponential decay as a function of the number of additional couplings. These results are demonstrated using the paradigmatic models of Rössler and Lorenz oscillators.

  12. Controlling and synchronizing the spatiotemporal chaos of photorefractive ring oscillators with coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Feng, Xiuqin; Tian, Zuolin; Yao, Zhihai

    2016-06-01

    We present the control and synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos in the photo-refractive ring oscillator systems with coupling technology. First, we realize the synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos in the two photorefractive ring oscillator systems via mutual coupling by choosing a suitable coupling strength. With the mutual coupling strength enlarging, the two mutual coupling photorefractive ring oscillator systems are controlled into periodic state, period number differs on account of the coupling strength and lattice coordinates. By increasing the coupling strength, the photorefractive ring oscillator is converted into period 8, subsequently it is converted into periods 4 and 2, periodic synchronization of the photorefractive ring oscillator systems is achieved at the same time. Calculation results show that period 1 is impossible by mutual coupling technology. Then, we investigate the influence of noise and parameter deviation on chaotic synchronization. We find that mutual coupling chaotic synchronization method can synchronize two chaotic systems with the weak noise and parameter deviation and has very good robustness. Given that the weak noise and parameter deviation have a slight effect on synchronization. Furthermore, we investigate two dimension control and synchronization of spatiotemporal chaos in the photorefractive ring osillator systems with coupling technology and get successful results. Mutual coupling technology is suitable in practical photorefractive ring oscillator systems.

  13. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. The authors propose that this role may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis, specifically, that the increases in theta oscillations and changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments.

  14. Transport equations for oscillating neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfan; Burrows, Adam

    2013-11-01

    We derive a suite of generalized Boltzmann equations, based on the density-matrix formalism, that incorporates the physics of neutrino oscillations for two- and three-flavor oscillations, matter refraction, and self-refraction. The resulting equations are straightforward extensions of the classical transport equations that nevertheless contain the full physics of quantum oscillation phenomena. In this way, our broadened formalism provides a bridge between the familiar neutrino transport algorithms employed by supernova modelers and the more quantum-heavy approaches frequently employed to illuminate the various neutrino oscillation effects. We also provide the corresponding angular-moment versions of this generalized equation set. Our goal is to make it easier for astrophysicists to address oscillation phenomena in a language with which they are familiar. The equations we derive are simple and practical, and are intended to facilitate progress concerning oscillation phenomena in the context of core-collapse supernova theory.

  15. Brain Oscillations, Hypnosis, and Hypnotizability

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Adachi, Tomonori; Hakimian, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we summarize the state-of-science knowledge regarding the associations between hypnosis and brain oscillations. Brain oscillations represent the combined electrical activity of neuronal assemblies, and are usually measured as specific frequencies representing slower (delta, theta, alpha) and faster (beta, gamma) oscillations. Hypnosis has been most closely linked to power in the theta band and changes in gamma activity. These oscillations are thought to play a critical role in both the recording and recall of declarative memory and emotional limbic circuits. Here we propose that it is this role that may be the mechanistic link between theta (and perhaps gamma) oscillations and hypnosis; specifically that theta oscillations may facilitate, and that changes in gamma activity observed with hypnosis may underlie, some hypnotic responses. If these hypotheses are supported, they have important implications for both understanding the effects of hypnosis, and for enhancing response to hypnotic treatments. PMID:25792761

  16. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    PubMed

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  17. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40–100 Hz in mammals, 20–30 Hz in insects, 0.5–1.5 Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb, antennal lobe, or procerebrum. Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the olfactory bulb and antennal lobe. Beta (20 Hz) and theta (2–12 Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal olfactory bulb input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration. PMID:25460070

  18. Phase-response curves of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Ko, Tae-Wook; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2009-01-01

    Many real oscillators are coupled to other oscillators, and the coupling can affect the response of the oscillators to stimuli. We investigate phase-response curves (PRCs) of coupled oscillators. The PRCs for two weakly coupled phase-locked oscillators are analytically obtained in terms of the PRC for uncoupled oscillators and the coupling function of the system. Through simulation and analytic methods, the PRCs for globally coupled oscillators are also discussed.

  19. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  20. Mathematics of oscillations and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical definition of the sine function and the number π which is related to sine function allows to understand, how harmonic oscillations and waves appear. The functional equation for the sine is received. The new fast algorithm of calculation of the π number is formulated. In the elementary case oscillations and waves are harmonious or sinusoidal. The sine function appears not accidentally. This function can be defined as the solution of the functional equation characterizing periodic properties of oscillations and waves.

  1. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  2. Spatial computation with gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Engelhard, Ben; Vaadia, Eilon

    2014-01-01

    Gamma oscillations in cortex have been extensively studied with relation to behavior in both humans and animal models; however, their computational role in the processing of behaviorally relevant signals is still not clear. One oft-overlooked characteristic of gamma oscillations is their spatial distribution over the cortical space and the computational consequences of such an organization. Here, we advance the proposal that the spatial organization of gamma oscillations is of major importance for their function. The interaction of specific spatial distributions of oscillations with the functional topography of cortex enables select amplification of neuronal signals, which supports perceptual and cognitive processing. PMID:25249950

  3. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  4. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  5. Quartz-crystal-oscillator hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measuring device, which eliminates complex and expensive optical components by electronically sensing dewpoint of water vapor in gas, employs piezoelectric crystal oscillator, supportive circuitry, temperature regulators, and readout.

  6. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  7. Theories of white dwarf oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhorn, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of theoretical understanding of the oscillations observed in the ZZ Ceti stars and cataclysmic variables is briefly reviewed. Nonradial g-mode oscillations appear to provide a satisfactory explanation for the low amplitude variables such as R548, with periods in the range of approximately 200 to 300 seconds, but for the longer period (800 to 1000 seconds) oscillators, the situation is still unclear. Rotation may play an important role in this problem, and the effects of both slow and fast rotation upon the mode structure are discussed. In the cataclysmic variables, both accretion and thermonuclear burning may act to excite oscillations of the white dwarf.

  8. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  9. Policy oscillation is overshooting.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A majority of approximate dynamic programming approaches to the reinforcement learning problem can be categorized into greedy value function methods and value-based policy gradient methods. The former approach, although fast, is well known to be susceptible to the policy oscillation phenomenon. We take a fresh view to this phenomenon by casting, within the context of non-optimistic policy iteration, a considerable subset of the former approach as a limiting special case of the latter. We explain the phenomenon in terms of this view and illustrate the underlying mechanism with artificial examples. We also use it to derive the constrained natural actor-critic algorithm that can interpolate between the aforementioned approaches. In addition, it has been suggested in the literature that the oscillation phenomenon might be subtly connected to the grossly suboptimal performance in the Tetris benchmark problem of all attempted approximate dynamic programming methods. Based on empirical findings, we offer a hypothesis that might explain the inferior performance levels and the associated policy degradation phenomenon, and which would partially support the suggested connection. Finally, we report scores in the Tetris problem that improve on existing dynamic programming based results by an order of magnitude. PMID:24491826

  10. Extinction of oscillating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naftali R.; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation.

  11. MULTIPLE OSCILLATION STABILIZING CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE,M.; SCHLUETER,R.; AZARM,M.; BARI,R.

    2004-07-23

    This paper presents a strategy that may be used to guide stabilizing control design for multiple oscillations, which are difficult to control using conventional control design procedures. A multiple oscillation phenomena is observed in an example power system. A local bifurcation and an interarea bifurcation develop in an example power system due to multiple bifurcation parameter variations. The dynamic behaviors of the bifurcating system are complex due to the overlapping of the two different bifurcation subsystems and are shown to be difficult to control. The double bifurcations are studied in this paper and in order to stabilize them, three kind of {mu}-synthesis robust controls are designed, (a) {mu}-synthesis power system stabilizer (MPSS); (b) {mu}-synthesis SVC control (MSVC); and (c) a mixed MPSS/MSVC control. Based on the bifurcation subsystem analysis, the measurement signals and locations of the controls are selected. The control performances of three kind of controls are evaluated and compared. The conclusions are given according to the analysis and time simulation results.

  12. Scanning for oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigné, Alain; Arzounian, Dorothée

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Oscillations are an important aspect of brain activity, but they often have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to source-to-electrode mixing with competing brain activity and noise. Filtering can improve the SNR of narrowband signals, but it introduces ringing effects that may masquerade as genuine oscillations, leading to uncertainty as to the true oscillatory nature of the phenomena. Likewise, time-frequency analysis kernels have a temporal extent that blurs the time course of narrowband activity, introducing uncertainty as to timing and causal relations between events and/or frequency bands. Approach. Here, we propose a methodology that reveals narrowband activity within multichannel data such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, electrocorticography or local field potential. The method exploits the between-channel correlation structure of the data to suppress competing sources by joint diagonalization of the covariance matrices of narrowband filtered and unfiltered data. Main results. Applied to synthetic and real data, the method effectively extracts narrowband components at unfavorable SNR. Significance. Oscillatory components of brain activity, including weak sources that are hard or impossible to observe using standard methods, can be detected and their time course plotted accurately. The method avoids the temporal artifacts of standard filtering and time-frequency analysis methods with which it remains complementary.

  13. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  14. Extinction of oscillating populations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Naftali R; Meerson, Baruch

    2016-03-01

    Established populations often exhibit oscillations in their sizes that, in the deterministic theory, correspond to a limit cycle in the space of population sizes. If a population is isolated, the intrinsic stochasticity of elemental processes can ultimately bring it to extinction. Here we study extinction of oscillating populations in a stochastic version of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model. To this end we develop a WKB (Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) approximation to the master equation, employing the characteristic population size as the large parameter. Similar WKB theories have been developed previously in the context of population extinction from an attracting multipopulation fixed point. We evaluate the extinction rates and find the most probable paths to extinction from the limit cycle by applying Floquet theory to the dynamics of an effective four-dimensional WKB Hamiltonian. We show that the entropic barriers to extinction change in a nonanalytic way as the system passes through the Hopf bifurcation. We also study the subleading pre-exponential factors of the WKB approximation. PMID:27078294

  15. Heterogeneity of time delays determines synchronization of coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkoski, Spase; Spiegler, Andreas; Proix, Timothée; Aram, Parham; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2016-07-01

    Network couplings of oscillatory large-scale systems, such as the brain, have a space-time structure composed of connection strengths and signal transmission delays. We provide a theoretical framework, which allows treating the spatial distribution of time delays with regard to synchronization, by decomposing it into patterns and therefore reducing the stability analysis into the tractable problem of a finite set of delay-coupled differential equations. We analyze delay-structured networks of phase oscillators and we find that, depending on the heterogeneity of the delays, the oscillators group in phase-shifted, anti-phase, steady, and non-stationary clusters, and analytically compute their stability boundaries. These results find direct application in the study of brain oscillations.

  16. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions-a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself.

  17. Oscillations of a deformed liquid drop in an acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tao; Apfel, Robert E.

    1995-07-01

    The oscillations of an axially symmetric liquid drop in an acoustic standing wave field in air have been studied using the boundary integral method. The interaction between the drop oscillation and sound field has been included in this analysis. Our computations focus on the frequency shift of small-amplitude oscillations of an acoustically deformed drop typical of a drop levitated in air. In the presence or absence of gravity, the trend and the magnitude of the frequency shift have been given in terms of drop size, drop deformation, and the strength of the sound field. Our calculations are compared with experiments performed on the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) and with ground-based measurements, and are found to be in good agreement within the accuracy of the experimental data.

  18. Driving Rabi oscillations at the giant dipole resonance in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Stefan; Wang, Daochen; Santra, Robin

    2015-11-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short and very intense light pulses in the XUV and x-ray regimes. We investigate the possibility to drive Rabi oscillations in xenon with an intense FEL pulse by using the unusually large dipole strength of the giant dipole resonance (GDR). The GDR decays within less than 30 as due to its position, which is above the 4 d ionization threshold. We find that intensities around 1018W /cm2 are required to induce Rabi oscillations with a period comparable to the lifetime. The pulse duration should not exceed 100 as because xenon will be fully ionized within a few lifetimes. Rabi oscillations reveal themselves also in the photoelectron spectrum in the form of Autler-Townes splittings extending over several tens of electronvolts.

  19. Heterogeneity of time delays determines synchronization of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Petkoski, Spase; Spiegler, Andreas; Proix, Timothée; Aram, Parham; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2016-07-01

    Network couplings of oscillatory large-scale systems, such as the brain, have a space-time structure composed of connection strengths and signal transmission delays. We provide a theoretical framework, which allows treating the spatial distribution of time delays with regard to synchronization, by decomposing it into patterns and therefore reducing the stability analysis into the tractable problem of a finite set of delay-coupled differential equations. We analyze delay-structured networks of phase oscillators and we find that, depending on the heterogeneity of the delays, the oscillators group in phase-shifted, anti-phase, steady, and non-stationary clusters, and analytically compute their stability boundaries. These results find direct application in the study of brain oscillations. PMID:27575125

  20. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions-a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  1. Control of coupled oscillator networks with application to microgrid technologies

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The control of complex systems and network-coupled dynamical systems is a topic of vital theoretical importance in mathematics and physics with a wide range of applications in engineering and various other sciences. Motivated by recent research into smart grid technologies, we study the control of synchronization and consider the important case of networks of coupled phase oscillators with nonlinear interactions—a paradigmatic example that has guided our understanding of self-organization for decades. We develop a method for control based on identifying and stabilizing problematic oscillators, resulting in a stable spectrum of eigenvalues, and in turn a linearly stable synchronized state. The amount of control, that is, number of oscillators, required to stabilize the network is primarily dictated by the coupling strength, dynamical heterogeneity, and mean degree of the network, and depends little on the structural heterogeneity of the network itself. PMID:26601231

  2. Heterogeneity of time delays determines synchronization of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Petkoski, Spase; Spiegler, Andreas; Proix, Timothée; Aram, Parham; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2016-07-01

    Network couplings of oscillatory large-scale systems, such as the brain, have a space-time structure composed of connection strengths and signal transmission delays. We provide a theoretical framework, which allows treating the spatial distribution of time delays with regard to synchronization, by decomposing it into patterns and therefore reducing the stability analysis into the tractable problem of a finite set of delay-coupled differential equations. We analyze delay-structured networks of phase oscillators and we find that, depending on the heterogeneity of the delays, the oscillators group in phase-shifted, anti-phase, steady, and non-stationary clusters, and analytically compute their stability boundaries. These results find direct application in the study of brain oscillations.

  3. Amplitude death in networks of delay-coupled delay oscillators.

    PubMed

    Höfener, Johannes M; Sethia, Gautam C; Gross, Thilo

    2013-09-28

    Amplitude death is a dynamical phenomenon in which a network of oscillators settles to a stable state as a result of coupling. Here, we study amplitude death in a generalized model of delay-coupled delay oscillators. We derive analytical results for degree homogeneous networks which show that amplitude death is governed by certain eigenvalues of the network's adjacency matrix. In particular, these results demonstrate that in delay-coupled delay oscillators amplitude death can occur for arbitrarily large coupling strength k. In this limit, we find a region of amplitude death which already occurs at small coupling delays that scale with 1/k. We show numerically that these results remain valid in random networks with heterogeneous degree distribution.

  4. Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing within recurrent attractor networks

    PubMed Central

    Solanka, Lukas; van Rossum, Mark CW; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-01-01

    Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. We show that moderate intrinsic noise massively increases the range of synaptic strengths supporting gamma oscillations and grid computation. With moderate noise, variation in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic strength tunes the amplitude and frequency of gamma activity without disrupting grid firing. This beneficial role for noise results from disruption of epileptic-like network states. Thus, moderate noise promotes independent control of multiplexed firing rate- and gamma-based computational mechanisms. Our results have implications for tuning of normal circuit function and for disorders associated with changes in gamma oscillations and synaptic strength. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06444.001 PMID:26146940

  5. Crew Strength Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    Train to develop your upper and lower body strength in your muscles and bones by performing body-weight squats and push-ups.The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitement of exploration to...

  6. Developing Strengths in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ted

    1976-01-01

    There are few descriptions of growth experiences for total families. This paper describes one such model. It expresses the conviction that families need opportunities to come together with other families to identify strengths, sharpen communication skills, and establish goals. (Author)

  7. Stochastic bifurcation in noise-driven lasers and Hopf oscillators.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Sebastian

    2009-03-01

    This paper considers nonlinear dynamics in an ensemble of uncoupled lasers, each being a limit-cycle oscillator, which are driven by the same external white Gaussian noise. As the external-noise strength increases, there is an onset of synchronization and then subsequent loss of synchrony. Local analysis of the laser equations shows that synchronization becomes unstable via stochastic bifurcation to chaos, defined as a passing of the largest Lyapunov exponent through zero. The locus of this bifurcation is calculated in the three-dimensional parameter space defined by the Hopf parameter, amount of amplitude-phase coupling, and external-noise strength. Numerical comparison between the laser system and the normal form of Hopf bifurcation uncovers a square-root law for this stochastic bifurcation as well as strong enhancement in noise-induced chaos due to the laser's relaxation oscillation.

  8. On the classical dynamics of strongly driven anharmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, H. P.; Dietz, K.; Holthaus, M.

    1990-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of periodically driven anharmonic oscillators. In particular, we consider values of the coupling strength which are orders of magnitude higher than those required for the overlap of primary resonances. We observe a division of phase space into a regular and a stochastic region. Both regions are separated by a sharp chaos border which sets an upper limit to the stochastic heating of particles; its dependence on the coupling strength is studied. We construct perpetual adiabatic invariants governing regular motion. A bifurcation mechanism leading to the annihilation of resonances is explained.

  9. Apple Strength Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C

    2009-12-22

    Strength of the apple parts has been noticed to decrease, especially those installed by the new induction heating system since the LEP campaign started. Fig. 1 shows the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and elongation of the installed or installation-simulated apples on various systems. One can clearly see the mean values of UTS and YS of the post-LEP parts decreased by about 8 ksi and 6 ksi respectively from those of the pre-LEP parts. The slight increase in elongation seen in Fig.1 can be understood from the weak inverse relationship between the strength and elongation in metals. Fig.2 shows the weak correlation between the YS and elongation of the parts listed in Fig. 1. Strength data listed in Figure 1 were re-plotted as histograms in Figs. 3 and 4. Figs. 3a and 4a show histograms of all UTS and YS data. Figs. 3b and 4b shows histograms of pre-LEP data and Figs. 3c and 4c of post-LEP data. Data on statistical scatter of tensile strengths have been rarely published by material suppliers. Instead, only the minimum 'guaranteed' strength data are typically presented. An example of strength distribution of aluminum 7075-T6 sheet material, listed in Fig. 5, show that its scatter width of both UTS and YS for a single sheet can be about 6 ksi and for multi-lot scatter can be as large as 11 ksi even though the sheets have been produced through well-controlled manufacturing process. By approximating the histograms shown in Figs. 3 and 4 by a Gaussian or similar type of distribution curves, one can plausibly see the strength reductions in the later or more recent apples. The pre-LEP data in Figs. 3b and 4b show wider scatter than the post-LEP data in Figs. 3c and 4c and seem to follow the binomial distribution of strength indicating that the apples might have been made from two different lots of material, either from two different vendors or from two different melts of perhaps slightly different chemical composition by a single vendor. The post

  10. Noise-induced synchronization, desynchronization, and clustering in globally coupled nonidentical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi Ming; Porter, Mason A

    2013-07-01

    We study ensembles of globally coupled, nonidentical phase oscillators subject to correlated noise, and we identify several important factors that cause noise and coupling to synchronize or desynchronize a system. By introducing noise in various ways, we find an estimate for the onset of synchrony of a system in terms of the coupling strength, noise strength, and width of the frequency distribution of its natural oscillations. We also demonstrate that noise alone can be sufficient to synchronize nonidentical oscillators. However, this synchrony depends on the first Fourier mode of a phase-sensitivity function, through which we introduce common noise into the system. We show that higher Fourier modes can cause desynchronization due to clustering effects, and that this can reinforce clustering caused by different forms of coupling. Finally, we discuss the effects of noise on an ensemble in which antiferromagnetic coupling causes oscillators to form two clusters in the absence of noise.

  11. Engineering oscillating microtubule bundles.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Timothy; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2013-01-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate their activity to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach toward studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up and we present methods for engineering such structures. We demonstrate how simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent assemble into structures that produce spontaneous oscillations, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Synthetic cilia-like structures can be assembled at high density, leading to synchronization and metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in biological ciliary fields.

  12. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  13. Longitudinal oscillation of launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    During powered flight a vehicle may develop longitudinal self-excited oscillations, so-called oscillations, of its structure. The energy supplying the vibration is tapped from the thrust by the activity of the system itself; that is, oscillation of the structure causes oscillation of the propellant system, especially of the pumps. In this way an oscillating thrust can be created that, by a feedback loop, may sustain the structural oscillation under certain circumstances. Two special features of the system proved to be essential for creation of instability. One is the effect of the inherent time interval that the thrust oscillation is lagging behind the structural oscillation. The other is the decreased of system mass caused by the exhausting of gas. The latter feature may cause an initially stable system to become unstable. To examine the stability of the system, a single mass-spring model, which is the result of a one-term Galerkin approach to the equation of motion, has been considered. The Nyquist stability criterion leads to a stability graph that shows the stability conditions in terms of the system parameter and also demonstrates the significance of time lag, feedback magnitude, and loss of mass. An important conclusion can be drawn from the analysis: large relative displacements of the pump-engine masses favor instability. This is also confirmed by flight measurements.

  14. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  15. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  16. Oscillations in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Stark, Jaroslav; Chan, Cliburn; George, Andrew J T

    2007-04-01

    Oscillations are surprisingly common in the immune system, both in its healthy state and in disease. The most famous example is that of periodic fevers caused by the malaria parasite. A number of hereditary disorders, which also cause periodic fevers, have also been known for a long time. Various reports of oscillations in cytokine concentrations following antigen challenge have been published over at least the past three decades. Oscillations can also occur at the intracellular level. Calcium oscillations following T-cell activation are familiar to all immunologists, and metabolic and reactive oxygen species oscillations in neutrophils have been well documented. More recently, oscillations in nuclear factor kappaB activity following stimulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha have received considerable publicity. However, despite all of these examples, oscillations in the immune system still tend to be considered mainly as pathological aberrations, and their causes and significance remained largely unknown. This is partly because of a lack of awareness within the immunological community of the appropriate theoretical frameworks for describing and analyzing such behavior. We provide an introduction to these frameworks and give a survey of the currently known oscillations that occur within the immune system. PMID:17367345

  17. Experiments on oscillator ensemble with global nonlinear coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Michael; Temirbayev, Amirkhan; Zhanabaev, Zeinulla; Tarasov, Stanislav; Ponomarenko, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    We experimentally analyze collective dynamics of a population of 20 electronic Wien-bridge limit-cycle oscillators with a linear or nonlinear phase-shifting unit in the global feedback loop. With linear unit we observe, with increase of the coupling strength, a standard Kuramoto-like transition to a fully synchronous state; the threshold of the transition depends on the phase shift. In case of nonlinear global coupling we first observe a transition to a state when approximately half of the population forms a synchronous cluster. With further increase of the coupling strength we observe destruction of this cluster and formation of a self-organized quasiperiodic state, predicted in [M. Rosenblum and A. Pikovsky, PRL, 98, 064101 (2007)]. In this state, frequencies of all oscillators are smaller than the frequency of the mean field, so that the oscillators are not locked to the mean field they create and their dynamics is quasiperiodic. The transition is characterized by a non-monotonic dependence of the order parameter on the coupling strength. We demonstrate a good correspondence between theory and experiment.

  18. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  19. Nonlinear oscillations in marine hydroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venslauskas, Mindaugas S.; Asmantas, Sarunas

    2003-06-01

    Irregular oscillations in a colony of marine hydroids Podocoryne carnea were investigated. Quantitative characteristics were obtained as a result of long term (10-12 h) monitoring of oscillations at arbitrary sites. The sliding window spectra as well as the pulse-to-pulse dynamics argue the transient chaotic behavior of hydroid colony. The significant change of amplitudes and frequencies in intact colony oscillations after feeding and long sustained oscillations of stolons separated from colony suggest that the irregular activity could be determined by the network of pacemakers residing in stolon wall cells. These are influenced mechanically by the amount of digesting food and/or by chemical action of nutrients inside the stolon lumen. The possible correlation of these oscillations which can evoke Ca2+ waves in stolon wall cells is discussed.

  20. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  1. Controlling the synchronization properties of two dipolarly coupled vortex based spin-torque nano-oscillators by the intermediate of a third one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu Araujo, Flavio; Grollier, Julie

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose to control the strength of phase-locking between two dipolarly coupled vortex based spin-torque nano-oscillators by placing an intermediate oscillator between them. We show through micromagnetic simulations that the strength of phase-locking can be largely tuned by a slight variation of current in the intermediate oscillator. We develop simplified numerical simulations based on analytical expressions of the vortex core trajectories that will be useful for investigating large arrays of densely packed spin-torque oscillators interacting through their stray fields.

  2. Electrical Oscillations in Two-Dimensional Microtubular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, María Del Rocío; Perez, Paula L.; Smoler, Mariano; Villa Etchegoyen, Cecilia; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are unique components of the cytoskeleton formed by hollow cylindrical structures of αβ tubulin dimeric units. The structural wall of the MT is interspersed by nanopores formed by the lateral arrangement of its subunits. MTs are also highly charged polar polyelectrolytes, capable of amplifying electrical signals. The actual nature of these electrodynamic capabilities remains largely unknown. Herein we applied the patch clamp technique to two-dimensional MT sheets, to characterize their electrical properties. Voltage-clamped MT sheets generated cation-selective oscillatory electrical currents whose magnitude depended on both the holding potential, and ionic strength and composition. The oscillations progressed through various modes including single and double periodic regimes and more complex behaviours, being prominent a fundamental frequency at 29 Hz. In physiological K+ (140 mM), oscillations represented in average a 640% change in conductance that was also affected by the prevalent anion. Current injection induced voltage oscillations, thus showing excitability akin with action potentials. The electrical oscillations were entirely blocked by taxol, with pseudo Michaelis-Menten kinetics and a KD of ~1.29 μM. The findings suggest a functional role of the nanopores in the MT wall on the genesis of electrical oscillations that offer new insights into the nonlinear behaviour of the cytoskeleton.

  3. Electrical Oscillations in Two-Dimensional Microtubular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Perez, Paula L.; Smoler, Mariano; Villa Etchegoyen, Cecilia; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are unique components of the cytoskeleton formed by hollow cylindrical structures of αβ tubulin dimeric units. The structural wall of the MT is interspersed by nanopores formed by the lateral arrangement of its subunits. MTs are also highly charged polar polyelectrolytes, capable of amplifying electrical signals. The actual nature of these electrodynamic capabilities remains largely unknown. Herein we applied the patch clamp technique to two-dimensional MT sheets, to characterize their electrical properties. Voltage-clamped MT sheets generated cation-selective oscillatory electrical currents whose magnitude depended on both the holding potential, and ionic strength and composition. The oscillations progressed through various modes including single and double periodic regimes and more complex behaviours, being prominent a fundamental frequency at 29 Hz. In physiological K+ (140 mM), oscillations represented in average a 640% change in conductance that was also affected by the prevalent anion. Current injection induced voltage oscillations, thus showing excitability akin with action potentials. The electrical oscillations were entirely blocked by taxol, with pseudo Michaelis-Menten kinetics and a KD of ~1.29 μM. The findings suggest a functional role of the nanopores in the MT wall on the genesis of electrical oscillations that offer new insights into the nonlinear behaviour of the cytoskeleton. PMID:27256791

  4. Electrical Oscillations in Two-Dimensional Microtubular Structures.

    PubMed

    Cantero, María Del Rocío; Perez, Paula L; Smoler, Mariano; Villa Etchegoyen, Cecilia; Cantiello, Horacio F

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are unique components of the cytoskeleton formed by hollow cylindrical structures of αβ tubulin dimeric units. The structural wall of the MT is interspersed by nanopores formed by the lateral arrangement of its subunits. MTs are also highly charged polar polyelectrolytes, capable of amplifying electrical signals. The actual nature of these electrodynamic capabilities remains largely unknown. Herein we applied the patch clamp technique to two-dimensional MT sheets, to characterize their electrical properties. Voltage-clamped MT sheets generated cation-selective oscillatory electrical currents whose magnitude depended on both the holding potential, and ionic strength and composition. The oscillations progressed through various modes including single and double periodic regimes and more complex behaviours, being prominent a fundamental frequency at 29 Hz. In physiological K(+) (140 mM), oscillations represented in average a 640% change in conductance that was also affected by the prevalent anion. Current injection induced voltage oscillations, thus showing excitability akin with action potentials. The electrical oscillations were entirely blocked by taxol, with pseudo Michaelis-Menten kinetics and a KD of ~1.29 μM. The findings suggest a functional role of the nanopores in the MT wall on the genesis of electrical oscillations that offer new insights into the nonlinear behaviour of the cytoskeleton. PMID:27256791

  5. Genesis and synchronization properties of fast neural oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Rulkov, Nikolai

    2008-03-01

    Fast neural network oscillations in gamma (30-80 Hz) range are associated with attentiveness and sensory perception and have strong relation to both cognitive processing and temporal binding of sensory stimuli. These oscillations are found in different brain systems including cerebral cortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Cortical gamma oscillations may become synchronized within 1-2 msec over distances up to a few millimeters. In this study we used computational network models to analyze basic synaptic mechanisms and synchronization properties of fast neural oscillations. Using the network models of synaptically coupled pyramidal neurons (up to 500,000 cells) and fast spiking interneurons (up to 125,000 cells) we found that the strength of feedback inhibition determined the network synchronization state: either global network oscillations with near zero phase lag between remote sites or waves of gamma activity propagating through the network. Long-range excitatory connections between pyramidal cells were not required for long-range synchronization. The model predicts that local inhibitory circuits can mediate global network synchronization with phase delays being much smaller than activity propagation time between remote network sites.

  6. Mismatch Oscillations in High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A.

    2005-05-03

    When planning the design of high-current FODO transport for accelerators, it is useful to have simple, accurate tools for calculating quantities such as the phase advances {sigma}{sub 0} and !given the lattice and beam parameters. Along with the KV beam model, the smooth approximation is often used. It is simple but not very accurate in many cases. Although Struckmeier and Reiser [1] showed that the stable oscillation frequencies of mismatched beams could be obtained accurately, they actually used a hybrid approach where {sigma}{sub 0} and {sigma} were already known precisely. When starting instead with basic quantities such as quadrupole dimensions, field strength, beam line charge density and emittance, the smooth approximation gives substantial errors. Here we derive a simple modification of the smooth approximation formula that improves the accuracy of the predicted frequencies by a factor of five at {sigma}{sub 0} = 83{sup o}.

  7. Dynamical regimes of four almost identical chemical oscillators coupled via pulse inhibitory coupling with time delay.

    PubMed

    Vanag, Vladimir K; Smelov, Pavel S; Klinshov, Vladimir V

    2016-02-21

    The dynamic regimes in networks of four almost identical spike oscillators with pulsatile coupling via inhibitor are systematically studied. We used two models to describe individual oscillators: a phase-oscillator model and a model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A time delay τ between a spike in one oscillator and the spike-induced inhibitory perturbation of other oscillators is introduced. Diagrams of all rhythms found for three different types of connectivities (unidirectional on a ring, mutual on a ring, and all-to-all) are built in the plane C(inh)-τ, where C(inh) is the coupling strength. It is shown analytically and numerically that only four regular rhythms are stable for unidirectional coupling: walk (phase shift between spikes of neighbouring oscillators equals the quarter of the global period T), walk-reverse (the same as walk but consecutive spikes take place in the direction opposite to the direction of connectivity), anti-phase (any two neighbouring oscillators are anti-phase), and in-phase oscillations. In the case of mutual on the ring coupling, an additional in-phase-anti-phase mode emerges. For all-to-all coupling, two new asymmetrical patterns (two-cluster and three-cluster modes) have been found. More complex rhythms are observed at large C(inh), when some oscillators are suppressed completely or generate smaller number of spikes than others.

  8. Role of Frontal Alpha Oscillations in Creativity

    PubMed Central

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R.; Foulser, A. Alban; Mellin, Juliann M.; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent EEG data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8 – 12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a fundamental role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking, a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40Hz-tACS was used in instead of 10Hz-tACS to rule out a general “electrical stimulation” effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal gamma stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation. PMID:25913062

  9. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  10. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  11. Influence of the Magnetic Field on Oscillation Spectra in Solar Faculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelpanov, A. A.; Kobanov, N. I.; Kolobov, D. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We study oscillation parameters in faculae above magnetic knots and in the areas adjacent to them. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data, we analyse oscillations in magnetic field strength, Doppler velocity, and intensity signals for the lower photosphere, and in intensity for the higher levels. We find peaks in the oscillation spectra for the magnetic field strength in magnetic knots at a frequency of about 4.8 mHz, while there are no such frequencies in the adjacent facular patches, which have a moderate field strength. In contrast, the spectra for the Doppler velocity oscillations are similar for these types of regions: in both cases, the significant peaks are in the 2.5 - 4.5 mHz range, although the oscillations in magnetic knots are 2 - 3 times weaker than those at the facular periphery. In the upper photosphere, the dominant frequencies in magnetic knots are 0.5 - 1 mHz higher than in the medium-field regions. The transition region oscillations above magnetic knots are mainly concentrated in the 3 - 6 mHz range, and those above moderate-field patches are concentrated below 3 mHz.

  12. Synchronization in an ensemble of spatially moving oscillators with linear and nonlinear coupling schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janagal, Lavneet; Parmananda, P.

    2012-11-01

    We study synchronization in an ensemble of oscillators residing in a finite two-dimensional space. The interaction between the oscillators is governed by their spatial movement. The coupling is unidirectional and is of the intermediate kind, with the spatial vision of each oscillator deciding the number of oscillators to which it is coupled. We also analyze how the extent of synchronization, characterized by the order parameter, depends upon the system parameters, such as spatial vision, spatial motion, and strength of the coupling. The model systems employed here are the Van der Pol oscillator and the Brusselator. Furthermore, for the same spatial configuration, both linear and nonlinear coupling schemes are studied and their results compared.

  13. Synchronization in an ensemble of spatially moving oscillators with linear and nonlinear coupling schemes.

    PubMed

    Janagal, Lavneet; Parmananda, P

    2012-11-01

    We study synchronization in an ensemble of oscillators residing in a finite two-dimensional space. The interaction between the oscillators is governed by their spatial movement. The coupling is unidirectional and is of the intermediate kind, with the spatial vision of each oscillator deciding the number of oscillators to which it is coupled. We also analyze how the extent of synchronization, characterized by the order parameter, depends upon the system parameters, such as spatial vision, spatial motion, and strength of the coupling. The model systems employed here are the Van der Pol oscillator and the Brusselator. Furthermore, for the same spatial configuration, both linear and nonlinear coupling schemes are studied and their results compared. PMID:23214863

  14. Noisy predator-prey model explains oscillation patterns in sockeye salmon data.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph K; Wildner, Christian; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A model of sockeye salmon population dynamics that incorporates predator-prey dynamics in the nursery lakes, salmon migration and stochastic effects is compared to Fraser River sockeye salmon spawner numbers with respect to cyclic dominance. For this comparison we use a method developed by White et al. (2014) to calculate measures for the consistency and strength of cyclic dominance in the time series using its wavelet transform. We find that the model can match the oscillation patterns found in nature, both for persistently oscillating populations and for intermittent oscillations. It matches persistently oscillating populations much better than a model that does not incorporate predator-prey interaction. Persistent oscillations are more likely to occur in the model if the growth conditions for the sockeye fry are good and the coupling to the predator is strong. PMID:26551158

  15. Noisy predator-prey model explains oscillation patterns in sockeye salmon data.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph K; Wildner, Christian; Drossel, Barbara

    2016-01-21

    A model of sockeye salmon population dynamics that incorporates predator-prey dynamics in the nursery lakes, salmon migration and stochastic effects is compared to Fraser River sockeye salmon spawner numbers with respect to cyclic dominance. For this comparison we use a method developed by White et al. (2014) to calculate measures for the consistency and strength of cyclic dominance in the time series using its wavelet transform. We find that the model can match the oscillation patterns found in nature, both for persistently oscillating populations and for intermittent oscillations. It matches persistently oscillating populations much better than a model that does not incorporate predator-prey interaction. Persistent oscillations are more likely to occur in the model if the growth conditions for the sockeye fry are good and the coupling to the predator is strong.

  16. A theory of generalized Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Duggen, Lars; Lew Yan Voon, L C; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-20

    Bloch oscillations of electrons are shown to occur for cases when the energy spectrum does not consist of the traditional evenly-spaced ladders and the potential gradient does not result from an external electric field. A theory of such generalized Bloch oscillations is presented and an exact calculation is given to confirm this phenomenon. Our results allow for a greater freedom of design for experimentally observing Bloch oscillations. For strongly coupled oscillator systems displaying Bloch oscillations, it is further demonstrated that reordering of oscillators leads to destruction of Bloch oscillations. We stipulate that the presented theory of generalized Bloch oscillations can be extended to other systems such as acoustics and photonics.

  17. Experimental study of synchronization of coupled electrical self-oscillators and comparison to the Sakaguchi-Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    English, L Q; Zeng, Zhuwei; Mertens, David

    2015-11-01

    We explore the collective phase dynamics of Wien-bridge oscillators coupled resistively. We carefully analyze the behavior of two coupled oscillators, obtaining a transformation from voltage to effective phase. From the phase dynamics we show that the coupling can be quantitatively described by Sakaguchi's modification to the Kuramoto model. We also examine an ensemble of oscillators whose frequencies are taken from a flat distribution within a fixed frequency interval. We characterize in detail the synchronized cluster, its initial formation, as well as its effect on unsynchronized oscillators, all as a function of a global coupling strength.

  18. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts.

    PubMed

    Popov, M; Popov, V L; Pohrt, R

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect "relaxation damping". The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  19. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  20. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  1. Experimental evidence of explosive synchronization in mercury beating-heart oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Parmananda, P.; Boccaletti, S.

    2015-06-01

    We report experimental evidence of explosive synchronization in coupled chemo-mechanical systems, namely in mercury beating-heart (MBH) oscillators. Connecting four MBH oscillators in a star network configuration and setting natural frequencies of each oscillator in proportion to the number of its links, a gradual increase of the coupling strength results in an abrupt and irreversible (first-order-like) transition from the system's unordered to ordered phase. On its turn, such a transition indicates the emergence of a bistable regime wherein coexisting states can be experimentally revealed. Finally, we prove how such a regime allows an experimental implementation of magneticlike states of synchronization, by the use of an external signal.

  2. Electromagnetic excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by yttrium iron garnet films on gallium gadolinium garnet substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatskii, V. M.; Mavlonazarov, I. O.; Lutsev, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied the phenomenon of contactless excitation of ultrasonic oscillations by thin yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films on gallium gadolinium garnet (GGG) substrates upon application of the superposition of a constant magnetic bias field and alternating magnetic field. Dimensional resonance effects that cannot be explained in the framework of existing theoretical notions have been discovered, in particular, in dependences of the amplitude of excited longitudinal oscillations on the YIG film thickness, frequency of ultrasound, and degree of homogeneity and strength of the magnetic bias field. It is suggested that the observed phenomenon is caused by resonant participation of the intrinsic oscillations of domain walls in the excitation of ultrasound.

  3. Inferring coupling strength from event-related dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łęski, Szymon; Wójcik, Daniel K.

    2008-10-01

    We propose an approach for inferring strength of coupling between two systems from their transient dynamics. This is of vital importance in cases where most information is carried by the transients, for instance, in evoked potentials measured commonly in electrophysiology. We show viability of our approach using nonlinear and linear measures of synchronization on a population model of thalamocortical loop and on a system of two coupled Rössler-type oscillators in nonchaotic regime.

  4. Interlimb coupling strength scales with movement amplitude.

    PubMed

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Boer, Betteco J; de Poel, Harjo J; Beek, Peter J

    2008-05-23

    The relation between movement amplitude and the strength of interlimb interactions was examined by comparing bimanual performance at different amplitude ratios (1:2, 1:1, and 2:1). For conditions with unequal amplitudes, the arm moving at the smaller amplitude was predicted to be more strongly affected by the contralateral arm than vice versa. This prediction was based on neurophysiological considerations and the HKB model of coupled oscillators. Participants performed rhythmic bimanual forearm movements at prescribed amplitude relations. After a brief mechanical perturbation of one arm, the relaxation process back to the initial coordination pattern was examined. This analysis focused on phase adaptations in the unperturbed arm, as these reflect the degree to which the movements of this arm were affected by the coupling influences stemming from the contralateral (perturbed) arm. The thus obtained index of coupling (IC) reflected the relative contribution of the unperturbed arm to the relaxation process. As predicted IC was larger when the perturbed arm moved at a larger amplitude than did the unperturbed arm, indicating that coupling strength scaled with movement amplitude. This result was discussed in relation to previous research regarding sources of asymmetry in coupling strength and the effects of amplitude disparity on interlimb coordination.

  5. Notch strength of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The notch strength of composites is discussed. The point stress and average stress criteria relate the notched strength of a laminate to the average strength of a relatively long tensile coupon. Tests of notched specimens in which microstrain gages have been placed at or near the edges of the holes have measured strains much larger that those measured in an unnotched tensile coupon. Orthotropic stress concentration analyses of failed notched laminates have also indicated that failure occurred at strains much larger than those experienced on tensile coupons with normal gage lengths. This suggests that the high strains at the edge of a hole can be related to the very short length of fiber subjected to these strains. Lockheed has attempted to correlate a series of tests of several laminates with holes ranging from 0.19 to 0.50 in. Although the average stress criterion correlated well with test results for hole sizes equal to or greater than 0.50 in., it over-estimated the laminate strength in the range of hole sizes from 0.19 to 0.38 in. It thus appears that a theory is needed that is based on the mechanics of failure and is more generally applicable to the range of hole sizes and the varieties of laminates found in aircraft construction.

  6. High strength composites evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    A high-strength, thick-section, graphite/epoxy composite was identified. The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate candidate materials and provide LANL with engineering properties. Eight candidate materials (Samples 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, and 1700) were chosen for evaluation. The Sample 1700 thermoplastic material was the strongest overall.

  7. Gender Differences in Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyward, Vivian H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This investigation examined gender differences of 103 physically active men and women in upper and lower body strength as a function of lean body weight and the distribution of muscle and subcutaneous fat in the upper and lower limbs. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  8. VOLTAGE-CONTROLLED TRANSISTOR OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Scheele, P.F.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to transistor oscillators and in particular to those transistor oscillators whose frequencies vary according to controlling voltages. A principal feature of the disclosed transistor oscillator circuit resides in the temperature compensation of the frequency modulating stage by the use of a resistorthermistor network. The resistor-thermistor network components are selected to have the network resistance, which is in series with the modulator transistor emitter circuit, vary with temperature to compensate for variation in the parameters of the transistor due to temperature change.

  9. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  10. Sawtooth oscillation in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Monticello, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear toroidal full MHD code, MH3D, has been used to study sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. The profile evolution during the sawtooth crash phase compares well with experiment, but only if neoclassical resistivity is used in the rise phase. (Classical resistivity has been used in most of the previous theoretical sawtooth studies.) With neoclassical resistivity, the q value at the axis drops from 1 to about 0.8 before the crash phase, and then resets to 1 through a Kadomtsev-type complete reconnection process. This ..delta..q/sub 0/ approx. = 0.2 is much larger than ..delta..q/sub o/ approx. = 0.01, which is obtained if classical resistivity is used. The current profile is strongly peaked at the axis with a flat region around the singular surface, and is similar to the Textor profile. To understand this behavior, approximate formulas for the time behavior of current and q values are derived. A functional dependence of sawtooth period scaling is also derived. A semi-empirical scaling is found which fits the experimental data from various tokamaks. Some evidence is presented which indicates that the fast crash time is due to enhanced effective resistivity inside the singular current sheet, generated by, e.g., microinstability and electron parallel viscosity with stochastic fields at the x-point. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  12. Constraining anisotropic baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We present an analysis of anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillations and elucidate how a mis-estimation of the cosmology, which leads to incorrect values of the angular diameter distance, dA, and Hubble parameter, H, manifest themselves in changes to the monopole and quadrupole power spectrum of biased tracers of the density field. Previous work has focused on the monopole power spectrum, and shown that the isotropic dilation combination dA2H-1 is robustly constrained by an overall shift in the scale of the baryon feature. We extend this by demonstrating that the quadrupole power spectrum is sensitive to an anisotropic warping mode dAH, allowing one to break the degeneracy between dA and H. We describe a method for measuring this warping, explicitly marginalizing over the form of redshift-space distortions. We verify this method on N-body simulations and estimate that dAH can be measured with a fractional accuracy of ˜(3/V)% where the survey volume is estimated in h-3Gpc3.

  13. Laser oscillating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, E.D.

    1988-03-08

    This patent describes a laser oscillating apparatus of type having a hollow cylindrical housing, gas flow generating means for generating a circulatory gas flow within the housing, paired discharge electrode assemblies opposedly disposed in spaced relationship to define a lasing region therebetween traversed by the circulatory gas flow for carrying out a predetermined discharge within the gas flow traversing the lasing region thereby generating a ray of radiation, and optical resonator means disposed within the housing for resonating the ray of radiation generated in the discharge. Each of the paired discharge electrode assemblies comprises: a. an insulated substrate having a molded base portion and an insulated ceramic surface portion disposed adjacent the molded base portion; b. pin-shaped electrodes; c. a ballast capacitor disposed within the molded base portion of the insulated substrate; d. cooling tube means disposed within the molded base portion of the insulated substrate so as to pass between each pair of adjacent rows of the capacitor units forming the ballast capacitor; and e. at least one heat absorbing plate disposed between each pair of adjacent rows of capacitor units forming the ballast capacitor in contact with the cooling tube means passing therebetween.

  14. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  15. Glucose Oscillations Can Activate an Endogenous Oscillator in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Roper, Michael G.; Bertram, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets manage elevations in blood glucose level by secreting insulin into the bloodstream in a pulsatile manner. Pulsatile insulin secretion is governed by islet oscillations such as bursting electrical activity and periodic Ca2+ entry in β-cells. In this report, we demonstrate that although islet oscillations are lost by fixing a glucose stimulus at a high concentration, they may be recovered by subsequently converting the glucose stimulus to a sinusoidal wave. We predict with mathematical modeling that the sinusoidal glucose signal’s ability to recover islet oscillations depends on its amplitude and period, and we confirm our predictions by conducting experiments with islets using a microfluidics platform. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby oscillatory blood glucose levels recruit non-oscillating islets to enhance pulsatile insulin output from the pancreas. Our results also provide support for the main hypothesis of the Dual Oscillator Model, that a glycolytic oscillator endogenous to islet β-cells drives pulsatile insulin secretion. PMID:27788129

  16. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Coronal seismology is used extensively to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength is derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation, including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. Methods: From the simulation of the corona above an active region, we synthesise extreme ultraviolet emission from the model corona. From this, we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. Results: The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5 s and a damping time of 125 s, which are both consistent with the ranges of periods and damping times found in observations. Using standard coronal seismology techniques, we find an average magnetic field strength of Bkink = 79 G for our loop in the simulation, while in the loop the field strength drops from roughly 300 G at the coronal base to 50 G at the apex. Using the data from our simulation, we can infer what the average magnetic field derived from coronal seismology actually means. It is close to the magnetic field strength in a constant cross-section flux tube, which would give the same wave travel time through the loop. Conclusions: Our model produced a realistic looking loop-dominated corona, and provides realistic information on the oscillation properties that can be used to calibrate and better understand the result from coronal seismology. A movie associated with Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. PUTTING CORONAL SEISMOLOGY ESTIMATES OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH TO THE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    De Moortel, I.; Pascoe, D. J.

    2009-07-10

    The magnetic field strength inside a model coronal loop is 'estimated' using coronal seismology, to examine the reliability of magnetic field strengths derived from observed, transverse coronal loop oscillations. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of an external pressure pulse with a coronal loop (modeled as a three-dimensional density enhancement inside a two-dimensional magnetic arcade) are analyzed and the 'observed' properties of the excited transverse loop oscillations are used to derive the value of the local magnetic field strength, following the method of Nakariakov and Ofman. Due to the (unexpected) change in periodicity, the magnetic field derived from our 'observed' oscillation is substantially different from the actual (input) magnetic field value (approximately 50%). Coronal seismology can derive useful information about the local magnetic field, but the combined effect of the loop curvature, the density ratio, and aspect ratio of the loop appears to be more important than previously expected.

  18. Matter Effects On Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    An introduction to neutrino oscillations in vacuum is presented, followed by a survey of various techniques for obtaining either exact or approximate expressions for numu → nue oscillations in matter. The method developed by Arafune, Koike, and Sato uses a perturbative analysis to find an approximation for the evolution operator. The method used by Freund yields an approximate oscillation probability by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian, finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and then using those to find modified mixing angles with the matter effect taken into account. The method devised by Mann, Kafka, Schneps, and Altinok produces an exact expression for the oscillation by determining explicitly the evolution operator. These methods are compared to each other using the T2K, MINOS, NOnuA, and LBNE parameters.

  19. Brain oscillations in neuropsychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Başar, Erol

    2013-09-01

    The term "brain (or neural) oscillations" refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system. The importance of brain oscillations in sensory-cognitive processes has become increasingly evident. It has also become clear that event-related oscillations are modified in many types of neuropathology, in particular in cognitive impairment. This review discusses methods such as evoked/event-related oscillations and spectra, coherence analysis, and phase locking. It gives examples of applications of essential methods and concepts in bipolar disorder that provide a basis for fundamental notions regarding neurophysiologic biomarkers in cognitive impairment. The take-home message is that in the development of diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic strategies, neurophysiologic data should be analyzed in a framework that uses a multiplicity of methods and frequency bands.

  20. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  1. Gamma Oscillations and Visual Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter A.; Kim, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    At the root of visual perception is the mechanism the brain uses to analyze features in a scene and bind related ones together. Experiments show this process is linked to oscillations of brain activity in the 30-100 Hz gamma band. Oscillations at different sites have correlation functions (CFs) that often peak at zero lag, implying simultaneous firing, even when conduction delays are large. CFs are strongest between cells stimulated by related features. Gamma oscillations are studied here by modeling mm-scale patchy interconnections in the visual cortex. Resulting predictions for gamma responses to stimuli account for numerous experimental findings, including why oscillations and zero-lag synchrony are associated, observed connections with feature preferences, the shape of the zero-lag peak, and variations of CFs with attention. Gamma waves are found to obey the Schroedinger equation, opening the possibility of cortical analogs of quantum phenomena. Gamma instabilities are tied to observations of gamma activity linked to seizures and hallucinations.

  2. Matrix Theory of Small Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavda, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complete matrix formulation of the theory of small oscillations is presented. Simple analytic solutions involving matrix functions are found which clearly exhibit the transients, the damping factors, the Breit-Wigner form for resonances, etc. (BB)

  3. Engineering synchronization of chaotic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanaban, E.; Dana, Syamal K.

    2011-04-19

    We propose a controller based coupling design for engineering synchronization in chaotic oscillators for unidirectional as well as bi-directional mode. In the synchronization regimes, it is possible to amplify/ attenuate a chaotic attractor with respect to other chaotic attractors. Numerical examples are presented for a Lorenz system, a Roessler oscillator, and a Sprott system. Physical implementation of the scheme is done in electronic circuit to design the controller for verification of the theory.

  4. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  5. Mobius Strip underlying Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaz, Edaurdo; Satija, Indubala

    2004-03-01

    Geometrical and topolgocial aspects of phase space orbits of driven nonlinear oscillators are shown to share many features with the circuits on the mobius strips. Most important characteristic shared by nonlinear oscillators and the mobius strip is the first order geometrical phase transition characterized in terms of local variable torsion and the global variable the geometrical phase . These geometrical transitions are geometrical resonances and lead to geometrical localization that underlie not only limit cycles but also the strange attractors.

  6. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  7. Magnetically Coupled Magnet-Spring Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2010-01-01

    A system of two magnets hung from two vertical springs and oscillating in the hollows of a pair of coils connected in series is a new, interesting and useful example of coupled oscillators. The electromagnetically coupled oscillations of these oscillators are experimentally and theoretically studied. Its coupling is electromagnetic instead of…

  8. Corium crust strength measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-11-01

    Corium strength is of interest in the context of a severe reactor accident in which molten core material melts through the reactor vessel and collects on the containment basemat. Some accident management strategies involve pouring water over the melt to solidify it and halt corium/concrete interactions. The effectiveness of this method could be influenced by the strength of the corium crust at the interface between the melt and coolant. A strong, coherent crust anchored to the containment walls could allow the yet-molten corium to fall away from the crust as it erodes the basemat, thereby thermally decoupling the melt from the coolant and sharply reducing the cooling rate. This paper presents a diverse collection of measurements of the mechanical strength of corium. The data is based on load tests of corium samples in three different contexts: (1) small blocks cut from the debris of the large-scale MACE experiments, (2) 30 cm-diameter, 75 kg ingots produced by SSWICS quench tests, and (3) high temperature crusts loaded during large-scale corium/concrete interaction (CCI) tests. In every case the corium consisted of varying proportions of UO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and the constituents of concrete to represent a LWR melt at different stages of a molten core/concrete interaction. The collection of data was used to assess the strength and stability of an anchored, plant-scale crust. The results indicate that such a crust is likely to be too weak to support itself above the melt. It is therefore improbable that an anchored crust configuration could persist and the melt become thermally decoupled from the water layer to restrict cooling and prolong an attack of the reactor cavity concrete.

  9. Strength calculations on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, A

    1925-01-01

    Every strength calculation, including those on airplanes, must be preceded by a determination of the forces to be taken into account. In the following discussion, it will be assumed that the magnitudes of these forces are known and that it is only a question of how, on the basis of these known forces, to meet the prescribed conditions on the one hand and the practical requirements on the other.

  10. Nonlinear oscillations of coalescing magnetic flux ropes.

    PubMed

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y; Nakariakov, Valery M; Rowlands, George

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of highly nonlinear oscillations occurring during a coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes, based upon two-fluid hydrodynamics, is developed. The model accounts for the effect of electric charge separation, and describes perpendicular oscillations of the current sheet formed by the coalescence. The oscillation period is determined by the current sheet thickness, the plasma parameter β, and the oscillation amplitude. The oscillation periods are typically greater or about the ion plasma oscillation period. In the nonlinear regime, the oscillations of the ion and electron concentrations have a shape of a narrow symmetric spikes. PMID:27300993

  11. Entanglement dynamics for a conditionally kicked harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrais, Eric G.; Sales, J. S.; de Almeida, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The time evolution of the quantum kicked harmonic oscillator (KHO) is described by the Floquet operator which maps the state of the system immediately before one kick onto the state at a time immediately after the next. Quantum KHO is characterized by three parameters: the coupling strength V 0, the so-called Lamb–Dicke parameter η whose square is proportional to the effective Planck constant {{\\hslash }}{{eff}}, and the ratio T of the natural frequency of the oscillator and the kick frequency. To a given coupling strength and depending on T being a natural or irrational number, the phase space of the classical kicked oscillator can display different behaviors, as for example, stochastic webs or quasicrystal structures, thus showing a chaotic or localized behavior that is mirrored in the quantum phase space. On the other hand, the classical limit is studied letting {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} become negligible. In this paper we investigate how the ratio T, considered as integer, rational or irrational, influences the entanglement dynamics of the quantum KHO and study how the entanglement dynamics behaves when varying either V 0 or {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} parameters.

  12. Entanglement dynamics for a conditionally kicked harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrais, Eric G.; Sales, J. S.; de Almeida, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    The time evolution of the quantum kicked harmonic oscillator (KHO) is described by the Floquet operator which maps the state of the system immediately before one kick onto the state at a time immediately after the next. Quantum KHO is characterized by three parameters: the coupling strength V 0, the so-called Lamb-Dicke parameter η whose square is proportional to the effective Planck constant {{\\hslash }}{{eff}}, and the ratio T of the natural frequency of the oscillator and the kick frequency. To a given coupling strength and depending on T being a natural or irrational number, the phase space of the classical kicked oscillator can display different behaviors, as for example, stochastic webs or quasicrystal structures, thus showing a chaotic or localized behavior that is mirrored in the quantum phase space. On the other hand, the classical limit is studied letting {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} become negligible. In this paper we investigate how the ratio T, considered as integer, rational or irrational, influences the entanglement dynamics of the quantum KHO and study how the entanglement dynamics behaves when varying either V 0 or {{\\hslash }}{{eff}} parameters.

  13. Collective signaling behavior in a networked-oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-H.; Hui, P. M.

    2007-09-01

    We propose and study the collective behavior of a model of networked signaling objects that incorporates several ingredients of real-life systems. These ingredients include spatial inhomogeneity with grouping of signaling objects, signal attenuation with distance, and delayed and impulsive coupling between non-identical signaling objects. Depending on the coupling strength and/or time-delay effect, the model exhibits completely, partially, and locally collective signaling behavior. In particular, a correlated signaling (CS) behavior is observed in which there exist time durations when nearly a constant fraction of oscillators in the system are in the signaling state. These time durations are much longer than the duration of a spike when a single oscillator signals, and they are separated by regular intervals in which nearly all oscillators are silent. Such CS behavior is similar to that observed in biological systems such as fireflies, cicadas, crickets, and frogs. The robustness of the CS behavior against noise is also studied. It is found that properly adjusting the coupling strength and noise level could enhance the correlated behavior.

  14. Coupling among three chemical oscillators: Synchronization, phase death, and frustration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Mori, Yoshihito

    1993-02-01

    Various modes in three coupled chemical oscillators in a triangular arrangement were observed. As a well-defined nonlinear oscillator, the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction was studied in a continuous-flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Coupling among CSTR's was performed by mass exchange. The coupling strength was quantitatively controlled by changing the flow rate of reacting solutions among the three CSTR's using peristaltic pumps between each pair of the reactors. As a key parameter to control the model of coupling, we changed the symmetry of the interaction between the oscillators. In the case of the symmetric coupling, a quasiperiodic state or a biperiodic mode, an all-death mode and two kinds of synchronized modes appeared, depending on the coupling strength. On the other hand, under the asymmetric coupling, a quasiperiodic state or a biperiodic mode, an all death mode and four kinds of synchronized modes appeared. Those modes have been discussed in relation to the idea of ``frustration'' in the Ising spin system, where the three-phase mode appears as a transition from the Ising spin system to the XY spin system.

  15. Experiments on oscillator ensembles with global nonlinear coupling.

    PubMed

    Temirbayev, Amirkhan A; Zhanabaev, Zeinulla Zh; Tarasov, Stanislav B; Ponomarenko, Vladimir I; Rosenblum, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally analyze collective dynamics of a population of 20 electronic Wien-bridge limit-cycle oscillators with a nonlinear phase-shifting unit in the global feedback loop. With an increase in the coupling strength we first observe formation and then destruction of a synchronous cluster, so that the dependence of the order parameter on the coupling strength is not monotonic. After destruction of the cluster the ensemble remains nevertheless coherent, i.e., it exhibits an oscillatory collective mode (mean field). We show that the system is now in a self-organized quasiperiodic state, predicted in Rosenblum and Pikovsky [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 064101 (2007)]. In this state, frequencies of all oscillators are smaller than the frequency of the mean field, so that the oscillators are not locked to the mean field they create and their dynamics is quasiperiodic. Without a nonlinear phase-shifting unit, the system exhibits a standard Kuramoto-like transition to a fully synchronous state. We demonstrate a good correspondence between the experiment and previously developed theory. We also propose a simple measure which characterizes the macroscopic incoherence-coherence transition in a finite-size ensemble.

  16. Experiments on oscillator ensembles with global nonlinear coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirbayev, Amirkhan A.; Zhanabaev, Zeinulla Zh.; Tarasov, Stanislav B.; Ponomarenko, Vladimir I.; Rosenblum, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally analyze collective dynamics of a population of 20 electronic Wien-bridge limit-cycle oscillators with a nonlinear phase-shifting unit in the global feedback loop. With an increase in the coupling strength we first observe formation and then destruction of a synchronous cluster, so that the dependence of the order parameter on the coupling strength is not monotonic. After destruction of the cluster the ensemble remains nevertheless coherent, i.e., it exhibits an oscillatory collective mode (mean field). We show that the system is now in a self-organized quasiperiodic state, predicted in Rosenblum and Pikovsky [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.064101 98, 064101 (2007)]. In this state, frequencies of all oscillators are smaller than the frequency of the mean field, so that the oscillators are not locked to the mean field they create and their dynamics is quasiperiodic. Without a nonlinear phase-shifting unit, the system exhibits a standard Kuramoto-like transition to a fully synchronous state. We demonstrate a good correspondence between the experiment and previously developed theory. We also propose a simple measure which characterizes the macroscopic incoherence-coherence transition in a finite-size ensemble.

  17. Impurity induced current oscillations in one-dimensional conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, S. N.; Shapiro, D. S.; Vakhitov, R. R.; Remizov, S. V.

    2009-11-01

    We study theoretically electronic transport through an isolated local defect in a 1D conductor described in terms of the Luttinger liquid, and show that the well-known tunneling regime of electronic transport leading to power-law I-V curves takes place only in the limit of small voltage. At voltages exceeding a threshold value a new dynamic regime of transport starts in which the DC current bar I induces AC oscillations of frequency f = bar I/e. In gated quantum wires where interaction between electrons is short-ranged, generation linewidth is small provided the inter-electronic repulsion is strong enough, otherwise a wide-band noise is generated. In case of long-range Coulomb interaction generation is coherent at any interaction strength. The effect is related to interaction of the current with Friedel oscillations of the electronic density around the impurity. Manifestations of the effect resemble the Coulomb blockade and the Josephson effect. Oscillations of the electric current are accompanied by spin current oscillations. The results are related to semiconducting quantum wires, metallic atomic chains, carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons and others.

  18. Transient short-period oscillations in Super Soft Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J.

    2014-07-01

    Novae are powered by nuclear runaway reactions that take place on the surface of a white dwarf. The nova ejecta block all emission produced by nuclear burning until the start of the Super Soft Source (SSS) phase when X-rays become visible after the ejecta have cleared sufficiently. Recently, transient short-period (<100s) oscillations have been found in Swift/XRT light curves taken during the SSS phase of three novae. We performed a systematic search for short-period oscillations in all available continuous XMM and Chandra SSS light curves and found short-period oscillation in LMC 2009a (33s), RS Oph (35s), KT Eri (35s), V339 Del (54s), and Cal 83 (67s). Period-time maps clearly illustrate the transient nature of the period both in terms of period value and signal strength. A similar systematic study of all Swift/XRT observations is under way (Beardmore et al.). If interpreted as g-mode oscillations, excited by the ɛ mechanism, theoretical relations between period, luminosity, and white dwarf mass can be explored to determine the white dwarf mass.

  19. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  20. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  1. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  2. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-19

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  3. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN CHROMOSPHERIC MOTTLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P.; Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Dorrian, G. D.

    2012-05-01

    A number of recent investigations have revealed that transverse waves are ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere. The vast majority of these have been reported in limb spicules and active region fibrils. We investigate long-lived, quiet-Sun, on-disk features such as chromospheric mottles (jet-like features located at the boundaries of supergranular cells) and their transverse motions. The observations were obtained with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope. The data set is comprised of simultaneous imaging in the H{alpha} core, Ca II K, and G band of an on-disk quiet-Sun region. Time-distance techniques are used to study the characteristics of the transverse oscillations. We detect over 40 transverse oscillations in both bright and dark mottles, with periods ranging from 70 to 280 s, with the most frequent occurrence at {approx}165 s. The velocity amplitudes and transverse displacements exhibit characteristics similar to limb spicules. Neighboring mottles oscillating in-phase are also observed. The transverse oscillations of individual mottles are interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Their estimated periods and damping times are consistent with phase mixing and resonant mode conversion.

  4. Phase Response Synchronization in Neuronal Population with Time-Varying Coupling Strength

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xianfa; Zhao, Wanyu; Cao, Jinde

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamic model of global coupled neuronal population subject to external stimulus by the use of phase sensitivity function. We investigate the effect of time-varying coupling strength on the synchronized phase response of neural population subjected to external harmonic stimulus. For a time-periodic coupling strength, we found that the stimulus with increasing intensity or frequency can reinforce the phase response synchronization in neuronal population of the weakly coupled neural oscillators, and the neuronal population with stronger coupling strength has good adaptability to stimulus. When we consider the dynamics of coupling strength, we found that a strong stimulus can quickly cause the synchronization in the neuronal population, the degree of synchronization grows with the increasing stimulus intensity, and the period of synchronized oscillation induced by external stimulation is related to stimulus frequency. PMID:26640514

  5. Measuring Neutron-Star Spins via Burst Oscillations (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measuring the spin of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries is one of the great strengths and highest priorities for RXTE. We propose targeted observations of known thermonuclear burst sources which do not have confirmed burst oscillations, as well as previously unknown sources, in order to detect new examples of burst oscillations and thus add to the sample of neutron star spins. We will target sources in states of frequent, bright bursts by triggering on the detection of bursts by INTEGRAL and/or Swift. Detection of neutron stars spinning beyond the present maximum will allow us to significantly constrain the neutron-star equation of state, presently an area of major uncertainty.

  6. Stepwise frequency tuning of a gyrotron backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.H.; Chen, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    The gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO) features broadband tunability, but ragged tuning curves are frequently observed experimentally. Accordingly, a Ka-band gyro-BWO experiment with external circuit mismatch was conducted to examine its tuning properties at two reflected strengths: one is slightly mismatched (15 dB reflection) and the other can be categorized as matched (30 dB reflection). Stepwise frequency tunings by varying the magnetic field, the beam voltage, and the beam current were observed under mismatched conditions. A self-locking model was introduced using the concept of injection-locking, where the output and reinjected signals tend to form a stable phase relation, favoring certain discrete oscillation frequencies. The observed frequencies agree closely with the calculated frequencies. Smooth tuning curves were also obtained, revealing a remedy for the stepwise tuning of a gyro-BWO.

  7. Dirac bound states of anharmonic oscillator in external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hamzavi, Majid; Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Falaye, Babatunde J.

    2014-02-15

    We explore the effect of the external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle subjects to mixed scalar and vector anharmonic oscillator field in the two-dimensional (2D) space. We calculate the exact energy eigenvalues and the corresponding un-normalized two-spinor-components wave functions in terms of the chemical potential parameter, magnetic field strength, AB flux field and magnetic quantum number by using the Nikiforov–Uvarov (NU) method. -- Highlights: • Effect of the external fields on the energy levels of Dirac particle with the anharmonic oscillator is investigated. • The solutions are discussed in view of spin and pseudospin symmetries limits. • The energy levels and wave function are presented by the Nikiforov–Uvarov method.

  8. Partially coherent twisted states in arrays of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Wolfrum, Matthias; Laing, Carlo R.

    2014-06-15

    We consider a one-dimensional array of phase oscillators with non-local coupling and a Lorentzian distribution of natural frequencies. The primary objects of interest are partially coherent states that are uniformly “twisted” in space. To analyze these, we take the continuum limit, perform an Ott/Antonsen reduction, integrate over the natural frequencies, and study the resulting spatio-temporal system on an unbounded domain. We show that these twisted states and their stability can be calculated explicitly. We find that stable twisted states with different wave numbers appear for increasing coupling strength in the well-known Eckhaus scenario. Simulations of finite arrays of oscillators show good agreement with results of the analysis of the infinite system.

  9. Partially coherent twisted states in arrays of coupled phase oscillators.

    PubMed

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E; Wolfrum, Matthias; Laing, Carlo R

    2014-06-01

    We consider a one-dimensional array of phase oscillators with non-local coupling and a Lorentzian distribution of natural frequencies. The primary objects of interest are partially coherent states that are uniformly "twisted" in space. To analyze these, we take the continuum limit, perform an Ott/Antonsen reduction, integrate over the natural frequencies, and study the resulting spatio-temporal system on an unbounded domain. We show that these twisted states and their stability can be calculated explicitly. We find that stable twisted states with different wave numbers appear for increasing coupling strength in the well-known Eckhaus scenario. Simulations of finite arrays of oscillators show good agreement with results of the analysis of the infinite system.

  10. Dynamic Strength of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabildas, Lalit

    2011-06-01

    Historically when shock loading techniques became accessible in the early fifties it was assumed that materials behave like fluids implying that materials cannot support any shear stresses. Early and careful investigation in the sixties by G. R. Fowles in aluminum indicated otherwise. When he compared his Hugoniot compression measurements to hydrostatic pressure compression measurements in the pressure volume plane he noticed that the shock data lay above the hydrostatic compression curve - which laid the ground work for what is the basis for elastic-plastic theories that exist today. In this talk, a brief historical perspective on strength measurements in materials will be discussed including how time-resolved techniques have played a role in allowing estimates of the strength of materials at over Mbar stress. This is crucial especially at high stresses since we are determining values that are small compared to the loading stress. Even though we have made considerable progress in our understanding of materials, there are still many anomalies and unanswered questions. Some of these anomalies are fertile grounds for further and future research and will be mentioned.

  11. Phase Diffusion in Unequally Noisy Coupled Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Amro, Rami M; Lindner, Benjamin; Neiman, Alexander B

    2015-07-17

    We consider the dynamics of two directionally coupled unequally noisy oscillators, the first oscillator being noisier than the second oscillator. We derive analytically the phase diffusion coefficient of both oscillators in a heterogeneous setup (different frequencies, coupling coefficients, and intrinsic noise intensities) and show that the phase coherence of the second oscillator depends in a nonmonotonic fashion on the noise intensity of the first oscillator: as the first oscillator becomes less coherent, i.e., worse, the second one becomes more coherent, i.e., better. This surprising effect is related to the statistics of the first oscillator which provides a source of noise for the second oscillator, that is non-Gaussian, bounded, and possesses a finite bandwidth. We verify that the effect is robust by numerical simulations of two coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo models.

  12. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  13. Nonstationary oscillations in gyrotrons revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Kalis, H.

    2015-05-15

    Development of gyrotrons requires careful understanding of different regimes of gyrotron oscillations. It is known that in the planes of the generalized gyrotron variables: cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless current or cyclotron resonance mismatch and dimensionless interaction length complicated alternating sequences of regions of stationary, periodic, automodulation, and chaotic oscillations exist. In the past, these regions were investigated on the supposition that the transit time of electrons through the interaction space is much shorter than the cavity decay time. This assumption is valid for short and/or high diffraction quality resonators. However, in the case of long and/or low diffraction quality resonators, which are often utilized, this assumption is no longer valid. In such a case, a different mathematical formalism has to be used for studying nonstationary oscillations. One example of such a formalism is described in the present paper.

  14. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  15. Brain oscillations in neuropsychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Başar, Erol

    2013-01-01

    The term “brain (or neural) oscillations” refers to the rhythmic and/or repetitive electrical activity generated spontaneously and in response to stimuli by neural tissue in the central nervous system. The importance of brain oscillations in sensory-cognitive processes has become increasingly evident. It has also become clear that event-related oscillations are modified in many types of neuropathology, in particular in cognitive impairment. This review discusses methods such as evoked/event-related oscillations and spectra, coherence analysis, and phase locking. It gives examples of applications of essential methods and concepts in bipolar disorder that provide a basis for fundamental notions regarding neurophysiologic biomarkers in cognitive impairment. The take-home message is that in the development of diagnostic and pharmacotherapeutic strategies, neurophysiologic data should be analyzed in a framework that uses a multiplicity of methods and frequency bands. PMID:24174901

  16. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  17. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, Larry D.; Ballard, William P.; Clark, M. Collins; Marder, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  18. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  19. Strength Development for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Participation in strength training is important for older children or young adolescences who wish to improve fitness or participate in sports. When designing strength training programs for our youth this age group is immature anatomically, physiologically, and psychologically. For the younger or inexperienced group the strength training activities…

  20. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  1. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.; Romanyuk, S. N.

    2012-06-01

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60-100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 102-103 units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method.

  2. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  3. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated.

  4. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated. PMID:26382478

  5. Calculations of combustion response profiles and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.; Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The theory and procedures for determining the characteristics of pressure oscillations in rocket engines with prescribed burning rate oscillations are presented. Pressure and velocity oscillations calculated using this procedure are presented for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to show the influence of baffles and absorbers on the burning rate oscillations required to achieve neutral stability. Results of calculations to determine local combustion responses using detailed physical models for injection, atomization, and vaporization with gas phase oscillations in baffled and unbaffled SSME combustors are presented. The contributions of the various physical phenomena occurring in a combustor to oscillations in combustion response were determined.

  6. Capture into resonance of coupled Duffing oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we investigate capture into resonance of a pair of coupled Duffing oscillators, one of which is excited by periodic forcing with a slowly varying frequency. Previous studies have shown that, under certain conditions, a single oscillator can be captured into persistent resonance with a permanently growing amplitude of oscillations (autoresonance). This paper demonstrates that the emergence of autoresonance in the forced oscillator may be insufficient to generate oscillations with increasing amplitude in the attachment. A parametric domain, in which both oscillators can be captured into resonance, is determined. The quasisteady states determining the growth of amplitudes are found. An agreement between the theoretical and numerical results is demonstrated.

  7. BLOCKING OSCILLATOR DOUBLE PULSE GENERATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Haase, J.A.

    1961-01-24

    A double-pulse generator, particuiarly a double-pulse generator comprising a blocking oscillator utilizing a feedback circuit to provide means for producing a second pulse within the recovery time of the blocking oscillator, is described. The invention utilized a passive network which permits adjustment of the spacing between the original pulses derived from the blocking oscillator and further utilizes the original pulses to trigger a circuit from which other pulses are initiated. These other pulses are delayed and then applied to the input of the blocking oscillator, with the result that the output from the oscillator circuit contains twice the number of pulses originally initiated by the blocking oscillator itself.

  8. Chaotic weak chimeras and their persistence in coupled populations of phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Ashwin, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Nontrivial collective behavior may emerge from the interactive dynamics of many oscillatory units. Chimera states are chaotic patterns of spatially localized coherent and incoherent oscillations. The recently-introduced notion of a weak chimera gives a rigorously testable characterization of chimera states for finite-dimensional phase oscillator networks. In this paper we give some persistence results for dynamically invariant sets under perturbations and apply them to coupled populations of phase oscillators with generalized coupling. In contrast to the weak chimeras with nonpositive maximal Lyapunov exponents constructed so far, we show that weak chimeras that are chaotic can exist in the limit of vanishing coupling between coupled populations of phase oscillators. We present numerical evidence that positive Lyapunov exponents can persist for a positive measure set of this inter-population coupling strength.

  9. Optimal Phase-Control Strategy for Damped-Driven Duffing Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meucci, R.; Euzzor, S.; Pugliese, E.; Zambrano, S.; Gallas, M. R.; Gallas, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-control techniques of chaos aim to extract periodic behaviors from chaotic systems by applying weak harmonic perturbations with a suitably chosen phase. However, little is known about the best strategy for selecting adequate perturbations to reach desired states. Here we use experimental measures and numerical simulations to assess the benefits of controlling individually the three terms of a Duffing oscillator. Using a real-time analog indicator able to discriminate on-the-fly periodic behaviors from chaos, we reconstruct experimentally the phase versus perturbation strength stability areas when periodic perturbations are applied to different terms governing the oscillator. We verify the system to be more sensitive to perturbations applied to the quadratic term of the double-well Duffing oscillator and to the quartic term of the single-well Duffing oscillator.

  10. Optimal Phase-Control Strategy for Damped-Driven Duffing Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Meucci, R; Euzzor, S; Pugliese, E; Zambrano, S; Gallas, M R; Gallas, J A C

    2016-01-29

    Phase-control techniques of chaos aim to extract periodic behaviors from chaotic systems by applying weak harmonic perturbations with a suitably chosen phase. However, little is known about the best strategy for selecting adequate perturbations to reach desired states. Here we use experimental measures and numerical simulations to assess the benefits of controlling individually the three terms of a Duffing oscillator. Using a real-time analog indicator able to discriminate on-the-fly periodic behaviors from chaos, we reconstruct experimentally the phase versus perturbation strength stability areas when periodic perturbations are applied to different terms governing the oscillator. We verify the system to be more sensitive to perturbations applied to the quadratic term of the double-well Duffing oscillator and to the quartic term of the single-well Duffing oscillator. PMID:26871335

  11. Experimental and theoretical approach for the clustering of globally coupled density oscillators based on phase response.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanobu; Sakurai, Tatsunari; Kitahata, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the phase-response curve of a coupled system of density oscillators with an analytical approach. The behaviors of two-, three-, and four-coupled systems seen in the experiments were reproduced by the model considering the phase-response curve. Especially in a four-coupled system, the clustering state and its incidence rate as functions of the coupling strength are well reproduced with this approach. Moreover, we confirmed that the shape of the phase-response curve we obtained analytically was close to that observed in the experiment where a perturbation is added to a single-density oscillator. We expect that this approach to obtaining the phase-response curve is general in the sense that it could be applied to coupled systems of other oscillators such as electrical-circuit oscillators, metronomes, and so on.

  12. Grain Refinement in Al-Mg-Si Alloy TIG Welds Using Transverse Mechanical Arc Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    2012-11-01

    Reduction in grain size in weld fusion zones (FZs) presents the advantages of increased resistance to solidification cracking and improvement in mechanical properties. Transverse mechanical arc oscillation was employed to obtain grain refinement in the weldment during tungsten inert gas welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis was carried out on AA6061-AA4043 filler metal tungsten inert gas welds. Grain size, texture evolution, misorientation distribution, and aspect ratio of weld metal, PMZ, and BM have been observed at fixed arc oscillation amplitude and at three different frequencies levels. Arc oscillation showed grain size reduction and texture formation. Fine-grained arc oscillated welds exhibited better yield and ultimate tensile strengths and significant improvement in percent elongation. The obtained results were attributed to reduction in equivalent circular diameter of grains and increase in number of subgrain network structure of low angle grain boundaries.

  13. Failure strength of icy lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    Lithospheric strengths derived from friction on pre-existing fractures and ductile flow laws show that the tensile strength of intact ice under applicable conditions is actually an order of magnitude stronger than widely assumed. It is demonstrated that this strength is everywhere greater than that required to initiate frictional sliding on pre-existing fractures and faults. Because the tensile strength of intact ice increases markedly with confining pressure, it actually exceeds the frictional strength at all depths. Thus, icy lithospheres will fail by frictional slip along pre-existing fractures at yeild stresses greater than previously assumed rather than opening tensile cracks in intact ice.

  14. QM02 Strength Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    In late April, Paul Emma reported that his orbit fitting program could find a reasonably good fit only if the strength of QM02 was changed from design value of -5.83 kG to -6.25 kG - a strength change of 7.3%. In late May, we made a focal length measurement of QM02 by turning off all focusing optics between YC07 and BPMS1 (in the spectrometer line) except for QM02 and adjusted the strength of QM02 so that vertical kicks by YC07 did not produce any displacements at BPMS1 (see Figure 1). The result was quoted in the LCLS elog was that QM02 appeared to 6% too weak, and approximately agreed with Paul's observation. The analysis used for the entry in the log book was based on the thin lens approximation and used the following numbers: Distance YC07 to QM02 - 5.128 m; Distance QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.778 m; and Energy - 135 MeV. These distances were computed from the X,Z coordinates given the on the large plot of the Injector on the wall of the control room. On review of the MAD output file coordinates, it seems that the distance used for QM02 to BPMS1 is not 1.778 m. The correct value is Distance, center of QM02 to BPMS1 - 1.845 m. There may be a typo on the wall chart values for the coordinates of BPMS1, or perhaps there was a misinterpretation of edge versus center of QM02. In any case, the effect of this change is that the thin lens estimate changes from 6% too weak to 9% too weak. At John Galayda's suggestion, we looked into the thin lens versus thick lens approximation. A Mathematica program was written to solve for the K value of the QM02, in the thick lens approximation, that provides point to point focusing from YC07 to BPMS1, and to compare this number with the value obtained using the thin lens approximation. The length of QM02 used in the thick lens calculation is the effective length determined by magnetic measurements of 0.108 m. The result of the Mathematica calculation is that the thin lens approximation predicts less magnet strength is required to produce the

  15. Gaussian discriminating strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Giovannetti, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a quantifier of nonclassical correlations for bipartite, multimode Gaussian states. It is derived from the Discriminating Strength measure, introduced for finite dimensional systems in Farace et al., [New J. Phys. 16, 073010 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/7/073010]. As the latter the new measure exploits the quantum Chernoff bound to gauge the susceptibility of the composite system with respect to local perturbations induced by unitary gates extracted from a suitable set of allowed transformations (the latter being identified by posing some general requirements). Closed expressions are provided for the case of two-mode Gaussian states obtained by squeezing or by linearly mixing via a beam splitter a factorized two-mode thermal state. For these density matrices, we study how nonclassical correlations are related with the entanglement present in the system and with its total photon number.

  16. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  17. Entanglement of mechanical oscillators coupled to a nonequilibrium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, Max; Hammerer, K.; Marquardt, Florian

    2010-07-15

    Recent experiments aim at cooling nanomechanical resonators to the ground state by coupling them to nonequilibrium environments in order to observe quantum effects such as entanglement. This raises the general question of how such environments affect entanglement. Here we show that there is an optimal dissipation strength for which the entanglement between two coupled oscillators is maximized. Our results are established with the help of a general framework of exact quantum Langevin equations valid for arbitrary bath spectra, in and out of equilibrium. We point out why the commonly employed Lindblad approach fails to give even a qualitatively correct picture.

  18. A 20-day period standing oscillation in the northern winter stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, K.; Studer, S.; Martius, O.; Scheiben, D.; Kämpfer, N.

    2013-04-01

    Observations of the ozone profile by a ground-based microwave radiometer in Switzerland indicate a dominant 20-day oscillation in stratospheric ozone, possibly related to oscillations of the polar vortex edge during winter. For further understanding of the nature of the 20-day oscillation, the ozone data set of ERA Interim meteorological reanalysis is analyzed at the latitude belt of 47.5° N and in the time from 1979 to 2010. Spectral analysis of ozone time series at 7 hPa indicates that the 20-day oscillation is maximal at two locations: 7.5° E, 47.5° N and 60° E, 47.5° N. Composites of the stream function are derived for different phases of the 20-day oscillation of stratospheric ozone at 7 hPa in the Northern Hemisphere. The streamline at Ψ = -2 × 107 m2 s-1 is in the vicinity of the polar vortex edge. The other streamline at Ψ = 4 × 107 m2 s1 surrounds the Aleutian anticyclone and goes to the subtropics. The composites show 20-day period standing oscillations at the polar vortex edge and in the subtropics above Northern Africa, India, and China. The 20-day period standing oscillation above Aral Sea and India is correlated to the strength of the Aleutian anticyclone.

  19. Electron plasma oscillations associated with type 3 radio emissions and solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive study of the IMP-6 and IMP-8 plasma and radio wave data was performed to try to find electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio noise bursts and low-energy solar electrons. It is shown that electron plasma oscillations are seldom observed in association with solar electron events and type III radio bursts at 1.0 AU. For the one case in which electron plasma oscillations are definitely produced by the electrons ejected by the solar flare the electric field strength is relatively small. Electromagnetic radiation, believed to be similar to the type III radio emission, is observed coming from the region of the more intense electron plasma oscillations upstream. Quantitative calculations of the rate of conversion of the plasma oscillation energy to electromagnetic radiation are presented for plasma oscillations excited by both solar electrons and electrons from the bow shock. These calculations show that neither the type III radio emissions nor the radiation from upstream of the bow shock can be adequately explained by a current theory for the coupling of electron plasma oscillations to electromagnetic radiation.

  20. Synchronization and quorum sensing in an ensemble of indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing-Wei; Fu, Chenbo; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xingang

    2012-10-01

    The fact that the elements in some realistic systems are influenced by each other indirectly through a common environment has stimulated a new surge of studies on the collective behavior of coupled oscillators. Most of the previous studies, however, consider only the case of coupled periodic oscillators, and it remains unknown whether and to what extent the findings can be applied to the case of coupled chaotic oscillators. Here, using the population density and coupling strength as the tuning parameters, we explore the synchronization and quorum sensing behaviors in an ensemble of chaotic oscillators coupled through a common medium, in which some interesting phenomena are observed, including the appearance of the phase synchronization in the process of progressive synchronization, the various periodic oscillations close to the quorum sensing transition, and the crossover of the critical population density at the transition. These phenomena, which have not been reported for indirectly coupled periodic oscillators, reveal a corner of the rich dynamics inherent in indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators, and are believed to have important implications to the performance and functionality of some realistic systems.

  1. Fluctuations in a coupled-oscillator model of the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge A.; Suárez-Vargas, Jose J.; Stefanovska, Aneta; McClintock, Peter V. E.

    2007-06-01

    We present a model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) based on a system of coupled oscillators. Using this approach we can describe several complex physiological phenomena that can have a range of applications. For instance, heart rate variability (HRV), can have a new deterministic explanation. The intrinsic dynamics of the HRV is controlled by deterministic couplings between the physiological oscillators in our model and without the need to introduce external noise as is commonly done. This new result provides potential applications not only for physiological systems but also for the design of very precise electronic generators where the frequency stability is crucial. Another important phenomenon is that of oscillation death. We show that in our CVS model the mechanism leading to the quenching of the oscillations can be controlled, not only by the coupling parameter, but by a more general scheme. In fact, we propose that a change in the relative current state of the cardiovascular oscillators can lead to a cease of the oscillations without actually changing the strength of the coupling among them. We performed real experiments using electronic oscillators and show them to match the theoretical and numerical predictions. We discuss the relevance of the studied phenomena to real cardiovascular systems regimes, including the explanation of certain pathologies, and the possible applications in medical practice.

  2. Synchronization and quorum sensing in an ensemble of indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Fu, Chenbo; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xingang

    2012-10-01

    The fact that the elements in some realistic systems are influenced by each other indirectly through a common environment has stimulated a new surge of studies on the collective behavior of coupled oscillators. Most of the previous studies, however, consider only the case of coupled periodic oscillators, and it remains unknown whether and to what extent the findings can be applied to the case of coupled chaotic oscillators. Here, using the population density and coupling strength as the tuning parameters, we explore the synchronization and quorum sensing behaviors in an ensemble of chaotic oscillators coupled through a common medium, in which some interesting phenomena are observed, including the appearance of the phase synchronization in the process of progressive synchronization, the various periodic oscillations close to the quorum sensing transition, and the crossover of the critical population density at the transition. These phenomena, which have not been reported for indirectly coupled periodic oscillators, reveal a corner of the rich dynamics inherent in indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators, and are believed to have important implications to the performance and functionality of some realistic systems.

  3. Observation of anharmonic Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Dreisow, Felix; Wang, Gang; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2011-10-15

    We report on the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations of an optical wave packet in a lattice with second-order coupling. To this end, we employ zigzag waveguide arrays, in which the second-order coupling can be precisely tuned.

  4. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17).

  5. Geometry of thermal plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Da; Noble, A.

    2009-01-22

    We develop a method for investigating the relationship between the shape of a 1-particle distribution and non-linear electrostatic oscillations in a collisionless plasma, incorporating transverse thermal motion. A general expression is found for the maximum sustainable electric field, and is evaluated for a particular highly anisotropic distribution.

  6. Temporal oscillations in neuronal nets.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, G B; Cowan, J D

    1979-04-18

    A model for the interactions of cortical neurons is derived and analyzed. It is shown that small amplitude spatially inhomogeneous standing oscillations can bifurcate from the rest state. In a periodic domain, traveling wave trains exist. Stability of these patterns is discussed in terms of biological parameters. Homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits are demonstrated for the space-clamped system.

  7. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  8. Linearization of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, A.; Alvarez, M. L.; Fernandez, E.; Pascual, I.

    2009-01-01

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for…

  9. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  10. Hydrogen rotation-vibration oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1974-01-29

    A laser system is described wherein molecular species of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes are induced to oscillate on rotational-vibrational levels by subjecting the hydrogen to a transverse beam of electrons of a narrowly defined energy between about 1 and 5 eV, thereby producing high intensity and high energy output. (Official Gazette)

  11. Chimera States in Neural Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Sonya; Glaze, Tera

    2014-03-01

    Chimera states have recently been explored both theoretically and experimentally, in various coupled nonlinear oscillators, ranging from phase-oscillator models to coupled chemical reactions. In a chimera state, both coherent and incoherent (or synchronized and desynchronized) states occur simultaneously in populations of identical oscillators. We investigate chimera behavior in a population of neural oscillators using the Huber-Braun model, a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model originally developed to characterize the temperature-dependent bursting behavior of mammalian cold receptors. One population of neurons is allowed to synchronize, with each neuron receiving input from all the others in its group (global within-group coupling). Subsequently, a second population of identical neurons is placed under an identical global within-group coupling, and the two populations are also coupled to each other (between-group coupling). For certain values of the coupling constants, the neurons in the two populations exhibit radically different synchronization behavior. We will discuss the range of chimera activity in the model, and discuss its implications for actual neural activity, such as unihemispheric sleep.

  12. Optoelectronic Oscillators for Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José

    We introduce and report recent developments on a novel five port optoelectronic voltage controlled oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) optical-waveguide integrated with a laser diode. The RTD-based optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) has both optical and electrical input and output ports, with the fifth port allowing voltage control. The RTD-OEO locks to reference radio-frequency (RF) sources by either optical or electrical injection locking techniques allowing remote synchronization, eliminating the need of impedance matching between traditional RF oscillators. RTD-OEO functions include generation, amplification and distribution of RF carriers, clock recovery, carrier recovery, modulation and demodulation and frequency synthesis. Self-injection locking operation modes, where small portions of the output electrical/optical signals are fed back into the electrical/optical input ports, are also proposed. The self-phase locked loop configuration can give rise to low-noise high-stable oscillations, not limited by the RF source performance and with no need of external optoelectronic conversion.

  13. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  14. Covariant harmonic oscillators: 1973 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noz, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Using the relativistic harmonic oscillator, a physical basis is given to the phenomenological wave function of Yukawa which is covariant and normalizable. It is shown that this wave function can be interpreted in terms of the unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare group. The transformation properties of these covariant wave functions are also demonstrated.

  15. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  16. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  17. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  18. The second law of thermodynamics in the quantum Brownian oscillator at an arbitrary temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.; Mahler, G.

    2007-12-01

    In the classical limit no work is needed to couple a system to a bath with sufficiently weak coupling strength ( or with arbitrarily finite coupling strength for a linear system) at the same temperature. In the quantum domain this may be expected to change due to system-bath entanglement. Here we show analytically that the work needed to couple a single linear oscillator with finite strength to a bath cannot be less than the work obtainable from the oscillator when it decouples from the bath. Therefore, the quantum second law holds for an arbitrary temperature. This is a generalization of the previous results for zero temperature [Ford and O'Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 020402 (2006); Kim and Mahler, Eur. Phys. J. B 54, 405 (2006)]; in the high temperature limit we recover the classical behavior.

  19. Gamma Oscillations Underlie the Maintenance of Feature-Specific Information and the Contents of Visual Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Roosa; Rouhinen, Santeri; Wang, Sheng H; Palva, J Matias; Palva, Satu

    2015-10-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) sustains information online as integrated object representations. Neuronal mechanisms supporting the maintenance of feature-specific information have remained unidentified. Synchronized oscillations in the gamma band (30-120 Hz) characterize VWM retention and predict task performance, but whether these oscillations are specific to memorized features and VWM contents or underlie general executive VWM functions is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether gamma oscillations reflect the maintenance of feature-specific information in VWM. Concurrent magneto- and electroencephalography was recorded while subjects memorized different object features or feature conjunctions in identical VWM experiments. Using a data-driven source analysis approach, we show that the strength, load-dependence, and source topographies of gamma oscillations in the visual cortex differentiate these memorized features. Load-dependence of gamma oscillations in feature-specific visual and prefrontal areas also predicts VWM accuracy. Furthermore, corroborating the hypothesis that gamma oscillations support the perceptual binding of feature-specific neuronal assemblies, we also show that VWM for color-location conjunctions is associated with stronger gamma oscillations than that for these features separately. Gamma oscillations hence support the maintenance of feature-specific information and reflect VWM contents. The results also suggest that gamma oscillations contribute to feature binding in the formation of memory representations. PMID:25405942

  20. Optical analogue of electronic Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Riccardo; Costantino, Paola; Wiersma, Diederik; Ghulinyan, Mher; Oton, Claudio J; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2003-12-31

    We report on the observation of Bloch oscillations in light transport through periodic dielectric systems. By introducing a linear refractive index gradient along the propagation direction the optical equivalent of a Wannier-Stark ladder was obtained. Bloch oscillations were observed as time-resolved oscillations in transmission, in direct analogy to electronic Bloch oscillations in conducting crystals where the Wannier-Stark ladder is obtained via an external electric field. The observed oscillatory behavior is in excellent agreement with transfer matrix calculations.

  1. Exciton-polariton oscillations in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, T. C. H.; Rubo, Y. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and model spin-Rabi oscillations based on exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. The phase and polarization of oscillations can be controlled by resonant coherent pulses and the propagation of oscillating domains gives rise to phase-dependent interference patterns in real space. We show that interbranch polariton-polariton scattering controls the propagation of oscillating domains, which can be used to realize logic gates based on an analog variable phase.

  2. Bloch-Zener oscillations in binary superlattices.

    PubMed

    Dreisow, F; Szameit, A; Heinrich, M; Pertsch, T; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A; Longhi, S

    2009-02-20

    Bloch-Zener oscillations, i.e., the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling between minibands of a binary lattice, are experimentally demonstrated for light waves in curved femtosecond laser-written waveguide arrays. Visualization of double-periodicity breathing and oscillation modes is reported, and synchronous tunneling leading to wave reconstruction is demonstrated.

  3. Scleronomic Holonomic Constraints and Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, R.; Gonzalez-Garcia, G.; Izquierdo-De La Cruz, E.; Fernandez-Anaya, G.

    2011-01-01

    A bead sliding, under the sole influence of its own weight, on a rigid wire shaped in the fashion of a plane curve, will describe (generally anharmonic) oscillations around a local minimum. For given shapes, the bead will behave as a harmonic oscillator in the whole range, such as an unforced, undamped, Duffing oscillator, etc. We also present…

  4. Mechanical and current oscillations in corroding electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Teschke, O.; Galembeck, F.; Tenan, M.A.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanical oscillations of the solution meniscus risen around a corroding wire electrode were observed in synchronism with electrical current oscillations. Scanning electron microscopy coupled to microprobe analysis was used to investigate the topochemistry of the system under study. Solution capillarity effects on iron and on iron compounds are related to the oscillations detected in this system.

  5. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Schwetz, Thomas

    2008-02-21

    I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

  6. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This project focuses on a new technology that reduces NOx emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxygen-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace.

  7. Squeezed states of damped oscillator chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1993-01-01

    The Caldirola-Kanai model of one-dimensional damped oscillator is extended to the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping. The correlated and squeezed states for the chain of coupled parametric oscillators with damping are constructed. Based on the concept of the integrals of motion, it is demonstrated how squeezing phenomenon arises due to parametric excitation.

  8. Oscillations death revisited; coupling of identical chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bar-Eli, Kedma

    2011-06-28

    The coupling of identical reactors containing chemical oscillators is discussed. The coupling is executed by means of transferring chemical species from one cell (reactor) to the other in a diffusion like manner i.e. in proportion to the concentration difference between the cells. The coupling rate constant, however, is the same for all species. The individual, uncoupled, cells may be oscillating or in a stable steady state (the same for all reactors). In both cases, depending on the initial conditions, the symmetry breaks, and the cells may end up-contrary to intuition-in a stable steady state in which the final concentrations are not equal in the various reactors. The Brusselator and Oregonator mechanisms are examined and they behave in the manner described. On the other hand, the Lotka-Volterra mechanism, being conservative, keeps, when coupled, only the homogeneous solutions. PMID:21594295

  9. Fluidic Oscillator Array for Synchronized Oscillating Jet Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator array includes a plurality of fluidic-oscillator main flow channels. Each main flow channel has an inlet and an outlet. Each main flow channel has first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof, and has a first and a second feedback ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. The feedback ports are located downstream of the control ports with respect to a direction of a fluid flow through the main flow channel. The system also includes a first fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each first control port and each first feedback port, and a second fluid accumulator in fluid communication with each second control port and each second feedback port.

  10. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  11. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  12. Restoration of oscillation in network of oscillators in presence of direct and indirect interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Soumen; Bera, Bidesh K.; Bhowmick, Sourav K.; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-10-01

    The suppression of oscillations in coupled systems may lead to several unwanted situations, which requires a suitable treatment to overcome the suppression. In this paper, we show that the environmental coupling in the presence of direct interaction, which can suppress oscillation even in a network of identical oscillators, can be modified by introducing a feedback factor in the coupling scheme in order to restore the oscillation. We inspect how the introduction of the feedback factor helps to resurrect oscillation from various kinds of death states. We numerically verify the resurrection of oscillations for two paradigmatic limit cycle systems, namely Landau-Stuart and Van der Pol oscillators and also in generic chaotic Lorenz oscillator. We also study the effect of parameter mismatch in the process of restoring oscillation for coupled oscillators.

  13. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Couple Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation considers linear arrays of coupled oscillators. Our purpose in coupling oscillators together is to achieve high radiated power through the spatial power combining which results when the oscillators are injection locked to each other. York, et. al. have shown that, left to themselves, the ensemble of injection locked oscillators oscillate at the average of the tuning frequencies of all the oscillators. Coupling these arrays achieves high radiated power through coherent spatial power combining. The coupled oscillators are usually designed to produce constant aperture phase. Oscillators are injection locked to each other or to a master oscillator to produce coherent radiation. Oscillators do not necessarily oscillate at their tuning frequency.

  14. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  15. Adaptive oscillator networks with conserved overall coupling: Sequential firing and near-synchronized states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picallo, Clara B.; Riecke, Hermann

    2011-03-01

    Motivated by recent observations in neuronal systems we investigate all-to-all networks of nonidentical oscillators with adaptive coupling. The adaptation models spike-timing-dependent plasticity in which the sum of the weights of all incoming links is conserved. We find multiple phase-locked states that fall into two classes: near-synchronized states and splay states. Among the near-synchronized states are states that oscillate with a frequency that depends only very weakly on the coupling strength and is essentially given by the frequency of one of the oscillators, which is, however, neither the fastest nor the slowest oscillator. In sufficiently large networks the adaptive coupling is found to develop effective network topologies dominated by one or two loops. This results in a multitude of stable splay states, which differ in their firing sequences. With increasing coupling strength their frequency increases linearly and the oscillators become less synchronized. The essential features of the two classes of states are captured analytically in perturbation analyses of the extended Kuramoto model used in the simulations.

  16. Time-delay effects on the aging transition in a population of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhumika; Sharma, Devendra; Sen, Abhijit

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the influence of time-delayed coupling on the nature of the aging transition in a system of coupled oscillators that have a mix of active and inactive oscillators, where the aging transition is defined as the gradual loss of collective synchrony as the proportion of inactive oscillators is increased. We start from a simple model of two time-delay coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators that have identical frequencies but are located at different distances from the Hopf bifurcation point. A systematic numerical and analytic study delineates the dependence of the critical coupling strength (at which the system experiences total loss of synchrony) on time delay and the average distance of the system from the Hopf bifurcation point. We find that time delay can act to facilitate the aging transition by lowering the threshold coupling strength for amplitude death in the system. We then extend our study to larger systems of globally coupled active and inactive oscillators including an infinite system in the thermodynamic limit. Our model system and results can provide a useful paradigm for understanding the functional robustness of diverse physical and biological systems that are prone to aging transitions.

  17. Physiological Effects of Strength Training and Various Strength Training Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Jack H.

    Current knowledge in the area of muscle physiology is a basis for a discussion on strength training programs. It is now recognized that the expression of strength is related to, but not dependent upon, the size of the muscle and is probably more related to the ability to recruit more muscle fibers in the contraction, or to better synchronize their…

  18. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.H.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

    1998-08-11

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time. 7 figs.

  19. Combustor oscillating pressure stabilization and method

    DOEpatents

    Gemmen, Randall S.; Richards, George A.; Yip, Mui-Tong Joseph; Robey, Edward H.; Cully, Scott R.; Addis, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    High dynamic pressure oscillations in hydrocarbon-fueled combustors typically occur when the transport time of the fuel to the flame front is at some fraction of the acoustic period. These oscillations are reduced to acceptably lower levels by restructuring or repositioning the flame front in the combustor to increase the transport time. A pilot flame front located upstream of the oscillating flame and pulsed at a selected frequency and duration effectively restructures and repositions the oscillating flame in the combustor to alter the oscillation-causing transport time.

  20. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.