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Sample records for osmoregulation heme biosynthesis

  1. Biosynthesis of Hemes.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2007-04-01

    This review is concerned specifically with the structures and biosynthesis of hemes in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. However, inasmuch as all tetrapyrroles share a common biosynthetic pathway, much of the material covered here is applicable to tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in other organisms. Conversely, much of the available information about tetrapyrrole biosynthesis has been gained from studies of other organisms, such as plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and anoxygenic phototrophs, which synthesize large quantities of these compounds. This information is applicable to E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. Hemes play important roles as enzyme prosthetic groups in mineral nutrition, redox metabolism, and gas-and redox-modulated signal transduction. The biosynthetic steps from the earliest universal precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), to protoporphyrin IX-based hemes constitute the major, common portion of the pathway, and other steps leading to specific groups of products can be considered branches off the main axis. Porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (PBGS; also known as ALA dehydratase) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation of two ALA molecules to form PBG, with the release of two molecules of H2O. Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPX) catalyzes the removal of six electrons from the tetrapyrrole macrocycle to form protoporphyrin IX in the last biosynthetic step that is common to hemes and chlorophylls. Several lines of evidence converge to support a regulatory model in which the cellular level of available or free protoheme controls the rate of heme synthesis at the level of the first step unique to heme synthesis, the formation of GSA by the action of GTR.

  2. Intraspecific variation in expression of candidate genes for osmoregulation, heme biosynthesis and stress resistance suggests local adaptation in European flounder (Platichthys flesus).

    PubMed

    Larsen, P F; Nielsen, E E; Williams, T D; Loeschcke, V

    2008-09-01

    Despite the recent discovery of significant genetic structuring in a large number of marine organisms, the evolutionary significance of these often minute genetic differences are still poorly understood. To elucidate the adaptive relevance of low genetic differentiation among marine fish populations, we studied expression differences of osmoregulatory and stress genes in genetically weakly differentiated populations of the European flounder (Platichthys flesus), distributed across a natural salinity gradient. Flounders were maintained in a long-term reciprocal transplantation experiment mimicking natural salinities in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Applying real-time quantitative PCR and microarray analysis we studied expression of four candidate genes (hsp70, angiotensinogen, Na/K-ATPase-alpha and 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS)) in gill, kidney and liver tissues. Genes involved in osmoregulative processes (Na/K-ATPases-alpha and angiotensinogen) showed highly plastic but similar expression in the two populations dependent on environmental salinity. However, we observed a unique sixfold up-regulation of hsp70 in kidney tissue of flounder from the North Sea following long-term acclimation to Baltic salinities. Similarly, significant differences between North Sea and Baltic flounders in expression of ALAS in response to different salinities were found in gill and liver tissue. These findings strongly suggest that gene expression in flounders is shaped by adaptation to local environmental conditions. This identification of adaptive differences in high gene flow marine organisms adds a new dimension to our current understanding of evolutionary processes in the sea and is of paramount importance for identification, protection and sustainable management of marine biodiversity.

  3. Biosynthesis of heme in immature erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, L.C.; Cox, T.M.

    1988-05-15

    Heme formation in reticulocytes from rabbits and rodents is subject to end produce negative feedback regulation: intracellular free heme has been shown to control acquisition of transferrin iron for heme synthesis. To identify the site of control of heme biosynthesis in the human erythron, immature erythroid cells were obtained from peripheral blood and aspirated bone marrow. After incubation with human /sup 59/Fe transferrin, 2-(/sup 14/C)glycine, or 4-(/sup 14/C)delta-aminolevulinate, isotopic incorporation into extracted heme was determined. Addition of cycloheximide to increase endogenous free heme, reduced incorporation of labeled glycine and iron but not delta-aminolevulinate into cell heme. Incorporation of glycine and iron was also sensitive to inhibition by exogenous hematin. Hematin treatment rapidly diminished incorporation of intracellular /sup 59/Fe into heme by human erythroid cells but assimilation of 4-(/sup 14/C)delta-aminolevulinate into heme was insensitive to inhibition by hematin. In human erythroid cells (but not rabbit reticulocytes) pre-incubation with unlabeled delta-aminolevulinate or protoporphyrin IX greatly stimulated utilization of cell /sup 59/Fe for heme synthesis and also attenuated end product inhibition. In human erythroid cells heme biosynthesis is thus primarily regulated by feedback inhibition at one or more steps which lead to delta-aminolevulinate formation. Hence in man the regulatory process affects generation of the first committed precursor of porphyrin biosynthesis by delta-aminolevulinate synthetase, whereas in the rabbit separate regulatory mechanisms exist which control the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin IX.

  4. Deconvoluting heme biosynthesis to target blood-stage malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sigala, Paul A; Crowley, Jan R; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Heme metabolism is central to blood-stage infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Parasites retain a heme biosynthesis pathway but do not require its activity during infection of heme-rich erythrocytes, where they can scavenge host heme to meet metabolic needs. Nevertheless, heme biosynthesis in parasite-infected erythrocytes can be potently stimulated by exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), resulting in accumulation of the phototoxic intermediate protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). Here we use photodynamic imaging, mass spectrometry, parasite gene disruption, and chemical probes to reveal that vestigial host enzymes in the cytoplasm of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes contribute to ALA-stimulated heme biosynthesis and that ALA uptake depends on parasite-established permeability pathways. We show that PPIX accumulation in infected erythrocytes can be harnessed for antimalarial chemotherapy using luminol-based chemiluminescence and combinatorial stimulation by low-dose artemisinin to photoactivate PPIX to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen. This photodynamic strategy has the advantage of exploiting host enzymes refractory to resistance-conferring mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09143.001 PMID:26173178

  5. Structure and function of enzymes in heme biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Gunhild; Reichelt, Joachim; Jahn, Dieter; Heinz, Dirk W

    2010-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles like hemes, chlorophylls, and cobalamin are complex macrocycles which play essential roles in almost all living organisms. Heme serves as prosthetic group of many proteins involved in fundamental biological processes like respiration, photosynthesis, and the metabolism and transport of oxygen. Further, enzymes such as catalases, peroxidases, or cytochromes P450 rely on heme as essential cofactors. Heme is synthesized in most organisms via a highly conserved biosynthetic route. In humans, defects in heme biosynthesis lead to severe metabolic disorders called porphyrias. The elucidation of the 3D structures for all heme biosynthetic enzymes over the last decade provided new insights into their function and elucidated the structural basis of many known diseases. In terms of structure and function several rather unique proteins were revealed such as the V-shaped glutamyl-tRNA reductase, the dipyrromethane cofactor containing porphobilinogen deaminase, or the “Radical SAM enzyme” coproporphyrinogen III dehydrogenase. This review summarizes the current understanding of the structure–function relationship for all heme biosynthetic enzymes and their potential interactions in the cell. PMID:20506125

  6. Alterations in renal heme biosynthesis during metal nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, A; Fowler, B A

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of the heme biosynthetic pathway in the kidney by various metals has been reviewed. In addition, a study on the effects of lead on renal heme biosynthesis after acute treatment of rats has been reported. Chronic low-level lead exposure in rats results in relatively small effects on renal heme biosynthetic pathway enzymes. After acute treatment of rats with lead, no effects on ALAD or UROS and mild, transitory effects on ALAS and ferrochelatase are observed. The intracellular binding of lead within intranuclear inclusion bodies in the proximal tubule cells and to high-affinity cytosolic lead-binding proteins probably protects sensitive subcellular systems, such as the heme pathway, from lead toxicity. Chronic exposure to methyl mercury results in increased urinary excretion of uro- and coproporphyrins in rats, mediated via inhibition of ferrochelatase and UROS and stimulation of ALAS. A tissue-specific inhibition of ALAD occurs in the kidney after treatment of rats with indium. Acute treatment of rats with nickel, platinum, tin, antimony, bismuth, and cobalt results in induction of heme oxygenase, followed by decreased microsomal heme content and ALAS stimulation in the kidney.

  7. Biosynthesis of heme in immature erythroid cells. The regulatory step for heme formation in the human erythron

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, L.C.; Cox, T.M.

    1988-05-15

    Heme formation in reticulocytes from rabbits and rodents is subject to end product negative feedback regulation: intracellular free heme has been shown to control acquisition of transferrin iron for heme synthesis. To identify the site of control of heme biosynthesis in the human erythron, immature erythroid cells were obtained from peripheral blood and aspirated bone marrow. After incubation with human 59Fe transferrin, 2-(14C)glycine, or 4-(14C)delta-aminolevulinate, isotopic incorporation into extracted heme was determined. Addition of cycloheximide to increase endogenous free heme, reduced incorporation of labeled glycine and iron but not delta-aminolevulinate into cell heme. Incorporation of glycine and iron was also sensitive to inhibition by exogenous hematin (Ki, 30 and 45 microM, respectively) i.e. at concentrations in the range which affect cell-free protein synthesis in reticulocyte lysates. Hematin treatment rapidly diminished incorporation of intracellular 59Fe into heme by human erythroid cells but assimilation of 4-(14C)delta-aminolevulinate into heme was insensitive to inhibition by hematin (Ki greater than 100 microM). In human reticulocytes (unlike those from rabbits), addition of ferric salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone, to increase the pre-heme iron pool independently of the transferrin cycle, failed to promote heme synthesis or modify feedback inhibition induced by hematin. In human erythroid cells (but not rabbit reticulocytes) pre-incubation with unlabeled delta-aminolevulinate or protoporphyrin IX greatly stimulated utilization of cell 59Fe for heme synthesis and also attenuated end product inhibition. In human erythroid cells heme biosynthesis is thus primarily regulated by feedback inhibition at one or more steps which lead to delta-aminolevulinate formation.

  8. Mosaic origin of the heme biosynthesis pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Oborník, Miroslav; Green, Beverley R

    2005-12-01

    Heme biosynthesis represents one of the most essential metabolic pathways in living organisms, providing the precursors for cytochrome prosthetic groups, photosynthetic pigments, and vitamin B(12). Using genomic data, we have compared the heme pathway in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae to those of green algae and higher plants, as well as to those of heterotrophic eukaryotes (fungi, apicomplexans, and animals). Phylogenetic analyses showed the mosaic character of this pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Although most of the algal and plant enzymes showed the expected plastid (cyanobacterial) origin, at least one of them (porphobilinogen deaminase) appears to have a mitochondrial (alpha-proteobacterial) origin. Another enzyme, glutamyl-tRNA synthase, obviously originated in the eukaryotic nucleus. Because all the plastid-targeted sequences consistently form a well-supported cluster, this suggests that genes were either transferred from the primary endosymbiont (cyanobacteria) to the primary host nucleus shortly after the primary endosymbiotic event or replaced with genes from other sources at an equally early time, i.e., before the formation of three primary plastid lineages. The one striking exception to this pattern is ferrochelatase, the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step to heme and bilin pigments. In this case, two red algal sequences do not cluster either with the other plastid sequences or with cyanobacterial sequences and appear to have a proteobacterial origin like that of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Although the heterokonts also acquired their plastid via secondary endosymbiosis from a red alga, the diatom has a typical plastid-cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. We have not found any remnants of the plastidlike heme pathway in the nonphotosynthetic heterokonts Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora sojae.

  9. Activation of heme biosynthesis by a small molecule that is toxic to fermenting Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mike, Laura A.; Dutter, Brendan F.; Stauff, Devin L.; Moore, Jessica L.; Vitko, Nicholas P.; Aranmolate, Olusegun; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Sullivan, Sarah; Reid, Paul R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Richardson, Anthony R.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant infectious threat to global public health. Acquisition or synthesis of heme is required for S. aureus to capture energy through respiration, but an excess of this critical cofactor is toxic to bacteria. S. aureus employs the heme sensor system (HssRS) to overcome heme toxicity; however, the mechanism of heme sensing is not defined. Here, we describe the identification of a small molecule activator of HssRS that induces endogenous heme biosynthesis by perturbing central metabolism. This molecule is toxic to fermenting S. aureus, including clinically relevant small colony variants. The utility of targeting fermenting bacteria is exemplified by the fact that this compound prevents the emergence of antibiotic resistance, enhances phagocyte killing, and reduces S. aureus pathogenesis. Not only is this small molecule a powerful tool for studying bacterial heme biosynthesis and central metabolism; it also establishes targeting of fermentation as a viable antibacterial strategy. PMID:23630262

  10. A novel pathway for the biosynthesis of heme in Archaea: genome-based bioinformatic predictions and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Sonja; Rolfes, Sarah; Raux-Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J; Jahn, Dieter; Layer, Gunhild

    2010-12-13

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group for many proteins involved in fundamental biological processes in all three domains of life. In Eukaryota and Bacteria heme is formed via a conserved and well-studied biosynthetic pathway. Surprisingly, in Archaea heme biosynthesis proceeds via an alternative route which is poorly understood. In order to formulate a working hypothesis for this novel pathway, we searched 59 completely sequenced archaeal genomes for the presence of gene clusters consisting of established heme biosynthetic genes and colocalized conserved candidate genes. Within the majority of archaeal genomes it was possible to identify such heme biosynthesis gene clusters. From this analysis we have been able to identify several novel heme biosynthesis genes that are restricted to archaea. Intriguingly, several of the encoded proteins display similarity to enzymes involved in heme d(1) biosynthesis. To initiate an experimental verification of our proposals two Methanosarcina barkeri proteins predicted to catalyze the initial steps of archaeal heme biosynthesis were recombinantly produced, purified, and their predicted enzymatic functions verified.

  11. Decoupling Activation of Heme Biosynthesis from Anaerobic Toxicity in a Molecule Active in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dutter, Brendan F; Mike, Laura A; Reid, Paul R; Chong, Katherine M; Ramos-Hunter, Susan J; Skaar, Eric P; Sulikowski, Gary A

    2016-05-20

    Small molecules active in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus are valuable tools for the study of its basic biology and pathogenesis, and many molecules may provide leads for novel therapeutics. We have previously reported a small molecule, 1, which activates endogenous heme biosynthesis in S. aureus, leading to an accumulation of intracellular heme. In addition to this novel activity, 1 also exhibits toxicity towards S. aureus growing under fermentative conditions. To determine if these activities are linked and establish what features of the molecule are required for activity, we synthesized a library of analogs around the structure of 1 and screened them for activation of heme biosynthesis and anaerobic toxicity to investigate structure-activity relationships. The results of this analysis suggest that these activities are not linked. Furthermore, we have identified the structural features that promote each activity and have established two classes of molecules: activators of heme biosynthesis and inhibitors of anaerobic growth. These molecules will serve as useful probes for their respective activities without concern for the off target effects of the parent compound.

  12. Prokaryotic Heme Biosynthesis: Multiple Pathways to a Common Essential Product.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Harry A; Dailey, Tamara A; Gerdes, Svetlana; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina; O'Brian, Mark R; Warren, Martin J

    2017-03-01

    The advent of heme during evolution allowed organisms possessing this compound to safely and efficiently carry out a variety of chemical reactions that otherwise were difficult or impossible. While it was long assumed that a single heme biosynthetic pathway existed in nature, over the past decade, it has become clear that there are three distinct pathways among prokaryotes, although all three pathways utilize a common initial core of three enzymes to produce the intermediate uroporphyrinogen III. The most ancient pathway and the only one found in the Archaea converts siroheme to protoheme via an oxygen-independent four-enzyme-step process. Bacteria utilize the initial core pathway but then add one additional common step to produce coproporphyrinogen III. Following this step, Gram-positive organisms oxidize coproporphyrinogen III to coproporphyrin III, insert iron to make coproheme, and finally decarboxylate coproheme to protoheme, whereas Gram-negative bacteria first decarboxylate coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX and then oxidize this to protoporphyrin IX prior to metal insertion to make protoheme. In order to adapt to oxygen-deficient conditions, two steps in the bacterial pathways have multiple forms to accommodate oxidative reactions in an anaerobic environment. The regulation of these pathways reflects the diversity of bacterial metabolism. This diversity, along with the late recognition that three pathways exist, has significantly slowed advances in this field such that no single organism's heme synthesis pathway regulation is currently completely characterized.

  13. Mitochondrial ClpX activates a key enzyme for heme biosynthesis and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kardon, Julia R.; Yien, Yvette Y.; Huston, Nicholas C.; Branco, Diana S.; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Paw, Barry H.; Baker, Tania A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitochondrion maintains and regulates its proteome with chaperones primarily inherited from its bacterial endosymbiont ancestor. Among these chaperones is the AAA+ unfoldase ClpX, an important regulator of prokaryotic physiology with poorly defined function in the eukaryotic mitochondrion. We observed phenotypic similarity in S. cerevisiae genetic interaction data between mitochondrial ClpX (mtClpX) and genes contributing to heme biosynthesis, an essential mitochondrial function. Metabolomic analysis revealed that 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the first heme precursor, is five-fold reduced in yeast lacking mtClpX activity, and total heme is reduced by half. mtClpX directly stimulates ALA synthase in vitro by catalyzing incorporation of its cofactor, pyridoxal phosphate. This activity is conserved in mammalian homologs; additionally, mtClpX depletion impairs vertebrate erythropoiesis, which requires massive upregulation of heme biosynthesis to supply hemoglobin. mtClpX therefore is a widely conserved stimulator of an essential biosynthetic pathway, and employs a previously unrecognized mechanism for AAA+ unfoldases. PMID:25957689

  14. Mitochondrial Translocator Protein (TSPO) Function Is Not Essential for Heme Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Amy H.; Tu, Lan N.; Mukai, Chinatsu; Sirivelu, Madhu P.; Pillai, Viju V.; Morohaku, Kanako; Cohen, Roy; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Function of the mammalian translocator protein (TSPO; previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor) remains unclear because its presumed role in steroidogenesis and mitochondrial permeability transition established using pharmacological methods has been refuted in recent genetic studies. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is considered a conserved endogenous ligand for TSPO. In bacteria, TSPO was identified to regulate tetrapyrrole metabolism and chemical catalysis of PPIX in the presence of light, and in vertebrates, TSPO function has been linked to porphyrin transport and heme biosynthesis. Positive correlation between high TSPO expression in cancer cells and susceptibility to photodynamic therapy based on their increased ability to convert the precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to PPIX appeared to reinforce this mechanism. In this study, we used TSPO knock-out (Tspo−/−) mice, primary cells, and different tumor cell lines to examine the role of TSPO in erythropoiesis, heme levels, PPIX biosynthesis, phototoxic cell death, and mitochondrial bioenergetic homeostasis. In contrast to expectations, our results demonstrate that TSPO deficiency does not adversely affect erythropoiesis, heme biosynthesis, bioconversion of ALA to PPIX, and porphyrin-mediated phototoxic cell death. TSPO expression levels in cancer cells do not correlate with their ability to convert ALA to PPIX. In fibroblasts, we observed that TSPO deficiency decreased the oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) indicative of a cellular metabolic shift, without a negative impact on porphyrin biosynthetic capability. Based on these findings, we conclude that mammalian TSPO does not have a critical physiological function related to PPIX and heme biosynthesis. PMID:26627829

  15. Optimization of the heme biosynthesis pathway for the production of 5-aminolevulinic acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Kang, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Du, Guocheng

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the committed intermediate of the heme biosynthesis pathway, shows significant promise for cancer treatment. Here, we identified that in addition to hemA and hemL, hemB, hemD, hemF, hemG and hemH are also the major regulatory targets of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Interestingly, up-regulation of hemD and hemF benefited ALA accumulation whereas overexpression of hemB, hemG and hemH diminished ALA accumulation. Accordingly, by combinatorial overexpression of the hemA, hemL, hemD and hemF with different copy-number plasmids, the titer of ALA was improved to 3.25 g l−1. Furthermore, in combination with transcriptional and enzymatic analysis, we demonstrated that ALA dehydratase (HemB) encoded by hemB is feedback inhibited by the downstream intermediate protoporphyrinogen IX. This work has great potential to be scaled-up for microbial production of ALA and provides new important insights into the regulatory mechanism of the heme biosynthesis pathway. PMID:25716896

  16. Discovery of genes essential for heme biosynthesis through large-scale gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Roland; Schultz, Iman J.; Pierce, Eric L.; Soltis, Kathleen A.; Naranuntarat, Amornrat; Ward, Diane M.; Baughman, Joshua; Paradkar, Prasad N.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Culotta, Valeria C.; Kaplan, Jerry; Palis, James; Paw, Barry H.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Heme biosynthesis consists of a series of eight enzymatic reactions that originate in mitochondria and continue in the cytosol before returning to mitochondria. Although these core enzymes are well studied, additional mitochondrial transporters and regulatory factors are predicted to be required. To discover such unknown components, we utilized a large-scale computational screen to identify mitochondrial proteins whose transcripts consistently co-express with the core machinery of heme biosynthesis. We identified SLC25A39, SLC22A4 and TMEM14C, which are putative mitochondrial transporters, as well as C1orf69 and ISCA1, which are iron-sulfur cluster proteins. Targeted knockdowns of all five genes in zebrafish resulted in profound anemia without impacting erythroid lineage specification. Moreover, silencing of Slc25a39 in murine erythroleukemia cells impaired iron incorporation into protoporphyrin IX, and vertebrate Slc25a39 complemented an iron homeostasis defect in the orthologous yeast mtm1Δ deletion mutant. Our results advance the molecular understanding of heme biosynthesis and offer promising candidate genes for inherited anemias. PMID:19656490

  17. Heme and heme biosynthesis intermediates induce heme oxygenase-1 and cytochrome P450 2A5, enzymes with putative sequential roles in heme and bilirubin metabolism: different requirement for transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid- derived 2-like 2.

    PubMed

    Lämsä, Virpi; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Sormunen, Raija; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hakkola, Jukka

    2012-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5) oxidizes bilirubin to biliverdin and represents a putative candidate for maintaining bilirubin at safe but adequate antioxidant levels. Curiously, CYP2A5 is induced by both excessive heme and chemicals that inhibit heme synthesis. We hypothesized that heme homeostasis is a key modifier of Cyp2a5 expression via transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) and characterized the coordination of CYP2A5 and heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) responses using wild-type and Nrf2(-/-) primary mouse hepatocytes. HMOX1 was rapidly elevated by exogenous hemin, thereby limiting the transactivation of Cyp2a5 until high heme (> 5µM) exposure. Nrf2 was mandatory for CYP2A5 but not for HMOX1 induction by heme. CYP2A5 was intensively and HMOX1 moderately elevated in heme synthesis blockades by succinylacetone and N-methyl protoporphyrin IX, and Nrf2 partially mediated the induction of CYP2A5. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that CYP2A5 is targeted Nrf2 dependently both to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. However, excessive heme increased CYP2A5 predominantly in the ER. Phenobarbital, dibutyryl-cAMP, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) overexpression stimulate heme biosynthesis and induce CYP2A5. Acute but not chronic CYP2A5 induction by phenobarbital required Nrf2, whereas CYP2A5 induction by dibutyryl-cAMP and PGC-1α was potentiated by Nrf2 knockout. Collectively, heme homeostasis is established as a crucial regulator of hepatic Cyp2a5 expression mediated via Nrf2 activation, whereas Nrf2 is redundant for Hmox1 induction by heme. Similar subcellular targeting and coordination of CYP2A5 and HMOX1 responses suggest favorable conditions for enhanced CYP2A5-mediated bilirubin maintenance in altered heme homeostasis that predisposes to oxidative stress.

  18. Phycobilin biosynthesis: reductant requirements and product identification for heme oxygenase from Cyanidium caldarium.

    PubMed

    Rhie, G; Beale, S I

    1995-06-20

    Algal heme oxygenase is a soluble enzyme from Cyanidium caldarium that catalyzes the first committed step of phycobilin biosynthesis by converting protoheme to biliverdin IX alpha. Although the physiological substrate (protoheme) of algal heme oxygenase is identical to that of microsomal heme oxygenase, which catalyzes heme catabolism in animals, the two enzyme systems differ in several respects including the nature of the required reductants and solubility of the enzymes. Addition of the strong Fe3+ ion chelators, desferrioxamine and Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid), greatly increased the yield of solvent-extracted bilin product. The effect of the Fe3+ chelators was approximately equal whether they were added during or after the enzyme incubation. Postincubation treatment of the enzyme reaction mixture with strong acid also greatly increased the product yield. Addition of desferrioxamine to the reaction mixture after the incubation was terminated caused the appearance of an absorption spectrum, indicating an increase in the concentration of free bilin product. Acid and Fe3+ chelators are known to cause dissociation of Fe(III)-bilin complexes. These results indicate that the in vitro enzymic reaction product of algal heme oxygenase is a nonenzyme-bound Fe(III)-biliverdin IX alpha complex that is poorly extracted and/or quantitated unless it is first dissociated. Algal heme oxygenase required the simultaneous presence of both reduced ferredoxin and a second reductant such as ascorbate for activity. The requirement for L-ascorbate could be substituted by Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid) or D-ascorbate, but not by dehydroascorbate or dithiothreitol. Heme oxygenase was purified over 200-fold from C. caldarium by differential (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and serial column chromatography over reactive blue 2-Sepharose, DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-75, and ferredoxin-Sepharose.

  19. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  20. Biosynthesis of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in Escherichia coli: the phosphoethanolamine transferase is encoded by opgE.

    PubMed

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Cogez, Virginie; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Quintard, Kevin; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Madec, Edwige; Lacroix, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are oligosaccharides found in the periplasm of many Gram-negative bacteria. Glucose is the sole constitutive sugar and this backbone may be substituted by various kinds of molecules depending on the species. In E. coli, OPG are substituted by phosphoglycerol and phosphoethanolamine derived from membrane phospholipids and by succinyl residues. In this study, we describe the isolation of the opgE gene encoding the phosphoethanolamine transferase by a screen previously used for the isolation of the opgB gene encoding the phosphoglycerol transferase. Both genes show structural and functional similarities without sequence similarity.

  1. Biosynthesis of Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans in Escherichia coli: The Phosphoethanolamine Transferase Is Encoded by opgE

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Quintard, Kevin; Dondeyne, Jacqueline; Madec, Edwige

    2013-01-01

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are oligosaccharides found in the periplasm of many Gram-negative bacteria. Glucose is the sole constitutive sugar and this backbone may be substituted by various kinds of molecules depending on the species. In E. coli, OPG are substituted by phosphoglycerol and phosphoethanolamine derived from membrane phospholipids and by succinyl residues. In this study, we describe the isolation of the opgE gene encoding the phosphoethanolamine transferase by a screen previously used for the isolation of the opgB gene encoding the phosphoglycerol transferase. Both genes show structural and functional similarities without sequence similarity. PMID:24228245

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha controls hepatic heme biosynthesis through ALAS1.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Tatjana; Väisänen, Sami; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Kersten, Sander; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-05-01

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group of proteins involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism and nitric oxide production. ALAS1 (5-aminolevulinate synthase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis in the liver and is highly regulated to adapt to the metabolic demand of the hepatocyte. In the present study, we describe human hepatic ALAS1 as a new direct target for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). In primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells, PPARalpha agonists induced an increase in ALAS1 mRNA levels, which was abolished by PPARalpha silencing. These effects are mediated by two functional PPAR binding sites at positions -9 and -2.3 kb relative to the ALAS1 transcription start site. PPARalpha ligand treatment also up-regulated the mRNA levels of the genes ALAD (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase), UROD (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase), CPOX (coproporphyrinogen oxidase) and PPOX (protoporphyrinogen oxidase) encoding for enzymes controlling further steps in heme biosynthesis. In HepG2 cells treated with PPARalpha agonists and in mouse liver upon fasting, the association of PPARalpha, its partner retinoid X receptor, PPARgamma co-activator 1alpha and activated RNA polymerase II with the transcription start site region of all six genes was increased, leading to higher levels of the metabolite heme. In conclusion, these data strongly support a role of PPARalpha in the regulation of human ALAS1 and of five additional genes of the pathway, consequently leading to increased heme synthesis.

  3. Leishmania spp: Delta-aminolevulinate-inducible neogenesis of porphyria by genetic complementation of incomplete heme biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sujoy; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Chang, Kwang-Poo Chang

    2008-01-01

    To further develop the Leishmania model for porphyria based on their deficiencies in heme biosynthesis, three Old World species were doubly transfected as before for Leishmania amazonensis with cDNAs, encoding the 2nd and 3rd enzymes in the pathway. Expression of the transgenes was verified immunologically at the protein level and functionally by uroporphyrin neogenesis that occurs only after exposure of the double-transfectants to delta-aminolevulinate. All species examined were equally deficient in heme biosynthesis, as indicated by the accumulation of uroporphyrin as the sole porphyrin and the production of coproporphyrin upon further transfection of one representative species with the downstream gene. The results obtained thus demonstrate that at least the first five enzymes for heme biosynthesis are absent in all species examined, rendering their transfectants inducible with aminolevulinate to accumulate porphyrins and thus useful as cellular models for human porphyrias. PMID:18164705

  4. Noncanonical coproporphyrin-dependent bacterial heme biosynthesis pathway that does not use protoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Harry A; Gerdes, Svetlana; Dailey, Tamara A; Burch, Joseph S; Phillips, John D

    2015-02-17

    It has been generally accepted that biosynthesis of protoheme (heme) uses a common set of core metabolic intermediates that includes protoporphyrin. Herein, we show that the Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (high-GC and low-GC Gram-positive bacteria) are unable to synthesize protoporphyrin. Instead, they oxidize coproporphyrinogen to coproporphyrin, insert ferrous iron to make Fe-coproporphyrin (coproheme), and then decarboxylate coproheme to generate protoheme. This pathway is specified by three genes named hemY, hemH, and hemQ. The analysis of 982 representative prokaryotic genomes is consistent with this pathway being the most ancient heme synthesis pathway in the Eubacteria. Our results identifying a previously unknown branch of tetrapyrrole synthesis support a significant shift from current models for the evolution of bacterial heme and chlorophyll synthesis. Because some organisms that possess this coproporphyrin-dependent branch are major causes of human disease, HemQ is a novel pharmacological target of significant therapeutic relevance, particularly given high rates of antimicrobial resistance among these pathogens.

  5. Balanced globin protein expression and heme biosynthesis improve production of human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifang; Martínez, José L; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Due to limitations associated with whole blood for transfusions (antigen compatibility, transmission of infections, supply and storage), the use of cell-free hemoglobin as an oxygen carrier substitute has been in the center of research interest for decades. Human hemoglobin has previously been synthesized in yeast, however the challenge is to balance the expression of the two different globin subunits, as well as the supply of the prosthetic heme required for obtaining the active hemoglobin (α2β2). In this work we evaluated the expression of different combinations of α and β peptides and combined this with metabolic engineering of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Through evaluation of several different strategies we showed that engineering the biosynthesis pathway can substantially increase the heme level in yeast cells, and this resulted in a significant enhancement of human hemoglobin production. Besides demonstration of improved hemoglobin production our work demonstrates a novel strategy for improving the production of complex proteins, especially multimers with a prosthetic group. © 2013 Published by International Metabolic Engineering Society on behalf of International Metabolic Engineering Society.

  6. Molecular evolution of multiple-level control of heme biosynthesis pathway in animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Chu, Ying; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Hu, Chin-Hwa; Pai, Tun-Wen; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Lin, Han-Jia; Cases, Ildeofonso; Rojas, Ana; Sanchez, Mayka; You, Zong-Ye; Hsu, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of enzymes in a metabolic pathway can occur not only through changes in amino acid sequences but also through variations in transcriptional activation, mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. The heme biosynthesis pathway, a linear pathway comprised of eight consecutive enzymes in animals, provides researchers with ample information for multiple types of evolutionary analyses performed with respect to the position of each enzyme in the pathway. Through bioinformatics analysis, we found that the protein-coding sequences of all enzymes in this pathway are under strong purifying selection, from cnidarians to mammals. However, loose evolutionary constraints are observed for enzymes in which self-catalysis occurs. Through comparative genomics, we found that in animals, the first intron of the enzyme-encoding genes has been co-opted for transcriptional activation of the genes in this pathway. Organisms sense the cellular content of iron, and through iron-responsive elements in the 5' untranslated regions of mRNAs and the intron-exon boundary regions of pathway genes, translational inhibition and exon choice in enzymes may be enabled, respectively. Pathway product (heme)-mediated negative feedback control can affect the transport of pathway enzymes into the mitochondria as well as the ubiquitin-mediated stability of enzymes. Remarkably, the positions of these controls on pathway activity are not ubiquitous but are biased towards the enzymes in the upstream portion of the pathway. We revealed that multiple-level controls on the activity of the heme biosynthesis pathway depend on the linear depth of the enzymes in the pathway, indicating a new strategy for discovering the molecular constraints that shape the evolution of a metabolic pathway.

  7. Molecular biological study of early steps of heme biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianming.

    1989-01-01

    The heme molecule is the prosthetic group of hemoglobins, cytochromes, catalases and peroxidases, and modified tetrapyrroles are the active moieties of the chlorophylls and vitamin B{sub 12}. The pathway of heme biosynthesis is highly conserved except for the formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the first common intermediate. ALA can be synthesized from glutamic acid (C{sub 5} pathway) or succinyl CoA and glycine (C{sub 4} pathway). In E. coli, the heme biosynthetic pathway consists of more than eight enzymatic steps. The genes encoding these enzymes are widely scattered on the chromosome. An E. coli heme-requiring, hemin-permeable mutant had no detectable 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA D) or porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG D) activities. The gene which complemented this mutation was cloned. PBG D activity was restored to normal levels, but the activity of ALA D was 20-30 fold higher than normal. A maxicell procedure confirmed that the cloned gene was hemB. The hemB gene was sequenced. Two promoter regions, two Shine-Dalgarno sequences and two possible initiation sites were identified. Extensive homologies with yeast (36%), human liver (40%) and rat liver (40%) amino acid sequences were observed, especially in the sixteen-amino acid Zn-binding region (75%) and the four amino acids surrounding the essential lysine at the active site (100% for rate and human proteins). Analysis of promoter strength and two independent analyses of codon usage indicated that the hemB gene is moderately-expressed. E. coli hemA gene was cloned and sequenced. Complemented mutants overproduced 5-ALA and porphyrins. The cloned sequence appears to encode a 46 kDa protein. The amino acid sequence of the cloned gene product showed no significant homologies with any cloned ALA synthase nor with any protein in two data banks.

  8. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zavala, A; Del Razo, L M; García-Vargas, G G; Aguilar, C; Borja, V H; Albores, A; Cebrián, M E

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 microg As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized.

  9. Multiple Heme Oxygenase Family Members Contribute to the Biosynthesis of the Phytochrome Chromophore in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Thomas J.; Walker, Joseph M.; Noh, Bosl; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2006-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases (HOs) to form biliverdin IXα (BV) is the committed step in the biosynthesis of the phytochrome (phy) chromophore and thus essential for proper photomorphogenesis in plants. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains four possible HO genes (HY1, HO2–4). Genetic analysis of the HY1 locus showed previously that it is the major source of BV with hy1 mutant plants displaying long hypocotyls and decreased chlorophyll accumulation consistent with a substantial deficiency in photochemically active phys. More recent analysis of HO2 suggested that it also plays a role in phy assembly and photomorphogenesis but the ho2 mutant phenotype is more subtle than that of hy1 mutants. Here, we define the functions of HO3 and HO4 in Arabidopsis. Like HY1, the HO3 and HO4 proteins have the capacity to synthesize BV from heme. Through a phenotypic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants affecting HO3 and HO4 in combination with mutants affecting HY1 or HO2, we demonstrate that both of the encoded proteins also have roles in photomorphogenesis, especially in the absence of HY1. Disruption of HO3 and HO4 in the hy1 background further desensitizes seedlings to red and far-red light and accelerates flowering time, with the triple mutant strongly resembling seedlings deficient in the synthesis of multiple phy apoproteins. The hy1/ho3/ho4 mutant can be rescued phenotypically and for the accumulation of holo-phy by feeding seedlings BV. Taken together, we conclude that multiple members of the Arabidopsis HO family are important for synthesizing the bilin chromophore used to assemble photochemically active phys. PMID:16428602

  10. Crystal structure of the non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH in pentalenolactone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    You, Zheng; Omura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Haruo; Cane, David E; Jogl, Gerwald

    2007-12-14

    The non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH from the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis is a member of the iron(II)/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily and catalyzes an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone. To investigate the structural basis for substrate recognition and catalysis, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of PtlH in several complexes with the cofactors iron, alpha-ketoglutarate, and the non-reactive enantiomer of the substrate, ent-1-deoxypentalenic acid, in four different crystal forms to up to 1.31 A resolution. The overall structure of PtlH forms a double-stranded barrel helix fold, and the cofactor-binding site for iron and alpha-ketoglutarate is similar to other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Additional secondary structure elements that contribute to the substrate-binding site in PtlH are not conserved in other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Binding of the substrate enantiomer induces a reorganization of the monoclinic crystal lattice leading to a disorder-order transition of a C-terminal alpha-helix. The newly formed helix blocks the major access to the active site and effectively traps the bound substrate. Kinetic analysis of wild type and site-directed mutant proteins confirms a critical function of two arginine residues in substrate binding, while simulated docking of the enzymatic reaction product reveals the likely orientation of bound substrate.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Non-heme Iron Dixoygenase PtlH in Pentalenolactone Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    You,Z.; Omura, S.; Ikeda, H.; Cane, D.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    The non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH from the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis is a member of the iron(II)/{alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily and catalyzes an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone. To investigate the structural basis for substrate recognition and catalysis, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of PtlH in several complexes with the cofactors iron, a-ketoglutarate, and the non-reactive enantiomer of the substrate, ent-1-deoxypentalenic acid, in four different crystal forms to up to 1.31 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure of PtlH forms a double-stranded barrel helix fold, and the cofactor-binding site for iron and a-ketoglutarate is similar to other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Additional secondary structure elements that contribute to the substrate-binding site in PtlH are not conserved in other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Binding of the substrate enantiomer induces a reorganization of the monoclinic crystal lattice leading to a disorder-order transition of a C-terminal {alpha}-helix. The newly formed helix blocks the major access to the active site and effectively traps the bound substrate. Kinetic analysis of wild type and site-directed mutant proteins confirms a critical function of two arginine residues in substrate binding, while simulated docking of the enzymatic reaction product reveals the likely orientation of bound substrate.

  12. Protective effect of zinc on heme biosynthesis disturbances in rabbits after administration per os of tin.

    PubMed

    Chmielnicka, J; Zareba, G; Grabowska, U

    1992-12-01

    In the present study the lowest p.o. doses of tin affecting heme biosynthesis in rabbits were determined and the protective effect of zinc on these disorders was evaluated. The experiment was performed on female rabbits who received per os single doses of SnCl2 x 2 H2O (10, 100, and 200 mg Sn/kg) and ZnSO4 (50 mg Zn/kg s.c.). The activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) in the whole blood, free erythrocyte propoporhyrins, urine delta-aminolevulinic acid, and coproporphyrins (CP-U) were determined. In animals administered tin at a dose of 100 mg Sn/kg, ALA-D activity decreased by about 80% and two- to threefold increases in the ALA and CP concentrations in urine were observed. A protective effect of zinc with respect to ALA-D activity was noticed in both groups (100 and 200 mg Sn/kg) after combined administration of both metals. Results of an interaction between zinc and tin were also observed to reduce ALA levels in urine, whereas zinc did not protect against an effect of tin on CP excretion.

  13. A Heme Peroxidase with a Functional Role as an L-Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the Biosynthesis of Anthramycin

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Katherine L.; Colabroy, Keri L.; Gerratana, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report the first characterization and classification of Orf13 (S. refuineus) as a heme dependent peroxidase catalyzing the ortho-hydroxylation of l-tyrosine to l-DOPA. The putative tyrosine hydroxylase coded by orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthesis gene cluster has been expressed and purified. Heme b has been identified as the required cofactor for catalysis and maximal l-tyrosine conversion to l-DOPA is observed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Pre-incubation of l-tyrosine with Orf13 prior to the addition of hydrogen peroxide is required for l-DOPA production. However, the enzyme becomes inactivated by hydrogen peroxide during catalysis. Steady state kinetic analysis of l-tyrosine hydroxylation revealed similar catalytic efficiency for both l-tyrosine and hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic data from a reduced-CO (g) UV-visible spectrum of Orf13 and electron paramagnetic resonance of ferric-heme Orf13 are consistent with heme peroxidases that have a histidyl-ligated heme-iron. Contrary to the classical heme peroxidase oxidation reaction with hydrogen peroxide that produces coupled aromatic products such as o,o'-dityrosine, Orf13 is novel in its ability to catalyze aromatic amino acid hydroxylation with hydrogen peroxide, in the substrate addition order and for its substrate specificity for l-tyrosine. Peroxygenase activity of Orf13 for the ortho-hydroxylation of l-tyrosine to l-DOPA by a molecular oxygen dependent pathway in the presence of dihydroxyfumaric acid is also observed. This reaction behavior is consistent with peroxygenase activity reported with horseradish peroxidase for the hydroxylation of phenol. Overall, the putative function of Orf13 as a tyrosine hydroxylase has been confirmed and establishes the first bacterial class of tyrosine hydroxylases. PMID:21919439

  14. NirN Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Novel Electron-bifurcating Dehydrogenase Catalyzing the Last Step of Heme d1 Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Adamczack, Julia; Hoffmann, Martin; Papke, Ulrich; Haufschildt, Kristin; Nicke, Tristan; Bröring, Martin; Sezer, Murat; Weimar, Rebecca; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Hildebrandt, Peter; Layer, Gunhild

    2014-01-01

    Heme d1 plays an important role in denitrification as the essential cofactor of the cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase NirS. At present, the biosynthesis of heme d1 is only partially understood. The last step of heme d1 biosynthesis requires a so far unknown enzyme that catalyzes the introduction of a double bond into one of the propionate side chains of the tetrapyrrole yielding the corresponding acrylate side chain. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain lacking the NirN protein does not produce heme d1. Instead, the NirS purified from this strain contains the heme d1 precursor dihydro-heme d1 lacking the acrylic double bond, as indicated by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the dihydro-heme d1 was extracted from purified NirS and characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and finally identified by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Moreover, we show that purified NirN from P. aeruginosa binds the dihydro-heme d1 and catalyzes the introduction of the acrylic double bond in vitro. Strikingly, NirN uses an electron bifurcation mechanism for the two-electron oxidation reaction, during which one electron ends up on its heme c cofactor and the second electron reduces the substrate/product from the ferric to the ferrous state. On the basis of our results, we propose novel roles for the proteins NirN and NirF during the biosynthesis of heme d1. PMID:25204657

  15. Thiol Redox Sensitivity of Two Key Enzymes of Heme Biosynthesis and Pentose Phosphate Pathways: Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase and Transketolase

    PubMed Central

    Pedrajas, José Rafael; Padilla, C. Alicia; Bárcena, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Hem12p) and transketolase (Tkl1p) are key mediators of two critical processes within the cell, heme biosynthesis, and the nonoxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The redox properties of both Hem12p and Tkl1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated using proteomic techniques (SRM and label-free quantification) and biochemical assays in cell extracts and in vitro with recombinant proteins. The in vivo analysis revealed an increase in oxidized Cys-peptides in the absence of Grx2p, and also after treatment with H2O2 in the case of Tkl1p, without corresponding changes in total protein, demonstrating a true redox response. Out of three detectable Cys residues in Hem12p, only the conserved residue Cys52 could be modified by glutathione and efficiently deglutathionylated by Grx2p, suggesting a possible redox control mechanism for heme biosynthesis. On the other hand, Tkl1p activity was sensitive to thiol redox modification and although Cys622 could be glutathionylated to a limited extent, it was not a natural substrate of Grx2p. The human orthologues of both enzymes have been involved in certain cancers and possess Cys residues equivalent to those identified as redox sensitive in yeast. The possible implication for redox regulation in the context of tumour progression is put forward. PMID:23970950

  16. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on the Biosynthesis of Heme and Proteins: Potential Implications for the Partitioning of Glu-tRNAGlu between These Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Carolina; Levicán, Gloria; Ibba, Michael; Orellana, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA (Glu-tRNAGlu) is the common substrate for both protein translation and heme biosynthesis via the C5 pathway. Under normal conditions, an adequate supply of this aminoacyl-tRNA is available to both pathways. However, under certain circumstances, Glu-tRNAGlu can become scarce, resulting in competition between the two pathways for this aminoacyl-tRNA. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, glutamyl-tRNA synthetase 1 (GluRS1) is the main enzyme that synthesizes Glu-tRNAGlu. Previous studies have shown that GluRS1 is inactivated in vitro by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This raises the question as to whether H2O2 negatively affects in vivo GluRS1 activity in A. ferrooxidans and whether Glu-tRNAGlu distribution between the heme and protein biosynthesis processes may be affected by these conditions. To address this issue, we measured GluRS1 activity. We determined that GluRS1 is inactivated when cells are exposed to H2O2, with a concomitant reduction in intracellular heme level. The effects of H2O2 on the activity of purified glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), the key enzyme for heme biosynthesis, and on the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) were also measured. While exposing purified GluTR, the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis, to H2O2 resulted in its inactivation, the binding of glutamyl-tRNA to EF-Tu was not affected. Taken together, these data suggest that in A. ferrooxidans, the flow of glutamyl-tRNA is diverted from heme biosynthesis towards protein synthesis under oxidative stress conditions. PMID:25514408

  17. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on the biosynthesis of heme and proteins: potential implications for the partitioning of Glu-tRNA(Glu) between these pathways.

    PubMed

    Farah, Carolina; Levicán, Gloria; Ibba, Michael; Orellana, Omar

    2014-12-11

    Glutamyl-tRNA (Glu-tRNA(Glu)) is the common substrate for both protein translation and heme biosynthesis via the C5 pathway. Under normal conditions, an adequate supply of this aminoacyl-tRNA is available to both pathways. However, under certain circumstances, Glu-tRNA(Glu) can become scarce, resulting in competition between the two pathways for this aminoacyl-tRNA. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, glutamyl-tRNA synthetase 1 (GluRS1) is the main enzyme that synthesizes Glu-tRNA(Glu). Previous studies have shown that GluRS1 is inactivated in vitro by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This raises the question as to whether H2O2 negatively affects in vivo GluRS1 activity in A. ferrooxidans and whether Glu-tRNA(Glu) distribution between the heme and protein biosynthesis processes may be affected by these conditions. To address this issue, we measured GluRS1 activity. We determined that GluRS1 is inactivated when cells are exposed to H2O2, with a concomitant reduction in intracellular heme level. The effects of H2O2 on the activity of purified glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), the key enzyme for heme biosynthesis, and on the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) were also measured. While exposing purified GluTR, the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis, to H2O2 resulted in its inactivation, the binding of glutamyl-tRNA to EF-Tu was not affected. Taken together, these data suggest that in A. ferrooxidans, the flow of glutamyl-tRNA is diverted from heme biosynthesis towards protein synthesis under oxidative stress conditions.

  18. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-to-trans isomerization of the 15–15′ C=C bond in 9,15,9′-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the following biosynthetic pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand-switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large, hydrophobic compound in a membrane is unprecedented. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially utilizes a novel chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  19. Molecular Insights into Frataxin-Mediated Iron Supply for Heme Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Andreas; Blauenburg, Bastian; Miethke, Marcus; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is required as an element to sustain life in all eukaryotes and most bacteria. Although several bacterial iron acquisition strategies have been well explored, little is known about the intracellular trafficking pathways of iron and its entry into the systems for co-factor biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the iron-dependent process of heme maturation in Bacillus subtilis and present, for the first time, structural evidence for the physical interaction of a frataxin homologue (Fra), which is suggested to act as a regulatory component as well as an iron chaperone in different cellular pathways, and a ferrochelatase (HemH), which catalyses the final step of heme b biogenesis. Specific interaction between Fra and HemH was observed upon co-purification from crude cell lysates and, further, by using the recombinant proteins for analytical size-exclusion chromatography. Hydrogen–deuterium exchange experiments identified the landscape of the Fra/HemH interaction interface and revealed Fra as a specific ferrous iron donor for the ferrochelatase HemH. The functional utilisation of the in vitro-generated heme b co-factor upon Fra-mediated iron transfer was confirmed by using the B. subtilis nitric oxide synthase bsNos as a metabolic target enzyme. Complementary mutational analyses confirmed that Fra acts as an essential component for maturation and subsequent targeting of the heme b co-factor, hence representing a key player in the iron-dependent physiology of B. subtilis. PMID:25826316

  20. The Heme-Oxygenase Family Required for Phytochrome Chromophore Biosynthesis Is Necessary for Proper Photomorphogenesis in Higher Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Seth J.; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Durski, Adam M.; Walker, Joseph M.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    The committed step in the biosynthesis of the phytochrome chromophore phytochromobilin involves the oxidative cleavage of heme by a heme oxygenase (HO) to form biliverdin IXα. Through positional cloning of the photomorphogenic mutant hy1, the Arabidopsis HO (designated AtHO1) responsible for much of phytochromobilin synthesis recently was identified. Using the AtHO1 sequence, we identified families of HO genes in a number of plants that cluster into two subfamilies (HO1- and HO2-like). The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) yg-2 and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia pew1 photomorphogenic mutants are defective in specific HO genes. Phenotypic analysis of a T-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis HO2 revealed that the second HO subfamily also contributes to phytochromobilin synthesis. Homozygous ho2-1 plants show decreased chlorophyll accumulation, reduced growth rate, accelerated flowering time, and reduced de-etiolation. A mixture of apo- and holo-phyA was detected in etiolated ho2-1 seedlings, suggesting that phytochromobilin is limiting in this mutant, even in the presence of functional AtHO1. The patterns of Arabidopsis HO1 and HO2 expression suggest that the products of both genes overlap temporally and spatially. Taken together, the family of HOs is important for phytochrome-mediated development in a number of plants and that each family member may uniquely contribute to the phytochromobilin pool needed to assemble holo-phytochromes. PMID:11402195

  1. 5-AMINOLEVULINATE SYNTHASE: CATALYSIS OF THE FIRST STEP OF HEME BIOSYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, G. A.; Ferreira, G. C.

    2010-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase is a homodimeric pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the first step of the heme biosynthetic pathway in animals, fungi, and the α-subclass of the photosynthetic purple bacteria. The reaction cycle involves condensation of glycine with succinyl-coenzyme A to yield 5-aminolevulinate, carbon dioxide, and CoA. Mutations in the human erythroid-specific aminolevulinate synthase gene are associated with the erythropoietic disorder X-linked sideroblastic anemia. Recent kinetic and crystallographic data have facilitated an unprecedented understanding of how this important enzyme produces 5-aminolevulinate, and suggest possible directions for future research that may lead to treatments not only for X-linked sideroblastic anemia, but also other diseases. PMID:19268008

  2. Porphyrin-heme biosynthesis in organotypic cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Effects of heme and lead on porphyrin synthesis and peripheral myelin.

    PubMed Central

    Whetsell, W O; Sassa, S; Kappas, A

    1984-01-01

    Well-myelinated cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglia incubated for 48 h with sigma-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) showed intense porphyrin fluorescence localized in myelin sheaths but not in axons or neuronal somata. When the cultures were continuously incubated with a high concentration of lead, focal swelling and segmental degeneration of myelin began to develop within 2 wk. Incubation of cultures with ALA after 3 wk of lead treatment revealed markedly decreased porphyrin fluorescence in myelin sheaths compared with untreated controls. After 6 wk of lead treatment, myelin showed severe segmental degeneration. Porphyrin fluorescence from ALA at this time was barely detectable in these cultures. No fluorescence was visible in the demyelinated axons; however, silver-impregnation staining after fixation demonstrated continuity of the axon despite the severe loss of myelin. When cultures were continuously incubated with lead and heme together for 6 wk, the segmental demyelination seen in cultures treated with lead alone did not occur. These findings suggest that the lead-induced segmental demyelination in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia may be due to toxic effects of the metal on the heme biosynthetic pathway in myelinating cells and that exogenous heme may counteract this toxic effect of lead. Images PMID:6746908

  3. Heme content in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Determination of the physiological relevance of this inhibition requires a sensitive measurement which can distinguish regulatory free heme from heme which is an integral part of functional hemoproteins. A preliminary estimate was provided by reconstituting peroxidase activity from apo-peroxidase and the heme contained in broken plastids. However, subsequent experiments have suggested that this initial estimate was too large due to reconstitution of apo-peroxidase with heme from functional hemoproteins (i.e. heme stealing). The authors have now refined the measurement techniques to greatly reduce the extent of this heme stealing. Incubation of broken plastids with apo-peroxidase at 10C resolves the kinetics of reconstitution into two components. A fast component levels off after 100 min, and a slow component increases linearly for up to 6 hours. They believe that the heme which reconstitutes during the fast phase represents free heme, and the linear slow component represents heme stealing. In support of this theory, incubation at 15C increases the rate of both components. However, extrapolation to zero time of the slow components of the 10C and 15C time courses results in equivalent amounts of heme. Based on this kinetic differentiation between free heme and hemoprotein heme, chloroplasts isolated from cucumber cotyledons after 30 h of greening contain substantially greater amounts of free heme than etioplasts.

  4. Osmoregulation in marine mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Osmoregulation in marine mammals has been investigated for over a century; however, a review of recent advances in our understanding of water and electrolyte balance and of renal function in marine mammals is warranted. The following topics are discussed: (i) kidney structure and urine concentrating ability, (ii) sources of water, (iii) the effects of feeding, fasting and diving, (iv) the renal responses to infusions of varying salinity and (v) hormonal regulation. The kidneys of pinnipeds and cetaceans are reniculate in structure, unlike those of terrestrial mammals (except bears), but this difference does not confer any greater concentrating ability. Pinnipeds, cetaceans, manatees and sea otters can concentrate their urine above the concentration of sea water, but only pinnipeds and otters have been shown to produce urine concentrations of Na+ and Cl- that are similar to those in sea water. This could afford them the capacity to drink sea water and not lose fresh water. However, with few exceptions, drinking is not a common behavior in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Water balance is maintained in these animals via metabolic and dietary water, while incidental ingestion and dietary salt may help maintain electrolyte homeostasis. Unlike most other aquatic mammals, sea otters commonly drink sea water and manatees frequently drink fresh water. Among the various taxonomic groups of marine mammals, the sensitivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system appears to be influenced by the availability of Na+. The antidiuretic role of vasopressin remains inconclusive in marine mammals, while the natriuretic function of atrial natriuretic peptide has yet to be examined. Ideas on the direction of future studies are presented.

  5. Effect of lead (Pb) exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) with reference to heme biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Arun J; Bhagwat, Vinod R; Patil, Jyotsna A; Dongre, Nilima N; Ambekar, Jeevan G; Jailkhani, Rama; Das, Kusal K

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma of battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) who were occupationally exposed to lead (Pb) over a long period of time (about 15 years). This study was also aimed to determine the Pb intoxication resulted in a disturbance of heme biosynthesis in BMW group. The blood Pb level of BMW group (n = 28) was found to be in the range of 25.8 - 78.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 53.63 + 16.98) whereas in Pb unexposed control group (n = 35) the range was 2.8 - 22.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 12.52 + 4.08). The blood level (Pb-B) and urinary lead level (Pb-U) were significantly increased in BMW group as compared to unexposed control. Though activated d- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activities in BMW group did not show any significant change when compared to control group but activated / non activated erythrocyte - ALAD activities in BMW group showed a significant increase. Erythrocyte- zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), urinary daminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) and porphobilinogen (PBG-U) of BMW groups elevated significantly as compared to control. A positive correlation (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) between Pb-B and ALA-U were found in BMW group but no such significant correlation (r = 0.02, p> 1.0) were observed in control group. Hematological study revealed a significant decrease of hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (%) and other blood indices and a significant increase of total leucocytes count in BMW group in comparison to control group. The serum MDA content was significantly increased (p < 0.001) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as erythrocyte- SOD (p < 0.001) and erythrocytecatalase (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced in BMW group as compared to control group. A positive correlation (r = 0.45, p < 0.02) between Pb-B and serum MDA level was observed in BMW group (Pb-B range 25.8 - 78.0 microg / d

  6. Functional differentiation of two analogous coproporphyrinogen III oxidases for heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis pathways in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeaki; Aoki, Rina; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2010-04-01

    Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPO) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of coproporphyrinogen III to form protoporphyrinogen IX in heme biosynthesis and is shared in chlorophyll biosynthesis in photosynthetic organisms. There are two analogous CPOs, oxygen-dependent (HemF) and oxygen-independent (HemN) CPOs, in various organisms. Little information on cyanobacterial CPOs has been available to date. In the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there is one hemF-like gene, sll1185, and two hemN-like genes, sll1876 and sll1917. The three genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sll1185 showed CPO activity under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. While Sll1876 and Sll1917 showed absorbance spectra indicative of Fe-S proteins, only Sll1876 showed CPO activity under anaerobic conditions. Three mutants lacking one of these genes were isolated. The Deltasll1185 mutant failed to grow under aerobic conditions, with accumulation of coproporphyrin III. This growth defect was restored by cultivation under micro-oxic conditions. The growth of the Deltasll1876 mutant was significantly slower than that of the wild type under micro-oxic conditions, while it grew normally under aerobic conditions. Coproporphyrin III was accumulated at a low but significant level in the Deltasll1876 mutant grown under micro-oxic conditions. There was no detectable phenotype in Deltasll1917 under the conditions we examined. These results suggested that sll1185 encodes HemF as the sole CPO under aerobic conditions and that sll1876 encodes HemN operating under micro-oxic conditions, together with HemF. Such a differential operation of CPOs would ensure the stable supply of tetrapyrrole pigments under environments where oxygen levels fluctuate greatly.

  7. Glutaredoxin 5 deficiency causes sideroblastic anemia by specifically impairing heme biosynthesis and depleting cytosolic iron in human erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hong; Jeong, Suh Young; Ghosh, Manik C.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Silvestri, Laura; Ortillo, Danilo; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John; Camaschella, Clara; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) deficiency has previously been identified as a cause of anemia in a zebrafish model and of sideroblastic anemia in a human patient. Here we report that GLRX5 is essential for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and the maintenance of normal mitochondrial and cytosolic iron homeostasis in human cells. GLRX5, a mitochondrial protein that is highly expressed in erythroid cells, can homodimerize and assemble [2Fe-2S] in vitro. In GLRX5-deficient cells, [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis was impaired, the iron-responsive element–binding (IRE-binding) activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was activated, and increased IRP2 levels, indicative of relative cytosolic iron depletion, were observed together with mitochondrial iron overload. Rescue of patient fibroblasts with the WT GLRX5 gene by transfection or viral transduction reversed a slow growth phenotype, reversed the mitochondrial iron overload, and increased aconitase activity. Decreased aminolevulinate δ, synthase 2 (ALAS2) levels attributable to IRP-mediated translational repression were observed in erythroid cells in which GLRX5 expression had been downregulated using siRNA along with marked reduction in ferrochelatase levels and increased ferroportin expression. Erythroblasts express both IRP-repressible ALAS2 and non-IRP–repressible ferroportin 1b. The unique combination of IRP targets likely accounts for the tissue-specific phenotype of human GLRX5 deficiency. PMID:20364084

  8. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  9. A trilogy on. delta. -aminolevulinic acid biosynthesis in plants and algae: I. Glutamate is the sole precursor to protoheme and heme a in maize. II. The UUC glutamate anticodon is a general feature of the tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis. III. Protein and ALA biosynthesis use the same tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Schneegurt, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Specifically radiolabeled substrates can be used to determine whether the heme and chlorophyll precursor {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is synthesized via the fife-carbon pathway (incorporation from L-1-({sup 14}C)glutamate) or ALA synthase (incorporation from 2-({sup 14}C)glycine). In etiolated maize epicotyl sections, highly purified total cellular protoheme was labeled 29.7 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Mitochondrial heme {alpha} was labeled 4.1 times more effectively by glutamate than by glycine. Cell-free plant and algal preparations require tRNA for the enzymatic conversion of glutamate to ALA. The tRNA required for ALA biosynthesis ahs been shown to contain the UUC glutamate anticodon, as determined by its specific retention through anticodon:anticodon interactions by tRNA{sup Phe(GAA)}-acrylamide. A fraction that was highly enriched in the RNA which supported ALA formation was obtained by affinity chromatography of RNA extracts from Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena garcilis, Cyanidium caldarium, Synechocystis, sp. PCC 6803, pea, and spinach. Other glutamate-accepting RNAs that were not retained by the affinity column were ineffective in supporting ALA formation.

  10. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  11. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  12. The role of sulfur in osmoregulation and salinity tolerance in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yopp, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are involved in osmoregulation and salinity tolerance in some cyanobacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes. Glycinebetaine, the osmolyte of the halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica, requires the sulfonium compound. S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) for its synthesis. Glutamate is the nitrogen source, SAM is the methyl carbon and serine the carbon backbone source of this unique osmolyte. Inhibitor studies suggest that photorespiration interacts with sulfur metabolism to control betaine synthesis in cyanobacteria. The limiting factor for SAM synthesis is formate from photorespiration. SAM is, in turn, the methyl donor for betaine synthesis from serine. The nitrogen component of serine is from glutamate. Betaine synthesis is hypothesized to be regulated via potassium. The biosynthesis of dimethyl-B-propiothetin (DMPT, which is the same as beta-dimethyl sulfonioprpionate) and diacylsulfoquinovosylglycerol were elucidated as having their roles in osmoregulation and salinity tolerance. The relation between these sulfolipids and the sulfur cycle was discussed.

  13. Osmoregulation in a parasitic nematode, Setaria cervi.

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Sharma, S

    1984-03-01

    Studies on osmotic and ionic regulation in Setaria cervi indicate that it can osmoregulate in hypertonic solutions but not in hypotonic solutions. The depression of the freezing point (delta degrees C) of host's peritoneal fluid was -0.71 degrees C.

  14. Presence and formation of heme and occurrence of certain heme proteins in the filarial parasite Setaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R A; Raj, R K

    1998-12-09

    There is currently renewed interest in the biological significance of heme proteins. The most common heme proteins include hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and redox enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase. Setaria digitata is a cattle filarial parasite, which is devoid of typical cytochrome systems. However, studies showed activities of delta Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), delta Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD), and heme oxygenase in appreciable amounts, suggesting the presence of necessary equipment for the biosynthesis of heme. This is further confirmed by the end product inhibition of ALAS by heme and the observation of the death of the parasite by succinyl acetone, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of heme. Though typical cytochrome systems are absent, microsomal cytochrome P 450 and elevated levels of heme containing enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase are present in the parasite. A unique hemoglobin is also detected which shows a difference in biological functions from the host system and that of the much-studied nematode parasite Ascaris sum.

  15. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number of transporters of heme and heme synthesis intermediates have been described. Here we review aspects of heme metabolism and discuss our current understanding of heme transporters, with emphasis on the function of the cell-surface heme exporter, FLVCR. Knockdown of Flvcr in mice leads to both defective erythropoiesis and disturbed systemic iron homeostasis, underscoring the critical role of heme transporters in mammalian physiology. PMID:21238504

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of a higher plant heme oxygenase isoform-1 from Glycine max (soybean)--coordination structure of the heme complex and catabolism of heme.

    PubMed

    Gohya, Tomohiko; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T

    2006-12-01

    Heme oxygenase converts heme into biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In plants, as well as in cyanobacteria, heme oxygenase plays a particular role in the biosynthesis of photoreceptive pigments, such as phytochromobilins and phycobilins, supplying biliverdin IX(alpha) as a direct synthetic resource. In this study, a higher plant heme oxygenase, GmHO-1, of Glycine max (soybean), was prepared to evaluate the molecular features of its heme complex, the enzymatic activity, and the mechanism of heme conversion. The similarity in the amino acid sequence between GmHO-1 and heme oxygenases from other biological species is low, and GmHO-1 binds heme with 1 : 1 stoichiometry at His30; this position does not correspond to the proximal histidine of other heme oxygenases in their sequence alignments. The heme bound to GmHO-1, in the ferric high-spin state, exhibits an acid-base transition and is converted to biliverdin IX(alpha) in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, or ascorbate. During the heme conversion, an intermediate with an absorption maximum different from that of typical verdoheme-heme oxygenase or CO-verdoheme-heme oxygenase complexes was observed and was extracted as a bis-imidazole complex; it was identified as verdoheme. A myoglobin mutant, H64L, with high CO affinity trapped CO produced during the heme degradation. Thus, the mechanism of heme degradation by GmHO-1 appears to be similar to that of known heme oxygenases, despite the low sequence homology. The heme conversion by GmHO-1 is as fast as that by SynHO-1 in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, thereby suggesting that the latter is the physiologic electron-donating system.

  17. Osmoregulation in the parasitic nematode Pseudoterranova decipiens.

    PubMed

    Fusé, M; Davey, K G; Sommerville, R I

    1993-02-01

    When subjected to hyper- or hypo-osmotic stress at 5 degrees C for 24 h, third-stage larvae of the parasitic nematode Pseudoterranova decipiens do not exhibit changes in mass or in the osmotic pressure of the pseudocoelomic fluid. Immersion in solutions containing 3H2O demonstrates that exchange with the water in the pseudocoelomic fluid is substantially complete within 24 h. Sacs composed of cylinders of body wall without the intestine and pseudocoelomic fluid do not gain weight when immersed for 24 h in hypotonic medium. Metabolic poisons abolish the ability of whole worms and sacs to maintain their weight when immersed in hypotonic media. These observations support the conclusion that the nematode is capable of at least short-term osmoregulation and that the site of osmoregulation is the body wall. The observations that more fluid is passed from the anus in some hypo-osmotically stressed worms and that worms ligatured at the tail exhibit a small increase in mass when exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions may indicate that the intestine plays a minor and subsidiary role in osmoregulation.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  19. Renal Failure Affects the Enzymatic Activities of the Three First Steps in Hepatic Heme Biosynthesis in the Acute Intermittent Porphyria Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Unzu, Carmen; Sampedro, Ana; Sardh, Eliane; Mauleón, Itsaso; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a long-term complication in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The pathophysiological significance of hepatic overproduction of the porphyrin precursors aminolevulinate acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in chronic kidney disease is unclear. We have investigated the effect of repetitive acute attacks on renal function and the effect of total or five-sixth nephrectomy causing renal insufficiency on hepatic heme synthesis in the porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD)-deficient (AIP) mouse. Phenobarbital challenge in the AIP-mice increased urinary porphyrin precursor excretion. Successive attacks throughout 14 weeks led to minor renal lesions with no impact on renal function. In the liver of wild type and AIP mice, 5/6 nephrectomy enhanced transcription of the first and rate-limiting ALA synthase. As a consequence, urinary PBG excretion increased in AIP mice. The PBG/ALA ratio increased from 1 in sham operated AIP animals to over 5 (males) and over 13 (females) in the 5/6 nephrectomized mice. Total nephrectomy caused a rapid decrease in PBGD activity without changes in enzyme protein level in the AIP mice but not in the wild type animals. In conclusion, high concentration of porphyrin precursors had little impact on renal function. However, progressive renal insufficiency aggravates porphyria attacks and increases the PBG/ALA ratio, which should be considered a warning sign for potentially life-threatening impairment in AIP patients with signs of renal failure. PMID:22412963

  20. Identification of the Mitochondrial Heme Metabolism Complex

    PubMed Central

    Medlock, Amy E.; Shiferaw, Mesafint T.; Marcero, Jason R.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Phillips, John D.; Dailey, Harry A.

    2015-01-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor for most organisms and all metazoans. While the individual enzymes involved in synthesis and utilization of heme are fairly well known, less is known about the intracellular trafficking of porphyrins and heme, or regulation of heme biosynthesis via protein complexes. To better understand this process we have undertaken a study of macromolecular assemblies associated with heme synthesis. Herein we have utilized mass spectrometry with coimmunoprecipitation of tagged enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway in a developing erythroid cell culture model to identify putative protein partners. The validity of these data obtained in the tagged protein system is confirmed by normal porphyrin/heme production by the engineered cells. Data obtained are consistent with the presence of a mitochondrial heme metabolism complex which minimally consists of ferrochelatase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase and aminolevulinic acid synthase-2. Additional proteins involved in iron and intermediary metabolism as well as mitochondrial transporters were identified as potential partners in this complex. The data are consistent with the known location of protein components and support a model of transient protein-protein interactions within a dynamic protein complex. PMID:26287972

  1. Transmutation of a heme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, P D; Ferrer, J C; Mylrajan, M; Loehr, T M; Feng, R; Konishi, Y; Funk, W D; MacGillivray, R T; Mauk, A G

    1993-01-01

    Residue Asn57 of bovine liver cytochrome b5 has been replaced with a cysteine residue, and the resulting variant has been isolated from recombinant Escherichia coli as a mixture of four major species: A, BI, BII, and C. A combination of electronic spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry, and direct electrochemistry has been used to characterize these four major cytochrome derivatives. The red form A (E(m) = -19 mV) is found to possess a heme group bound covalently through a thioether linkage involving Cys57 and the alpha carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BI has a covalently bound heme group coupled through a thioether linkage involving the beta carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BII is similar to BI except that the sulfur involved in the thioether linkage is oxidized to a sulfoxide. The green form C (E(m) = 175 mV) possesses a noncovalently bound prosthetic group with spectroscopic properties characteristic of a chlorin. A mechanism is proposed for the generation of these derivatives, and the implications of these observations for the biosynthesis of cytochrome c and naturally occurring chlorin prosthetic groups are discussed. PMID:8341666

  2. Transmutation of a heme protein.

    PubMed

    Barker, P D; Ferrer, J C; Mylrajan, M; Loehr, T M; Feng, R; Konishi, Y; Funk, W D; MacGillivray, R T; Mauk, A G

    1993-07-15

    Residue Asn57 of bovine liver cytochrome b5 has been replaced with a cysteine residue, and the resulting variant has been isolated from recombinant Escherichia coli as a mixture of four major species: A, BI, BII, and C. A combination of electronic spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry, and direct electrochemistry has been used to characterize these four major cytochrome derivatives. The red form A (E(m) = -19 mV) is found to possess a heme group bound covalently through a thioether linkage involving Cys57 and the alpha carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BI has a covalently bound heme group coupled through a thioether linkage involving the beta carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BII is similar to BI except that the sulfur involved in the thioether linkage is oxidized to a sulfoxide. The green form C (E(m) = 175 mV) possesses a noncovalently bound prosthetic group with spectroscopic properties characteristic of a chlorin. A mechanism is proposed for the generation of these derivatives, and the implications of these observations for the biosynthesis of cytochrome c and naturally occurring chlorin prosthetic groups are discussed.

  3. Lessons from bloodless worms: heme homeostasis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jason; Hamza, Iqbal

    2015-06-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor for proteins involved in diverse biological processes such as oxygen transport, electron transport, and microRNA processing. Free heme is hydrophobic and cytotoxic, implying that specific trafficking pathways must exist for the delivery of heme to target hemoproteins which reside in various subcellular locales. Although heme biosynthesis and catabolism have been well characterized, the pathways for trafficking heme within and between cells remain poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans serves as a unique animal model for uncovering these pathways because, unlike vertebrates, the worm lacks enzymes to synthesize heme and therefore is crucially dependent on dietary heme for sustenance. Using C. elegans as a genetic animal model, several novel heme trafficking molecules have been identified. Importantly, these proteins have corresponding homologs in vertebrates underscoring the power of using C. elegans, a bloodless worm, in elucidating pathways in heme homeostasis and hematology in humans. Since iron deficiency and anemia are often exacerbated by parasites such as helminths and protozoa which also rely on host heme for survival, C. elegans will be an ideal model to identify anti-parasitic drugs that target heme transport pathways unique to the parasite.

  4. Osmosensing and osmoregulation in unicellular eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Suescún-Bolívar, Luis Parmenio; Thomé, Patricia Elena

    2015-03-01

    Eukaryotic microorganisms possess mechanisms to detect osmotic variations in their surroundings, from specialized receptors and membrane transporters, to sophisticated systems such as two-component histidine kinases. Osmotic stimuli are transduced through conserved phosphorylation cascades that result in a rapid response to mitigate stress. This response allows for the maintenance of an optimal biochemical environment for cell functioning, as well as a suitable recovery in suboptimal environments that would otherwise endanger cell survival. The molecular basis of these responses has been largely studied in yeasts and bacteria. However, fewer studies have been published concerning the molecular basis of osmoregulation in other eukaryotic microorganisms such as protozoans and microalgae. Here, we review the main osmosensors reported in unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms (yeasts, microalgae and protozoa) and the pathways that maintain homeostasis in cells encountering hyperosmotic challenges.

  5. Hypothalamic adipic hypernatraemia syndrome with normal osmoregulation of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    López-Capapé, Marta; Golmayo, Luz; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Gallego, Nieves; Barrio, Raquel

    2004-10-01

    Adipsic hypernatraemia is an uncommon disorder in childhood caused by a defect in the osmoregulation of thirst, leading to impairment of water homeostasis and chronic hyperosmolality of body fluids. Adipsia is often associated with an abnormality in osmoregulated vasopressin secretion due to the close proximity of the hypothalamic osmoreceptors that control thirst with those regulating vasopressin secretion. Hypothalamic lesions of diverse aetiology (vascular abnormalities, neoplasms, granulomatous diseases, trauma etc.) have been described in this syndrome. We report a 12-year-old boy with evident weight loss due to hypernatraemic dehydration with a selective defect in osmoregulation of thirst and normal vasopressin secretion with no demonstrable structural lesion. To date, only six paediatric patients with this condition have been described in the literature. Hypothalamic adipsic hypernatraemia syndrome must be suspected when a dehydrated patient denies thirst. The study of antidiuretic function is necessary because the osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion could be altered.

  6. Heme exporter FLVCR1a regulates heme synthesis and degradation and controls activity of cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular hijacking of siroheme for the synthesis of heme and d1 heme.

    PubMed

    Bali, Shilpa; Lawrence, Andrew D; Lobo, Susana A; Saraiva, Lígia M; Golding, Bernard T; Palmer, David J; Howard, Mark J; Ferguson, Stuart J; Warren, Martin J

    2011-11-08

    Modified tetrapyrroles such as chlorophyll, heme, siroheme, vitamin B(12), coenzyme F(430), and heme d(1) underpin a wide range of essential biological functions in all domains of life, and it is therefore surprising that the syntheses of many of these life pigments remain poorly understood. It is known that the construction of the central molecular framework of modified tetrapyrroles is mediated via a common, core pathway. Herein a further branch of the modified tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway is described in denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as the Archaea. This process entails the hijacking of siroheme, the prosthetic group of sulfite and nitrite reductase, and its processing into heme and d(1) heme. The initial step in these transformations involves the decarboxylation of siroheme to give didecarboxysiroheme. For d(1) heme synthesis this intermediate has to undergo the replacement of two propionate side chains with oxygen functionalities and the introduction of a double bond into a further peripheral side chain. For heme synthesis didecarboxysiroheme is converted into Fe-coproporphyrin by oxidative loss of two acetic acid side chains. Fe-coproporphyrin is then transformed into heme by the oxidative decarboxylation of two propionate side chains. The mechanisms of these reactions are discussed and the evolutionary significance of another role for siroheme is examined.

  8. Substantia nigra osmoregulation: taurine and ATP involvement.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ingrid; Dopico, Jose G; Sabate, Magdalena; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Tomas; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2007-05-01

    An extracellular nonsynaptic taurine pool of glial origin was recently reported in the substantia nigra (SN). There is previous evidence showing taurine as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the SN, but the physiological role of this nonsynaptic pool of taurine has not been explored. By using microdialysis methods, we studied the action of local osmolarity on the nonsynaptic taurine pool in the SN of the rat. Hypoosmolar pulses (285-80 mosM) administered in the SN by the microdialysis probe increased extrasynaptic taurine in a dose-dependent way, a response that was counteracted by compensating osmolarity with choline. The opposite effect (taurine decrease) was observed when osmolarity was increased. Under basal conditions, the blockade of either the AMPA-kainate glutamate receptors with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dionine disodium or the purinergic receptors with pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid modified the taurine concentration, suggesting that both receptors modulate the extrasynaptic pool of taurine. In addition, these drugs decreased the taurine response to hypoosmolar pulses, suggesting roles for glutamatergic and purinergic receptors in the taurine response to osmolarity. The participation of purinergic receptors was also supported by the fact that ATP (which, under basal conditions, increased the extrasynaptic taurine in a dose-dependent way) administered in doses saturating purinergic receptors also decreased the taurine response to hypoosmolarity. Taken together, present data suggest osmoregulation as a role of the nonsynaptic taurine pool of the SN, a function that also involves glutamate and ATP and that could influence the nigral cell vulnerability in Parkinson's disease.

  9. Heme Uptake by Leishmania amazonensis Is Mediated by the Transmembrane Protein LHR1

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Chau; Yuan, Xiaojing; Miguel, Danilo C.; Renberg, Rebecca L.; Protchenko, Olga; Philpott, Caroline C.; Hamza, Iqbal; Andrews, Norma W.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatid protozoan parasites lack a functional heme biosynthetic pathway, so must acquire heme from the environment to survive. However, the molecular pathway responsible for heme acquisition by these organisms is unknown. Here we show that L. amazonensis LHR1, a homolog of the C. elegans plasma membrane heme transporter HRG-4, functions in heme transport. Tagged LHR1 localized to the plasma membrane and to endocytic compartments, in both L. amazonensis and mammalian cells. Heme deprivation in L. amazonensis increased LHR1 transcript levels, promoted uptake of the fluorescent heme analog ZnMP, and increased the total intracellular heme content of promastigotes. Conversely, deletion of one LHR1 allele reduced ZnMP uptake and the intracellular heme pool by approximately 50%, indicating that LHR1 is a major heme importer in L. amazonensis. Viable parasites with correct replacement of both LHR1 alleles could not be obtained despite extensive attempts, suggesting that this gene is essential for the survival of promastigotes. Notably, LHR1 expression allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae to import heme from the environment, and rescued growth of a strain deficient in heme biosynthesis. Syntenic genes with high sequence identity to LHR1 are present in the genomes of several species of Leishmania and also Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, indicating that therapeutic agents targeting this transporter could be effective against a broad group of trypanosomatid parasites that cause serious human disease. PMID:22807677

  10. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans synthesis gene family of Shigella flexneri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) of foodborne enteropathogen Shigella flexneri were characterized. OPGs were composed of 100 percent glucose with 2-linked glucose as the most abundant residue with terminal glucose, 2-linked and 2,6-linked glucose also present in high quantities. Most dominan...

  11. Role of Heme and Heme-Proteins in Trypanosomatid Essential Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Karina E. J.; Menendez Bravo, Simón M.; Cricco, Julia A.

    2011-01-01

    Around the world, trypanosomatids are known for being etiological agents of several highly disabling and often fatal diseases like Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi), leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp.), and African trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma brucei). Throughout their life cycle, they must cope with diverse environmental conditions, and the mechanisms involved in these processes are crucial for their survival. In this review, we describe the role of heme in several essential metabolic pathways of these protozoans. Notwithstanding trypanosomatids lack of the complete heme biosynthetic pathway, we focus our discussion in the metabolic role played for important heme-proteins, like cytochromes. Although several genes for different types of cytochromes, involved in mitochondrial respiration, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and sterol biosynthesis, are annotated at the Tritryp Genome Project, the encoded proteins have not yet been deeply studied. We pointed our attention into relevant aspects of these protein functions that are amenable to be considered for rational design of trypanocidal agents. PMID:21603276

  12. Convergent Evolution of the Osmoregulation System in Decapod Shrimps.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Chengzhang; Duan, Hu; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-02-01

    In adaptating to different aquatic environments, seawater (SW) and freshwater (FW) shrimps have exploited different adaptation strategies, which should generate clusters of genes with different adaptive features. However, little is known about the genetic basis of these physiological adaptations. Thus, in this study, we performed comparative transcriptomics and adaptive evolution analyses on SW and FW shrimps and found that convergent evolution may have happened on osmoregulation system of shrimps. We identified 275 and 234 positively selected genes in SW and FW shrimps, respectively, which enriched in the functions of ion-binding and membrane-bounded organelles. Among them, five (CaCC, BEST2, GPDH, NKA, and Integrin) and four (RasGAP, RhoGDI, CNK3, and ODC) osmoregulation-related genes were detected in SW and FW shrimps, respectively. All five genes in SW shrimps have been reported to have positive effects on ion transportation, whereas RasGAP and RhoGDI in FW shrimps are associated with negative control of ion transportation, and CNK3 and ODC play central roles in cation homeostasis. Besides, the phylogenetic tree reconstructed from the positively selected sites separated the SW and FW shrimps into two groups. Distinct subsets of parallel substitutions also have been found in these osmoregulation-related genes in SW and FW shrimps. Therefore, our results suggest that distinct convergent evolution may have occurred in the osmoregulation systems of SW and FW shrimps. Furthermore, positive selection of osmoregulation-related genes may be beneficial for the regulation of water and salt balance in decapod shrimps.

  13. The lipoprotein components of the Isd and Hts transport systems are dispensable for acquisition of heme by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wright, John A; Nair, Sean P

    2012-04-01

    Heme is a key molecule for Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in many aspects of oxidative metabolism. Crucially, heme is required for the activity of cytochromes of the electron transport chain. Staphylococcus aureus is able to obtain heme either through biosynthesis or through acquisition from the host. Clinically persistent 'small colony variant' (SCV) forms of S. aureus are frequently deficient for heme biosynthesis, and disruption of the hemB gene produces stable heme-auxotrophic strains that reproduce many SCV phenotypes. We sought to address the role of heme transport in SCVs by deleting components of the two described heme import systems, the iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) and heme transport system (Hts) in wild-type S. aureus and hemB mutant backgrounds. Analysis of the growth of S. aureus hemB strains either singly or doubly deficient in isdE and htsA in the presence and absence of heme or hemoglobin revealed that S. aureus is able to obtain exogenous heme in the absence of these transporter components. These data suggest the presence of additional, as yet unidentified transporter components that enable S. aureus to internalize exogenous heme and contradict the proposed model that IsdE can transfer heme to the HtsBC permease. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heme Deficiency in Alzheimer's Disease: A Possible Connection to Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Barney E.; Stone, Meghan L.; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms that cause Alzheimer's disease (AD), an invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease, are unknown. Important recent data indicate that neuronal heme deficiency may contribute to AD pathogenesis. If true, factors that contribute to the intracellular heme deficiency could potentially alter the course of AD. The porphyrias are metabolic disorders characterized by enzyme deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. We hypothesize that AD may differ significantly in individuals possessing the genetic trait for an acute hepatic porphyria. We elaborate on this hypothesis and briefly review the characteristics of the acute hepatic porphyrias that may be relevant to AD. We note the proximity of genes encoding enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway to genetic loci linked to sporadic, late-onset AD. In addition, we suggest that identification of individuals carrying the genetic trait for acute porphyria may provide a unique resource for investigating AD pathogenesis and inform treatment and management decisions. PMID:17047301

  15. Processing of heme and heme-containing proteins by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stojiljkovic, Igor; Perkins-Balding, Donna

    2002-04-01

    An extensive amount of new knowledge on bacterial systems involved in heme processing has been accumulated in the last 10 years. We discuss common themes in heme transport across bacterial outer and inner membranes, emphasizing proteins and mechanisms involved. The processing of heme in the bacterial cytoplasm is extensively covered, and a new hypothesis about the fate of heme in the bacterial cell is presented. Auxiliary genes involved in heme utilization, i.e., TonB, proteases, proteins involved in heme storage and pigmentation, as well as genes involved in regulation of heme assimilation are reviewed.

  16. Extracellular Heme Peroxidases in Actinomycetes: a Case of Mistaken Identity

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Maria G.; Ball, Andrew S.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Nicholls, Peter; Wilson, Michael T.

    2001-01-01

    Actinomycetes secrete into their surroundings a suite of enzymes involved in the biodegradation of plant lignocellulose; these have been reported to include both hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including peroxidases. Reports of secreted peroxidases have been based upon observations of peroxidase-like activity associated with fractions that exhibit optical spectra reminiscent of heme peroxidases, such as the lignin peroxidases of wood-rotting fungi. Here we show that the appearance of the secreted pseudoperoxidase of the thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora fusca BD25 is also associated with the appearance of a heme-like spectrum. The species responsible for this spectrum is a metalloporphyrin; however, we show that this metalloporphyrin is not heme but zinc coproporphyrin. The same porphyrin was found in the growth medium of the actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. We therefore propose that earlier reports of heme peroxidases secreted by actinomycetes were due to the incorrect assignment of optical spectra to heme groups rather than to non-iron-containing porphyrins and that lignin-degrading heme peroxidases are not secreted by actinomycetes. The porphyrin, an excretory product, is degraded during peroxidase assays. The low levels of secreted peroxidase activity are associated with a nonheme protein fraction previously shown to contain copper. We suggest that the role of the secreted copper-containing protein may be to bind and detoxify metals that can cause inhibition of heme biosynthesis and thus stimulate porphyrin excretion. PMID:11571150

  17. Ontogeny of osmoregulation in postembryonic fish: a review.

    PubMed

    Varsamos, Stamatis; Nebel, Catherine; Charmantier, Guy

    2005-08-01

    Salinity and its variations are among the key factors that affect survival, metabolism and distribution during the fish development. The successful establishment of a fish species in a given habitat depends on the ability of each developmental stage to cope with salinity through osmoregulation. It is well established that adult teleosts maintain their blood osmolality close to 300 mosM kg(-1) due to ion and water regulation effected at several sites: tegument, gut, branchial chambers, urinary organs. But fewer data are available in developing fish. We propose a review on the ontogeny of osmoregulation based on studies conducted in different species. Most teleost prelarvae are able to osmoregulate at hatch, and their ability increases in later stages. Before the occurrence of gills, the prelarval tegument where a high density of ionocytes (displaying high contents of Na+/K+-ATPase) is located appears temporarily as the main osmoregulatory site. Gills develop gradually during the prelarval stage along with the numerous ionocytes they support. The tegument and gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity varies ontogenetically. During the larval phase, the osmoregulatory function shifts from the skin to the gills, which become the main osmoregulatory site. The drinking rate normalized to body weight tends to decrease throughout development. The kidney and urinary bladder develop progressively during ontogeny and the capacity to produce hypotonic urine at low salinity increases accordingly. The development of the osmoregulatory functions is hormonally controlled. These events are inter-related and are correlated with changes in salinity tolerance, which often increases markedly at the metamorphic transition from larva to juvenile. In summary, the ability of ontogenetical stages of fish to tolerate salinity through osmoregulation relies on integumental ionocytes, then digestive tract development and drinking rate, developing branchial chambers and urinary organs. The physiological

  18. Improvement of heme oxygenase-1-based heme sensor for quantifying free heme in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Taira, Junichi; Nakashima, Yukinori; Yoshihara, Shun; Koga, Shinya; Sueda, Shinji; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Toru; Tanioka, Nohito; Shimizu, Hiroko; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-15

    We recently reported a novel heme sensor using fluorescently labeled heme oxygenase-1; however, its inherent enzyme activity would be a potential obstacle in quantifying heme in biological samples. Here, we found that mutation of the catalytically important residue, Asp140, with histidine in the sensor not only diminished the heme degradation activity but also increased heme binding affinity. The sensor with a visible fluorophore was also found to be beneficial to avoid background emission from endogenous substance in biological samples. By using the improved heme sensor, we succeeded in quantifying free heme in rat hepatic samples for the first time.

  19. Processing of microRNA primary transcripts requires heme in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Sara H; Gong, Ming; Barr, Ian; Weiss, Shimon; Guo, Feng

    2014-02-04

    DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) is the RNA-binding partner protein of the nuclease Drosha. DGCR8 and Drosha recognize and cleave primary transcripts of microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the maturation of canonical microRNAs (miRNAs) in animals. We previously reported that human, frog, and starfish DGCR8 bind heme when expressed in Escherichia coli and that Fe(III) heme activates apoDGCR8 in reconstituted pri-miRNA processing assays. However, the physiological relevance of heme in miRNA maturation has not been clear. Here, we present a live-cell pri-miRNA processing assay that produces robust signals and faithfully indicates DGCR8 and Drosha activities. We demonstrate that all known heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants are defective in pri-miRNA processing in HeLa cells. DGCR8 contains a previously uncharacterized heme-binding motif, "IPCL," that is also required for its activity. Heme availability and biosynthesis in HeLa cells positively affect pri-miRNA processing and production of mature miRNA. These results establish an essential function for heme in pri-miRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our study suggests that abnormal heme biosynthesis and degradation may contribute to diseases via miRNA-mediated gene regulation networks.

  20. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yien, Yvette Y.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Schultz, Iman J.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E.; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Pierce, Eric L.; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A.; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D.; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Alan B.; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M.; Dailey, Harry A.; Phillips, John D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paw, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias. PMID:25157825

  1. Mitochondrial Atpif1 regulates heme synthesis in developing erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhvanit I.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Li, Liangtao; Schultz, Iman J.; Pierce, Eric L.; Narla, Anupama; Seguin, Alexandra; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Medlock, Amy E.; Langer, Nathaniel B.; Dailey, Tamara A.; Hurst, Slater N.; Faccenda, Danilo; Wiwczar, Jessica M.; Heggers, Spencer K.; Vogin, Guillaume; Chen, Wen; Chen, Caiyong; Campagna, Dean R.; Brugnara, Carlo; Zhou, Yi; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Danial, Nika N.; Fleming, Mark D.; Ward, Diane M.; Campanella, Michelangelo; Dailey, Harry A.; Kaplan, Jerry; Paw, Barry H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Defects in the availability of heme substrates or the catalytic activity of the terminal enzyme in heme biosynthesis, ferrochelatase (Fech), impair heme synthesis, and thus cause human congenital anemias1,2. The inter-dependent functions of regulators of mitochondrial homeostasis and enzymes responsible for heme synthesis are largely unknown. To uncover this unmet need, we utilized zebrafish genetic screens and cloned mitochondrial ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (atpif1) from a zebrafish mutant with profound anemia, pinotage (pnt tq209). We now report a direct mechanism establishing that Atpif1 regulates the catalytic efficiency of vertebrate Fech to synthesize heme. The loss of Atpif1 impairs hemoglobin synthesis in zebrafish, mouse, and human hematopoietic models as a consequence of diminished Fech activity, and elevated mitochondrial pH. To understand the relationship among mitochondrial pH, redox potential, [2Fe-2S] clusters, and Fech activity, we used (1) genetic complementation studies of Fech constructs with or without [2Fe-2S] clusters in pnt, and (2) pharmacological agents modulating mitochondrial pH and redox potential. The presence of [2Fe-2S] cluster renders vertebrate Fech vulnerable to Atpif1-regulated mitochondrial pH and redox potential perturbations. Therefore, Atpif1 deficiency reduces the efficiency of vertebrate Fech to synthesize heme, resulting in anemia. The novel mechanism of Atpif1 as a regulator of heme synthesis advances the understanding of mitochondrial heme homeostasis and red blood cell development. A deficiency of Atpif1 may contribute to important human diseases, such as congenital sideroblastic anemias and mitochondriopathies. PMID:23135403

  2. Heme, an Essential Nutrient from Dietary Proteins, Critically Impacts Diverse Physiological and Pathological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Shah, Ajit; Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Heme constitutes 95% of functional iron in the human body, as well as two-thirds of the average person’s iron intake in developed countries. Hence, a wide range of epidemiological studies have focused on examining the association of dietary heme intake, mainly from red meat, with the risks of common diseases. High heme intake is associated with increased risk of several cancers, including colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and lung cancer. Likewise, the evidence for increased risks of type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease associated with high heme intake is compelling. Furthermore, recent comparative metabolic and molecular studies of lung cancer cells showed that cancer cells require increased intracellular heme biosynthesis and uptake to meet the increased demand for oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins. Increased levels of hemoproteins in turn lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy generation, thereby fueling cancer cell progression. Together, both epidemiological and molecular studies support the idea that heme positively impacts cancer progression. However, it is also worth noting that heme deficiency can cause serious diseases in humans, such as anemia, porphyrias, and Alzheimer’s disease. This review attempts to summarize the latest literature in understanding the role of dietary heme intake and heme function in diverse diseases. PMID:24633395

  3. Osmoregulation in zebrafish: ion transport mechanisms and functional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Ying-Jey; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Fish, like mammals, have to maintain their body fluid ionic and osmotic homeostasis through sophisticated iono-/osmoregulation mechanisms, which are conducted mainly by ionocytes of the gill (the skin in embryonic stages), instead of the renal tubular cells in mammals. Given the advantages in terms of genetic database availability and manipulation, zebrafish is an emerging model for research into regulatory and integrative physiology. At least five types of ionocytes, HR, NaR, NCC, SLC26, and KS cells, have been identified to carry out Na+ uptake/H+ secretion/NH4+ excretion, Ca2+ uptake, Na+/Cl- uptake, K+ secretion, and Cl- uptake/HCO3- secretion, respectively, through distinct sets of transporters. Several hormones, namely isotocin, prolactin, cortisol, stanniocalcin-1, calcitonin, endothelin-1, vitamin D, parathyorid hormone 1, catecholamines, and the renin-angiotensin-system, have been demonstrated to positively or negatively regulate ion transport through specific receptors at different ionocytes stages, at either the transcriptional/translational or posttranslational level. The knowledge obtained using zebrafish answered many long-term contentious or unknown issues in the field of fish iono-/osmoregulation. The homology of ion transport pathways and hormone systems also means that the zebrafish model informs studies on mammals or other animal species, thereby providing insights into related fields. PMID:26600749

  4. Role of xylem consumption on osmoregulation in Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas).

    PubMed

    Pompon, Julien; Quiring, Dan; Giordanengo, Philippe; Pelletier, Yvan

    2010-06-01

    Aphids are phloem feeders that occasionally ingest xylem sap. The duration of xylem consumption by Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) was positively correlated with the level of dehydration of alate aphids of different ages after a period of starvation, supporting the hypothesis that aphids ingest xylem sap to replenish their water balance. However, the duration of xylem sap ingestion but not phloem sap consumption varied in unstarved alate adults of different ages. Furthermore, both alate and apterous aphids ingested xylem sap at the end of their life, when aphids were not dehydrated but when fecundity started to decrease. Fecundity was negatively correlated with the proportion of time spent ingesting xylem sap, and that over the entire reproductive life of alate and apterous aphids. The lower proportion of xylem ingested by apterous than by alate aphids during the first few days of adult life may be related to a higher symbiont density in apterous morphs. As previous studies have demonstrated a relationship between sucrose assimilation, which is directly influenced by fecundity and symbiont density, and osmoregulation, we suggest that xylem consumption may play a role in the osmoregulation of haemolymph of aphids. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis, Delivery and Regulation of Eukaryotic Heme and Fe-S Cluster Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Barupala, Dulmini P.; Dzul, Stephen P.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela Jo; Stemmler, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the bulk of iron in the body (over 75%) is directed towards heme- or Fe-S cluster cofactor synthesis, and the complex, highly regulated pathways in place to accomplish biosynthesis have evolved to safely assemble and load these cofactors into apoprotein partners. In eukaryotes, heme biosynthesis is both initiated and finalized within the mitochondria, while cellular Fe-S cluster assembly is controlled by correlated pathways both within the mitochondria and within the cytosol. Iron plays a vital role in a wide array of metabolic processes and defects in iron cofactor assembly leads to human diseases. This review describes progress towards our molecular-level understanding of cellular heme and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, focusing on the regulation and mechanistic details that are essential for understanding human disorders related to the breakdown in these essential pathways. PMID:26785297

  6. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F.; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0 Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2 μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8 μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. PMID:25602700

  7. Heme Biosynthetic Pathway is Functionally Linked to Adipogenesis via Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ortega, Francisco; Becerril, Sara; Girones, Jordi; Sabater-Masdeu, Mònica; Latorre, Jéssica; Ricart, Wifredo; Frühbeck, Gema; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2017-10-01

    To investigate key enzymes of heme biosynthesis in human adipocytes and adipose tissue (AT). Heme biosynthesis-related gene expression (ALAS1, ALAD, HMBS) was investigated in whole AT from humans (n = 178 and n = 75) and rats according to obesity status and during adipogenesis of human preadipocytes. The effects of aminotriazole (an ALAD inhibitor) and of ALAD knockdown were also studied. Consistent heme biosynthesis-related gene expression was detected in both subcutaneous AT (SAT) and visceral AT (VAT) and was significantly increased in SAT. ALAS1, ALAD, and HMBS mRNAs were positively associated with adipogenic gene expression in human AT and significantly decreased in subjects with obesity. These results were replicated in an independent cohort. Both SAT and VAT heme levels were positively correlated with ALAS1, ALAD, and HMBS mRNAs. ALAD and HMBS were mainly expressed in adipocytes and increased during differentiation of human adipocytes in parallel to adipogenic genes. In rats, high-fat diet-induced weight gain resulted in decreased Alad and Hmbs mRNAs in a similar way to what was observed with Adipoq. Aminotriazole administration or ALAD knockdown attenuated adipogenesis in parallel with decreased glucose uptake and impaired mitochondrial respiratory function during human adipocyte differentiation. Current data suggest a possible role of heme biosynthesis in human adipogenesis. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  9. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  10. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lanceta, Lilibeth; Mattingly, Jacob M; Li, Chi; Eaton, John W

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal) iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment). Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  11. Taurine in the osmoregulation of the Brattleboro rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nieminen, M.J.; Tuomisto, L.; Solatunturi, E.; Eriksson, L.; Paasonen, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The function of taurine in mammalian osmoregulation was studied in the Brattleboro rat with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (DI). DI rats are chronically dehydrated because of their inability to synthesize vasopressin. One day of water deprivation did not affect the water balance in rats with normal vasopressin synthesis, whereas DI rats were markedly dehydrated and lost considerably body weight. Taurine content and /sup 3/H-taurine accumulation by platelets were significantly higher in DI rats, with a further increase after one day of water deprivation. In DI rats, water deprivation also evoked a clear taurine increase in skeletal muscle and in the brain. These findings indicate that taurine has an osmoregulatory function in mammals.

  12. Effects of gravistimuli on osmoregulation in azuki bean epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2013-02-01

    The effects of hypergravity on growth and osmoregulation were examined in dark-grown azuki bean epicotyls. Elongation growth of epicotyls was promptly suppressed by hypergravity at 300g. On the contrary, the increase in fresh weight of epicotyls during incubation was not suppressed by hypergravity at 300g at least up to 6 h. Also, the level of total osmotic solutes increased during epicotyl growth for 6 h, which was not affected by hypergravity. These results suggest that azuki bean epicotyls are capable of maintaining osmoregulation even under 300g conditions for a short period. On the other hand, the increase in fresh weight of epicotyls was suppressed, in addition to suppression of elongation growth, when seedlings were treated with 300g for 24 h. The increase in level of total osmotic solutes was also inhibited by 24 h hypergravity treatment, which was accounted by the reduced levels of organic solutes, such as sugars and amino acids. Furthermore, the dry weight of seeds decreased during incubation for 24 h, but the decrease was inhibited by hypergravity at 300g. Hypergravity treatment at 300g for 24 h also increased the pH value of apoplastic solution in epicotyls. Taken together, these results suggest that the translocation of organic solutes from the seed to epicotyls is inhibited by prolonged hypergravity treatment, which may underlie the suppression of epicotyl growth, and that the breakdown of H+ gradient across the plasma membrane in epicotyl cells may be at least partly involved in the reduction of organic solute accumulation under hypergravity conditions.

  13. TRPV4 is associated with central rather than nephrogenic osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Janas, Sylvie; Seghers, François; Schakman, Olivier; Alsady, Mohammad; Deen, Peter; Vriens, Joris; Tissir, Fadel; Nilius, Bernd; Loffing, Johannes; Gailly, Philippe; Devuyst, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    TRPV4 is a polymodal cation channel expressed in osmosensitive neurons of the hypothalamus and in the mammalian nephron. The segmental distribution and role(s) of TRPV4 in osmoregulation remain debated. We investigated the renal distribution pattern of TRPV4 and the functional consequences of its disruption in mouse models. Using qPCR on microdissected segments, immunohistochemistry, and a LacZ reporter mouse, we found that TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in the proximal tubule, the late distal convoluted tubule, and throughout the connecting tubule and collecting duct, including principal and intercalated cells. TRPV4 was undetectable in the glomeruli and thick ascending limb and weakly abundant in the early distal convoluted tubule. Metabolic studies in Trpv4 (+/+) and Trpv4 (-/-) littermates revealed that the lack of TRPV4 did not influence activity, food and water intake, renal function, and urinary concentration at baseline. The mice showed a similar response to furosemide, water loading and deprivation, acid loading, and dietary NaCl restriction. However, Trpv4 (-/-) mice showed a significantly lower vasopressin synthesis and release after water deprivation, with a loss of the positive correlation between plasma osmolality and plasma vasopressin levels, and a delayed water intake upon acute administration of hypertonic saline. Specific activation of TRPV4 in primary cultures of proximal tubule cells increased albumin uptake, whereas no effect of TRPV4 deletion could be observed at baseline. These data reveal that, despite its abundant expression in tubular segments, TRPV4 does not play a major role in the kidney or is efficiently compensated when deleted. Instead, TRPV4 is critical for the release of vasopressin, the sensation of thirst, and the central osmoregulation.

  14. Osmoregulation in wild and captive West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Worthy, G A; MacKenzie, D S

    1998-01-01

    The ability of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris and Trichechus manatus manatus) to inhabit both freshwater and marine habitats presents an interesting model to study osmoregulation in sirenians. Blood samples were analyzed from manatees held in fresh- and saltwater and from wild animals captured in fresh-, brackish, and saltwater for concentrations of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin, plasma renin activity, Na+, K+, Cl-, and osmolality. Two separate experiments were also conducted on captive animals to evaluate osmoregulatory responses to acute saltwater exposure and freshwater deprivation. Spurious differences were observed in plasma electrolyte and osmolality among the captive and wild groups. Wild brackish water animals exhibited the highest vasopressin concentrations, while wild freshwater manatees had the highest aldosterone levels. A significant correlation between mean vasopressin and osmolality was demonstrated for captive and wild animals. When freshwater animals were acutely exposed to saltwater, osmolality, Na+, and Cl- increased 5.5%, 8.0%, and 14%, respectively, while aldosterone decreased 82.6%. Saltwater animals deprived of freshwater exhibited an almost twofold increase in aldosterone during the deprivation period and a fourfold decrease when freshwater was again provided. Within this group, osmolality increased significantly by 3.4% over the course of the study; however, electrolytes did not change. The lack of consistent differences in electrolyte and osmolality among wild and captive groups suggests that manatees are good osmoregulators regardless of the environment. The high aldosterone levels in wild freshwater animals may indicate a need to conserve Na+, while the high vasopressin levels in wild brackish-water manatees suggest an antidiuretic state to conserve water. Vasopressin levels appear to be osmotically mediated in manatees as in other mammals.

  15. [Hereditary porphyrias and heme related disorders].

    PubMed

    Puy, Hervé; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-charles

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary porphyrias comprise a group of eight metabolic disorders of the haem biosynthesis pathway, characterised by acute neurovisceral symptoms and/or skin lesions. Each porphyria is caused by abnormal functioning of a particular enzymatic step, resulting in specific accumulation of heme precursors. Seven porphyrias are due to a partial enzyme deficiency, while a gain-of-function mechanism has recently been identify in a novel porphyria. Acute porphyrias present with severe abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and confusion, and are sometimes complicated by seizures and severe neurological disorders, which may be life-threatening. Cutaneous porphyrias can also be present, with either acute painful photosensitivity or skin fragility and blisters. Rare recessive porphyrias usually manifest in early childhood with either severe chronic neurological symptoms or chronic haemolysis and severe cutaneous photosensitivity. Porphyrias are still under-diagnosed, but recent advances in the pathogenesis and genetics of human porphyrias are leading to better care of these patients and their families.

  16. The Chlorite Dismutase (HemQ) from Staphylococcus aureus Has a Redox-sensitive Heme and Is Associated with the Small Colony Variant Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Hammer, Neal D.; Kurker, Richard C.; Chen, Thomas K.; Ojha, Sunil; Skaar, Eric P.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (C-family proteins) are a widespread family of heme-binding proteins for which chemical and biological roles remain unclear. An association of the gene with heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria was previously demonstrated by experiments involving introduction of genes from two Gram-positive species into heme biosynthesis mutant strains of Escherichia coli, leading to the gene being renamed hemQ. To assess the gene product's biological role more directly, a Staphylococcus aureus strain with an inactivated hemQ gene was generated and shown to be a slow growing small colony variant under aerobic but not anaerobic conditions. The small colony variant phenotype is rescued by the addition of exogenous heme despite an otherwise wild type heme biosynthetic pathway. The ΔhemQ mutant accumulates coproporphyrin specifically under aerobic conditions. Although its sequence is highly similar to functional chlorite dismutases, the HemQ protein has no steady state reactivity with chlorite, very modest reactivity with H2O2 or peracetic acid, and no observable transient intermediates. HemQ's equilibrium affinity for heme is in the low micromolar range. Holo-HemQ reconstituted with heme exhibits heme lysis after <50 turnovers with peroxide and <10 turnovers with chlorite. The heme-free apoprotein aggregates or unfolds over time. IsdG-like proteins and antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenases are close sequence and structural relatives of HemQ that use heme or porphyrin-like organic molecules as substrates. The genetic and biochemical data suggest a similar substrate role for heme or porphyrin, with possible sensor-regulator functions for the protein. HemQ heme could serve as the means by which S. aureus reversibly adopts an SCV phenotype in response to redox stress. PMID:23737523

  17. The Legend of Sally Hemings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belz, Herman

    2012-01-01

    The part played by Sally Hemings in the life of Thomas Jefferson has been regarded as provocatively dubious since political enemy James Callender claimed in 1802 that Jefferson was the father of several of Hemings's children. Historian Merrill Peterson, observing that paternity is hard to prove, wrote in 1960 that no concrete evidence was ever…

  18. The Legend of Sally Hemings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belz, Herman

    2012-01-01

    The part played by Sally Hemings in the life of Thomas Jefferson has been regarded as provocatively dubious since political enemy James Callender claimed in 1802 that Jefferson was the father of several of Hemings's children. Historian Merrill Peterson, observing that paternity is hard to prove, wrote in 1960 that no concrete evidence was ever…

  19. Hepatic heme catabolism in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, B.C.; Bonkovsky, H.L.

    1987-05-01

    Uncertainty persists concerning the role and importance of heme oxygenase in the catabolism of heme by hepatocytes. The products of heme oxygenase catalyzed heme catabolism are equimolar amounts of biliverdin IX..cap alpha.., CO, and iron. Previous reports from studies with rodent hepatocyte cultures have suggested the possibility that non-heme oxygenase pathway(s) predominate in the breakdown of hepatic hemoprotein heme. The authors have studied this question in cultured chick embryo hepatocytes, which retain normal regulation of heme metabolism and levels of cytochromes P-450 as in intact animals. Exogenous heme added to the culture medium with control chick embryo hepatocyte cultures was quantitatively converted to biliverdin IX..cap alpha... To study endogenous heme breakdown, cellular heme was labelled by exposing cultured cells to (5-/sup 14/C) 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The hepatocytes were also treated with mephenytoin that increases cytochrome P-450, total hepatic heme and heme oxygenase. At various times after labelling heme, biliverdin, and CO were isolated and counted. For at least 8 hrs, the increase in CO radioactivity corresponded to the loss of radioactivity in heme. Beyond 1 h biliverdin was unstable in culture medium, but for 1 h after labelling (dpm BVIX..cap alpha.. + dpm CO) ..delta..dpm heme. All BV detected was the ..cap alpha.. isomer. They conclude that heme oxygenase accounts for both endogenous and exogenous heme breakdown by hepatocytes.

  20. [Osmoregulation--an important parameter of bacterial growth].

    PubMed

    Sochocka, Marta; Boratyński, Janusz

    2011-11-22

    Environmental conditions such as temperature, pH, radiation and osmotic pressure are important factors limiting the growth and multiplication of bacteria. Regular structure and metabolism of bacterial cells are maintained through a stable arrangement of the water-electrolyte system, regulated by osmosis. The rapid changes caused by osmotic shock (dehydration, rehydration) might lead to modifications of the phospholipid structure of the cell membrane and even cell death. Advances disturbing the osmosis, which are a natural part of living cells, may appear for example in colloid systems. The biological identification of the osmotic pressure is connected with an increase or decrease in the environmental osmotic strength of microorganisms' habitat. Cells exposed to osmotic stress, such as an increase in osmotic pressure, initiate mechanisms of active coping with the adverse consequences of its effects. Osmoregulatory processes are designed to maintain cell turgor, hence ensuring proper conditions for bacterial growth. Osmoregulation, which consists of maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance of cells, raising concerns accumulation of specific compatible solutes (osmolytes). Osmolytes are small, soluble organic molecules with a positive influence on membrane stabilization and proteins, without disrupting cellular functions. Storage of compatible solutes takes place by synthesis or by downregulation from the medium by means of special transport systems, activated by mechanical stimuli. Knowledge of the impact of osmotic pressure on microbial cells and the regulation of its activity led to the appropriate use of bacteria in various branches of the biotechnology industry.

  1. Osmoregulation and nutritional relationships between Orobanche foetida and faba bean

    PubMed Central

    Kharrat, Mohamed; Delavault, Philippe; Chaïbi, Wided; Simier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at comparing the phloem composition of the tolerant XBJ90.03-16-1-1-1 and the susceptible Bachaar genotypes and the impact of the faba bean genotype on the levels of the major solutes and invertase activities in the parasite Orobanche foetida. In comparison to Bachaar, the XBJ90.03-161-1-1 genotype limited the growth of orobanche tubercles under in vitro conditions. The limited growth was due to low soluble invertase activity, low osmotic potential of the infected roots and the organic nitrogen deficiency of the host phloem sap. The faba bean genotype did not affect the osmoregulation process of O. foetida. Among the organic solutes, stachyose, hexoses, starch and free amino acids, mainly asparagine and aspartate were highly accumulated in orobanche. However, asparagine/aspartate, glutamine/glutamate, alanine, serine, gamma amino butyric acid, stachyose, sucrose were identified as the main organic components in the host phloem exudates. The key role of the enzymes α-galactosidase, asparagine synthetase and aspartate oxaloglutarate aminotransferase in the utilization of the host solutes is proposed in O. foetida parasitizing faba bean. PMID:19794856

  2. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Christopher M; Mazzucca, Nicholas Q; Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M; Keane, Meaghan L; Leonard, Jessica N; Scola, Shelby E; Beer, Emma N; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  3. Reduced Heme Levels Underlie the Exponential Growth Defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M.; Keane, Meaghan L.; Leonard, Jessica N.; Scola, Shelby E.; Beer, Emma N.; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J.

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step. PMID:25356668

  4. Impact of Aeration and Heme-Activated Respiration on Lactococcus lactis Gene Expression: Identification of a Heme-Responsive Operon▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Garrigues, Christel; Tuphile, Karine; Brun, Célia; Vido, Karin; Bennedsen, Mads; Møllgaard, Henrik; Gaudu, Philippe; Gruss, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a widely used food bacterium mainly characterized for its fermentation metabolism. However, this species undergoes a metabolic shift to respiration when heme is added to an aerobic medium. Respiration results in markedly improved biomass and survival compared to fermentation. Whole-genome microarrays were used to assess changes in L. lactis expression under aerobic and respiratory conditions compared to static growth, i.e., nonaerated. We observed the following. (i) Stress response genes were affected mainly by aerobic fermentation. This result underscores the differences between aerobic fermentation and respiration environments and confirms that respiration growth alleviates oxidative stress. (ii) Functions essential for respiratory metabolism, e.g., genes encoding cytochrome bd oxidase, menaquinone biosynthesis, and heme uptake, are similarly expressed under the three conditions. This indicates that cells are prepared for respiration once O2 and heme become available. (iii) Expression of only 11 genes distinguishes respiration from both aerobic and static fermentation cultures. Among them, the genes comprising the putative ygfCBA operon are strongly induced by heme regardless of respiration, thus identifying the first heme-responsive operon in lactococci. We give experimental evidence that the ygfCBA genes are involved in heme homeostasis. PMID:18487342

  5. Heme Synthesis and Acquisition in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Choby, Jacob E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require the iron-containing cofactor heme to cause disease. Heme is essential to the function of hemoproteins, which are involved in energy generation by the electron transport chain, detoxification of host immune effectors, and other processes. During infection, bacterial pathogens must synthesize heme or acquire heme from the host; however, host heme is sequestered in high-affinity hemoproteins. Pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to acquire heme from host sources, particularly hemoglobin, and both heme acquisition and synthesis are important for pathogenesis. Paradoxically, excess heme is toxic to bacteria and pathogens must rely on heme detoxification strategies. Heme is a key nutrient in the struggle for survival between host and pathogen, and its study has offered significant insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:27019298

  6. Adaptive evolution of the osmoregulation-related genes in cetaceans during secondary aquatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shixia; Yang, Yunxia; Zhou, Xuming; Xu, Junxiao; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2013-09-09

    Osmoregulation was a primary challenge for cetaceans during the evolutionary transition from a terrestrial to a mainly hyperosmotic environment. Several physiological mechanisms have been suggested to maintain the water and salt balance in cetaceans, but their genetic and evolutionary bases remain poorly explored. The current study investigated the genes involved in osmoregulation in cetaceans and compared them with their counterparts in terrestrial mammals to test whether adaptive evolution occurred during secondary aquatic adaptation. The present study analyzed the molecular evolution of 11 osmoregulation-related genes in 11 cetacean species, which represented all of the major cetacean clades. The results demonstrated positive selection acting on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), SLC14A2, and aquaporin 2 (AQP2). This evidence for the positive selection of AQP2 and SLC14A2 suggests that the adaptive evolution of these genes has helped to enhance the capacity for water and urea transport, thereby leading to the concentration of urine, which is an efficient mechanism for maintaining the water balance. By contrast, a series of positively selected amino acid residues identified in the ACE and AGT (two key members of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, RAAS) proteins of cetaceans suggests that RAAS might have been adapted to maintain the water and salt balance in response to a hyperosmotic environment. Radical amino acid changes in positively selected sites were distributed among most internal and terminal branches of the cetacean phylogeny, which suggests the pervasively adaptive evolution of osmoregulation since the origin of cetaceans and their subsequent diversification. This is the first comprehensive analysis of the molecular evolution of osmoregulation-related genes in cetaceans in response to selection pressure from a generally hyperosmotic environment. Four genes, i.e., AQP2, SLC14A2, ACE, and AGT were subject to positive

  7. Effect of biosynthetic manipulation of heme on insolubility of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.A.; Kallio, P.T.; Bailey, J.E.

    1994-07-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobulin (VHb) is accumulated at high levels in both soluble and insoluble forms when expressed from its native promoter on a pUC19-derived plasmid in Escherichia coli. Examination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the insoluble form uniformly lacks the heme prosthetic group (apoVHb). The purified soluble form contains heme (holoVHb) and is spectroscopically indistinguishable from holoVHb produced by Vitreoscilla cells. This observation suggested that a relationship may exist between the insolubility of apoVHb and biosynthesis of heme. To examine this possibility, a series of experiments were conducted to chemically and genetically manipulate the formation and conversion of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a key intermediate in heme biosynthesis. Chemical perturbations involved supplementing the growth medium with the intermediate ALA and the competitive inhibitor levulinic acid which freely cross the cell barrier. Genetic manipulations involved amplifying the gene dosage for the enzymes ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase. Results from both levulinic acid and ALA supplementations indicate that the level of soluble holoVHb correlates with the heme level but that the level of insoluble apoVHb does not. The ratio of soluble to insoluble VHb also does not correlate with the level of total VHb accumulated. The effect of amplifying ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase gene dosage is complex and may involve secondary factors. Results indicate that the rate-limiting step of heme biosynthesis in cells overproducing VHb does not lie at ALA synthesis, as it reportedly does in wild-type E. coli. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Enzymes of heme metabolism in the kidney: regulation by trace metals which do not form heme complexes.

    PubMed

    Maines, M D; Kappas, A

    1977-11-01

    The in vivo regulation by metal ions of the enzymes of heme metabolism in kidney-particularly of ALAS, the rate-limiting enzyme in heine formation- was investigated. Ni(2+) and Pt(4+), metals which do not enzymatically form metalloporphyrins, were found to regulate ALAS in kidney as they do in liver. The pattern of this regulation was generally similar to that observed with heme and metal ions in liver, i.e., a late increase in enzyme activity after an early period in which ALAS activity was unaltered or inhibited. The metals did not interact with the enzyme in vitro to alter its activity. In this study no direct reciprocal relationship between ALAS activity and total cellular heine content was demonstrated. The metal ions, particularly Pt(4+), also altered the activity of other enzymes of heme biosynthesis in kidney. Pt(4+) severely inhibited the activity of ALAD and UROS. Ni(2+) and Pt(4+) were potent inducers of heme oxygenase, the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in heine degradation. It is proposed that the physiological regulation of ALAS is mediated through the action of metal ions, rather than by the cellular content of heine, and that the regulation of ALAS by heine reflects the action of the central metal ion of heme rather than that of the entire metalloporphyrin complex. In this proposed mechanism for metal ion regulation of ALAS, the tetrapyrrole moiety of heine is considered to function principally as an efficient carrier of metal to the regulatory site for ALAS production, inasmuch as the tetrapyrrole ring itself has been shown in earlier studies not to have any effect on ALAS activity. The production of heine oxygenase is believed to be similarly regulated.

  9. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prosthetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion, and hemorrhage. The plasma scavenger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavenge heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce reactive oxygen species generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases. PMID:24904418

  10. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  11. Structural Characterization of Heme Environmental Mutants of CgHmuT that Shuttles Heme Molecules to Heme Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Norifumi; Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Ogura, Mariko; Uchida, Takeshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Aono, Shigetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacteria contain a heme uptake system encoded in hmuTUV genes, in which HmuT protein acts as a heme binding protein to transport heme to the cognate transporter HmuUV. The crystal structure of HmuT from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgHmuT) reveals that heme is accommodated in the central cleft with His141 and Tyr240 as the axial ligands and that Tyr240 forms a hydrogen bond with Arg242. In this work, the crystal structures of H141A, Y240A, and R242A mutants were determined to understand the role of these residues for the heme binding of CgHmuT. Overall and heme environmental structures of these mutants were similar to those of the wild type, suggesting that there is little conformational change in the heme-binding cleft during heme transport reaction with binding and the dissociation of heme. A loss of one axial ligand or the hydrogen bonding interaction with Tyr240 resulted in an increase in the redox potential of the heme for CgHmuT to be reduced by dithionite, though the wild type was not reduced under physiological conditions. These results suggest that the heme environmental structure stabilizes the ferric heme binding in CgHmuT, which will be responsible for efficient heme uptake under aerobic conditions where Corynebacteria grow. PMID:27240352

  12. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G

    2015-05-15

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The integration of digestion and osmoregulation in the avian gut.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Todd J; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H

    2009-11-01

    We review digestion and osmoregulation in the avian gut, with an emphasis on the ways these different functions might interact to support or constrain each other and the ways they support the functioning of the whole animal in its natural environment. Differences between birds and other vertebrates are highlighted because these differences may make birds excellent models for study and may suggest interesting directions for future research. At a given body size birds, compared with mammals, tend to eat more food but have less small intestine and retain food in their gastrointestinal tract (GIT) for shorter periods of time, despite generally higher mass-specific energy demands. On most foods, however, they are not less efficient at digestion, which begs the question how they compensate. Intestinal tissue-specific rates of enzymatic breakdown of substrates and rates of active transport do not appear higher in birds than in mammals, nor is there a demonstrated difference in the extent to which those rates can be modulated during acclimation to different feeding regimes (e.g. diet, relative intake level). One compensation appears to be more extensive reliance on passive nutrient absorption by the paracellular pathway, because the avian species studied so far exceed the mammalian species by a factor of at least two- to threefold in this regard. Undigested residues reach the hindgut, but there is little evidence that most wild birds recover microbial metabolites of nutritional significance (essential amino acids and vitamins) by re-ingestion of faeces, in contrast to many hindgut fermenting mammals and possibly poultry. In birds, there is some evidence for hindgut capacity to breakdown either microbial protein or protein that escapes the small intestine intact, freeing up essential amino acids, and there is considerable evidence for an amino acid absorptive capacity in the hindgut of both avian and mammalian hindgut fermenters. Birds, unlike mammals, do not excrete

  14. Regulation of a glutamyl-tRNA synthetase by the heme status

    PubMed Central

    Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; de Armas, Merly; Núñez, Harold; Orellana, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA (Glu-tRNA), formed by Glu-tRNA synthetase (GluRS), is a substrate for protein biosynthesis and tetrapyrrole formation by the C5 pathway. In this route Glu-tRNA is transformed to δ-aminolevulinic acid, the universal precursor of tetrapyrroles (e.g., heme and chlorophyll) by the action of Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) and glutamate semialdehyde aminotransferase. GluTR is a target of feedback regulation by heme. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic bacterium that expresses two GluRSs (GluRS1 and GluRS2) with different tRNA specificity, the intracellular heme level varies depending on growth conditions. Under high heme requirement for respiration increased levels of GluRS and GluTR are observed. Strikingly, when intracellular heme is in excess, the cells respond by a dramatic decrease of GluRS activity and the level of GluTR. The recombinant GluRS1 enzyme is inhibited in vitro by hemin, but NADPH restores its activity. These results suggest that GluRS plays a major role in regulating the cellular level of heme. PMID:17360620

  15. Hydroxylamine and hydrazine bind directly to the heme iron of the heme-heme oxygenase-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Sugishima, Masakazu; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Palmer, Graham; Noguchi, Masato

    2004-07-01

    We investigated whether or not hydroxylamine (HA) and hydrazine (HZ) interact with heme bound to heme oxygenase-1. Anaerobic addition of either HA or HZ to the ferric heme-enzyme complex produced a low-spin heme species. Titration studies at different pHs revealed that the neutral form of each of HA and HZ selectively binds to the heme with dissociation constants of 9.8 and 1.8 mM, respectively. Electron spin resonance analysis suggested that the nitrogen atom of each amine is coordinated to the ferric heme iron. With a concentrated solution of the heme-enzyme complex, however, another species of HA binding appeared, in which the oxygen atom of HA is coordinated to the iron. This species showed an unusual low-spin signal which is similar to that of the ferric hydroperoxide species in the heme oxygenase reaction.

  16. Swarm and swim motilities of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and role of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains synthesize osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) under low osmolarity conditions (< 70 mos mol l-1). OPG synthesis is not observed when cells are grown in iso- or hyper-osmotic media (> 400 mos mol l-1). Mutation in OPG structural gene...

  17. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear.

  18. Measurement of heme efflux and heme content in isolated developing chloroplasts. [Cucumis sativus, cv. Sumter

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-11-01

    Hemes destined for cytosolic hemoproteins must originate in one of the cellular compartments which have the capacity for heme synthesis, namely the chloroplast or the mitochondria. Since developing chloroplasts from greening cucumber (Cucumis sativus, cv. Sumter) cotyledons are known to contain complete heme and chlorophyll biosynthetic pathways, they were tested for their capacity export hemes. Picomole quantities of heme were measured by reconstitution of the heme with apo-peroxidase and subsequent determination of peroxidase activity. The assay method was sensitive (as little as 0.7 picomole of heme could be detected in a volume of 100 microliters) and was linear with heme concentration. When intact plastids were incubated with apo-peroxidase, a steady-state rate of efflux between 0.12 and 0.45 picomole heme/minute/milligram plastid protein was measured. The efflux rate was not due to plastid breakage and could be enhanced by incubating with the heme precursor, {delta}-aminolevulinic acid. Cold acetone extraction removed 47 {plus minus} 17 picomoles heme/milligram plastid protein from the total b-type heme pool in the chloroplasts (166 {plus minus} 9 picomoles heme/milligram protein, by acid-acetone extraction). The reconstitution technique provided a similar estimate of readily exchangeable heme in the plastid, 37 {plus minus} 8 picomoles heme/milligram protein (or 6 micromolar in the plastids). These values may be indicative of a free heme pool which exists in the chloroplast.

  19. Measurement of Heme Efflux and Heme Content in Isolated Developing Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jim; Weinstein, Jon D.

    1990-01-01

    Hemes destined for cytosolic hemoproteins must originate in one of the cellular compartments which have the capacity for heme synthesis, namely the chloroplast or the mitochondria. Since developing chloroplasts from greening cucumber (Cucumis sativus, cv. Sumter) cotyledons are known to contain complete heme and chlorophyll biosynthetic pathways, they were tested for their capacity export hemes. Picomole quantities of heme were measured by reconstitution of the heme with apo-peroxidase and subsequent determination of peroxidase activity. The assay method was sensitive (as little as 0.7 picomole of heme could be detected in a volume of 100 microliters) and was linear with heme concentration. When intact plastids were incubated with apo-peroxidase, a steady-state rate of efflux between 0.12 and 0.45 picomole heme/minute/milligram plastid protein was measured. The efflux rate was not due to plastid breakage and could be enhanced by incubating with the heme precursor, δ-aminolevulinic acid. Cold acetone extraction removed 47 ± 17 picomoles heme/milligram plastid protein from the total b-type heme pool in the chloroplasts (166 ± 9 picomoles heme/milligram protein, by acid-acetone extraction). The reconstitution technique provided a similar estimate of readily exchangeable heme in the plastid, 37 ± 8 picomoles heme/milligram protein (or 6 micromolar in the plastids). These values may be indicative of a `free heme pool' which exists in the chloroplast. PMID:16667847

  20. Heme Utilization in Campylobacter jejuni▿

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Kristian A.; Rock, Jonathan D.; Li, Ying; Ketley, Julian M.

    2006-01-01

    A putative iron- and Fur-regulated hemin uptake gene cluster, composed of the transport genes chuABCD and a putative heme oxygenase gene (Cj1613c), has been identified in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168. Mutation of chuA or Cj1613c leads to an inability to grow in the presence of hemin or hemoglobin as a sole source of iron. Mutation of chuB, -C, or -D only partially attenuates growth where hemin is the sole iron source, suggesting that an additional inner membrane (IM) ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system(s) for heme is present in C. jejuni. Genotyping experiments revealed that Cj1613c is highly conserved in 32 clinical isolates. One strain did not possess chuC, though it was still capable of using hemin/hemoglobin as a sole iron source, supporting the hypothesis that additional IM transport genes are present. In two other strains, sequence variations within the gene cluster were apparent and may account for an observed negative heme utilization phenotype. Analysis of promoter activity within the Cj1613c-chuA intergenic spacer region revealed chuABCD and Cj1613c are expressed from separate iron-repressed promoters and that this region also specifically binds purified recombinant FurCj in gel retardation studies. Absorbance spectroscopy of purified recombinant His6-Cj1613c revealed a 1:1 heme:His6-Cj1613c binding ratio. The complex was oxidatively degraded in the presence of ascorbic acid as the electron donor, indicating that the Cj1613c gene product functions as a heme oxygenase. In conclusion, we confirm the involvement of Cj1613c and ChuABCD in heme/hemoglobin utilization in C. jejuni. PMID:16980451

  1. An intercellular heme trafficking protein delivers maternal heme to the embryo during development in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Caiyong; Samuel, Tamika K.; Sinclair, Jason; Dailey, Harry A.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    Summary Heme is a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole that crosses multiple biological membranes for incorporation into proteins critical for numerous biological processes. Thus, a prima facie argument can be made that heme trafficking within the aqueous cellular milieu must be mediated by specific intra- and intercellular pathways. Embryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans, a heme auxotroph, is inextricably dependent on maternal heme acquisition. Here we show that HRG-3 is required to deliver maternal heme to oocytes for zygotic development. HRG-3 binds heme and is exclusively secreted by the intestine during heme insufficiency into the interstitial fluid for transport of maternal heme to extra-intestinal cells. HRG-3 deficiency results either in death during embryogenesis or in developmental arrest immediately post hatching – phenotypes that are fully suppressed by maternal but not zygotic hrg-3 expression. Our results establish an unprecedented role for HRG-3 as an intercellular heme chaperone in zygotic development and maternal-embryonic nutrition in C. elegans. PMID:21620137

  2. Visualization of the role of host heme on the virulence of the heme auxotroph Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Laetitia; Dagieu, Jean-Baptiste; Fernandez, Annabelle; Derré-Bobillot, Aurélie; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Fleurot, Isabelle; Gruss, Alexandra; Lechardeur, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Heme is essential for several cellular key functions but is also toxic. Whereas most bacterial pathogens utilize heme as a metabolic cofactor and iron source, the impact of host heme during bacterial infection remains elusive. The opportunist pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae does not synthesize heme but still uses it to activate a respiration metabolism. Concomitantly, heme toxicity is mainly controlled by the HrtBA efflux transporter. Here we investigate how S. agalactiae manages heme toxicity versus benefits in the living host. Using bioluminescent bacteria and heme-responsive reporters for in vivo imaging, we show that the capacity of S. agalactiae to overcome heme toxicity is required for successful infection, particularly in blood-rich organs. Host heme is simultaneously required, as visualized by a generalized infection defect of a respiration-negative mutant. In S. agalactiae, HrtBA expression responds to an intracellular heme signal via activation of the two-component system HssRS. A hssRS promoter-driven intracellular luminescent heme sensor was designed to identify host compartments that supply S. agalactiae with heme. S. agalactiae acquires heme in heart, kidneys, and liver, but not in the brain. We conclude that S. agalactiae response to heme is organ-dependent, and its efflux may be particularly relevant in late stages of infection. PMID:28091535

  3. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Frank A D T G; Scharstuhl, Alwin; Tyrrell, Rex M; Von den Hoff, Johannes W; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Russel, Frans G M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2010-12-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special emphasis on the heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system and the versatile effector molecules that are formed after HO-mediated heme degradation. Excessive scar formation following wounding is thought to relate to prolonged oxidative and inflammatory stress in the skin. Evidence is accumulating that the heme-HO system forms a novel and important target in the control of wound healing. Heme-protein derived heme can act as a potent oxidative and inflammatory stress inducer, and excess levels of heme may thus contribute to delayed resolution of oxidative and inflammatory insults in the skin. This emphasizes the need for a timely reduction of the levels of heme. Heme-binding proteins, heme transporters, and the heme degrading protein, HO, form therefore a necessary defense. Deficiencies in these defense proteins or a disturbed redox status, as in diabetic patients, may render individuals more prone to heme-induced deleterious effects. A better understanding of the heme-heme oxygenase system as target during wound healing may result in novel strategies to reduce scar formation.

  4. Characterization of heme ligation properties of Rv0203, a secreted heme binding protein involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis heme uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Cedric P.; Du, Jing; Dawson, John H.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    The secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) heme binding protein Rv0203 has been shown to play a role in Mtb heme uptake. In this work we use spectroscopic (absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic circular dichrosim) methods to further characterize the heme coordination environments of His-tagged and native protein forms, Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag, respectively. Rv0203-His binds the heme molecule through bis-His coordination and is low spin in both ferric and ferrous oxidation states. Rv0203-notag is high spin in both oxidation states and shares spectroscopic similarity with pentacoordinate oxygen ligated heme proteins. Mutagenesis experiments identified that residues Tyr59, His63 and His89 are required for Rv0203-notag to efficiently bind heme, reinforcing the hypothesis based on our previous structural and mutagenesis studies of Rv0203-His. While Tyr59, His63 and His89 are required for heme binding to Rv0203-notag, comparison of the absorption spectra of the Rv0203-notag mutants suggest the heme-ligand may be the hydroxyl group of Tyr59, although an exogenous hydroxide cannot be ruled out. Additionally, we measured the heme affinities of Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag using stopped flow techniques. The rates for heme binding to Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag are similar, 115 (μM s)-1 and 133 (μM s)-1, respectively. However, the heme off-rates differ quite dramatically, whereby Rv0203-His gives biphasic dissociation kinetics with fast and slow rates of 0.0019 s-1 and 0.0002 s-1, respectively, and Rv0203-notag has a single off-rate of 0.082 s-1. The spectral and heme binding affinity differences between Rv0203-His and Rv0203-notag suggest that the His-tag interferes with heme binding. Furthermore, these results imply that the His-tag has the ability to stabilize heme binding as well as alter heme ligand coordination of Rv0203 by providing an unnatural histidine ligand. Moreover, the heme affinity of Rv0203-notag is comparable to that of other heme

  5. Qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of the osmoregulation system in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how Morven, a computational framework which can perform qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of dynamical systems using the same model formalism, is applied to study the osmotic stress response pathway in yeast. First the Morven framework itself is briefly introduced in terms of the model formalism employed and output format. We then built a qualitative model for the biophysical process of the osmoregulation in yeast, and a global qualitative-level picture was obtained through qualitative simulation of this model. Furthermore, we constructed a Morven model based on existing quantitative model of the osmoregulation system. This model was then simulated qualitatively, semi-quantitatively, and quantitatively. The obtained simulation results are presented with an analysis. Finally the future development of the Morven framework for modelling the dynamic biological systems is discussed.

  6. Activities of Amphioxus GH-Like Protein in Osmoregulation: Insight into Origin of Vertebrate GH Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengyang; Jiang, Chengyan

    2017-01-01

    GH is known to play an important role in both growth promotion and osmoregulation in vertebrates. We have shown that amphioxus possesses a single GH-like hormone (GHl) gene encoding a functional protein capable of promoting growth. However, if GHl can mediate osmoregulation remains open. Here, we demonstrated clearly that GHl increased not only the survival rate of amphioxus but also the muscle moisture under high salinity. Moreover, GHl induced the expression of both the ion transporter Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) in the gill as well as the mediator of GH action IGFl in the hepatic caecum, indicating that GHl fulfills this osmoregulatory activity through the same mechanisms of vertebrate GH. These results together suggest that the osmoregulatory activities of GH had emerged in the basal chordate amphioxus. We also proposed a new model depicting the origin of pituitary hormone family in vertebrates. PMID:28408927

  7. Qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of the osmoregulation system in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wei; Coghill, George M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how Morven, a computational framework which can perform qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative simulation of dynamical systems using the same model formalism, is applied to study the osmotic stress response pathway in yeast. First the Morven framework itself is briefly introduced in terms of the model formalism employed and output format. We then built a qualitative model for the biophysical process of the osmoregulation in yeast, and a global qualitative-level picture was obtained through qualitative simulation of this model. Furthermore, we constructed a Morven model based on existing quantitative model of the osmoregulation system. This model was then simulated qualitatively, semi-quantitatively, and quantitatively. The obtained simulation results are presented with an analysis. Finally the future development of the Morven framework for modelling the dynamic biological systems is discussed. PMID:25864377

  8. Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heme b-HemQ and Coproheme-HemQ

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a novel pathway for heme b biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria has been proposed. The final poorly understood step is catalyzed by an enzyme called HemQ and includes two decarboxylation reactions leading from coproheme to heme b. Coproheme has been suggested to act as both substrate and redox active cofactor in this reaction. In the study presented here, we focus on HemQs from Listeria monocytogenes (LmHemQ) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaHemQ) recombinantly produced as apoproteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the rapid and two-phase uptake of coproheme by both apo forms and the significant differences in thermal stability of the apo forms, coproheme-HemQ and heme b-HemQ. Reduction of ferric high-spin coproheme-HemQ to the ferrous form is shown to be enthalpically favored but entropically disfavored with standard reduction potentials of −205 ± 3 mV for LmHemQ and −207 ± 3 mV for SaHemQ versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7.0. Redox thermodynamics suggests the presence of a pronounced H-bonding network and restricted solvent mobility in the heme cavity. Binding of cyanide to the sixth coproheme position is monophasic but relatively slow (∼1 × 104 M–1 s–1). On the basis of the available structures of apo-HemQ and modeling of both loaded forms, molecular dynamics simulation allowed analysis of the interaction of coproheme and heme b with the protein as well as the role of the flexibility at the proximal heme cavity and the substrate access channel for coproheme binding and heme b release. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the proposed function of HemQ in monoderm bacteria. PMID:27599156

  9. Mineralization of hazardous chemicals by heme reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, G.; Jung, J.; Park, K.; Stevens, D.K.

    1995-12-31

    The catalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol contaminated soil by heme and hydrogen peroxide has been reported. Here we studied evidence for the mechanism and mineralization by the heme catalyzed reaction for hazardous organopollutants. Ferryl heme radical and non-radical ferryl heme were generated rapidly by the interaction of heme and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The activated heme radical could initiate the oxidation of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). The reactions by heme with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} could support the redox cycling between the ferryl species of heme and 5-ASA as the mechanistic routes of the heme catalyzed reaction. Hazardous compounds such as pentachlorophenol, phenanthrene and benzota[a]pyrene were mineralized 20, 6, and 7%, respectively, with 30 mM heme and 1500 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} after 24 hr reaction. This catalyzed degradation of organopollutants could be used as a novel technology for hazardous waste remediation.

  10. The C-Terminal Heme Regulatory Motifs of Heme Oxygenase-2 Are Redox-Regulated Heme Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Sharma, Ajay; Choi, Michelle; Spencer, Andrea M.; Bagai, Ireena; Hoffman, Brian M.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-2 (HO2), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, contains three heme regulatory motifs (HRMs) centered at Cys127, Cys265, and Cys282. Previous studies using the soluble form of human HO2 spanning residues 1–288 (HO2sol) have shown that a disulfide bond forms between Cys265 and Cys282 and that, in this oxidized state, heme binds to the catalytic site of HO2sol via His45. However, various mutational and spectroscopic studies have confirmed the involvement of cysteine in Fe3+-heme binding upon reduction of the disulfide bond. In an effort to understand how the HRMs are involved in binding of heme to disulfide-reduced HO2sol, in the work described here, we further investigated the properties of Fe3+-heme bound to HO2. Specifically, we investigated binding of Fe3+-heme to a truncated form of soluble HO2 (residues 213–288; HO2tail) that spans the C-terminal HRMs of HO2 but lacks the catalytic core. We found that HO2tail in the disulfide-reduced state binds Fe3+-heme and accounts for the spectral features observed upon binding of heme to the disulfide-reduced form of HO2sol that cannot be attributed to heme binding at the catalytic site. Further analysis revealed that while HO2sol binds one Fe3+-heme per monomer of protein under oxidizing conditions, disulfide-reduced HO2sol binds slightly more than two. Both Cys265 and Cys282 were identified as Fe3+-heme ligands, and His256 also acts as a ligand to the Cys265-ligated heme. Additionally, Fe3+-heme binds with a much weaker affinity to Cys282 than to Cys265, which has an affinity much weaker than that of the His45 binding site in the catalytic core. In summary, disulfide-reduced HO2 has multiple binding sites with varying affinities for Fe3+-heme. PMID:25853617

  11. Heme and iron induce protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Leonardo H; Vasconcellos, Luiz R C; Bozza, Marcelo T; Carneiro, Leticia A M

    2017-03-04

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed in many tissues where it plays key roles as the prosthetic group of several proteins involved in vital physiological and metabolic processes such as gas and electron transport. Structurally, heme is a tetrapyrrole ring containing an atom of iron (Fe) in its center. When released into the extracellular milieu, heme exerts several deleterious effects, which make it an important player in infectious and noninfectious hemolytic diseases where large amounts of free heme are observed such as malaria, dengue fever, β-thalassemia, sickle cell disease and ischemia-reperfusion. Our recent work has uncovered an unappreciated cellular response triggered by heme or Fe, one of its degradation products, on macrophages, which is the formation of protein aggregates known as aggresome-like induced structres (ALIS). This response was shown to be fully dependent on ROS production and the activation of the transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2. In addition, we have demonstrated that heme degradation by HMOX1/HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) is required and that Fe is essential for the formation of ALIS, as heme analogs lacking the central atom of Fe are not able to induce these structures. ALIS formation is also observed in vivo, in a model of phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced hemolysis, indicating that it is an integral part of the host response to excessive free heme and that it may play a role in cellular homeostasis.

  12. Understanding heme proteins with hyperfine spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    Heme proteins are versatile proteins that are involved in a large number of biological processes. Many spectroscopic methods are used to gain insight into the different mechanistic processes governing heme-protein functions. Since many (intermediate) states of heme proteins are paramagnetic, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods, such as hyperfine spectroscopy, offer unique tools for these investigations. This perspective gives an overview of the use of state-of-the-art hyperfine spectroscopy in heme research, focusing on the advantages, limits and challenges of the different techniques.

  13. Echinomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Nakazawa, Takehito; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    Echinomycin is an antitumor antibiotic secondary metabolite isolated from streptomycetes, whose core structure is biosynthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). The echinomycin biosynthetic pathway was successfully reconstituted in Escherichia coli. NRPS often contains a thioesterase domain at its C terminus for cyclorelease of the elongating peptide chain. Those thioesterase domains were shown to exhibit significant substrate tolerance. More recently, an oxidoreductase Ecm17, which forms the disulfide bridge in triostin A, was characterized. Surprisingly, an unrelated disulfide-forming enzyme GliT for gliotoxin biosynthesis was also able to catalyze the same reaction, providing another example of broad substrate specificity in secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes. Those promiscuous catalysts can be a valuable tool in generating diversity in natural products analogs we can produce heterologously.

  14. NikA binds heme: a new role for an Escherichia coli periplasmic nickel-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Mark; Heath, Mathew D; Poole, Robert K

    2007-05-01

    NikA is a periplasmic binding protein involved in nickel uptake in Escherichia coli. NikA was identified as a heme-binding protein in the periplasm of anaerobically grown cells overexpressing CydDC, an ABC transporter that exports reductant to the periplasm. CydDC-overexpressing cells accumulate a heme biosynthesis-derived pigment, P-574. For further biochemical and spectroscopic analysis, unliganded NikA was overexpressed and purified. NikA was found to comigrate with both hemin and protoporphyrin IX during gel filtration. Furthermore, tryptophan fluorescence quenching titrations demonstrated that both hemin and protoporphyrin IX bind to NikA with similar affinity. The binding affinity of NikA for these pigments (Kd approximately 0.5 microM) was unaltered in the presence and absence of saturating concentrations of nickel, suggesting that these tetrapyrroles bind to NikA in a manner independent of nickel. To test the hypothesis that NikA is required for periplasmic heme protein assembly, the effects of a nikA mutation (nikA::Tn5, Km(R) insertion) on accumulation of P-574 by CydDC-overexpressing cells was assessed. This mutation significantly lowered P-574 levels, implying that NikA may be involved in P-574 production. Thus, in the reducing environment of the periplasm, NikA may serve as a heme chaperone as well as a periplasmic nickel-binding protein. The docking of heme onto NikA was modeled using the published crystal structure; many of the predicted complexes exhibit a heme-binding cleft remote from the nickel-binding site, which is consistent with the independent binding of nickel and heme. This work has implications for the incorporation of heme into b- and c-type cytochromes.

  15. Iron and heme utilization in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Teresa; Simpson, Waltena; Liu, Xinyan; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2005-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with the initiation and progression of adult periodontal disease. Iron is utilized by this pathogen in the form of heme and has been shown to play an essential role in its growth and virulence. Recently, considerable attention has been given to the characterization of various secreted and surface-associated proteins of P. gingivalis and their contribution to virulence. In particular, the properties of proteins involved in the uptake of iron and heme have been extensively studied. Unlike other Gram-negative bacteria, P. gingivalis does not produce siderophores. Instead it employs specific outer membrane receptors, proteases (particularly gingipains), and lipoproteins to acquire iron/heme. In this review, we will focus on the diverse mechanisms of iron and heme acquisition in P. gingivalis. Specific proteins involved in iron and heme capture will be described. In addition, we will discuss new genes for iron/heme utilization identified by nucleotide sequencing of the P. gingivalis W83 genome. Putative iron- and heme-responsive gene regulation in P. gingivalis will be discussed. We will also examine the significance of heme/hemoglobin acquisition for the virulence of this pathogen.

  16. Dioxygen Binding to Protonated Heme in the Gas Phase, an Intermediate Between Ferric and Ferrous Heme.

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Soorkia, Satchin; Grégoire, Gilles; Broquier, Michel; Crestoni, Maria-Elisa; Soep, Benoît

    2017-09-27

    With a view to characterizing the influence of the electronic structure of the Fe atom on the nature of its bond with dioxygen (O2 ) in heme compounds, a study of the UV/Vis action spectra and binding energies of heme-O2 molecules has been undertaken in the gas phase. The binding reaction of protonated ferrous heme [Fe(II) -hemeH](+) with O2 has been studied in the gas phase by determining the equilibrium of complexed [Fe(II) -hemeH(O2 )](+) with uncomplexed protonated heme in an ion trap at controlled temperatures. The binding energy of O2 to the Fe atom of protonated ferrous heme was obtained from a van't Hoff plot. Surprisingly, this energy (1540±170 cm(-1) , 18.4±2 kJ mol(-1) ) is intermediate between those of ferric heme and ferrous heme. This result is interpreted in terms of a delocalization of the positive charge over the porphyrin cycle, such that the Fe atom bears a fractional positive charge. The resulting electron distribution on the Fe atom differs notably from that of a purely low-spin ferrous heme [Fe(II) -heme(O2 )] complex, as deduced from its absorption spectrum. It also differs from that of ferric heme [Fe(III) -heme(O2 )](+) , as evidenced by the absorption spectra. Protonated heme creates a specific bond that cannot accommodate strong σ donation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Distal regulation of heme binding of heme oxygenase-1 mediated by conformational fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Harada, Erisa; Sugishima, Masakazu; Harada, Jiro; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sugase, Kenji

    2015-01-20

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative degradation of heme. Since free heme is toxic to cells, rapid degradation of heme is important for maintaining cellular health. There have been useful mechanistic studies of the HO reaction based on crystal structures; however, how HO-1 recognizes heme is not completely understood because the crystal structure of heme-free rat HO-1 lacks electron densities for A-helix that ligates heme. In this study, we characterized conformational dynamics of HO-1 using NMR to elucidate the mechanism by which HO-1 recognizes heme. NMR relaxation experiments showed that the heme-binding site in heme-free HO-1 fluctuates in concert with a surface-exposed loop and transiently forms a partially unfolded structure. Because the fluctuating loop is located over 17 Å distal from the heme-binding site and its conformation is nearly identical among different crystal structures including catalytic intermediate states, the function of the loop has been unexamined. In the course of elucidating its function, we found interesting mutations in this loop that altered activity but caused little change to the conformation. The Phe79Ala mutation in the loop changed the conformational dynamics of the heme-binding site. Furthermore, the heme binding kinetics of the mutant was slower than that of the wild type. Hence, we concluded that the distal loop is involved in the regulation of the conformational change for heme binding through the conformational fluctuations. Similar to other enzymes, HO-1 effectively promotes its function using the identified distal sites, which might be potential targets for protein engineering.

  18. Heme-mediated inhibition of Bach1 regulates the liver specificity and transience of the Nrf2-dependent induction of zebrafish heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Yuji; Nakajima, Hitomi; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Nakajima, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The induction of the gene encoding heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1, HO-1) by Nrf2 is unique compared with other Nrf2 targets. We previously showed that the Nrf2a-mediated induction of zebrafish hmox1a was liver specific and transient. We screened transcription factors that could repress the induction of hmox1a but not other Nrf2a targets and concluded that Bach1b was a prime candidate. In bach1b-knocked-down larvae, the induction of hmox1a was observed ectopically in nonliver tissues and persisted longer than normal fish, suggesting that Bach1 is the only regulator for both the liver-specific and transient induction of hmox1a. Co-knockdown of bach1b with its co-ortholog bach1a enhanced these effects. To determine why Bach1 could not repress the hmox1a induction in the liver, we analyzed the effects of a heme biosynthesis inhibitor, succinylacetone, and a heme precursor, hemin. Succinylacetone decreased the Nrf2a-mediated hmox1a induction, whereas pre-treatment with hemin caused ectopic induction of hmox1a in nonliver tissues, implying that the high heme levels in the liver may release the repressive activity of Bach1. Our results suggested that Bach1 regulates the liver specificity and transience of the Nrf2a-dependent induction of hmox1a and that heme mediates this regulation through Bach1 inhibition based on its level in each tissue.

  19. A Brief History of the Study of Fish Osmoregulation: The Central Role of the Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Mt. Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) has played a central role in the study of fish osmoregulation for the past 80 years. In particular, scientists at the MDIBL have made significant discoveries in the basic pattern of fish osmoregulation, the function of aglomerular kidneys and proximal tubular secretion, the roles of NaCl cotransporters in intestinal uptake and gill and rectal gland secretion, the role of the shark rectal gland in osmoregulation, the mechanisms of salt secretion by the teleost fish gill epithelium, and the evolution of the ionic uptake mechanisms in fish gills. This short review presents the history of these discoveries and their relationships to the study of epithelial transport in general. PMID:21423356

  20. Heme oxygenase: evolution, structure, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Angela

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase has evolved to carry out the oxidative cleavage of heme, a reaction essential in physiological processes as diverse as iron reutilization and cellular signaling in mammals, synthesis of essential light-harvesting pigments in cyanobacteria and higher plants, and the acquisition of iron by bacterial pathogens. In all of these processes, heme oxygenase has evolved a similar structural and mechanistic scaffold to function within seemingly diverse physiological pathways. The heme oxygenase reaction is catalytically distinct from that of other hemoproteins such as the cytochromes P450, peroxidases, and catalases, but shares a hemoprotein scaffold that has evolved to generate a distinct activated oxygen species. In the following review we discuss the evolution of the structural and functional properties of heme oxygenase in light of the recent crystal structures of the mammalian and bacterial enzymes.

  1. Glucocorticoids accelerate maturation of the heme pathway in fetal liver through effects on transcription and DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Khulan, Batbayar; Liu, Lincoln; Rose, Catherine M.; Boyle, Ashley K.; Manning, Jonathan R.; Drake, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucocorticoids are widely used in threatened preterm labor to promote maturation in many organ systems in preterm babies and have significant beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. We performed transcriptional profiling in fetal liver in a rat model of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and identified marked gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis, utilization, and degradation pathways in late gestation. These changes in gene expression associated with alterations in DNA methylation and with a reduction in hepatic heme concentration. There were no persistent differences in gene expression, DNA methylation, or heme concentrations at 4 weeks of age, suggesting that these are transient effects. Our findings are consistent with glucocorticoid-induced accelerated maturation of the haematopoietic system and support the hypothesis that glucocorticoids can drive changes in gene expression in association with alterations in DNA methylation. PMID:26889791

  2. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  3. Reversible binding of heme to proteins in cellular signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shangwei; Reynolds, Mark F; Horrigan, Frank T; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2006-12-01

    Heme plays critical roles in numerous biological phenomena. Recent evidence has uncovered a new role of heme in cellular signal transduction, and its mechanism involves reversible binding of heme to proteins. This Account highlights the novel function of heme as an intracellular messenger in the regulation of gene expression and ion channel function.

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  5. HEME-HEME COMUNICATION DURING THE ALKALINE INDUCED STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN CYTOCROME C OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong; Rousseau, Denis L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline induced conformational changes at pH 12.0 in the oxidized as well as the reduced state of cytochrome c oxidase have been systematically studied with time-resolved optical absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies. In the reduced state, the heme a3 first converts from the native five-coordinate configuration to a six-coordinate bis-histidine intermediate as a result of the coordination of one of the CuB ligands, H290 or H291, to the heme iron. The coordination state change in the heme a3 causes the alteration in the microenvironment of the formyl group of the heme a3 and the disruption of the H-bond between R38 and the formyl group of the heme a. This structural transition, which occurs within 1 minute following the initiation of the pH jump, is followed by a slower reaction, in which Schiff base linkages are formed between the formyl groups of the two hemes and their nearby amino acid residues, presumably R38 and R302 for the heme a and a3, respectively. In the oxidized enzyme, a similar Schiff base modification on heme a and a3 was observed but it is triggered by the coordination of the H290 or H291 to heme a3 followed by the breakage of the native proximal H378-iron and H376-iron bonds in heme a and a3, respectively. In both oxidation states, the synchronous formation of the Schiff base linkages in heme a and a3 relies on the structural communication between the two hemes via the H-bonding network involving R438 and R439 and the propionate groups of the two hemes as well as the helix X housing the two proximal ligands, H378 and H376, of the hemes. The heme-heme communication mechanism revealed in this work may be important in controlling the coupling of the oxygen and redox chemistry in the heme sites to proton pumping during the enzymatic turnover of CcO. PMID:18187199

  6. Osmoregulation in the Avena coleoptile in relation to auxin and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, T.T.; Cleland, R.E.

    1981-04-01

    A study has been made of the effects of auxin and growth on the ability of Avena coleoptile sections to osmoregulate, i.e., to take up solutes so as to maintain their osmotic concentration, turgor pressure, and growth rate. The high auxin-induced growth rate of Avena coleoptiles is maintained when cells are provided sucrose, glucose, NaCl, or KCl as a source of absorbable solutes, but not when 2-deoxy-O-glucose or 3-O-methyl-O-glucose is used. In the absence of auxin, cells take up solutes from a 2% sucrose solution and the osmotic concentration increases. Solute uptake is not stimulated by auxin when growth is inhibited osmotically or by calcium ions. Solute uptake appears to have two components: a basal rate, independent of auxin or growth, and an additional uptake which is proportional to growth. Osmoregulation of sections may be limited by the rate of entry of solutes into the tissue rather than by their rate of uptake into the cells.

  7. Cloning and in vitro characterization of a Schistosoma japonicum aquaglyceroporin that functions in osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuzheng; Li, Wei; Lu, Wuguang; Xiong, Chunrong; Yang, Yang; Yan, Huaijiang; Liu, Kun Connie; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    As one of the three major human pathogens that cause schistosomiasis, Schistosoma japonicum is the only one that is endemic in China. Despite great progress on schistosomiasis control over the past 50 years in China, S. japonicum transmission still occurs in certain endemic regions, which causes significant public health problems and enormous economic losses. During different life stages, parasites are able to survive dramatic osmolality changes between its vector, fresh water, and mammal host. However, the molecular mechanism of parasite osmoregulation remains unknown. To address this challenging question, we report the first cloning of an S. japonicum aquaglyceroporin (SjAQP) from an isolate from Jiangsu province, China. Expressing SjAQP in Xenopus oocytes facilitated the permeation of water, glycerol, and urea. The water permeability of SjAQP was inhibited by 1 mM HgCl2, 3 mM tetraethylammonium, 1 mM ZnCl2, and 1 mM CuSO4. SjAQP was constitutively expressed throughout the S. japonicum life cycle, including in the egg, miracidia, cercaria, and adult stages. The highest expression was detected during the infective cercaria stage. Our results suggest that SjAQP plays a role in osmoregulation throughout the S. japonicum life cycle, especially during cercariae transformation, which enables parasites to survive osmotic challenges. PMID:27733755

  8. Effects of fresh and seawater ingestion on osmoregulation in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Sam; Venn-Watson, Stephanie

    2010-04-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are marine mammals with body water needs challenged by little access to fresh water and constant exposure to salt water. Osmoregulation has been studied in marine mammals for a century. Research assessing the effects of ingested fresh water or seawater in dolphins, however, has been limited to few animals and sampling times. Nine 16- to 25-h studies were conducted on eight adult dolphins to assess the hourly impact of fresh water, seawater, and seawater with protein ingestion on plasma and urine osmolality, urine flow rate (ufr), urinary and plasma solute concentrations, and solute clearance rates. Fresh water ingestion increased ufr. Fresh water ingestion also decreased plasma and urine osmolality, sodium and chloride urine concentrations, and solute excretion rates. Seawater ingestion resulted in increased ufr, sodium, chloride, and potassium urine concentrations, sodium excretion rates, and urine osmolality. Seawater with protein ingestion was associated with increased ufr, plasma osmolality, sodium excretion, and sodium, chloride, potassium, and urea urine concentrations. In conclusion, bottlenose dolphins appear to maintain water and plasma solute balance after ingesting fresh water or seawater by altering urine osmolality and solute clearance. Ingestion of protein with seawater appears to further push osmoregulation limits and urine solute concentrations in dolphins.

  9. Osmoregulation in water-deprived rats drinking hypertonic saline: effect of area postrema lesions.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E M; Craver, C F; Curtis, K S; Peacock-Kinzig, K A; Sved, A F; Smith, J C

    2001-03-01

    Rats drank rapidly when 0.3 M NaCl was the only drinking fluid available after overnight water deprivation, consuming approximately 200 ml/24 h. Although such large intakes of this hypertonic solution initially elevated plasma osmolality, excretion of comparable volumes of urine more concentrated than 300 meq Na(+)/l ultimately appears to restore plasma osmolality to normal levels. Rats drank approximately 100 ml of 0.5 M NaCl after overnight water deprivation, but urine Na(+) concentration (U(Na)) did not increase sufficiently to achieve osmoregulation. When an injected salt load exacerbated the initial dehydration caused by water deprivation, rats increased U(Na) to void the injected load and did not significantly alter 24-h intake of 0.3 or 0.5 M NaCl. Rats with lesions of area postrema had much higher saline intakes and lower U(Na) than did intact control rats; nonetheless, they appeared to osmoregulate well while drinking 0.3 M NaCl but not while drinking 0.5 M NaCl. Detailed analyses of drinking behavior by intact rats suggest that individual bouts were terminated by some rapid postabsorptive consequence of the ingested NaCl load that inhibited further NaCl intake, not by a fixed intake volume or number of licks that temporarily satiated thirst.

  10. Osmoregulation and epithelial water transport: lessons from the intestine of marine teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    For teleost fish living in seawater, drinking the surrounding medium is necessary to avoid dehydration. This is a key component of their osmoregulatory strategy presenting the challenge of excreting excess salts while achieving a net retention of water. The intestine has an established role in osmoregulation, and its ability to effectively absorb fluid is crucial to compensating for water losses to the hyperosmotic environment. Despite this, the potential for the teleost intestine to serve as a comparative model for detailed, integrative experimental studies on epithelial water transport has so far gone largely untapped. The following review aims to present an assessment of the teleost intestine as a fluid-transporting epithelium. Beginning with a brief overview of marine teleost osmoregulation, emphasis shifts to the processing of ingested seawater by the gastrointestinal tract and the characteristics of intestinal ion and fluid transport. Particular attention is given to acid-base transfers by the intestine, specifically bicarbonate secretion, which creates the distinctly alkaline gut fluids responsible for the formation of solid calcium carbonate precipitates. The respective contributions of these unique features to intestinal fluid absorption, alongside other recognised ion transport processes, are then subsequently considered within the wider context of the classic physiological problem of epithelial water transport.

  11. A comparative study of osmoregulation in four fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae: Uca).

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Chen; Su, Yong-Chao; Su, Shan-Hui

    2002-06-01

    This study aims to give an integrative description of the correlation of physiological parameters of osmoregulation and the habitats of the four common Uca species in Taiwan. Uca arcuata inhabits areas close to fresh water in the upper beach. Uca formosensis is only found in the areas near the mean high water of spring tide where there is a clear dry-wet transition within a single semilunar cycle. Uca vocans is found in the lower intertidal zone. Uca lactea, the most widely distributed species, can easily be found on most muddy sand shores. The number of gills was observed and histological sectioning performed on each species. The range of salinity in which the fiddler crabs maintained their hemolymph osmolality without any significant change (i.e. osmoregulatory homeostasis) and the gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity were determined by transferring individuals to different salinity tanks. The results suggest that U. formosensis and U. lactea can sustain a wider range of salinity change through both modification in gill morphology and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. Uca arcuata can regulate in a hypo-osmotic condition and U. vocans tends to be a weak-osmoregulator.

  12. Computational prediction of the osmoregulation network in Synechococcus sp. WH8102

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osmotic stress is caused by sudden changes in the impermeable solute concentration around a cell, which induces instantaneous water flow in or out of the cell to balance the concentration. Very little is known about the detailed response mechanism to osmotic stress in marine Synechococcus, one of the major oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterial genera that contribute greatly to the global CO2 fixation. Results We present here a computational study of the osmoregulation network in response to hyperosmotic stress of Synechococcus sp strain WH8102 using comparative genome analyses and computational prediction. In this study, we identified the key transporters, synthetases, signal sensor proteins and transcriptional regulator proteins, and found experimentally that of these proteins, 15 genes showed significantly changed expression levels under a mild hyperosmotic stress. Conclusions From the predicted network model, we have made a number of interesting observations about WH8102. Specifically, we found that (i) the organism likely uses glycine betaine as the major osmolyte, and others such as glucosylglycerol, glucosylglycerate, trehalose, sucrose and arginine as the minor osmolytes, making it efficient and adaptable to its changing environment; and (ii) σ38, one of the seven types of σ factors, probably serves as a global regulator coordinating the osmoregulation network and the other relevant networks. PMID:20459751

  13. Ontogeny of osmoregulation and salinity tolerance in the gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Bodinier, Charlotte; Sucré, Elliott; Lecurieux-Belfond, Laura; Blondeau-Bidet, Eva; Charmantier, Guy

    2010-11-01

    The gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata, is a euryhaline teleost that hatches in the open sea. The larvae drift to the coast and juveniles migrate into estuaries and lagoons where the salinity of the water may vary from brackish to hyper-saline. The ontogeny of osmoregulation in Sparus aurata was studied at successive stages, from day 1 (D1) post-hatch to the late juvenile stage (D300) after exposure to different salinities ranging from fresh water to 45.1 per thousand, at 18 degrees C. Survival ranged from between 5.1 and 39.1 per thousand at D3, and from 1.0 to 45.1 per thousand from D75. The fish were hyper-hypo-osmotic regulators at all studied stages. The acquisition of the full ability to hypo- and hyper-regulate occurred in four steps. The osmoregulatory capacity appeared age-dependent and reached its maximum level after D96, and the localization of ionocytes in the integument and gills occurred concurrently during development of the sea bream. However, the main site of osmoregulation shifted from the integument to the gills from D30 to D70, with a corresponding sharp increase in the osmoregulatory ability. Our results suggest that the early development of osmoregulatory ability, and thus of salinity tolerance in the sea bream may provide an advantageous flexibility for the timing of the migration between sea and estuaries and lagoons.

  14. Relaxed selection causes microevolution of seawater osmoregulation and gene expression in landlocked Alewives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velotta, Jonathan P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; O'Neill, Rachel J.; Schultz, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological transitions from marine to freshwater environments have been important in the creation of diversity among fishes. Evolutionary changes associated with these transitions likely involve modifications of osmoregulatory function. In particular, relaxed selection on hypo-osmoregulation should strongly affect animals that transition into novel freshwater environments. We used populations of the Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to study evolutionary shifts in hypo-osmoregulatory capacity and ion regulation associated with freshwater transitions. Alewives are ancestrally anadromous, but multiple populations in Connecticut have been independently restricted to freshwater lakes; these landlocked populations complete their entire life cycle in freshwater. Juvenile landlocked and anadromous Alewives were exposed to three salinities (1, 20 and 30 ppt) in small enclosures within the lake. We detected strong differentiation between life history forms: landlocked Alewives exhibited reduced seawater tolerance and hypo-osmoregulatory performance compared to anadromous Alewives. Furthermore, gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity and transcription of genes for seawater osmoregulation (NKCC—Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter and CFTR—cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) exhibited reduced responsiveness to seawater challenge. Our study demonstrates that adaptations of marine-derived species to completely freshwater life cycles involve partial loss of seawater osmoregulatory performance mediated through changes to ion regulation in the gill.

  15. An organelle K+ channel is required for osmoregulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Wu, Xiaoan; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hucheng; Pan, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    Fresh water protozoa and algae face hypotonic challenges in their living environment. Many of them employ a contractile vacuole system to uptake excessive water from the cytoplasm and expel it to the environment to achieve cellular homeostasis. K(+), a major osmolyte in contractile vacuole, is predicted to create higher osmolarity for water influx. Molecular mechanisms for K(+) permeation through the plasma membrane have been well studied. However, how K(+) permeates organelles such as the contractile vacuole is not clear. Here, we show that the six-transmembrane K(+) channel KCN11 in Chlamydomonas is exclusively localized to contractile vacuole. Ectopic expression of KCN11 in HEK293T cells results in voltage-gated K(+) channel activity. Disruption of the gene or mutation of key residues for K(+) permeability of the channel leads to dysfunction of cell osmoregulation in very hypotonic conditions. The contractile cycle is inhibited in the mutant cells with a slower rate of contractile vacuole swelling, leading to cell death. These data demonstrate a new role for six-transmembrane K(+) channels in contractile vacuole functioning and provide further insights into osmoregulation mediated by the contractile vacuole.

  16. Porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Guo, Jun-Tao; Hou, Weihong; Li, Ting; Narang, Tarun; Thapar, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are the key pigments of life on earth as we know it, because they include chlorophyll (a magnesium-containing metalloporphyrin) and heme (iron protoporphyrin). In eukaryotes, porphyrins and heme are synthesized by a multistep pathway that involves eight enzymes. The first and rate-controlling step is the formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glycine plus succinyl CoA, catalyzed by ALA synthase. Intermediate steps occur in the cytoplasm, with formation of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen and the tetrapyrroles hydroxymethylbilane and a series of porphyrinogens, which are serially decarboxylated. Heme is utilized chiefly for the formation of hemoglobin in erythrocytes, myoglobin in muscle cells, cytochromes P-450 and mitochondrial cytochromes, and other hemoproteins in hepatocytes. The rate-controlling step of heme breakdown is catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HMOX), of which there are two isoforms, called HMOX1 and HMOX2. HMOX breaks down heme to form biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. The porphyrias are a group of disorders, mainly inherited, in which there are defects in normal porphyrin and heme synthesis. The cardinal clinical features are cutaneous (due to the skin-damaging effects of excess deposited porphyrins) or neurovisceral attacks of pain, sometimes with weakness, delirium, seizures, and the like (probably due mainly to neurotoxic effects of ALA). The treatment of choice for the acute hepatic porphyrias is intravenous heme therapy, which repletes a critical regulatory heme pool in hepatocytes and leads to downregulation of hepatic ALA synthase, which is a biochemical hallmark of all forms of acute porphyria in relapse.

  17. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  18. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, Halina; Wojaczynski, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw; Olczak, Teresa

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  19. delta-Aminolevulinate couples cycA transcription to changes in heme availability in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Schilke, B A; Donohue, T J

    1992-07-05

    In this paper, the response of the transcriptional control region of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c2 gene, cycA, to intermediates in heme biosynthesis was studied. To determine if cycA transcription was regulated by heme availability, several precursors or analogs of tetrapyrroles were tested. Addition of delta-aminolevulinate (ALA), the first committed intermediate in heme biosynthesis, was shown to inhibit cycA transcription initiation at both the upstream and downstream promoter regions. In addition, an ALA auxotroph, which can grow in the presence of high levels of ALA, showed a 5 to 7-fold reduction in steady-state transcription from cycA::lacZYA operon fusions. To identify genetic elements responsible for negative regulation by ALA, trans-acting mutants with increased expression of cycA were isolated that were resistant to growth inhibition by the heme analog cohemin. These cohemin-resistant mutants (Chr) have elevated levels of several cycA transcripts and they contain cycA transcripts that had not previously been detected in wild-type cells. In addition, cycA transcription in the Chr mutants continues after the addition of ALA. Finally, we found that Chr mutants have increased ALA synthase activity, suggesting that synthesis of cytochrome c2 and ALA synthase are controlled by a common gene product whose activity has been modified in these mutants. A model is presented to explain how changes in tetrapyrrole intermediates could provide an effective signal to control both cycA transcription and ALA synthase synthesis in R. sphaeroides.

  20. Intestinal Absorption of Hemoglobin Iron-Heme Cleavage by Mucosal Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffin, Steven B.; Woo, Choong H.; Roost, Kenneth T.; Price, David C.; Schmid, Rudi

    1974-01-01

    Hemoglobin and myoglobin are a major source of dietary iron in man. Heme, separated from these hemoproteins by intraluminal proteolysis, is absorbed intact by the intestinal mucosa. The absorbed heme is cleaved in the mucosal cell releasing inorganic iron. Although this mucosal heme-splitting activity initially was ascribed to xanthine oxidase, we investigated the possibility that it is catalyzed by microsomal heme oxygenase, an enzyme which converts heme to bilirubin, CO, and inorganic iron. Microsomes prepared from rat intestinal mucosa contain enzymatic activity similar to that of heme oxygenase in liver and spleen. The intestinal enzyme requires NADPH; is completely inhibited by 50% CO; and produces bilirubin IX-α, identified spectrophotometrically and chromatographically. Moreover, duodenal heme oxygenase was shown to release inorganic 55Fe from 55Fe-heme. Along the intestinal tract, enzyme activity was found to be highest in the duodenum where hemoglobin iron absorption is reported to be most active. Furthermore, when rats were made iron deficient, duodenal heme oxygenase activity and hemoglobin-iron absorption rose to a comparable extent. Upon iron repletion of iron-deficient animals, duodenal enzyme activity returned towards control values. In contrast to heme oxygenase, duodenal xanthine oxidase activity fell sharply in iron deficiency and rose towards base line upon iron repletion. Our findings suggest that mucosal heme oxygenase catalyzes the cleavage of heme absorbed in the intestinal mucosa and thus plays an important role in the absorption of hemoglobin iron. The mechanisms controlling this intestinal enzyme activity and the enzyme's role in the overall regulation of hemoglobin-iron absorption remain to be defined. PMID:4436436

  1. In-Cell Enzymology To Probe His-Heme Ligation in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sigala, Paul A; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2016-08-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a ubiquitous enzyme with key roles in inflammation, cell signaling, heme disposal, and iron acquisition. HO catalyzes the oxidative conversion of heme to biliverdin (BV) using a conserved histidine to coordinate the iron atom of bound heme. This His-heme interaction has been regarded as being essential for enzyme activity, because His-to-Ala mutants fail to convert heme to biliverdin in vitro. We probed a panel of proximal His mutants of cyanobacterial, human, and plant HO enzymes using a live-cell activity assay based on heterologous co-expression in Escherichia coli of each HO mutant and a fluorescent biliverdin biosensor. In contrast to in vitro studies with purified proteins, we observed that multiple HO mutants retained significant activity within the intracellular environment of bacteria. X-ray crystallographic structures of human HO1 H25R with bound heme and additional functional studies suggest that HO mutant activity inside these cells does not involve heme ligation by a proximal amino acid. Our study reveals unexpected plasticity in the active site binding interactions with heme that can support HO activity within cells, suggests important contributions by the surrounding active site environment to HO catalysis, and can guide efforts to understand the evolution and divergence of HO function.

  2. Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans (OPGs) of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium are needed for optimal growth under nutrient limiting- hypoosmotic conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are major periplasmic constituents of gram negative bacteria. Synthesis of OPGs is regulated by the osmolarity of the growth medium. The role of OPGs has been postulated in plant-symbiotic as well as pathogenic microorganisms. On the other hand, opg mutant...

  3. Osmoregulation in larvae and juveniles of two recently separated Macrobrachium species: Expression patterns of ion transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Boudour-Boucheker, Nesrine; Boulo, Viviane; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille; Anger, Klaus; Charmantier, Guy; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    In this comparative study, osmoregulatory mechanisms were analyzed in two closely related species of palaemonid shrimp from Brazil, Macrobrachium pantanalense and Macrobrachium amazonicum. A previous investigation showed that all postembryonic stages of M. pantanalense from inland waters of the Pantanal are able to hyper-osmoregulate in fresh water, while this species was not able to hypo-osmoregulate at high salinities. In M. amazonicum originating from the Amazon estuary, in contrast, all stages are able to hypo-osmoregulate, but only first-stage larvae, late juveniles and adults are able to hyper-osmoregulate in fresh water. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these physiological differences have not been known. We therefore investigated the expression patterns of three ion transporters (NKA α-subunit, VHA B-subunit and NHE3) following differential salinity acclimation in different ontogenetic stages (stage-V larvae, juveniles) of both species. Larval NKAα expression was at both salinities significantly higher in M. pantanalense than in M. amazonicum, whereas no difference was noted in juveniles. VHA was also more expressed in larvae of M. pantanalense than in those of M. amazonicum. When NHE3 expression is compared between the larvae of the two species, further salinity-related differences were observed, with generally higher expression in the inland species. Overall, a high expression of ion pumps in M. pantanalense suggests an evolutionary key role of these transporters in freshwater invasion.

  4. Function and distribution of bilin biosynthesis enzymes in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2008-10-01

    Bilins are open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules essential for light-harvesting and/or sensing in many photosynthetic organisms. While they serve as chromophores in phytochrome-mediated light-sensing in plants, they additionally function in light-harvesting in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptomonads. Associated to phycobiliproteins a variety of bile pigments is responsible for the specific light-absorbance properties of the organisms enabling efficient photosynthesis under different light conditions. The initial step of bilin biosynthesis is the cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases (HO) to afford the first linear molecule biliverdin. This reaction is ubiquitously found also in non-photosynthetic organisms. Biliverdin is then further reduced by site specific reductases most of them belonging to the interesting family of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs)-a new family of radical oxidoreductases. In recent years much progress has been made in the field of heme oxygenases but even more in the widespread family of FDBRs, revealing novel biochemical FDBR activities, new crystal structures and new ecological aspects, including the discovery of bilin biosynthesis genes in wild marine phage populations. The aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the recent progress in this field and to highlight the new and remaining questions.

  5. Characterization of plasma labile heme in hemolytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Zélia; Carlos, Ana R; Yuan, Xiaojing; Aires-da-Silva, Frederico; Stocker, Roland; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Leal, Sónia S; Gomes, Cláudio M; Todorovic, Smilja; Iranzo, Olga; Ramos, Susana; Santos, Ana C; Hamza, Iqbal; Gonçalves, João; Soares, Miguel P

    2017-10-01

    Extracellular hemoglobin, a byproduct of hemolysis, can release its prosthetic heme groups upon oxidation. This produces metabolically active heme that is exchangeable between acceptor proteins, macromolecules and low molecular weight ligands, termed here labile heme. As it accumulates in plasma labile heme acts in a pro-oxidant manner and regulates cellular metabolism while exerting pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects that foster the pathogenesis of hemolytic diseases. Here, we developed and characterized a panel of heme-specific single domain antibodies (sdAbs) that together with a cellular-based heme reporter assay, allow for quantification and characterization of labile heme in plasma during hemolytic conditions. Using these approaches, we demonstrate that when generated during hemolytic conditions labile heme is bound to plasma molecules with an affinity higher than 10(-7) m and that 2-8% (~ 2-5 μm) of the total amount of heme detected in plasma can be internalized by bystander cells, termed here bioavailable heme. Acute, but not chronic, hemolysis is associated with transient reduction of plasma heme-binding capacity, that is, the ability of plasma molecules to bind labile heme with an affinity higher than 10(-7) m. The heme-specific sdAbs neutralize the pro-oxidant activity of soluble heme in vitro, suggesting that these maybe used to counter the pathologic effects of labile heme during hemolytic conditions. Finally, we show that heme-specific sdAbs can be used to visualize cellular heme. In conclusion, we describe a panel of heme-specific sdAbs that when used with other approaches provide novel insights to the pathophysiology of heme. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis: a radical approach to posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Victor L; Liu, Aimin

    2012-11-01

    Protein-derived cofactors are formed by irreversible covalent posttranslational modification of amino acid residues. An example is tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) found in the enzyme methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). TTQ biosynthesis requires the cross-linking of the indole rings of two Trp residues and the insertion of two oxygen atoms onto adjacent carbons of one of the indole rings. The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the completion of TTQ within a precursor protein of MADH. The preMADH substrate contains a single hydroxyl group on one of the tryptophans and no crosslink. MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation that completes TTQ assembly and generates fully active MADH. These oxidation reactions proceed via a high valent bis-Fe(IV) state in which one heme is present as Fe(IV)=O and the other is Fe(IV) with both axial heme ligands provided by amino acid side chains. The crystal structure of MauG in complex with preMADH revealed that catalysis does not involve direct contact between the hemes of MauG and the protein substrate. Rather it is accomplished through long-range electron transfer, which presumably generates radical intermediates. Kinetic, spectrophotometric, and site-directed mutagenesis studies are beginning to elucidate how the MauG protein controls the reactivity of the hemes and mediates the long range electron/radical transfer required for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology.

  7. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  8. Heme Oxygenases in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam; Stocker, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Heme oxygenases are composed of two isozymes, Hmox1 and Hmox2, that catalyze the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous iron, and biliverdin, the latter of which is subsequently converted to bilirubin. While initially considered to be waste products, CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown over the last 20 years to modulate key cellular processes, such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as antioxidant defense. This shift in paradigm has led to the importance of heme oxygenases and their products in cell physiology now being well accepted. The identification of the two human cases thus far of heme oxygenase deficiency and the generation of mice deficient in Hmox1 or Hmox2 have reiterated a role for these enzymes in both normal cell function and disease pathogenesis, especially in the context of cardiovascular disease. This review covers the current knowledge on the function of both Hmox1 and Hmox2 at both a cellular and tissue level in the cardiovascular system. Initially, the roles of heme oxygenases in vascular health and the regulation of processes central to vascular diseases are outlined, followed by an evaluation of the role(s) of Hmox1 and Hmox2 in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, myocardial infarction, and angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of heme oxygenases and their products are examined in a cardiovascular disease context, with a focus on how the knowledge we have gained on these enzymes may be capitalized in future clinical studies.

  9. Planetary change and biochemical adaptation: molecular evolution of corrinoid and heme biosyntheses.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    This review examines the evidence suggesting that the anaerobic biosynthesis of cobalamin (vitamin B12) evolved during early stages of cell evolution and was quickly recruited in the pathway leading to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks of DNA genomes. Biochemical evolution preceding the synthesis of the heme group and related molecules is discussed within the framework of geological evolution in which the appearance and accumulation of an oxygen-rich atmosphere stands as one of the major events in the evolution of the planet and the biosphere.

  10. Crystal structure of dimeric heme oxygenase-2 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in complex with heme.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2005-03-22

    Phycobiliproteins, light-harvesting proteins in cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptophytes, contain phycobilin pigments. Phycobilins are synthesized from biliverdin, which is produced by the oxidative cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO). Two paralogs of ho (ho1 and ho2) have been identified in the genome of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The recombinant proteins of both paralogs (Syn HO-1 and Syn HO-2) possess in vitro heme degradation activity. We have determined the crystal structures of Syn HO-2 in complex with heme (heme-Syn HO-2) and its reduced and NO bound forms. The heme-Syn HO-2 crystal was a nonmerohedral twin, and detwinned diffraction data were used to refine the structure. Although heme-Syn HO-2 shares common folding with other HOs, the C-terminal segment is ordered and turns back to the heme-binding side. Gel-filtration chromatography analysis and molecular packing in the crystal indicate that heme-Syn HO-2 forms a homodimer, in which the C-terminal ordered segments interact with each other. Because Syn HO-2 is a monomer in the apo state, the dimeric interaction may aid in the selection of the reducing partner but likely does not interfere with heme binding. The heme iron is coordinated by a water molecule in the ferric form, but the distal water is absent in the ferrous form. In all of the Syn HO-2 structures, several water molecules form a hydrogen-bond network at the distal hemepocket, which is involved in HO activity. Upon NO binding, the side-chain conformation of Tyr 156 changes. Tyr 156 is located at the hydrophobic cluster, which interrupts the possible H(+) pathway from the molecular surface to the hemepocket. Thus, Tyr 156 may function as a H(+) shuttle by changing conformation.

  11. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  12. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Ashley N.; Yuan, Xiaojing; Voronin, Denis; Slatko, Barton E.; Hamza, Iqbal; Foster, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Nematodes lack a heme biosynthetic pathway and must acquire heme from exogenous sources. Given the indispensable role of heme, this auxotrophy may be exploited to develop drugs that interfere with heme uptake in parasites. Although multiple heme-responsive genes (HRGs) have been characterized within the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we have undertaken the first study of heme transport in Brugia malayi, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis. Through functional assays in yeast, as well as heme analog, RNAi, and transcriptomic experiments, we have shown that the heme transporter B. malayi HRG-1 (BmHRG-1) is indeed functional in B. malayi. In addition, BmHRG-1 localizes both to the endocytic compartments and cell membrane when expressed in yeast cells. Transcriptomic sequencing revealed that BmHRG-1, BmHRG-2, and BmMRP-5 (all orthologs of HRGs in C. elegans) are down-regulated in heme-treated B. malayi, as compared to non–heme-treated control worms. Likely because of short gene lengths, multiple exons, other HRGs in B. malayi (BmHRG-3–6) remain unidentified. Although the precise mechanisms of heme homeostasis in a nematode with the ability to acquire heme remains unknown, this study clearly demonstrates that the filarial nematode B. malayi is capable of transporting exogenous heme.—Luck, A. N., Yuan, X., Voronin, D., Slatko, B. E., Hamza, I., Foster, J. M. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi. PMID:27363426

  13. Relaxation Dynamics in Heme Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Reinhard Wilhelm

    A protein molecule possesses many conformational substates that are likely arranged in a hierarchy consisting of a number of tiers. A hierarchical organization of conformational substates is expected to give rise to a multitude of nonequilibrium relaxation phenomena. If the temperature is lowered, transitions between substates of higher tiers are frozen out, and relaxation processes characteristic of lower tiers will dominate the observational time scale. This thesis addresses the following questions: (i) What is the energy landscape of a protein? How does the landscape depend on the environment such as pH and viscosity, and how can it be connected to specific structural parts? (ii) What relaxation phenomena can be observed in a protein? Which are protein specific, and which occur in other proteins? How does the environment influence relaxations? (iii) What functional form best describes relaxation functions? (iv) Can we connect the motions to specific structural parts of the protein molecule, and are these motions important for the function of the protein?. To this purpose, relaxation processes after a pressure change are studied in carbonmonoxy (CO) heme proteins (myoglobin-CO, substrate-bound and substrate-free cytochrome P450cam-CO, chloroperoxidase-CO, horseradish peroxidase -CO) between 150 K and 250 K using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the CO bound to the heme iron. Two types of p -relaxation experiments are performed: p-release (200 to ~eq40 MPa) and p-jump (~eq40 to 200 MPa) experiments. Most of the relaxations fall into one of three groups and are characterized by (i) nonexponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM1( nu), FIM1(Gamma)); (ii) exponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM0(A_{i}to A_{j})); exponential time dependence and Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIMX( nu)). The influence of pH is studied in myoglobin-CO and shown to have a strong influence on the substate population of the

  14. Conversion of a heme-based oxygen sensor to a heme oxygenase by hydrogen sulfide: effects of mutations in the heme distal side of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase (Ec DOS).

    PubMed

    Du, Yongming; Liu, Gefei; Yan, Yinxia; Huang, Dongyang; Luo, Wenhong; Martinkova, Marketa; Man, Petr; Shimizu, Toru

    2013-10-01

    The heme-based oxygen-sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (Ec DOS), is composed of an N-terminal heme-bound oxygen sensing domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. Oxygen (O2) binding to the heme Fe(II) complex in Ec DOS substantially enhances catalysis. Addition of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to the heme Fe(III) complex in Ec DOS also remarkably stimulates catalysis in part due to the heme Fe(III)-SH and heme Fe(II)-O2 complexes formed by H2S. In this study, we examined the roles of the heme distal amino acids, M95 (the axial ligand of the heme Fe(II) complex) and R97 (the O2 binding site in the heme Fe(II)-O2 complex) of the isolated heme-binding domain of Ec DOS (Ec DOS-PAS) in the binding of H2S under aerobic conditions. Interestingly, R97A and R97I mutant proteins formed an oxygen-incorporated modified heme, verdoheme, following addition of H2S combined with H2O2 generated by the reactions. Time-dependent mass spectroscopic data corroborated the findings. In contrast, H2S did not interact with the heme Fe(III) complex of M95H and R97E mutants. Thus, M95 and/or R97 on the heme distal side in Ec DOS-PAS significantly contribute to the interaction of H2S with the Fe(III) heme complex and also to the modification of the heme Fe(III) complex with reactive oxygen species. Importantly, mutations of the O2 binding site of the heme protein converted its function from oxygen sensor to that of a heme oxygenase. This study establishes the novel role of H2S in modifying the heme iron complex to form verdoheme with the aid of reactive oxygen species.

  15. Effect of disordered hemes on energy transfer rates between tryptophans and heme in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Z; Fronticelli, C; Tenenholz, T; Bucci, E

    1993-01-01

    Our recent linear dichroism study of heme transitions (Gryczynski, Z., E. Bucci, and J. Kusba. 1993. Photochem. Photobiology. in press) indicate that heme cannot be considered a planar oscillator when it acts as an acceptor of radiationless excitation energy transfer from tryptophan. The linear nature of the heme absorption transition moment in the near-UV region implies a strong dependence of the transfer rate factors on the relative angular position of the heme and tryptophan, i.e., on the kappa 2 orientation parameter of the Förster equation. Using the atomic coordinates of SW myoglobin we have estimated the variation of kappa 2 parameter as a function of the heme absorption transition moment direction. The simulations proved that transfer is very efficient and anticipates lifetimes in the picosecond range. Also, they showed that transfer is very sensitive to rotations of the heme around its alpha-gamma-meso-axis, which may reduce the efficiency of transfer to almost zero values, producing lifetimes very similar to those of free tryptophan, in the nanosecond range. Comparisons between the lifetime values reported in the literature and those here estimated suggest that natural heme disorder, in which heme is rotated 180 degrees around its meso axis, is at the origin of the nanosecond lifetimes found in myoglobin systems. PMID:8298024

  16. Supramolecular control of heme binding and electronic states in multi-heme peptide assemblies

    DOE PAGES

    Fry, H. Christopher; Solomon, Lee A.; Wood, Anna R.

    2017-08-28

    Nature guides the flow of electrons in biological systems with the assistance of multi-heme proteins called cytochromes. In an effort to understand natures approach to developing electronic systems, three peptides that are compositionally identical but sequentially distinct have been designed to study the impact of morphology and hydrophobicity on heme coordination and function.

  17. Biochemical and Mutational Characterization of the Heme Chaperone CcmE Reveals a Heme Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Enggist, Elisabeth; Schneider, Michael J.; Schulz, Henk; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2003-01-01

    CcmE is a heme chaperone that binds heme transiently in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and delivers it to newly synthesized and exported c-type cytochromes. The chemical nature of the covalent bond between heme and H130 is not known. We have purified soluble histidine-tagged CcmE and present its spectroscopic characteristics in the visible range. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of conserved amino acids revealed that H130 is the only residue found to be strictly required for heme binding and delivery. Mutation of the hydrophobic amino acids F37, F103, L127, and Y134 to alanine affected CcmE more than mutation of charged and polar residues. Our data are in agreement with the recently solved nuclear magnetic resonance structure of apo-CcmE (PDB code 1LIZ) and suggest that heme is bound to a hydrophobic platform at the surface of the protein and then attached to H130 by a covalent bond. Replacement of H130 with cysteine led to the formation of a covalent bond between heme and C130 at a low level. However, the H130C mutant CcmE was not active in cytochrome c maturation. Isolation and characterization of the heme-binding peptides obtained after a tryptic digest of wild-type and H130C CcmE support the hypothesis that heme is bound covalently at a vinyl group. PMID:12486054

  18. Is the weight loss of hyperbaric habitation a disorder of osmoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, L. W.; Raymond, N. S.; Frattiali, V. P.; Sode, J.; Leach, C. S.; Spaur, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    To examine the weight loss of hyperbaric helium-oxygen habitation, the exchange of liquids and calories was measured in six men who lived in this atmosphere for 32 d. The maximum pressure was 49.5 ATA. The men lost 3.7-10.1 kg, in spite of warm ambient (31-32 C) temperatures and adequate calories (2,737 kcal/d) provided for the sedentary ways of chamber living. Weight loss and a calculated fluid deficit were accompanied by significant hemoconcentration, shown by increases in serum proteins. These changes were followed by a rise in urinary aldosterone and vasopressin, but not thirst. Weight loss in hyperbaric atmospheres is probably multifactorial, but the data suggests an uncoupling of normal osmoregulation may have occured in the present set of subjects. This may have been due to altered lung mechanics, increased catecholamines, or effects of high pressure on cellular responses to vasopressin.

  19. Organellar mechanosensitive channels involved in hypo-osmoregulation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2014-12-01

    MscS and MscL, bacterial mechanosensitive channels, play crucial roles in the hypo-osmotic shock response. However, only MscS has homologs in eukaryotes. These homologs are called MscS-like proteins or MSL proteins. MSL proteins have changed both structurally and functionally during evolution and are now localized not only to the membrane of the chloroplast, which is thought to be a descendant of an ancient, free-living bacterium, but also the cell membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, suggesting that the role of MSL proteins has diverged. In this brief review, we mainly focus on two MSL proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that are localized in the ER membrane and protect cells from hypo-osmotic shock-induced death by regulating intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. We also discuss Arabidopsis thaliana MSL proteins and other yeast ion channels in terms of osmoregulation in eukaryotes.

  20. Is the weight loss of hyperbaric habitation a disorder of osmoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, L. W.; Raymond, N. S.; Frattiali, V. P.; Sode, J.; Leach, C. S.; Spaur, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    To examine the weight loss of hyperbaric helium-oxygen habitation, the exchange of liquids and calories was measured in six men who lived in this atmosphere for 32 d. The maximum pressure was 49.5 ATA. The men lost 3.7-10.1 kg, in spite of warm ambient (31-32 C) temperatures and adequate calories (2,737 kcal/d) provided for the sedentary ways of chamber living. Weight loss and a calculated fluid deficit were accompanied by significant hemoconcentration, shown by increases in serum proteins. These changes were followed by a rise in urinary aldosterone and vasopressin, but not thirst. Weight loss in hyperbaric atmospheres is probably multifactorial, but the data suggests an uncoupling of normal osmoregulation may have occured in the present set of subjects. This may have been due to altered lung mechanics, increased catecholamines, or effects of high pressure on cellular responses to vasopressin.

  1. Divergent mechanisms of iron-containing enzymes for hydrocarbon biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Courtney E; Grant, Job L; Amaya, Jose A; Ratigan, Steven C; Hsieh, Chun H; Manley, Olivia M; Makris, Thomas M

    2017-04-01

    Increasing levels of energy consumption, dwindling resources, and environmental considerations have served as compelling motivations to explore renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels, including enzymatic routes for hydrocarbon synthesis. Phylogenetically diverse species have long been recognized to produce hydrocarbons, but many of the enzymes responsible have been identified within the past decade. The enzymatic conversion of Cn chain length fatty aldehydes (or acids) to Cn-1 hydrocarbons, alkanes or alkenes, involves a C-C scission reaction. Surprisingly, the enzymes involved in hydrocarbon synthesis utilize non-heme mononuclear iron, dinuclear iron, and thiolate-ligated heme cofactors that are most often associated with monooxygenation reactions. In this review, we examine the mechanisms of several enzymes involved in hydrocarbon biosynthesis, with specific emphasis on the structural and electronic changes that enable this functional switch.

  2. The significance of gut sucrase activity for osmoregulation in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Karley, A J; Ashford, D A; Minto, L M; Pritchard, J; Douglas, A E

    2005-12-01

    The osmotic pressure of the body fluids of aphids is lower than in their diet of plant phloem sap. It is hypothesised that aphids reduce the osmotic pressure of ingested food by sucrase-mediated hydrolysis of dietary sucrose to glucose and fructose, and the polymerisation of glucose into oligosaccharides of low osmotic pressure per hexose unit. To test this hypothesis, the impact of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on the sugar relations and osmoregulation of aphids was explored. Acarbose inhibited sucrase activity in gut homogenates and the production of monosaccharides and oligosaccharides in the honeydew of live aphids. Acarbose caused an increase in the haemolymph osmotic pressure for aphids reared on a diet (containing 0.75 M sucrose) hyperosmotic to the haemolymph and not on the isoosmotic diet containing 0.2 M sucrose. It did not affect aphid feeding rate over 2 days, except at high concentrations on 0.75 M sucrose diet, and this may have been a secondary consequence of osmotic dysfunction. Acarbose-treated aphids died prematurely. With 5 microM dietary acarbose, mean survivorship on 0.2 M sucrose diet was 4.2 days, not significantly different from starved aphids, indicating that, although these aphids fed, they were deprived of utilisable carbon; and on 0.75 M sucrose diet, mean survivorship was just 2.8 days, probably as a consequence of osmotic failure. It is concluded that the aphid gut sucrase activity is essential for osmoregulation of aphids ingesting food hyperosmotic to their body fluids.

  3. Endocrinology of osmoregulation and thermoregulation of Australian desert tetrapods: A historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christine Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Many Australian tetrapods inhabit desert environments characterised by low productivity, unpredictable rainfall, high temperatures and high incident solar radiation. Maintaining a homeostatic milieu intérieur by osmoregulation and thermoregulation are two physiological challenges faced by tetrapods in deserts, and the endocrine system plays an important role in regulating these processes. There is a considerable body of work examining the osmoregulatory role of antidiuretic hormones for Australian amphibians, reptiles and mammals, with particular contributions concerning their role and function for wild, free-living animals in arid environments. The osmoregulatory role of the natriuretic peptide system has received some attention, while the role of adrenal corticosteroids has been more thoroughly investigated for reptiles and marsupials. The endocrinology of thermoregulation has not received similar attention. Reptiles are best-studied, with research examining the influence of arginine vasotocin and melatonin on body temperature, the role of prostaglandins in heart rate hysteresis and the effect of melanocyte-stimulating hormone on skin reflectivity. Australian mammals have been under-utilised in studies examining the regulation, development and evolution of endothermy, and there is little information concerning the endocrinology of thermoregulation for desert species. There is a paucity of data concerning the endocrinology of osmoregulation and thermoregulation for Australian desert birds. Studies of Australian desert fauna have made substantial contributions to endocrinology, but there is considerable scope for further research. A co-ordinated approach to examine arid-habitat adaptations of the endocrine system in an environmental and evolutionary context would be of particular value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Effects of abrupt salinity stress on osmoregulation of juvenile Rachycentron canadum].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Wen; Liu, Guang-Feng; Wang, Rui-Xuan; Su, You-Lu; Guo, Zhi-Xun; Feng, Juan

    2007-07-01

    Rachycentron canadum is a thriving mariculture species for offshore cage in southern Mainland and Taiwan of China, due to its rapid growth rate and high quality flesh. In this paper, the gill Na(+)-K+ ATPase (NKA) activity and iono- and osmoregulation of juvenile R. canadum were investigated in a 12 h stress of ambient salinities (0-45), and the results showed that after an abrupt transfer to the salinities of 0, 5, 15, 25, 37 (control) and 45, the death of juvenile R. canadum only occurred in salinity 0, with a mortality of 100% by the end of the experiment. In all treatments, the gill NKA activity and serum osmolality fluctuated in first 3 h, and then changed smoothly. The NKA activity varied with salinity grade in U shape, being significantly (P < 0.05) higher in salinity 5 and the lowest in salinity 15 in 12 h, while the serum osmolality (ranged 293-399 mOsmol x kg(-1)) presented a positive correlation with salinity. Serum [Na+] and [Cl-] concentration slightly increased with salinity within the period of 3-12 h, while serum [K+] displayed a reverse pattern. The isosmotic point was estimated as 328.2 mOsm x kg(-1) and corresponded to salinity 11.48. The isoionic points for serum [Na+], [K+] and [Cl-] were estimated as 155.2, 6.16, and 137.1 mmol x L(-1), which corresponded to the salinities of 10.68, 20.44 and 8.41, respectively. It was concluded that R. canadum could be characterized physiologically as a "higher-NKA-in-hyposmotic media" marine euryhaline teleost with the capability of rapid and effective hyper/hypo iono- and osmoregulation.

  5. Osmoregulation, the secretion of arginine vasopressin and its metabolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lindheimer, M D; Davison, J M

    1995-02-01

    This review stresses changes in osmoregulation as well as the secretion and metabolism of arginine vasopressin during pregnancy, focusing on human gestation. Pregnant women experience a decrease in body tonicity, plasma osmolality decreasing immediately after conception to a nadir approximately 10 mosmol/kg below non-pregnant levels early in pregnancy, after which a new steady state is maintained until term. Data from both human and rodent gestation have led to a formation of how these changes occur. The osmotic thresholds for thirst and antidiuretic hormone release decrease in parallel. Lowering the threshold to drink stimulates increased water intake and dilution of body fluids. Because arginine vasopressin (AVP) release is not suppressed at the usual level of body tonicity, the hormone continues to circulate and the ingested water is retained. Plasma osmolality declines until it is below the osmotic thirst threshold, and a new steady state with little change in water turnover is established. Pregnancy is characterized by increments in intravascular volume, but volume-sensing AVP release mechanisms appear to adjust as gestation progresses so that each new volume status is "sensed" as normal. The metabolic clearance of AVP increases fourfold, the rise paralleling that of circulating cystine aminopeptidase (vasopressinase), and enzyme produced by the placenta. Furthermore, the disposal rate of 1-deamino-8-D-AVP, and AVP analogue resistant to inactivation by vasopressinase, is unaltered in pregnancy. Thus, the increase in AVP's metabolism and the high circulating aminopeptidase levels have been implicated in certain forms of transient diabetes insipidus that occur in late pregnancy. Finally, mechanisms responsible for the altered osmoregulation in pregnancy are obscure, but chorionic gonadotropin and relaxin may be implicated in the changes.

  6. Heme/heme redox interaction and resolution of individual optical absorption spectra of the hemes in cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Dmitry A; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Mogi, Tatsushi; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2009-10-01

    Cytochrome bd is a terminal component of the respiratory chain of Escherichia coli catalyzing reduction of molecular oxygen to water. It contains three hemes, b(558), b(595), and d. The detailed spectroelectrochemical redox titration and numerical modeling of the data reveal significant redox interaction between the low-spin heme b(558) and high-spin heme b(595), whereas the interaction between heme d and either hemes b appears to be rather weak. However, the presence of heme d itself decreases much larger interaction between the two hemes b. Fitting the titration data with a model where redox interaction between the hemes is explicitly included makes it possible to extract individual absorption spectra of all hemes. The alpha- and beta-band reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectra agree with the data published earlier ([22] J.G. Koland, M.J. Miller, R.B. Gennis, Potentiometric analysis of the purified cytochrome d terminal oxidase complex from Escherichia coli, Biochemistry 23 (1984) 1051-1056., and [23] R.M. Lorence, J.G. Koland, R.B. Gennis, Coulometric and spectroscopic analysis of the purified cytochrome d complex of Escherichia coli: evidence for the identification of "cytochrome a(1)" as cytochrome b(595), Biochemistry 25 (1986) 2314-2321.). The Soret band spectra show lambda(max)=429.5 nm, lambda(min) approximately 413 nm (heme b(558)), lambda(max)=439 nm, lambda(min) approximately 400+/-1 nm (heme b(595)), and lambda(max)=430 nm, lambda(min)=405 nm (heme d). The spectral contribution of heme d to the complex Soret band is much smaller than those of either hemes b; the Soret/alpha (DeltaA(430):DeltaA(629)) ratio for heme d is 1.6.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Evidence for Osmoregulation of the Δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase (proC) Gene in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) 12

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Cynthia L.; Slocum, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    Several cDNA clones encoding Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR, l-proline:NAD[P]+ 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the terminal step in proline biosynthesis, were isolated from a pea leaf library screened with a 32P-labeled Aval fragment of a soybean nodule P5CR cDNA (A.J. Delauney, D.P.S. Verma [1990] Mol Gen Genet 221: 299-305). DNA sequence analysis of one full-length 1.3-kb clone (pPPS3) indicated that the pea P5CR gene contains a single major open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 28,242 Da. Genomic analysis suggested that two to three copies of the P5CR gene are present per haploid genome in pea. The primary structure of pea P5CR is 85% identical with that of soybean and exhibits significant homology to human, yeast, and Escherichia coli P5CR. The sequence of one of four highly conserved domains found in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic P5CRs is similar to the consensus sequence for the NAD(P)H-binding site of other enzymes. The pea P5CR cDNA hybridized to two transcripts, 1.3 and 1.1 kb in size, in polyadenylated RNA purified from leaf tissues of mature, light-grown plants (4 weeks old). Only the 1.3-kb transcript was detected in younger (1 week old) greened seedlings or in etiolated seedlings. In greened seedlings, steady-state levels of this 1.3-kb mRNA increased approximately 5-fold in root tissues within 6 h after plants were irrigated with 0.4 m NaCl, suggesting that expression of the P5CR gene is osmoregulated. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:11537868

  8. Sterol Uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Heme Auxotrophic Mutants Is Affected by Ergosterol and Oleate but Not by Palmitoleate or by Sterol Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Frédérique; Achstetter, Tilman; Duport, Catherine; Karst, Francis; Spagnoli, Roberto; Degryse, Eric

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between sterol uptake and heme competence in two yeast strains impaired in heme synthesis, namely, G204 and H12-6A, was analyzed. To evaluate heme availability, a heterologous 17α-hydroxylase cytochrome P-450 cDNA (P-450c17) was expressed in these strains, and its activity was measured in vivo. Heme deficiency in G204 led to accumulation of squalene and lethality. The heterologous cytochrome P-450 was inactive in this strain. The leaky H12-6A strain presented a slightly modified sterol content compared to that for the wild type, and the P-450c17 recovered partial activity. By analyzing sterol transfer on nongrowing cells, it was shown that the cells were permeable toward exogenous cholesterol when they were depleted of endogenous sterols, which was the case for G204 but not for H12-6A. It was concluded that the fully blocked heme mutant (G204) replenishes its diminishing endogenous sterol levels during growth by replacement with sterol from the outside medium. Endogenous sterol biosynthesis appears to be the primary factor capable of excluding exogenous sterol. Oleate but not palmitoleate was identified as a component that reduced but did not prevent sterol transfer. Sterol transfer was only slightly affected by a lack of esterification. It is described herein how avoidance of the potential cytotoxicity of the early intermediates of the mevalonate pathway could be achieved by a secondary heme mutation in erg auxotrophs. PMID:9537392

  9. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    PubMed Central

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-established methods for assaying total cellular heme (e.g., heme-proteins plus RH), currently there is no method available for measuring RH independently from the total heme (TH). The current study describes and validates a new method to measure intracellular RH. The method is based on the reconstitution of apo-horseradish peroxidase (apoHRP) with heme to form holoHRP. The resulting holoHRP activity is then measured with a colorimetric substrate. The results show that apoHRP specifically binds RH but not with heme from housekeeping heme-proteins. The RH assay detects intracellular RH. Furthermore, using conditions that create positive (hemin) or negative (N-methyl protoporphyrin IX) controls for heme in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90), the RH assay shows that RH is dynamic and independent from TH. We also demonstrated that short-term exposure to subcytotoxic concentrations of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), or amyloid-β(Aβ) significantly alters intracellular RH with little effect on TH. In conclusion the RH assay is an effective assay to investigate intracellular RH concentration and demonstrates that RH represents ~6% of total heme in IMR90 cells. PMID:25525887

  10. Heme synthesis in normal mouse liver and mouse liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F. )

    1990-04-15

    Hepatic cancers from mice and rats demonstrate decreased levels of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway, and increased heme oxygenase, the heme-catabolizing enzyme. These findings suggest that diminution of P-450, b5, and catalase in these lesions may result from a heme supply that is limited by decreased heme synthesis and increased heme catabolism. Heme synthesis was measured in mouse liver tumors (MLT) and adjacent tumor-free lobes (BKG) by administering the radiolabeled heme precursors {sup 55}FeCl3 and (2-{sup 14}C)glycine and subsequently extracting the heme for determination of specific activity. Despite reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase activity in MLT, both tissues incorporated (2-14C)glycine into heme at similar rates. At early time points, heme extracted from MLT contained less 55Fe than that from BKG. This was attributed to the findings that MLT took up 55Fe at a slower rate than BKG and had larger iron stores than BKG. The amount of heme per milligram of protein was also similar in both tissues. These findings militate against the hypothesis that diminished hemoprotein levels in MLT result from limited availability of heme. It is probable, therefore, that decreased hemoprotein levels in hepatic tumors are linked to a general program of dedifferentiation associated with the cancer phenotype. Diminution of hemoprotein in MLT may result in a relatively increased intracellular heme pool. delta-Aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme oxygenase are, respectively, negatively and positively regulated by heme. Thus, their alteration in MLT may be due to the regulatory influences of the heme pool.

  11. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A.; Phillips, John D.; Raven, Emma L.; Reddi, Amit R.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models. PMID:27528661

  12. Ontogenetic taurine biosynthesis ability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) plays important roles in multiple physiological processes including osmoregulation, bile salt conjugation and membrane protection. It is known that taurine biosynthesis varies in different fish species. However, its ontogenetic regulation has not been clear. In the present study, we found that the hepatic concentrations of taurine increased marginally with rainbow trout growth. The mRNA expression, protein levels and enzyme activities of key enzymes involved in taurine biosynthesis, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), were analyzed. Our results showed that the mRNA levels and protein abundances of CSD increased dramatically with the development of rainbow trout stages while the enzyme activities showed a slight improvement. However, the expression and activities of CDO decreased with rainbow trout growth. These results provide valuable information on defining the exact supplementation of taurine in diets for different stages of rainbow trout and give new insights into elucidating the regulation of taurine metabolism in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of heme-protein covalent bonds in mammalian peroxidases. Protection of the heme by a single engineered heme-protein link in horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liusheng; Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-07-14

    Oxidation of SCN-, Br-, and Cl- (X-) by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and other plant and fungal peroxidases results in the addition of HOX to the heme vinyl group. This reaction is not observed with lactoperoxidase (LPO), in which the heme is covalently bound to the protein via two ester bonds between carboxylic side chains and heme methyl groups. To test the hypothesis that the heme of LPO and other mammalian peroxidases is protected from vinyl group modification by the hemeprotein covalent bonds, we prepared the F41E mutant of HRP in which the heme is attached to the protein via a covalent bond between Glu41 and the heme 3-methyl. We also examined the E375D mutant of LPO in which only one of the two normal covalent heme links is retained. The prosthetic heme groups of F41E HRP and E375D LPO are essentially not modified by the HOBr produced by these enzymes. The double E375D/D225E mutant of LPO that can form no covalent bonds is inactive and could not be examined. These results unambiguously demonstrate that a single heme-protein link is sufficient to protect the heme from vinyl group modification even in a protein (HRP) that is normally highly susceptible to this reaction. The results directly establish that one function of the covalent heme-protein bonds in mammalian peroxidases is to protect their prosthetic group from their highly reactive metabolic products.

  14. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F.; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase–catalase, peroxidase–cyclooxygenase, peroxidase–chlorite dismutase and peroxidase–peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  15. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  16. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and β thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias. PMID:19181781

  17. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and beta thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias.

  18. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  19. Horseradish peroxidase inactivation: heme destruction and influence of polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-11-04

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation.

  20. Tyrosine-heme ligation in heme-peptide complex: design based on conserved motif of catalase.

    PubMed

    Rai, Jagdish; Raghothama, S; Sahal, D

    2007-06-01

    On the basis of evolutionary conservation of sequence in catalases, we have designed a heme-binding peptide (Ac-RLKSYTDTQISR12-(GGGG)-CRIVHC22-NH2) for the 'redox activity modulation' of heme. Heme-binding studies showed a blue-shifted Soret (369 nm) in the presence of TFE and a red-shifted Soret (418 nm) in the absence of TFE. These blue- and red-shifted Sorets suggest ligation through tyrosinate and histidine, respectively. This is the first designed peptide ligating to heme through tyrosine. NMR studies have confirmed that tyrosine ligation to heme in this heme-peptide complex occurs only in the presence of TFE. We suggest that TFE induces helicity in the peptide and brings the arginine and tyrosine in proximity, resulting in ionization of the phenolic side chain of tyrosine. In the absence of TFE, the unstructured peptide lacks the intra-molecular Arg(+)Tyr(-) ion pair, allowing heme binding to histidine. This peptide has significant peroxidase activity though it does not have catalase activity. Copyright (c) 2007 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The Arabidopsis Multistress Regulator TSPO Is a Heme Binding Membrane Protein and a Potential Scavenger of Porphyrins via an Autophagy-Dependent Degradation Mechanism[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vanhee, Celine; Zapotoczny, Grzegorz; Masquelier, Danièle; Ghislain, Michel; Batoko, Henri

    2011-01-01

    TSPO, a stress-induced, posttranslationally regulated, early secretory pathway-localized plant cell membrane protein, belongs to the TspO/MBR family of regulatory proteins, which can bind porphyrins. This work finds that boosting tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enhanced TSPO degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana and that TSPO could bind heme in vitro and in vivo. This binding required the His residue at position 91 (H91), but not that at position 115 (H115). The H91A and double H91A/H115A substitutions stabilized TSPO and rendered the protein insensitive to heme-regulated degradation, suggesting that heme binding regulates At-TSPO degradation. TSPO degradation was inhibited in the autophagy-defective atg5 mutant and was sensitive to inhibitors of type III phosphoinositide 3-kinases, which regulate autophagy in eukaryotic cells. Mutation of the two Tyr residues in a putative ubiquitin-like ATG8 interacting motif of At-TSPO did not affect heme binding in vitro but stabilized the protein in vivo, suggesting that downregulation of At-TSPO requires an active autophagy pathway, in addition to heme. Abscisic acid–dependent TSPO induction was accompanied by an increase in unbound heme levels, and downregulation of TSPO coincided with the return to steady state levels of unbound heme, suggesting that a physiological consequence of active TSPO downregulation may be heme scavenging. In addition, overexpression of TSPO attenuated aminolevulinic acid–induced porphyria in plant cells. Taken together, these data support a role for TSPO in porphyrin binding and scavenging during stress in plants. PMID:21317376

  2. Combinational biosynthesis of phycocyanobilin using genetically-engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ge, Baosheng; Li, Yan; Sun, Haixiang; Zhang, Shuai; Hu, Peijie; Qin, Song; Huang, Fang

    2013-05-01

    Genes of the key enzymes for phycocyanobilin (PCB) biosynthesis were cloned into E. coli and combinationally expressed to produce phycocyanobilin, with autologous heme as substrate. Culture conditions were optimized to achieve ~3 mg PCB/l. A protocol for the purification of recombinant phycocyanobilin was established using solvent extraction combined with chromatography, which resulted in a final yield of ~0.3 mg PCB/l with a purity >95 %. Recombinant phycocyanobilin could scavenge hydroxyl radicals with an EC50 of 0.1 μM.

  3. Heme Binding by Corynebacterium diphtheriae HmuT: Function and Heme Environment.

    PubMed

    Draganova, Elizabeth B; Akbas, Neval; Adrian, Seth A; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Collins, Daniel P; Dawson, John H; Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dixon, Dabney W

    2015-11-03

    The heme uptake pathway (hmu) of Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes multiple proteins to bind and transport heme into the cell. One of these proteins, HmuT, delivers heme to the ABC transporter HmuUV. In this study, the axial ligation of the heme in ferric HmuT is probed by examination of wild-type (WT) HmuT and a series of conserved heme pocket residue mutants, H136A, Y235A, and M292A. Characterization by UV-visible, resonance Raman, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopies indicates that H136 and Y235 are the axial ligands in ferric HmuT. Consistent with this assignment of axial ligands, ferric WT and H136A HmuT are difficult to reduce while Y235A is reduced readily in the presence of dithionite. The FeCO Raman shifts in WT, H136A, and Y235A HmuT-CO complexes provide further evidence of the axial ligand assignments. Additionally, these frequencies provide insight into the nonbonding environment of the heme pocket. Ferrous Y235A and the Y235A-CO complex reveal that the imidazole of H136 exists in two forms, one neutral and one with imidazolate character, consistent with a hydrogen bond acceptor on the H136 side of the heme. The ferric fluoride complex of Y235A reveals the presence of at least one hydrogen bond donor on the Y235 side of the heme. Hemoglobin utilization assays showed that the axial Y235 ligand is required for heme uptake in HmuT.

  4. Heme compounds in dinosaur trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M H; Marshall, M; Carron, K; Bohle, D S; Busse, S C; Arnold, E V; Barnard, D; Horner, J R; Starkey, J R

    1997-06-10

    Six independent lines of evidence point to the existence of heme-containing compounds and/or hemoglobin breakdown products in extracts of trabecular tissues of the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. These include signatures from nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance that indicate the presence of a paramagnetic compound consistent with heme. In addition, UV/visible spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography data are consistent with the Soret absorbance characteristic of this molecule. Resonance Raman profiles are also consistent with a modified heme structure. Finally, when dinosaurian tissues were extracted for protein fragments and were used to immunize rats, the resulting antisera reacted positively with purified avian and mammalian hemoglobins. The most parsimonious explanation of this evidence is the presence of blood-derived hemoglobin compounds preserved in the dinosaurian tissues.

  5. Heme compounds in dinosaur trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Mary H.; Marshall, Mark; Carron, Keith; Bohle, D. Scott; Busse, Scott C.; Arnold, Ernst V.; Barnard, Darlene; Horner, J. R.; Starkey, Jean R.

    1997-01-01

    Six independent lines of evidence point to the existence of heme-containing compounds and/or hemoglobin breakdown products in extracts of trabecular tissues of the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. These include signatures from nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance that indicate the presence of a paramagnetic compound consistent with heme. In addition, UV/visible spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography data are consistent with the Soret absorbance characteristic of this molecule. Resonance Raman profiles are also consistent with a modified heme structure. Finally, when dinosaurian tissues were extracted for protein fragments and were used to immunize rats, the resulting antisera reacted positively with purified avian and mammalian hemoglobins. The most parsimonious explanation of this evidence is the presence of blood-derived hemoglobin compounds preserved in the dinosaurian tissues. PMID:9177210

  6. Molecular Simulations of Porphyrins and Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-01-18

    An overview of the use of classical mechanical molecular simulations of porphyrins, hydroporphyrins, and heme proteins is given. The topics cover molecular mechanics calculations of structures and conformer energies of porphyrins, energies of barriers for interconversion between stable conformers, molecular dynamics of porphyrins and heme proteins, and normal-coordinate structural analysis of experimental and calculated porphyrin structures. Molecular mechanics and dynamics are currently a fertile area of research on porphyrins. In the future, other computational methods such as Monte Carlo simulations, which have yet to be applied to porphyrins, will come into use and open new avenues of research into molecular simulations of porphyrins.

  7. Osmoregulation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: accumulation of a novel disaccharide is controlled by osmotic strength and glycine betaine.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Smith, G M; Madkour, M A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of osmotic stress adaptation (osmoregulation) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens biotype I (salt-tolerant) and biotype II (salt-sensitive) strains. Using natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified all organic solutes that accumulated to significant levels in osmotically stressed cultures. When stressed, biotype I strains (C58, NT1, and A348) accumulated glutamate and a novel disaccharide, beta-fructofuranosyl-alpha-mannopyranoside, commonly known as mannosucrose. In the salt-sensitive biotype II strain K84, glutamate was observed but mannosucrose was not. We speculate that mannosucrose confers the extra osmotic tolerance observed in the biotype I strains. In addition to identifying the osmoregulated solutes that this species synthesizes, we investigated the ability of A. tumefaciens to utilize the powerful osmotic stress protectant glycine betaine when it is supplied in the medium. Results from growth experiments, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a 14C labeling experiment demonstrated that in the absence of osmotic stress, glycine betaine was metabolized, while in stressed cultures, glycine betaine accumulated intracellularly and conferred enhanced osmotic stress tolerance. Furthermore, when glycine betaine was taken up in stressed cells, its accumulation caused the intracellular concentration of mannosucrose to drop significantly. The possible role of osmoregulation of A. tumefaciens in the transformation of plants is discussed. PMID:2254260

  8. Reactions of Ferrous Coproheme Decarboxylase (HemQ) with O2 and H2O2 Yield Ferric Heme b.

    PubMed

    Streit, Bennett R; Celis, Arianna I; Shisler, Krista; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2017-01-10

    A recently discovered pathway for the biosynthesis of heme b ends in an unusual reaction catalyzed by coproheme decarboxylase (HemQ), where the Fe(II)-containing coproheme acts as both substrate and cofactor. Because both O2 and H2O2 are available as cellular oxidants, pathways for the reaction involving either can be proposed. Analysis of reaction kinetics and products showed that, under aerobic conditions, the ferrous coproheme-decarboxylase complex is rapidly and selectively oxidized by O2 to the ferric state. The subsequent second-order reaction between the ferric complex and H2O2 is slow, pH-dependent, and further decelerated by D2O2 (average kinetic isotope effect of 2.2). The observation of rapid reactivity with peracetic acid suggested the possible involvement of Compound I (ferryl porphyrin cation radical), consistent with coproheme and harderoheme reduction potentials in the range of heme proteins that heterolytically cleave H2O2. Resonance Raman spectroscopy nonetheless indicated a remarkably weak Fe-His interaction; how the active site structure may support heterolytic H2O2 cleavage is therefore unclear. From a cellular perspective, the use of H2O2 as an oxidant in a catalase-positive organism is intriguing, as is the unusual generation of heme b in the Fe(III) rather than Fe(II) state as the end product of heme synthesis.

  9. Identification and treatment of heme depletion attributed to overexpression of a lineage of evolved P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Michener, Joshua K; Nielsen, Jens; Smolke, Christina D

    2012-11-20

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated that microbial biosynthesis can provide a viable alternative to chemical synthesis for the production of bulk and fine chemicals. Introduction of a new biosynthetic pathway typically requires the expression of multiple heterologous enzymes in the production host, which can impose stress on the host cell and, thereby, limit performance of the pathway. Unfortunately, analysis and treatment of the host stress response can be difficult, because there are many sources of stress that may interact in complex ways. We use a systems biological approach to analyze the stress imposed by expressing different enzyme variants from a lineage of soluble P450 monooxygenases, previously evolved for heterologous activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis identifies patterns of stress imposed on the host by heterologous enzyme overexpression that are consistent across the evolutionary lineage, ultimately implicating heme depletion as the major stress. We show that the monooxygenase evolution, starting from conditions of either high or low stress, caused the cellular stress to converge to a common level. Overexpression of rate-limiting enzymes in the endogenous heme biosynthetic pathway alleviates the stress imposed by expression of the P450 monooxygenases and increases the enzymatic activity of the final evolved P450 by an additional 2.3-fold. Heme overexpression also increases the total activity of an endogenous cytosolic heme-containing catalase but not a heterologous P450 that is membrane-associated. This work demonstrates the utility of combining systems and synthetic biology to analyze and optimize heterologous enzyme expression.

  10. Shu1 Is a Cell-surface Protein Involved in Iron Acquisition from Heme in Schizosaccharomyces pombe*

    PubMed Central

    Mourer, Thierry; Jacques, Jean-François; Brault, Ariane; Bisaillon, Martin; Labbé, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal cofactor that is required for many biological processes. Eukaryotic cells have consequently developed different strategies for its acquisition. Until now, Schizosaccharomyces pombe was known to use reductive iron uptake and siderophore-bound iron transport to scavenge iron from the environment. Here, we report the identification of a gene designated shu1+ that encodes a protein that enables S. pombe to take up extracellular heme for cell growth. When iron levels are low, the transcription of shu1+ is induced, although its expression is repressed when iron levels rise. The iron-dependent down-regulation of shu1+ requires the GATA-type transcriptional repressor Fep1, which strongly associates with a proximal promoter region of shu1+ in vivo in response to iron repletion. HA4-tagged Shu1 localizes to the plasma membrane in cells expressing a functional shu1+-HA4 allele. When heme biosynthesis is selectively blocked in mutated S. pombe cells, their ability to acquire exogenous hemin or the fluorescent heme analog zinc mesoporphyrin IX is dependent on the expression of Shu1. Further analysis by absorbance spectroscopy and hemin-agarose pulldown assays showed that Shu1 interacts with hemin, with a KD of ∼2.2 μm. Taken together, results reported here revealed that S. pombe possesses an unexpected pathway for heme assimilation, which may also serve as a source of iron for cell growth. PMID:25733668

  11. Intracellular Zn(II) Intoxication Leads to Dysregulation of the PerR Regulon Resulting in Heme Toxicity in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions (Zn(II), Cu(II)/(I), Fe(III)/(II), Mn(II)) are essential for life and participate in a wide range of biological functions. Cellular Zn(II) levels must be high enough to ensure that it can perform its essential roles. Yet, since Zn(II) binds to ligands with high avidity, excess Zn(II) can lead to protein mismetallation. The major targets of mismetallation, and the underlying causes of Zn(II) intoxication, are not well understood. Here, we use a forward genetic selection to identify targets of Zn(II) toxicity. In wild-type cells, in which Zn(II) efflux prevents intoxication of the cytoplasm, extracellular Zn(II) inhibits the electron transport chain due to the inactivation of the major aerobic cytochrome oxidase. This toxicity can be ameliorated by depression of an alternate oxidase or by mutations that restrict access of Zn(II) to the cell surface. Conversely, efflux deficient cells are sensitive to low levels of Zn(II) that do not inhibit the respiratory chain. Under these conditions, intracellular Zn(II) accumulates and leads to heme toxicity. Heme accumulation results from dysregulation of the regulon controlled by PerR, a metal-dependent repressor of peroxide stress genes. When metallated with Fe(II) or Mn(II), PerR represses both heme biosynthesis (hemAXCDBL operon) and the abundant heme protein catalase (katA). Metallation of PerR with Zn(II) disrupts this coordination, resulting in depression of heme biosynthesis but continued repression of catalase. Our results support a model in which excess heme partitions to the membrane and undergoes redox cycling catalyzed by reduced menaquinone thereby resulting in oxidative stress. PMID:27935957

  12. Intracellular Zn(II) Intoxication Leads to Dysregulation of the PerR Regulon Resulting in Heme Toxicity in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chandrangsu, Pete; Helmann, John D

    2016-12-01

    Transition metal ions (Zn(II), Cu(II)/(I), Fe(III)/(II), Mn(II)) are essential for life and participate in a wide range of biological functions. Cellular Zn(II) levels must be high enough to ensure that it can perform its essential roles. Yet, since Zn(II) binds to ligands with high avidity, excess Zn(II) can lead to protein mismetallation. The major targets of mismetallation, and the underlying causes of Zn(II) intoxication, are not well understood. Here, we use a forward genetic selection to identify targets of Zn(II) toxicity. In wild-type cells, in which Zn(II) efflux prevents intoxication of the cytoplasm, extracellular Zn(II) inhibits the electron transport chain due to the inactivation of the major aerobic cytochrome oxidase. This toxicity can be ameliorated by depression of an alternate oxidase or by mutations that restrict access of Zn(II) to the cell surface. Conversely, efflux deficient cells are sensitive to low levels of Zn(II) that do not inhibit the respiratory chain. Under these conditions, intracellular Zn(II) accumulates and leads to heme toxicity. Heme accumulation results from dysregulation of the regulon controlled by PerR, a metal-dependent repressor of peroxide stress genes. When metallated with Fe(II) or Mn(II), PerR represses both heme biosynthesis (hemAXCDBL operon) and the abundant heme protein catalase (katA). Metallation of PerR with Zn(II) disrupts this coordination, resulting in depression of heme biosynthesis but continued repression of catalase. Our results support a model in which excess heme partitions to the membrane and undergoes redox cycling catalyzed by reduced menaquinone thereby resulting in oxidative stress.

  13. Covalent heme attachment in Synechocystis hemoglobin is required to prevent ferrous heme dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Julie A.; Smagghe, Benoit J.; Halder, Puspita; Hargrove, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Synechocystis hemoglobin contains an unprecedented covalent bond between a nonaxial histidine side chain (H117) and the heme 2-vinyl. This bond has been previously shown to stabilize the ferric protein against denaturation, and also to affect the kinetics of cyanide association. However, it is unclear why Synechocystis hemoglobin would require the additional degree of stabilization accompanying the His117–heme 2-vinyl bond because it also displays endogenous bis-histidyl axial heme coordination, which should greatly assist heme retention. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the His117–heme 2-vinyl bond affects ligand binding has not been reported, nor has any investigation of the role of this bond on the structure and function of the protein in the ferrous oxidation state. Here we report an investigation of the role of the Synechocystis hemoglobin His117–heme 2-vinyl bond on structure, heme coordination, exogenous ligand binding, and stability in both the ferrous and ferric oxidation states. Our results reveal that hexacoordinate Synechocystis hemoglobin lacking this bond is less stable in the ferrous oxidation state than the ferric, which is surprising in light of our understanding of pentacoordinate Hb stability, in which the ferric protein is always less stable. It is also demonstrated that removal of the His117–heme 2-vinyl bond increases the affinity constant for intramolecular histidine coordination in the ferric oxidation state, thus presenting greater competition for the ligand binding site and lowering the observed rate and affinity constants for exogenous ligands. PMID:17242429

  14. Iron Supplementation Alters Heme and Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Levels In Pregnant Women in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Salifu, Hassana; Wilson, Nana O.; Liu, Mingli; Dickinson-Copeland, Carmen; Yatich, Nelly; Keenan, John; Turpin, Cornelius; Jolly, Pauline; Gyasi, Richard; Adjei, Andrew A.; Stiles, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron supplementation is recommended for pregnant women to meet their iron requirement for a healthy pregnancy. The benefits and risks of universal iron supplementation during pregnancy in malaria endemic countries are currently being debated. As part of a broader study that focused on the effect of heme/HO-1 on pregnancy outcomes in malaria in pregnancy, we determined the association between iron supplementation and free heme levels in blood of pregnant women with and without malaria in Ghana. We hypothesized that pregnant women with malaria who took iron supplements will have higher levels of Heme/HO-1 than those who did not take iron supplements. Methods A total of 337 women were recruited for this study. Blood samples were collected for malaria diagnosis and heme/HO-1 measurement. Quantification of heme was done using a heme colorimetric assay kit and HO-1 levels were performed using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) on plasma samples. Results Malaria positive iron supplemented women, in their third trimester, had significantly higher median levels of heme 59.3(43.1 – 60.4) than non-malaria iron supplemented women 35.7(33.0 – 62.2), p = 0.026. Also, malaria positive iron supplemented women had significant higher median levels of HO-16.2(IQR 4.9 – 8.1) than pregnant women who did not take iron supplements 2.9 (IQR 2.1 – 3.8), p = <0.001 Conclusion Although iron supplementation may be highly beneficial and improve pregnancy outcomes for iron deficient or anemic mothers, it is also likely that iron supplementation for pregnant women who are not iron deficient may put this group of women at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Findings from this study sheds light on the effect of iron supplementation on malaria derived heme in pregnancy, which may inform how iron supplementation is recommended for pregnant women who are not iron deficient. PMID:28124024

  15. A transcriptomic scan for potential candidate genes involved in osmoregulation in an obligate freshwater palaemonid prawn (Macrobrachium australiense)

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, Md. Lifat; Nguyen, Viet Tuan; Mather, Peter B.; Hurwood, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the genomic basis of osmoregulation (candidate genes and/or molecular mechanisms controlling the phenotype) addresses one of the fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology. Species distributions and adaptive radiations are thought to be controlled by environmental salinity levels, and efficient osmoregulatory (ionic balance) ability is the main mechanism to overcome the problems related to environmental salinity gradients. Methods To better understand how osmoregulatory performance in freshwater (FW) crustaceans allow individuals to acclimate and adapt to raised salinity conditions, here we (i), reviewed the literature on genes that have been identified to be associated with osmoregulation in FW crustaceans, and (ii), performed a transcriptomic analysis using cDNA libraries developed from mRNA isolated from three important osmoregulatory tissues (gill, antennal gland, hepatopancreas) and total mRNA from post larvae taken from the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium australiense using Illumina deep sequencing technology. This species was targeted because it can complete its life cycle totally in freshwater but, like many Macrobrachium sp., can also tolerate brackish water conditions and hence should have genes associated with tolerance of both FW and saline conditions. Results We obtained between 55.4 and 65.2 million Illumina read pairs from four cDNA libraries. Overall, paired end sequences assembled into a total of 125,196 non-redundant contigs (≥200 bp) with an N50 length of 2,282 bp and an average contig length of 968 bp. Transcriptomic analysis of M. australiense identified 32 different gene families that were potentially involved with osmoregulatory capacity. A total of 32,597 transcripts were specified with gene ontology (GO) terms identified on the basis of GO categories. Abundance estimation of expressed genes based on TPM (transcript per million) ≥20 showed 1625 transcripts commonly expressed in all four libraries. Among the

  16. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    PubMed Central

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Tolleson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP), lactoperoxidase (LPO), and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2). Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (Ki  9.5 ± 0.7 mM), and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (Ki  14.5 ± 4.7 mM). The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases. PMID:22852071

  17. Insights into phycoerythrobilin biosynthesis point toward metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2006-09-15

    Phycoerythrobilin is a linear tetrapyrrole molecule found in cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptomonads. Together with other bilins such as phycocyanobilin it serves as a light-harvesting pigment in the photosynthetic light-harvesting structures of cyanobacteria called phycobilisomes. The biosynthesis of both pigments starts with the cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases to yield biliverdin IXalpha, which is further reduced at specific positions by ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs), a new family of radical enzymes. The biosynthesis of phycoerythrobilin requires two subsequent two-electron reductions, each step being catalyzed by one FDBR. This is in contrast to the biosynthesis of phycocyanobilin, where the FDBR phycocyanobilin: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA) catalyzes a four-electron reduction. The first reaction in phycoerythrobilin biosynthesis is the reduction of the 15,16-double bond of biliverdin IXalpha by 15,16-dihydrobiliverdin:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PebA). This reaction reduces the conjugated pi -electron system thereby blue-shifting the absorbance properties of the linear tetrapyrrole. The second FDBR, phycoerythrobilin:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PebB), then reduces the A-ring 2,3,3(1),3(2)-diene structure of 15,16-dihydrobiliverdin to yield phycoerythrobilin. Both FDBRs from the limnic filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon and the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH8020 were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli and purified, and their enzymatic activities were determined. By using various natural bilins, the substrate specificity of each FDBR was established, revealing conformational preconditions for their unique specificity. Preparation of the semi-reduced intermediate, 15,16-dihydrobiliverdin, enabled us to perform steady state binding experiments indicating distinct spectroscopic and fluorescent properties of enzyme.bilin complexes. A combination of substrate/product binding analyses and gel permeation

  18. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  19. Heme and erythropoieis: more than a structural role

    PubMed Central

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is the biological process that consumes the highest amount of body iron for heme synthesis. Heme synthesis in erythroid cells is finely coordinated with that of alpha (α) and beta (β)-globin, resulting in the production of hemoglobin, a tetramer of 2α- and 2β-globin chains, and heme as the prosthetic group. Heme is not only the structural component of hemoglobin, but it plays multiple regulatory roles during the differentiation of erythroid precursors since it controls its own synthesis and regulates the expression of several erythroid-specific genes. Heme is synthesized in developing erythroid progenitors by the stage of proerythroblast, through a series of eight enzymatic reactions divided between mitochondria and cytosol. Defects of heme synthesis in the erythroid lineage result in sideroblastic anemias, characterized by microcytic anemia associated to mitochondrial iron overload, or in erythropoietic porphyrias, characterized by porphyrin deposition in erythroid cells. Here, we focus on the heme biosynthetic pathway and on human erythroid disorders due to defective heme synthesis. The regulatory role of heme during erythroid differentiation is discussed as well as the heme-mediated regulatory mechanisms that allow the orchestration of the adaptive cell response to heme deficiency. PMID:24881043

  20. Osmoregulation of a pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase gene in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, N; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M

    1993-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. proline can account for up to 20% of the free amino acid pool after salt stress. Proline accumulation occurs in plants mainly by de novo synthesis from glutamate. The last step of the proline biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase. A gene (AT-P5C1) encoding this enzyme in A. thaliana has been cloned and sequenced. Expression of AT-P5C1 in Escherichia coli resulted in the complementation of a proC mutant to prototrophy. A comparison of the AT-P5C1 primary and secondary structures with those of six P5C reductase of other organisms is presented. With the exception of several functionally important amino acid residues, little conservation in the primary structure is seen; much greater similarity exists in the putative secondary structure. The AT-P5C1 protein is probably cytosolic. Under normal growth conditions, the P5C reductase mRNA level was significantly higher in roots and ripening seeds than in green tissue. A salt treatment of A. thaliana plants resulted in a 5-fold induction of the AT-P5C1 transcript, suggesting osmoregulation of the AT-P5C1 promoter region. Moreover, a time-course experiment indicated that this induction precedes proline accumulation. PMID:8022935

  1. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  2. Effect of plant-based feed ingredients on osmoregulation in the Atlantic salmon lens.

    PubMed

    Trösse, Christiane; Rhodes, Jeremy D; Sanderson, Julie; Breck, Olav; Waagbø, Rune

    2010-04-01

    Lenses of adult Atlantic salmon fed with a plant oil and plant protein-based diet (plant diet) were compared to lenses of fish fed a diet based on traditional marine ingredients (marine diet) with respect to biochemical composition and functionality ex vivo. After 12 months of feeding, plant diet-fed fish had smaller lenses with higher water contents and lower concentrations of histidine (His) and N-acetylhistidine (NAH) than fish fed with the marine diet. Cataract development in both dietary groups was minimal and no differences between the groups were observed. Lens fatty acid and lipid class composition differed minimally, although a significant increase in linoleic acid was observed. The lenses were examined for their ability to withstand osmotic disturbances ex vivo. Culture in hypoosmotic and hyperosmotic media led to increase and decrease of lens volume, respectively. Lenses from plant diet-fed fish were less resistant to swelling and shrinking, released less NAH into the culture medium, and accumulated His and NAH at higher rates than lenses from marine diet-fed fish. Culture in hypoosmotic medium resulted in higher cataract scores than in control and hyperosmotic medium. mRNA expression of selected genes, including glutathione peroxidase 4 and SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), was affected by diet and osmotic treatment. It can be concluded that lenses of farmed Atlantic salmon are affected by the diet composition, both in biochemical composition and physiological functionality in relation to osmoregulation.

  3. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  4. Response of Holobiont Compartments to Salinity Changes Indicates Osmoregulation of Scleractinian Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roethig, T.; Ochsenkuehn, M. A.; van der Merwe, R.; Roik, A.; Voolstra, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental change is expected to render the oceans more saline, but scleractinian corals are assumed to be stenohaline osmoconformers. Yet, some corals are able to tolerate salinities up to 50 PSU, but we know little about the mechanisms involved. Previous studies have exclusively addressed the coral host and their algal symbionts (Symbiodinium) in hospite. To disentangle the role of all compartments of the coral holobiont we assessed the response of the coral host, its symbiont algae in the genus Symbiodinium (in hospite and in culture), and the associated bacterial community to strongly increased salinities. In a short-term incubation (4h) we could measure decreases in the calcification rate of the coral host and the photosynthetic performance of its algal symbiont in hospite. In a long-term (29 days) setup we found no differences in the photosynthetic efficiency but a major restructuring of the bacterial communities. In four Symbiodinium cultures we identified changes in photosynthetic yields and osmolytes composition upon short-term salinity exposure (≤24h). Our results show a short-term reaction of coral host and Symbiodinium to strongly increased salinities. However, lack of an apparent physiological long-term response indicates an acclimation process that is accompanied by a microbiome community shift towards a microbiome that potentially supports increased osmolyte production. Furthermore, changes in osmolytes composition in the Symbiodinium cultures display conserved osmoregulatory processes that may translate to osmoregulation for the coral holobiont.

  5. Dopamine regulates renal osmoregulation during hyposaline stress via DRD1 in the spotted scat (Scatophagus argus)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Maoliang; Mu, Xingjiang; Gui, Lang; Zhang, Peipei; Zhou, Jianan; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Junbin

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is an important regulator of renal natriuresis and is critical for the adaptation of many animals to changing environmental salinity. However, the molecular mechanisms through which dopamine promotes this adaptation remain poorly understood. We studied the effects of dopamine on renal hypo-osmoregulation in the euryhaline fish Scatophagus argus (S. argus) during abrupt transfer from seawater (SW) to freshwater (FW). Following the transfer, serum dopamine concentration was decreased, and dopamine activated expression of the dopamine receptor 1 (designated SaDRD1) in the kidney, triggering the osmoregulatory signaling cascade. SaDRD1 protein is expressed in the renal proximal tubule cells in vivo, and is localized to the cell membrane of renal primary cells in vitro. Knockdown of SaDRD1 mRNA by siRNA significantly increased Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity in cultured renal primary cells in vitro, suggesting that expression of SaDRD1 may oppose the activity of NKA. We demonstrate that exogenous dopamine enhances the response of NKA to hyposaline stress after transferring primary renal cells from isosmotic medium to hypoosmotic medium. Our results indicate that dopamine regulation via SaDRD1 ignited the renal dopaminergic system to balance the osmotic pressure through inhibiting NKA activity, providing a new perspective on the hyposaline adaptation of fish. PMID:27857228

  6. Alterations in osmoregulation, antioxidant enzymes and indole alkaloid levels in Catharanthus roseus exposed to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Kishorekumar, A; Sankar, B; Gopi, R; Somasundaram, R; Panneerselvam, R

    2007-10-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don plants were grown in different water regimes in order to study the drought induced osmotic stress and proline (PRO) metabolism, antioxidative enzyme activities and indole alkaloid accumulation. The plants under pot culture were subjected to 10, 15 and 20 days interval drought (DID) stress from 30 days after sowing (DAS) and regular irrigation was kept as control. The plants were uprooted on 41DAS (10DID), 46DAS (15DID) and 51DAS (20DID). The drought stressed plants showed increased aminoacid (AA), glycine betaine (GB) and PRO contents and decreased proline oxidase (PROX) and increased gamma-glutamyl kinase (gamma-GK) activities when compared to control. The antioxidative enzymes like peroxidase (POX) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) increased to a significant level in drought stressed plants when compared to control. The drought stressed C. roseus plants showed an increase in total indole alkaloid content in shoots and roots when compared to well-watered control plants. Our results suggest that the cultivation of medicinal plants like C. roseus in water deficit areas would increase its PRO metabolism, osmoregulation, defense system and the level of active principles.

  7. Changes in growth and osmoregulation during acclimation to saltwater in juvenile Amur sturgeon Acipenser schrenckii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feng; Zhuang, Ping; Zhang, Longzhen; Hou, Junli

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the ability of juvenile Amur sturgeon ( Acipenser schrenckii) to osmoregulate and grow in saltwater. Hatchery-reared juveniles (mean weight 106.8 g, 5-month old) were transferred from freshwater to 10, 20, and 25 salinity saltwater over a period of 20 d. We measured the growth, serum osmolality, ion concentrations, and Na+/K+-ATPase activity. In addition, we prepared samples of gill tissue to quantify morphological changes in gill ultrastructure. Rearing in up to 25 saltwater for 30 d had no significant effect on growth. Similarly, serum osmolality and ion concentrations were similar to levels reported in other teleosts following acclimation to saltwater. Serum osmolality and Na+, Cl- concentrations increased significantly with the initial increase in salinity. Afterwards, levels tended to stabilize and then decrease. Serum K+ levels did not change during acclimation to saltwater. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased initially as salinity was increased. However, the activity later decreased and, finally stabilized at 3.7±0.1 μmol Pi/mg·prot·h in 25 saltwater (1.6 times higher than the level in those in freshwater). In fish that were held only in freshwater, the chloride cells were located in the interlamellar regions of the filament and at the base of the lamella. Following acclimation to 25 saltwater for 30 d, the number and size of chloride cells increased significantly. Our results suggest that juvenile Amur sturgeon is able to tolerate, and grow in, relatively high concentrations of saltwater.

  8. Osmoregulation and salt gland Na, K-ATPase activity following exposure to the anticholinesterase fenthion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Fleming, W.J.; Murray, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    Salt gland function and osmoregulation in aquatic birds drinking hyperosmotic water has been suggested to be impaired by organophosphorus insecticides. To test this hypothesis, adult ducks (Anas rubripes) were provided various regimens of fresh or salt (1.5% NaCl) water (FW, SW) and mash containing vehicle or 21 ppm fenthion (Fn) on days 1-7 and 7-12 of this study. The 8 treatments (day 1-7:day 7-12) included :FW:FW, FW:FW+Fn, FW:SW, FW+Fn:SW, FW:SW+Fn, FW+Fn:SW+FN, SW;SW, and SW:5W+Fn. Ducks were bled by jugular venipuncture on days 1,7 and 12, and then sacrificed. Brain and salt gland acetylcholinesterase activities were substantially inhibited (44-52% and 14-26%) by Fn. However, plasma Na, Cl and osmolality, as indirect but cumulative indices of salt gland function, were uniformly elevated in all SW groups including those receiving Fn. In a second experiment, salt gland Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced after in vitro incubation with DDE (40 and 400 ?M; positive control), but was unaffected by Fn and its oxygen analog (0.04-400 ?M). The present findings suggest that environmentally realistic concentrations of organophosphorus insecticides do not affect osmoregulatory function in adult ducks.

  9. Chronic hypernatremia from a congenital defect in osmoregulation of thirst and vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Schaff-Blass, E; Robertson, G L; Rosenfield, R L

    1983-05-01

    An infant with microcephaly and delayed development was found to have chronic asymptomatic hypernatremia. Computerized brain tomography disclosed dysplasia of the midline structures, septum pellucidum and corpus collosum. Evaluation revealed defective osmoregulation, hypothalamic hypothyroidism, and hypogonadotropinism. He showed no desire to drink at plasma osmolalities over 330 mOsm/kg. His plasma vasopressin levels (less than or equal to 1.4 pg/ml) were inappropriately low relative to his high levels of plasma osmolality (greater than or equal to 310 mOsm/kg), which might be accounted for by either deficient neurohypophyseal vasopressin stores or disturbance of the hypothalamic osmoreceptors governing vasopressin. The first possibility was ruled out by demonstrating normal vasopressin response (167 pg/ml) to nonosmotic (emetic) stimulation. Under baseline conditions, his urine was concentrated up to 747 mOsm/kg and urine volume was low. With water loading, maximal water diuresis developed (urine osmolality 68 mOsm/kg), but his plasma osmolality remained in the hyperosmolar range (312 mOsm/kg). Treatment with a vasopressin analogue, desamino-D-arginine vasopressin, and forced hydration restored plasma osmolality and plasma sodium to normal. These findings indicate a severe defect in the hypothalamic osmoreceptors controlling thirst and vasopressin secretion with normal vasopressin stores and preserved vasopressin responsiveness to nonosmotic stimuli. To our knowledge, this report provides the first documentation of selective osmoreceptor defect in conjunction with congenital dysplasia of midline brain structures.

  10. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D.; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Spork, Anatol P.; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S.; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5′-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C–C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5′-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. PMID:25855790

  11. Hemosomegenesis and hemoglobin biosynthesis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Brunner Júnior, A; de Rizzo, E; Morena, D D; Cianciarullo, A M; Jared, C; Morena, P

    1992-08-01

    1. Ultrastructural observations on maturing rabbit embryo erythroid cells led to the finding of hemoglobinized organelles distinguishable from mitochondria due to their highly dense matrix, two or three longitudinally arranged double lamellae, and smaller diameters. Intraorganellar 50-60 A particles identical to those contained in the hemoglobinized cytoplasm were found. 2. Their hemoglobin (Hb) content was demonstrated by electrophoresis of the concentrated supernatant from the isolated, washed, and osmotically lysed organellar fraction. We have proposed that these organelles are the sites for heme integration into the globin (G) polypeptide chains and subunits assembly. The term hemosome has been suggested for such entities. 3. This hypothesis has been sustained by several analytical and experimental works based on the postulation that hemosomes should be found at higher frequencies where the Hb biosynthesis rate is more intensive, or where the induction of this biosynthesis is always dependent on the formation of hemosomes. 4. Maturing erythroid cells of the circulating embryo blood contain hemosomes in higher frequency than in liver erythroid cells, coinciding with the higher Hb biosynthesis rate in peripheral blood than in the liver. In bleeding anemia, the decay of Hb concentration parallels the reduction of the mean number of hemosomes per reticulocyte, in comparison with normal reticulocytes. 5. In HeLa cells and epithelial cultured cells induced to synthesize Hb, it was shown that this biosynthesis is ever concomitant with the formation of hemosomes and depends on the presence of erythropoietin, as occurs in erythroid cells. 6. Studies on hemosomegenesis and Hb biosynthesis experimentally effected in epithelial cultured cells, allowed the interpretation of the sequence of events leading to hemosome formation in maturing erythroid cells. Simultaneously with iron uptake, mitochondria differentiate to lamellated bodies and, successively, expansions rise for

  12. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  13. Protein Biosynthesis in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, A. V.; Levitskii, S. A.; Vinogradova, E. N.; Atkinson, G. C.; Hauryliuk, V.; Zenkin, N.; Kamenski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis. PMID:24228873

  14. Heme Distortions in Sperm-Whale Carbonmonoxy Myoglobin: Correlations between Rotational Strengths and Heme Distortions in MD-Generated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    KIEFL,CHRISTOPH; SCREERAMA,NARASIMHA; LU,YI; QIU,YAN; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; WOODY,ROBERT W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors have investigated the effects of heme rotational isomerism in sperm-whale carbonmonoxy myoglobin using computational techniques. Several molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for the two rotational isomers A and B, which are related by a 180{degree} rotation around the {alpha}-{gamma} axis of the heme, of sperm-whale carbonmonoxy myoglobin in water. Both neutron diffraction and NMR structures were used as starting structures. In the absence of an experimental structure, the structure of isomer B was generated by rotating the heme in the structure of isomer A. Distortions of the heme from planarity were characterized by normal coordinate structural decomposition and by the angle of twist of the pyrrole rings from the heme plane. The heme distortions of the neutron diffraction structure were conserved in the MD trajectories, but in the NMR-based trajectories, where the heme distortions are less well defined, they differ from the original heme deformations. The protein matrix induced similar distortions on the heroes in orientations A and B. The results suggest that the binding site prefers a particular macrocycle conformation, and a 180{degree} rotation of the heme does not significantly alter the protein's preference for this conformation. The intrinsic rotational strengths of the two Soret transitions, separated according to their polarization in the heme plane, show strong correlations with the ruf-deformation and the average twist angle of the pyrrole rings. The total rotational strength, which includes contributions from the chromophores in the protein, shows a weaker correlation with heme distortions.

  15. Functional Importance of Tyrosine 294 and the Catalytic Selectivity for the Bis-Fe(IV) State of MauG Revealed by Replacement of This Axial Heme Ligand with Histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tarboush, Nafez Abu; Jensen, Lyndal M.R.; Feng, Manliang; Tachikawa, Hiroyasu; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2010-12-07

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the posttranslational modification of a precursor protein of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete the biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. It catalyzes three sequential two-electron oxidation reactions which proceed through a high-valent bis-Fe(IV) redox state. Tyr294, the unusual distal axial ligand of one c-type heme, was mutated to His, and the crystal structure of Y294H MauG in complex with preMADH reveals that this heme now has His-His axial ligation. Y294H MauG is able to interact with preMADH and participate in interprotein electron transfer, but it is unable to catalyze the TTQ biosynthesis reactions that require the bis-Fe(IV) state. This mutation affects not only the redox properties of the six-coordinate heme but also the redox and CO-binding properties of the five-coordinate heme, despite the 21 {angstrom} separation of the heme iron centers. This highlights the communication between the hemes which in wild-type MauG behave as a single diheme unit. Spectroscopic data suggest that Y294H MauG can stabilize a high-valent redox state equivalent to Fe(V), but it appears to be an Fe(IV)=O/{pi} radical at the five-coordinate heme rather than the bis-Fe(IV) state. This compound I-like intermediate does not catalyze TTQ biosynthesis, demonstrating that the bis-Fe(IV) state, which is stabilized by Tyr294, is specifically required for this reaction. The TTQ biosynthetic reactions catalyzed by wild-type MauG do not occur via direct contact with the Fe(IV)=O heme but via long-range electron transfer through the six-coordinate heme. Thus, a critical feature of the bis-Fe(IV) species may be that it shortens the electron transfer distance from preMADH to a high-valent heme iron.

  16. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Novelli, Jacopo; Foster, Jeremy; Vaisvila, Romualdas; Conway, Leslie; Ingram, Jessica; Ganatra, Mehul; Rao, Anita U; Hamza, Iqbal; Slatko, Barton

    2009-07-14

    Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti) are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole) can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf) larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP), which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step). Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA) between Wolbachia and human 5'-aminolevulinic acid

  17. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Heme c: Functional Bases for Covalent Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Sarah E. J.; Bren, Kara L.

    2009-01-01

    A discussion of the literature concerning the synthesis, function, and activity of heme c-containing proteins is presented. Comparison of the properties of heme c, which is covalently bound to protein, is made to heme b, which is bound noncovalently. A question of interest is why nature uses biochemically expensive heme c in many proteins when its properties are expected to be similar to heme b. Considering the effects of covalent heme attachment on heme conformation and on the proximal histidine interaction with iron, it is proposed that heme attachment influences both heme reduction potential and ligand-iron interactions. PMID:19030605

  18. Cytoplasmic Heme-Binding Protein (HutX) from Vibrio cholerae Is an Intracellular Heme Transport Protein for the Heme-Degrading Enzyme, HutZ.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yukari; Tanzawa, Takehito; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ishimori, Koichiro; Uchida, Takeshi

    2016-02-16

    HutZ is a cytoplasmic heme-binding protein from Vibrio cholerae. Although we have previously identified HutZ as a heme-degrading enzyme [Uchida, T., et al. (2012) Chem. Commun. 48, 6741-6743], the heme transport protein for HutZ remained unknown. To identify the heme transport protein for HutZ, we focused on the heme utilization operon, hutWXZ. To this end, we constructed an expression system for HutX in Escherichia coli and purified it to homogeneity. An absorption spectral analysis demonstrated that HutX binds heme with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a dissociation constant of 7.4 nM. The crystal structure of HutX displays a fold similar to that of the homologous protein, ChuX, from E. coli O157:H7. A structural comparison of HutX and ChuX, and resonance Raman spectra of heme-HutX, suggest that the axial ligand of the ferric heme is Tyr90. The heme bound to HutX is transferred to HutZ with biphasic dissociation kinetics of 8.3 × 10(-2) and 1.5 × 10(-2) s(-1), values distinctly larger than those for transfer from HutX to apomyoglobin. Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed that HutX interacts with HutZ with a dissociation constant of ∼400 μM. These results suggest that heme is transferred from HutX to HutZ via a specific protein-protein interaction. Therefore, we can conclude that HutX is a cytoplasmic heme transport protein for HutZ.

  19. Lack of heme synthesis in a free-living eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anita U.; Carta, Lynn K.; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Hamza, Iqbal

    2005-01-01

    In most free-living eukaryotes studied thus far, heme is synthesized from a series of intermediates through a well defined evolutionarily conserved pathway. We found that free-living worms, including the model genetic organism Caenorhabditis elegans, and parasitic helminths are unable to synthesize heme de novo, even though these animals contain hemoproteins that function in key biological processes. Radioisotope, fluorescence labeling, and heme analog studies suggest that C. elegans acquires heme from exogenous sources. Iron-deprived worms were unable to grow in the presence of adequate heme unless rescued by increasing heme levels in the growth medium. These data indicate that although worms use dietary heme for incorporation into hemoproteins, ingested heme is also used as an iron source when iron is limiting. Our results provide a biochemical basis for the dependence of worm growth and development on heme, and they suggest that pharmacologic targeting of heme transport pathways in worms could be an important control measure for helminthic infections. PMID:15767563

  20. Leukotriene B4 mediates neutrophil migration induced by heme.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Pinheiro, Carla S; Luna-Gomes, Tatiana; Alves, Liliane R; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Porto, Barbara N; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Benjamim, Claudia F; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Marcelo T; Canetti, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of free heme found during hemolytic events or cell damage leads to inflammation, characterized by neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species, through mechanisms not yet elucidated. In this study, we provide evidence that heme-induced neutrophilic inflammation depends on endogenous activity of the macrophage-derived lipid mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). In vivo, heme-induced neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity of mice was attenuated by pretreatment with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors and leukotriene B(4) receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor antagonists as well as in 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice. Heme administration in vivo increased peritoneal levels of LTB(4) prior to and during neutrophil recruitment. Evidence that LTB(4) was synthesized by resident macrophages, but not mast cells, included the following: 1) immuno-localization of heme-induced LTB(4) was compartmentalized exclusively within lipid bodies of resident macrophages; 2) an increase in the macrophage population enhanced heme-induced neutrophil migration; 3) depletion of resident mast cells did not affect heme-induced LTB(4) production or neutrophil influx; 4) increased levels of LTB(4) were found in heme-stimulated peritoneal cavities displaying increased macrophage numbers; and 5) in vitro, heme was able to activate directly macrophages to synthesize LTB(4). Our findings uncover a crucial role of LTB(4) in neutrophil migration induced by heme and suggest that beneficial therapeutic outcomes could be achieved by targeting the 5-LO pathway in the treatment of inflammation associated with hemolytic processes.

  1. Single or functionalized fullerenes interacting with heme group

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Wallison Chaves; Diniz, Eduardo Moraes

    2014-09-15

    The heme group is responsible for iron transportation through the bloodstream, where iron participates in redox reactions, electron transfer, gases detection etc. The efficiency of such processes can be reduced if the whole heme molecule or even the iron is somehow altered from its original oxidation state, which can be caused by interactions with nanoparticles as fullerenes. To verify how such particles alter the geometry and electronic structure of heme molecule, here we report first principles calculations based on density functional theory of heme group interacting with single C{sub 60} fullerene or with C{sub 60} functionalized with small functional groups (−CH{sub 3}, −COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH). The calculations shown that the system heme + nanoparticle has a different spin state in comparison with heme group if the fullerene is functionalized. Also a functional group can provide a stronger binding between nanoparticle and heme molecule or inhibit the chemical bonding in comparison with single fullerene results. In addition heme molecule loses electrons to the nanoparticles and some systems exhibited a geometry distortion in heme group, depending on the binding energy. Furthermore, one find that such nanoparticles induce a formation of spin up states in heme group. Moreover, there exist modifications in density of states near the Fermi energy. Although of such changes in heme electronic structure and geometry, the iron atom remains in the heme group with the same oxidation state, so that processes that involve the iron might not be affected, only those that depend on the whole heme molecule.

  2. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  3. Generation of nitroxyl by heme protein-mediated peroxidation of hydroxylamine but not N-hydroxy-L-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Donzelli, Sonia; Espey, Michael G.; Flores-Santana, Wilmarie; Switzer, Christopher H.; Yeh, Grace C.; Huang, S. Jinming; Stuehr, Dennis J.; King, S. Bruce; Miranda, Katrina M.; Wink, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical reactivity, toxicology and pharmacological responses to nitroxyl (HNO) are often distinctly different from those of nitric oxide (NO). The discovery that HNO donors may have pharmacological utility for treatment of cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure and ischemia reperfusion has led to increased speculation of potential endogenous pathways for HNO biosynthesis. Here, the ability of heme proteins to utilize H2O2 to oxidize hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) to HNO was examined. Formation of HNO was evaluated with a recently developed selective assay in which the reaction products in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH) were quantified by HPLC. Release of HNO from the heme pocket was indicated by formation of sulfinamide (GS(O)NH2), while the yields of nitrite and nitrate signified the degree of intramolecular recombination of HNO with the heme. Formation of GS(O)NH2 was observed upon oxidation of NH2OH, whereas NOHA, the primary intermediate in oxidation of L-arginine by NO synthase, was apparently resistant to oxidation by the heme proteins utilized. In the presence of NH2OH, the highest yields of GS(O)NH2 were observed with proteins in which the heme was coordinated to a histidine (horseradish peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, myeloperoxidase, myoglobin and hemoglobin) in contrast to a tyrosine (catalase) or cysteine (cytochrome P450). That peroxidation of NH2OH by horseradish peroxidase produced free HNO, which was able to affect intracellular targets, was verified by conversion of 4,5-diaminofluorescein to the corresponding fluorophore within intact cells. PMID:18503778

  4. Generation of nitroxyl by heme protein-mediated peroxidation of hydroxylamine but not N-hydroxy-L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Sonia; Espey, Michael Graham; Flores-Santana, Wilmarie; Switzer, Christopher H; Yeh, Grace C; Huang, Jinming; Stuehr, Dennis J; King, S Bruce; Miranda, Katrina M; Wink, David A

    2008-09-01

    The chemical reactivity, toxicology, and pharmacological responses to nitroxyl (HNO) are often distinctly different from those of nitric oxide (NO). The discovery that HNO donors may have pharmacological utility for treatment of cardiovascular disorders such as heart failure and ischemia reperfusion has led to increased speculation of potential endogenous pathways for HNO biosynthesis. Here, the ability of heme proteins to utilize H2O2 to oxidize hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or N-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) to HNO was examined. Formation of HNO was evaluated with a recently developed selective assay in which the reaction products in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH) were quantified by HPLC. Release of HNO from the heme pocket was indicated by formation of sulfinamide (GS(O)NH2), while the yields of nitrite and nitrate signified the degree of intramolecular recombination of HNO with the heme. Formation of GS(O)NH2 was observed upon oxidation of NH2OH, whereas NOHA, the primary intermediate in oxidation of L-arginine by NO synthase, was apparently resistant to oxidation by the heme proteins utilized. In the presence of NH2OH, the highest yields of GS(O)NH2 were observed with proteins in which the heme was coordinated to a histidine (horseradish peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, myeloperoxidase, myoglobin, and hemoglobin) in contrast to a tyrosine (catalase) or cysteine (cytochrome P450). That peroxidation of NH2OH by horseradish peroxidase produced free HNO, which was able to affect intracellular targets, was verified by conversion of 4,5-diaminofluorescein to the corresponding fluorophore within intact cells.

  5. Heme Oxygenase Database (HemeOxDB) and QSAR Analysis of Isoform 1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Amata, Emanuele; Marrazzo, Agostino; Dichiara, Maria; Modica, Maria N; Salerno, Loredana; Prezzavento, Orazio; Nastasi, Giovanni; Rescifina, Antonio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Pittalà, Valeria

    2017-07-14

    Due to increasing interest in the field of heme oxygenases (HOs), we built a ligand database called HemeOxDB that includes the entire set of known HO-1 and HO-2 inhibitors, resulting in more than 400 compounds. The HemeOxDB is available online at http://www.researchdsf.unict.it/hemeoxdb/, and having a robust search engine allows end users to build complex queries, sort tabulated results, and generate color-coded two- and three-dimensional graphs. This database will grow to be a tool for the design of potent and selective HO-1 or HO-2 inhibitors. We were also interested in virtually searching for alternative inhibitors, and, for the first time in the field of HOs, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was built using half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) values of the whole set of known HO-1 inhibitors, taken from the HemeOxDB and employing the Monte Carlo technique. The statistical quality suggested that the model is robust and possesses desirable predictive potential. The screening of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, external to our dataset, suggested new predicted inhibitors, opening the way for replacing imidazole groups. The HemeOxDB and the QSAR model reported herein may help in prospectively identifying or repurposing new drugs with optimal structural attributes for HO enzyme inhibition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  7. Heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 confers host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2013-07-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (M) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1(-/-)) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1(+/+)) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1(-/-) mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1(-/-) versus Hmox1(+/+) SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected M, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type M in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in M, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

  8. Molecular-Genetic Analysis of Osmoregulation, Osmotic Adjustment and Growth in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Elizabeth Bray

    2009-05-04

    The molecular mechanism by which plants control cellular solute and water content, called osmoregulation, is critical for cell expansion and survival, particularly in response to cellular water deficit or low water potential. Two loci, lwr1 and lwr2 (low water potential response), that affect osmoregulation were isolated as part of a larger screen to identify mutants with alterations in low water potential-induced proline accumulation. When seedlings of lwr2 were exposed to a steady low water potential stress over a period of several days using PEG-infused agar plates, the mutants had lesser proline accumulation and osmotic adjustment than the wild type, Ben. A mapping population was raised but it was not possible to reliably identify the mutants in the population and thus could not be used for mapping. The mutant lwr1 was mapped and the gene identified. The mutant lwr1 had greater accumulation of proline, higher total solute content, greater osmotic adjustment at low water potential, altered abscisic acid content, and increased sensitivity to applied abscisic acid with respect to Pro content than the wild type, Ben, when the water potential was decreased over a period of several days using PEG-infused agar plates. lwr1 also had altered growth and morphology, including defects in trichome branching with the majority of the trichomes having a single point, shortened siliques which were crooked, and significantly lengthened time to flowering. Using bulk segregant analysis, the lwr1 loci was mapped to the lower arm of chromosome II, near the marker nga168. Further detailed fine mapping located the mutation to the gene PKL, At2g25170, which was previously identified as a gene involved in altered root development. PKL encodes a chromatin remodeling factor. The mutation in lwr1 introduced a stop codon in the 14th exon of At2g25170. The mutant was not complemented by 4 other known mutants having a disrupted PKL gene confirming the placement of this mutation in lwr1. In

  9. Identification of essential histidine residues involved in heme binding and Hemozoin formation in heme detoxification protein from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Haruto; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-08-20

    Malaria parasites digest hemoglobin within a food vacuole to supply amino acids, releasing the toxic product heme. During the detoxification, toxic free heme is converted into an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (Hz). Heme detoxification protein (HDP) in Plasmodium falciparum is one of the most potent of the hemozoin-producing enzymes. However, the reaction mechanisms of HDP are poorly understood. We identified the active site residues in HDP using a combination of Hz formation assay and spectroscopic characterization of mutant proteins. Replacement of the critical histidine residues His122, His172, His175, and His197 resulted in a reduction in the Hz formation activity to approximately 50% of the wild-type protein. Spectroscopic characterization of histidine-substituted mutants revealed that His122 binds heme and that His172 and His175 form a part of another heme-binding site. Our results show that the histidine residues could be present in the individual active sites and could be ligated to each heme. The interaction between heme and the histidine residues would serve as a molecular tether, allowing the proper positioning of two hemes to enable heme dimer formation. The heme dimer would act as a seed for the crystal growth of Hz in P. falciparum.

  10. Expression of hormone genes and osmoregulation in homing chum salmon: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Makino, Keita; Onuma, Takeshi A; Kitahashi, Takashi; Ando, Hironori; Ban, Masatoshi; Urano, Akihisa

    2007-01-01

    Pacific salmon migrate from ocean through the natal river for spawning. Information on expression of genes encoding osmoregulatory hormones and migratory behavior is important for understanding of molecular events that underlie osmoregulation of homing salmon. In the present article, regulation of gene expression for osmoregulatory hormones in pre-spawning salmon was briefly reviewed with special reference to neurohypophysial hormone, vasotocin (VT), and pituitary hormones, growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL). Thereafter, we introduced recent data on migratory behavior from SW to FW environment. In pre-spawning chum salmon, the hypothalamic VT mRNA levels increased in the males, while decreased in the females with loss of salinity tolerance when they were kept in SW. The amounts of GH mRNA in the pituitary decreased during ocean migration prior to entrance into FW. Hypo-osmotic stimulation by SW-to-FW transfer did not significantly affect the amount of PRL mRNA, but it was elevated in both SW and FW environments along with progress in final maturation. Behaviorally, homing chum salmon continued vertical movement between SW and FW layers in the mouth of the natal river for about 12h prior to upstream migration. Pre-spawning chum salmon in an aquarium, which allowed fish free access to SW and FW, showed that individuals with the lower plasma testosterone (T) and higher estradiol-17beta (E2) levels spent longer time in FW when compared with the SW fish. Taken together, neuroendocrine mechanisms that underlie salt and water homeostasis and migratory behavior from SW to FW may be under the control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in pre-spawning salmon.

  11. Thirst Perception and Osmoregulation of Vasopressin Secretion Are Altered During Recovery From Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Siami, Shidasp; Polito, Andrea; Porcher, Raphael; Hissem, Tarik; Blanchard, Anne; Boucly, Catherine; Carlier, Robert; Annane, Djillali; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Sharshar, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vasopressin (AVP) secretion during an osmotic challenge is frequently altered in the immediate post-acute phase of septic shock. We sought to determine if this response is still altered in patients recovering from septic shock. Design Prospective interventional study Setting Intensive care unit (ICU) at Raymond Poincaré and Etampes Hospitals. Patients Normonatremic patients at least 5 days post discontinuation of catecholamines given for a septic shock. Intervention Osmotic challenge involved infusing 500 mL of hypertonic saline solution (with cumulative amount of sodium not exceeding 24 g) over 120 minutes. Measurements and main results Plasma AVP levels were measured 15 minutes before the infusion and then every 30 minutes for two hours. Non-responders were defined as those with a slope of the relation between AVP and plasma sodium levels less than < 0.5 ng/mEq. Among the 30 included patients, 18 (60%) were non-responders. Blood pressure and plasma sodium and brain natriuretic peptide levels were similar in both responders and non-responders during the course of the test. Critical illness severity, hemodynamic alteration, electrolyte disturbances, treatment and outcome did not differ between the two groups. Responders had more severe gas exchange abnormality. Thirst perception was significantly diminished in non-responders. The osmotic challenge was repeated in 4 non-responders several months after discharge and the abnormal response persisted. Conclusion More than half of patients recovering from septic shock have an alteration of osmoregulation characterised by a dramatic decrease in vasopressin secretion and thirst perception during osmotic challenge. The mechanisms of this alteration but also of the relationship between haematosis and normal response remain to be elucidated. PMID:24223220

  12. Phylogenetic patterns and the adaptive evolution of osmoregulation in fiddler crabs (Brachyura, Uca)

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Samuel Coelho; Provete, Diogo Borges; Thurman, Carl Leo

    2017-01-01

    Salinity is the primary driver of osmoregulatory evolution in decapods, and may have influenced their diversification into different osmotic niches. In semi-terrestrial crabs, hyper-osmoregulatory ability favors sojourns into burrows and dilute media, and provides a safeguard against hemolymph dilution; hypo-osmoregulatory ability underlies emersion capability and a life more removed from water sources. However, most comparative studies have neglected the roles of the phylogenetic and environmental components of inter-specific physiological variation, hindering evaluation of phylogenetic patterns and the adaptive nature of osmoregulatory evolution. Semi-terrestrial fiddler crabs (Uca) inhabit fresh to hyper-saline waters, with species from the Americas occupying higher intertidal habitats than Indo-west Pacific species mainly found in the low intertidal zone. Here, we characterize numerous osmoregulatory traits in all ten fiddler crabs found along the Atlantic coast of Brazil, and we employ phylogenetic comparative methods using 24 species to test for: (i) similarities of osmoregulatory ability among closely related species; (ii) salinity as a driver of osmoregulatory evolution; (iii) correlation between salt uptake and secretion; and (iv) adaptive peaks in osmoregulatory ability in the high intertidal American lineages. Our findings reveal that osmoregulation in Uca exhibits strong phylogenetic patterns in salt uptake traits. Salinity does not correlate with hyper/hypo-regulatory abilities, but drives hemolymph osmolality at ambient salinities. Osmoregulatory traits have evolved towards three adaptive peaks, revealing a significant contribution of hyper/hypo-regulatory ability in the American clades. Thus, during the evolutionary history of fiddler crabs, salinity has driven some of the osmoregulatory transformations that underpin habitat diversification, although others are apparently constrained phylogenetically. PMID:28182764

  13. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, G; Hellebust, J A

    1989-11-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent K(m) values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments.

  14. An Acanthamoeba castellanii metacaspase associates with the contractile vacuole and functions in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Saheb, Entsar; Trzyna, Wendy; Bush, John

    2013-03-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living protozoan. Some strains are opportunistic pathogens. A type-I metacaspase was identified in A. castellanii (Acmcp) and was shown to be expressed through the encystation process. The model organism, Dictyostelium discoideum, has been used here as a model for studying these caspase-like proteins. Separate cell lines expressing a GFP-tagged version of the full length Acmcp protein, as well as a deletion proline region mutant of Acmcp protein (GFP-Acmcp-dpr), have been introduced into D. discoideum. Both mutants affect the cellular metabolism, characterized by an increase in the growth rate. Microscopic imaging revealed an association between Acmcp and the contractile vacuole system in D. discoideum. The treatment of cells with selected inhibitors in different environments added additional support to these findings. This evidence shows that Acmcp plays an important role in contractile vacuole regulation and mediated membrane trafficking in D. discoideum. Additionally, the severe defect in contractile vacuole function in GFP-Acmcp-dpr mutant cells suggests that the proline-rich region in Acmcp has an essential role in binding this protein with other partners to maintain this process. Furthermore, Yeast two-hybrid system identified there are weak interactions of the Dictyostelium contractile vacuolar proteins, including Calmodulin, RabD, Rab11 and vacuolar proton ATPase, with Acmcp protein. Taken together, our findings suggest that A. castellanii metacaspase associate with the contractile vacuole and have an essential role in cell osmoregulation, which contributes to its attractiveness as a possible target for treatment therapies against A. castellanii infection.

  15. Evaporation-induced stimulation of bacterial osmoregulation for electrical assessment of cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria cells use osmoregulatory proteins as emergency valves to respond to changes in the osmotic pressure of their external environment. The existence of these emergency valves has been known since the 1960s, but they have never been used as the basis of a viability assay to tell dead bacteria cells apart from live ones. In this paper, we show that osmoregulation provides a much faster, label-free assessment of cell viability compared with traditional approaches that rely on cell multiplication (growth) to reach a detectable threshold. The cells are confined in an evaporating droplet that serves as a dynamic microenvironment. Evaporation-induced increase in ionic concentration is reflected in a proportional increase of the droplet’s osmotic pressure, which in turn, stimulates the osmoregulatory response from the cells. By monitoring the time-varying electrical conductance of evaporating droplets, bacterial cells are identified within a few minutes compared with several hours in growth-based methods. To show the versatility of the proposed method, we show detection of WT and genetically modified nonhalotolerant cells (Salmonella typhimurium) and dead vs. live differentiation of nonhalotolerant (such as Escherichia coli DH5α) and halotolerant cells (such as Staphylococcus epidermidis). Unlike the growth-based techniques, the assay time of the proposed method is independent of cell concentration or the bacteria type. The proposed label-free approach paves the road toward realization of a new class of real time, array-formatted electrical sensors compatible with droplet microfluidics for laboratory on a chip applications. PMID:27303045

  16. Phylogenetic patterns and the adaptive evolution of osmoregulation in fiddler crabs (Brachyura, Uca).

    PubMed

    Faria, Samuel Coelho; Provete, Diogo Borges; Thurman, Carl Leo; McNamara, John Campbell

    2017-01-01

    Salinity is the primary driver of osmoregulatory evolution in decapods, and may have influenced their diversification into different osmotic niches. In semi-terrestrial crabs, hyper-osmoregulatory ability favors sojourns into burrows and dilute media, and provides a safeguard against hemolymph dilution; hypo-osmoregulatory ability underlies emersion capability and a life more removed from water sources. However, most comparative studies have neglected the roles of the phylogenetic and environmental components of inter-specific physiological variation, hindering evaluation of phylogenetic patterns and the adaptive nature of osmoregulatory evolution. Semi-terrestrial fiddler crabs (Uca) inhabit fresh to hyper-saline waters, with species from the Americas occupying higher intertidal habitats than Indo-west Pacific species mainly found in the low intertidal zone. Here, we characterize numerous osmoregulatory traits in all ten fiddler crabs found along the Atlantic coast of Brazil, and we employ phylogenetic comparative methods using 24 species to test for: (i) similarities of osmoregulatory ability among closely related species; (ii) salinity as a driver of osmoregulatory evolution; (iii) correlation between salt uptake and secretion; and (iv) adaptive peaks in osmoregulatory ability in the high intertidal American lineages. Our findings reveal that osmoregulation in Uca exhibits strong phylogenetic patterns in salt uptake traits. Salinity does not correlate with hyper/hypo-regulatory abilities, but drives hemolymph osmolality at ambient salinities. Osmoregulatory traits have evolved towards three adaptive peaks, revealing a significant contribution of hyper/hypo-regulatory ability in the American clades. Thus, during the evolutionary history of fiddler crabs, salinity has driven some of the osmoregulatory transformations that underpin habitat diversification, although others are apparently constrained phylogenetically.

  17. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation 1

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Gilles; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1989-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent Km values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments. PMID:16667157

  18. Effect of nutritional status on the osmoregulation of green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris).

    PubMed

    Haller, Liran Y; Hung, Silas S O; Lee, Seunghyung; Fadel, James G; Lee, Jun-Ho; McEnroe, Maryann; Fangue, Nann A

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is linked to food web and salinity fluctuations in estuarine environments. Both decreased nutritional status and environmental salinity influence the physiological tolerance and health of fish populations; however, limited information on the interaction of these two factors and their physiological consequences is available. The green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) is a species of special concern in California, and the southern distinct population segment is listed as threatened. To test the hypothesis that poor nutrition negatively affects osmoregulation, juvenile green sturgeon (222 d posthatch) were randomly assigned to four feed restriction groups (12.5%, 25%, 50%, and 100% of the optimal feeding rate for 4 wk). Fish were then acutely exposed to 0-, 8-, 16-, or 32-ppt salinities and sampled at three time points (12, 72, or 120 h). Feed restriction significantly (P < 0.05) decreased specific growth rate, feed efficiency, condition factor, whole-body lipids, and protein content as well as plasma glucose, triglycerides, and proteins. Furthermore, feed restriction, salinity concentration, and salinity exposure time had significant effects on hematological indexes (hematocrit, hemoglobin), plasma values (osmolality, Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), glucose, lactate, cortisol), enzymatic activity (gill and pyloric ceca Na(+)/K(+) ATPase), and morphology of gill mitochondria-rich cells. The largest disturbances were observed at the highest salinity treatments across all feeding regimes. In addition, the interaction between feed restriction and acute salinity exposure at the highest salinity treatment resulted in high mortality rates during the first 72 h of salinity exposure. Evaluating the interactions of these environmental stressors and their implications on green sturgeon physiological tolerance will inform restoration and management efforts in rapidly changing estuarine environments.

  19. Body shaping under water stress: osmosensing and osmoregulation of solute transport in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morbach, Susanne; Krämer, Reinhard

    2002-05-03

    Fluctuation of external osmolarity is one of the most common types of environmental stress factors for all kind of cells, both of prokaryotic and of eukaryotic origin. Cells try to keep their volume and/or turgor pressure constant; consequently, both a decrease (hypoosmotic stress) and an increase (hyperosmotic stress) of the solute concentration (correctly: increase or decrease in water activity) in the surrounding area, respectively, are challenges for cellular metabolism and survival. A common example from the prokaryotic world is the fate of a soil bacterium that, after a sunny day has dried out the soil (hyperosmotic stress), is suddenly exposed to a drop of distilled water from a rain cloud (hypoosmotic stress). The immediate and inevitable passive response to the sudden osmotic shift in the surroundings is fast water efflux out of the cell in the former situation and water influx in the latter. In the worst case, these responses may lead to either loss of cell turgor and plasmolysis or to cell burst. In order to overcome such drastic consequences cells have developed effective mechanisms, namely osmoadaptation, to cope with the two different types of osmotic stress. For a graded reaction to osmotic shifts, cells must be able (1) to sense stimuli related to osmotic stress, (2) to transduce corresponding signals to those systems that properly respond (3) by activating transport or enzymatic functions or (4) by changing gene expression profiles. In this review, membrane proteins involved in the cell's active response to osmotic stress are described. Molecular details of structure, function, and regulation of mechanosensitive efflux channels from various organisms, as well as of osmoregulated uptake systems are discussed.

  20. A role for tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins in larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Bui, Phuong; Donini, Andrew; Wilkie, Mike P; Kelly, Scott P

    2017-08-10

    This study reports on tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins of larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and their potential role in ammocoete osmoregulation. Two Occludin isoforms (designated Ocln and Ocln-a) and a tricellulin (Tric) were identified. Transcripts encoding ocln, ocln-a, and tric were broadly expressed in larval lamprey, with greatest abundance of ocln in gut, liver and kidney, ocln-a in the gill and skin, and tric in the kidney. Ocln and Ocln-a resolved as ∼63 kDa and ∼35 kDa MW proteins respectively while Tric resolved as a ∼50 kDa protein. Ocln immunolocalized to the gill vasculature and in gill mucous cells while Ocln-a localized to the gill pouch and gill epithelium. Both Ocln and Ocln-a localized in the nephron, the epidermis and the luminal side of the gut. In branchial tissue, Tric exhibited punctate localization, consistent with its presence at regions of tricellular contact. Following ion-poor water (IPW) acclimation of ammocoetes, serum [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] reduced, but not [Ca(++)], and carcass moisture content increased. In association, Ocln abundance increased in skin and kidney, but reduced in gill of IPW-acclimated ammocoetes while Ocln-a abundance reduced in the kidney only. Tric abundance increased in the gill. Region-specific alterations in ocln, ocln-a and tric mRNA abundance was also observed in the gut. Data support a role for Ocln, Ocln-a and Tric in the osmoregulatory strategies of a basal vertebrate. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Portunus trituberculatus in Response to Salinity Stress Provides Insights into the Molecular Basis of Osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jianjian; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yu; Gao, Baoquan; Chen, Ping; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, which is naturally distributed in the coastal waters of Asia-Pacific countries, is an important farmed species in China. Salinity is one of the most important abiotic factors that influence not only the distribution and abundance of crustaceans, it is also an important factor for artificial propagation of the crab. To better understand the interaction between salinity stress and osmoregulation, we performed a transcriptome analysis in the gills of Portunus trituberculatus challenged with salinity stress, using the Illumina Deep Sequencing technology. Results We obtained 27,696,835, 28,268,353 and 33,901,271 qualified Illumina read pairs from low salinity challenged (LC), non-challenged (NC), and high salinity challenged (HC) Portunus trituberculatus cDNA libraries, respectively. The overall de novo assembly of cDNA sequence data generated 94,511 unigenes, with an average length of 644 bp. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 1,705 genes differentially expressed in salinity stress compared to the controls, including 615 and 1,516 unigenes in NC vs LC and NC vs HC respectively. GO functional enrichment analysis results showed some differentially expressed genes were involved in crucial processes related to osmoregulation, such as ion transport processes, amino acid metabolism and synthesis processes, proteolysis process and chitin metabolic process. Conclusion This work represents the first report of the utilization of the next generation sequencing techniques for transcriptome analysis in Portunus trituberculatus and provides valuable information on salinity adaptation mechanism. Results reveal a substantial number of genes modified by salinity stress and a few important salinity acclimation pathways, which will serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular basis of osmoregulation in Portunus trituberculatus. In addition, the most comprehensive sequences of transcripts reported in this study

  2. Transcriptome Changes in Eriocheir sinensis Megalopae after Desalination Provide Insights into Osmoregulation and Stress Adaption in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Min; Liu, Yuan; Song, Chengwen; Li, Yingdong; Shi, Guohui; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Eriocheir sinensis, an extremely invasive alien crab species, has important economic value in China. It encounters different salinities during its life cycle, and at the megalopal stage it faces a turning point regarding the salinity in its environment. We applied RNA sequencing to E. sinensis megalopae before (MB) and after (MA) desalination, resulting in the discovery of 21,042 unigenes and 908 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 4.32% of the unigenes). The DEGs primarily belonged to the Gene Ontology groups “Energy metabolism,” “Oxidoreductase activity,” “Translation,” “Transport,” “Metabolism,” and “Stress response.” In total, 33 DEGs related to transport processes were found, including 12 proton pump genes, three ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs), 13 solute carrier (SLC) family members, two sweet sugar transporter (ST) family members and three other substance transporters. Mitochondrial genes as well as genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolytic pathway, or β-oxidation pathway, which can generate energy in the form of ATP, were typically up-regulated in MA. 11 unigenes related to amino acid metabolism and a large number of genes related to protein synthesis were differentially expressed in MB and MA, indicating that E. sinensis possibly adjusts its concentration of free amino acid osmolytes for hyper-osmoregulation. Additionally, 33 salinity and oxidative stress induced genes were found to be differentially expressed, such as the LEA2, HSPs, GST and coagulation factor genes. Notably, LEA2 is an extremely hydrophilic protein that responds to desiccation and reported for the first time in crabs. Therefore, we suppose that when the environment is hypo-osmotic, the megalopae might compensate for ion loss via hyper-osmoregulation by consuming more energy, accompanied by a series of stress induced adaptions. This study provides the first genome-wide transcriptome analysis of E. sinensis megalopae for studying its osmoregulation

  3. KCNE1-KCNQ1 osmoregulation by interaction of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate with Mg2+ and polyamines.

    PubMed

    Piron, Julien; Choveau, Frank S; Amarouch, Mohammed Yassine; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Charpentier, Flavien; Mérot, Jean; Baró, Isabelle; Loussouarn, Gildas

    2010-09-15

    KCNQ1 osmosensitivity is of physiological and pathophysiological relevance in epithelial and cardiac cells, but the mechanism involved remains elusive. In COS-7 cells expressing the KCNE1-KCNQ1 fusion protein, extracellular hypoosmolarity and hyperosmolarity modify the channel biophysical parameters. These changes are consistent with hypoosmolarity increasing the level of membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), which in turn upregulates KCNE1-KCNQ1 channels. We showed that increasing PIP(2) levels with a water-soluble PIP(2) analogue prevented channel upregulation in hypoosmotic condition, suggesting a variation of the channel-PIP(2) interaction during channel osmoregulation. Furthermore, we showed that polyamines and Mg(2+), already known to tonically inhibit KCNQ channels by screening PIP(2) negative charges, are involved in the osmoregulatory process. Indeed, intracellular Mg(2+) removal and polyamines chelation inhibited the channel osmoregulation. Thus, the dilution of those cations during cell swelling might decrease channel inhibition and explain the channel upregulation by hypoosmolarity. To support this idea, we quantified the role of Mg(2+) in the osmodependent channel activity. Direct measurement of intracellular [Mg(2+)] variations during osmotic changes and characterization of the channel Mg(2+) sensitivity showed that Mg(2+) participates significantly to the osmoregulation. Using intracellular solutions that mimic the variation of Mg(2+) and polyamines, we were able to recapitulate the current amplitude variations in response to extracellular osmolarity changes. Altogether, these results support the idea of a modulation of the channel-PIP(2) interactions by Mg(2+) and polyamines during cell volume changes. It is likely that this mechanism applies to other channels that are sensitive to both osmolarity and PIP(2).

  4. Transcriptome changes in Eriocheir sinensis megalopae after desalination provide insights into osmoregulation and stress adaption in larvae.

    PubMed

    Hui, Min; Liu, Yuan; Song, Chengwen; Li, Yingdong; Shi, Guohui; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Eriocheir sinensis, an extremely invasive alien crab species, has important economic value in China. It encounters different salinities during its life cycle, and at the megalopal stage it faces a turning point regarding the salinity in its environment. We applied RNA sequencing to E. sinensis megalopae before (MB) and after (MA) desalination, resulting in the discovery of 21,042 unigenes and 908 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 4.32% of the unigenes). The DEGs primarily belonged to the Gene Ontology groups "Energy metabolism," "Oxidoreductase activity," "Translation," "Transport," "Metabolism," and "Stress response." In total, 33 DEGs related to transport processes were found, including 12 proton pump genes, three ATP-binding cassettes (ABCs), 13 solute carrier (SLC) family members, two sweet sugar transporter (ST) family members and three other substance transporters. Mitochondrial genes as well as genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolytic pathway, or β-oxidation pathway, which can generate energy in the form of ATP, were typically up-regulated in MA. 11 unigenes related to amino acid metabolism and a large number of genes related to protein synthesis were differentially expressed in MB and MA, indicating that E. sinensis possibly adjusts its concentration of free amino acid osmolytes for hyper-osmoregulation. Additionally, 33 salinity and oxidative stress induced genes were found to be differentially expressed, such as the LEA2, HSPs, GST and coagulation factor genes. Notably, LEA2 is an extremely hydrophilic protein that responds to desiccation and reported for the first time in crabs. Therefore, we suppose that when the environment is hypo-osmotic, the megalopae might compensate for ion loss via hyper-osmoregulation by consuming more energy, accompanied by a series of stress induced adaptions. This study provides the first genome-wide transcriptome analysis of E. sinensis megalopae for studying its osmoregulation and stress adaption

  5. Proline 107 Is a Major Determinant in Maintaining the Structure of the Distal Pocket and Reactivity of the High-Spin Heme of MauG

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Manliang; Jensen, Lyndal M.R.; Yukl, Erik T.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Liu, Aimin; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2012-05-09

    The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation required for posttranslational modification of a precursor of methylamine dehydrogenase (preMADH) to complete the biosynthesis of its protein-derived tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor. Crystallographic studies had shown that Pro107, which resides in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme of MauG, changes conformation upon binding of CO or NO to the heme iron. In this study, Pro107 was converted to Cys, Val, and Ser by site-directed mutagenesis. The structures of each of these MauG mutant proteins in complex with preMADH were determined, as were their physical and catalytic properties. P107C MauG was inactive, and the crystal structure revealed that Cys107 had been oxidatively modified to a sulfinic acid. Mass spectrometry revealed that this modification was present prior to crystallization. P107V MauG exhibited spectroscopic and catalytic properties that were similar to those of wild-type MauG, but P107V MauG was more susceptible to oxidative damage. The P107S mutation caused a structural change that resulted in the five-coordinate high-spin heme being converted to a six-coordinate heme with a distal axial ligand provided by Glu113. EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy revealed this heme remained high-spin but with greatly increased rhombicity as compared to that of the axial signal of wild-type MauG. P107S MauG was resistant to reduction by dithionite and reaction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and unable to catalyze TTQ biosynthesis. These results show that the presence of Pro107 is critical in maintaining the proper structure of the distal heme pocket of the high-spin heme of MauG, allowing exogenous ligands to bind and directing the reactivity of the heme-activated oxygen during catalysis, thus minimizing the oxidation of other residues of MauG.

  6. Fe-heme conformations in ferric myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Della Longa, S; Pin, S; Cortès, R; Soldatov, A V; Alpert, B

    1998-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of ferric myoglobin from horse heart have been acquired as a function of pH (between 5.3 and 11.3). At pH = 11.3 temperature-dependent spectra (between 20 and 293 K) have been collected as well. Experimental data solve three main conformations of the Fe-heme: the first, at low pH, is related to high-spin aquomet-myoglobin (Mb+OH2). The other two, at pH 11.3, are related to hydroxymet-myoglobin (Mb+OH-), and are in thermal equilibrium, corresponding to high- and low-spin Mb+OH-. The structure of the three Fe-heme conformations has been assigned according to spin-resolved multiple scattering simulations and fitting of the XANES data. The chemical transition between Mb+OH2 and high-spin Mb+OH-, and the spin transition of Mb+OH-, are accompanied by changes of the Fe coordination sphere due to its movement toward the heme plane, coupled to an increase of the axial asymmetry.

  7. Mechanisms of catalase activity of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Vlasits, Jutta; Jakopitsch, Christa; Bernroitner, Margit; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-08-01

    In the absence of exogenous electron donors monofunctional heme peroxidases can slowly degrade hydrogen peroxide following a mechanism different from monofunctional catalases. This pseudo-catalase cycle involves several redox intermediates including Compounds I, II and III, hydrogen peroxide reduction and oxidation reactions as well as release of both dioxygen and superoxide. The rate of decay of oxyferrous complex determines the rate-limiting step and the enzymes' resistance to inactivation. Homologous bifunctional catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique in having both a peroxidase and high hydrogen dismutation activity without inhibition reactions. It is demonstrated that KatGs follow a similar reaction pathway as monofunctional peroxidases, but use a unique post-translational distal modification (Met+-Tyr-Trp adduct) in close vicinity to the heme as radical site that enhances turnover of oxyferrous heme and avoids release of superoxide. Similarities and differences between monofunctional peroxidases and bifunctional KatGs are discussed and mechanisms of pseudo-catalase activity are proposed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In Vivo Detection of the Cyclic Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucan of Ralstonia solanacearum by High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieruszeski, J.-M.; Bohin, A.; Bohin, J.-P.; Lippens, G.

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the mobility of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans of Ralstonia solanacearum in the bacterial periplasm through the use of high-resolution (HR) NMR spectroscopy under static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Because the nature of periplasm is far from an isotropic aqueous solution, the molecules could be freely diffusing or rather associated to a periplasmic protein, a membrane protein, a lipid, or the peptidoglycan. HR MAS NMR spectroscopy leads to more reproducible results and allows the in vivo detection and characterization of the complex molecule.

  9. Mimicking Heme Enzymes in the Solid State: Metal-Organic Materials with Selectively Encapsulated Heme

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Randy W; Wojtas, Lukasz; Perman, Jason; Musselman, Ronald L; Zaworotko, Michael J; Vetromile, Carissa M

    2011-06-13

    To carry out essential life processes, nature has had to evolve heme enzymes capable of synthesizing and manipulating complex molecules. These proteins perform a plethora of chemical reactions utilizing a single iron porphyrin active site embedded within an evolutionarily designed protein pocket. We herein report the first class of metal–organic materials (MOMs) that mimic heme enzymes in terms of both structure and reactivity. The MOMzyme-1 class is based upon a prototypal MOM, HKUST-1, into which catalytically active metalloporphyrins are selectively encapsulated in a “ship-in-a-bottle” fashion within one of the three nanoscale cages that exist in HKUST-1. MOMs offer unparalleled levels of permanent porosity and their modular nature affords enormous diversity of structures and properties. The MOMzyme-1 class could therefore represent a new paradigm for heme biomimetic catalysis since it combines the activity of a homogeneous catalyst with the stability and recyclability of heterogeneous catalytic systems within a single material.

  10. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  11. Peroxidase Activity of De novo Heme Proteins Immobilized on Electrodes‡

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aditi; Hecht, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    De novo proteins from designed combinatorial libraries were bound to heme terminated gold electrodes. The novel heme proteins were shown to possess peroxidase activity, and this activity was compared to that of horseradish peroxidase and bovine serum albumin when immobilized in a similar fashion. The various designed proteins from the libraries displayed distinctly different levels of peroxidase activity, thereby demonstrating that the sequence and structure of a designed protein can exert a substantial effect on the peroxidase activity of immobilized heme. PMID:17765314

  12. Temperature dependent studies of NO recombination to heme and heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ionascu, Dan; Gruia, Flaviu; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Rosca, Florin; Beck, Chris; Demidov, Andrey; Olson, John S.; Champion, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The rebinding kinetics of NO to the heme iron of myoglobin (Mb) is investigated as a function of temperature. Below 200K, the transition state enthalpy barrier associated with the fastest (~10ps) recombination phase is found to be zero, while a slower geminate phase (~200ps) reveals a small enthalpic barrier (~ 3 ± 1 kJ/mol). Both of the kinetic rates slow down slightly in the myoglobin (Mb) samples above 200K, suggesting that a small amount of protein relaxation takes place above the solvent glass transition. When the temperature dependence of the NO recombination in Mb is studied under conditions where the distal pocket is mutated (e.g., V68W), the rebinding kinetics lack the slow phase. This is consistent with a mechanism where the slower (~200ps) kinetic phase involves transitions of the NO ligand into the distal heme pocket from a more distant site (e.g., in or near the Xe4 cavity). Comparison of the temperature dependent NO rebinding kinetics of native Mb with that of the bare heme (PPIX) in glycerol reveals that the fast (enthalpically barrierless) NO rebinding process observed below 200K is independent of the presence or absence of the proximal histidine ligand. In contrast, the slowing of the kinetic rates above 200K in MbNO disappears in the absence of the protein. Generally, the data indicate that, in contrast to CO, the NO ligand binds to the heme iron through a “harpoon” mechanism where the heme iron out-of-plane conformation presents a negligible enthalpic barrier to NO rebinding. These observations strongly support a previous analysis (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 6656) that primarily attributes the low temperature stretched exponential rebinding of MbCO to a quenched distribution of heme geometries. A simple model is presented for MbNO rebinding that explains a variety of experiments, including the dependence of the kinetic amplitudes on the pump photon energy. PMID:16316238

  13. Mechanisms of peroxynitrite interactions with heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T

    2010-07-19

    Oxygenated heme proteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. PN is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN interactions with heme proteins. In this Forum, we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve NO and PN. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylmyolgobin (ferrylMb) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb) (Su, J.; Groves, J. T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 12979-12988). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from the initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [Fe(IV) horizontal lineO.NO(2)]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant k(r) to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen-rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, k(obs), of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely diffusing NO(2), which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (k(e)), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a beta-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH (Balakrishnan, G.; Hu, Y.; Oyerinde, O. F.; Su, J.; Groves, J. T.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 504-505). It is proposed that a short beta-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58

  14. Multi-heme cytochromes--new structures, new chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Christopher G; Chapman, Stephen K

    2005-11-07

    Heme is one of the most pervasive cofactors in nature and the c-type cytochromes represent one of the largest families of heme-containing proteins. Recent progress in bacterial genomic analysis has revealed a vast range of genes encoding novel c-type cytochromes that contain multiple numbers of heme cofactors. The genome sequence of Geobacter sulfurreducens, for example, includes some one hundred genes encoding c-type cytochromes, with around seventy of these containing two, or more, heme groups and with one protein containing an astonishing twenty seven heme groups. This wealth of cytochromes is of great significance in the respiratory flexibility shown by bacteria such as Geobacter. In addition, we are now discovering that many of these multi-heme cytochromes have associated enzymatic activities and in some cases this is revealing new chemistries. The purpose of this perspective is to describe recent progress in the structural and functional analyses of these new multi-heme cytochromes. To illustrate this we have chosen to focus on three of these cytochromes which exhibit catalytic activities; nitrite reductase, hydroxylamine oxidoreductase and tetrathionate reductase. In addition we consider the multi-heme cytochromes from Geobacter and Desulfovibrio species. Finally, we consider and contrast the repeating structural modules found in these multi-heme cytochromes.

  15. Heme compounds as iron sources for nonpathogenic Rhizobium bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Noya, F; Arias, A; Fabiano, E

    1997-01-01

    Many animal-pathogenic bacteria can use heme compounds as iron sources. Like these microorganisms, rhizobium strains interact with host organisms where heme compounds are available. Results presented in this paper indicate that the use of hemoglobin as an iron source is not restricted to animal-pathogenic microorganisms. We also demonstrate that heme, hemoglobin, and leghemoglobin can act as iron sources under iron-depleted conditions for Rhizobium meliloti 242. Analysis of iron acquisition mutant strains indicates that siderophore-, heme-, hemoglobin-, and leghemoglobin-mediated iron transport systems expressed by R. meliloti 242 share at least one component. PMID:9139934

  16. Simultaneous depletion of Atm and Mdl rebalances cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly but not heme import into the mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Paris, Zdeněk; Salmon, Didier; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-11-01

    ABC transporter mitochondrial 1 (Atm1) and multidrug resistance-like 1 (Mdl) are mitochondrial ABC transporters. Although Atm1 was recently suggested to transport different forms of glutathione from the mitochondrion, which are used for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster maturation in the cytosol, the function of Mdl remains elusive. In Trypanosoma brucei, we identified one homolog of each of these genes, TbAtm and TbMdl, which were downregulated either separately or simultaneously using RNA interference. Individual depletion of TbAtm and TbMdl led to limited growth defects. In cells downregulated for TbAtm, the enzymatic activities of the Fe-S cluster proteins aconitase and fumarase significantly decreased in the cytosol but not in the mitochondrion. Downregulation of TbMdl did not cause any change in activities of the Fe-S proteins. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous downregulation of TbAtm and TbMdl did not result in any growth defect, nor were the Fe-S cluster protein activities altered in either the cytosolic or mitochondrial compartments. Additionally, TbAtm and TbMdl were able to partially restore the growth of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δatm1 and Δmdl2 null mutants, respectively. Because T. brucei completely lost the heme b biosynthesis pathway, this cofactor has to be obtained from the host. Based on our results, TbMdl is a candidate for mitochondrial import of heme b, which was markedly decreased in both TbMdl and TbAtm + TbMdl knockdowns. Moreover, the levels of heme a were strongly decreased in the same knockdowns, suggesting that TbMdl plays a key role in heme a biosynthesis, thus affecting the overall heme homeostasis in T. brucei.

  17. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  18. [Direct biosynthesis of ethylene].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Chen, Yifeng

    2013-10-01

    Ethylene is the most widely used petrochemical feedstock globally. The development of bio-ethylene is essential due to limited fossil fuels and rising oil prices. Bio-ethylene is produced primarily by the dehydration of ethanol, but can alternatively be directly produced from ethylene biosynthesis pathways in plants, algae, or microorganisms by using cheap and renewable substrates. This review addressed the biosynthesis of ethylene in plants and microorganisms, the characterization of key enzymes, genetic engineering strategies for ethylene biosynthesis in microorganisms, and evaluated its perspective and successful cases toward the industrial application. The direct production of bio-ethylene from a biological process in situ is promising to supplement and even replace the petrochemical ethylene production.

  19. Protein oxidation mediated by heme-induced active site conversion specific for heme-regulated transcription factor, iron response regulator.

    PubMed

    Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Izumi, Kozue; Nambu, Shusuke; Kurogochi, Masaki; Uchida, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro; O'Brian, Mark R; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-05

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum transcriptional regulator Irr (iron response regulator) is a key regulator of the iron homeostasis, which is degraded in response to heme binding via a mechanism that involves oxidative modification of the protein. Here, we show that heme-bound Irr activates O2 to form highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the "active site conversion" from heme iron to non-heme iron to degrade itself. In the presence of heme and reductant, the ROS scavenging experiments show that Irr generates H2O2 from O2 as found for other hemoproteins, but H2O2 is less effective in oxidizing the peptide, and further activation of H2O2 is suggested. Interestingly, we find a time-dependent decrease of the intensity of the Soret band and appearance of the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3 during the oxidation, showing the heme degradation and the successive formation of a non-heme iron site. Together with the mutational studies, we here propose a novel "two-step self-oxidative modification" mechanism, during which O2 is activated to form H2O2 at the heme regulatory motif (HRM) site and the generated H2O2 is further converted into more reactive species such as ·OH at the non-heme iron site in the His-cluster region formed by the active site conversion.

  20. RNA Interference based Approach to Down Regulate Osmoregulators of Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci): Potential Technology for the Control of Whitefly.

    PubMed

    Raza, Amir; Malik, Hassan Jamil; Shafiq, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Scheffler, Jodi A; Scheffler, Brian E; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi) technology has emerged as a successful tool not only for functional genomics, but in planta expression of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that could offer great potential for insect pest management. The diet of insects feeding exclusively on phloem sieves contains water and sugars as main components, and the uptake of the liquid food greatly depends on the osmotic pressure within the insect body. Based on this physiological mechanism, transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum were generated expressing double stranded RNA (dsRNA) against both aquaporin (AQP) and a sucrase gene, alpha glucosidase (AGLU). These two genes are involved in osmotic pressure maintenance particularly in sap sucking insects, and the aim was to disrupt osmoregulation within the insect ultimately leading to mortality. Real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to assess the suppression of gene expression in Bemisia tabaci (B. tabaci) and mortality was recorded during transgenic tobacco feeding bioassays. Feeding of insects on plants expressing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci after six days of feeding and more than 70% mortality was observed in B. tabaci fed on transgenic plants compared to the control plants. Our data shows that down-regulation of genes related to osmoregulation may find practical applications for the control of this important pest in cotton and other crops.

  1. Trade-offs in osmoregulation and parallel shifts in molecular function follow ecological transitions to freshwater in the Alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velotta, Jonathan P.; McCormick, Stephen; Schultz, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to freshwater may be expected to reduce performance in seawater because these environments represent opposing selective regimes. We tested for such a trade-off in populations of the Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus). Alewives are ancestrally anadromous, and multiple populations have been independently restricted to freshwater (landlocked). We conducted salinity challenge experiments, whereby juvenile Alewives from one anadromous and multiple landlocked populations were exposed to freshwater and seawater on acute and acclimation timescales. In response to acute salinity challenge trials, independently derived landlocked populations varied in the degree to which seawater tolerance has been lost. In laboratory-acclimation experiments, landlocked Alewives exhibited improved freshwater tolerance, which was correlated with reductions in seawater tolerance and hypo-osmotic balance, suggesting that trade-offs in osmoregulation may be associated with local adaptation to freshwater. We detected differentiation between life-history forms in the expression of an ion-uptake gene (NHE3), and in gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Trade-offs in osmoregulation, therefore, may be mediated by differentiation in ion-uptake and salt-secreting pathways.

  2. RNA Interference based Approach to Down Regulate Osmoregulators of Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci): Potential Technology for the Control of Whitefly

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Amir; Malik, Hassan Jamil; Shafiq, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Scheffler, Jodi A.; Scheffler, Brian E.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade RNA interference (RNAi) technology has emerged as a successful tool not only for functional genomics, but in planta expression of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that could offer great potential for insect pest management. The diet of insects feeding exclusively on phloem sieves contains water and sugars as main components, and the uptake of the liquid food greatly depends on the osmotic pressure within the insect body. Based on this physiological mechanism, transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum were generated expressing double stranded RNA (dsRNA) against both aquaporin (AQP) and a sucrase gene, alpha glucosidase (AGLU). These two genes are involved in osmotic pressure maintenance particularly in sap sucking insects, and the aim was to disrupt osmoregulation within the insect ultimately leading to mortality. Real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was performed to assess the suppression of gene expression in Bemisia tabaci (B. tabaci) and mortality was recorded during transgenic tobacco feeding bioassays. Feeding of insects on plants expressing dsRNA significantly reduced the transcript level of the target genes in B. tabaci after six days of feeding and more than 70% mortality was observed in B. tabaci fed on transgenic plants compared to the control plants. Our data shows that down-regulation of genes related to osmoregulation may find practical applications for the control of this important pest in cotton and other crops. PMID:27105353

  3. Heme oxygenase 1 defects lead to reduced chlorophyll in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lixia; Yang, Zonghui; Zeng, Xinhua; Gao, Jie; Liu, Jie; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We previously described a Brassica napus chlorophyll-deficient mutant (ygl) with yellow-green seedling leaves and mapped the related gene, BnaC.YGL, to a 0.35 cM region. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this chlorophyll defect are still unknown. In this study, the BnaC07.HO1 gene (equivalent to BnaC.YGL) was isolated by the candidate gene approach, and its function was confirmed by genetic complementation. Comparative sequencing analysis suggested that BnaC07.HO1 was lost in the mutant, while a long noncoding-RNA was inserted into the promoter of the homologous gene BnaA07.HO1. This insert was widely present in B. napus cultivars and down-regulated BnaA07.HO1 expression. BnaC07.HO1 was highly expressed in the seedling leaves and encoded heme oxygenase 1, which was localized in the chloroplast. Biochemical analysis showed that BnaC07.HO1 can catalyze heme conversion to form biliverdin IXα. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the loss of BnaC07.HO1 impaired tetrapyrrole metabolism, especially chlorophyll biosynthesis. According, the levels of chlorophyll intermediates were reduced in the ygl mutant. In addition, gene expression in multiple pathways was affected in ygl. These findings provide molecular evidences for the basis of the yellow-green leaf phenotype and further insights into the crucial role of HO1 in B. napus.

  4. Acute nephropathy induced by gold sodium thiomalate: alterations in renal heme metabolism and morphology.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, J L; Ribas, J L; Knight, E; Alvares, A P

    1987-11-01

    Gold compounds are used clinically in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Acute renal toxicity is observed in some patients receiving chrysotherapy. The present study addresses morphofunctional and biochemical changes in rat kidneys during the first 8 days following a single ip injection of gold sodium thiomalate (AuTM), one of the gold compounds presently in clinical use. Compared to controls, AuTM pretreatment resulted in increased urine output and elevated serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations. Also, by Day 8, treated rats had decreased body weights and increased kidney weights. Postmortem examination on Day 1 showed pale and mottled kidneys and diffusely pale inner cortex. Microscopically, there was severe coagulative necrosis of the proximal tubular epithelium. Epithelial regeneration was prominent by Day 4 and was nearly complete by Day 8. The regenerating epithelium was hyperplastic with basophilic cytoplasm and pleomorphic nuclei. Alterations in renal heme biosynthesis and drug metabolism paralleled the morphologic changes. The activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase were inhibited on Days 1, 2, and 4 following AuTM administration. Decreases in monooxygenase activity were accompanied by decreases in renal cytochrome P-450 levels. In contrast, renal microsomal heme oxygenase activity was elevated 9.5-fold on Day 1 and 2.5-fold on Day 2. By Day 8, all renal enzymatic activities assayed for were similar to those obtained with untreated rats.

  5. Heme Binding Biguanides Target Cytochrome P450-Dependent Cancer Cell Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhijun; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Denisov, Ilia G; Zhang, Xia; Chiu, Ting-Lan; Thomas, Dafydd G; Hanse, Eric A; Cuellar, Rebecca A D; Grinkova, Yelena V; Langenfeld, Vanessa Wankhede; Swedien, Daniel S; Stamschror, Justin D; Alvarez, Juan; Luna, Fernando; Galván, Adela; Bae, Young Kyung; Wulfkuhle, Julia D; Gallagher, Rosa I; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Norris, Beverly; Flory, Craig M; Schumacher, Robert J; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Cao, Qing; Chu, Haitao; Lipscomb, John D; Atkins, William M; Gupta, Kalpna; Kelekar, Ameeta; Blair, Ian A; Capdevila, Jorge H; Falck, John R; Sligar, Stephen G; Poulos, Thomas L; Georg, Gunda I; Ambrose, Elizabeth; Potter, David A

    2017-09-14

    The mechanisms by which cancer cell-intrinsic CYP monooxygenases promote tumor progression are largely unknown. CYP3A4 was unexpectedly associated with breast cancer mitochondria and synthesized arachidonic acid (AA)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which promoted the electron transport chain/respiration and inhibited AMPKα. CYP3A4 knockdown activated AMPKα, promoted autophagy, and prevented mammary tumor formation. The diabetes drug metformin inhibited CYP3A4-mediated EET biosynthesis and depleted cancer cell-intrinsic EETs. Metformin bound to the active-site heme of CYP3A4 in a co-crystal structure, establishing CYP3A4 as a biguanide target. Structure-based design led to discovery of N1-hexyl-N5-benzyl-biguanide (HBB), which bound to the CYP3A4 heme with higher affinity than metformin. HBB potently and specifically inhibited CYP3A4 AA epoxygenase activity. HBB also inhibited growth of established ER(+) mammary tumors and suppressed intratumoral mTOR. CYP3A4 AA epoxygenase inhibition by biguanides thus demonstrates convergence between eicosanoid activity in mitochondria and biguanide action in cancer, opening a new avenue for cancer drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  7. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  8. Characterization of heme binding to recombinant α1-microglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Karnaukhova, Elena; Rutardottir, Sigurbjörg; Rajabi, Mohsen; Wester Rosenlöf, Lena; Alayash, Abdu I.; Åkerström, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M), a small lipocalin protein found in plasma and tissues, has been identified as a heme1 and radical scavenger that may participate in the mitigation of toxicities caused by degradation of hemoglobin. The objective of this work was to investigate heme interactions with A1M in vitro using various analytical techniques and to optimize analytical methodology suitable for rapid evaluation of the ligand binding properties of recombinant A1M versions. Methods: To examine heme binding properties of A1M we utilized UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, visible circular dichroism (CD), catalase-like activity, migration shift electrophoresis, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which was specifically developed for the assessment of His-tagged A1M. Results: The results of this study confirm that A1M is a heme binding protein that can accommodate heme at more than one binding site and/or in coordination with different amino acid residues depending upon heme concentration and ligand-to-protein molar ratio. UV/Vis titration of A1M with heme revealed an unusually large bathochromic shift, up to 38 nm, observed for heme binding to a primary binding site. UV/Vis spectroscopy, visible CD and catalase-like activity suggested that heme is accommodated inside His-tagged (tgA1M) and tagless A1M (ntA1M) in a rather similar fashion although the His-tag is very likely involved into coordination with iron of the heme molecule. SPR data indicated kinetic rate constants and equilibrium binding constants with KD values in a μM range. Conclusions: This study provided experimental evidence of the A1M heme binding properties by aid of different techniques and suggested an analytical methodology for a rapid evaluation of ligand-binding properties of recombinant A1M versions, also suitable for other His-tagged proteins. PMID:25538624

  9. Osmoregulation in an avian nectarivore, the whitebellied sunbird Nectarinia talatala: response to extremes of diet concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleming, P A; Nicolson, S W

    2003-06-01

    Water intake of nectarivores is intrinsically linked to nectar concentration. Osmoregulation in whitebellied sunbirds Nectarinia talatala (body mass 9.3+/-0.1 g, mean +/- S.D., N=7), was examined by feeding them sucrose solutions, equivalent to extreme diet concentrations (0.07-2.5 mol l(-1) sucrose; 2-65% w/w), with and without supplementary drinking water. Total water gain was 33-515% of body mass daily. Cloacal fluid (CF) volume increased with diet dilution from 0.4% to 309% of body mass while increases in evaporative water loss (obtained by difference) were also recorded. Osmolality of CF demonstrated the largest scope yet recorded for a bird and was significantly correlated with water flux: mean values were 6-460 mosm kg(-1) H(2)O (minimum 3, maximum 1900 mosm kg(-1)). When supplementary water was provided, its consumption by birds fed concentrated diets (2.5 mol l(-1) sucrose) led to a dramatic reduction in CF osmolality, from 461+/-253 to 80+/-119 mosm kg(-1) fluid. Sunbirds maintained energy balance on sucrose diets varying tenfold in concentration, from 0.25 to 2.5 mol l(-1); however, on extremely dilute diets (0.07 and 0.1 mol l(-1) sucrose, lower than natural nectar concentrations) their inability to maintain energy balance was probably due to excess preformed water. Total osmotic excretion and concentrations of Na(+) and K(+) increased with high water fluxes, and are a possible physiological constraint for nectarivorous birds on artificial dilute diets devoid of electrolytes. Even low electrolyte levels in nectars may be adequate to replace these losses, but other physiological limitations to the intake of dilute nectars are increased energetic costs of solute recovery, increased heat loss and interference with digestive processes. Sunbirds therefore deal with sugar solutions spanning the range of nectar concentrations by shutting down water excretion on concentrated diets, or, on dilute diets, by producing extremely dilute CF with some of the lowest

  10. The African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi): ionoregulation and osmoregulation in a fish out of water.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Michael P; Morgan, Tammie P; Galvez, Fernando; Smith, Richard W; Kajimura, Makiko; Ip, Yuen K; Wood, Chris M

    2007-01-01

    surface, including the gills, has relatively low permeability to water and ions but that the ventral surface is an important site of osmoregulation and ionoregulation. We further propose that an amphibian-like combination of ventral skin water and ion permeability, plus internal urea accumulation during air exposure, allows P. dolloi to extract water from its surroundings and to store water in the muscle when the water supply becomes limited.

  11. Evolutionary Aspects and Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria under Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuichi; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Aoki, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll a (Chl) is a light-absorbing tetrapyrrole pigment that is essential for photosynthesis. The molecule is produced from glutamate via a complex biosynthetic pathway comprised of at least 15 enzymatic steps. The first half of the Chl pathway is shared with heme biosynthesis, and the latter half, called the Mg-branch, is specific to Mg-containing Chl a. Bilin pigments, such as phycocyanobilin, are additionally produced from heme, so these light-harvesting pigments also share many common biosynthetic steps with Chl biosynthesis. Some of these common steps in the biosynthetic pathways of heme, Chl and bilins require molecular oxygen for catalysis, such as oxygen-dependent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase. Cyanobacteria thrive in diverse environments in terms of oxygen levels. To cope with Chl deficiency caused by low-oxygen conditions, cyanobacteria have developed elaborate mechanisms to maintain Chl production, even under microoxic environments. The use of enzymes specialized for low-oxygen conditions, such as oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, constitutes part of a mechanism adapted to low-oxygen conditions. Another mechanism adaptive to hypoxic conditions is mediated by the transcriptional regulator ChlR that senses low oxygen and subsequently activates the transcription of genes encoding enzymes that work under low-oxygen tension. In diazotrophic cyanobacteria, this multilayered regulation also contributes in Chl biosynthesis by supporting energy production for nitrogen fixation that also requires low-oxygen conditions. We will also discuss the evolutionary implications of cyanobacterial tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and regulation, because low oxygen-type enzymes also appear to be evolutionarily older than oxygen-dependent enzymes. PMID:25830590

  12. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  13. Heme acquisition mechanisms of Porphyromonas gingivalis - strategies used in a polymicrobial community in a heme-limited host environment.

    PubMed

    Smalley, J W; Olczak, T

    2017-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a main etiologic agent and key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis requires heme as a source of iron and protoporphyrin IX for its survival and the ability to establish an infection. Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to accumulate a defensive cell-surface heme-containing pigment in the form of μ-oxo bisheme. The main sources of heme for P. gingivalis in vivo are hemoproteins present in saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and erythrocytes. To acquire heme, P. gingivalis uses several mechanisms. Among them, the best characterized are those employing hemagglutinins, hemolysins, and gingipains (Kgp, RgpA, RgpB), TonB-dependent outer-membrane receptors (HmuR, HusB, IhtA), and hemophore-like proteins (HmuY, HusA). Proteins involved in intracellular heme transport, storage, and processing are less well characterized (e.g. PgDps). Importantly, P. gingivalis may also use the heme acquisition systems of other bacteria to fulfill its own heme requirements. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel paradigm for heme acquisition from hemoglobin, whereby the Fe(II)-containing oxyhemoglobin molecule must first be oxidized to methemoglobin to facilitate heme release. This process not only involves P. gingivalis arginine- and lysine-specific gingipains, but other proteases (e.g. interpain A from Prevotella intermedia) or pyocyanin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Porphyromonas gingivalis is then able to fully proteolyze the more susceptible methemoglobin substrate to release free heme or to wrest heme from it directly through the use of the HmuY hemophore. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  15. The biosynthesis of dicoumarol

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, D. M.; Spring, M. S.; Stoker, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    Micro-organisms have been isolated that can utilize o-coumaric acid as a sole carbon source with the subsequent production of 4-hydroxycoumarin and dicoumarol. One of these organisms, Penicillium jenseni, has been used to examine the biosynthesis of dicoumarol. Certain thermophilic fungi have also been found that can convert o-coumaric acid into dicoumarol. PMID:6033758

  16. Interactions of organic hydroperoxides with heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Zídek, L; Machala, M; Skurský, L

    1991-01-01

    The decomposition of p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide by cytochrome c and other selected heme systems in the absence of reducing agents was investigated. p-Methylbenzaldehyde was identified as the major product. A mechanism for this reaction has been suggested. H2O2 and tertiary cumyl hydroperoxide do not react under these conditions. The ability of organic hydroperoxides to act as oxygen donors in the cytochrome-mediated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation was studied. Cumyl and tert.butyl hydroperoxides are able to substitute oxygen in the absence of NADPH while p-methylbenzyl hydroperoxide is not.

  17. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    Bromine (Br2 ) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 h of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2 -induced human toxicity. We discuss our latest published data, which suggest that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into bilverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  19. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  20. Nanosecond electron tunneling between the hemes in cytochrome bo3

    PubMed Central

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Johansson, Mikael P.; Wikström, Mårten; Vos, Marten H.; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Biological electron transfer (eT) between redox-active cofactors is thought to occur by quantum-mechanical tunneling. However, in many cases the observed rate is limited by other reactions coupled to eT, such as proton transfer, conformational changes, or catalytic chemistry at an active site. A prominent example of this phenomenon is the eT between the heme groups of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, which has been reported to take place in several different time domains. The question of whether pure eT tunneling in the nanosecond regime between the heme groups can be observed has been the subject of some experimental controversy. Here, we report direct observations of eT between the heme groups of the quinol oxidase cytochrome bo3 from Escherichia coli, where the reaction is initiated by photolysis of carbon monoxide from heme o3. eT from CO-dissociated ferrous heme o3 to the low-spin ferric heme b takes place at a rate of (1.2 ns)−1 at 20°C as determined by optical spectroscopy. These results establish heme–heme electron tunneling in the bo3 enzyme, a bacterial relative to the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. The properties of eT between the closely lying heme groups in the heme–copper oxidases are discussed in terms of the reorganization energy for the process, and two methods for assessing the rate of electron tunneling are presented. PMID:18087041

  1. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Alves, Letícia S.; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L.; de Oliveira, Rosane B.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K+ efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release. PMID:25225402

  2. Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans are needed for competitive growth and biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in leafy-green vegetable wash-waters and colonization in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs) are major periplasmic constituents of Gram negative bacteria. The role of OPGs has been postulated in symbiotic as well as pathogenic host-microbe interactions. Here we report the role of OPGs from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during growth and b...

  3. Direct Heme Uptake by Phytoplankton-Associated Roseobacter Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brahamsha, Bianca; Barbeau, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is an essential micronutrient and can limit the growth of both marine phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of heme transport, an organic iron acquisition pathway, in phytoplankton-associated Roseobacter bacteria and explored the potential role of bacterial heme uptake in the marine environment. We searched 153 Roseobacter genomes and found that nearly half contained putative complete heme transport systems with nearly the same synteny. We also examined a publicly available coculture transcriptome and found that Roseobacter strain Sulfitobacter sp. strain SA11 strongly downregulated a putative heme transport gene cluster during mutualistic growth with a marine diatom, suggesting that the regulation of heme transport might be influenced by host cues. We generated a mutant of phytoplankton-associated Roseobacter strain Ruegeria sp. strain TM1040 by insertionally inactivating its homolog of the TonB-dependent heme transporter hmuR and confirmed the role of this gene in the uptake of heme and hemoproteins. We performed competition experiments between iron-limited wild-type and mutant TM1040 strains and found that the wild type maintains a growth advantage when competing with the mutant for iron compounds derived solely from lysed diatom cells. Heme transport systems were largely absent from public marine metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, suggesting that marine bacteria with the potential for heme transport likely have small standing populations in the free-living bacterioplankton. Heme transport is likely a useful strategy for phytoplankton-associated bacteria because it provides direct access to components of the host intracellular iron pool after lysis. IMPORTANCE Ecosystem productivity in large regions of the surface ocean is fueled by iron that has been microbially regenerated from biomass. Currently, the specific microbes and molecules that mediate the transfer of recycled iron between

  4. Evaluation of unbound free heme in plant cells by differential acetone extraction.

    PubMed

    Espinas, Nino A; Kobayashi, Koichi; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2012-07-01

    Heme functions not only as a prosthetic group of hemoproteins but also as a regulatory molecule, suggesting the presence of 'free' heme. Classically, total non-covalently bound heme is extracted from plant samples with acidic acetone after removal of pigments with basic and neutral acetone. Earlier work proposed that free heme can be selectively extracted into basic acetone. Using authentic hemoproteins, we confirmed that acidic acetone can quantitatively extract heme, while no heme was extracted into neutral acetone. Meanwhile, a certain amount of heme was extracted into basic acetone from hemoglobin and myoglobin. Moreover, basic acetone extracted loosely bound heme from bovine serum albumin, implying that the nature of hemoproteins largely influences heme extraction into basic acetone. Using a highly sensitive heme assay, we found that basic and neutral acetone can extract low levels of heme from plant samples. In addition, neutral acetone quantitatively extracted free heme when it was externally added to plant homogenates. Furthermore, the level of neutral acetone-extractable heme remained unchanged by precursor (5-aminolevulinic acid) feeding, while increased by norflurazon treatment which abolishes chloroplast biogenesis. However, changes in these heme levels did not correlate to genomes uncoupled phenotypes, suggesting that the level of unbound free heme would not affect retrograde signaling from plastids to the nucleus. The present data demonstrate that the combination of single-step acetone extraction following a sensitive heme assay is the ideal method for determining total and free heme in plants.

  5. Posttranslational stability of the heme biosynthetic enzyme ferrochelatase is dependent on iron availability and intact iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Daniel R.; Ghosh, Manik C.; Haller, Ronald G.; Tong, Wing-Hang

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, possesses an iron-sulfur [2Fe-2S] cluster that does not participate in catalysis. We investigated ferrochelatase expression in iron-deficient erythropoietic tissues of mice lacking iron regulatory protein 2, in iron-deficient murine erythroleukemia cells, and in human patients with ISCU myopathy. Ferrochelatase activity and protein levels were dramatically decreased in Irp2−/− spleens, whereas ferrochelatase mRNA levels were increased, demonstrating posttranscriptional regulation of ferrochelatase in vivo. Translation of ferrochelatase mRNA was unchanged in iron-depleted murine erythroleukemia cells, and the stability of mature ferrochelatase protein was also unaffected. However, the stability of newly formed ferrochelatase protein was dramatically decreased during iron deficiency. Ferrochelatase was also severely depleted in muscle biopsies and cultured myoblasts from patients with ISCU myopathy, a disease caused by deficiency of a scaffold protein required for Fe-S cluster assembly. Together, these data suggest that decreased Fe-S cluster availability because of cellular iron depletion or impaired Fe-S cluster assembly causes reduced maturation and stabilization of apo-ferrochelatase, providing a direct link between Fe-S biogenesis and completion of heme biosynthesis. We propose that decreased heme biosynthesis resulting from impaired Fe-S cluster assembly can contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases caused by defective Fe-S cluster biogenesis. PMID:19965627

  6. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron (Jiang, Y., Ortiz de Montellano, P.R., Inorg. Chem., 47, 3480-3482 (2008)), indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group. PMID:19135260

  7. Biosynthesis of Single Thioether c-Type Cytochromes Provides Insight into Mechanisms Intrinsic to Holocytochrome c Synthase (HCCS).

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Hsu, Jennifer; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2017-07-05

    C-type cytochromes (cyts c) are generally characterized by the presence of two thioether attachments between heme and two cysteine residues within a highly conserved CXXCH motif. Most eukaryotes use the System III cyt c biogenesis pathway composed of holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) to catalyze thioether formation. Some protozoan organisms express a functionally equivalent, natural variant of cyt c with an XXXCH heme-attachment motif, resulting in a single covalent attachment. Previous studies have shown that recombinant HCCS can produce low levels of the XXXCH single thioether variant. However, cyt c variants containing substitutions at the C-terminal cysteine of the heme-attachment site (i.e., resulting in CXXXH) have never been observed in nature, and attempts to biosynthesize a recombinant version of this cyt c variant have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we report the biochemical analyses of an HCCS-matured CXXXH cyt c variant, comparing its biosynthesis and properties to those of the XXXCH variant. The results indicate that although HCCS mediates heme attachment to the N-terminal cysteine in CXXXH cyt c variants, up to 50% of the cyt c produced is modified in an oxygen-dependent manner, resulting in a mixed population of cyt c. Since this aerobic modification occurs only in the context of CXXXH, we also propose that natural HCCS-mediated heme attachment to CXXCH likely initiates at the C-terminal cysteine.

  8. Structures of Prostacyclin Synthase and Its Complexes with Substrate Analog and Inhibitor Reveal a Ligand-specific Heme Conformation Change*s

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ching; Chiang, Chia-Wang; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Hsu, Pei-Yung; Whitby, Frank G.; Wang, Lee-Ho; Chan, Nei-Li

    2008-01-01

    Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) is a cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme that catalyzes production of prostacyclin from prostaglandin H2. PGIS is unusual in that it catalyzes an isomerization rather than a monooxygenation, which is typical of P450 enzymes. To understand the structural basis for prostacyclin biosynthesis in greater detail, we have determined the crystal structures of ligand-free, inhibitor (minoxidil)-bound and substrate analog U51605-bound PGIS. These structures demonstrate a stereo-specific substrate binding and suggest features of the enzyme that facilitate isomerization. Unlike most microsomal P450s, where large substrate-induced conformational changes take place at the distal side of the heme, conformational changes in PGIS are observed at the proximal side and in the heme itself. The conserved and extensive heme propionate-protein interactions seen in all other P450s, which are largely absent in the ligand-free PGIS, are recovered upon U51605 binding accompanied by water exclusion from the active site. In contrast, when minoxidil binds, the propionate-protein interactions are not recovered and water molecules are largely retained. These findings suggest that PGIS represents a divergent evolution of the P450 family, in which a heme barrier has evolved to ensure strict binding specificity for prostaglandin H2, leading to a radical-mediated isomerization with high product fidelity. The U51605-bound structure also provides a view of the substrate entrance and product exit channels. PMID:18032380

  9. Leghemoglobin green derivatives with nitrated hemes evidence production of highly reactive nitrogen species during aging of legume nodules.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Joaquín; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Gay, Marina; Marcos, Manuel; Yang, Fei; Walker, F Ann; Desbois, Alain; Abián, Joaquín; Becana, Manuel

    2012-02-14

    Globins constitute a superfamily of proteins widespread in all kingdoms of life, where they fulfill multiple functions, such as efficient O(2) transport and modulation of nitric oxide bioactivity. In plants, the most abundant Hbs are the symbiotic leghemoglobins (Lbs) that scavenge O(2) and facilitate its diffusion to the N(2)-fixing bacteroids in nodules. The biosynthesis of Lbs during nodule formation has been studied in detail, whereas little is known about the green derivatives of Lbs generated during nodule senescence. Here we characterize modified forms of Lbs, termed Lba(m), Lbc(m), and Lbd(m), of soybean nodules. These green Lbs have identical globins to the parent red Lbs but their hemes are nitrated. By combining UV-visible, MS, NMR, and resonance Raman spectroscopies with reconstitution experiments of the apoprotein with protoheme or mesoheme, we show that the nitro group is on the 4-vinyl. In vitro nitration of Lba with excess nitrite produced several isomers of nitrated heme, one of which is identical to those found in vivo. The use of antioxidants, metal chelators, and heme ligands reveals that nitration is contingent upon the binding of nitrite to heme Fe, and that the reactive nitrogen species involved derives from nitrous acid and is most probably the nitronium cation. The identification of these green Lbs provides conclusive evidence that highly oxidizing and nitrating species are produced in nodules leading to nitrosative stress. These findings are consistent with a previous report showing that the modified Lbs are more abundant in senescing nodules and have aberrant O(2) binding.

  10. Rates of energy transfer between tryptophans and hemes in hemoglobin, assuming that the heme is a planar oscillator.

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Z; Tenenholz, T; Bucci, E

    1992-01-01

    Using the Förster equations we have estimated the rate of energy transfer from tryptophans to hemes in hemoglobin. Assuming an isotropic distribution of the transition moments of the heme in the plane of the porphyrin, we computed the orientation factors and the consequent transfer rates from the crystallographic coordinates of human oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. It appears that the orientation factors do not play a limiting role in regulating the energy transfer and that the rates are controlled almost exclusively by the intrasubunit separations between tryptophans and hemes. In intact hemoglobin tetramers the intrasubunit separations are such as to reduce lifetimes to 5 and 15 ps/ns of tryptophan lifetime. Lifetimes of several hundred picoseconds would be allowed by the intersubunit separations, but intersubunits transfer becomes important only when one heme per tetramer is absent or does not accept transfer. If more than one heme per tetramer is absent lifetimes of more than 1 ns would appear. PMID:1420905

  11. Electrochemical determination of heme-linked pKa values and the importance of using fluoride binding in heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Jose F; Roeder, Margaret H; Houchins, Danielle N; Guzman, Carmen X; Amendola, Emily J; Castorino, Jacquelyn D; Fritz, Andrea L

    2013-12-01

    The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroelectrochemical measurements of heme proteins in the presence of a heme-bound fluoride ion can be used as a probe for heme-linked ionizations of acid-base groups in the heme pocket. A detailed study of the pH dependence of the midpoint potential of skeletal horse myoglobin (Mb) with a heme-bound fluoride ion (Mb-F) reveals how protonation of the distal histidine (H64) changes the redox properties of the protein with a determined pKa of 5.3. In addition, fluoride binding in myoglobin provides a stabilization of -1.9 kcal/mol of the ferric Mb-F relative to ferric Mb without fluoride.

  12. Bioinspired heme, heme/nonheme diiron, heme/copper, and inorganic NOx chemistry: *NO((g)) oxidation, peroxynitrite-metal chemistry, and *NO((g)) reductive coupling.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, Mark P; Wang, Jun; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2010-07-19

    The focus of this Forum Article highlights work from our own laboratories and those of others in the area of biochemical and biologically inspired inorganic chemistry dealing with nitric oxide [nitrogen monoxide, *NO((g))] and its biological roles and reactions. The latter focus is on (i) oxidation of *NO((g)) to nitrate by nitric oxide dioxygenases (NODs) and (ii) reductive coupling of two molecules of *NO((g)) to give N(2)O(g). In the former case, NODs are described, and the highlighting of possible peroxynitrite/heme intermediates and the consequences of this are given by a discussion of recent works with myoglobin and a synthetic heme model system for NOD action. Summaries of recent copper complex chemistries with *NO((g)) and O(2)(g), leading to peroxynitrite species, are given. The coverage of biological reductive coupling of *NO((g)) deals with bacterial nitric oxide reductases (NORs) with heme/nonheme diiron active sites and on heme/copper oxidases such as cytochrome c oxidase, which can mediate the same chemistry. Recently designed protein and synthetic model compounds (heme/nonheme/diiron or heme/copper) as functional mimics are discussed in some detail. We also highlight examples from the chemical literature, not necessarily involving biologically relevant metal ions, that describe the oxidation of *NO((g)) to nitrate (or nitrite) and possible peroxynitrite intermediates or reductive coupling of *NO((g)) to give nitrous oxide.

  13. Nickel induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Reid, M.C.; Bibeau, L.M.; Linden, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Heme oxygenase activity was measured in tissues of rats killed after administration of NiCl/sub 2/ or Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity occurred 6 hr after NiCl/sub 2/ injection (0.25 mmol/kg sc), reached a maximum of five to six times the baseline activity at 17 hr, and remained significantly increased at 72 hr. Heme oxygenase activities were also increased in liver, lung, and brain at 17 hr after the NiCl/sub 2/ injection; heme oxygenase activities in spleen and intestinal mucosa were unchanged. The effects of NiCl/sub 2/ on heme oxygenase activities in kidney and liver were dose-related from 0.06 to 0.75 mmol/kg, sc. Three Ni chelators were administered (1 mmol/kg, im) prior to injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc); d-penicillamine partially prevented Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity; triethylenetetramine had no effect; sodium diethyldithiocarbamate enhanced the Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity (three times greater than NiCl/sub 2/ alone). Intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ (10 mg/rat) caused induction of renal heme oxygenase activity at 1 week but not at 2, 3, or 4 weeks; no correlation was observed between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and erythropoietin-mediated erythrocytosis. Hypoxia (10% O/sub 2/, 12 hr/day, 7 days) did not affect renal heme oxygenase activity. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity was observed in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs killed 17 hr after injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc). These studies established (a) the time course, dose-effect, organ selectivity, and species susceptibility relationships for Ni induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity, (b) the effects of Ni chelators, and (c) the lack of relationship between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and the erythrocytosis that develops after intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/.

  14. The FG loop of a heme-based gas sensor enzyme, Ec DOS, functions in heme binding, autoxidation and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinya; Igarashi, Jotaro; Shimizu, Toru

    2009-10-01

    Ec DOS is a heme-based gas sensor enzyme that catalyzes conversion from cyclic-di-GMP to linear-di-GMP in response to gas molecules, such as oxygen, CO and NO. Ec DOS contains an N-terminal heme-binding PAS domain and C-terminal phosphodiesterase domain. Based on crystal structures of the isolated heme-binding domain, it is suggested that the FG loop is involved in intra-molecular signal transduction to the catalytic domain. We generated nine full-length proteins mutated at ionic and non-ionic polar residues between positions 83 and 96 corresponding to the F-helix and FG loop, and examined the heme binding properties, autoxidation rates, and catalytic activities of mutant proteins. N84A and R85A mutant proteins displayed lower heme binding affinities, consistent with the finding that Asn84 interacts with propionate of protoporphyrin IX, and Arg85 with Asp40 on the heme proximal side. Autoxidation rates (0.058-0.54 min(-1)) of R91A, S96A and K89A/R91A/E93A mutant proteins were significantly higher than that (0.0053 min(-1)) of wild-type protein, suggesting that these residues in the FG loop form heme distal architecture conferring stability to the Fe(II)-O(2) complex. Catalytic activities of N84A and R85A mutant proteins with low heme affinity were significantly higher than those of wild-type protein in the absence of gas molecules. Accordingly, we propose that loss of heme binding enhances basal catalysis without the gas molecule, consistent with previous reports on heme inhibition of Ec DOS catalysis.

  15. Exploiting the Chromone Scaffold for the Development of Inhibitors of Corticosteroid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Silvia; Hu, Qingzhong; Zimmer, Christina; Engel, Matthias; Belluti, Federica; Rampa, Angela; Hartmann, Rolf W; Bisi, Alessandra

    2016-03-24

    The inhibition of corticosteroid biosynthesis could be considered as an emerging strategy to reduce their abnormally high levels, and in this framework CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 represent the most promising targets. In continuing our studies on flavonoid-like scaffolds as privileged structures in medicinal chemistry, in this paper we describe a small library of pyridyl- and imidazolylmethylchromones as potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Testing results proved that position 3 of the chromone scaffold is the most favorable for the introduction of the heme-coordinating heterocycles and, among them, the 4-imidazolyl moiety is the most convenient for the interaction with the heme iron of the selected cytochromes. A low nanomolar inhibitor of CYP11B1 (5c) was obtained, endowed with reasonable selectivity toward CYP11B2 and able to better discriminate with respect to CYP17 and CYP19.

  16. Glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Thaker, Maulik N; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Unfortunately, the dwindled pipeline of new antibiotics into the market and the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci and other resistant bacteria are increasingly making effective antibiotic treatment difficult. We have now learned a great deal about how bacteria produce antibiotics. This information can be exploited to develop the next generation of antimicrobials. The biosynthesis of glycopeptides via nonribosomal peptide assembly and unusual amino acid synthesis, crosslinking and tailoring enzymes gives rise to intricate chemical structures that target the bacterial cell wall. This review seeks to describe recent advances in our understanding of both biosynthesis and resistance of these important antibiotics.

  17. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  18. Histidine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Stepansky, A; Leustek, T

    2006-03-01

    The study of histidine metabolism has never been at the forefront of interest in plant systems despite the significant role that the analysis of this pathway has played in development of the field of molecular genetics in microbes. With the advent of methods to analyze plant gene function by complementation of microbial auxotrophic mutants and the complete analysis of plant genome sequences, strides have been made in deciphering the histidine pathway in plants. The studies point to a complex evolutionary origin of genes for histidine biosynthesis. Gene regulation studies have indicated novel regulatory networks involving histidine. In addition, physiological studies have indicated novel functions for histidine in plants as chelators and transporters of metal ions. Recent investigations have revealed intriguing connections of histidine in plant reproduction. The exciting new information suggests that the study of plant histidine biosynthesis has finally begun to flower.

  19. Observation of heme transfer from cytochrome b5 to DNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Wu; Sun, Mei-Hui; Wan, Dun; Liao, Li-Fu

    2012-10-01

    Heme transfer is commonly observed from one heme protein to the other such as from cytochrome b(5) (cyt b(5)) to apo-myoglobin. In this study, instead of to another heme protein, we observed the heme transfer from wild-type (WT) cyt b(5), H39C cyt b(5) with heme axial ligand His39 mutated to Cys39, and DME cyt b(5) with heme replaced by protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester, to a heme DNA aptamer, PS2.M, respectively, with a different rate constant. The heme transfer was further confirmed by the enhancement of peroxidase activity of the cyt b(5)s-PS2.M system due to the formation of catalytic PS2.M-heme complex. This study provides valuable insights into both cyt b(5)-heme and PS2.M-heme interactions and shows that heme transfer from heme protein to heme-aptamer can be used to evaluate the relative stability of heme proteins. In addition, this study sheds light on the maturation of heme proteins in vivo by interacting with DNA/RNA enzymes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Go it alone: four-electron oxidations by mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2017-04-01

    This review discusses the current mechanistic understanding of a group of mononuclear non-heme iron-dependent enzymes that catalyze four-electron oxidation of their organic substrates without the use of any cofactors or cosubstrates. One set of enzymes acts on α-ketoacid-containing substrates, coupling decarboxylation to oxygen activation. This group includes 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, 4-hydroxymandelate synthase, and CloR involved in clorobiocin biosynthesis. A second set of enzymes acts on substrates containing a thiol group that coordinates to the iron. This group is comprised of isopenicillin N synthase, thiol dioxygenases, and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ergothioneine and ovothiol. The final group of enzymes includes HEPD and MPnS that both carry out the oxidative cleavage of the carbon-carbon bond of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate but generate different products. Commonalities amongst many of these enzymes are discussed and include the initial substrate oxidation by a ferric-superoxo-intermediate and a second oxidation by a ferryl species.

  1. O2 Activation by Non-Heme Iron Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Goudarzi, Serra; Sutherlin, Kyle D

    2016-11-22

    The non-heme Fe enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and perform a wide range of functions involving O2 activation. These had been difficult to study relative to heme enzymes; however, spectroscopic methods that provide significant insight into the correlation of structure with function have now been developed. This Current Topics article summarizes both the molecular mechanism these enzymes use to control O2 activation in the presence of cosubstrates and the oxygen intermediates these reactions generate. Three types of O2 activation are observed. First, non-heme reactivity is shown to be different from heme chemistry where a low-spin Fe(III)-OOH non-heme intermediate directly reacts with substrate. Also, two subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes generate high-spin Fe(IV)═O intermediates that provide both σ and π frontier molecular orbitals that can control selectivity. Finally, for several subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes, binding of the substrate to the Fe(II) site leads to the one-electron reductive activation of O2 to an Fe(III)-superoxide capable of H atom abstraction and electrophilic attack.

  2. Heme requirement and intracellular trafficking in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, F.A.; Sant'Anna, C.; Lemos, D.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Coelho, M.G.P.; Reis Salles, I.; Michel, A.; Oliveira, P.L.; Cunha-e-Silva, N.; Salmon, D.; Paes, M.C. . E-mail: mcpaes@uerj.br

    2007-03-30

    Epimastigotes multiplies in the insect midgut by taking up nutrients present in the blood meal including heme bound to hemoglobin of red blood cell. During blood meal digestion by vector proteases in the posterior midgut, hemoglobin is clipped off into amino acids, peptides, and free heme. In this paper, we compared the heme and hemoglobin uptake kinetics and followed their intracellular trafficking. Addition of heme to culture medium increased epimastigote proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while medium supplemented with hemoglobin enhanced growth after 3-day lag phase. Medium supplemented with globin-derived peptides stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-independent way. Using Palladium mesoporphyrin IX (Pd-mP) as a fluorescent heme-analog, we observed that heme internalization proceeded much faster than that observed by hemoglobin-rhodamine. Binding experiments showed that parasites accumulated the Pd-mP into the posterior region of the cell whereas hemoglobin-rhodamine stained the anterior region. Finally, using different specific inhibitors of ABC transporters we conclude that a P-glycoprotein homologue transporter is probably involved in heme transport through the plasma membrane.

  3. Environmental chemical exposures and disturbances of heme synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, W E; Stockbridge, H L; Labbe, R F; Woods, J S; Anderson, K E; Bissell, D M; Bloomer, J R; Ellefson, R D; Moore, M R; Pierach, C A; Schreiber, W E; Tefferi, A; Franklin, G M

    1997-01-01

    Porphyrias are relatively uncommon inherited or acquired disorders in which clinical manifestations are attributable to a disturbance of heme synthesis (porphyrin metabolism), usually in association with endogenous or exogenous stressors. Porphyrias are characterized by elevations of heme precursors in blood, urine, and/or stool. A number of chemicals, particularly metals and halogenated hydrocarbons, induce disturbances of heme synthesis in experimental animals. Certain chemicals have also been linked to porphyria or porphyrinuria in humans, generally involving chronic industrial exposures or environmental exposures much higher than those usually encountered. A noteworthy example is the Turkish epidemic of porphyria cutanea tarda produced by accidental ingestion of wheat treated with the fungicide hexachlorobenzene. Measurements of excreted heme precursors have the potential to serve as biological markers for harmful but preclinical effects of certain chemical exposures; this potential warrants further research and applied field studies. It has been hypothesized that several otherwise unexplained chemical-associated illnesses, such as multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome, may represent mild chronic cases of porphyria or other acquired abnormalities in heme synthesis. This review concludes that, although it is reasonable to consider such hypotheses, there is currently no convincing evidence that these illnesses are mediated by a disturbance of heme synthesis; it is premature or unfounded to base clinical management on such explanations unless laboratory data are diagnostic for porphyria. This review discusses the limitations of laboratory measures of heme synthesis, and diagnostic guidelines are provided to assist in evaluating the symptomatic individual suspected of having a porphyria. PMID:9114276

  4. O2 Activation by Non-Heme Iron Enzymes

    DOE PAGES

    Solomon, Edward I.; Goudarzi, Serra; Sutherlin, Kyle D.

    2016-10-28

    The non-heme Fe enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and perform a wide range of functions involving O2 activation. These had been difficult to study relative to heme enzymes; however, spectroscopic methods have now been developed that provide significant insight into the correlation of structure with function. This Current Topics article summarizes both the molecular mechanism these enzymes use to control O2 activation in the presence of cosubstrates and the oxygen intermediates these reactions generate. Three types of O2 activation are observed. First, non-heme reactivity is shown to be different from heme chemistry where a low-spin FeIII-OOH non-heme intermediate directly reactsmore » with substrate. Also, two subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes generate high-spin FeIV=O intermediates that provide both σ and π frontier molecular orbitals that can control selectivity. Lastly, for several subclasses of non-heme Fe enzymes, substrate binding to the FeII site leads to the one electron reductive activation of O2 to an FeIII-superoxide capable of H-atom abstraction and electrophilic attack.« less

  5. The free heme concentration in healthy human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Freundlich, Melissa; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Heme, the prosthetic group of hemoglobin, may be released from its host due to an intrinsic instability of hemoglobin and accumulate in the erythrocytes. Free heme is in the form of hematin (Fe3+ protoporphyrin IX OH) and follows several pathways of biochemical toxicity to tissues, cells, and organelles since it catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. To determine concentration of soluble free heme in human erythrocytes, we develop a new method. We lyse the red blood cells and isolate free heme from hemoglobin by dialysis. We use the heme to reconstitute horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from an excess of the apoenzyme and determine the HRP reaction rate from the evolution of the emitted luminescence. We find that in a population of five healthy adults the average free heme concentration in the erythrocytes is 21 ± 2 μM, ca. 100× higher than previously determined. Tests suggest that the lower previous value was due to the use of elevated concentrations of NaCl, which drive hematin precipitation and re-association with apoglobin. We show that the found hematin concentration is significantly higher than estimates based on equilibrium release and the known hematin dimerization. The factors that lead to enhanced heme release remain an open question. PMID:26460266

  6. Cooperative coupling and role of heme a in the proton pump of heme-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Capitanio, N; Villani, G; Capitanio, G; Bizzoca, A; Palese, L L; Carlino, V; De Nitto, E

    1998-10-01

    In the last few years, evidence has accumulated supporting the applicability of the cooperative model of proton pumps in cytochrome systems, vectorial Bohr mechanisms, to heme-copper oxidases. The vectorial Bohr mechanism is based on short- and long-range protonmotive cooperative effects linked to redox transitions of the metal centers. The crystal structure of oxidized and reduced bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase reveals, upon reduction, the occurrence of long-range conformational changes in subunit I of the oxidase. Analysis of the crystal structure of cytochrome c oxidase shows the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of amino acid residues which could undergo redox-linked pK shifts resulting in transmembrane proton translocation. Our group has identified four proteolytic groups undergoing reversible redox-linked pK shifts. Two groups result in being linked to redox transitions of heme a3. One group is apparently linked to CuB. The fourth group is linked to oxido-reduction of heme a. We have shown that the proton transfer resulting from the redox Bohr effects linked to heme a and CuB in the bovine oxidase displays membrane vectorial asymmetry, i.e., protons are taken up from the inner aqueous space (N), upon reduction, and released in the external space (P), upon oxidation of the metals. This direction of proton uptake and release is just what is expected from the vectorial Bohr mechanism. The group linked to heme a, which can transfer up to 0.9 H+/e- at pHs around neutrality, can provide the major contribution to the proton pump. It is proposed that translocation of pumped protons, linked to electron flow through heme a, utilizes a channel (channel D) which extends from a conserved aspartate at the N entrance to a conserved glutamate located between heme a and the binuclear center. The carboxylic group of this glutamic acid, after having delivered, upon electron flow through heme a, pumped protons towards the P phase, once reprotonated from the N phase, moves

  7. Acute effects of cadmium on osmoregulation of the freshwater teleost Prochilodus lineatus: enzymes activity and plasma ions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alexandre O F da; Martinez, Cláudia B R

    2014-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a trace element that is very toxic to fish. It is commonly found in surface waters contaminated with industrial effluents. When dissolved in water, Cd can rapidly cause physiological changes in the gills and kidneys of freshwater fish. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of Cd on the osmoregulation of the Neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus. Juvenile fish were exposed to Cd at two concentrations [1 (Cd1) and 10 (Cd10) μgL(-1)] for 24 and 96h. The effects of Cd were evaluated through the analysis of ions (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-)) and plasma osmolality, and by measuring the activities of enzymes involved in osmoregulation obtained from the gills and kidney. Fish exposed to Cd for 24 and 96h showed a decrease in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in the gills and kidney. The activity of carbonic anhydrase decreased in the gills after 24h and in both tissues after 96h of Cd exposure. The gill Ca(2+)-ATPase activity also decreased with Cd exposure, with a concomitant drop in the plasma concentration of Ca(2+). Despite the hypocalcemia, there were no changes in the concentration of the ions Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) or in plasma osmolality. Among the enzymes involved in ion transport, H(+)-ATPase was the only enzyme that showed increased activity in gills, whereas its activity in kidney remained unchanged. The results of this study demonstrate that waterborne Cd at the maximum concentrations set by Brazilian guidelines for freshwater affects the gills and kidney functions of P. lineatus. Acute exposure to Cd resulted in the decrease of the activity of enzymes, which culminated with the loss of the fish's ability to regulate the levels of calcium in the blood, leading to hypocalcemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the heme regulatory motifs of heme oxygenase-2 are dynamically disordered and exhibit redox-dependent interaction with heme

    DOE PAGES

    Bagai, Ireena; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fleischhacker, Angela S.; ...

    2015-05-05

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes a key step in heme homeostasis: the O₂₋ and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent conversion of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Mammals contain two isoforms of this enzyme, HO2 and HO1, which share the same α-helical fold forming the catalytic core and heme binding site, as well as a membrane spanning helix at their C-termini. However, unlike HO1, HO2 has an additional 30-residue N-terminus as well as two cysteine-proline sequences near the C-terminus that reside in heme regulatory motifs (HRMs).more » While the role of the additional N-terminal residues of HO2 is not yet understood, the HRMs have been proposed to reversibly form a thiol/disulfide redox switch that modulates the affinity of HO2 for ferric heme as a function of cellular redox poise. To further define the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions unique to HO2, we used multiple spectroscopic techniques to characterize these regions of the human HO2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments with HO2 demonstrate that, when the HRMs are in the oxidized state (HO2O), both the extra N-terminal and the C-terminal HRM-containing regions are disordered. However, protein NMR experiments illustrate that, under reducing conditions, the C-terminal region gains some structure as the Cys residues in the HRMs undergo reduction (HO2R) and, in experiments employing a diamagnetic protoporphyrin, suggest a redox-dependent interaction between the core and the HRM domains. Further, electron nuclear double resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies demonstrate that, upon reduction of the HRMs to the sulfhydryl form, a cysteine residue from the HRM region ligates to a ferric heme. Taken together with EPR measurements, which show the appearance of a new low-spin heme signal in reduced HO2, it appears that a cysteine residue(s) in the HRMs directly interacts with a second

  9. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the heme regulatory motifs of heme oxygenase-2 are dynamically disordered and exhibit redox-dependent interaction with heme

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, Ireena; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Sharma, Ajay; Hoffman, Brian M.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-05-05

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes a key step in heme homeostasis: the O₂₋ and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent conversion of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Mammals contain two isoforms of this enzyme, HO2 and HO1, which share the same α-helical fold forming the catalytic core and heme binding site, as well as a membrane spanning helix at their C-termini. However, unlike HO1, HO2 has an additional 30-residue N-terminus as well as two cysteine-proline sequences near the C-terminus that reside in heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). While the role of the additional N-terminal residues of HO2 is not yet understood, the HRMs have been proposed to reversibly form a thiol/disulfide redox switch that modulates the affinity of HO2 for ferric heme as a function of cellular redox poise. To further define the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions unique to HO2, we used multiple spectroscopic techniques to characterize these regions of the human HO2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments with HO2 demonstrate that, when the HRMs are in the oxidized state (HO2O), both the extra N-terminal and the C-terminal HRM-containing regions are disordered. However, protein NMR experiments illustrate that, under reducing conditions, the C-terminal region gains some structure as the Cys residues in the HRMs undergo reduction (HO2R) and, in experiments employing a diamagnetic protoporphyrin, suggest a redox-dependent interaction between the core and the HRM domains. Further, electron nuclear double resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies demonstrate that, upon reduction of the HRMs to the sulfhydryl form, a cysteine residue from the HRM region ligates to a ferric heme. Taken together with EPR measurements, which show the appearance of a new low-spin heme signal in reduced HO2, it appears that a cysteine residue(s) in the HRMs directly interacts

  10. Spectroscopic Studies Reveal That the Heme Regulatory Motifs of Heme Oxygenase-2 Are Dynamically Disordered and Exhibit Redox-Dependent Interaction with Heme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes a key step in heme homeostasis: the O2- and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent conversion of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Mammals contain two isoforms of this enzyme, HO2 and HO1, which share the same α-helical fold forming the catalytic core and heme binding site, as well as a membrane spanning helix at their C-termini. However, unlike HO1, HO2 has an additional 30-residue N-terminus as well as two cysteine-proline sequences near the C-terminus that reside in heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). While the role of the additional N-terminal residues of HO2 is not yet understood, the HRMs have been proposed to reversibly form a thiol/disulfide redox switch that modulates the affinity of HO2 for ferric heme as a function of cellular redox poise. To further define the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions unique to HO2, we used multiple spectroscopic techniques to characterize these regions of the human HO2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments with HO2 demonstrate that, when the HRMs are in the oxidized state (HO2O), both the extra N-terminal and the C-terminal HRM-containing regions are disordered. However, protein NMR experiments illustrate that, under reducing conditions, the C-terminal region gains some structure as the Cys residues in the HRMs undergo reduction (HO2R) and, in experiments employing a diamagnetic protoporphyrin, suggest a redox-dependent interaction between the core and the HRM domains. Further, electron nuclear double resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies demonstrate that, upon reduction of the HRMs to the sulfhydryl form, a cysteine residue from the HRM region ligates to a ferric heme. Taken together with EPR measurements, which show the appearance of a new low-spin heme signal in reduced HO2, it appears that a cysteine residue(s) in the HRMs directly interacts with a second bound heme

  11. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  12. Heme synthase (ferrochelatase) catalyzes the removal of iron from heme and demetalation of metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Shigeru; Ishigaki, Mutsumi; Mizutani, Atsushi; Uebayashi, Masashi; Numata, Masahiro; Ohgari, Yoshiko; Kitajima, Sakihito

    2007-12-25

    The red pigments in meat products, including cooked cured ham, arise from the reaction of myoglobin with nitric oxide generated from exogenous nitrite. Since carcinogenic nitrosoamines may be generated by the treatment of meats with nitrite, the production of nitrite-free meat products is an attractive alternative. Raw dry-cured (Parma) hams are produced by the treatment of meats with salts other than nitrite. Analysis of pigments in raw dry-cured hams reveals that the main pigment is zinc protoporphyrin, suggesting that the conversion of heme to zinc protoporphyrin occurs via an iron-removal reaction from myoglobin heme during the processing of raw hams. Purification of the iron-removal enzyme showed that it was identical to ferrochelatase. Recombinant ferrochelatase in combination with NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase catalyzed NADH-dependent iron-removal reaction from hemin and hemoproteins. Metal ions such as zinc and cobalt were also removed from the corresponding metalloporphyrins. The addition of zinc ions led to the formation of zinc protoporphyrin. In cultured cells, the conversion of zinc mesoporphyrin to mesoheme was observed to be dependent on ferrochelatase and could be markedly induced during erythroid differentiation. This is the first demonstration of a new enzyme reaction, the reverse reaction of ferrochelatase, which may contribute to a new route of the recycling of protoporphyrin and heme in cells.

  13. Femtosecond resolution of ligand-heme interactions in the high-affinity quinol oxidase bd: A di-heme active site?

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Marten H.; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Konstantinov, Alexander A.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of the two high-spin hemes in the oxygen reduction site of the bd-type quinol oxidase from Escherichia coli has been studied by femtosecond multicolor transient absorption spectroscopy. The previously unidentified Soret band of ferrous heme b595 was determined to be centered around 440 nm by selective excitation of the fully reduced unliganded or CO-bound cytochrome bd in the α-band of heme b595. The redox state of the b-type hemes strongly affects both the line shape and the kinetics of the absorption changes induced by photodissociation of CO from heme d. In the reduced enzyme, CO photodissociation from heme d perturbs the spectrum of ferrous cytochrome b595 within a few ps, pointing to a direct interaction between hemes b595 and d. Whereas in the reduced enzyme no heme d-CO geminate recombination is observed, in the mixed-valence CO-liganded complex with heme b595 initially oxidized, a significant part of photodissociated CO does not leave the protein and recombines with heme d within a few hundred ps. This caging effect may indicate that ferrous heme b595 provides a transient binding site for carbon monoxide within one of the routes by which the dissociated ligand leaves the protein. Taken together, the data indicate physical proximity of the hemes d and b595 and corroborate the possibility of a functional cooperation between the two hemes in the dioxygen-reducing center of cytochrome bd. PMID:10660685

  14. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  15. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  16. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements of heme proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiong; Demidov, Andrey; Wang, Wei; Christian, James; Champion, Paul

    1998-03-01

    Transient absorption spectra reveal the dynamics and intermediate states of the heme active site after ligand photodissociation, which helps clarify the physical process of ligand dissociation and geminate recombination. To measure the transient absorption spectra, we apply a femtosecond pump-probe technique with frequency resolved detection using a multichannel diode array. The femtosecond pulse output from a regenerative laser amplifier system is split in two; one beam pumps the optical parametric amplifier to produce a tunable wavelength pump pulse, the other beam generates a white light continuum that is varied in time with respect to pump pulse and probe the transient absorbance of the sample. We make a comparative study of myoglobin with different ligands, mutants and pH conditions.

  17. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of heme homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Aono, Shigetoshi

    2012-08-31

    Although heme is a crucial element for many biological processes including respiration, heme homeostasis should be regulated strictly due to the cytotoxicity of free heme molecules. Numerous lactic acid bacteria, including Lactococcus lactis, acquire heme molecules exogenously to establish an aerobic respiratory chain. A heme efflux system plays an important role for heme homeostasis to avoid cytotoxicity of acquired free heme, but its regulatory mechanism is not clear. Here, we report that the transcriptional regulator heme-regulated transporter regulator (HrtR) senses and binds a heme molecule as its physiological effector to regulate the expression of the heme-efflux system responsible for heme homeostasis in L. lactis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of how HrtR senses a heme molecule and regulates gene expression for the heme efflux system, we determined the crystal structures of the apo-HrtR·DNA complex, apo-HrtR, and holo-HrtR at a resolution of 2.0, 3.1, and 1.9 Å, respectively. These structures revealed that HrtR is a member of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The residue pair Arg-46 and Tyr-50 plays a crucial role for specific DNA binding through hydrogen bonding and a CH-π interaction with the DNA bases. HrtR adopts a unique mechanism for its functional regulation upon heme sensing. Heme binding to HrtR causes a coil-to-helix transition of the α4 helix in the heme-sensing domain, which triggers a structural change of HrtR, causing it to dissociate from the target DNA for derepression of the genes encoding the heme efflux system. HrtR uses a unique heme-sensing motif with bis-His (His-72 and His-149) ligation to the heme, which is essential for the coil-to-helix transition of the α4 helix upon heme sensing.

  18. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E.; Lee, Y. C.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme.

  19. Drugs modulate allosterically heme-Fe-recognition by human serum albumin and heme-fe-mediated reactivity.

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Leboffe, Loris; Trezza, Viviana; Fanali, Gabriella; Coletta, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) represents an important determinant of plasma oncotic pressure and a relevant factor that modulates fluid distribution between the body compartments. Moreover, HSA (i) represents the depot and transporter of several compounds, both endogenous and exogenous, (ii) affects the pharmacokinetics of many drugs, (iii) regulates chemical modifications of some ligands, (iv) shows (pseudo-)enzymatic properties, (v) inactivates some toxic compounds, and (vi) displays anti-oxidant properties. HSA binding and (pseudo-)enzymatic properties are regulated competitively, allosterically, and by covalent modifications. While competitive inhibition of HSA binding properties is evident, allosteric mechanisms and covalent modifications affecting HSA reactivity are less clear. In several pathological conditions in which free heme-Fe levels increase, the buffering capacity of plasma hemopexin is overwhelmed and most of heme-Fe binds to the fatty acid site 1 of HSA. HSA-heme-Fe displays globin-like properties; in turn, heme-Fe modulates competitively and allosterically HSA binding and reactivity properties. Remarkably, heme-Fe-mediated HSA properties are time-dependent, representing a case for "chronosteric effects". Here, we review the drug-based modulation of (i) heme-Fe-recognition by HSA and (ii) heme-Fe-mediated reactivity.

  20. Wearing red for signaling: the heme-bach axis in heme metabolism, oxidative stress response and iron immunology.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki

    2014-04-01

    The connection between gene regulation and metabolism is an old issue that warrants revisiting in order to understand both normal as well as pathogenic processes in higher eukaryotes. Metabolites affect the gene expression by either binding to transcription factors or serving as donors for post-translational modification, such as that involving acetylation and methylation. The focus of this review is heme, a prosthetic group of proteins that includes hemoglobin and cytochromes. Heme has been shown to bind to several transcription factors, including Bach1 and Bach2, in higher eukaryotes. Heme inhibits the transcriptional repressor activity of Bach1, resulting in the derepression of its target genes, such as globin in erythroid cells and heme oxygenase-1 in diverse cell types. Since Bach2 is important for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes as well as regulatory and effector T cell differentiation and the macrophage function, the heme-Bach2 axis may regulate the immune response as a signaling cascade. We discuss future issues regarding the topic of the iron/heme-gene regulation network based on current understanding of the heme-Bach axis, including the concept of "iron immunology" as the synthesis of the iron metabolism and the immune response.

  1. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E.; Lee, Y. C.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme.

  2. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Lee, Yu-Chen; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme. PMID:11687640

  3. Signaling Function of Heme Oxygenase Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Many reports have underscored the importance of the heme degradation pathway that is regulated by heme oxygenase (HO). This reaction releases bile pigments and carbon monoxide (CO), which are important antioxidant and signaling molecules. Thus, the reaction of HO-1 would have significant cytoprotective effects. Nevertheless, the importance of this protein goes beyond its enzymatic action. New evidence outlines significant effects of inactive forms of the HO-1 protein. Recent Advances: In fact, the role of the HO protein in cellular signaling, including transcription factor activation, binding to proteins, phosphorylation, and modulation of protein function, among others, has started being elucidated. The mechanism by which the inducible form of HO-1, in particular, can migrate to various cellular compartments to mediate important signaling or how and why it binds to key transcription factors and other proteins that are important in DNA repair is also described in several physiologic systems. Critical Issues: The signaling functions of HO-1 may have particular relevance in clinical circumstances, including cancer, as redistribution of HO-1 into the nuclear compartment is observed with cancer progression and metastasis. In addition, along with oxidative stress, the pleiotropic functions of HO-1 modulate antioxidant defense. In organ transplantation, HO and its byproducts suppress rejection at multiple levels and in sepsis-induced pulmonary dysfunction, inhaled CO or modulation of HO activity can change the course of the disease in animals. Future Directions: It is hoped that a more detailed understanding of the various signaling functions of HO will guide therapeutic approaches for complex diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1743–1753. PMID:24180238

  4. Heme orientational disorder in human adult hemoglobin reconstituted with a ring fluorinated heme and its functional consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Satoshi; Hirai, Yueki; Kawano, Shin; Imai, Kiyohiro; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko . E-mail: yamamoto@chem.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2007-03-16

    A ring fluorinated heme, 13,17-bis(2-carboxylatoethyl)-3,8-diethyl-2-fluoro-7,12, 18-trimethyl-porphyrin-atoiron(III), has been incorporated into human adult hemoglobin (Hb A). The heme orientational disorder in the individual subunits of the protein has been readily characterized using {sup 19}F NMR and the O{sub 2} binding properties of the protein have been evaluated through the oxygen equilibrium analysis. The equilibrated orientations of hemes in {alpha}- and {beta}- subunits of the reconstituted protein were found to be almost completely opposite to each other, and hence were largely different from those of the native and the previously reported reconstituted proteins [T. Jue, G.N. La Mar, Heme orientational heterogeneity in deuterohemin-reconstituted horse and human hemoglobin characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 119 (1984) 640-645]. Despite the large difference in the degree of the heme orientational disorder in the subunits of the proteins, the O{sub 2} affinity and the cooperativity of the protein reconstituted with 2-MF were similar to those of the proteins reconstituted with a series of hemes chemically modified at the heme 3- and 8-positions [K. Kawabe, K. Imaizumi, Z. Yoshida, K. Imai, I. Tyuma, Studies on reconstituted myoglobins and hemoglobins II. Role of the heme side chains in the oxygenation of hemoglobin, J. Biochem. 92 (1982) 1713-1722], whose O{sub 2} affinity and cooperativity were higher and lower, respectively, relative to those of native protein. These results indicated that the heme orientational disorder could exert little effect, if any, on the O{sub 2} affinity properties of Hb A. This finding provides new insights into structure-function relationship of Hb A.

  5. Comparison of the mechanisms of heme hydroxylation by heme oxygenases-1 and -2: kinetic and cryoreduction studies

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Roman; Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Bagai, Ireena; Hoffman, Brian M.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    The two isoforms of human heme oxygenase (HO1 and HO2) catalyze oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO. Unlike HO1, HO2 contains two C-terminal heme regulatory motifs (HRMs) centered at Cys265 and Cys282 that act as redox switches and, in their reduced dithiolate state, bind heme (Fleischhacker, et al., 2015, Biochemistry 54, 2693-708). Here, we describe cryoreduction/annealing and EPR spectroscopic experiments to study the structural features of the oxyheme moiety in HO2 and to elucidate the initial steps in heme degradation. We conclude that the same mechanism of heme hydroxylation to α-meso-hydroxyheme is employed by both isoforms and that the HRMs do not affect the physico-chemical properties of the oxy-Fe(II) and HOO-Fe(III) states of HO2. However, the absorption spectrum of oxy-Fe(II)-HO2 is slightly blue shifted relative to that of HO1. Furthermore, heme hydroxylation proceeds three times slower and the oxy-Fe(II) state is 100-fold less stable in HO2 than in HO1. These distinctions are attributed to slight structural variances in the two proteins, including differences in equilibrium between open versus closed conformations. Kinetic studies revealed that heme oxygenation by HO2 occurs solely at the catalytic core in that a variant of HO2 lacking the C-terminal HRM domain exhibits the same specific activity as one containing both the catalytic core and HRM domain; furthermore, a truncated variant containing only the HRM region binds but cannot oxidize heme. In summary, HO1 and HO2 share similar catalytic mechanisms and the HRMs do not play a direct role in the HO2 catalytic cycle. PMID:26652036

  6. The Role of Heme Chirality in the Circular Dichroism of Heme Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, Robert W.; Pescitelli, Gennaro

    2014-07-01

    The rotational strength (R) of the Soret transition in sperm-whale myoglobin (SW Mb), the hemoglobin from Chironomus thummi thummi (CTT Hb), and human hemoglobin (hHb) has been calculated using 20 high-resolution (< 1:5 Å) crystal structures. The intrinsic rotational strength due to heme non-planarity was calculated using π-electron theory and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Calculations on model protoporphyrins with a planar nucleus and with various torsional angles for the 2- and 4-vinyl substituents showed maximum R of ±0.70 Debye-Bohr magneton (1 DBM = 0.9273 · 10-38 cgs units). Viewing the heme so that the 2- and 4-vinyls are in a counterclockwise relationship, if a vinyl points toward the viewer, it contributes positively to R. Calculations of the intrinsic R for explicit heme geometries of SW Mb, CTT Hb, and hHb gave averages of 0.40±0.09, ±0:44±0.04, and +0.32±0.11 DBM, respectively. Coupling of the Soret transition with aromatic side-chain and peptide backbone transitions was also considered. For SW Mb, the magnitudes of the contributions decreased in the order Rint > Raro > Rpep. For CTT Hb and hHB, the orders were, respectively, Rint > Rpep > Raro and Rint > Raro ≈ Rpep. Human Hb ɑ chains showed the same trend as CTT Hb. Only in the hHb β chains did Raro predominate, with the order Raro > Rint > Rpep. The total predicted Rtot for SW Mb, CTT Hb, and hHb averaged +0.77±0.10 (0.56 - 0.80), -0.37±0.12 (-0.5), and +0.31±0.17 DBM (0.23 - 0.50), respectively. (Values in parentheses are experimental values.) Thus, contrary to the currently accepted view, coupling with aromatic side-chain or peptide transitions is not the dominant factor in the Soret circular dichroism (CD) of these proteins. The Soret CD is dominated by intrinsic CD of the heme chromophore, of which vinyl torsion is the major determinant. This result suggests an explanation for the large effect of heme isomerism on the Soret CD of Mb and Hb. Rotation about the

  7. Ligand preference and orientation in b- and c-type heme-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fufezan, Christian; Zhang, Jun; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Hemes are often incorporated into designed proteins. The importance of the heme ligand type and its orientation is still a matter of debate. Here, heme ligands and ligand orientation were investigated using a nonredundant (87 structures) and a redundant (1503 structures) set of structures to compare and contrast design features of natural b- and c-type heme-binding proteins. Histidine is the most common ligand. Marked differences in ligation motifs between b- and c-type hemes are higher occurrence of His-Met in c-type heme binding motifs (16.4% vs. 1.4%) and higher occurrence of exchangeable, small molecules in b-type heme binding motifs (67.6% vs. 9.9%). Histidine ligands that are part of the c-type CXXCH heme-binding motif show a distinct asymmetric distribution of orientation. They tend to point between either the heme propionates or between the NA and NB heme nitrogens. Molecular mechanics calculations show that this asymmetry is due to the bonded constraints of the covalent attachment between the heme and the protein. In contrast, the orientations of b-type hemes histidine ligands are found evenly distributed with no preference. Observed histidine heme ligand orientations show no dominating influence of electrostatic interactions between the heme propionates and the ligands. Furthermore, ligands in bis-His hemes are found more frequently perpendicular rather than parallel to each other. These correlations support energetic constraints on ligands that can be used in designing proteins. PMID:18491383

  8. Heme in pathophysiology: a matter of scavenging, metabolism and trafficking across cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Vinchi, Francesca; Fiorito, Veronica; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Heme (iron-protoporphyrin IX) is an essential co-factor involved in multiple biological processes: oxygen transport and storage, electron transfer, drug and steroid metabolism, signal transduction, and micro RNA processing. However, excess free-heme is highly toxic due to its ability to promote oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, thus leading to membrane injury and, ultimately, apoptosis. Thus, heme metabolism needs to be finely regulated. Intracellular heme amount is controlled at multiple levels: synthesis, utilization by hemoproteins, degradation and both intracellular and intercellular trafficking. This review focuses on recent findings highlighting the importance of controlling intracellular heme levels to counteract heme-induced oxidative stress. The contributions of heme scavenging from the extracellular environment, heme synthesis and incorporation into hemoproteins, heme catabolism and heme transport in maintaining adequate intracellular heme content are discussed. Particular attention is put on the recently described mechanisms of heme trafficking through the plasma membrane mediated by specific heme importers and exporters. Finally, the involvement of genes orchestrating heme metabolism in several pathological conditions is illustrated and new therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling heme metabolism are discussed. PMID:24782769

  9. Feasibility of combining spectra with texture data of multispectral imaging to predict heme and non-heme iron contents in pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Qin, Hao; Shi, Kefu; Zhou, Cunliu; Chen, Conggui; Hu, Xiaohua; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To precisely determine heme and non-heme iron contents in meat product, the feasibility of combining spectral with texture features extracted from multispectral imaging data (405-970 nm) was assessed. In our study, spectra and textures of 120 pork sausages (PSs) treated by different temperatures (30-80 °C) were analyzed using different calibration models including partial least squares regression (PLSR) and LIB support vector machine (Lib-SVM) for predicting heme and non-heme iron contents in PSs. Based on a combination of spectral and textural features, optimized PLSR models were obtained with determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.912 for heme and of 0.901 for non-heme iron prediction, which demonstrated the superiority of combining spectra with texture data. Results of satisfactory determination and visualization of heme and non-heme iron contents indicated that multispectral imaging could serve as a feasible approach for online industrial applications in the future.

  10. Structure and Reaction Mechanism in the Heme Dioxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    As members of the family of heme-dependent enzymes, the heme dioxygenases are differentiated by virtue of their ability to catalyze the oxidation of l-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine, the first and rate-limiting step in tryptophan catabolism. In the past several years, there have been a number of important developments that have meant that established proposals for the reaction mechanism in the heme dioxygenases have required reassessment. This focused review presents a summary of these recent advances, written from a structural and mechanistic perspective. It attempts to present answers to some of the long-standing questions, to highlight as yet unresolved issues, and to explore the similarities and differences of other well-known catalytic heme enzymes such as the cytochromes P450, NO synthase, and peroxidases. PMID:21361337

  11. Fast photoreduction of a heme peptide encapsulated in nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B Paul; Janicke, Michael T; Woodruff, William H; Bailey, James A

    2005-10-27

    Microperoxidase-11 has been immobilized on siliceous materials MCM-41 and SBA-15 and on amino-functionalized SBA-15. Resonance Raman spectroscopy has provided solid evidence that the exogenous species occupy the pores of the mesoporous silica materials. Photoreduction of the microperoxidase-11 Fe(III) center has been observed to occur in the immobilized samples and results in a long-lived stable reduced heme. Reoxidation of the heme occurs upon addition of oxygen, and the redox cycle can be repeated numerous times. The source of the electron resulting in reduction of the heme is proposed to originate from the silica matrix, and functionalization of silica surface is suggested to facilitate electron transfer to the heme.

  12. Heme crystallization in the midgut of triatomine insects.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcus F; Gandara, Ana Caroline P; Braga, Cláudia M S; Silva, José R; Mury, Flavia B; Dansa-Petretski, Marílvia; Menezes, Diego; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2007-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by several blood-feeding organisms in order to detoxify free heme released upon hemoglobin (Hb) digestion. Here we show that heme crystallization also occurs in three species of triatomine insects. Ultraviolet-visible and infrared light absorption spectra of insoluble pigments isolated from the midgut of three triatomine species Triatoma infestans, Dipetalogaster maximus and Panstrongylus megistus indicated that all produce Hz. Morphological analysis of T. infestans and D. maximus midguts revealed the close association of Hz crystals to perimicrovillar membranes and also as multicrystalline assemblies, forming nearly spherical structures. Heme crystallization was promoted by isolated perimicrovillar membranes from all three species of triatomine bugs in vitro in heat-sensitive reactions. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that Hz formation is an ancestral adaptation of Triatominae to a blood-sucking habit and that the presence of perimicrovillar membranes plays a central role in this process.

  13. Heme and blood-feeding parasites: friends or foes?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hemoparasites, like malaria and schistosomes, are constantly faced with the challenges of storing and detoxifying large quantities of heme, released from their catabolism of host erythrocytes. Heme is an essential prosthetic group that forms the reactive core of numerous hemoproteins with diverse biological functions. However, due to its reactive nature, it is also a potentially toxic molecule. Thus, the acquisition and detoxification of heme is likely to be paramount for the survival and establishment of parasitism. Understanding the underlying mechanism involved in this interaction could possibly provide potential novel targets for drug and vaccine development, and disease treatment. However, there remains a wide gap in our understanding of these mechanisms. This review summarizes the biological importance of heme for hemoparasite, and the adaptations utilized in its sequestration and detoxification. PMID:21087517

  14. Adaptive Responses to Tissue Injury: Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupam; Bolisetty, Subhashini

    2013-01-01

    Tissue injury may result as a consequence of a physical, chemical, or biological insult. Such injury recruits an adaptive response to restore homeostasis and protect against further injury. One of the most prompt protective and adaptive responses by all tissues is the robust activation of the highly inducible, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-apoptotic protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1, a microsomal enzyme, catalyzes the breakdown of pro-oxidant heme, which is released from heme proteins to equimolar quantities of iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. Biliverdin is converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. The beneficial effects of HO-1 expression are not merely due to heme degradation but are also attributed to the cytoprotective properties of the byproducts of the reaction. Manipulation of this enzymatic system in a myriad of disease models has provided substantial evidence to support its role as a cytoprotective enzyme and is therefore an emerging therapeutic molecule. PMID:23874015

  15. Structure of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme and enzymatic inactivation by mutation of the heme coordinating residue His-193

    SciTech Connect

    Suits,M.; Jaffer, N.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Heme oxygenases catalyze the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. For pathogenic microorganisms, heme uptake and degradation are critical mechanisms for iron acquisition that enable multiplication and survival within hosts they invade. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution. When compared with other heme oxygenases, ChuS has a unique fold, including structural repeats and a {beta}-sheet core. Not surprisingly, the mode of heme coordination by ChuS is also distinct, whereby heme is largely stabilized by residues from the C-terminal domain, assisted by a distant arginine from the N-terminal domain. Upon heme binding, there is no large conformational change beyond the fine tuning of a key histidine (His-193) residue. Most intriguingly, in contrast to other heme oxygenases, the propionic side chains of heme are orientated toward the protein core, exposing the {alpha}-meso carbon position where O{sub 2} is added during heme degradation. This unique orientation may facilitate presentation to an electron donor, explaining the significantly reduced concentration of ascorbic acid needed for the reaction. Based on the ChuS-heme structure, we converted the histidine residue responsible for axial coordination of the heme group to an asparagine residue (H193N), as well as converting a second histidine to an alanine residue (H73A) for comparison purposes. We employed spectral analysis and CO measurement by gas chromatography to analyze catalysis by ChuS, H193N, and H73A, demonstrating that His-193 is the key residue for the heme-degrading activity of ChuS.

  16. Expression and functional analysis of citrus carotene hydroxylases: unravelling the xanthophyll biosynthesis in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Zhang, Lancui; Yungyuen, Witchulada; Tsukamoto, Issei; Iijima, Natsumi; Oikawa, Michiru; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Yahata, Masaki; Kato, Masaya

    2016-06-29

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids and fulfill critical roles in plant growth and development. In plants, two different types of carotene hydroxylases, non-heme di-iron and heme-containing cytochrome P450, were reported to be involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophyll. Citrus fruits accumulate a high amount of xanthophylls, especially β,β-xanthophylls. To date, however, the roles of carotene hydroxylases in regulating xanthophyll content and composition have not been elucidated. In the present study, the roles of four carotene hydroxylase genes (CitHYb, CitCYP97A, CitCYP97B, and CitCYP97C) in the biosynthesis of xanthophyll in citrus fruits were investigated. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four citrus carotene hydroxylases presented in four distinct clusters which have been identified in higher plants. CitHYb was a non-heme di-iron carotene hydroxylase, while CitCYP97A, CitCYP97B, and CitCYP97C were heme-containing cytochrome P450-type carotene hydroxylases. Gene expression results showed that the expression of CitHYb increased in the flavedo and juice sacs during the ripening process, which was well consistent with the accumulation of β,β-xanthophyll in citrus fruits. The expression of CitCYP97A and CitCYP97C increased with a peak in November, which might lead to an increase of lutein in the juice sacs during the ripening process. The expression level of CitCYP97B was much lower than that of CitHYb, CitCYP97A, and CitCYP97C in the juice sacs during the ripening process. Functional analysis showed that the CitHYb was able to catalyze the hydroxylation of the β-rings of β-carotene and α-carotene in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Meanwhile, when CitHYb was co-expressed with CitCYP97C, α-carotene was hydroxylated on the β-ring and ε-ring sequentially to produce lutein. CitHYb was a key gene for β,β-xanthophyll biosynthesis in citrus fruits. CitCYP97C functioned as an ε-ring hydroxylase to produce lutein using zeinoxanthin as a substrate

  17. Chirality and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2013-01-01

    Chirality is present at all levels of structural hierarchy of protein and plays a significant role in protein biosynthesis. The macromolecules involved in protein biosynthesis such as aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and ribosome have chiral subunits. Despite the omnipresence of chirality in the biosynthetic pathway, its origin, role in current pathway, and importance is far from understood. In this review we first present an introduction to biochirality and its relevance to protein biosynthesis. Major propositions about the prebiotic origin of biomolecules are presented with particular reference to proteins and nucleic acids. The problem of the origin of homochirality is unresolved at present. The chiral discrimination by enzymes involved in protein synthesis is essential for keeping the life process going. However, questions remained pertaining to the mechanism of chiral discrimination and concomitant retention of biochirality. We discuss the experimental evidence which shows that it is virtually impossible to incorporate D-amino acids in protein structures in present biosynthetic pathways via any of the two major steps of protein synthesis, namely aminoacylation and peptide bond formation reactions. Molecular level explanations of the stringent chiral specificity in each step are extended based on computational analysis. A detailed account of the current state of understanding of the mechanism of chiral discrimination during aminoacylation in the active site of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and peptide bond formation in ribosomal peptidyl transferase center is presented. Finally, it is pointed out that the understanding of the mechanism of retention of enantiopurity has implications in developing novel enzyme mimetic systems and biocatalysts and might be useful in chiral drug design.

  18. FORUM: Bioinspired Heme, Heme/non-heme Diiron, Heme/copper and Inorganic NOx Chemistry: ·NO(g) Oxidation, Peroxynitrite-Metal Chemistry and ·NO(g) Reductive Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Schopfer, Mark P.; Wang, Jun; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Forum review highlights work from our own laboratories and those of others in the area of biochemical and biologically inspired inorganic chemistry dealing with nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, ·NO(g)) and its biological roles and reactions. The latter focus is on (i) oxidation of ·NO(g) to nitrate by nitric oxide dioxygenases (NOD’s), and (ii) reductive coupling of two molecules of ·NO(g) to give N2O(g). In the former case, NOD’s are described and the highlighting of possible peroxynitrite-heme intermediates and consequences of this are given by discussion of recent works with myoglobin and a synthetic heme model system for NOD action. Summaries of recent copper complex chemistries with ·NO(g) and O2(g) leading to peroxynitrite species are given. The coverage of biological reductive coupling of ·NO(g) deals with bacterial nitric oxide reductases (NOR’s) with heme/non-heme diiron active sites, and on heme/Cu oxidases such as cytochrome c oxidase which can mediate the same chemistry. Recent designed protein and synthetic model compound (heme/non-heme diiron or heme/copper) as functional mimics are discussed in some detail. We also highlight examples from the chemical literature, not necessarily involving biologically relevant metal ions, which describe the oxidation of ·NO(g) to nitrate (or nitrite) and possible peroxynitrite intermediates, or reductive coupling of ·NO(g) to give nitrous oxide. PMID:20666386

  19. Heme Regulates Allosteric Activation of the Slo1 BK Channel

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2005-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-dependent (Slo1 BK) channels are allosterically activated by membrane depolarization and divalent cations, and possess a rich modulatory repertoire. Recently, intracellular heme has been identified as a potent regulator of Slo1 BK channels (Tang, X.D., R. Xu, M.F. Reynolds, M.L. Garcia, S.H. Heinemann, and T. Hoshi. 2003. Nature. 425:531–535). Here we investigated the mechanism of the regulatory action of heme on heterologously expressed Slo1 BK channels by separating the influences of voltage and divalent cations. In the absence of divalent cations, heme generally decreased ionic currents by shifting the channel's G–V curve toward more depolarized voltages and by rendering the curve less steep. In contrast, gating currents remained largely unaffected by heme. Simulations suggest that a decrease in the strength of allosteric coupling between the voltage sensor and the activation gate and a concomitant stabilization of the open state account for the essential features of the heme action in the absence of divalent ions. At saturating levels of divalent cations, heme remained similarly effective with its influence on the G–V simulated by weakening the coupling of both Ca2+ binding and voltage sensor activation to channel opening. The results thus show that heme dampens the influence of allosteric activators on the activation gate of the Slo1 BK channel. To account for these effects, we consider the possibility that heme binding alters the structure of the RCK gating ring and thereby disrupts both Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating as well as intrinsic stability of the open state. PMID:15955873

  20. Heme regulates allosteric activation of the Slo1 BK channel.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Frank T; Heinemann, Stefan H; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2005-07-01

    Large conductance calcium-dependent (Slo1 BK) channels are allosterically activated by membrane depolarization and divalent cations, and possess a rich modulatory repertoire. Recently, intracellular heme has been identified as a potent regulator of Slo1 BK channels (Tang, X.D., R. Xu, M.F. Reynolds, M.L. Garcia, S.H. Heinemann, and T. Hoshi. 2003. Nature. 425:531-535). Here we investigated the mechanism of the regulatory action of heme on heterologously expressed Slo1 BK channels by separating the influences of voltage and divalent cations. In the absence of divalent cations, heme generally decreased ionic currents by shifting the channel's G-V curve toward more depolarized voltages and by rendering the curve less steep. In contrast, gating currents remained largely unaffected by heme. Simulations suggest that a decrease in the strength of allosteric coupling between the voltage sensor and the activation gate and a concomitant stabilization of the open state account for the essential features of the heme action in the absence of divalent ions. At saturating levels of divalent cations, heme remained similarly effective with its influence on the G-V simulated by weakening the coupling of both Ca(2+) binding and voltage sensor activation to channel opening. The results thus show that heme dampens the influence of allosteric activators on the activation gate of the Slo1 BK channel. To account for these effects, we consider the possibility that heme binding alters the structure of the RCK gating ring and thereby disrupts both Ca(2+)- and voltage-dependent gating as well as intrinsic stability of the open state.

  1. QMMM Methods for the Spin Density in Heme Compound I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallar, Victor

    2007-12-01

    Mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics methods (QMMM) offer a valuable computational tool for understanding the spin delocalization in highly reactive enzymatic intermediates. Compound I, an oxyferryl heme intermediate has been particularly difficult to characterize. In particular, the nature of the third unpaired electron appears to be highly dependent of the heme local environment. Here we show some examples of application of QM/MM methods to different compound I intermediate in cytochromes and peroxidases.

  2. Chromosomal localization of the human heme oxygenase genes: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) maps to chromosome 22q12 and heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2) maps to chromosome 16p13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R.K.; Kutty, G.; Rodriguez, I.R.; Chader, G.J.; Wiggert, B. )

    1994-04-01

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, the precursor of the bile pigment bilirubin, and carbon monoxide, a putative neurotransmitter. The authors have employed polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine the chromosome localization of the genes coding for the two known heme oxygenase isozymes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), the inducible form, was localized to human chromosome 22q12, while heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2), the constitutive form, was localized to chromosome 16p13.3. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. HmuS and HmuQ of Ensifer/Sinorhizobium meliloti degrade heme in vitro and participate in heme metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Amarelle, Vanesa; Rosconi, Federico; Lázaro-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Buldain, Graciela; Noya, Francisco; O'Brian, Mark R; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Ensifer meliloti is a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the alfalfa legume able to use heme as an iron source. The transport mechanism involved in heme acquisition in E. meliloti has been identified and characterized, but the fate of heme once inside the cell is not known. In silico analysis of E. meliloti 1021 genome revealed no canonical heme oxygenases although two genes encoding putative heme degrading enzymes, smc01518 and hmuS, were identified. SMc01518 is similar to HmuQ of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which is weakly homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus IsdG heme-degrading monooxygenase, whereas HmuS is homolog to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PhuS, a protein reported as a heme chaperone and as a heme degrading enzyme. Recombinant HmuQ and HmuS were able to bind hemin with a 1:1 stoichiometry and displayed a Kd value of 5 and 4 µM, respectively. HmuS degrades heme in vitro to the biliverdin isomers IX-β and IX-δ in an equimolar ratio. The HmuQ recombinant protein degrades heme to biliverdin IX-δ only. Additionally, in this work we demonstrate that humS and hmuQ gene expression is regulated by iron and heme in a RirA dependent manner and that both proteins are involved in heme metabolism in E. meliloti in vivo.

  4. Acquisition of iron from transferrin regulates reticulocyte heme synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ponka, P.; Schulman, H.M.

    1985-11-25

    Fe-salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone (SIH), which can donate iron to reticulocytes without transferrin as a mediator, has been utilized to test the hypothesis that the rate of iron uptake from transferrin limits the rate of heme synthesis in erythroid cells. Reticulocytes take up VZFe from (VZFe)SIH and incorporate it into heme to a much greater extent than from saturating concentrations of (VZFe)transferrin. Also, Fe-SIH stimulates (2- UC)glycine into heme when compared to the incorporation observed with saturating levels of Fe-transferrin. In addition, delta-aminolevulinic acid does not stimulate VZFe incorporation into heme from either (VZFe)transferrin or (VZFe)SIH but does reverse the inhibition of VZFe incorporation into heme caused by isoniazid, an inhibitor of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase. Taken together, these results suggest the hypothesis that some step(s) in the pathway of iron from extracellular transferrin to intracellular protoporphyrin limits the overall rate of heme synthesis in reticulocytes.

  5. Reactivity of inorganic sulfide species toward a heme protein model.

    PubMed

    Bieza, Silvina A; Boubeta, Fernando; Feis, Alessandro; Smulevich, Giulietta; Estrin, Darío A; Boechi, Leonardo; Bari, Sara E

    2015-01-20

    The reactivity of inorganic sulfide species toward heme peptides was explored under biorelevant conditions in order to unravel the molecular details of the reactivity of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide toward heme proteins. Unlike ferric porphyrinates, which are reduced by inorganic sulfide, some heme proteins can form stable Fe(III)-sulfide adducts. To isolate the protein factors ruling the redox chemistry, we used as a system model, the undecapeptide microperoxidase (MP11), a heme peptide derived from cytochrome c proteolysis that retains the proximal histidine bound to the Fe(III) atom. Upon addition of gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at pH 6.8, the UV-vis spectra of MP11 closely resembled those of the low-spin ferric hydroxo complex (only attained at an alkaline pH) and cysteine or alkylthiol derivatives, suggesting that the Fe(III) reduction was prevented. The low-frequency region of the resonance Raman spectrum revealed the presence of an Fe(III)-S band at 366 cm(-1) and the general features of a low-spin hexacoordinated heme. Anhydrous sodium sulfide (Na2S) was the source of sulfide of choice for the kinetic evaluation of the process. Theoretical calculations showed no distal stabilization mechanisms for bound sulfide species in MP11, highlighting a key role of the proximal histidine for the stabilization of the Fe(III)-S adducts of heme compounds devoid of distal counterparts, which is significant with regard to the biochemical reactivity of endogenous hydrogen sulfide.

  6. Optical spectroscopic studies of heme proteins at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.I.; Agnew, S.F.; Ondrias, M.R.; Alden, R.G.

    1986-01-22

    There has been considerable interest in studying the physical and chemical behavior of small molecules at high static pressure by using diamond-anvil cells. In contrast to the relatively rich chemistry now developing on small molecules at high densities, studies of metalloproteins have largely been limited to relatively low pressures (<7 kbar) using UV-vis absorption, magnetic susceptibility, or NMR spectroscopy. Low-pressure studies of a variety of oxidized heme proteins have conclusively shown evidence for spin-state changes for the iron site at pressures above 1 kbar. Optical absorption studies of reduced heme proteins, while not conclusive, have also been interpreted in terms of spin-state changes. Other changes within the heme pocket most notably in the proximal histidine in the ..beta..-chain of Hb via proton NMR, have also been detected. The molecular bases for these changes and the behavior of the heme electronic states at higher pressures, however, remain open questions. In this paper both resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy are used to address these problems in reduced heme proteins. Resonance Raman scattering is well suited for this application as it provides a structurally specific probe of the heme active site. 11 references, 2 figures.

  7. Ontogeny of salinity tolerance and hyper-osmoregulation by embryos of the intertidal crabs Hemigrapsus edwardsii and Hemigrapsus crenulatus (Decapoda, Grapsidae): survival of acute hyposaline exposure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H H; Seneviratna, Deepani

    2005-04-01

    The adults of Hemigrapsus edwardsii and Hemigrapsus crenulatus are euryhaline crabs and strong hyper-osmoregulators. Their embryos are carried externally attached to the abdominal pleopods of female crabs, where they are exposed to temporal and spatial changes in salinity associated with their intertidal and estuarine habitats. Although embryos lack the branchial and excretory organs responsible for adult osmoregulation, post-gastrula embryos were highly tolerant of exposure to hypo-osmotic sea water. Detached eggs (embryos+envelopes), of both species, at all developmental stages between gastrulation and hatching, exhibited 80-100% survival for periods up to 96 h in sea water (osmolality, 1050 mmol kg(-1)) and in dilutions to 50%, 10%, and 1%. Cleavage stages were less tolerant of dilution; H. edwardsii, <50% survived 24 h in 10% sea water; H. crenulatus <50% survived 6 h in 10% sea water. Post-gastrulation stages strongly hyper-osmoregulated but cleavage stages were hyper-osmoconformers (maintaining internal osmolality approximately 150 mmol kg(-1) above external). Osmoregulatory capacity was reduced just prior hatching, particularly in H. crenulatus, although salinity tolerance remained high. Gastrulation therefore marks a critical stage in the ontogeny of osmoregulation and salinity tolerance. Total Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity increased greatly during embryogenesis of H. crenulatus (undetectable in blastulae; gastrulae 0.31+/-0.05 pmol P(i) embryo(-1) min(-1); pre-hatching 16.4+/-1.0 pmol P(i) embryo(-1) min(-1)). Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity increased in embryos exposed to dilute sea water for 24 h implicating regulation of this transporter in a short-term acclimation response.

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1, Oxidation, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Jesus A.; Zhang, Min; Yin, Fen

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low-density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of HO, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This suggests that a potential intervention on HO-1 or its byproducts may need to take into account any potential alteration in the status of Nrf2 activation

  9. Heme Degradation by Heme Oxygenase Protects Mitochondria but Induces ER Stress via Formed Bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Müllebner, Andrea; Moldzio, Rudolf; Redl, Heinz; Kozlov, Andrey V; Duvigneau, J Catharina

    2015-04-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO), in conjunction with biliverdin reductase, degrades heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous iron and bilirubin (BR); the latter is a potent antioxidant. The induced isoform HO-1 has evoked intense research interest, especially because it manifests anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects relieving acute cell stress. The mechanisms by which HO mediates the described effects are not completely clear. However, the degradation of heme, a strong pro-oxidant, and the generation of BR are considered to play key roles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of BR on vital functions of hepatocytes focusing on mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The affinity of BR to proteins is a known challenge for its exact quantification. We consider two major consequences of this affinity, namely possible analytical errors in the determination of HO activity, and biological effects of BR due to direct interaction with protein function. In order to overcome analytical bias we applied a polynomial correction accounting for the loss of BR due to its adsorption to proteins. To identify potential intracellular targets of BR we used an in vitro approach involving hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria. After verification that the hepatocytes possess HO activity at a similar level as liver tissue by using our improved post-extraction spectroscopic assay, we elucidated the effects of increased HO activity and the formed BR on mitochondrial function and the ER stress response. Our data show that BR may compromise cellular metabolism and proliferation via induction of ER stress. ER and mitochondria respond differently to elevated levels of BR and HO-activity. Mitochondria are susceptible to hemin, but active HO protects them against hemin-induced toxicity. BR at slightly elevated levels induces a stress response at the ER, resulting in a decreased proliferative and metabolic activity of hepatocytes. However, the proteins that are targeted by BR still have

  10. Impact of osmoregulation on the differences in Cd accumulation between two contrasting edible amaranth cultivars grown on Cd-polluted saline soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Min; Li, Qu-Sheng; Yang, Ping; Ye, Han-Jie; Chen, Zi-Shuo; Guo, Shi-Hong; Wang, Li-Li; He, Bao-Yan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the difference of osmoregulation between two edible amaranth cultivars, Liuye (high Cd accumulator) and Quanhong (low Cd accumulator), under salinity stress and determine the effects of such difference on Cd accumulation. A pot experiment was conducted to expose the plants to sewage-irrigated garden soil (mean 2.28 mg kg(-1) Cd) pretreated at three salinity levels. Under salinity stress, the concentrations of Cd in the two cultivars were significantly elevated compared with those in the controls, and the Cd concentration in Liuye was statistically higher than that in Quanhong (p < 0.05). Salinity-induced osmoregulation triggered different biogeochemical processes involved in Cd mobilization in the rhizosphere soil, Cd absorption, and translocation by the two cultivars. Rhizosphere acidification induced by an imbalance of cation over anion uptake was more serious in Liuye than in Quanhong, which obviously increased soil Cd bioavailability. Salinity-induced injuries in the cell wall pectin and membrane structure were worse in Liuye than in Quanhong, increasing the risk of Cd entering the protoplasts. The chelation of more cytoplasmic Cd(2+) with Cl(-) ions in the roots of Liuye promoted Cd translocation into the shoots. Furthermore, the less organic solutes in the root sap of Liuye than in that of Quanhong also favored Cd translocation into the shoots. Hence, osmoregulation processes can be regarded as important factors in reducing Cd accumulation in crop cultivars grown on saline soils.

  11. Genetic analysis of mouse strains with variable serum sodium concentrations identifies the Nalcn sodium channel as a novel player in osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sinke, Anne P.; Caputo, Christina; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Yuan, Rong; Ren, Dejian; Deen, Peter M. T.

    2011-01-01

    In central osmoregulation, a 1–2% rise in plasma osmolality is detected by specialized osmoreceptors located in the circumventricular organs of the hypothalamus. A disturbance in this tightly regulated balance will result in either hyponatremia or hypernatremia, which are both common electrolyte disorders in hospitalized patients. Despite the high clinical importance of hypo- and hypernatremia and the fact that this vital process has been studied for many years, the genes and corresponding proteins involved in this process are just beginning to be identified. To identify novel genes involved in the (patho-)physiology of osmoregulation, we therefore employed haplotype association mapping on an aging group of 27 inbred mouse strains. Serum sodium concentrations were determined in all strains at 6, 12, and 18 mo of age, and high-resolution mapping was performed for males and females separately. We identified a total of five loci associated with the serum sodium concentration of which the locus on chromosome 14, containing only one known gene (Nalcn), showed the strongest correlation. Within this locus three different haplotypes could be distinguished, which associated with different average serum sodium levels. The association of Nalcn with sodium levels was confirmed by analysis of heterozygous Nalcn knockout mice, which displayed hypernatremia compared with wild-type littermates. Our study demonstrates that Nalcn associates with serum sodium concentrations in mice and indicates that Nalcn is an important novel player in osmoregulation. PMID:21177381

  12. Regulation and function of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Brzezowski, Pawel; Richter, Andreas S; Grimm, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    Tetrapyrroles are macrocyclic molecules with various structural variants and multiple functions in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. Present knowledge about the metabolism of tetrapyrroles reflects the complex evolution of the pathway in different kingdoms of organisms, the complexity of structural and enzymatic variations of enzymatic steps, as well as a wide range of regulatory mechanisms, which ensure adequate synthesis of tetrapyrrole end-products at any time of development and environmental condition. This review intends to highlight new findings of research on tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants and algae. In the course of the heme and chlorophyll synthesis in these photosynthetic organisms, glutamate, one of the central and abundant metabolites, is converted into highly photoreactive tetrapyrrole intermediates. Thereby, several mechanisms of posttranslational control are thought to be essential for a tight regulation of each enzymatic step. Finally, we wish to discuss the potential role of tetrapyrroles in retrograde signaling and point out perspectives of the formation of macromolecular protein complexes in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis as an efficient mechanism to ensure a fine-tuned metabolic flow in the pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical basis of fungal tropolone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Davison, Jack; al Fahad, Ahmed; Cai, Menghao; Song, Zhongshu; Yehia, Samar Y; Lazarus, Colin M; Bailey, Andrew M; Simpson, Thomas J; Cox, Russell J

    2012-05-15

    A gene cluster encoding the biosynthesis of the fungal tropolone stipitatic acid was discovered in Talaromyces stipitatus (Penicillium stipitatum) and investigated by targeted gene knockout. A minimum of three genes are required to form the tropolone nucleus: tropA encodes a nonreducing polyketide synthase which releases 3-methylorcinaldehyde; tropB encodes a FAD-dependent monooxygenase which dearomatizes 3-methylorcinaldehyde via hydroxylation at C-3; and tropC encodes a non-heme Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenase which catalyzes the oxidative ring expansion to the tropolone nucleus via hydroxylation of the 3-methyl group. The tropA gene was characterized by heterologous expression in Aspergillus oryzae, whereas tropB and tropC were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified TropB and TropC proteins converted 3-methylorcinaldehyde to a tropolone in vitro. Finally, knockout of the tropD gene, encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, indicated its place as the next gene in the pathway, probably responsible for hydroxylation of the 6-methyl group. Comparison of the T. stipitatus tropolone biosynthetic cluster with other known gene clusters allows clarification of important steps during the biosynthesis of other fungal compounds including the xenovulenes, citrinin, sepedonin, sclerotiorin, and asperfuranone.

  14. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical basis of fungal tropolone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Jack; al Fahad, Ahmed; Cai, Menghao; Song, Zhongshu; Yehia, Samar Y.; Lazarus, Colin M.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Simpson, Thomas J.; Cox, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    A gene cluster encoding the biosynthesis of the fungal tropolone stipitatic acid was discovered in Talaromyces stipitatus (Penicillium stipitatum) and investigated by targeted gene knockout. A minimum of three genes are required to form the tropolone nucleus: tropA encodes a nonreducing polyketide synthase which releases 3-methylorcinaldehyde; tropB encodes a FAD-dependent monooxygenase which dearomatizes 3-methylorcinaldehyde via hydroxylation at C-3; and tropC encodes a non-heme Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenase which catalyzes the oxidative ring expansion to the tropolone nucleus via hydroxylation of the 3-methyl group. The tropA gene was characterized by heterologous expression in Aspergillus oryzae, whereas tropB and tropC were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified TropB and TropC proteins converted 3-methylorcinaldehyde to a tropolone in vitro. Finally, knockout of the tropD gene, encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, indicated its place as the next gene in the pathway, probably responsible for hydroxylation of the 6-methyl group. Comparison of the T. stipitatus tropolone biosynthetic cluster with other known gene clusters allows clarification of important steps during the biosynthesis of other fungal compounds including the xenovulenes, citrinin, sepedonin, sclerotiorin, and asperfuranone. PMID:22508998

  15. The heme exporter Flvcr1 regulates expansion and differentiation of committed erythroid progenitors by controlling intracellular heme accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sonia; Petrillo, Sara; Chiabrando, Deborah; Bassi, Zuni Irma; Gays, Dafne; Camporeale, Annalisa; Vacaru, Andrei; Miniscalco, Barbara; Valperga, Giulio; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Baron, Margaret H; Santoro, Massimo Mattia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor 1 (Flvcr1) encodes two heme exporters: FLVCR1a, which localizes to the plasma membrane, and FLVCR1b, which localizes to mitochondria. Here, we investigated the role of the two Flvcr1 isoforms during erythropoiesis. We showed that, in mice and zebrafish, Flvcr1a is required for the expansion of committed erythroid progenitors but cannot drive their terminal differentiation, while Flvcr1b contributes to the expansion phase and is required for differentiation. FLVCR1a-down-regulated K562 cells have defective proliferation, enhanced differentiation, and heme loading in the cytosol, while FLVCR1a/1b-deficient K562 cells show impairment in both proliferation and differentiation, and accumulate heme in mitochondria. These data support a model in which the coordinated expression of Flvcr1a and Flvcr1b contributes to control the size of the cytosolic heme pool required to sustain metabolic activity during the expansion of erythroid progenitors and to allow hemoglobinization during their terminal maturation. Consistently, reduction or increase of the cytosolic heme rescued the erythroid defects in zebrafish deficient in Flvcr1a or Flvcr1b, respectively. Thus, heme export represents a tightly regulated process that controls erythropoiesis.

  16. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  17. SOUL in mouse eyes is a new hexameric heme-binding protein with characteristic optical absorption, resonance Raman spectral, and heme-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Emiko; Sagami, Ikuko; Uchida, Takeshi; Sato, Akira; Kitagawa, Teizo; Igarashi, Jotaro; Shimizu, Toru

    2004-11-09

    SOUL is specifically expressed in the retina and pineal gland and displays more than 40% sequence homology with p22HBP, a heme protein ubiquitously expressed in numerous tissues. SOUL was purified as a dimer in the absence of heme from the Escherichia coli expression system but displayed a hexameric structure upon heme binding. Heme-bound SOUL displayed optical absorption and resonance Raman spectra typical of 6-coordinate low-spin heme protein, with one heme per monomeric unit for both the Fe(III) and Fe(II) complexes. Spectral data additionally suggest that one of the axial ligands of the Fe(III) heme complex is His. Mutation of His42 (the only His of SOUL) to Ala resulted in loss of heme binding, confirming that this residue is an axial ligand of SOUL. The K(d) value of heme for SOUL was estimated as 4.8 x 10(-9) M from the association and dissociation rate constants, suggesting high binding affinity. On the other hand, p22HBP was obtained as a monomer containing one heme per subunit, with a K(d) value of 2.1 x 10(-11) M. Spectra of heme-bound p22HBP were different from those of SOUL but similar to those of heme-bound bovine serum albumin in which heme bound to a hydrophobic cavity with no specific axial ligand coordination. Therefore, the heme-binding properties and coordination structure of SOUL are distinct from those of p22HBP, despite high sequence homology. The physiological role of the new heme-binding protein, SOUL, is further discussed in this report.

  18. Heme modulates Trypanosoma cruzi bioenergetics inducing mitochondrial ROS production.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Natália P; Saraiva, Francis M S; Oliveira, Matheus P; Mendonça, Ana Paula M; Inacio, Job D F; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F; Laranja, Gustavo A T; Torres, Eduardo J Lopes; Oliveira, Marcus F; Paes, Marcia C

    2017-03-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease and has a single mitochondrion, an organelle responsible for ATP production and the main site for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). T. cruzi is an obligate intracellular parasite with a complex life cycle that alternates between vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, therefore the development of survival strategies and morphogenetic adaptations to deal with the various environments is mandatory. Over the years our group has been studying the vector-parasite interactions using heme as a physiological oxidant molecule that triggered epimastigote proliferation however, the source of ROS induced by heme remained unknown. In the present study we demonstrate the involvement of heme in the parasite mitochondrial metabolism, decreasing oxygen consumption leading to increased mitochondrial ROS and membrane potential. First, we incubated epimastigotes with carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, which led to decreased ROS formation and parasite proliferation, even in the presence of heme, correlating mitochondrial ROS and T. cruzi survival. This hypothesis was confirmed after the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant ((2-(2,2,6,6 Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl-4-ylamino)-2-oxoethyl) triphenylphosphonium chloride (MitoTEMPO) decreased both heme-induced ROS and epimastigote proliferation. Furthermore, heme increased the percentage of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) positive parasites tremendously-indicating the hyperpolarization and increase of potential of the mitochondrial membrane (ΔΨm). Assessing the mitochondrial functional metabolism, we observed that in comparison to untreated parasites, heme-treated epimastigotes decreased their oxygen consumption, and increased the complex II-III activity. These changes allowed the electron flow into the electron transport system, even though the complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) activity decreased

  19. Inactivation of anthracyclines by serum heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Brett A; Teesch, Lynn M; Buettner, Garry R; Britigan, Bradley E; Burns, C Patrick; Reszka, Krzysztof J

    2007-06-01

    We have previously shown that the anticancer agent doxorubicin undergoes oxidation and inactivation when exposed to myeloperoxidase-containing human leukemia HL-60 cells, or to isolated myeloperoxidase, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. In the current study we report that commercial fetal bovine serum (FBS) alone oxidizes doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite accelerates this oxidation. The efficacy of inactivation was dependent on the concentration of serum present; no reaction was observed when hydrogen peroxide or serum was omitted. Peroxidase activity assays, based on oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, confirmed the presence of a peroxidase in the sera from several suppliers. The peroxidative activity was contained in the >10000 MW fraction. We also found that hemoglobin, a heme protein likely to be present in commercial FBS, is capable of oxidizing doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite further stimulates the reaction. In contrast to intact doxorubicin, the serum + hydrogen peroxide + nitrite treated drug appeared to be nontoxic for PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Together, this study shows that (pseudo)peroxidases present in sera catalyze oxidation of doxorubicin by hydrogen peroxide and that this diminishes the tumoricidal activity of the anthracycline, at least in in vitro settings. Finally, this study also points out that addition of H2O2 to media containing FBS will stimulate peroxidase-type of reactions, which may affect cytotoxic properties of studied compounds.

  20. Facile heme vinyl posttranslational modification in a hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Preimesberger, Matthew R; Wenke, Belinda B; Gilevicius, Lukas; Pond, Matthew P; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2013-05-21

    Iron-protoporphyrin IX, or b heme, is utilized as such by a large number of proteins and enzymes. In some cases, notably the c-type cytochromes, this group undergoes a posttranslational covalent attachment to the polypeptide chain, which adjusts the physicochemical properties of the holoprotein. The hemoglobin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (GlbN), contrary to the archetypical hemoglobin, modifies its b heme covalently. The posttranslational modification links His117, a residue that does not coordinate the iron, to the porphyrin 2-vinyl substituent and forms a hybrid b/c heme. The reaction is an electrophilic addition that occurs spontaneously in the ferrous state of the protein. This apparently facile type of heme modification has been observed in only two cyanobacterial GlbNs. To explore the determinants of the reaction, we examined the behavior of Synechocystis GlbN variants containing a histidine at position 79, which is buried against the porphyrin 4-vinyl substituent. We found that L79H/H117A GlbN bound the heme weakly but nevertheless formed a cross-link between His79 Nε2 and the heme 4-Cα. In addition to this linkage, the single variant L79H GlbN also formed the native His117-2-Cα bond yielding an unprecedented bis-alkylated protein adduct. The ability to engineer the doubly modified protein indicates that the histidine-heme modification in GlbN is robust and could be engineered in different local environments. The rarity of the histidine linkage in natural proteins, despite the ease of reaction, is proposed to stem from multiple sources of negative selection.

  1. The Bordetella bhu Locus Is Required for Heme Iron Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Carin K.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2001-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are capable of obtaining iron from hemin and hemoglobin. Genes encoding a putative bacterial heme iron acquisition system (bhu, for Bordetella heme utilization) were identified in a B. pertussis genomic sequence database, and the corresponding DNA was isolated from a virulent strain of B. pertussis. A B. pertussis bhuR mutant, predicted to lack the heme outer membrane receptor, was generated by allelic exchange. In contrast to the wild-type strain, bhuR mutant PM5 was incapable of acquiring iron from hemin and hemoglobin; genetic complementation of PM5 with the cloned bhuRSTUV genes restored heme utilization to wild-type levels. In parallel studies, B. bronchiseptica bhu sequences were also identified and a B. bronchiseptica bhuR mutant was constructed and confirmed to be defective in heme iron acquisition. The wild-type B. bronchiseptica parent strain grown under low-iron conditions produced the presumptive BhuR protein, which was absent in the bhuR mutant. Furthermore, production of BhuR by iron-starved B. bronchiseptica was markedly enhanced by culture in hemin-supplemented medium, suggesting that these organisms sense and respond to heme in the environment. Analysis of the genetic region upstream of the bhu cluster identified open reading frames predicted to encode homologs of the Escherichia coli ferric citrate uptake regulators FecI and FecR. These putative Bordetella regulators may mediate heme-responsive positive transcriptional control of the bhu genes. PMID:11418569

  2. Designer microbes for biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have long been adapted for the biosynthetic production of useful compounds. There is increasing demand for the rapid and cheap microbial production of diverse molecules in an industrial setting. Microbes can now be designed and engineered for a particular biosynthetic purpose, thanks to recent developments in genome sequencing, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology. Advanced tools exist for the genetic manipulation of microbes to create novel metabolic circuits, making new products accessible. Metabolic processes can be optimized to increase yield and balance pathway flux. Progress is being made towards the design and creation of fully synthetic microbes for biosynthetic purposes. Together, these emerging technologies will facilitate the production of designer microbes for biosynthesis. PMID:24646570

  3. Genetics of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Martin S; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean C

    2014-08-01

    The complex cell envelope is a hallmark of mycobacteria and is anchored by the peptidoglycan layer, which is similar to that of Escherichia coli and a number of other bacteria but with modifications to the monomeric units and other structural complexities that are likely related to a role for the peptidoglycan in stabilizing the mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex (MAPc). In this article, we will review the genetics of several aspects of peptidoglycan biosynthesis in mycobacteria, including the production of monomeric precursors in the cytoplasm, assembly of the monomers into the mature wall, cell wall turnover, and cell division. Finally, we will touch upon the resistance of mycobacteria to β-lactam antibiotics, an important class of drugs that, until recently, have not been extensively exploited as potential antimycobacterial agents. We will also note areas of research where there are still unanswered questions.

  4. Terpenoid biosynthesis in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms (archaea and eubacteria) are found in all habitats where life exists on our planet. This would not be possible without the astounding biochemical plasticity developed by such organisms. Part of the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes was transferred to eukaryotic cells when endosymbiotic prokaryotes became mitochondria and plastids but also in a large number of horizontal gene transfer episodes. A group of metabolites produced by all free-living organisms is terpenoids (also known as isoprenoids). In prokaryotes, terpenoids play an indispensable role in cell-wall and membrane biosynthesis (bactoprenol, hopanoids), electron transport (ubiquinone, menaquinone), or conversion of light into chemical energy (chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls, rhodopsins, carotenoids), among other processes. But despite their remarkable structural and functional diversity, they all derive from the same metabolic precursors. Here we describe the metabolic pathways producing these universal terpenoid units and provide a complete picture of the main terpenoid compounds found in prokaryotic organisms.

  5. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  6. Characterization of purified c-type heme-containing peptides and identification of c-type heme-attachment sites in Shewanella oneidenis cytochromes using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Vilkov, Andrey N.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Ni, Shuisong; Romine, Margaret F.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-01

    We describe methods for mass spectrometric identification of heme-containing peptides from digests of c-type cytochromes that contain the CXXCH(X = any amino acid) sequence motif. Analysis of purified standard heme-containing peptides showed that the charged heme group was present both before and after peptide fragmentation in the gas phase. The heme fragment ion yielded the most abundant MS/MS peak for standard heme-containing peptides with one amino acid difference (DAA=1) for both 2+ and 3+ peptide charge states and the extent of heme loss during peptide fragmentation was affected by both sequence and charge. A modified search strategy was evaluated with tryptic digests of one known and two unknown cytochromes from Shewanella oneidenis, demonstrating that this approach can be generally applied for identification of c-type heme-containing peptides from complex samples.

  7. Ultrafast Spectroscopy Evidence for Picosecond Ligand Exchange at the Binding Site of a Heme Protein: Heme-Based Sensor YddV.

    PubMed

    Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Stranava, Martin; Lobato, Laura; Martinkova, Marketa; Shimizu, Toru; Liebl, Ursula; Vos, Marten H

    2016-01-07

    An important question for the functioning of heme proteins is whether different ligands present within the protein moiety can readily exchange with heme-bound ligands. Studying the dynamics of the heme domain of the Escherichia coli sensor protein YddV upon dissociation of NO from the ferric heme by ultrafast spectroscopy, we demonstrate that when the hydrophobic leucine residue in the distal heme pocket is mutated to glycine, in a substantial fraction of the protein water replaces NO as an internal ligand in as fast as ∼4 ps. This process, which is near-barrierless and occurs orders of magnitude faster than the corresponding process in myoglobin, corresponds to a ligand swap of NO with a water molecule present in the heme pocket, as corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings provide important new insight into ligand exchange in heme proteins that functionally interact with different external ligands.

  8. NMR studies of osmoregulation in methanogenic archaebacteria. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobic archaebacteria whose metabolism centers around the reduction of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4]. Their environments are often extreme (high temperatures, high salt, few nutrients, etc.) and they may have evolved unique ways to handle these stresses. It is proposed that methanogenic archaebacteria respond to osmotic stress by accumulating a series of organic solutes. In two strains of marine methanogens, Methanogenium cariaci and Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, four key organic solutes are observed: L-[alpha]-glutamate, [beta]-glutamate, N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine, and glycine betaine. The first three of these are synthesized de novo; glycine betaine is transported into the Mg. cariaci cells from the medium. In the absence of betaine, Mg. cariaci synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine as the dominant osmolyte. Mc. thermolithotrophicus also synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine but only at salt concentrations greater than 1 M. In Mc. thermolithotrophicus intracellular potassium ion concentrations, determined by [sup 39]K NMR spectroscopy, are balanced by the total concentration of anionic amino acid species, [alpha]-glutamate and [beta]-glutamate. Turnover of the organic solutes has been monitored using [sup 13]C-pulse/[sup 12]C-chase, and [sup 15]N-pulse/[sup 14]N-chase experiments. The [beta]-amino acids exhibit slower turnover rates compared to L-[alpha]-glutamate or aspartate, consistent with their role as compatible solutes. Biosynthetic information for the [beta]-amino acids was provided by [sup 13]C-label incorporation and steady state labeling experiments. [beta]-glutamate shows a lag in [sup 13]C uptake from [sup 13]CO[sub 2], indicative of its biosynthesis from a precursor not in equilibrium with the soluble L-[alpha]-glutamate pool, probably a macromolecule. A novel biosynthetic pathway is proposed for N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine from the diaminopimelate pathway.

  9. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  10. Biosynthesis of methanopterin

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H. )

    1990-06-05

    The biosynthetic pathway for the generation of the methylated pterin in methanopterins was determined for the methanogenic bacteria Methanococcus volta and Methanobacterium formicicum. Extracts of M. volta were found to readily cleave L-7,8-dihydroneopterin to 7,8-dihydro-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which was confirmed to be a precursor of the pterin portion of the methanopterin. (methylene{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin was incorporated into methanopterin by growing cells of M. volta to an extent of 30%. Both the C-11 and C-12 methyl groups of methanopterin originate from (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. Cells grown in the presence of (methylene-{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)pterin, (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methylpterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4}, methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin, and (1-ethyl-{sup 3}H)-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin showed that only the non-7-methylated pterins were incorporated into methanopterin. Cells extracts of M. formicicum readily condensed synthetic (methylene-{sup 3}H)-7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin-PP with methaniline to generate demethylated methanopterin, which is then methylated to methanopterin by the cell extract in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine. These observations indicate that the pterin portion of methanopterin is biosynthetically derived from 7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which is coupled to methaniline by a pathway analogous to the biosynthesis of folic acid. This pathway for the biosynthesis of methanopterin represents the first example of the modification of the specificity of a coenzyme through a methylation reaction.

  11. Update on selenoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Chavatte, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element that is incorporated in the small but vital family of proteins, namely the selenoproteins, as the selenocysteine amino acid residue. In humans, 25 selenoprotein genes have been characterized. The most remarkable trait of selenoprotein biosynthesis is the cotranslational insertion of selenocysteine by the recoding of a UGA codon, normally decoded as a stop signal. In eukaryotes, a set of dedicated cis- and trans-acting factors have been identified as well as a variety of regulatory mechanisms, factors, or elements that control the selenoprotein expression at the level of the UGA-selenocysteine recoding process, offering a fascinating playground in the field of translational control. It appeared that the central players are two RNA molecules: the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element within selenoprotein mRNA and the selenocysteine-tRNA([Ser]Sec); and their interacting partners. After a couple of decades, despite many advances in the field and the discovery of many essential and regulatory components, the precise mechanism of UGA-selenocysteine recoding remains elusive and more complex than anticipated, with many layers of control. This review offers an update of selenoproteome biosynthesis and regulation in eukaryotes. The regulation of selenoproteins in response to a variety of pathophysiological conditions and cellular stressors, including selenium levels, oxidative stress, replicative senescence, or cancer, awaits further detailed investigation. Clearly, the efficiency of UGA-selenocysteine recoding is the limiting stage of selenoprotein synthesis. The sequence of events leading Sec-tRNA([Ser]Sec) delivery to ribosomal A site awaits further analysis, notably at the level of a three-dimensional structure.

  12. Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Efficiently Catabolizes Heme in the Absence of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) uses molecular oxygen and electrons from NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase to convert heme to CO, ferrous iron, and biliverdin (BV). Enzymatic studies with the purified 30-kDa form of HO-1 routinely use a coupled assay containing biliverdin reductase (BVR), which converts BV to bilirubin (BR). BVR is believed to be required for optimal HO-1 activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether HO-1 activity could be monitored directly by following BV generation or iron release (using the ferrous iron chelator, ferrozine) in the absence of BVR. Using assays for each of the three end products, we found that HO-1 activity was stimulated in the presence of catalase and comparable rates were measured with each assay. Absorbance scans revealed characteristic spectra for BR, BV, and/or the ferrozine-iron complex. The optimal conditions were slightly different for the direct and coupled assays. BSA activated the coupled but inhibited the direct assays, and the assays had different pH optima. By measuring the activity of BVR directly using BV as a substrate, these differences were attributed to different enzymatic properties of BVR and HO-1. Thus, BVR is not needed to measure the activity of HO-1 when catalase is present. In fact, the factors affecting catalysis by HO-1 are better understood using the direct assays because the coupled assay can be influenced by properties of BVR. PMID:20679134

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of chlorophyll (Chl) involves many enzymatic reactions that share several first steps for biosynthesis of other tetrapyrroles such as heme, siroheme, and phycobilins. Chl allows photosynthetic organisms to capture light energy for photosynthesis but with simultaneous threat of photooxidative damage to cells. To prevent photodamage by Chl and its highly photoreactive intermediates, photosynthetic organisms have developed multiple levels of regulatory mechanisms to coordinate tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) with the formation of photosynthetic and photoprotective systems and to fine-tune the metabolic flow with the varying needs of Chl and other tetrapyrroles under various developmental and environmental conditions. Among a wide range of regulatory mechanisms of TPB, this review summarizes transcriptional regulation of TPB genes during plant development, with focusing on several transcription factors characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. Key TPB genes are tightly coexpressed with other photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes and are induced by light, oscillate in a diurnal and circadian manner, are coordinated with developmental and nutritional status, and are strongly downregulated in response to arrested chloroplast biogenesis. LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 and PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs, which are positive and negative transcription factors with a wide range of light signaling, respectively, target many TPB genes for light and circadian regulation. GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors directly regulate key TPB genes to fine-tune the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus with chloroplast functionality. Some transcription factors such as FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3, REVEILLE1, and scarecrow-like transcription factors may directly regulate some specific TPB genes, whereas other factors such as GATA transcription factors are likely to regulate TPB genes in an indirect manner. Comprehensive transcriptional analyses of TPB genes and detailed characterization of

  14. Heme Binding to the Mammalian Circadian Clock Protein Period 2 is Non-Specific†

    PubMed Central

    Airola, Michael V.; Du, Jing; Dawson, John H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock synchronizes physical and metabolic activity with the diurnal cycle through a transcriptional-posttranslational feedback loop. An additional feedback mechanism regulating clock timing has been proposed to involve oscillation in heme availability. Period 2 (PER2), an integral component in the negative feedback loop that establishes circadian rhythms in mammals, has been identified as a heme binding protein. However, the majority of evidence for heme binding is based upon in vitro heme binding assays. We sought to ascertain if these largely spectral assays could distinguish between specific and non-specific heme interactions. Heme binding properties by a number of other well-characterized proteins, all with no known biological role involving heme interaction, corresponded to those displayed by PER2. Site-directed mutants of putative heme-binding residues identified by MCD were unable to locate a specific heme-binding site on PER2. Protein film electrochemistry also indicates that heme binds PER2 non-specifically on the protein surface. Our results establish the inability of typical in vitro assays to easily distinguish between specific and non-specific heme binding. We conclude that heme binding to PER2 is likely to be non-specific and does not involve the hydrophobic pocket within the PER2 PAS domains that in other PAS proteins commonly recognizes cofactors. These findings also question the significance of in vivo studies that implicate heme interactions with the clock proteins PER2 and nPAS2 in biological function. PMID:20411915

  15. De novo assembly and transcriptome analysis of osmoregulation in Litopenaeus vannamei under three cultivated conditions with different salinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin; Lu, Yunliang

    2016-03-10

    Litopenaeus vannamei, one of the most important euryhaline crustaceans, is cultured in seawater, brackish water, and freshwater worldwide. We performed Illumina RNA sequencing of L. vannamei gills, generating 124,914,870; 119,250,450; and 105,487,350 raw reads from the shrimps cultured in seawater, brackish water, and freshwater, respectively. From these reads, 466,293 transcripts were de novo assembled and annotated. Comparative genomic analysis showed that 1752 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the freshwater group compared with the seawater group, including 1242 upregulated and 510 downregulated genes. In addition, 1246 genes were differentially expressed in the brackish group vs. the seawater water group, including 659 upregulated and 587 downregulated genes. These differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in energy metabolism, substance metabolism, ion transport and signal transduction, and genetic process. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis were used to analyze the functional significance of the differentially expressed genes, included those responding to salinity through diverse biological functions and processes and numerous potential genes associated with the osmotic response. L. vannamei responses to the three cultivated salinities were analyzed using next-generation sequencing. The transcriptional database established from the current research adds to the information available on L. vannamei and the findings expand our knowledge of the molecular basis of osmoregulation mechanisms in this species.

  16. Negative osmoregulation of the Salmonella ompS1 porin gene independently of OmpR in an hns background.

    PubMed

    Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Puente, José Luis; Calva, Edmundo

    2003-11-01

    The ompS1 gene encodes a quiescent porin in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Typhimurium. By using random mariner transposon mutagenesis, mutations that caused derepression of ompS1 expression were isolated, one in S. enterica serovar Typhi and two in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. All of them mapped in the hns gene in the region coding for the carboxy terminus of the H-NS nucleoid protein. The derepressed ompS1 expression was subject to negative regulation at high osmolarity, both in the presence and in the absence of OmpR. This observation was possible due to the fact that there are two promoters: P1, which is OmpR dependent, and P2, which does not require OmpR for activation (rather, OmpR represses P2). The sequences upstream from position -88, a region previously shown to be involved in the negative regulation of ompS1, can form a static bend, and the integrity of this region was required for function and binding of H-NS and for osmoregulation, as determined with gene reporter fusions of different lengths and with a 31-bp deletion mutant. This is consistent with the notion that this region determines a structure required for repression. Hence, ompS1 shares negative regulation by H-NS with other loci, such as the bgl operon and the ade gene.

  17. Natural selection and the genetic basis of osmoregulation in heteromyid rodents as revealed by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Marra, Nicholas J; Romero, Andrea; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2014-06-01

    One adaptation of ecological and evolutionary interest is the extraordinary ability of desert rodents to retain water during waste production. Much is known regarding the unique kidney physiology of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) and their ability to retain water during waste production, yet the genetic basis of these physiological adaptations is relatively unknown. Herein, we utilized RNA-seq data to conduct a comparative study to identify osmoregulatory genes expressed in heteromyid rodents. We sequenced kidney tissue from two temperate desert species (Dipodomys spectabilis and Chaetodipus baileyi) from two separate subfamilies of the Heteromyidae and compared these transcriptomes to a tropical mesic species (Heteromys desmarestianus) from a third subfamily. The evolutionary history of these subfamilies provided a robust phylogenetic control that allowed us to separate shared evolutionary history from convergence. Using two methods to detect differential expression (DE), we identified 1890 genes that showed consistent patterns of DE between the arid and mesic species. A three-species reciprocal BLAST analysis revealed 3511 sets of putative orthologues that, upon comparison to known Mus musculus sequences, revealed 323 annotated and full-length genic regions. Selection tests displayed evidence of positive selection (dn/ds > 1) on six genes in the two desert species and remained significant for one of these genes after correction for multiple testing. Thus, our data suggest that both the coding sequence and expression of genes have been shaped by natural selection to provide the genetic architecture for efficient osmoregulation in desert-adapted heteromyid rodents.

  18. Osmoregulation during Long-Term Fasting in Lungfish and Elephant Seal: Old and New Lessons for the Nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Bernard C

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrates control the osmolality of their extra- and intra-cellular compartments despite large variations in salt and water intake. Aldosterone-dependent sodium reabsorption and vasopressin-dependent water transport in the distal nephron and collecting duct play a critical role in the final control of sodium and water balance. Long-term fasting (no eating, no drinking) represents an osmotic challenge for survival. Evolution has found very different solutions to meet this challenge. To illustrate this point, I will discuss osmoregulation of a mammal (elephant seal pup) and of a fish (lungfish) that are able to survive long-term fasting for months or even years. Homer W. Smith taught us how informative comparative anatomy and physiology of the kidney could help physiologists and nephrologists to better understand how the kidney works. In recent years, comparative genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics across the tree of life have led to the emergence of a new discipline, evolutionary medicine. In the near future, physiologists and nephrologists will benefit from this new field of investigation, thanks to its potential for the identification of novel drug targets and therapies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Sublethal effects of the organic antifoulant Mexel(R)432 on osmoregulation and xenobiotic detoxification in the flatfish Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    López-Galindo, Cristina; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Nebot, Enrique; Casanueva, José F; Rubio, Daniel; Solé, Montserrat; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2010-03-01

    Mexel(R)432 is an anionic surfactant used as biocide in the cooling water system of power plants for biofouling reduction. Refrigeration waters from power plants do not usually follow, prior to their discharge to sea, any treatment aimed to eliminate biocides and this can have negative consequences on the aquatic fauna nearby. The effects of different concentrations of the antifoulant Mexel(R)432 (0.5, 1 and 2mgL(-1)) on osmoregulation (osmolality and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity) and stress parameters (cortisol, glucose, and lactate) were assessed in juveniles of the flatfish Solea senegalensis. Gill histopathology and alterations due to oxidative stress (increased lipid peroxidation, LPO, levels) at branchial and hepatic levels were also considered. Other parameters tested were the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; and glutathione reductase, GR), xenobiotic metabolism defenses involved in detoxification (carboxylesterase, CbE; 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, EROD; and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and the neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Significant variations in osmoregulatory parameters, histological lesions and decreased branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were observed in exposed fish. Other gill biomarkers presented little or no significant variations in relation to controls. In contrast, hepatic parameters, such as CAT activity, were inhibited while EROD activity was initially elevated but after longer exposures it recovered basal values. These results suggested that under our experimental protocol exists toxic associated to Mexel(R)432 exposures.

  20. Histidine placement in de novo-designed heme proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, B. R.; Dutton, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of histidine residue placement in a de novo-designed four-alpha-helix bundle are investigated by placement of histidine residues at coiled coil heptad a positions in two distinct heptads and at each position within a single heptad repeat of our prototype heme protein maquette, [H10H24]2 [[Ac-CGGGELWKL x HEELLKK x FEELLKL x HEERLKK x L-CONH2]2]2 composed of a generic (alpha-SS-alpha)2 peptide architecture. The heme to peptide stoichiometry of variants of [H10H24]2 with either or both histidines on each helix replaced with noncoordinating alanine residues ([H10A24]2, [A10H24]2, and [A10A24]2) demonstrates the obligate requirement of histidine for biologically significant heme affinity. Variants of [A10A24]2, [[Ac-CGGGELWKL x AEELLKK x FEELLKL x AEERLKK x L-CONH2]2]2, containing a single histidine per helix in positions 9 to 15 were evaluated to verify the design based on molecular modeling. The bis-histidine site formed between heptad positions a at 10 and 10' bound ferric hemes with the highest affinity, Kd1 and Kd2 values of 1.5 and 800 nM, respectively. Placement of histidine at position 11 (heptad position b) resulted in a protein that bound a single heme with moderate affinity, Kd1 of 9.5 microM, whereas the other peptides had no measurable apparent affinity for ferric heme with Kd1 values >200 microM. The bis-histidine ligation of heme to [H10A24]2 and [H11A24]2 was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The protein design rules derived from this study, together with the narrow tolerances revealed, are applicable for improving future heme protein designs, for analyzing the results of randomized heme protein combinatorial libraries, as well as for implementation in automated protein design. PMID:10493590

  1. The nature of heme/iron-induced protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ka; Gao, Zhonghong; Weisbrodt, Norman; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Recently, substantial evidence has emerged that revealed a very close association between the formation of nitrotyrosine and the presence of activated granulocytes containing peroxidases, such as myeloperoxidase. Peroxidases share heme-containing homology and can use H2O2 to oxidize substrates. Heme is a complex of iron with protoporphyrin IX, and the iron-containing structure of heme has been shown to be an oxidant in several model systems where the prooxidant effects of free iron, heme, and hemoproteins may be attributed to the formation of hypervalent states of the heme iron. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that free heme and iron play a crucial role in NO2-Tyr formation. The data from our study indicate that: (i) heme/iron catalyzes nitration of tyrosine residues by using hydrogen peroxide and nitrite, a reaction that revealed the mechanism underlying the protein nitration by peroxidase, H2O2, and NO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}; (ii) H2O2 plays a key role in the protein oxidation that forms the basis for the protein nitration, whereas nitrite is an essential element that facilitates nitration by the heme(Fe), H2O2, and the NO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{2}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} system; (iii) the formation of a Fe(IV) hypervalent compound may be essential for heme(Fe)-catalyzed nitration, whereas O\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage

  2. Heme degradation by Staphylococcus aureus IsdG and IsdI liberates formaldehyde rather than carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Nambu, Shusuke; Ono, Yukari; Goulding, Celia W.; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2013-01-01

    IsdG and IsdI from Staphylococcus aureus are novel heme degrading enzymes containing unusually non-planar (ruffled) heme. While canonical heme degrading enzymes, heme oxygenases, catalyze heme degradation coupled with the release of CO, in this study we demonstrate that the primary C1 product of the S. aureus enzymes is formaldehyde. This finding clearly reveals that both IsdG and IsdI degrade heme by an unusual mechanism distinct from the well-characterized heme oxygenase mechanism as recently proposed for MhuD from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We conclude that heme ruffling is critical for the drastic mechanistic change for these novel bacterial enzymes. PMID:23600533

  3. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  4. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Designed Heme-Cage β-Sheet Miniproteins.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Areetha; Wu, Xiangyang; Yeow, Edwin Kok Lee; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2017-05-15

    The structure and function of naturally occurring proteins are governed by a large number of amino acids (≥100). The design of miniature proteins with desired structures and functions not only substantiates our knowledge about proteins but can also contribute to the development of novel applications. Excellent progress has been made towards the design of helical proteins with diverse functions. However, the development of functional β-sheet proteins remains challenging. Herein, we describe the construction and characterization of four-stranded β-sheet miniproteins made up of about 19 amino acids that bind heme inside a hydrophobic binding pocket or "heme cage" by bis-histidine coordination in an aqueous environment. The designed miniproteins bound to heme with high affinity comparable to that of native heme proteins. Atomic-resolution structures confirmed the presence of a four-stranded β-sheet fold. The heme-protein complexes also exhibited high stability against thermal and chaotrope-induced unfolding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of hydration in human serum heme-albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Simona; Pariani, Giorgio; Fanali, Gabriella; Longo, Dario; Ascenzi, Paolo; Aime, Silvio; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-07-31

    Ferric human serum heme-albumin (heme-HSA) shows a peculiar nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) behavior that allows to investigate structural and functional properties. Here, we report a thermodynamic analysis of NMRD profiles of heme-HSA between 20 and 60 {sup o}C to characterize its hydration. NMRD profiles, all showing two Lorentzian dispersions at 0.3 and 60 MHz, were analyzed in terms of modulation of the zero field splitting tensor for the S = {sup 5}/{sub 2} manifold. Values of correlation times for tensor fluctuation ({tau}{sub v}) and chemical exchange of water molecules ({tau}{sub M}) show the expected temperature dependence, with activation enthalpies of -1.94 and -2.46 {+-} 0.2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. The cluster of water molecules located in the close proximity of the heme is progressively reduced in size by increasing the temperature, with {Delta}H = 68 {+-} 28 kJ mol{sup -1} and {Delta}S = 200 {+-} 80 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. These results highlight the role of the water solvent in heme-HSA structure-function relationships.

  7. The Thr-His Connection on the Distal Heme of Catalase-Related Hemoproteins: A Hallmark of Reaction with Fatty Acid Hydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Newcomer, Marcia E; Brash, Alan R

    2016-11-03

    This review focuses on a group of heme peroxidases that retain the catalase fold in structure, yet show little or no reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Instead of having a role in oxidative defense, these enzymes are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The prototypical enzyme is catalase-related allene oxide synthase, an enzyme that converts a specific fatty acid hydroperoxide to the corresponding allene oxide (epoxide). Other catalase-related enzymes form allylic epoxides, aldehydes, or a bicyclobutane fatty acid. In all catalases (including these relatives), a His residue on the distal face of the heme is absolutely required for activity. Its immediate neighbor in sequence as well as in 3 D space is conserved as Val in true catalases and Thr in the fatty acid hydroperoxide-metabolizing enzymes. Thr-His on the distal face of the heme is critical in switching the substrate specificity from H2 O2 to fatty acid hydroperoxide. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature's main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the stunningly diverse oxidative transformations that these enzymes catalyze. The wealth of available structural data has furthermore established the so-called 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad as a new common structural motif for the activation of dioxygen. This superfamily of mononuclear iron(ii) enzymes catalyzes a wide range of oxidative transformations, ranging from the cis-dihydroxylation of arenes to the biosynthesis of antibiotics such as isopenicillin and fosfomycin. The remarkable scope of oxidative transformations seems to be even broader than that associated with oxidative heme enzymes. Not only are many of these oxidative transformations of key biological importance, many of these selective oxidations are also unprecedented in synthetic organic chemistry. In this critical review, we wish to provide a concise background on the chemistry of the mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes characterized by the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and to discuss the many recent developments in the field. New examples of enzymes with unique reactivities belonging to the superfamily have been reported. Furthermore, key insights into the intricate mechanistic details and reactive intermediates have been obtained from both enzyme and modeling studies. Sections of this review are devoted to each of these subjects, i.e. the enzymes, biomimetic models, and reactive intermediates (225 references).

  9. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  10. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  11. Involvement of a lipoxygenase-like enzyme in abscisic Acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Bell, E; Mullet, J E

    1992-07-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that abscisic acid (ABA) is derived from 9'-cis-neoxanthin or 9'-cis-violaxanthin with xanthoxin as an intermediate. (18)O-labeling experiments show incorporation primarily into the side chain carboxyl group of ABA, suggesting that oxidative cleavage occurs at the 11, 12 (11', 12') double bond of xanthophylls. Carbon monoxide, a strong inhibitor of heme-containing P-450 monooxygenases, did not inhibit ABA accumulation, suggesting that the oxygenase catalyzing the carotenoid cleavage step did not contain heme. This observation, plus the ability of lipoxygenase to make xanthoxin from violaxanthin, suggested that a lipoxygenase-like enzyme is involved in ABA biosynthesis. To test this idea, the ability of several soybean (Glycine max L.) lipoxygenase inhibitors (5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and naproxen) to inhibit stress-induced ABA accumulation in soybean cell culture and soybean seedlings was determined. All lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly inhibited ABA accumulation in response to stress. These results suggest that the in vivo oxidative cleavage reaction involved in ABA biosynthesis requires activity of a nonheme oxygenase having lipoxygenase-like properties.

  12. Tearing down to build up: Metalloenzymes in the biosynthesis lincomycin, hormaomycin and the pyrrolo [1,4]benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Colabroy, Keri L

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic pathways for the production of lincomycin, hormaomycin and the antitumor pyrrolo [1,4] benzodiazepines share a vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid (3-vinyl-2,3-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid, VPCA) as a common intermediate. Biosynthesis of this vinyl substituted pyrroline carboxylic acid intermediate requires a short, three-enzyme pathway containing two metalloenzymes: a heme-dependent l-tyrosine hydroxylase and a non-heme Fe(2+) dependent l-DOPA dioxygenase. The l-tyrosine hydroxylase is an unprecedented type of peroxidase that specifically monohydroxylates tyrosine, while the l-DOPA extradiol cleaving enzyme is a single-domain vicinal-oxygen-chelate (VOC) dioxygenase. The dioxygenase product subsequently undergoes an, as yet uncharacterized, C-C bond cleavage reaction. This mini-pathway demonstrates the use of metal-dependent chemistry typically associated with natural product degradation in order to build a compact, functionalized building block for larger, bioactive molecules.

  13. Fungal Hybrid B heme peroxidases - unique fusions of a heme peroxidase domain with a carbohydrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Janeček, Štefan; Obinger, Christian

    2017-08-24

    Heme peroxidases, essential peroxide converting oxidoreductases are divided into four independently evolved superfamilies. Within the largest one - the peroxidase-catalase superfamily - two hybrid lineages were described recently. Whereas Hybrid A heme peroxidases represent intermediate enzymes between ascorbate peroxidases and cytochrome c peroxidases, Hybrid B heme peroxidases are unique fusion proteins comprised of a conserved N-terminal heme peroxidase domain and a C-terminal domain of various sugar binding motifs. So far these peculiar peroxidases are only found in the kingdom of Fungi. Here we present a phylogenetic reconstruction of the whole superfamily with focus on Hybrid B peroxidases. We analyse the domain assembly and putative structure and function of the newly discovered oligosaccharide binding domains. Two distinct carbohydrate binding modules (CBM21 and CBM34) are shown to occur in phytopathogenic ascomycetous orthologs of Hybrid B heme peroxidases only. Based on multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling the structure-function relationships are discussed with respect to physiological function. A concerted action of peroxide cleavage with specific cell-wall carbohydrate binding can support phytopathogens survival within the plant host.

  14. Porphyrin-Cored Polymer Nanoparticles: Macromolecular Models for Heme Iron Coordination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kyle J; Hanlon, Ashley M; Lyon, Christopher K; Cole, Justin P; Tuten, Bryan T; Tooley, Christian A; Berda, Erik B; Pazicni, Samuel

    2016-10-03

    Porphyrin-cored polymer nanoparticles (PCPNs) were synthesized and characterized to investigate their utility as heme protein models. Created using collapsible heme-centered star polymers containing photodimerizable anthracene units, these systems afford model heme cofactors buried within hydrophobic, macromolecular environments. Spectroscopic interrogations demonstrate that PCPNs display redox and ligand-binding reactivity similar to that of native systems and thus are potential candidates for modeling biological heme iron coordination.

  15. Structural evidence for the functional importance of the heme domain mobility in flavocytochrome b2.

    PubMed

    Diêp Lê, K H; Lederer, Florence; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2010-07-16

    Yeast flavocytochrome b(2) (Fcb2) is an L-lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductase in the mitochondrial intermembrane space participating in cellular respiration. Each enzyme subunit consists of a cytochrome b(5)-like heme domain and a flavodehydrogenase (FDH) domain. In the Fcb2 crystal structure, the heme domain is mobile relative to the tetrameric FDH core in one out of two subunits. The monoclonal antibody B2B4, elicited against the holoenzyme, recognizes only the native heme domain in the holoenzyme. When bound, it suppresses the intramolecular electron transfer from flavin to heme b(2), hence cytochrome c reduction. We report here the crystal structure of the heme domain in complex with the Fab at 2.7 A resolution. The Fab epitope on the heme domain includes the two exposed propionate groups of the heme, which are hidden in the interface between the domains in the complete subunit. The structure discloses an unexpected plasticity of Fcb2 in the neighborhood of the heme cavity, in which the heme has rotated. The epitope overlaps with the docking area of the FDH domain onto the heme domain, indicating that the antibody displaces the heme domain in a movement of large amplitude. We suggest that the binding sites on the heme domain of cytochrome c and of the FDH domain also overlap and therefore that cytochrome c binding also requires the heme domain to move away from the FDH domain, so as to allow electron transfer between the two hemes. Based on this hypothesis, we propose a possible model of the Fcb2.cytochrome c complex. Interestingly, this model shares similarity with that of the cytochrome b(5) x cytochrome c complex, in which cytochrome c binds to the surface around the exposed heme edge of cytochrome b(5). The present results therefore support the idea that the heme domain mobility is an inherent component of the Fcb2 functioning. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Degradation of heme in gram-negative bacteria: the product of the hemO gene of Neisseriae is a heme oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Wilks, A; Stojiljkovic, I

    2000-12-01

    A full-length heme oxygenase gene from the gram-negative pathogen Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of the enzyme yielded soluble catalytically active protein and caused accumulation of biliverdin within the E. coli cells. The purified HemO forms a 1:1 complex with heme and has a heme protein spectrum similar to that previously reported for the purified heme oxygenase (HmuO) from the gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae and for eukaryotic heme oxygenases. The overall sequence identity between HemO and these heme oxygenases is, however, low. In the presence of ascorbate or the human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase system, the heme-HemO complex is converted to ferric-biliverdin IXalpha and carbon monoxide as the final products. Homologs of the hemO gene were identified and characterized in six commensal Neisseria isolates, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flava, Neisseria polysacchareae, Neisseria kochii, and Neisseria cinerea. All HemO orthologs shared between 95 and 98% identity in amino acid sequences with functionally important residues being completely conserved. This is the first heme oxygenase identified in a gram-negative pathogen. The identification of HemO as a heme oxygenase provides further evidence that oxidative cleavage of the heme is the mechanism by which some bacteria acquire iron for further use.

  17. The heme-regulatory motif of nuclear receptor Rev-erbβ is a key mediator of heme and redox signaling in circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Carter, Eric L; Ramirez, Yanil; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2017-07-07

    Rev-erbβ is a heme-responsive transcription factor that regulates genes involved in circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism, effectively bridging these critical cellular processes. Heme binding to Rev-erbβ indirectly facilitates its interaction with the nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR1), resulting in repression of Rev-erbβ target genes. Fe(3+)-heme binds in a 6-coordinate complex with axial His and Cys ligands, the latter provided by a heme-regulatory motif (HRM). Rev-erbβ was thought to be a heme sensor based on a weak Kd value for the Rev-erbβ·heme complex of 2 μm determined with isothermal titration calorimetry. However, our group demonstrated with UV-visible difference titrations that the Kd value is in the low nanomolar range, and the Fe(3+)-heme off-rate is on the order of 10(-6) s(-1) making Rev-erbβ ineffective as a sensor of Fe(3+)-heme. In this study, we dissected the kinetics of heme binding to Rev-erbβ and provided a Kd for Fe(3+)-heme of ∼0.1 nm Loss of the HRM axial thiolate via redox processes, including oxidation to a disulfide with a neighboring cysteine or dissociation upon reduction of Fe(3+)- to Fe(2+)-heme, decreased binding affinity by >20-fold. Furthermore, as measured in a co-immunoprecipitation assay, substitution of the His or Cys heme ligands in Rev-erbβ was accompanied by a significant loss of NCoR1 binding. These results demonstrate the importance of the Rev-erbβ HRM in regulating interactions with heme and NCoR1 and advance our understanding of how signaling through HRMs affects the major cellular processes of circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Giardia intestinalis incorporates heme into cytosolic cytochrome b₅.

    PubMed

    Pyrih, Jan; Harant, Karel; Martincová, Eva; Sutak, Robert; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Hrdý, Ivan; Tachezy, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic intestinal pathogen Giardia intestinalis does not possess enzymes for heme synthesis, and it also lacks the typical set of hemoproteins that are involved in mitochondrial respiration and cellular oxygen stress management. Nevertheless, G. intestinalis may require heme for the function of particular hemoproteins, such as cytochrome b5 (cytb5). We have analyzed the sequences of eukaryotic cytb5 proteins and identified three distinct cytb5 groups: group I, which consists of C-tail membrane-anchored cytb5 proteins; group II, which includes soluble cytb5 proteins; and group III, which comprises the fungal cytb5 proteins. The majority of eukaryotes possess both group I and II cytb5 proteins, whereas three Giardia paralogs belong to group II. We have identified a fourth Giardia cytb5 paralog (gCYTb5-IV) that is rather divergent and possesses an unusual 134-residue N-terminal extension. Recombinant Giardia cytb5 proteins, including gCYTb5-IV, were expressed in Escherichia coli and exhibited characteristic UV-visible spectra that corresponded to heme-loaded cytb5 proteins. The expression of the recombinant gCYTb5-IV in G. intestinalis resulted in the increased import of extracellular heme and its incorporation into the protein, whereas this effect was not observed when gCYTb5-IV containing a mutated heme-binding site was expressed. The electrons for Giardia cytb5 proteins may be provided by the NADPH-dependent Tah18-like oxidoreductase GiOR-1. Therefore, GiOR-1 and cytb5 may constitute a novel redox system in G. intestinalis. To our knowledge, G. intestinalis is the first anaerobic eukaryote in which the presence of heme has been directly demonstrated.

  19. The Quantum Mathematical Modelling of Adsorption of Atoms on Heme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza; Devi, V. R.; Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    2008-01-01

    The heme group is known to be primarily responsible for the breathing system. We generate the heme group by using density functional theory and by using the protons, neutrons and the electrons. We use the electron-electron repulsive Coulomb interaction, the electron-proton attractive interaction as well as the nuclear-nuclear attractive interaction. It is said that people who have heart problems should eat less salt. Therefore, we calculate the adsorption of several atoms of Na, one at a time, on the heme molecule. We wanted to reduce the effect of Na adsorption, so we calculated the adsorption of Li atoms on the heme group. We compare the adsorption energy of Na with that of Li on heme group. We find that the Na and Li adsorption curves cross. Therefore, the effect of Li is to reduce the effect of Na. Therefore, a special salt can be made which has a small quantity of Li added to the ordinary table salt. This kind of salt can be useful for the people who are suffereing with heart problems. Our calculation is done by using simulation of molecules in the computer and hence it is a low cost and fast yielding method. We optimized the geometry of a heme molecule with and without Na and Li atoms. Our calculated bond distance are in agreement with those known. The quantity of salt is determined by the number of Na atoms adsorbed in the centre of the porphyrin rings. We solve the quantum mechanical Schroedinger equation for all of the electrons. The minimum energy configuration is determined which gives the bond distances and angles. After the geometry of the molecule is determined we obtain the bond energy of the full system.

  20. The heme oxygenase system and its functions in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maines, M D

    2000-05-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) system was identified in the early 1970s as a distinct microsomal enzyme system that catalyzes formation of bile pigments (Maines and Kappas, 1974). Up to the early 1990s the system was considered only as a "molecular wrecking ball" (Lane, 1998) for degradation of the heme molecule and production of toxic waste products, CO and bile pigments. For those years, the HO system remained relatively unknown to the research community. In a rather short span of the past 10 years following the discovery of high levels of a second form of the enzyme, HO-2, in the brain, suggesting that "heme oxygenase in the brain has functions aside from heme degradation" (Sun et al., 1990); concomitant with finding that another toxic gas, NO, is a signal molecule for generation of cGMP (Ignarro et al., 1982), the system was propelled into main stream research. This propulsion was fueled by the realization of the multiple and diverse functions of heme degradation products. Heme oxygenase has now found relevance in all kinds of human pathophysiology ranging from stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and malaria to transplantation and immune response. As it turns out, its potential benefits are mesmerizing investigators in diverse fields (Lane, 1998). The most recent findings with HO-2 being a hemoprotein and potentially an intracellular "sink" for NO (McCoubrey et al., 1997a; Ding et al., 1999), together with the discovery of the third form of the enzyme, HO-3 (McCoubrey et al., 1997b), are likely to insure the widespread interest in the enzyme system in the coming years. The present review is intended to highlight molecular properties of HO isozymes and their likely functions in the brain. Extended reviews of the system are found in Maines (1992, 1997).

  1. Developmental expression of heme oxygenase in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Dennery, Phyllis A; Lee, Christen S; Ford, Berendera S; Weng, Yi-Hao; Yang, Guang; Rodgers, Pamela A

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of bilirubin, is expressed in the lung and may serve as an antioxidant. This enzyme results in the formation of antioxidant bile pigments and the degradation of pro-oxidant heme. We wanted to evaluate the differences in expression of HO-1, the inducible form, and HO-2, the constitutive isoenzyme, during lung maturation and document whether lung HO expression was similar to that of other antioxidant enzymes. Lung total HO activity and HO-1 and HO-2 proteins as well as HO-1 and HO-2 mRNA were evaluated in animals from 16 d of gestation (e(16.5)) to 2 mo of age. Heme content was also evaluated because heme is the substrate of the reaction. HO-1 mRNA was maximal at e(19.5) and e(20.5), whereas HO-2 mRNA was not changed throughout maturation. Lung HO-1 protein was highest on the first days of life and lowest in adults, whereas HO-2 protein was maximally expressed at postnatal d 5 and then declined to reach adult values. As to HO activity, there was a prenatal peak at e(20.5), a second lesser peak at d 5, and thereafter a decline to adult values. Lung heme content was inversely correlated with HO activity or protein as the highest heme values were seen in adults with the lowest HO activity. In response to hyperoxia, HO-1 mRNA was induced only in the adult lungs. A better understanding of the maturational regulation of lung HO will define a role for HO in newborns at risk for oxygen toxicity.

  2. Over-expression of Multi-heme C-type Cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Lin, Chiann Tso; Markillie, Lye Meng; Squier, Thomas C.; Hooker, Brian S.

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT-Because they contain covalently attached hemes, c-type cytochromes, especially those with multi-heme, are difficult to over-express. The gram negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been successfully used for over-expression of multi-heme c-type cytochromes...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease associated... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862....1410 Iron (non-heme) test system. (a) Identification. An iron (non-heme) test system is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease associated... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862....1410 Iron (non-heme) test system. (a) Identification. An iron (non-heme) test system is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease associated... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862....1410 Iron (non-heme) test system. (a) Identification. An iron (non-heme) test system is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis (a disease associated... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862....1410 Iron (non-heme) test system. (a) Identification. An iron (non-heme) test system is a device...

  7. AN INTEGRATED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDY OF ARSENITE ACTION 2. HEME OXYGENASE INDUCTION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and its activity has a significant impact on intracellular heme pools. Rat studies indicate that HO induction is a sensitive, dose-dependent response to arsenite (AsIII) exposure in both liver and kidney. The o...

  8. Heme-Oxygenases during Erythropoiesis in K562 and Human Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Liliane R.; Costa, Elaine S.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L.; Teodosio, Cristina; Bárcena, Paloma; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, heme can be degraded by heme-oxygenases (HO). Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is known to be the heme inducible isoform, whereas heme-oxygenase 2 (HO-2) is the constitutive enzyme. Here we investigated the presence of HO during erythroid differentiation in human bone marrow erythroid precursors and K562 cells. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were below limits of detection in K562 cells. Moreover, heme was unable to induce HO-1, at the protein and mRNA profiles. Surprisingly, HO-2 expression was inhibited upon incubation with heme. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these findings, we analyzed HO expression during normal erythropoiesis in human bone marrow. Erythroid precursors were characterized by lack of significant expression of HO-1 and by progressive reduction of HO-2 during differentiation. FLVCR expression, a recently described heme exporter found in erythroid precursors, was also analyzed. Interestingly, the disruption in the HO detoxification system was accompanied by a transient induction of FLVCR. It will be interesting to verify if the inhibition of HO expression, that we found, is preventing a futile cycle of concomitant heme synthesis and catabolism. We believe that a significant feature of erythropoiesis could be the replacement of heme breakdown by heme exportation, as a mechanism to prevent heme toxicity. PMID:21765894

  9. Like iron in the blood of the people: the requirement for heme trafficking in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Korolnek, Tamara; Hamza, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellular compartments as well as possible mechanisms for the mobilization of heme to these compartments. We also discuss how these trafficking pathways might function during physiological events involving inter- and intra-cellular mobilization of heme, including erythropoiesis, erythrophagocytosis, heme absorption in the gut, as well as heme transport pathways supporting embryonic development. Lastly, we aim to question the current dogma that heme, in toto, is not mobilized from one cell or tissue to another, outlining the evidence for these pathways and drawing parallels to other well-accepted paradigms for copper, iron, and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:24926267

  10. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  11. Parallels in lignin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Banks, Jo Ann

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of vascular plants is the development of a complex water-conducting system, which is physically reinforced by the heterogeneous aromatic polymer lignin. Syringyl lignin, a major building block of lignin, is often thought to be uniquely characteristic of angiosperms; however, it was demonstrated over fifty years ago that that syringyl lignin is found in another group of plants, known as the lycophytes, the ancestors of which diverged from all the other vascular plant lineages 400 million years ago.1 To determine the biochemical basis for this common biosynthetic ability, we isolated and characterized cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (P450s) from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and compared them to the enzyme that is required for syringyl lignin synthesis in angiosperms. Our results showed that one of these P450s encodes an enzyme that is functionally analogous to but phylogenetically independent from its angiosperm counterpart. Here, we discuss the evolution of lignin biosynthesis in vascular plants and the role of Selaginella moellendorffii in plant comparative biology and genomics. PMID:19704782

  12. Biosynthesis of Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gong-Li; Tang, Man-Cheng; Song, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloids are naturally occurring antibiotics isolated from a variety of microorganisms and marine invertebrates. This family of natural products exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial and strong antitumor activities, and the potency of clinical application has been validated by the marketing of ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) as anticancer drug. In the past 20 years, the biosynthetic gene cluster of six THIQ antibiotics has been characterized including saframycin Mx1 from Myxococcus xanthus, safracin-B from Pseudomonas fluorescens, saframycin A, naphthyridinomycin, and quinocarcin from Streptomyces, as well as ET-743 from Ecteinascidia turbinata. This review gives a brief summary of the current status in understanding the molecular logic for the biosynthesis of these natural products, which provides new insights on the biosynthetic machinery involved in the nonribosomal peptide synthetase system. The proposal of the THIQ biosynthetic pathway not only shows nature's route to generate such complex molecules, but also set the stage to develop a different process for production of ET-743 by synthetic biology.

  13. A new mode for heme-heme interactions in hemoglobin associated with distal perturbations.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, A; Sharma, V S; Zhang, L; Rifkind, J M

    1992-01-01

    The distal side of the heme pocket, known to regulate ligand affinity, is shown to be directly involved in subunit interactions. Valency hybrids with oxygen or carbon monoxide bound to the reduced chain are used to model R-state hemoglobin with different distal perturbations. Electron paramagnetic resonance of the oxidized chains shows that the carbon monoxide perturbation is transmitted between subunits to the distal histidine and the oxidized iron center. A comparison of hybrids with only one type of chain oxidized and hybrids with a single alpha beta dimer oxidized is consistent with this perturbation being transmitted across the alpha 1 beta 1 interface. This represents a new mode of subunit interactions in hemoglobin. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:1324020

  14. Heme Mediated STAT3 Activation in Severe Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingli; Amodu, Audu S.; Pitts, Sidney; Patrickson, John; Hibbert, Jacqueline M.; Battle, Monica; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Stiles, Jonathan K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The mortality of severe malaria [cerebral malaria (CM), severe malaria anemia (SMA), acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)] remains high despite the availability associated with adequate treatments. Recent studies in our laboratory and others have revealed a hitherto unknown correlation between chemokine CXCL10/CXCR3, Heme/HO-1 and STAT3 and cerebral malaria severity and mortality. Although Heme/HO-1 and CXCL10/CXCR3 interactions are directly involved in the pathogenesis of CM and fatal disease, the mechanism dictating how Heme/HO-1 and CXCL10/CXCR3 are expressed and regulated under these conditions is still unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that these factors share common signaling pathways and may be mutually regulated. Methods We first clarified the roles of Heme/HO-1, CXCL10/CXCR3 and STAT3 in CM pathogenesis utilizing a well established experimental cerebral malaria mouse (ECM, P. berghei ANKA) model. Then, we further determined the mechanisms how STAT3 regulates HO-1 and CXCL10 as well as mutual regulation among them in CRL-2581, a murine endothelial cell line. Results The results demonstrate that (1) STAT3 is activated by P. berghei ANKA (PBA) infection in vivo and Heme in vitro. (2) Heme up-regulates HO-1 and CXCL10 production through STAT3 pathway, and regulates CXCL10 at the transcriptional level in vitro. (3) HO-1 transcription is positively regulated by CXCL10. (4) HO-1 regulates STAT3 signaling. Conclusion Our data indicate that Heme/HO-1, CXCL10/CXCR3 and STAT3 molecules as well as related signaling pathways play very important roles in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. We conclude that these factors are mutually regulated and provide new opportunities to develop potential novel therapeutic targets that could be used to supplement traditional prophylactics and treatments for malaria and improve clinical outcomes while reducing malaria mortality. Our ultimate goal is to develop novel therapies

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal inflammation: a short review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Kung, Hsiangfu; Lin, Marie Cm

    2011-10-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catalyzes heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A growing body of evidence indicates that HO-1 activation may play an important protective role in acute and chronic inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal inflammation studied to date. The ability to upregulate HO-1 by pharmacological means or using gene therapy may offer therapeutic strategies for gastrointestinal inflammation in the future.

  16. The Structure of the Complex between Yeast Frataxin and Ferrochelatase: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRE-STEADY STATE REACTION OF FERROUS IRON DELIVERY AND HEME SYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Christopher; Gillam, Mallory E; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Hunter, Gregory A; Gakh, Oleksandr; Isaya, Grazia; Ferreira, Gloria C; Al-Karadaghi, Salam

    2016-05-27

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial iron-binding protein involved in iron storage, detoxification, and delivery for iron sulfur-cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. The ability of frataxin from different organisms to populate multiple oligomeric states in the presence of metal ions, e.g. Fe(2+) and Co(2+), led to the suggestion that different oligomers contribute to the functions of frataxin. Here we report on the complex between yeast frataxin and ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Protein-protein docking and cross-linking in combination with mass spectroscopic analysis and single-particle reconstruction from negatively stained electron microscopic images were used to verify the Yfh1-ferrochelatase interactions. The model of the complex indicates that at the 2:1 Fe(2+)-to-protein ratio, when Yfh1 populates a trimeric state, there are two interaction interfaces between frataxin and the ferrochelatase dimer. Each interaction site involves one ferrochelatase monomer and one frataxin trimer, with conserved polar and charged amino acids of the two proteins positioned at hydrogen-bonding distances from each other. One of the subunits of the Yfh1 trimer interacts extensively with one subunit of the ferrochelatase dimer, contributing to the stability of the complex, whereas another trimer subunit is positioned for Fe(2+) delivery. Single-turnover stopped-flow kinetics experiments demonstrate that increased rates of heme production result from monomers, dimers, and trimers, indicating that these forms are most efficient in delivering Fe(2+) to ferrochelatase and sustaining porphyrin metalation. Furthermore, they support the proposal that frataxin-mediated delivery of this potentially toxic substrate overcomes formation of reactive oxygen species.

  17. Mechanism of inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis by azole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Egbuta, Chinaza; Lo, Jessica; Ghosh, Debashis

    2014-12-01

    Biosynthesis of estrogens from androgens is catalyzed by cytochrome P450 aromatase. Aromatase inhibition by the triazole compounds letrozole (LTZ) and anastrozole is a prevalent therapy for estrogen-dependent postmenopausal breast cancer. Azoles are widely used as agricultural fungicides and antimycotic drugs that target 14α-demethylase. Some were previously shown to inhibit aromatase, thereby raising the possibility of endocrine disruptive effects. However, mechanistic analysis of their inhibition has never been undertaken. We have evaluated the inhibitory effects of 3 common fungicides, bifonazole, imazalil, and flusilazole, in human aromatase purified from placenta and compared them with LTZ, the most potent inhibitor of aromatase. Bifonazole exhibits strong inhibitory effects with an IC50 of 270nM and Ki (Michaeles-Menten inhibition constant) of 68nM, compared with 10nM and 13nM, respectively, for LTZ. The IC50 and Ki are 1100nM and 278nM for imazilil and 3200nM and 547nM for flusilazole, respectively. Analyses of inhibition kinetics suggest that the modes of inhibition by azole fungicides are mixed or competitive, whereas LTZ inhibition could be noncompetitive or mixed. We interpret the inhibition mechanism in the context of the x-ray structure of aromatase-androstenedione complex. Structural data show that aromatase has 3 binding pockets in relation to the heme. The substrate-binding cavity at the heme-distal site closely compliments the structures of the natural substrate, androstenedione, and steroidal aromatase inhibitors. Because the structures of LTZ and the azole fungicides are entirely dissimilar to the androstenedione backbone, the azoles possibly inhibit by binding to a structurally rearranged active site, the 2 other catalytically important sites, or both, in agreement with the kinetics data.

  18. The interaction of heme with plakortin and a synthetic endoperoxide analogue: new insights into the heme-activated antimalarial mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Persico, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Chianese, Giuseppina; de Paola, Ivan; Zaccaro, Laura; Rondinelli, Francesca; Lombardo, Marco; Quintavalla, Arianna; Trombini, Claudio; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Fattorusso, Caterina; Farina, Biancamaria

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we performed a combined experimental and computational study on the interaction of the natural antimalarial endoperoxide plakortin and its synthetic analogue 4a with heme. Obtained results indicate that the studied compounds produce reactive carbon radical species after being reductively activated by heme. In particular, similarly to artemisinin, the formation of radicals prone to inter-molecular reactions should represent the key event responsible for Plasmodium death. To our knowledge this is the first experimental investigation on the reductive activation of simple antimalarial endoperoxides (1,2-dioxanes) by heme and results were compared to the ones previously obtained from the reaction with FeCl2. The obtained experimental data and the calculated molecular interaction models represent crucial tools for the rational optimization of our promising class of low-cost synthetic antimalarial endoperoxides. PMID:28383076

  19. The interaction of heme with plakortin and a synthetic endoperoxide analogue: new insights into the heme-activated antimalarial mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Chianese, Giuseppina; de Paola, Ivan; Zaccaro, Laura; Rondinelli, Francesca; Lombardo, Marco; Quintavalla, Arianna; Trombini, Claudio; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Fattorusso, Caterina; Farina, Biancamaria

    2017-04-01

    In the present work we performed a combined experimental and computational study on the interaction of the natural antimalarial endoperoxide plakortin and its synthetic analogue 4a with heme. Obtained results indicate that the studied compounds produce reactive carbon radical species after being reductively activated by heme. In particular, similarly to artemisinin, the formation of radicals prone to inter-molecular reactions should represent the key event responsible for Plasmodium death. To our knowledge this is the first experimental investigation on the reductive activation of simple antimalarial endoperoxides (1,2-dioxanes) by heme and results were compared to the ones previously obtained from the reaction with FeCl2. The obtained experimental data and the calculated molecular interaction models represent crucial tools for the rational optimization of our promising class of low-cost synthetic antimalarial endoperoxides.

  20. Role of the Iron Axial Ligands of Heme Carrier HasA in Heme Uptake and Release*

    PubMed Central

    Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Piccioli, Mario; Turano, Paola; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Wolff, Nicolas; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Izadi-Pruneyre, Nadia; Delepierre, Muriel; Lecroisey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The hemophore protein HasA from Serratia marcescens cycles between two states as follows: the heme-bound holoprotein, which functions as a carrier of the metal cofactor toward the membrane receptor HasR, and the heme-free apoprotein fishing for new porphyrin to be taken up after the heme has been delivered to HasR. Holo- and apo-forms differ for the conformation of the two loops L1 and L2, which provide the axial ligands of the iron through His32 and Tyr75, respectively. In the apo-form, loop L1 protrudes toward the solvent far away from loop L2; in the holoprotein, closing of the loops on the heme occurs upon establishment of the two axial coordination bonds. We have established that the two variants obtained via single point mutations of either axial ligand (namely H32A and Y75A) are both in the closed conformation. The presence of the heme and one out of two axial ligands is sufficient to establish a link between L1 and L2, thanks to the presence of coordinating solvent molecules. The latter are stabilized in the iron coordination environment by H-bond interactions with surrounding protein residues. The presence of such a water molecule in both variants is revealed here through a set of different spectroscopic techniques. Previous studies had shown that heme release and uptake processes occur via intermediate states characterized by a Tyr75-iron-bound form with open conformation of loop L1. Here, we demonstrate that these states do not naturally occur in the free protein but can only be driven by the interaction with the partner proteins. PMID:22700962

  1. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

    PubMed

    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  2. Kinetics of nitric oxide dissociation from five- and six-coordinate nitrosyl hemes and heme proteins, including soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, V G; Sharma, V S; Magde, D; Koesling, D

    1997-06-03

    Kinetics of NO dissociation were characterized for three five-coordinate systems, heme-NO, HSA-heme-NO (human serum albumin), GC-NO (soluble guanylate cyclase), and for the six-coordinate system, Im-heme-NO. Nitrosyl myoglobin was redetermined for comparison. Previously known, six-coordinate R and T state nitrosyl hemoglobins are also included in the comparison. The data indicate that NO dissociates more than 1000 times faster from five-coordinate model heme than it does from the six-coordinate analog. Such a negative trans-effect between NO and a proximal base is in sharp contrast to carboxy heme derivatives, in which ligand dissociation rates are greatly slowed in when a trans base is present. As a result of opposite trans-effects, six-coordinate carboxy and nitrosyl derivatives have comparable dissociation rates, even though the five-coordinate species are very different. In proteins, five- and six-coordinate forms do not show a large difference in dissociation rates. Part of the reason may be due to different probabilities for geminate recombination in the different proteins, but this cannot explain all the facts. There must also be influences of the protein structure on bond-breaking rate constants themselves. With the exception of hemoglobin in the T state, nitrosyl guanylate cyclase shows the highest NO dissociation rate constant, k(obs) = 6 x 10(-4) s(-1). This would yield a half-life of about 2 min at 37 degrees C for dissociation of NO from GC-NO, a number that has implications for the mechanism of regulation of the activity of this key heme enzyme.

  3. Divergent non-heme iron enzymes in the nogalamycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Siitonen, Vilja; Selvaraj, Brinda; Niiranen, Laila; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Nogalamycin, an aromatic polyketide displaying high cytotoxicity, has a unique structure, with one of the carbohydrate units covalently attached to the aglycone via an additional carbon–carbon bond. The underlying chemistry, which implies a particularly challenging reaction requiring activation of an aliphatic carbon atom, has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unusual C5′′–C2 carbocyclization is catalyzed by the non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)–dependent SnoK in the biosynthesis of the anthracycline nogalamycin. The data are consistent with a mechanistic proposal whereby the Fe(IV) = O center abstracts the H5′′ atom from the amino sugar of the substrate, with subsequent attack of the aromatic C2 carbon on the radical center. We further show that, in the same metabolic pathway, the homologous SnoN (38% sequence identity) catalyzes an epimerization step at the adjacent C4′′ carbon, most likely via a radical mechanism involving the Fe(IV) = O center. SnoK and SnoN have surprisingly similar active site architectures considering the markedly different chemistries catalyzed by the enzymes. Structural studies reveal that the differences are achieved by minor changes in the alignment of the substrates in front of the reactive ferryl-oxo species. Our findings significantly expand the repertoire of reactions reported for this important protein family and provide an illustrative example of enzyme evolution. PMID:27114534

  4. Heme-Biosynthetic Porphobilinogen Deaminase Protects Aspergillus nidulans from Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengmin; Narukami, Toshiaki; Nameki, Misuzu; Ozawa, Tomoko; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have developed mechanisms to combat reactive nitrogen species (RNS); however, only a few of the fungal genes involved have been characterized. Here we screened RNS-resistant Aspergillus nidulans strains from fungal transformants obtained by introducing a genomic DNA library constructed in a multicopy vector. We found that the AN0121.3 gene (hemC) encodes a protein similar to the heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and facilitates RNS-tolerant fungal growth. The overproduction of PBG-D in A. nidulans promoted RNS tolerance, whereas PBG-D repression caused growth that was hypersensitive to RNS. PBG-D levels were comparable to those of cellular protoheme synthesis as well as flavohemoglobin (FHb; encoded by fhbA and fhbB) and nitrite reductase (NiR; encoded by niiA) activities. Both FHb and NiR are hemoproteins that consume nitric oxide and nitrite, respectively, and we found that they are required for maximal growth in the presence of RNS. The transcription of hemC was upregulated by RNS. These results demonstrated that PBG-D is a novel NO-tolerant protein that modulates the reduction of environmental NO and nitrite levels by FHb and NiR. PMID:22038601

  5. Inter-population differences in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation of juvenile wild and hatchery-born Sacramento splittail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verhille, Christine E.; Dabruzzi, Theresa F.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; Mahardja, Brian; Feyrer, Frederick V.; Foin, Theodore C.; Baerwald, Melinda R.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) is a minnow endemic to the highly modified San Francisco Estuary of California, USA and its associated rivers and tributaries. This species is composed of two genetically distinct populations, which, according to field observations and otolith strontium signatures, show largely allopatric distribution patterns as recently hatched juveniles. Juvenile Central Valley splittail are found primarily in the nearly fresh waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, whereas San Pablo juveniles are found in the typically higher-salinity waters (i.e. up to 10‰) of the Napa and Petaluma Rivers. As the large salinity differences between young-of-year habitats may indicate population-specific differences in salinity tolerance, we hypothesized that juvenile San Pablo and Central Valley splittail populations differ in their response to salinity. In hatchery-born and wild-caught juvenile San Pablo splittail, we found upper salinity tolerances, where mortalities occurred within 336 h of exposure to 16‰ or higher, which was higher than the upper salinity tolerance of 14‰ for wild-caught juvenile Central Valley splittail. This, in conjunction with slower recovery of plasma osmolality, but not ion levels, muscle moisture or gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity, in Central Valley relative to San Pablo splittail during osmoregulatory disturbance provides some support for our hypothesis of inter-population variation in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. The modestly improved salinity tolerance of San Pablo splittail is consistent with its use of higher-salinity habitats. Although confirmation of the putative adaptive difference through further studies is recommended, this may highlight the need for population-specific management considerations.

  6. Inter-population differences in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation of juvenile wild and hatchery-born Sacramento splittail

    PubMed Central

    Verhille, Christine E.; Dabruzzi, Theresa F.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; Mahardja, Brian; Feyrer, Frederick; Foin, Theodore C.; Baerwald, Melinda R.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) is a minnow endemic to the highly modified San Francisco Estuary of California, USA and its associated rivers and tributaries. This species is composed of two genetically distinct populations, which, according to field observations and otolith strontium signatures, show largely allopatric distribution patterns as recently hatched juveniles. Juvenile Central Valley splittail are found primarily in the nearly fresh waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, whereas San Pablo juveniles are found in the typically higher-salinity waters (i.e. up to 10‰) of the Napa and Petaluma Rivers. As the large salinity differences between young-of-year habitats may indicate population-specific differences in salinity tolerance, we hypothesized that juvenile San Pablo and Central Valley splittail populations differ in their response to salinity. In hatchery-born and wild-caught juvenile San Pablo splittail, we found upper salinity tolerances, where mortalities occurred within 336 h of exposure to 16‰ or higher, which was higher than the upper salinity tolerance of 14‰ for wild-caught juvenile Central Valley splittail. This, in conjunction with slower recovery of plasma osmolality, but not ion levels, muscle moisture or gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity, in Central Valley relative to San Pablo splittail during osmoregulatory disturbance provides some support for our hypothesis of inter-population variation in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. The modestly improved salinity tolerance of San Pablo splittail is consistent with its use of higher-salinity habitats. Although confirmation of the putative adaptive difference through further studies is recommended, this may highlight the need for population-specific management considerations. PMID:27293743

  7. Osmoregulation of gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium: proU encodes an osmotically induced betaine transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Cairney, J; Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1985-01-01

    Previous evidence has indicated that a gene, proU, is involved in the response of bacterial cells to growth at high osmolarity. Using Mu-mediated lacZ operon fusions we found that transcription of the proU gene of Salmonella typhimurium is stimulated over 100-fold in response to increases in external osmolarity. Our evidence suggests that changes in turgor pressure are responsible for these alterations in gene expression. Expression of proU is independent of the ompR gene, known to be involved in osmoregulation of porin expression. Thus, there must be at least two distinct mechanisms by which external osmolarity can influence gene expression. We show that there are relatively few genes in the cell which are under such osmotic control. The proU gene is shown to encode a high-affinity transport system (Km = 1.3 microM) for the osmoprotectant betaine, which is accumulated to high concentrations in response to osmotic stress. Even when fully induced, this transport system is only able to function in medium of high osmolarity. Thus, betaine transport is regulated by osmotic pressure at two levels: the induction of expression and by modulation of activity of the transport proteins. We have previously shown that the proP gene encodes a lower-affinity betaine transport system (J. Cairney, I. R. Booth, and C. F. Higgins, J. Bacteriol., 164:1218-1223, 1985). In proP proU strains, no saturable betaine uptake could be detected although there was a low-level nonsaturable component at high substrate concentrations. Thus, S. typhimurium has two genetically distinct pathways for betaine uptake, a constitutive low-affinity system (proP) and an osmotically induced high-affinity system (proU). PMID:3905768

  8. Investigations on the osmoregulation of freshwater fish (Oreochromis niloticus) following exposures to metals (Cd, Cu) in differing hardness.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Dilek; Atli, Gülüzar; Canli, Mustafa

    2013-06-01

    Hardness is one of the most important factors in water chemistry as it affects fish physiology and metal toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate osmoregulatory responses in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus exposed to copper and cadmium (1.0μg/mL) in soft water (SW) (hardness 80mg CaCO3/L and conductivity 1.77mS/cm) and hard water (HW) (hardness 320mg CaCO3/L and conductivity 5.80mS/cm) for 0, 1, 7 and 14 days. Following the exposures, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, ion and Cu levels in the gill, kidney and intestine were measured. There was no fish mortality within 14 days, except Cu exposure in SW which killed all fish between 8 and 12 days. Generally, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was altered by both metal exposures in the gill and kidney as it increased in HW condition, but decreased in SW condition. There were also alterations in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in the intestine as its activity generally decreased. Data, in general, showed that Cd was more effective on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity comparing to Cu. However, ion levels altered mainly in the kidney and intestine. Tissue metal accumulation was higher in fish tissues from SW condition comparing to HW condition. Data represented here showed that the effects of metals differed in differing water hardness. This suggests that special attention should be paid to the water chemistry when natural monitoring studies are carried out. This study also suggests that the response of osmoregulation system of fish may be a sensitive indicator under stressful conditions in different natural waters.

  9. Lipoic acid mitigates oxidative stress and recovers metabolic distortions in salt-stressed wheat seedlings by modulating ion homeostasis, the osmo-regulator level and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Gorcek, Zeynep; Erdal, Serkan

    2015-11-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most detrimental environmental factors affecting the growth of plants and limiting their agricultural productivity. This study investigated whether exogenous lipoic acid (LA) pretreatment plays a role in promoting salt tolerance in wheat seedlings. The seedlings were treated with LA (1.75 mmol L(-1)) and salt (100 mmol L(-1) NaCl) separately and a combination of them. Salt stress significantly reduced relative water content, leaf surface area, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase expression, and chlorophyll content but increased the content of osmo-regulator protein, carbohydrates and proline. In addition, salinity led to an imbalance in the inorganic composition of wheat leaves. While it elevated Na(+) content compared to control, Ca content and K(+)/Na(+) ratio were reduced. Under saline conditions, despite increases in antioxidant enzyme activity and levels of antioxidant compounds (ascorbate and glutathione), the content of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide) and malondialdehyde were higher than in control seedlings. LA significantly promoted osmo-regulator level and antioxidant enzyme activities compared to stressed seedlings alone. Also, it both increased levels of ascorbate and glutathione and regenerated their oxidised forms, thus contributing to maintaining cellular redox status. Similarly, LA prevented excessive accumulation of Na(+) and promoted K(+)/Na(+) ratio and Ca content. Reactive oxygen species content was significantly reduced, and the inhibitions in the above parameters markedly recovered. LA reduced salinity-induced oxidative damage and thus contributed to the growth and development of plants in saline soils by modulating ion homeostasis between plant and soil as well as in osmo-regulator content and antioxidant system. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Counteractive roles of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and a MAP kinase kinase homolog in the osmoregulation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, K; Russell, P

    1995-02-01

    With the goal of discovering the cellular functions of type 2C protein phosphatases, we have cloned and analyzed two ptc (phosphatase two C) genes, ptc2+ and ptc3+, from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Together with the previously identified ptc1+ gene, the enzymes encoded by these genes account for approximately 90% of the measurable PP2C activity in fission yeast cells. No obvious growth defects result from individual disruptions of ptc genes, but a delta ptc1 delta ptc3 double mutant displays aberrant cell morphology and temperature-sensitive cell lysis that is further accentuated in a delta ptc1 delta ptc2 delta ptc3 triple mutant. These phenotypes are almost completely suppressed by the presence of osmotic stabilizers, strongly indicating that PP2C has an important role in osmoregulation. Genetic suppression of delta ptc1 delta ptc3 lethality identified two loci, mutations of which render cells hypersensitive to high-osmolarity media. One locus is identical to wis1+, encoding a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) homolog. The Wis1 sequence is most closely related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEK encoded by PBS2, which is required for osmoregulation. These data indicate that divergent yeasts have functionally conserved MAP kinase pathways, which are required to increase intracellular osmotic concentrations in respon