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Sample records for osmotic minipump studies

  1. Replacement of osmotic minipumps to extend the intracerebral infusion time of compounds into the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grathwohl, Stefan A; Jucker, Mathias

    2013-08-01

    Osmotic minipumps represent a convenient and established method for targeted delivery of agents into the brain of small rodents. Agents unable to cross the blood brain barrier can be directly infused into the brain parenchyma or lateral ventricle through implanted cannulas. The small volume of the minipump reservoir typically limits the infusion time to 4-6 weeks. Pump changes with reattachment of a new pump reservoir to the cannula might lead to brain tissue irritation or increased intracranial pressure associated with hydrocephalus. Here, we describe a pump reservoir exchange technique using a Y-shaped connection piece (Y-con) between the infusion cannula and the pump reservoir. This allows repeated replacement of a subcutaneously installed pump reservoir for brain delivery of agents in mice. Experimental evaluation of Y-con pump replacement revealed no signs of tissue irritation or hydrocephalus and allowed extended controlled delivery of infusion agents in the brain.

  2. Olanzapine-induced weight gain: chronic infusion using osmotic minipumps does not result in stable plasma levels due to degradation of olanzapine in solution.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Adan, Roger A H; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2008-05-06

    The mechanisms underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain have not yet been fully elucidated. To examine the effects of long-term treatment with olanzapine on different aspects of energy balance, we administered olanzapine to male rats. Osmotic minipumps were chosen as preferred mode of administration because the half-life of olanzapine is only 2(1/2) h in rats compared to 30 h in humans. We discovered that, within one week, degradation of olanzapine occurred in the solution used to fill the minipump reservoir. This resulted in a decrease in delivered olanzapine and declining plasma levels over the course of the experiment. Therefore, we caution other researchers for the limitations of using osmotic minipumps to administer olanzapine for longer periods of time.

  3. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  4. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  5. Osmotic diuresis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001266.htm Osmotic diuresis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Osmotic diuresis is increased urination due to the presence of ...

  6. Studies of osmotic diarrhea induced in normal subjects by ingestion of polyethylene glycol and lactulose.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, H F; Santa Ana, C A; Schiller, L R; Fordtran, J S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of pure osmotic diarrhea and the osmotic diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption. Diarrhea was induced in normal volunteers by ingestion of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which is nonabsorbable, not metabolized by colonic bacteria, and carries no electrical charge. In PEG-induced diarrhea, (a) stool weight was directly correlated with the total mass of PEG ingested; (b) PEG contributed 40-60% of the osmolality of the fecal fluid, the remainder being contributed by other solutes either of dietary, endogenous, or bacterial origin; and (c) fecal sodium, potassium, and chloride were avidly conserved by the intestine, in spite of stool water losses exceeding 1,200 g/d. Diarrhea was also induced in normal subjects by ingestion of lactulose, a disaccharide that is not absorbed by the small intestine but is metabolized by colonic bacteria. In lactulose-induced diarrhea, (a) a maximum of approximate 80 g/d of lactulose was metabolized by colonic bacteria to noncarbohydrate moieties such as organic acids; (b) the organic acids were partially absorbed in the colon; (c) unabsorbed organic acids obligated the accumulation of inorganic cations (Na greater than Ca greater than K greater than Mg) in the diarrheal fluid; (d) diarrhea associated with low doses of lactulose was mainly due to unabsorbed organic acids and associated cations, whereas with larger doses of lactulose unmetabolized carbohydrates also played a major role; and (e) the net effect of bacterial metabolism of lactulose and partial absorption of organic acids on stool water output was done dependent. With low or moderate doses of lactulose, stool water losses were reduced by as much as 600 g/d (compared with equimolar osmotic loads of PEG); with large dose, the increment in osmotically active solutes within the lumen exceeded the increment of the ingested osmotic load, and the severity of diarrhea was augmented. PMID:2794043

  7. Filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic pore closure in erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodey, S V; Nikulina, O F

    2010-11-01

    Filterability of erythrocytes through small (3 μ) pores decreases with decreasing osmolarity of suspension medium because of hypo-osmotic swelling of cells. After appearance of lytic pores, erythrocyte filterability increases for some time, while after recovery of membrane integrity it decreases again. We suggest filtration method for studies of the kinetics of hypo-osmotic lytic pores closure. The dynamics of changes in erythrocyte filterability was studied in 2 patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and 6 donors (Ht 0.01%, Na phosphate buffer 5 mM, pH 7.4, 35 mOsm, 24°C). The method can be used for studies of erythrocyte membrane characteristics in various diseases and for evaluation of the membranotropic effects of drugs, infusion media, hemolysins, ethanol, etc.

  8. A study of the effect of sorbitol on osmotic tolerance during partial desiccation of bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, Ranjan; Fowler, Alex; Toner, Mehmet; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2010-06-01

    The goal of the study was to improve the partial desiccation survival of bovine sperm by decreasing the dehydration induced osmotic injury. The protective role of sorbitol, a polyol, was investigated by (i) studying the osmotic behavior of sperm in hypertonic Tyrode's buffer in the presence of sorbitol and trehalose, (ii) studying the effect of sorbitol and trehalose on sperm motility following partial dehydration. The osmotic behavior studies included the assessment of motility and volumetric responses in the presence of the additives. For the drying experiments, motility was assayed after drying the samples to different end water content followed by immediate rehydration. Compared to the effect of "intracellular+extracellular" trehalose alone, results showed a much improved motility in the presence of sorbitol and trehalose. While the drying results suggest an enhanced osmotolerance in the presence of sorbitol, the study of motility under hypertonic conditions combined with the sperm volume excursion experiments suggest that sorbitol imparts the enhancement by permeating into the cell cytoplasm.

  9. Fabrication and study of AC electro-osmotic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin

    In this thesis, microelectrode arrays of micropumps have been designed, fabricated and characterized for transporting microfluid by AC electro-osmosis (ACEO). In particular, the 3D stepped electrode design which shows superior performance to others in literature is adopted for making micropumps, and the performance of such devices has been studied and explored. A novel fabrication process has also been developed in the work, realizing 3D stepped electrodes on a flexible substrate, which is suitable for biomedical use, for example glaucoma implant. There are three major contributions to ACEO pumping in the work. First, a novel design of 3D "T-shaped" discrete electrode arrays was made using PolyMUMPsRTM process. The breakthrough of this work was discretizing the continuous 3D stepped electrodes which were commonly seen in the past research. The "T-shaped" electrodes did not only create ACEO flows on the top surfaces of electrodes but also along the side walls between separated electrodes. Secondly, four 3D stepped electrode arrays were designed, fabricated and tested. It was found from the experiment that PolyMUMPsRTM ACEO electrodes usually required a higher driving voltage than gold electrodes for operation. It was also noticed that a simulation based on the modified model taking into account the surface oxide of electrodes showed a better agreement with the experimental results. It thus demonstrated the possibility that the surface oxide of electrodes had impact on fluidic pumping. This methodology could also be applied to metal electrodes with a native oxide layer such as titanium and aluminum. Thirdly, a prototype of the ACEO pump with 3D stepped electrode arrays was first time realized on a flexible substrate using Kapton polyimide sheets and packaged with PDMS encapsulants. Comprehensive experimental testing was also conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties as well as the pumping performance. The experimental findings indicated that this fabrication

  10. Direct-push-installed, gas-driven mini-pumps for discrete-point groundwater sampling: A new in-situ approach to long-term monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeister, M. K.; Birk, S. M.; Healey, J. M.; Butler, J. J.; Whittemore, D. O.

    2001-12-01

    Discrete-point sampling is important for a variety of hydrogeological investigations. A new approach to vertical chemical profiling has been developed in which low-volume mini-pump samplers (MPS) are installed in a single borehole using direct-push methods. The new, positive-displacement, gas-driven mini-pumps overcome sampling depth limitations of conventional suction pumps. Up to ten pumps can be simultaneously operated using a multi-channel pneumatic controller that drives water to the surface through alternating pressurization and depressurization pulses. By combining direct-push chemical profiling with MPS installation, the pumps may be placed at the most appropriate depths for a particular investigation. This study assessed the potential of the new approach in an alluvial aquifer that has been the site of a great deal of previous work. Two sets of mini-pump samplers, comprised of four pumps each, were installed in an interval characterized by a steep chemical gradient. The MPS installations were placed within one meter of conventional multilevel samplers with similar intake depths. Chemical field parameters (DO, pH, ORP, conductivity and temperature) and dissolved constituent concentrations (NO3, SO4, Cl, Fe and Mn) were measured in the two sets of paired samplers. Although the vertical chemical trends observed in the multilevel samplers were also observed in MPS installed using direct-push rods composed of nitrided steel, redox sensitive measurements from the MPS were affected by installation with standard steel rods. The combination of MPS installation and direct-push characterization allows for repeat sampling of intervals of interest without the need for permanent wells. Ongoing work addresses the long-term performance of the MPS.

  11. Powering an Implantable Minipump with a Multi-layered Printed Circuit Coil for Drug Infusion Applications in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Givrad, Tina K.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Moore, William H.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of a multi-layer printed coil circuit for powering (36–94 mW) an implantable microbolus infusion pump (MIP) that can be activated remotely for use in drug infusion in nontethered, freely moving small animals. This implantable device provides a unique experimental tool with applications in the fields of animal behavior, pharmacology, physiology, and functional brain imaging. Two different designs are described: a battery-less pump usable when the animal is inside a home-cage surrounded by a primary inductive coil and a pump powered by a rechargeable battery that can be used for studies outside the homecage. The use of printed coils for powering of small devices by inductive power transfer presents significant advantages over similar approaches using hand-wound coils in terms of ease of manufacturing and uniformity of design. The high efficiency of a class-E oscillator allowed powering of the minipumps without the need for close physical contact of the primary and secondary coils, as is currently the case for most devices powered by inductive power transfer. PMID:20033778

  12. Powering an implantable minipump with a multi-layered printed circuit coil for drug infusion applications in rodents.

    PubMed

    Givrad, Tina K; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Moore, William H; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2010-03-01

    We report the use of a multi-layer printed coil circuit for powering (36-94 mW) an implantable microbolus infusion pump (MIP) that can be activated remotely for use in drug infusion in nontethered, freely moving small animals. This implantable device provides a unique experimental tool with applications in the fields of animal behavior, pharmacology, physiology, and functional brain imaging. Two different designs are described: a battery-less pump usable when the animal is inside a home-cage surrounded by a primary inductive coil and a pump powered by a rechargeable battery that can be used for studies outside the home-cage. The use of printed coils for powering of small devices by inductive power transfer presents significant advantages over similar approaches using hand-wound coils in terms of ease of manufacturing and uniformity of design. The high efficiency of a class-E oscillator allowed powering of the minipumps without the need for close physical contact of the primary and secondary coils, as is currently the case for most devices powered by inductive power transfer.

  13. Quantitative examination of a perfusion microscope for the study of osmotic response of cells.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Komori, Yuichi; Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Fujii, Motoo

    2004-08-01

    The perfusion microscope was developed for the study of the osmotic response of cells. In this microscope, the cells are immobilized in a transparent chamber mounted on the stage and exposed to a variety of milieus by perfusing the chamber with solutions of different concentrations. The concentration of the supplied solution is controlled using two variable-speed syringe pumps, which supply an isotonic solution and a hypertonic solution. Before using this system to characterize the osmotic response of cells, the change in the concentration of NaCl solution flowing through the chamber is examined quantitatively using a laser interferometer and an image processing technique. The NaCl concentration is increased from an isotonic condition to a hypertonic condition abruptly or gradually at a given constant rate, and decreased from a hypertonic condition to an isotonic condition. It is confirmed that the concentration is nearly uniform in the cross direction at the middle of the chamber, and the change in the NaCl concentration is reproducible. The average rate of increase or decrease in the measured concentration agrees fairly well with the given rate when the concentration is changed gradually at a constant rate. The rate of the abrupt change is also determined to be the highest limit achieved by the present method. As the first application of using the perfusion microscope for biological studies, the volume change of cells after exposure to a hypertonic solution is measured. Then, the hydraulic conductivity of the cell membrane is determinedfrom the comparison of the volume change between the experiment and the theoretical estimation for the measured change in the NaCl concentration of the perfused solution.

  14. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M.; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10−3 cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50–150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  15. Role of Osmotic Adjustment in Plant Productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gebre, G.M.

    2001-01-11

    Successful implementation of short rotation woody crops requires that the selected species and clones be productive, drought tolerant, and pest resistant. Since water is one of the major limiting factors in poplar (Populus sp.) growth, there is little debate for the need of drought tolerant clones, except on the wettest of sites (e.g., lower Columbia River delta). Whether drought tolerance is compatible with productivity remains a debatable issue. Among the many mechanisms of drought tolerance, dehydration postponement involves the maintenance of high leaf water potential due to, for example, an adequate root system. This trait is compatible with productivity, but requires available soil moisture. When the plant leaf water potential and soil water content decline, the plant must be able to survive drought through dehydration tolerance mechanisms, such as low osmotic potential or osmotic adjustment. Osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potential are considered compatible with growth and yield because they aid in the maintenance of leaf turgor. However, it has been shown that turgor alone does not regulate cell expansion or stomatal conductance and, therefore, the role of osmotic adjustment is debated. Despite this finding, osmotic adjustment has been correlated with grain yield in agronomic crop species, and gene markers responsible for osmotic adjustment are being investigated to improve drought tolerance in productive progenies. Although osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potentials have been investigated in several forest tree species, few studies have investigated the relationship between osmotic adjustment and growth. Most of these studies have been limited to greenhouse or container-grown plants. Osmotic adjustment and rapid growth have been specifically associated in Populus and black spruce (Picea mariuna (Mill.) B.S.P.) progenies. We tested whether these relationships held under field conditions using several poplar clones. In a study of two hybrid poplar

  16. Studies of cell pellets: II. Osmotic properties, electroporation, and related phenomena: membrane interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Li, L H; Hui, S W

    1994-01-01

    Using the relations between pellet structure and electric properties derived from the preceding paper, the responses of rabbit erythrocyte pellets to osmotic or colloidal-osmotic effects from exchanged supernatants and from electroporation were investigated. Changing the ionic strength of the supernatant, or replacing it with dextran or poly(ethylene glycol) solutions, caused changes of Rp according to the osmotic behavior of the pellet. Rp was high and ohmic before electroporation, but dropped abruptly in the first few microseconds once the transmembrane voltage exceeded the membrane breakdown potential. After the initial drop, Rp increased as a result of the reduction of intercellular space. Rp increased regardless of whether the pellets were formed before or immediately after the pulse, indicating that porated cells experienced a slow colloidal-osmotic swelling. The intercellular or intermembrane distances between cells in a pellet, as a function of osmotic, colloidal-osmotic, and centrifugal pressures used to compress rabbit erythrocyte pellets, were deduced from the Rp measurement. This offered a unique opportunity to measure the intermembrane repulsive force in a disordered system including living cells. Electrohemolysis of pelleted cells was reduced because of limited swelling by the compactness of the pellet. Electrofusion was observed when the applied voltage per pellet membrane exceeded the breakdown voltage. The fusion yield was independent of pulse length greater than 10 microseconds, because after the breakdown of membrane resistance, voltage drop across the pellet became insignificant. Replacing the supernatant with poly(ethylene glycol) or dextran solutions, or coating pellets with unporated cell layers reduced the colloidal-osmotic swelling and hemolysis, but also reduced the electrofusion yield. These manipulations can be explored to increase electroloading and electrofusion efficiencies. PMID:7522598

  17. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-07

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules.

  18. Osmotic fragility test

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis - osmotic fragility; Thalassemia - osmotic fragility ... done to detect conditions called hereditary spherocytosis and thalassemia . Hereditary spherocytosis makes red blood cells more fragile ...

  19. Analytical and numerical study of the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Ferrás, L L; Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Nóbrega, J M; Pinho, F T

    2014-04-15

    In this work we present semi-analytical solutions for the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids modeled by the Linear and Exponential PTT models. The viscoelastic fluid flows in the axial direction between two concentric cylinders under the combined influences of electrokinetic and pressure forcings. The analysis invokes the Debye-Hückel approximation and includes the limit case of pure electro-osmotic flow. The solution is valid for both no slip and slip velocity at the walls and the chosen slip boundary condition is the linear Navier slip velocity model. The combined effects of fluid rheology, electro-osmotic and pressure gradient forcings on the fluid velocity distribution are also discussed.

  20. OSMOTIC PRESSURE STUDY OF PROTEIN FRACTIONS IN NORMAL AND IN NEPHROTIC SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Bourdillon, Jaques

    1939-01-01

    In serum of patients with nephrosis both albumin and globulin showed by osmotic pressure nearly double the molecular weights of normal albumin and globulin. In the urines of such patients, on the other hand, both proteins showed molecular weights lower even than in normal serum. The colloidal osmotic pressures were measured by the author's method at such dilutions that the van't Hoff law relating pressures to molecular concentrations could be directly applied. For the albumin and globulin of normal serum the molecular weights found were 72,000 and 164,000 respectively, in agreement with the weights obtained by other methods. PMID:19870879

  1. A study of the molecular sources of nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin solutions as a function of pH.

    PubMed

    Kanal, K M; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L

    1994-01-01

    The nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions was studied extensively by Scatchard and colleagues. The extent of pH- and salt-dependent nonideality changes are large and unexplained. In 1992, Fullerton et al. derived new empirical expressions to describe solution nonideal colligative properties including osmotic pressure (Fullerton et al. 1992. Biochem. Cell Biol. 70:1325-1331). These expressions are based on the concepts of volume occupancy and hydration force. Nonideality is accurately described by a solute/solvent interaction parameter I and an "effective" osmotic molecular weight Ae. This paper uses the interaction-corrected nonideal expressions for osmotic pressure to calculate the hydration I values and "effective" osmotic molecular weight of BSA, Ae, as a function of pH. Both factors vary in a predictable manner due to denaturing of the BSA molecule. Both contribute to an increase in osmotic pressure for the same protein concentration as the solution pH moves away from the isoelectric point. Increased nonideality is caused by larger hydration resulting from larger solvent-accessible surface areas and by the decrease in "effective" osmotic molecular weight, Ae, due to segmental motion of denatured (filamentous) molecules.

  2. A study of the molecular sources of nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin solutions as a function of pH.

    PubMed Central

    Kanal, K M; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L

    1994-01-01

    The nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions was studied extensively by Scatchard and colleagues. The extent of pH- and salt-dependent nonideality changes are large and unexplained. In 1992, Fullerton et al. derived new empirical expressions to describe solution nonideal colligative properties including osmotic pressure (Fullerton et al. 1992. Biochem. Cell Biol. 70:1325-1331). These expressions are based on the concepts of volume occupancy and hydration force. Nonideality is accurately described by a solute/solvent interaction parameter I and an "effective" osmotic molecular weight Ae. This paper uses the interaction-corrected nonideal expressions for osmotic pressure to calculate the hydration I values and "effective" osmotic molecular weight of BSA, Ae, as a function of pH. Both factors vary in a predictable manner due to denaturing of the BSA molecule. Both contribute to an increase in osmotic pressure for the same protein concentration as the solution pH moves away from the isoelectric point. Increased nonideality is caused by larger hydration resulting from larger solvent-accessible surface areas and by the decrease in "effective" osmotic molecular weight, Ae, due to segmental motion of denatured (filamentous) molecules. PMID:8130335

  3. Preliminary study of osmotic membrane bioreactor: effects of draw solution on water flux and air scouring on fouling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Kekre, Kiran A; Oo, Maung H; Tao, Guihe; Lay, Chee L; Lew, Cheun H; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary study on a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was explored. Objective of this study was to investigate the effects of draw solution on membrane flux and air scouring at the feed side on fouling tendency in a pilot OMBR system composing the anoxic/aerobic and forward osmosis (FO) processes. Domestic sewage was the raw feed, FO membrane from HTI and NaCl/MgSO4 draw solutions were used in the experiments. Fluxes of 3 l/m2/h (LMH) and 7.2 LMH were achieved at osmotic pressure of 5 and 22.4 atm, respectively. No significant flux decline was observed at 3 LMH over 190 h and at 7.2 LMH over 150 h when air scouring was provided at the feed side of the membrane. However, without air scouring, the flux at 22.4 atm osmotic pressure declined by 30% after 195 h and then levelled off. The potential advantages of the fouling reversibility with air scouring under the operating conditions of the pilot OMBR and better water quality in OMBR over the conventional MBR were preliminarily demonstrated.

  4. Osmotic stress and cryoinjury of koala sperm: an integrative study of the plasma membrane, chromatin stability and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Satake, N; Zee, Y; López-Fernández, C; Holt, W V; Gosálvez, J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether cryopreservation-induced injury to koala spermatozoa could be explained using an experimental model that mimics the structural and physiological effects of osmotic flux. DNA labelling after in situ nick translation of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa revealed a positive correlation (r=0.573; P<0.001; n=50) between the area of relaxed chromatin in the nucleus and the degree of nucleotide labelling. While the chromatin of some spermatozoa increased more than eight times its normal size, not all sperm nuclei with relaxed chromatin showed evidence of nucleotide incorporation. Preferential staining associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) was typically located in the peri-acrosomal and peripheral regions of the sperm head and at the base of the spermatozoa where it appear to be 'hot spots' of DNA damage following cryopreservation. Results of the comparative effects of anisotonic media and cryopreservation on the integrity of koala spermatozoa revealed that injury induced by exposure to osmotic flux, essentially imitated the results found following cryopreservation. Plasma membrane integrity, chromatin relaxation and SDF appeared particularly susceptible to extreme hypotonic environments. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while susceptible to extreme hypo- and hypertonic environments, showed an ability to rebound from hypertonic stress when returned to isotonic conditions. Koala spermatozoa exposed to 64 mOsm/kg media showed an equivalent, or more severe, degree of structural and physiological injury to that of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, supporting the hypothesis that cryoinjury is principally associated with a hypo-osmotic effect. A direct comparison of SDF of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa and those exposed to a 64 mOsm/kg excursion showed a significant correlation (r=0.878; P<0.05; n=5); however, no correlation was found when the percentage of sperm with relaxed chromatin was compared. While a cryo-induced osmotic

  5. Interaction between osmotic and oxidative stress in diabetic precataractous lens: studies with a sorbitol dehydrogenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obrosova, I G; Fathallah, L; Lang, H J

    1999-12-15

    Both sorbitol accumulation-linked osmotic stress and "pseudohypoxia" [increase in NADH/NAD+, similar to that in hypoxic tissues, and attributed to increased sorbitol dehydrogenase (1-iditol:NAD+ 5-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.14; SDH) activity] have been invoked among the mechanisms underlying oxidative injury in target tissues for diabetic complications. We used the specific SDH inhibitor SDI-157 [2-methyl-4(4-N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl-1-piperazino)pyrimid ine] to evaluate the role of osmotic stress versus "pseudohypoxia" in oxidative stress occurring in diabetic precataractous lens. Control and diabetic rats were treated with or without SDI-157 (100 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks). Lens malondialdehyde (MDA) plus 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HA), MDA, GSH, and ascorbate levels, as well as the GSSG/GSH ratios, were similar in SDI-treated and untreated control rats, thus indicating that SDI-157 was not a prooxidant. Intralenticular osmotic stress, manifested by sorbitol levels, was more severe in SDI-treated diabetic rats (38.2+/-6.8 vs 21.2+/-3.5 micromol/g in untreated diabetic and 0.758+/-0.222 micromol/g in control rats, P<0.01 for both), while the decrease in the free cytosolic NAD+/NADH ratio was partially prevented (120+/-16 vs 88+/-11 in untreated diabetic rats and 143+/-13 in controls, P<0.01 for both). GSH and ascorbate levels were decreased, while MDA plus 4-HA and MDA levels were increased in diabetic rats versus controls; both antioxidant depletion and lipid aldehyde accumulation were exacerbated by SDI treatment. Superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.15.1.1), GSSG reductase (NAD[P]H:oxidized-glutathione oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.4.2), GSH transferase (glutathione S-transferase; EC 2.5.1.18), GSH peroxidase (glutathione:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.9), and cytoplasmic NADH oxidase activities were increased in diabetic rats versus controls, and all the enzymes but GSH peroxidase were up-regulated further by SDI. In conclusion, sorbitol

  6. The Osmotic Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenspiel, Octave; de Nevers, Noel

    1974-01-01

    Describes the principle involved in an osmotic pump used to extract fresh water from the oceans and in an osmotic power plant used to generate electricity. Although shown to be thermodynamically feasible, the osmotic principle is not likely to be used commerically for these purposes in the near future. (JR)

  7. A new role for carbonic anhydrase 2 in the response of fish to copper and osmotic stress: implications for multi-stressor studies.

    PubMed

    de Polo, Anna; Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Lockyer, Anne E; Scrimshaw, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ecotoxicological studies are performed under stable and optimal conditions, whereas in reality the complexity of the natural environment faces organisms with multiple stressors of different type and origin, which can activate pathways of response often difficult to interpret. In particular, aquatic organisms living in estuarine zones already impacted by metal contamination can be exposed to more severe salinity variations under a forecasted scenario of global change. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of copper exposure on the response of fish to osmotic stress by mimicking in laboratory conditions the salinity changes occurring in natural estuaries. We hypothesized that copper-exposed individuals are more sensitive to osmotic stresses, as copper affects their osmoregulatory system by acting on a number of osmotic effector proteins, among which the isoform two of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA2) was identified as a novel factor linking the physiological responses to both copper and osmotic stress. To test this hypothesis, two in vivo studies were performed using the euryhaline fish sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) as test species and applying different rates of salinity transition as a controlled way of dosing osmotic stress. Measured endpoints included plasma ions concentrations and gene expression of CA2 and the α1a-subunit of the enzyme Na+/K+ ATPase. Results showed that plasma ions concentrations changed after the salinity transition, but notably the magnitude of change was greater in the copper-exposed groups, suggesting a sensitizing effect of copper on the responses to osmotic stress. Gene expression results demonstrated that CA2 is affected by copper at the transcriptional level and that this enzyme might play a role in the observed combined effects of copper and osmotic stress on ion homeostasis.

  8. A New Role for Carbonic Anhydrase 2 in the Response of Fish to Copper and Osmotic Stress: Implications for Multi-Stressor Studies

    PubMed Central

    de Polo, Anna; Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Lockyer, Anne E.; Scrimshaw, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ecotoxicological studies are performed under stable and optimal conditions, whereas in reality the complexity of the natural environment faces organisms with multiple stressors of different type and origin, which can activate pathways of response often difficult to interpret. In particular, aquatic organisms living in estuarine zones already impacted by metal contamination can be exposed to more severe salinity variations under a forecasted scenario of global change. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of copper exposure on the response of fish to osmotic stress by mimicking in laboratory conditions the salinity changes occurring in natural estuaries. We hypothesized that copper-exposed individuals are more sensitive to osmotic stresses, as copper affects their osmoregulatory system by acting on a number of osmotic effector proteins, among which the isoform two of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA2) was identified as a novel factor linking the physiological responses to both copper and osmotic stress. To test this hypothesis, two in vivo studies were performed using the euryhaline fish sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus) as test species and applying different rates of salinity transition as a controlled way of dosing osmotic stress. Measured endpoints included plasma ions concentrations and gene expression of CA2 and the α1a-subunit of the enzyme Na+/K+ ATPase. Results showed that plasma ions concentrations changed after the salinity transition, but notably the magnitude of change was greater in the copper-exposed groups, suggesting a sensitizing effect of copper on the responses to osmotic stress. Gene expression results demonstrated that CA2 is affected by copper at the transcriptional level and that this enzyme might play a role in the observed combined effects of copper and osmotic stress on ion homeostasis. PMID:25272015

  9. Characterizing osmotic lysis kinetics under microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing for erythrocyte fragility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yihong; Loufakis, Despina Nelie; Bao, Ning; Lu, Chang

    2012-12-07

    The biomechanics of erythrocytes, determined by the membrane integrity and cytoskeletal structure, provides critical information on diseases such as diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction, hypertension, and sickle cell anemia. Here we demonstrate a simple microfluidic tool for examining erythrocyte fragility based on characterizing osmotic lysis kinetics. Hydrodynamic focusing is used for generating rapid dilution of the buffer and producing lysis of erythrocytes during their flow. The lysis kinetics are tracked by monitoring the release of intracellular contents from cells via recording the light intensity of erythrocytes at various locations in the channel. Such release profile reflects sensitively the changes in erythrocyte fragility induced by chemical, heating, and glucose treatment. Our tool provides a simple approach for probing red blood cell fragility in both basic research and clinical settings.

  10. Further studies on osmotic resistance of nucleated erythrocytes: observations with pigeon, peafowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes during changes in temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Oyewale, J O

    1994-02-01

    The osmotic resistance of pigeon, peafowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes at different temperatures and pH was studied. Erythrocytes from female pigeons showed greater osmotic resistance than those from males, but no sex difference appeared with erythrocytes from peafowls. Pigeon erythrocytes were more resistant and the red blood cell, packed cell volume and haemoglobin values were higher than those in peafowls. Although no significant differences appeared in their haematological values, erythrocytes from the lizard were more resistant than erythrocytes from the toad. At higher temperature, the osmotic resistance of pigeon, lizard and toad erythrocytes increased, while that of peafowl erythrocytes decreased. The resistance of toad erythrocytes decreased in acidic and alkaline solutions, but that of peafowl erythrocytes increased in both solutions. However, with pigeon and lizard erythrocytes, the resistance was unaltered in alkaline solution and decreased in acidic solution.

  11. Study of electro-osmotic flows in microchannels packed with variable porosity media via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhenhua; Guo, Zhaoli; Shi, Baochang

    2007-05-01

    In this article, electro-osmotic flow (EOF) in microchannels packed with a variable porosity medium is studied using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The present lattice Boltzmann model is constructed based on the generalized porous medium equation for EOF and validated by comparing the numerical solution with the approximate analytical solution. A detailed parametric study has been presented for EOF in microchannels filled with a variable porosity medium. It is found that the variations of porosity, particle size, ζ potential, applied electric field strength, and tortuosity significantly affect the flow pattern. Numerical results also indicate that the variation of the porosity near the wall has an important influence on the velocity profile, and should not be neglected in practice.

  12. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Dixon, Kenneth L.

    2013-09-23

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004.

  13. FOST 2 Upgrade with Hollow-Fiber CTA FO Module and Generation of Osmotic Agent for Microorganism Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Beeler, David

    2016-01-01

    FOST 2 is an integrated membrane system that incorporates a forward osmosis subsystem and a reverse osmosis subsystem working in series. It has been designed as a post treatment system to process the effluent from the Membrane Aerated Biological Reactor developed at NASA Johnson Space Center and Texas Tech University. Its function is to remove dissolved solids residual such as ammonia and suspended solids, as well as to provide a physical barrier to microbial and viral contamination. A tubular CTA membrane module from HTI and a flat-sheet lipid-base membrane module from Porifera were integrated and tested on FOST 2 in the past, using both a bioreactor's effluent and greywater as the feed solution. This paper documents the performance of FOST 2 after its upgrade with a hollow-fiber CTA membrane module from Toyobo, treating real black-water to generate the osmotic agent solution necessary to conduct growth studies of genetically engineered microorganism for the Synthetic Biological Membrane project.

  14. [Effects of Shenwu capsule on learning-memory ability and cholinergic function of brain in AD-like rat model induced by chronic infusion of sodium azide by minipump].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Ru-Yi; Li, Ya-Li; Zhang, Li; Ye, Cui-Fei; Li, Lin

    2013-05-01

    Because of the proposed importance of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase (COX) decrease in Alzheimer's disease (AD) , the protective effect of Shenwu capsule on mitochondrial deficiency model rats and its pharmacological mechanism were investigated in present study. Rats were administered with azide at 1 mg . kg-1 . h-1 subcutaneously via an Alzet minipump for 30 days. Tweny-four hours after the operation, the rats were administered intragastrically by Shenwu capsule with the dose of 0. 45, 0. 9 and 1. 8 g . kg-1 . d-1 for one month. Then learning-memory ability was determined by the watermaze test and passive avoidance tests. The activity of choline-acetyl-transfertase(ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in hippocampus and cortex of rats were measured by radiochemical method and hydroxylamine colorimetry separately. M-cholinergic receptor binding ability (M-binding) was assayed by radio binding. Chronic infusion of sodium azide via minipump induced learning-memory deficiency of rats. Both ChAT activity and M-binding decreased in hippocampus and cortex of model rats, however, the activity of AChE increased in hippocampus and was not affected at the cortex. As the result, the cholinergic function of the brain decreased in model rats. Shenwu capsule significantly improved learning and memory ability and the mechanism may be related with the improved cholinergic function in model brain: ChAT activity and M-binding significantly increased in Shenwu treated groups compared with model group; and the increased activity of AChE in hippocampus returned to normal. Mitochondria, especially mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase, may play the key role in the early event of AD. Chronic, partial in vivo inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase in rats provides a suitable model mimicking several aspects of AD. Shenwu capsule indicate effectiveness in AD-like mitochondrial deficiency model rats, so it would be applied in the treatment of AD.

  15. Nonlinear osmotic properties of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Finan, John D.; Chalut, Kevin J.; Wax, Adam; Guilak, Farshid

    2009-01-01

    Summary In the absence of active volume regulation processes, cell volume is inversely proportional to osmolarity, as predicted by the Boyle Van’t Hoff relation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that nuclear volume has a similar relationship with extracellular osmolarity in articular chondrocytes, cells that are exposed to changes in the osmotic environment in vivo, and furthermore, we explored the mechanism of the relationships between osmolarity and nuclear size and shape. Nuclear size was quantified using two independent techniques, confocal laser scanning microscopy and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. Nuclear volume was osmotically-sensitive but this relationship was not linear, showing a decline in the osmotic sensitivity in the hypo-osmotic range. Nuclear shape was also influenced by extracellular osmolarity, becoming smoother as the osmolarity decreased. The osmotically-induced changes in nuclear size paralleled the changes in nuclear shape, suggesting that shape and volume are interdependent. The osmotic sensitivity of shape and volume persisted after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Isolated nuclei contracted in response to physiologic changes in macromolecule concentration but not in response to physiologic changes in ion concentration, suggesting solute size has an important influence on the osmotic pressurization of the nucleus. This finding in turn implies that the diffusion barrier that causes osmotic effects is not a semi-permeable membrane, but rather due to size constraints that prevent large solute molecules from entering small spaces in the nucleus. As nuclear morphology has been associated previously with cell phenotype, these findings may provide new insight into the role of mechanical and osmotic signals in regulating cell physiology. PMID:19107599

  16. The effect of aqueous preparation of Allium cepa (onion) and Allium sativa (garlic) on erythrocyte osmotic fragility in Wistar rats: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Salami, H A; John, A I; Ekanem, A U

    2012-06-07

    Allium cepa (onion) and Allium sativa (garlic) are bulbous herbs used as food item, spice and medicine in different parts of the world. The effects of onion and garlic on the osmotic fragility of red blood cells in albino rats were assessed in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo studies, five albino rats weighing between 150 - 200g composed each of three study groups. Group A were administered 150mg/Kg body weight aqueous onion preparation; Group B 75mg/Kg body weight aqueous onion and 75mg/Kg body weight garlic preparations; and Group C served as the control and were administered distilled water. The treatment regimens were orally administered thrice a week, for a period of four weeks by gavages. The in vitro erythrocyte osmotic fragility was also evaluated in 12 Wistar rats that were not pre-treated with either onion alone or onion and garlic. The animals were divided into three groups. Blood samples from group A rats were treated with 150mg onion while blood from group B rats was treated with 75mg onion and 75mg garlic extracts. Group C served as the control and were treated with normal saline and osmotic fragility assays were carried out. The degree of haemolysis was greater in the treatment group compared to control and the percentage haemolysis was greater in blood samples with onion and garlic compared to the onion group. The same observation was made in the in vitro study, but the degree of haemolysis was significantly higher in in vitro than the in vivo experiments. It is concluded that onion and garlic increase the osmotic fragility of red blood cells in albino rats.

  17. Studies on bi-layer osmotic pump tablets of water-insoluble allopurinol with large dose: in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Nie, Shu-fang; Li, Wei; Luan, Lin; Pan, Weisan

    2007-09-01

    Controlled release bi-layer osmotic pump tablets (BOPT) of water-insoluble allopurinol with large dose (150 mg/BOPT) were successfully prepared merely with sodium chloride as osmotic promoting agent and polyethylene oxide (PEO) as suspending agent. Formulations of the two kinds of agents were investigated in order to discuss their effects on the release behavior of BOPT, and then the optimal formulation was evaluated. The pharmacokinetics studies of allopurinol and its active metabolite oxypurinol in two-preparation and two-period crossover design relative to the equivalent dose of commercially common allopurinol tablets were evaluated in six Beagle dogs. And the pharmacokinetics results showed that allopurinol BOPT were able to provide a slow release of allopurinol, and oxypurinol were bioequivalent between allopurinol BOPT and common allopurinol tablets. A good in vitro-in vivo correlation of allopurinol was also proved. In conclusion, water-insoluble drugs with large dose can be designed to BOPT for efficacy and safety use.

  18. Osmotic regulation of gene action.

    PubMed Central

    Douzou, P

    1994-01-01

    Most reactions involved in gene translation systems are ionic-dependent and may be explained in electrostatic terms. However, a number of observations of equilibria and rate processes making up the overall reactions clearly indicate that there is still an enormous gap between the rough picture of the mechanism of ionic regulation and the detailed behavior of reactions at the molecular level that hold the key to specific mechanisms. The present paper deals with possible osmotic contributions arising from the gel state of gene systems that are complementary to, and interdependent of, electrostatic contributions. This treatment, although still oversimplified, explains many previous observations by relating them to a general osmotic mechanism and suggests experimental approaches to studying the mechanisms of gene regulation in organelle-free and intact systems. PMID:8127862

  19. Nanofluidic osmotic diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Lyderic; Picallo, Clara; Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Osmosis describes the flow of water across semipermeable membranes powered by the chemical free energy extracted from salinity gradients. While osmosis can be expressed in simple terms via the van't Hoff ideal gas formula for the osmotic pressure, it is a complex phenomenon taking its roots in the subtle interactions occurring at the scale of the membrane nanopores. Here we use new opportunities offered by nanofluidic systems to create an osmotic diode exhibiting asymmetric water flow under reversal of osmotic driving. We show that a surface charge asymmetry built on a nanochannel surface leads to non-linear couplings between water flow and the ion dynamics, which are capable of water flow rectification. This phenomenon opens new opportunities for water purification and complex flow control in nanochannels.

  20. Silk Fibroin under Osmotic Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sungkyun; Strey, Helmut H.; Gido, Samuel P.

    2003-03-01

    The osmotic stress method was applied to study the thermodynamics of supramolecular self-assembly phenomena in crystallizable segments of Bombyx mori silkworm silk fibroin. Controlling compositions and phases of silk fibroin solution, the method provided a means for the direct investigation of microscopic and thermodynamic details of these intermolecular interactions in aqueous media. It is apparent that as osmotic pressure increases, silk fibroin molecules get pressurized to align together to form a water-soluble crystalline mesophase (Silk-I), and then gradually become anti-parallel b-sheet structure (Silk-II) at higher osmotic pressure. This behavior becomes more sensitive as the salt concentration decreases. A partial ternary phase diagram of Water-Silk fibroin-LiBr was constructed based on the results. This phase diagram can be utilized to help design a new route for wet spinning of re-generated silk fibroin. Precise control of compositions and corresponding crystalline structure of a silk fibroin solution may enable us to simulate the natural Bombyx mori silkworm spinning process.

  1. Auxin response under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Naser, Victoria; Shani, Eilon

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) is a small organic molecule that coordinates many of the key processes in plant development and adaptive growth. Plants regulate the auxin response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, transport and perception. One of the most striking aspects of plant plasticity is the modulation of development in response to changing growth environments. In this review, we explore recent findings correlating auxin response-dependent growth and development with osmotic stresses. Studies of water deficit, dehydration, salt, and other osmotic stresses point towards direct and indirect molecular perturbations in the auxin pathway. Osmotic stress stimuli modulate auxin responses by affecting auxin biosynthesis (YUC, TAA1), transport (PIN), perception (TIR/AFB, Aux/IAA), and inactivation/conjugation (GH3, miR167, IAR3) to coordinate growth and patterning. In turn, stress-modulated auxin gradients drive physiological and developmental mechanisms such as stomata aperture, aquaporin and lateral root positioning. We conclude by arguing that auxin-mediated growth inhibition under abiotic stress conditions is one of the developmental and physiological strategies to acclimate to the changing environment.

  2. Advanced Life Support Water Recycling Technologies Case Studies: Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal and Direct Osmotic Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Design for microgravity has traditionally not been well integrated early on into the development of advanced life support (ALS) technologies. NASA currently has a many ALS technologies that are currently being developed to high technology readiness levels but have not been formally evaluated for microgravity compatibility. Two examples of such technologies are the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Technology and the Direct Osmotic Concentration Technology. This presentation will cover the design of theses two systems and will identify potential microgravity issues.

  3. The plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Xiong, Liming; Li, Wenbo; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Zhu, Jianhua

    2011-05-01

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA). One major step in ABA biosynthesis is the carotenoid cleavage catalyzed by a 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the mechanism for osmotic stress activation of ABA biosynthesis, we screened for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that failed to induce the NCED3 gene expression in response to osmotic stress treatments. The ced1 (for 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase defective 1) mutant isolated in this study showed markedly reduced expression of NCED3 in response to osmotic stress (polyethylene glycol) treatments compared with the wild type. Other ABA biosynthesis genes are also greatly reduced in ced1 under osmotic stress. ced1 mutant plants are very sensitive to even mild osmotic stress. Map-based cloning revealed unexpectedly that CED1 encodes a putative α/β hydrolase domain-containing protein and is allelic to the BODYGUARD gene that was recently shown to be essential for cuticle biogenesis. Further studies discovered that other cutin biosynthesis mutants are also impaired in osmotic stress induction of ABA biosynthesis genes and are sensitive to osmotic stress. Our work demonstrates that the cuticle functions not merely as a physical barrier to minimize water loss but also mediates osmotic stress signaling and tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis and signaling.

  4. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  5. Negative second virial coefficients as predictors of protein crystal growth: evidence from sedimentation equilibrium studies that refutes the designation of those light scattering parameters as osmotic virial coefficients.

    PubMed

    Deszczynski, Marcin; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J

    2006-03-20

    The effects of ammonium sulphate concentration on the osmotic second virial coefficient (BAA/MA) for equine serum albumin (pH 5.6, 20 degrees C) have been examined by sedimentation equilibrium. After an initial steep decrease with increasing ammonium sulphate concentration, BAA/MA assumes an essentially concentration-independent magnitude of 8-9 ml/g. Such behaviour conforms with the statistical-mechanical prediction that a sufficient increase in ionic strength should effectively eliminate the contributions of charge interactions to BAA/MA but have no effect on the covolume contribution (8.4 ml/g for serum albumin). A similar situation is shown to apply to published sedimentation equilibrium data for lysozyme (pH 4.5). Although termed osmotic second virial coefficients and designated as such (B22), the negative values obtained in published light scattering studies of both systems have been described incorrectly because of the concomitant inclusion of the protein-salt contribution to thermodynamic nonideality of the protein. Those negative values are still valid predictors of conditions conducive to crystal growth inasmuch as they do reflect situations in which there is net attraction between protein molecules. However, the source of attraction responsible for the negative virial coefficient stems from the protein-salt rather than the protein-protein contribution, which is necessarily positive.

  6. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  7. Study on the Salini-adaptation Physiology in Different Ecotypes of Phragmites australis in the Yellow River Delta of China: Osmotica and Their Contribution to the Osmotic Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K. F.; Feng, L. T.; Zhang, S. Q.

    1999-08-01

    In the Yellow River Delta, there are four ecotypes of Phragmites australis: freshwater swamp reed; salty-water swamp reed; lower salt-meadow reed and higher salt-meadow reed. The growth status, composition and dominance of the reed community were observed. The organic and inorganic osmotica, osmotic potential and osmotic adjustment ability of reeds were determined. The abundance, coverage, plant height, leaf water content and osmotic potential all decreased with increasing salinity of habitats. K+ and sugars are the main osmotica in lower salinity, while Na+ is the main osmoticum in higher salinity. Na+ contents and the osmotic adjustment abilities of roots are higher than those in leaves. Na/K ratios of reeds varied with salinity levels of habitats, being about 1 in higher salinity. Moreover, the contributions of osmotica to the osmotic adjustment change with salinity, the higher the salinity level, the greater the contribution of inorganic osmotica, but the smaller the contribution of organic osmotica.

  8. Osmotically driven pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Hansen, Rasmus; Jensen, Kaare; Bohr, Tomas; Clanet, Christophe

    2006-11-01

    The mechanism for the transport of sugar in plants is a key issue for the understanding of their growth. Since the 1930'ies the dominant model has been the so-called M"unch model (M"unch 1930) where the transport of sugar in the phloem of plants is viewed as a purely passive hydrodynamical process. According to M"unch, differences in osmotic pressure caused by differences in sugar concentration create a mean flow, transporting sugar from high concentration regions (e.g. leaves) to low concentration regions (e.g. new shoots or roots). We have performed experiments and numerical solutions for such flows under various conditions, to explore the nature of the ensuing rich fluid dynamics. Experiments are performed with solutions of dextran of various molecular weights and in channels of widths ranging from centimetric down to micrometric.

  9. [Extrapontine osmotic myelinolysis].

    PubMed

    Silva, Federico A; Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Ramírez, Fabián

    2005-06-01

    Extrapontine osmotic myelinolysis is a rare nervous system complication. Symptoms of this malady were presented during the clinical examination of a 49-year-old alcoholic male, who arrived at the hospital emergency room in a state of cardiorespiratory arrest. After resuscitation methods were applied, the patient was found in metabolic acidosis (pH 7.014) and was treated with sodium bicarbonate. Forty-eight hours later, sodium levels in the patient had risen from 142 to 174 mEq/l. During the period of clinical observation, the patient showed signs of cognitive impairment, disartria, bilateral amaurosis, hyporeflexia and right-half body hemiparesias. After 72 hours, computer tomography was applied; this showed a bilateral lenticular hypodensity with internal and external capsule compromise. One month later, when the patient was referred to another institution for rehabilitation, the patient showed cognitive impairment, bilateral optic atrophy, residual disartria, bradikynesia and double hemiparesia.

  10. Canine RBC osmotic tolerance and membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Christian, J A; Critser, J K

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cryobiological characteristics of canine red blood cells (RBC). These included the hydraulic conductivity (L(p)), the permeability coefficients (P(s)) of common cryoprotectant agents (CPAs), the associated reflection coefficient (sigma), the activation energies (E(a)) of L(p) and P(s) and the osmotic tolerance limits. By using a stopped-flow apparatus, the changes of fluorescence intensity emitted by intracellularly entrapped 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) were recorded when cells were experiencing osmotic volume changes. After the determination of the relationship between fluorescence intensity and cell volume, cell volume changes were calculated. These volume changes were used in three-parameter fitting calculations to determine the values of L(p), P(s), and sigma for common CPAs. These volume measurements and data analyses were repeated at three different temperatures (22, 14, 7 degrees C). Using the Arrhenius equation, the activation energies of L(p) and P(s) in the presence of CPAs were determined. The osmotic tolerance limits for canine RBC were determined by measuring the percentage of free hemoglobin in NaCl solutions with various osmolalities compared to that released by RBC incubated in double distilled water. The upper and lower osmotic tolerance limits were found to be 150mOsm (1.67V(iso)) and 1200mOsm (0.45V(iso)), respectively. These parameters were then used to calculate the amount of non-permeating solute needed to keep cell volume excursions within the osmotic tolerance limits during CPA addition and removal.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit.

  12. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs.

  13. A study of the electrochemistry and osmotic relationships of the cochlear fluids in the neonatal rat at the time of the development of the endocochlear potential

    PubMed Central

    Bosher, S. K.; Warren, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    1. Changes in the endocochlear potential between the 8th and 18th days after birth were investigated in the rat. Initially the potential was low but its magnitude increased rapidly between the 11th and 16th day. During the 13th and 14th days the rate of increase was approximately 1 mV/hr. 2. The rapid potential increase arose virtually simultaneously in all three turns of the cochlea. 3. Histological examination revealed the cochlea, including the hair cells of Corti's organ and the stria vascularis, to be fully mature before the period of rapid change in the endocochlear potential, apart from the cells of Claudius, whose final development coincided with the latter part of this phase. 4. The endolymphatic sodium concentration (average 1·0 m-equiv/l.) had attained the very low adult level in the earliest period studied. The potassium and chloride concentrations were slightly below the normal adult levels, the result of some degree of general hypo-osmolality present at this time. 5. The endolymphatic ionic concentrations remained unchanged during the phase of rapid increase in the endocochlear potential. 6. The findings thus indicate that the distinctive endolymphatic ionic composition and the endocochlear potential arise largely independently and in succession during cochlear maturation. 7. No differences in osmotic pressure were demonstrated between endolymph, perilymph and serum. The problems concerning the homoeostasis of the inner ear fluids do not consequently seem to be complicated by unusual hydrodynamic aspects. 8. Alterations in body fluid osmolality, produced by intraperitoneal injection of water or hypertonic glycerol, were accompanied by simultaneous changes in the osmotic pressures of the inner ear fluids. Some portion of the membranes bounding the endolymphatic space is therefore considered to be freely permeable to water. 9. The investigations provide no further information about the nature of the endocochlear potential, although an increase in the

  14. Osmotic control of bilayer fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L R; Parker, N S

    1984-01-01

    We have used photography and capacitance measurement to monitor the steps in the interaction and eventual fusion of optically black lipid bilayers (BLMs), hydrostatically bulged to approximately hemispherical shape and pushed together mechanically. A necessary first step is drainage of aqueous solution from between the bilayers to allow close contact of the bilayers. The drainage can be controlled by varying the osmotic difference across the bilayers. If the differences are such as to remove water from between the bilayers, fusion occurs after a time that depends on the net osmotic difference and the area of contact. If there is an osmotic flow of water into the space between the bilayers, fusion never occurs. In the fusion process, a single central bilayer forms from the original apposed pair of bilayers. The central bilayer may later burst to allow mixing of the two volumes originally bounded by the separate bilayer; the topological equivalent of exocytosis. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6541065

  15. A model-based study delineating the roles of the two signaling branches of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sho1 and Sln1, during adaptation to osmotic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, J. H.; Bhartiya, Sharad; Venkatesh, K. V.

    2009-09-01

    Adaptation to osmotic shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is brought about by the activation of two independent signaling pathways, Sho1 and Sln1, which in turn trigger the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. The HOG pathway thereby activates the transcription of Gpd1p, an enzyme necessary to synthesize glycerol. The production of glycerol brings about a change in the intracellular osmolarity leading to adaptation. We present a detailed mechanistic model for the response of the yeast to hyperosmotic shock. The model integrates the two branches, Sho1 and Sln1, of the HOG pathway and also includes the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, gene regulation and metabolism. Model simulations are consistent with known experimental results for wild-type strain, and Ste11Δ and Ssk1Δ mutant strains subjected to osmotic stress. Simulation results predict that both the branches contribute to the overall wild-type response for moderate osmotic shock, while under severe osmotic shock, the cell responds mainly through the Sln1 branch. The analysis shows that the Sln1 branch helps the cell in preventing cross-talk to other signaling pathways by inhibiting ste11ste50 activation and also by increasing the phosphorylation of Ste50. We show that the negative feedbacks to the Sho1 branch must be faster than those to the Sln1 branch to simultaneously achieve pathway specificity and adaptation during hyperosmotic shock. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the presence of both branches imparts robust behavior to the cell under osmoadaptation to perturbations.

  16. The Kinetic-Molecular and Thermodynamic Approaches to Osmotic Pressure: A Study of Dispute in Physical Chemistry and the Implications for Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Berg, Kevin C.

    2006-01-01

    Osmotic pressure proves to be a useful topic for illustrating the disputes brought to bear on the chemistry profession when mathematics was introduced into its discipline. Some chemists of the late 19th century thought that the introduction of mathematics would destroy that "chemical feeling" or "experience" so necessary to the practice of…

  17. Effects of pulling forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and viscosity on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection from bacteriophages to bacterial cells: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Anton S.; Douglas, Scott S.; Harvey, Stephen C.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we report on simulations of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ejection from bacteriophage ϕ29 into a bacterial cell. The ejection was studied with a coarse-grained model, in which viral dsDNA was represented by beads on a torsion-less string. The bacteriophage’s capsid and the bacterial cell were defined by sets of spherical constraints. To account for the effects of the viscous medium inside the bacterial cell, the simulations were carried out using a Langevin dynamics protocol. Our simplest simulations (involving constant viscosity and no external biasing forces) produced results compatible with the push-pull model of DNA ejection, with an ejection rate significantly higher in the first part of ejection than in the latter parts. Additionally, we performed more complicated simulations, in which we included additional factors such as external forces, osmotic pressure, condensing agents and ejection-dependent viscosity. The effects of these factors (independently and in combination) on the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA ejection were studied. We found that, in general, the dependence of ejection forces and ejection rates on the amount of DNA ejected becomes more complex if the ejection is modeled with a broader, more realistic set of parameters and influences (such as variation in the solvent’s viscosity and the application of an external force). However, certain combinations of factors and numerical parameters led to the opposition of some ejection-driving and ejection-inhibiting influences, ultimately causing an apparent simplification of the ejection profiles.

  18. Chondrocyte intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal organization, and gene expression responses to dynamic osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; West, Alan C; Hung, Clark T

    2006-10-01

    While chondrocytes in articular cartilage experience dynamic stimuli from joint loading activities, few studies have examined the effects of dynamic osmotic loading on their signaling and biosynthetic activities. We hypothesize that dynamic osmotic loading modulates chondrocyte signaling and gene expression differently than static osmotic loading. With the use of a novel microfluidic device developed in our laboratory, dynamic hypotonic loading (-200 mosM) was applied up to 0.1 Hz and chondrocyte calcium signaling, cytoskeleton organization, and gene expression responses were examined. Chondrocytes exhibited decreasing volume and calcium responses with increasing loading frequency. Phalloidin staining showed osmotic loading-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton in chondrocytes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed a stimulatory effect of dynamic osmotic loading compared with static osmotic loading. These studies illustrate the utility of the microfluidic device in cell signaling investigations, and their potential role in helping to elucidate mechanisms that mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction to dynamic stimuli.

  19. High-throughput single-cell analysis for the proteomic dynamics study of the yeast osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongfei; Yuan, Haiyu; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Yong; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-01-01

    Motorized fluorescence microscopy combined with high-throughput microfluidic chips is a powerful method to obtain information about different biological processes in cell biology studies. Generally, to observe different strains under different environments, high-throughput microfluidic chips require complex preparatory work. In this study, we designed a novel and easily operated high-throughput microfluidic system to observe 96 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in one switchable culture condition or 24 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in four parallel switchable culture conditions. A multi-pipette is the only additional equipment required for high-throughput patterning of cells in the chip. Only eight connections are needed to control 96 conditions. Using these devices, the proteomic dynamics of the yeast stress response pathway were carefully studied based on single-cell data. A new method to characterize the proteomic dynamics using a single cell’s data is proposed and compared to previous methods, and the new technique should be useful for studying underlying control networks. Our method provides an easy and systematic way to study signaling pathways at the single-cell level. PMID:28181485

  20. High-throughput single-cell analysis for the proteomic dynamics study of the yeast osmotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfei; Yuan, Haiyu; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Yong; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-02-09

    Motorized fluorescence microscopy combined with high-throughput microfluidic chips is a powerful method to obtain information about different biological processes in cell biology studies. Generally, to observe different strains under different environments, high-throughput microfluidic chips require complex preparatory work. In this study, we designed a novel and easily operated high-throughput microfluidic system to observe 96 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in one switchable culture condition or 24 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in four parallel switchable culture conditions. A multi-pipette is the only additional equipment required for high-throughput patterning of cells in the chip. Only eight connections are needed to control 96 conditions. Using these devices, the proteomic dynamics of the yeast stress response pathway were carefully studied based on single-cell data. A new method to characterize the proteomic dynamics using a single cell's data is proposed and compared to previous methods, and the new technique should be useful for studying underlying control networks. Our method provides an easy and systematic way to study signaling pathways at the single-cell level.

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of Watermelon Root in Response to Short-Term Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongchao; Mo, Yanling; Yang, Xiaozheng; Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Yongqi; Li, Hao; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Osmotic stress adversely affects the growth, fruit quality and yield of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai). Increasing the tolerance of watermelon to osmotic stress caused by factors such as high salt and water deficit is an effective way to improve crop survival in osmotic stress environments. Roots are important organs in water absorption and are involved in the initial response to osmosis stress; however, few studies have examined the underlying mechanism of tolerance to osmotic stress in watermelon roots. For better understanding of this mechanism, the inbred watermelon accession M08, which exhibits relatively high tolerance to water deficits, was treated with 20% polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. The root samples were harvested at 6 h after PEG treatment and untreated samples were used as controls. Transcriptome analyses were carried out by Illumina RNA sequencing. A total of 5246 differentially expressed genes were identified. Gene ontology enrichment and biochemical pathway analyses of these 5246 genes showed that short-term osmotic stress affected osmotic adjustment, signal transduction, hormone responses, cell division, cell cycle and ribosome, and M08 may repress root growth to adapt osmotic stress. The results of this study describe the watermelon root transcriptome under osmotic stress and propose new insight into watermelon root responses to osmotic stress at the transcriptome level. Accordingly, these results allow us to better understand the molecular mechanisms of watermelon in response to drought stress and will facilitate watermelon breeding projects to improve drought tolerance. PMID:27861528

  2. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  3. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-03-23

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy-Chapman solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases.

  4. Efficiency of osmotic pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaning, Louise Sejling; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Bohr, Tomas

    2013-05-01

    We present experiments and theory for flows of sugar or salt solutions in cylindrical tubes with semipermeable walls (hollow fiber membranes) immersed in water, quantifying the strength of the osmotic driving force in relation to the dimensionless parameters that specify the system. The pumping efficiency of these flows is limited by the presence of “unstirred” concentration boundary layers near the tube walls, and our primary aim is to understand and quantify these layers and their effect on the flow. We measure the outlet flow rate Qout while varying the inlet flow rate Q*, concentration c*, and tube length L, and map out the dependence of the flow rate gain γ=Qout/Q*-1 on these parameters. A theoretical analysis based on (1) the known velocity field for slow flow in cylindrical porous tubes and (2) a parabolic concentration profile allows us to compute analytically how the flow gain depends on the relative magnitude of radial diffusion and advection as well as the ratio of the osmotic velocity to pumping velocity, in very good agreement with experiments and with no adjustable parameters. Our analysis provides criteria that are useful for optimizing osmotic flow processes in, e.g., water purification devices.

  5. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  6. Asymmetric criticality of the osmotic compressibility in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tianxiang; Liu, Shixia; Xie, Jingjing; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    Heat capacities in the critical and the non-critical regions for {benzonitrile + tridecane} and {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and light scattering for {benzonitrile + undecane}, {benzonitrile + dodecane}, {benzonitrile + tridecane}, {benzonitrile + tetradecane}, {benzonitrile + pentadecane}, and {benzonitrile + hexadecane} in the critical two-phase region were measured. Light scattering measurements confirmed the existence of the asymmetry for the osmotic compressibility while no such asymmetry was observed for the correlation length. An analysis of the osmotic compressibility asymmetry suggested the dominance of the singular term | {Δ hat T} |^β, which supports the complete scaling theory. The consistency of the complete scaling theory in descriptions of different asymmetry behaviors was also discussed. Moreover, it was found that the contribution of the heat capacity-related term is also important in describing the asymmetry of the osmotic compressibility as it was observed in studies of the diameters of the coexistence curves.

  7. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzer, H.J.; Fleischman, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  8. Osmotic pumped heat pipes for large space platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzer, H. J.; Fleischman, G. L.; Stalmach, D. D.

    1982-06-01

    A thermal bus will be required as a thermal control source for future space platforms. The osmotic heat pipe is one candidate device with potential significant payoff toward serving growing thermal management needs. Results of a study evaluating osmotic heat pipes for thermal bus applications are presented. Electrostatic and other techniques are proposed for flow control and solution circulation in zero-gravity. Baseline size and performance design parameters of cellulose acetate membrane/sugar-water solution and other combinations were scaled up to predict osmotic pump performance for heat loads and temperatures of 4 to 120 C. A compact hollow-fiber membrane module measuring 20 inches in diameter by 12 inches long and weighing 190 pounds is projected for 50-kW heat loads.

  9. Hypo-osmotic test in cat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Comercio, E A; Monachesi, N E; Loza, M E; Gambarotta, M; Wanke, M M

    2013-10-01

    The hypo-osmotic (HOS) test has been used in other species as an indicator of the fertilising capacity of spermatozoa. The aims of this study were to assess the response of domestic cat spermatozoa to the hypo-osmotic test, to determine the type of solution, concentration and time of incubation needed to obtain a maximum percentage of swelling, to correlate the selected combination with the percentages of progressive motility and to evaluate whether dilution of the ejaculate alters the results. Incubation for 30 and 45 min in solutions of fructose and of citrate of 50 and 100 mOsmol kg⁻¹ was evaluated. The highest percentage of swelling was obtained using the 50 mOsmol kg⁻¹ solution, and no significant differences were observed between the times of exposure to the solutions. A positive correlation was observed between the percentage of individual progressive motility and the percentage of sperm swelling in a 50 mOsmol kg⁻¹ fructose solution, with no significant differences being observed between raw and diluted semen samples. The results of this study suggest that the HOS test could be useful for evaluating membrane function in domestic cat spermatozoa, both in raw semen and in samples diluted in the EZ Mixin® commercial extender, and thus could be incorporated into routine semen evaluation protocols.

  10. Elastic and osmotic properties of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves cellular and biochemical processes linked to mechanical stress. A better understanding of the mechanism of these processes and how they cause changes in the composition, macro- and micro-structure, and mechanical properties of cartilage is necessary for developing effective preventative and treatment strategies. In this study, elastic and osmotic swelling properties of tissue-engineered cartilage were explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a tissue osmometer. AFM was also used to image the surface of the specimens while chemical composition was determined by biochemical analysis. Estimation of the Young's moduli of the tissue from AFM force-indentation data was performed using an optimization approach to fit appropriate models to the data. Force-indentation data were acquired both with sharp, pyramidal and with microspherical probes. The procedure has been validated by making measurements on model gel systems of known elastic properties. This approach is presented as a robust method of optimally extracting Young's moduli of soft, crosslinked materials from AFM data. Gross inhomogeneities at different scales in the cartilage tissue are manifested in the high degree of variance in local Young's moduli values obtained from both AFM and osmotic swelling data. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of cartilage are affected by the local macromolecular composition.

  11. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  12. Osmotic regulation of intracellular solute pools in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed Central

    Glaasker, E; Konings, W N; Poolman, B

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria respond to changes in medium osmolarity by varying the concentrations of specific solutes in order to maintain constant turgor pressure. The cytoplasmic pools of K+, proline, glutamate, alanine, and glycine of Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917 increased when the osmolarity of the growth media was raised from 0.20 to 1.51 osmol/kg by KCL. When glycine-betaine was present in a high-osmolarity chemically defined medium, it was accumulated to a high cytoplasmic concentration, while the concentrations of most other osmotically important solutes decreased. These observations, together with the effects of glycine-betaine on the specific growth rate under high-osmolarity conditions, suggest that glycine-betaine is preferentially accumulated in L. plantarum. Uptake of glycine-betaine, proline, glutamate, and alanine was studied in cells that were alternately exposed to hyper- and hypo-osmotic stresses. The rate of uptake of proline and glycine-betaine increased instantaneously upon increasing the osmolarity, whereas that of other amino acids did not. This activation occurred also under conditions in which protein synthesis was inhibited was most pronounced when cells were pregrown at high osmolarity. The duration of net transport was a function of the osmotic strength of the assay medium. Glutamate uptake was not activated by an osmotic upshock, and the uptake of alanine was low under all conditions tested. When cells were subjected to osmotic downshock, a rapid efflux of accumulated glycine-betaine, proline, and alanine occurred whereas the pools of other amin acids remained unaffected. The results indicate that osmolyte efflux is, at least to some extent, mediated via specific osmotically regulated efflux systems and not via nonspecific mechanisms as has been suggested previously. PMID:8550485

  13. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  14. The effect of osmotic stabilizers on the radiometric detection of osmotically sensitive populations of some gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, O.V.; Malinin, T.I.

    1982-02-01

    The effect of four osmotic stabilizers on the radiometric detection of osmotically sensitive populations of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and E. cloacae was studied. The addition of sucrose, sorbitol, glycerol, or ethylene glycoll to BACTEC 6B blood culture medium failed to improve the sensitivity of the system and produced an inhibitory effect on the level of 14CO2 released by organisms previously exposed to lysozyme and ECTA or to penicillin followed by the lysozyme treatment. The same effect was observed both in blood free media and simulated blood cultures. The addition of proline to sucrose-containing hypertonic media had no effect on growth index readings.

  15. [Applicability of a natural swelling matrix as the propellant of osmotic pump tablets].

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Li, Hai-Yan; Yin, Xian-Zhen; Li, Ying; Chen, Jian-Xiu; Hu, Rong-feng; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of a natural swelling matrix derived from boat-fruited sterculia seed (SMS) as the propellant of osmotic pump tablets. The sugar components, static swelling, water uptake and viscosity of SMS were determined and compared with that of polythylene oxide (WSR-N10 and WSR-303). Both ribavirin and glipizide were used as water-soluble and water-insoluble model drugs. Then, the monolayer osmotic pump tablets of ribavirin and the bilayer osmotic pump tablets of glipizide were prepared using SMS as the osmotically active substance and propellant. SMS was mainly composed of rhamnose, arabinose, xylose and galactose and exhibited relatively high swelling ability. The area of the disintegrated matrix tablet was 20.1 times as that at initial after swelling for 600 s. SMS swelled rapidly and was fully swelled (0.5%) in aqueous solution with relative low viscosity (3.66 +/- 0.03) mPa x s at 25 degrees C. The monolayer osmotic pump tablets of ribavirin and the bilayer osmotic pump tablets of glipizide using SMS as propellant exhibited typical drug release features of osmotic pumps. In conclusion, the swelling matrix derived from boat-fruited sterculia seed, with low viscosity and high swelling, is a potential propellant in the application of osmotic pump tablets.

  16. Genetic analysis of proline concentration under osmotic stress in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Farghama; Rauf, Saeed; Monneveux, Philippe; Anwar, Shoaib; Iqbal, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Proline concentration has been often suggested as an indicator of osmotic stress. A better understanding of the genetics of this trait is however needed. In the present study, proline concentration has been assessed, together with root and stem growth, potassium, calcium and total soluble sugars concentration and stress injury symptoms, in seedlings of sunflower hybrids and their parents grown under control and osmotic conditions. Proline strongly accumulated with osmotic stress. Its concentration exhibited a large variation among genotypes and was higher in hybrids than in parental lines. A positive association was noted between proline concentration and osmotic adjustment that was reflected in a reduction of osmotic stress induced injury, as showed by the reduced number of calli in the hybrids with higher proline concentration. Broad and narrow sense heritability was higher under osmotic stress suggesting applying the selection in osmotic stress condition. In the control treatment, dominance effects explained most of the genetic variation for proline concentration while under osmotic stress both dominance and additive variance were high. The importance of dominance and additive effects suggested that several genomic regions are controlling this trait. Good general combiners, presumably carrying positive additive alleles affecting proline concentration, were identified. PMID:27795671

  17. Abnormal osmotic regulation in trpv4-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    Osmotic homeostasis is one of the most aggressively defended physiological parameters in vertebrates. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying osmotic regulation are poorly understood. The transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily (TRPV4), is an osmotically activated ion channel that is expressed in circumventricular organs in the mammalian CNS, which is an important site of osmotic sensing. We have generated trpv4-null mice and observed abnormalities of their osmotic regulation. trpv4-/- mice drank less water and became more hyperosmolar than did wild-type littermates, a finding that was seen with and without administration of hypertonic saline. In addition, plasma levels of antidiuretic hormone were significantly lower in trpv4-/- mice than in wild-type littermates after a hyperosmotic challenge. Continuous s.c. infusion of the antidiuretic hormone analogue, dDAVP, resulted in systemic hypotonicity in trpv4-/- mice, despite the fact that their renal water reabsorption capacity was normal. Thus, the response to both hyper- and hypoosmolar stimuli is impaired in trpv4-/- mice. After a hyperosmolar challenge, there was markedly reduced expression of c-FOS in the circumventricular organ, the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, of trpv4-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. This finding suggests that there is an impairment of osmotic sensing in the CNS of trpv4-/- mice. These data indicate that TRPV4 is necessary for the normal response to changes in osmotic pressure and functions as an osmotic sensor in the CNS. PMID:14581612

  18. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate.

  19. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Gobade, N. G.; Koland, Marina; Harish, K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  20. Osmotic adaptation in Ulva lactuca under fluctuating salinity regimes.

    PubMed

    Dickson, D M; Wyn Jones, R G; Davenport, J

    1982-09-01

    A study has been made of the osmotic responses of the green intertidal alga, Ulva lactuca, under two fluctuating salinity regimes; sinusoidal and square-wave fluctuations between 30 and 100% sea water in a 12 h cycle. These regimes closely resemble the tidal fluctuation of salinity encountered by the alga in its natural estuarine habitat. Data on changes in the inorganic ions, potassium, sodium, chloride and sulphate; in the organic solute, dimethylsulphoniopropionate; in the total sugar levels and estimated osmotic and turgor pressures under the two salinity regimes are reported. Significant differences in the solute responses under these different conditions were detected. In general, better control of ion fluxes appeared to be exercised under the sinusoidal conditions which also buffered changes in dimethylsulphoniopropionate levels. Influxes of potassium were highly light-dependent. Chloride levels conspicuously failed to reach the steady-state levels in the 6-h-hyper-osmotic part of either the abrupt or gradual cycle. The possible significance of these data, which may better reflect osmotic changes in the natural environment, and some of the problems encountered, particularly in accounting for charge balance under some conditions, are discussed.

  1. Alterations in the Colonic Microbiota in Response to Osmotic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Trajanoski, Slave; Lackner, Stefan; Stocker, Gernot; Hinterleitner, Thomas; Gülly, Christian; Högenauer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Diseases of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract are often accompanied by diarrhea with profound alterations in the GI microbiota termed dysbiosis. Whether dysbiosis is due to the disease itself or to the accompanying diarrhea remains elusive. With this study we characterized the net effects of osmotic diarrhea on the composition of the GI microbiota in the absence of disease. Methods We induced osmotic diarrhea in four healthy adults by oral administration of polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG). Stool as well as mucosa specimens were collected before, during and after diarrhea and 16S rDNA-based microbial community profiling was used to assess the microbial community structure. Results Stool and mucosal microbiotas were strikingly different, with Firmicutes dominating the mucosa and Bacteroidetes the stools. Osmotic diarrhea decreased phylotype richness and showed a strong tendency to equalize the otherwise individualized microbiotas on the mucosa. Moreover, diarrhea led to significant relative shifts in the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes and to a relative increase in the abundance of Proteobacteria on the mucosa, a phenomenon also noted in several inflammatory and diarrheal GI diseases. Conclusions Changes in microbial community structure induced by osmotic diarrhea are profound and show similarities to changes observed in other GI diseases including IBD. These effects so must be considered when specimens from diarrheal diseases (i.e. obtained by stratification of samples according to diarrheal status) or conditions wherein bowel preparations like PEG (i.e. specimens obtained during endoscopy) are used. PMID:23409050

  2. Toward an Injectable Continuous Osmotic Glucose Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen, Erik; Krushinitskaya, Olga; Sokolov, Andrey; Philipp, Häfliger; Hoogerwerf, Arno; Hinderling, Christian; Kautio, Kari; Lenkkeri, Jaakko; Strömmer, Esko; Kondratyev, Vasily; Tønnessen, Tor Inge; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Jakobsen, Henrik; Zimmer, Even; Akselsen, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing pandemic of diabetes mellitus places a stringent social and economic burden on the society. A tight glycemic control circumvents the detrimental effects, but the prerogative is the development of new more effective tools capable of longterm tracking of blood glucose (BG) in vivo. Such discontinuous sensor technologies will benefit from an unprecedented marked potential as well as reducing the current life expectancy gap of eight years as part of a therapeutic regime. Method A sensor technology based on osmotic pressure incorporates a reversible competitive affinity assay performing glucose-specific recognition. An absolute change in particles generates a pressure that is proportional to the glucose concentration. An integrated pressure transducer and components developed from the silicon micro- and nanofabrication industry translate this pressure into BG data. Results An in vitro model based on a 3.6 × 8.7 mm large pill-shaped implant is equipped with a nanoporous membrane holding 4–6 nm large pores. The affinity assay offers a dynamic range of 36–720 mg/dl with a resolution of ±16 mg/dl. An integrated 1 × 1 mm2 large control chip samples the sensor signals for data processing and transmission back to the reader at a total power consumption of 76 µW. Conclusions Current studies have demonstrated the design, layout, and performance of a prototype osmotic sensor in vitro using an affinity assay solution for up to four weeks. The small physical size conforms to an injectable device, forming the basis of a conceptual monitor that offers a tight glycemic control of BG. PMID:20663452

  3. Mechanism of Osmotic Flow in Porous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Malone, Dermot M.

    1974-01-01

    A model for osmotic flow in porous membranes is developed from classical transport and thermodynamic relations. Mathematical expressions for the reflection coefficient as a function of solute dimension and shape, and more generally pore/bulk distribution coefficient, are derived for long cylindrical pores of circular cross section. For a rigid, spherical macromolecule the osmotic reflection coefficient equals (1 - Φ)2, where Φ is the solute distribution coefficient; this result differs significantly from expressions found in the literature. The effect of weak solute adsorption to (or repulsion from) the pore wall can also be accounted for in the derivation. The driving force for osmotic flow arises from solute-pore wall interactions which cause radial variations in concentration and concomitant gradients in pressure normal to the wall. Implications of this three-dimensionality of osmotic phenomena are discussed with particular reference to the adequacy of one-dimensional treatments in relating reflection coefficient to membrane and solute properties. PMID:4429773

  4. Synchronous delivery of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate using monolithic osmotic pump technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiqing; Yu, Fanglin; Liu, Nan; Di, Zhong; Yan, Kun; Liu, Yan; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Yang; Yang, Zhenbo; Li, Zhiping; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-11-01

    The synchronous sustained-release of two drugs was desired urgently for patients needing combination therapy in long term. However, sophisticated technologies were used generally to realize the simultaneous delivery of two drugs especially those with different physico-chemical properties. The purpose of this study was to obtain the concurrent release of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate, two drugs with completely different solubilities, in a simple monolithic osmotic pump system (FMOP). Two types of blocking agents were used in monolithic osmotic pump tablets and the synchronous sustained-release of FMOP was acquired in vitro. The tablets were also administered to beagle dogs and the plasma levels of FMOP were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Cmax of both felodipine and metoprolol from the osmotic pump tablets were lower, tmax and mean residence time of both felodipine and metoprolol from the osmotic pump tablets were longer significantly than those from immediate release tablets. These results verified prolonged release of felodipine and metoprolol tartrate from osmotic pump formulations. The similar absorption rate between felodipine and metoprolol in beagles was also obtained by this osmotic pump formulation. Therefore, it could be supposed that the accordant release of two drugs with completely different solubilities may be realized just by using monolithic osmotic pump technology.

  5. Modulation of osmotic stress effects on photosynthesis and respiration by temperature in mesophyll protoplast of pea.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Padmanabh; Raghavendra, A S

    2004-12-01

    Exposure of mesophyll protoplast of pea to osmotic stress decreases the rate of photosynthesis while stimulating marginally the respiratory rate of mesophyll protoplasts. The interaction of osmotic and temperature stress during the modulation of photosynthetic and respiratory rates of pea (Pisum sativum var Azad P1) mesophyll protoplasts was investigated. The protoplasts were exposed to either iso-osmotic (0.4 M) or hyper-osmotic (1.0 M) concentration of sorbitol at 15 degrees and 25 degrees C. The rates of photosynthesis and respiration were studied. At optimum temperature of 25 degrees C, there was a decrease in photosynthesis (< 10%) at hyper-osmoticum (osmotic effect), whereas respiration increased marginally (by about 15%). Low temperature (15 degrees C) aggravated the sensitivity of both respiration and photosynthesis to osmotic stress. At 15 degrees C, the decrease in photosynthesis due to osmotic stress was > 35%, while the respiratory rate was stimulated by 30%. The relative proportion of cytochrome pathway decreased by about 50% at both 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C while that of alternative pathway increased, more so, at 15 degrees C, when the mesophyll protoplasts were subjected to hyper-osmoticum stress. The titration experiments showed that extent of engagement of alternative pathway was higher, the slope value was slightly higher for 15 degrees C compared to 25 degrees C. Low temperature modulates the effect of hyper-osmoticum stress on photosynthesis and respiration, and results in increased participation of alternative pathway.

  6. Deriving Osmotic Pressures of Draw Solutes used in Osmotically Driven Membrane Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2013-03-01

    In osmotically driven membrane processes (ODMPs), such as forward osmosis (FO), the concentration of the draw solute and the related osmotic pressure play a critical role in mass transport and overall process performance. Search of the literature reveals that the concentration units used to describe draw solutes vary and the methods of deriving osmotic pressure from those concentrations are often unclear or not discussed. This paper recommends the use of molality and identifies the benefit of experimentally determined van ‘t Hoff indices when calculating osmotic pressures.

  7. A prospective multicentre study to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of osmotic release oral system (OROS®) hydromorphone in opioid-naive cancer patients: Results of the Korean South West Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Kee; Shim, Hyunjeong; Han, Hye-Suk; Sun, DerSheng; Lee, Soon-Il; Kang, Myung Hee; Lee, KyuTaek; Cho, DoYeun; Cho, In Sung; Park, Suk Young; Kim, Samyong; Yim, Chang-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osmotic release oral system (OROS®) hydromorphone is a potent, long-acting opioid analgesic, effective and safe for controlling cancer pain in patients who have received other strong opioids. To date, few studies have examined the efficacy of hydromorphone for pain relief in opioid-naive cancer patients. OBJECTIVES: A prospective, open-label, multicentre trial was conducted to determine the efficacy and tolerability of OROS hydromorphone as a single and front-line opioid therapy for patients experiencing moderate to severe cancer pain. METHODS: OROS hydromorphone was administered to patients who had not previously received strong, long-acting opioids. The baseline evaluation (visit 1) was followed by two evaluations (visits 2 and 3) performed two and 14 weeks later, respectively. The starting dose of OROS hydromorphone was 4 mg/day and was increased every two days when pain control was insufficient. Immediate-release hydromorphone was the only accepted alternative strong opioid for relief of breakthrough pain. The efficacy, safety and tolerability of OROS hydromorphone, including the effects on quality of life, and patients’ and investigators’ global impressions on pain relief were evaluated. The primary end point was pain intensity difference (PID) at visit 2 relative to visit 1 (expressed as %PID). RESULTS: A total of 107 patients were enrolled in the present study. An improvement in pain intensity of >50% (≥50% PID) was observed in 51.0% of the full analysis set and 58.6% of the per-protocol set. The mean pain score, measured using a numerical rating scale, was significantly reduced after two weeks of treatment, and most adverse events were manageable. Quality of life also improved, and >70% of patients and investigators were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSIONS: OROS hydromorphone provided effective pain relief and improved quality of life in opioid-naive cancer patients. As a single and front-line treatment, OROS hydromorphone delivered

  8. Self-consistent unstirred layers in osmotically driven flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruus, Henrik; Hartvig Jensen, Kåre; Bohr, Tomas

    2010-11-01

    It has long been recognized, that the osmotic transport characteristics of membranes may be strongly influenced by the presence of unstirred concentration boundary layers adjacent to the membrane. Previous experimental as well as theoretical works have mainly focused on the case where the solutions on both sides of the membrane remain well-mixed due to an external stirring mechanism. We investigate the effects of concentration boundary layers on the efficiency of osmotic pumping processes in the absence of external stirring i.e. when all advection is provided by the osmosis itself. This case is relevant in the study of intracellular flows, e.g. in plants. For such systems, we show that no well-defined boundary layer thickness exists and that the reduction in concentration can be estimated by a surprisingly simple mathematical relation across a wide range of geometries and P'eclet numbers. This work is accepted for publication in Journal of Fluid Mechanics.

  9. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  10. On equations for the total suction and its matric and osmotic components

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Vinh N.T. Morris, Peter H.; Dux, Peter F.

    2008-11-15

    A clear fundamental understanding of suctions is crucial for the study of the behaviour of plastic cement mortar and concrete, including plastic shrinkage cracking. In this paper, the expression relating the change in free energy of the pore water with an isothermal change in pressure is first derived. Based upon definitions of suctions, it is then shown that total, matric, and osmotic suctions can all be expressed in the same thermodynamic form. The widely accepted, but not yet satisfactorily validated, assumption that the total suction comprises matric and osmotic components is then confirmed theoretically. The well-known Kelvin equation for matric suction, and Morse and van't Hoff equations for osmotic suction are subsequently derived from the corresponding thermodynamic equations. The applicability of latter two equations in evaluating the osmotic suctions of cement mortar and concrete is highlighted.

  11. Casein Micelle Dispersions under Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bouchoux, Antoine; Cayemitte, Pierre-Emerson; Jardin, Julien; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève; Cabane, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Casein micelles dispersions have been concentrated and equilibrated at different osmotic pressures using equilibrium dialysis. This technique measured an equation of state of the dispersions over a wide range of pressures and concentrations and at different ionic strengths. Three regimes were found. i), A dilute regime in which the osmotic pressure is proportional to the casein concentration. In this regime, the casein micelles are well separated and rarely interact, whereas the osmotic pressure is dominated by the contribution from small residual peptides that are dissolved in the aqueous phase. ii), A transition range that starts when the casein micelles begin to interact through their κ-casein brushes and ends when the micelles are forced to get into contact with each other. At the end of this regime, the dispersions behave as coherent solids that do not fully redisperse when osmotic stress is released. iii), A concentrated regime in which compression removes water from within the micelles, and increases the fraction of micelles that are irreversibly linked to each other. In this regime the osmotic pressure profile is a power law of the residual free volume. It is well described by a simple model that considers the micelle to be made of dense regions separated by a continuous phase. The amount of water in the dense regions matches the usual hydration of proteins. PMID:19167314

  12. Proteomic profiling analysis reveals that glutathione system plays important roles responding to osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Zhang, Daijing; Gao, Xiaolong; Shao, Yun; Tong, Doudou

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world, and osmotic stress has become one of the main factors affecting wheat production. Understanding the mechanism of the response of wheat to osmotic stress would be greatly significant. In the present study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) was used to analyze the changes of protein expression in the wheat roots exposed to different osmotic stresses. A total of 2,228 expressed proteins, including 81 differentially expressed proteins, between osmotic stress and control, were found. The comprehensive analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed that osmotic stress increased the variety of expressed proteins and suppressed the quantity of expressed proteins in wheat roots. Furthermore, the proteins for detoxifying and reactive oxygen species scavenging, especially the glutathione system, played important roles in maintaining organism balance in response to osmotic stress in wheat roots. Thus, the present study comprehensively describes the protein expression changes in wheat roots in response to osmotic stress, providing firmer foundation to further study the mechanism of osmotic resistance in wheat. PMID:27602297

  13. Osmotic Pressure in a Bacterial Swarm

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Liyan; Wu, Yilin; Hosu, Basarab G.; Tang, Jay X.; Berg, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we studied how water is recruited by a bacterial swarm. A previous analysis of trajectories of small air bubbles revealed a stream of fluid flowing in a clockwise direction ahead of the swarm. A companion study suggested that water moves out of the agar into the swarm in a narrow region centered ∼30 μm from the leading edge of the swarm and then back into the agar (at a smaller rate) in a region centered ∼120 μm back from the leading edge. Presumably, these flows are driven by changes in osmolarity. Here, we utilized green/red fluorescent liposomes as reporters of osmolarity to verify this hypothesis. The stream of fluid that flows in front of the swarm contains osmolytes. Two distinct regions are observed inside the swarm near its leading edge: an outer high-osmolarity band (∼30 mOsm higher than the agar baseline) and an inner low-osmolarity band (isotonic or slightly hypotonic to the agar baseline). This profile supports the fluid-flow model derived from the drift of air bubbles and provides new (to our knowledge) insights into water maintenance in bacterial swarms. High osmotic pressure at the leading edge of the swarm extracts water from the underlying agar and promotes motility. The osmolyte is of high molecular weight and probably is lipopolysaccharide. PMID:25140422

  14. Enhancement of light in tissue using hyper-osmotic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Raiyan T.; Chen, Bo; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Estrada, Arnold D., Jr.; Ponticorvo, Ardien; Rylander, Henry G., III; Dunn, Andrew K.; Welch, Ashley J.

    2008-02-01

    Optical changes in skin blood flow due to the presence of glycerol were measured from a two-dimensional map of blood flow in skin blood vessels with a dynamic imaging technique using laser speckle. In this study a dorsal skin-flap window was implanted on the hamster skin with and without a hyper-osmotic agent i.e. glycerol. The hyper-osmotic drug was delivered to the skin through the open dermal end of the window model. A two-dimensional map of blood flow in skin blood vessels were obtained with very high spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the speckle pattern with a CCD camera. Preliminary studies demonstrated that hyper-osmotic agents such as glycerol not only make tissue temporarily translucent, but also reduce blood flow. The blood perfusion was measured every 3 minutes up to 36-60 minutes after diffusion of anhydrous glycerol. Small capillaries blood flow reduced significantly within 3-9 minutes. Perfusion rate in lager blood vessels i.e. all arteries and some veins decreased (speckle contrasts increased from 0.0115 to 0.384) over time. However, the blood flow in some veins reduced significantly in 36 minutes. After 24 hours the blood perfusion further reduced in capillaries. However, the blood flow increased in larger blood vessels in 24 hours compared to an hour after application of glycerol. For further investigation the speckle contrast measurement were verified with color Doppler optical coherence tomography.

  15. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  16. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  17. Electro-osmotic flow over a charged superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui

    2010-06-01

    Bubbles can be trapped inside textured structures such as grooves, forming a superhydrophobic surface. A superhydrophobic surface has a large effective hydrodynamic slip length compared to a smooth hydrophobic surface and holds the promise of enhancing electrokinetic flows that find many interesting applications in microfluidics. However, recent theoretical studies suggested that electro-osmotic flows over a weakly charged superhydrophobic surface [the zeta potential of the surface is smaller than the thermal potential (25 mV)] can only be enhanced when liquid-gas interfaces are charged [T. M. Squires, Phys. Fluids 20, 092105 (2008); Bahga , J. Fluid Mech. 644, 245 (2010)]. So far there is little work reported when the zeta potential of the surface is comparable or even larger than the thermal potential. In this paper we numerically investigate electro-osmotic flows over a periodically striped slip-stick surface by solving the standard Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. Our results indicate that at large zeta potentials, even if liquid-gas interfaces are charged, the nonuniform surface conduction due to the mismatch between surface conductions over no-shear and no-slip regions leads to electric field lines penetrating the double layer and thus the nonuniform surface conduction weakens the tangential component of the electric field which primarily drives electro-osmotic flows. Our results imply that, in the presence of strong nonuniform surface conduction, enhanced electro-osmotic flows over a superhydrophobic surface are possible only in certain conditions. In particular, the enhancement due to the slip can potentially be lost at large zeta potentials. Similar loss of the enhancement of a charged particle’s electrophoretic mobility due to the slip was reported by Khair and Squires [Phys. Fluids 21, 042001 (2009)].

  18. Mechanosensitive Channels and Sensing Osmotic Stimuli in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blount, Paul; Iscla, Irene; Li, Yuezhou

    Microbes are directly exposed to the elements, and one of the most acute insults they can experience is a rapid change in osmotic environment. The forces that are generated by even small changes in the osmolarity are massive. In response to increases in the osmolarity of the medium, also called osmotic upshock, the cell transports and synthesizes cytoplasmic osmoprotectants, which thus help to maintain its turgor. A subsequent severe osmotic downshock is more than an inconvenience, it is life threatening. The cell swells, its cell-wall becomes compromised, and without immediate action the organism would lyse. Largeconductance mechanosensitive channels within the cytoplasmic membrane prevent this needless death by serving as biological emergency release valves. Two such bacterial mechanosensitive channel families have been extensively studied: MscL and MscS. For each, a crystal structure of a family member has been obtained, and detailed models for structural changes that occur upon gating have been postulated. As we learn more of the molecular mechanisms by which these channels sense and respond to membrane tension, we discover similarities not only between these two relatively distant families, but also potentially with the more complex mechanosensory systems of eukaryotic organisms.

  19. Intravesical electro-osmotic administration of mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Di Stasi, Savino M; Verri, Cristian; Celestino, Francesco; De Carlo, Francesco; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-04

    Bladder cancer is very common and most cases are diagnosed as nonmuscle invasive disease, which is characterized by its propensity to recur and progress. Intravesical therapy is used to delay recurrence and progression, while cystectomy is reserved for patients who are refractory to transurethral resection and intravesical therapy. There is an increasing interest in methods to enhance the delivery of intravesical chemotherapeutic agents to improve efficacy. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that electro-osmosis of mitomycin C (MMC) is more effective in delivering this drug into the urothelium, lamina propria, and superficial muscle layers of the bladder wall than is passive transport. Higher MMC tissue concentrations might have a clinical impact in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). In randomized trials, intravesical electro-osmotic MMC was associated with superior response rate in high-risk NMIBC cancer, compared with passive diffusion MMC transport. New strategies such as intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) combined with electro-osmotic MMC as well as intravesical pre-operative electro-osmotic MMC provided promising results in terms of higher remission rates and longer remission times.Device-assisted intravesical chemotherapy may be a useful ancillary procedure in the treatment of NMIBC. Its evaluation must be planned with respect to the technical functioning of equipment and their use for a clear purpose to avoid the financial and human costs associated with incorrect therapies.

  20. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1. PMID:7229611

  1. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Rateri, Debra L.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5 - 10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms. PMID:26436287

  2. A phloem-sap feeder mixes phloem and xylem sap to regulate osmotic potential.

    PubMed

    Pompon, Julien; Quiring, Dan; Goyer, Claudia; Giordanengo, Philippe; Pelletier, Yvan

    2011-09-01

    Phloem-sap feeders (Hemiptera) occasionally consume the dilute sap of xylem, a behaviour that has previously been associated with replenishing water balance following dehydration. However, a recent study reported that non-dehydrated aphids ingested xylem sap. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the consumption of xylem sap, which has a low osmolality, is a general response to osmotic stresses other than dehydration. Alate aphids were subjected to different treatments and subsequently transferred onto a plant, where electrical penetration graph (EPG) was used to estimate durations of passive phloem sap consumption and active sucking of xylem sap. The proportion of time aphids fed on xylem sap (i.e., time spent feeding on xylem sap/total time spent feeding on phloem plus xylem sap) was used as a proxy of the solute concentration of the uptake. The proportion of time alate aphids fed on xylem sap increased: (1) with the time spent imbibing an artificial diet containing a solution of sucrose, which is highly concentrated in phloem sap and is mainly responsible for the high osmotic potential of phloem sap; (2) with the osmotic potential of the artificial diet, when osmotic potential excess was not related to sucrose concentration; and (3) when aphids were deprived of primary symbionts, a condition previously shown to lead to a higher haemolymph osmotic potential. All our results converge to support the hypothesis that xylem sap consumption contributes to the regulation of the osmotic potential in phloem-sap feeders.

  3. Products of Proline Catabolism Can Induce Osmotically Regulated Genes in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Suresh; Caplan, Allan

    1998-01-01

    Many plants accumulate high levels of free proline (Pro) in response to osmotic stress. This imino acid is widely believed to function as a protector or stabilizer of enzymes or membrane structures that are sensitive to dehydration or ionically induced damage. The present study provides evidence that the synthesis of Pro may have an additional effect. We found that intermediates in Pro biosynthesis and catabolism such as glutamine and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) can increase the expression of several osmotically regulated genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.), including salT and dhn4. One millimolar P5C or its analog, 3,4-dehydroproline, produced a greater effect on gene expression than 1 mm l-Pro or 75 mm NaCl. These chemicals did not induce hsp70, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, or another osmotically induced gene, Em, to any significant extent. Unlike NaCl, gene induction by P5C did not depend on the normal levels of either de novo protein synthesis or respiration, and did not raise abscisic acid levels significantly. P5C- and 3,4-dehydroproline-treated plants consumed less O2, had reduced NADPH levels, had increased NADH levels, and accumulated many osmolytes associated with osmotically stressed rice. These experiments indicate that osmotically induced increases in the concentrations of one or more intermediates in Pro metabolism could be influencing some of the characteristic responses to osmotic stress.

  4. Subcutaneous Angiotensin II Infusion using Osmotic Pumps Induces Aortic Aneurysms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Rateri, Debra L; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-09-28

    Osmotic pumps continuously deliver compounds at a constant rate into small animals. This article introduces a standard protocol used to induce aortic aneurysms via subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) from implanted osmotic pumps. This protocol includes calculation of AngII amount and dissolution, osmotic pump filling, implantation of osmotic pumps subcutaneously, observation after pump implantation, and harvest of aortas to visualize aortic aneurysms in mice. Subcutaneous infusion of AngII through osmotic pumps following this protocol is a reliable and reproducible technique to induce both abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice. Infusion durations range from a few days to several months based on the purpose of the study. AngII 1,000 ng/kg/min is sufficient to provide maximal effects on abdominal aortic aneurysmal formation in male hypercholesterolemic mouse models such as apolipoprotein E deficient or low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice. Incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysms induced by AngII infusion via osmotic pumps is 5-10 times lower in female hypercholesterolemic mice and also lower in both genders of normocholesterolemic mice. In contrast, AngII-induced thoracic aortic aneurysms in mice are not hypercholesterolemia or gender-dependent. Importantly, multiple features of this mouse model recapitulate those of human aortic aneurysms.

  5. Osmotic Model to Explain Anomalous Hydraulic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marine, I. Wendell; Fritz, Steven J.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that compacted clays act as osmotic membranes when they separate aqueous solutions of unequal ionic concentration. Theoretically, osmotically induced differential hydraulic pressure in groundwater systems can be relatively high. The magnitude depends primarily upon concentration differences across the membrane, type of ions, type of clay, and pore size. In experiments, thin, compacted clay membranes commonly exhibit varying degrees of osmotic efficiency due to ion leak-age through the clay. In natural systems the membrane and the solution containers are not as distinct and well defined as they are in the laboratory. Moreover, the membrane is commonly thick, inhomogeneous, and composite. In a buried Triassic basin at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, South Carolina, it is suspected that osmosis causes the saline water in the basin center to be slightly geopressurized in relation to freshwater in the overlying coastal plain aquifer. Two wells have heads of 7.88 and 12.98 bars (114.3 and 188.3 psi) above the head in the coastal plain aquifer. The head in each of these wells approximates the osmotic equilibrium head calculated from solution concentration of water produced by each well (12,000 and 18,500 mg/l, respectively). Other wells penetrating the top and edge of the Triassic basin probably penetrate a zone where ion leakage gives rise to less saline water. Thus these wells are not geopressurized.

  6. Effect of the achondroplasia mutation on FGFR3 dimerization and FGFR3 structural response to fgf1 and fgf2: A quantitative FRET study in osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-07-01

    The G380R mutation in the transmembrane domain of FGFR3 is a germline mutation responsible for most cases of Achondroplasia, a common form of human dwarfism. Here we use quantitative Fӧster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and osmotically derived plasma membrane vesicles to study the effect of the achondroplasia mutation on the early stages of FGFR3 signaling in response to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2. Using a methodology that allows us to capture structural changes on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane in response to ligand binding to the extracellular domain of FGFR3, we observe no measurable effects of the G380R mutation on FGFR3 ligand-bound dimer configurations. Instead, the most notable effect of the achondroplasia mutation is increased propensity for FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand. This work reveals new information about the molecular events that underlie the achondroplasia phenotype, and highlights differences in FGFR3 activation due to different single amino-acid pathogenic mutations.

  7. A simple student laboratory on osmotic flow, osmotic pressure, and the reflection coefficient.

    PubMed

    Feher, J J; Ford, G D

    1995-06-01

    Osmosis is usually taught from the point of view of the osmotic pressure developed when solutions of different concentrations of solute are separated by an ideal semipermeable membrane. The osmotic pressure is defined at equilibrium when there is no net flow, and it takes some time to reach this equilibrium. Although the osmotic pressure is certainly important, teaching only this point of view implicitly diminishes the importance of osmotic flow, which begins almost instantaneously across a membrane. A device was constructed with which students could measure the flow across a model membrane (dialysis tubing) as a function of concentration for solutes of different sizes. The device produced flows that were linearly proportional to the concentration, providing a confirmation of van't Hoff's law. Separate student groups repeated these experiments using both different solutes and different dialysis membranes. The combined results of four student groups showed that the flow across these nonideal membranes depends on the solute and membrane as well as the concentration of solute. Given a value for area times filtration coefficient (A x Lp) for the membranes (determined beforehand by their instructor), the students could calculate the reflection coefficient (sigma) for three solutes and two membranes. The results showed that large solutes had large sigma and that less porous membranes had larger sigma. A concurrent demonstration using this device and membranes showed that the osmotic flow can generate large pressures. These experiments and demonstration provide a balanced view of osmotic flow and pressure.

  8. Osmotically unresponsive water fraction on proteins: non-ideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin as a function of pH and salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Gary D; Kanal, Kalpana M; Cameron, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    How much does protein-associated water differ in colligative properties (freezing point, boiling point, vapor pressure and osmotic behavior) from pure bulk water? This question was approached by studying the globular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), using changes in pH and salt concentration to alter its native structural conformation and state of aggregation. BSA osmotic pressure was investigated experimentally and analyzed using the molecular model of Fullerton et al. [Biochem Cell Biol 1992;70(12):1325]. Analysis yielded both the extent of osmotically unresponsive water (OUW) and the effective molecular weight values of the membrane-impermeable BSA solute. Manipulation of BSA conformation and aggregation by membrane-penetrating cosolutes show that alterations in pH and salt concentration change the amount of bulk water that escapes into BSA from a minimum of 1.4 to a maximum of 11.7 g water per g dry mass BSA.

  9. The Water to Solute Permeability Ratio Governs the Osmotic Volume Dynamics in Beetroot Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Victoria; Sutka, Moira; Amodeo, Gabriela; Chara, Osvaldo; Ozu, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf ) is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous) osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf . We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modeling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf /Ps ), which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons, or stems that perform extensive rhythmic growth movements

  10. The Water to Solute Permeability Ratio Governs the Osmotic Volume Dynamics in Beetroot Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Victoria; Sutka, Moira; Amodeo, Gabriela; Chara, Osvaldo; Ozu, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell vacuoles occupy up to 90% of the cell volume and, beyond their physiological function, are constantly subjected to water and solute exchange. The osmotic flow and vacuole volume dynamics relies on the vacuole membrane -the tonoplast- and its capacity to regulate its permeability to both water and solutes. The osmotic permeability coefficient (Pf) is the parameter that better characterizes the water transport when submitted to an osmotic gradient. Usually, Pf determinations are made in vitro from the initial rate of volume change, when a fast (almost instantaneous) osmolality change occurs. When aquaporins are present, it is accepted that initial volume changes are only due to water movements. However, in living cells osmotic changes are not necessarily abrupt but gradually imposed. Under these conditions, water flux might not be the only relevant driving force shaping the vacuole volume response. In this study, we quantitatively investigated volume dynamics of isolated Beta vulgaris root vacuoles under progressively applied osmotic gradients at different pH, a condition that modifies the tonoplast Pf. We followed the vacuole volume changes while simultaneously determining the external osmolality time-courses and analyzing these data with mathematical modeling. Our findings indicate that vacuole volume changes, under progressively applied osmotic gradients, would not depend on the membrane elastic properties, nor on the non-osmotic volume of the vacuole, but on water and solute fluxes across the tonoplast. We found that the volume of the vacuole at the steady state is determined by the ratio of water to solute permeabilites (Pf/Ps), which in turn is ruled by pH. The dependence of the permeability ratio on pH can be interpreted in terms of the degree of aquaporin inhibition and the consequently solute transport modulation. This is relevant in many plant organs such as root, leaves, cotyledons, or stems that perform extensive rhythmic growth movements

  11. A novel solubility-modulated granules through porosity osmotic pump for controlled carvedilol delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Qun-Li; Li, Ping; Li, Yu-Min

    2012-01-01

    A method for the preparation of porosity osmotic pump granules was obtained by modulating carvedilol solubility with tartaric acid. Controlled porosity of the membrane was accomplished by the use of pore-forming agent in the coating. In this study, carvedilol was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop a zero-order release system; tartaric acid was used as the solubility promoter; NaCl was used as the osmotic agent; cellulose acetate (CA) was used as the materials of semipermeable membrane; and PEG-400 was used as the pore-forming agent in the semipermeable membrane. The influence of different factors or levels on the in vitro release was studied. In order to simulate the gastrointestinal tract environments, two kinds of pH media (pH 1.5 and 6.8) on drug release were studied in this research, respectively. This porosity osmotic pump was optimized by single factor design experiments, and it was found to deliver carvedilol at a zero-order rate within 12 h and controlled release for 24 h. We drew a conclusion that the solubility-modulated porosity osmotic pump system is simple to prepare and might be used for the preparation of osmotic pump system of other poorly water-soluble drugs with alkaline or acid groups.

  12. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  13. Ecophysiology of invasive plants: osmotic adjustment and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-12-01

    Current research into plant invasiveness often attempts to predict the effect of invasions under future climate change, but most studies only focus on ecological aspects. Understanding ecophysiological responses by characterizing physiological markers such as osmotic adjustment or antioxidant protection indicators will help us to project future invasiveness patterns. In this opinion article, we highlight how the information from physiological measurements can be incorporated into effective management strategies. Furthermore, we propose how combining research strategies of physiologists and ecologists could speed up our understanding of the advantageous mechanisms adopted by invasive species. We suggest that a combined approach would also be of considerable benefit for the development of effective governmental biodiversity conservation policies.

  14. Osmotically-assisted desalination method and system

    DOEpatents

    Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E.; Cath, Tzahi Y.

    2014-08-12

    Systems and methods for osmotically assisted desalination include using a pressurized concentrate from a pressure desalination process to pressurize a feed to the desalination process. The depressurized concentrate thereby produced is used as a draw solution for a pressure-retarded osmosis process. The pressure-retarded osmosis unit produces a pressurized draw solution stream that is used to pressurize another feed to the desalination process. In one example, the feed to the pressure-retarded osmosis process is impaired water.

  15. Evaluation of the tablet core factors influencing the release kinetics and the loadability of push-pull osmotic systems.

    PubMed

    Malaterre, Vincent; Ogorka, Joerg; Loggia, Nicoletta; Gurny, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Push-pull osmotic systems have been developed to deliver poorly soluble drugs in a modified-release fashion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the tablet core factors on the drug release kinetics and loadability. The release kinetics was efficiently modulated by varying either the proportion of osmotic agent or the drug layer polymer grade as an alternative to change the membrane characteristics. High osmotic agent proportions and viscous-grade polymers were recommended to formulate high drug loads up to 20% without losing both the release completeness and the zero-order drug release kinetics.

  16. Evaluation of an osmotic pump for microdialysis sampling in an awake and untethered rat.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua D; Heppert, Kathleen E; Davies, Malonne I; Lunte, Susan M

    2007-03-15

    The feasibility of using an osmotic pump in place of a syringe pump for microdialysis sampling in rat brain was investigated. The use of an osmotic pump permits the rat to be free from the constraints of the standard tethered system. The in vitro flow rates of a microdialysis syringe pump (set at 10.80 microl/h) and the osmotic pump (pump specifications were 11.35 microl/h) with no probe attached were compared, yielding results of 10.87 microl/h+/-1.7% and 10.95 microl/h+/-8.0%, respectively. The average of four flow rate experiments in vivo yielded R.S.D.s less than 10% and an average flow rate of 11.1 microl/h. Following the flow rate studies, in vivo sampling of neurotransmitters was accomplished with the osmotic pump coupled to a microdialysis probe implanted in the brain. Finally, after determination of basal levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) in the rats, the rats were dosed with benserazide followed by l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA). The results from the dosing study showed at least a 10-fold increase in compounds in the l-DOPA metabolic pathway (DOPAC and HVA) and a slight or no increase in 5-HIAA (serotonin metabolic pathway.) These results indicate that the osmotic pump is a viable alternative to the syringe pump for use in microdialysis sampling.

  17. Ions in mixed dielectric solvents: density profiles and osmotic pressure between charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Harries, Daniel; Podgornik, Rudi

    2009-04-30

    The forces between charged macromolecules, usually given in terms of osmotic pressure, are highly affected by the intervening ionic solution. While in most theoretical studies the solution is treated as a homogeneous structureless dielectric medium, recent experimental studies concluded that, for a bathing solution composed of two solvents (binary mixture), the osmotic pressure between charged macromolecules is affected by the binary solvent composition. By adding local solvent composition terms to the free energy, we obtain a general expression for the osmotic pressure, in planar geometry and within the mean-field framework. The added effect is due to the permeability inhomogeneity and nonelectrostatic short-range interactions between the ions and solvents (preferential solvation). This effect is mostly pronounced at small distances and leads to a reduction in the osmotic pressure for macromolecular separations of the order 1-2 nm. Furthermore, it leads to a depletion of one of the two solvents from the charged macromolecules (modeled as planar interfaces). Lastly, by comparing the theoretical results with experimental ones, an explanation based on preferential solvation is offered for recent experiments on the osmotic pressure of DNA solutions.

  18. Osmotic properties of human red cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A K; Toon, M R; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    When an osmotic pressure gradient is applied to human red cells, the volume changes anomalously, as if there were a significant fraction of "nonosmotic water" which could not serve as solvent for the cell solutes, a finding which has been discussed widely in the literature. In 1968, Gary-Bobo and Solomon (J. Gen. Physiol. 52:825) concluded that the anomalies could not be entirely explained by the colligative properties of hemoglobin (Hb) and proposed that there was an additional concentration dependence of the Hb charge (ZHb). A number of investigators, particularly Freedman and Hoffman (1979, J. Gen. Physiol. 74:157) have been unable to confirm Gary-Bobo and Solomon's experimental evidence for this concentration dependence of ZHb and we now report that we are also unable to repeat the earlier experiments. Nonetheless, there still remains a significant anomaly which amounts to 12.5 +/- 0.8% of the total isosmotic cell water (P much less than 0.0005, t test), even after taking account of the concentration dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient and all the other known physical chemical constraints, ideal and nonideal. It is suggested that the anomalies at high Hb concentration in shrunken cells may arise from the ionic strength dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient. In swollen red cells at low ionic strength, solute binding to membrane and intracellular proteins is increased and it is suggested that this factor may account, in part, for the anomalous behavior of these cells.

  19. Osmotic Pressure in Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2015-03-01

    Microgels are microscopic gel particles, typically 10-1000 nm in size, that are swollen by a solvent. Hollow microgels (microcapsules) can encapsulate cargo, such as dye molecules or drugs, in their solvent-filled cavities. Their sensitive response to environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pH) and influence on flow properties suit microgels to widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and consumer care industries. When dispersed in water, polyelectrolyte gels become charged through dissociation of counterions. The electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside and outside of ionic microgels influences particle swelling and bulk materials properties, including thermodynamic, structural, optical, and rheological properties. Within the primitive and cell models of polyelectrolyte solutions, we derive an exact statistical mechanical formula for the contribution of mobile microions to the osmotic pressure within ionic microgels. Using Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we validate this result by explicitly calculating ion distributions across the surface of an ionic microgel and the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure. Within a coarse-grained one-component model, we further chart the limits of the cell model for salty dispersions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  20. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Julian

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process. PMID:28006008

  1. Osmotic stress, endogenous abscisic acid and the control of leaf morphology in Hippuris vulgaris L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goliber, T. E.; Feldman, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that heterophyllous aquatic plants can be induced to form aerial-type leaves on submerged shoots when they are grown in exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). This study reports on the relationship between osmotic stress (e.g. the situation encountered by a shoot tip when it grows above the water surface), endogenous ABA (as measured by gas chromatography-electron capture detector) and leaf morphology in the heterophyllous aquatic plant, Hippuris vulgaris. Free ABA could not be detected in submerged shoots of H. vulgaris but in aerial shoots ABA occurred at ca. 40 ng (g fr wt)-1. When submerged shoots were osmotically stressed ABA appeared at levels of 26 to 40 ng (g fr wt)-1. These and other data support two main conclusions: (1) Osmotically stressing a submerged shoot causes the appearance of detectable levels of ABA. (2) The rise of ABA in osmotically stressed submerged shoots in turn induces a change in leaf morphology from the submerged to the aerial form. This corroborates the hypothesis that, in the natural environment, ABA levels rise in response to the osmotic stress encountered when a submerged shoot grows up through the water/air interface and that the increased ABA leads to the production of aerial-type leaves.

  2. Membrane fluidity of halophilic ectoine-secreting bacteria related to osmotic and thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Sven; David, Florian; Clark, Wiebke; Wittmann, Christoph; Krull, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    In response to sudden decrease in osmotic pressure, halophilic microorganisms secrete their accumulated osmolytes. This specific stress response, combined with physiochemical responses to the altered environment, influence the membrane properties and integrity of cells, with consequent effects on growth and yields in bioprocesses, such as bacterial milking. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in membrane fluidity and integrity induced by environmental stress in ectoine-secreting organisms. The halophilic ectoine-producing strains Alkalibacillus haloalkaliphilus and Chromohalobacter salexigens were treated hypo- and hyper-osmotically at several temperatures. The steady-state anisotropy of fluorescently labeled cells was measured, and membrane integrity assessed by flow cytometry and ectoine distribution. Strong osmotic downshocks slightly increased the fluidity of the bacterial membranes. As the temperature increased, the increasing membrane fluidity encouraged more ectoine release under the same osmotic shock conditions. On the other hand, combined shock treatments increased the number of disintegrated cells. From the ectoine release and membrane integrity measurements under coupled thermal and osmotic shock conditions, we could optimize the secretion conditions for both bacteria.

  3. Effects of intrathecal kynurenate on arterial pressure during chronic osmotic stress in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Veitenheimer, Britta; Osborn, John W

    2013-01-15

    Increased plasma osmolality elevates mean arterial pressure (MAP) through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the neurotransmitters released in the spinal cord to regulate MAP during osmotic stress remain unresolved. Glutamatergic neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla project to sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord and are likely activated during conditions of osmotic stress; however, this has not been examined in conscious rats. This study investigated whether increased MAP during chronic osmotic stress depends on activation of spinal glutamate receptors. Rats were chronically instrumented with an indwelling intrathecal (i.t.) catheter for antagonist delivery to the spinal cord and a radiotelemetry transmitter for continuous monitoring of MAP and heart rate. Osmotic stress induced by 48 h of water deprivation (WD) increased MAP by ~15 mmHg. Intrathecal kynurenic acid, a nonspecific antagonist of ionotropic glutamate receptors, decreased MAP significantly more after 48 h of WD compared with the water-replete state. Water-deprived rats also showed a greater fall in MAP in response to i.t. 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate. Finally, i.t. kynurenic acid also decreased MAP more in an osmotically driven model of neurogenic hypertension, the DOCA-salt rat, compared with normotensive controls. Our results suggest that spinally released glutamate mediates increased MAP during 48-h WD and DOCA-salt hypertension.

  4. An analysis of the effects of osmotic backwashing on the seawater reverse osmosis process.

    PubMed

    Park, JunYoung; Jeong, WooWon; Nam, JongWoo; Kim, JaeHun; Kim, JiHoon; Chon, Kangmin; Lee, Euijong; Kim, HyungSoo; Jang, Am

    2014-01-01

    Fouling control is an important consideration in the design and operation of membrane-based water treatment processes. It has been generally known that chemical cleaning is still the most common method to remove foultants and maintain the performance of reverse osmosis (RO) desalination. Regardless of the chemical membrane cleaning methods applied effectively, however, frequent chemical cleaning can shorten the membrane life. In addition, it also increases operating and maintenance costs due to the waste chemical disposal. As an alternative, osmotic backwashing can be applied to RO membranes by diluting the concentration polarization (CP) layer. In this study, the effects of osmotic backwashing were analysed under different total dissolved salts (TDSs) and backwashing conditions, and the parameters of the osmotic backwashing were evaluated. The results of the analysis based on the properties of the organic matters found in raw water showed that the cleaning efficiency in respect to the fouling by hydrophilic organic matters was the greatest. Osmotic backwashing was carried out by changing the TDS of the permeate. As a result, the backwashing volume decreased with time due to the CP of the permeate and the backwashing volume. The difference in the osmotic pressure between the raw water and the permeate (Delta pi) also decreased as time passed. It was confirmed that when the temperature of the effluent was high, both the cleaning efficiency and the backwashing volume, which inpours at the same time, increased. When the circulation flow of the effluent was high, both the cleaning efficiency and the backwashing volume increased.

  5. Differentiation of osmotic and secretory diarrhoea by stool carbohydrate and osmolar gap measurements

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Salazar-Lindo, E.; Leon-Barua, R.

    1997-01-01

    

 Clinical features and laboratory tests that determine carbohydrate in faeces were evaluated to determine which was best able to distinguish between osmotic and secretory diarrhoea in infants and children. For this purpose 80 boys aged 3 to 24 months, with acute watery diarrhoea, were studied prospectively. The faecal osmolar gap (FOG) was calculated as: serum osmolarity − [2 × (faecal sodium + potassium concentration)]. Fifty eight patients were classified as having predominantly osmotic diarrhoea (FOG >100 mosmol/l), and 22 as having predominantly secretory diarrhoea (FOG ⩽100 mosmol/l). The two groups were comparable in their clinical features on admission, in the results of blood and urine tests, and in the evolution of their diarrhoeal illness. Evidence of steatorrhoea (by positive Sudan III test) and of acid faecal pH on admission were significantly more frequent in patients with osmotic diarrhoea. Mean (SD) faecal osmolarity was not significantly different between the two groups (319 (80) mosmol/l in secretory diarrhoea v 361 (123) mosmol/l in osmotic diarrhoea). Tests for reducing substances in faeces such as Benedict's test—with and without hydrolysis—and glucose strip, all showed a positive and significant association with osmotic diarrhoea (p <0.05, <0.025, <0.05, respectively). The presence of excess reducing substances (Benedict's test with hydrolysis >++) on admission was the most sensitive and specific test with the best predictive value for differentiating between the two types of watery diarrhoea.

 PMID:9370895

  6. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli K-12 to continuous osmotic and heat stresses.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Csonka, Laszlo N; Paliy, Oleg

    2008-05-01

    Osmotic stress is known to increase the thermotolerance and oxidative-stress resistance of bacteria by a mechanism that is not adequately understood. We probed the cross-regulation of continuous osmotic and heat stress responses by characterizing the effects of external osmolarity (0.3 M versus 0.0 M NaCl) and temperature (43 degrees C versus 30 degrees C) on the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12. Our most important discovery was that a number of genes in the SoxRS and OxyR oxidative-stress regulons were up-regulated by high osmolarity, high temperature, or a combination of both stresses. This result can explain the previously noted cross-protection of osmotic stress against oxidative and heat stresses. Most of the genes shown in previous studies to be induced during the early phase of adaptation to hyperosmotic shock were found to be also overexpressed under continuous osmotic stress. However, there was a poorer overlap between the heat shock genes that are induced transiently after high temperature shifts and the genes that we found to be chronically up-regulated at 43 degrees C. Supplementation of the high-osmolarity medium with the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, which reduces the cytoplasmic K(+) pool, did not lead to a universal reduction in the expression of osmotically induced genes. This finding does not support the hypothesis that K(+) is the central osmoregulatory signal in Enterobacteriaceae.

  7. Laboratory experiments for estimating chemical osmotic parameters of mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, S.; Tokunaga, T.; Mogi, K.; Ito, K.; Takeda, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have quantitatively shown that mudstone can act as semi-permeable membrane and can generate abnormally high pore pressure in sedimentary basins. Reflection coefficient is one of the important properties that affect the chemical osmotic behavior of mudstones. However, not many quantitative studies on the reflection coefficient of mudstones have been done. We have developed a laboratory apparatus to observe chemical osmotic behavior, and a numerical simulation technique to estimate the reflection coefficient and other relating properties of mudstones. A core sample of siliceous mudstone obtained from the drilled core at Horonobe, Japan, was set into the apparatus and was saturated by 0.1mol/L sodium chloride solution. Then, the up-side reservoir was replaced with 0.05mol/L sodium chloride solution, and temporal changes of both pressure and concentration of the solution in both up-side and bottom-side reservoirs were measured. Using the data obtained from the experiment, we estimated the reflection coefficient, effective diffusion coefficient, hydraulic conductivity, and specific storage of the sample by fitting the numerical simulation results with the observed ones. A preliminary numerical simulation of groundwater flow and solute migration was conducted in the area where the core sample was obtained, using the reflection coefficient and other properties obtained from this study. The result suggested that the abnormal pore pressure observed in the region can be explained by the chemical osmosis.

  8. Effect of aging on regional cerebral blood flow responses associated with osmotic thirst and its satiation by water drinking: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M J; Zamarripa, F; Shade, R; Phillips, P A; McKinley, M; Fox, P T; Blair-West, J; Denton, D A; Egan, G F

    2008-01-08

    Levels of thirst and ad libitum drinking decrease with advancing age, making older people vulnerable to dehydration. This study investigated age-related changes in brain responses to thirst and drinking in healthy men. Thirst was induced with hypertonic infusions (3.1 ml/kg 0.51M NaCl) in young (Y) and older (O) subjects. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured with positron emission tomography (PET). Thirst activations were identified by correlating rCBF with thirst ratings. Average rCBF was measured from regions of interest (ROI) corresponding to activation clusters in each group. The effects of drinking were examined by correlating volume of water drunk with changes in ROI rCBF from maximum thirst to postdrinking. There were increases in blood osmolality (Y, 2.8 +/- 1.8%; O, 2.2 +/- 1.4%) and thirst ratings (Y, 3.1 +/- 2.1; O, 3.7 +/- 2.8) from baseline to the end of the hypertonic infusion. Older subjects drank less water (1.9 +/- 1.6 ml/kg) than younger subjects (3.9 +/- 1.9 ml/kg). Thirst-related activation was evident in S1/M1, prefrontal cortex, anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC), premotor cortex, and superior temporal gyrus in both groups. Postdrinking changes of rCBF in the aMCC correlated with drinking volumes in both groups. There was a greater reduction in aMCC rCBF relative to water drunk in the older group. Aging is associated with changes in satiation that militate against adequate hydration in response to hyperosmolarity, although it is unclear whether these alterations are due to changes in primary afferent inflow or higher cortical functioning.

  9. Design and statistical optimization of osmotically driven capsule based on push-pull technology.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Wasim; Deshmukh, Prashant K; Patil, Ganesh B; Chatap, Vivekanand K; Bari, Sanjay B

    2013-01-01

    In present investigation attempt was made to develop and statistically optimize osmotically active capsule tailor made from the concept of bilayer (push-pull) osmotic tablet technology. The capsule was comprised of active (drug) and push (osmogen) layer. Active layer was compressed in form of tablet by mixing known amount of drug and formulation excipients. Similarly push layer was made by compressing Mannitol with formulation excipients. Finally, both layers were packed in hard gelatin capsule having small aperture at top and coated with semipermeable membrane to form osmotically active capsule. Formulated and optimized capsules were characterized for Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), scanning electron microscopy, In-vitro drug release study and Release models and kinetics. Statistically optimized formulation showed good correlation between predicted and experimented results, which further confirms the practicability and validity of the model.

  10. Electro-osmotic flow of a model electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Singer, Sherwin J; Zheng, Zhi; Conlisk, A T

    2005-04-01

    Electro-osmotic flow is studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a model system chosen to elucidate various factors affecting the velocity profile and facilitate comparison with existing continuum theories. The model system consists of spherical ions and solvent, with stationary, uniformly charged walls that make a channel with a height of 20 particle diameters. We find that hydrodynamic theory adequately describes simple pressure-driven (Poiseuille) flow in this model. However, Poisson-Boltzmann theory fails to describe the ion distribution in important situations, and therefore continuum fluid dynamics based on the Poisson-Boltzmann ion distribution disagrees with simulation results in those situations. The failure of Poisson-Boltzmann theory is traced to the exclusion of ions near the channel walls resulting from reduced solvation of the ions in that region. When a corrected ion distribution is used as input for hydrodynamic theory, agreement with numerical simulations is restored. An analytic theory is presented that demonstrates that repulsion of the ions from the channel walls increases the flow rate, and attraction to the walls has the opposite effect. A recent numerical study of electro-osmotic flow is reanalyzed in the light of our findings, and the results conform well to our conclusions for the model system.

  11. Osmotic water permeability of plasma and vacuolar membranes in protoplasts I: high osmotic water permeability in radish (Raphanus sativus) root cells as measured by a new method.

    PubMed

    Murai-Hatano, Mari; Kuwagata, Tsuneo

    2007-03-01

    Intra- and transcellular water movements in plants are regulated by the water permeability of the plasma membrane (PM) and vacuolar membrane (VM) in plant cells. In the present study, we investigated the osmotic water permeability of both PM (P ( f1)) and VM (P ( f2)), as well as the bulk osmotic water permeability of a protoplast (P ( f(bulk))) isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus) roots. The values of P ( f(bulk)) and P ( f2) were determined from the swelling/shrinking rate of protoplasts and isolated vacuoles under hypo- or hypertonic conditions. In order to minimize the effect of unstirred layer, we monitored dropping or rising protoplasts (vacuoles) in sorbitol solutions as they swelled or shrunk. P ( f1) was calculated from P ( f(bulk)) and P ( f2) by using the 'three-compartment model', which describes the theoretical relationship between P ( f1), P ( f2) and P ( f(bulk)) (Kuwagata and Murai-Hatano in J Plant Res, 2007). The time-dependent changes in the volume of protoplasts and isolated vacuoles fitted well to the theoretical curves, and solute permeation of PM and VM was able to be neglected for measuring the osmotic water permeability. High osmotic water permeability of more than 500 mum s(-1), indicating high activity of aquaporins (water channels), was observed in both PM and VM in radish root cells. This method has the advantage that P ( f1) and P ( f2) can be measured accurately in individual higher plant cells.

  12. Role of the osmotic stress regulatory pathway in morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Duran, Rocio; Cary, Jeffrey W; Calvo, Ana M

    2010-04-01

    Environmental stimuli trigger an adaptative cellular response to optimize the probability of survival and proliferation. In eukaryotic organisms from mammals to fungi osmotic stress, mainly through the action of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, leads to a response necessary for adapting and surviving hyperosmotic environments. In this review we show that the osmoadaptative response is conserved but not identical in different fungi. The osmoadaptative response system is also intimately linked to morphogenesis in filamentous fungi, including mycotoxin producers. Previous studies indicate that the response to osmotic stress is also coupled to the biosynthesis of natural products, including mycotoxins.

  13. Osmotic Water Permeability of Isolated Protoplasts. Modifications during Development1

    PubMed Central

    Ramahaleo, Tiana; Morillon, Raphaël; Alexandre, Joël; Lassalles, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    A transference chamber was developed to measure the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pos) in protoplasts 40 to 120 μm in diameter. The protoplast was held by a micropipette and submitted to a steep osmotic gradient created in the transference chamber. Pos was derived from the changes in protoplast dimensions, as measured using a light microscope. Permeabilities were in the range 1 to 1000 μm s−1 for the various types of protoplasts tested. The precision for Pos was ≤40%, and within this limit, no asymmetry in the water fluxes was observed. Measurements on protoplasts isolated from 2- to 5-d-old roots revealed a dramatic increase in Pos during root development. A shift in Pos from 10 to 500 μm s−1 occurred within less than 48 h. This phenomenon was found in maize (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and rape (Brassica napus) roots. These results show that early developmental processes modify water-transport properties of the plasma membrane, and that the transference chamber is adapted to the study of water-transport mechanisms in native membranes. PMID:10069827

  14. Osmotic stress is accompanied by protein glycation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Gagan; Bilova, Tatiana; Schmidt, Rico; Greifenhagen, Uta; Berger, Robert; Tarakhovskaya, Elena; Stöckhardt, Stefanie; Balcke, Gerd Ulrich; Humbeck, Klaus; Brandt, Wolfgang; Sinz, Andrea; Vogt, Thomas; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Wessjohann, Ludger; Frolov, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Among the environmental alterations accompanying oncoming climate changes, drought is the most important factor influencing crop plant productivity. In plants, water deficit ultimately results in the development of oxidative stress and accumulation of osmolytes (e.g. amino acids and carbohydrates) in all tissues. Up-regulation of sugar biosynthesis in parallel to the increasing overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) might enhance protein glycation, i.e. interaction of carbonyl compounds, reducing sugars and α-dicarbonyls with lysyl and arginyl side-chains yielding early (Amadori and Heyns compounds) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Although the constitutive plant protein glycation patterns were characterized recently, the effects of environmental stress on AGE formation are unknown so far. To fill this gap, we present here a comprehensive in-depth study of the changes in Arabidopsis thaliana advanced glycated proteome related to osmotic stress. A 3 d application of osmotic stress revealed 31 stress-specifically and 12 differentially AGE-modified proteins, representing altogether 56 advanced glycation sites. Based on proteomic and metabolomic results, in combination with biochemical, enzymatic and gene expression analysis, we propose monosaccharide autoxidation as the main stress-related glycation mechanism, and glyoxal as the major glycation agent in plants subjected to drought. PMID:27856706

  15. Molecular origins of osmotic second virial coefficients of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Neal, B L; Asthagiri, D; Lenhoff, A M

    1998-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of protein solutions are determined by the molecular interactions involving both solvent and solute molecules. A quantitative understanding of the relationship would facilitate more systematic procedures for manipulating the properties in a process environment. In this work the molecular basis for the osmotic second virial coefficient, B22, is studied; osmotic effects are critical in membrane transport, and the value of B22 has also been shown to correlate with protein crystallization behavior. The calculations here account for steric, electrostatic, and short-range interactions, with the structural and functional anisotropy of the protein molecules explicitly accounted for. The orientational dependence of the protein interactions is seen to have a pronounced effect on the calculations; in particular, the relatively few protein-protein configurations in which the apposing surfaces display geometric complementarity contribute disproportionately strongly to B22. The importance of electrostatic interactions is also amplified in these high-complementarity configurations. The significance of molecular recognition in determining B22 can explain the correlation with crystallization behavior, and it suggests that alteration of local molecular geometry can help in manipulating protein solution behavior. The results also have implications for the role of protein interactions in biological self-organization. PMID:9788942

  16. A novel zinc-finger-like gene from Tamarix hispida is involved in salt and osmotic tolerance.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Wang, Yucheng; Lou, Lingling; Zheng, Tangchun; Qu, Guan-Zheng

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, a zinc-finger-like cDNA (ThZFL) was cloned from the Tamarix hispida. Northern blot analysis showed that the expression of ThZFL can be induced by salt, osmotic stress and ABA treatment. Overexpression of the ThZFL confers salt and osmotic stress tolerance in both yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and tobacco. Furthermore, MDA levels in ThZFL transformed tobacco were significantly decreased compared with control plants under salt and osmotic stress, suggesting ThZFL may confer stress tolerance by decreasing membrane lipid peroxidation. Subcellular localization analysis showed the ThZFL protein is localized in the cell wall. Our results indicated the ThZFL gene is an excellent candidate for genetic engineering to improve salt and osmotic tolerance in agricultural plants.

  17. Lipid tubule growth by osmotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Zhang, Di; Orster, George; Shen, Amy

    2013-11-01

    We present here a procedure for growing lipid tubules in vitro. This method allows us to grow tubules of consistent shape and structure and thus can be a useful tool for nano-engineering applications. There are three stages during the tubule growth process: initiation, elongation and termination. Balancing the forces that act on the tubule head shows that the growth of tubules during the elongation phase depends on the balance between osmotic pressure and the viscous drag exerted on the membrane from the substrate and the external fluid. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we identify the key forces that control tubule growth during the elongation phase.

  18. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  19. Osmotic stress-induced polyamine oxidation mediates defence responses and reduces stress-enhanced grapevine susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Hatmi, Saloua; Trotel-Aziz, Patricia; Villaume, Sandra; Couderchet, Michel; Clément, Christophe; Aziz, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic factors inducing osmotic stress can influence the plant immune response and resistance to pathogen infections. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)- and sucrose-induced osmotic stress on polyamine (PA) homeostasis and the basal immune response in grapevine plantlets before and after Botrytis cinerea infection was determined. Pharmacological approaches were also addressed to assess the contribution of osmotic stress-induced PA oxidation to the regulation of defence responses and the susceptibility of grapevine to B. cinerea. Following osmotic stress or pathogen infection, PA homeostasis was linked to enhanced activity of diamine oxidases (CuAO) and PA oxidases (PAO) and the production of 1,3-diaminopropane. These responses paralleled the accumulation of the main stilbenic phytoalexins, resveratrol and ε-viniferin and upregulation of gene transcripts including STS (a stilbene synthase), PR-2 (a β-1,3-glucanase), PR3-4c (acidic chitinase IV), and PR-5 (a thaumatin-like protein), as well as NCED2 involved in abscisic acid biosynthesis. It was also demonstrated that leaves pre-exposed to osmotic stress and later inoculated with B. cinerea showed enhanced PA accumulation and attenuation of CuAO and PAO activities. This was consistent with the impaired production of phytoalexins and transcript levels of defence- and stress-related genes following infection, and the enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. Pharmacological experiments revealed that, under osmotic stress conditions, CuAO and PAO were involved in PA homeostasis and in the regulation of defence responses. Specific inhibition of CuAO and PAO in osmotically stressed leaves strongly attenuated the induction of defence responses triggered by B. cinerea infection and enhanced susceptibility to the pathogen. Taken together, this study reveals a contribution of PA catabolism to the resistance state through modulation of immune response in grapevine following osmotic stress and/or after B

  20. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  1. Osmotic self-propulsion of slender particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    We consider self-diffusiophoresis of axisymmetric particles using the continuum description of Golestanian et al. ["Designing phoretic micro-and nano-swimmers," New J. Phys. 9, 126 (2007)], where the chemical reaction at the particle boundary is modelled by a prescribed distribution of solute absorption and the interaction of solute molecules with that boundary is represented by diffusio-osmotic slip. With a view towards modelling of needle-like particle shapes, commonly employed in experiments, the self-propulsion problem is analyzed using slender-body theory. For a particle of length 2L, whose boundary is specified by the axial distribution κ(z) of cross-sectional radius, we obtain the approximation - /μ 2 D L ∫- L L j ( z ) /d κ ( z ) d z d z for the particle velocity, wherein j(z) is the solute-flux distribution, μ the diffusio-osmotic slip coefficient, and D the solute diffusivity. This approximation can accommodate discontinuous flux distributions, which are commonly used for describing bimetallic particles; it agrees strikingly well with the numerical calculations of Popescu et al. ["Phoretic motion of spheroidal particles due to self-generated solute gradients," Eur. Phys. J. E: Soft Matter Biol. Phys. 31, 351-367 (2010)], performed for spheroidal particles.

  2. Novel regulation of aquaporins during osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Bohnert, Hans J; Pantoja, Omar

    2004-08-01

    Aquaporin protein regulation and redistribution in response to osmotic stress was investigated. Ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) McTIP1;2 (McMIPF) mediated water flux when expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes. Mannitol-induced water imbalance resulted in increased protein amounts in tonoplast fractions and a shift in protein distribution to other membrane fractions, suggesting aquaporin relocalization. Indirect immunofluorescence labeling also supports a change in membrane distribution for McTIP1;2 and the appearance of a unique compartment where McTIP1;2 is expressed. Mannitol-induced redistribution of McTIP1;2 was arrested by pretreatment with brefeldin A, wortmannin, and cytochalasin D, inhibitors of vesicle trafficking-related processes. Evidence suggests a role for glycosylation and involvement of a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in McTIP1;2 redistribution. McTIP1;2 redistribution to endosomal compartments may be part of a homeostatic process to restore and maintain cellular osmolarity under osmotic-stress conditions.

  3. Involvement of redox- and phosphorylation-dependent pathways in osmotic adaptation in sperm cells of euryhaline tilapia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Nakajima, Ayako; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2011-06-15

    Sperm cells involved in fertilisation must tolerate hypo-osmotic and hyper-osmotic environments. Euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) can acclimatise to and reproduce in freshwater and seawater because its sperm are able to adapt to these differing osmotic environments. In this study, we found that the dephosphorylation of sperm proteins in O. mossambicus correlated with the activation of flagellar motility when sperm were exposed to hypotonic or hypertonic conditions, and that differences in phosphorylation may reflect adaptations to a given osmotic environment. Of the sperm proteins that were dephosphorylated, the phosphorylation pattern of an 18 kDa protein, identified as the superoxide anion scavenger Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD), was different in freshwater- and seawater-acclimatised tilapia sperm. Cu/Zn SOD was distributed from the sperm head to the flagellum. Additionally, differences were observed between freshwater and seawater tilapia in the nitration of tyrosine residues (which might be mediated by SOD) in sperm flagellar proteins in response to osmotic shock. These results demonstrate that reactive-oxygen-species-dependent mechanisms contribute to both osmotic tolerance and the activation of flagellar motility.

  4. Effects of non-Newtonian power law rheology on mass transport of a neutral solute for electro-osmotic flow in a porous microtube

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2013-01-01

    Mass transport of a neutral solute for a power law fluid in a porous microtube under electro-osmotic flow regime is characterized in this study. Combined electro-osmotic and pressure driven flow is conducted herein. An analytical solution of concentration profile within mass transfer boundary layer is derived from the first principle. The solute transport through the porous wall is also coupled with the electro-osmotic flow to predict the solute concentration in the permeate stream. The effects of non-Newtonian rheology and the operating conditions on the permeation rate and permeate solute concentration are analyzed in detail. Both cases of assisting (electro-osmotic and poiseulle flow are in same direction) and opposing flow (the individual flows are in opposite direction) cases are taken care of. Enhancement of Sherwood due to electro-osmotic flow for a non-porous conduit is also quantified. Effects if non-Newtonian rheology on Sherwood number enhancement are observed. PMID:24404046

  5. Osmotic Power: A Fresh Look at an Old Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Electricity from osmotic pressure might seem a far-fetched idea but this article describes a prototype in Norway where the osmotic pressure generated between salt and fresh water drives a turbine. This idea was applied in a student investigation, where they were tasked with researching which alternative materials could be used for the…

  6. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  7. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  8. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  9. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  10. 21 CFR 864.6600 - Osmotic fragility test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Osmotic fragility test. 864.6600 Section 864.6600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6600 Osmotic...

  11. Astrocytes Are an Early Target in Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Soupart, Alain; Boom, Alain; Schiettecatte, Johan; Pochet, Roland; Brion, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Abrupt osmotic changes during rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia result in demyelinative brain lesions, but the sequence of events linking rapid osmotic changes to myelin loss is not yet understood. Here, in a rat model of osmotic demyelination syndrome, we found that massive astrocyte death occurred after rapid correction of hyponatremia, delineating the regions of future myelin loss. Astrocyte death caused a disruption of the astrocyte-oligodendrocyte network, rapidly upregulated inflammatory cytokines genes, and increased serum S100B, which predicted clinical manifestations and outcome of osmotic demyelination. These results support a model for the pathophysiology of osmotic brain injury in which rapid correction of hyponatremia triggers apoptosis in astrocytes followed by a loss of trophic communication between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, secondary inflammation, microglial activation, and finally demyelination. PMID:21885671

  12. Modeling of laboratory experiments determining the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.

    2008-12-01

    properties of clay-rich materials have been demonstrated in laboratory experiments. However, it remains inconclusive whether chemical osmosis can retain the pressure disequilibrium and so influence groundwater flow in a geologic time scale. Therefore, systematic research involving field-scale investigations of pressure and salinity distributions and experimental estimations of the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media is required. This study focuses on the development of a laboratory experimental system and the analytical solutions to estimate the chemico-osmotic, hydraulic and diffusive properties of formation media. The experimental system consists of a flexible-wall permeameter cell that loads confining pressures, along with a closed fluid circuit to perform osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments under background fluid pressures. This experimental design enables simulating underground conditions at the depths required for safety assessments of geological waste disposal. The effectiveness of the experimental system and the analytical solutions are demonstrated with a set of osmotic, hydraulic and diffusion experiments performed using sedimentary rocks.

  13. Causes and consequences of high osmotic potentials in epiphytic higher plants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Craig E; Lin, T C; Lin, K C; Hsu, C C; Chiou, W L

    2004-10-01

    Past reports of the water relations of epiphytes, particularly bromeliads, indicate that tissue osmotic potentials in these tropical and subtropical plants are very high (close to zero) and are similar to values for aquatic plants. This is puzzling because several ecophysiological studies have revealed a high degree of drought stress tolerance in some of these epiphytes. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to increase the number of epiphytic taxa sampled for tissue osmotic potentials; and (2) to explain the apparent discrepancy in the significance of the tissue water relations and tolerance of drought stress in epiphytes. Tissue osmotic potentials of 30 species of epiphytic ferns, lycophytes, and orchids were measured in a subtropical rain forest in northeastern Taiwan. Nearly all values were less negative than -1.0 MPa, in line with all previous data for epiphytes. It is argued that such high osmotic potentials, indicative of low solute concentrations, are the result of environmental constraints of the epiphytic habitat on productivity of these plants, and that low rates of photosynthesis and transpiration delay the onset of turgor loss in the tissues of epiphytes such that they appear to be very drought-stress tolerant. Maintenance of photosynthetic activity long into drought periods is ascribed to low rates of transpiration and, hence, delayed tissue desiccation, and hydration of the photosynthetic tissue at the expense of water from the water-storage parenchyma.

  14. Electro-osmotic flow in polygonal ducts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Yi; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents semi-analytical solutions to electro-osmotic (EO) flow through polygonal ducts under the Debye-Hückel approximation. Analytical series solutions assisted with numerical collocations are found to yield very fast convergence. The solutions have practical applications as the pores of EO membranes are mostly hexagonal, stacked densely in a beehive-like matrix. In addition, we develop simple asymptotic approximations that would be applicable to all EO tube flows of small as well as large dimensionless electrokinetic width. This facilitates investigation of analytical structures of general EO flows in all shapes of tubes, including the present geometries. In particular, for thick electrical double layers, the flow rate of EO is related to the corresponding viscous Poiseuille flow rate, while for thin electrical double layers, the flow rate is shown to be characterized by the cross-sectional area and the perimeter length of the tubes.

  15. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 - 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  16. A Case of Osmotic Demyelination Presenting with Severe Hypernatremia

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min Jee; Kim, Do Hyoung; Kim, Young Hwa; Yang, In Mo; Park, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome is a demyelinating disorder associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. But, it rarely occurs in acute hypernatremia, and it leads to permanent neurologic symptoms and is associated with high mortality. A 44-year-old woman treated with alternative medicine was admitted with a history of drowsy mental status. Severe hypernatremia (197mEq/L) with hyperosmolality (415mOsm/kgH2O) was evident initially and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal intensity lesion in the pons, consistent with central pontine myelinolysis. She was treated with 0.45% saline and 5% dextrose water and intravenous corticosteroids. Serum sodium normalized and her clinical course gradually improved. Brain lesion of myelinolysis also improved in a follow-up imaging study. This is the first report of a successful treatment of hypernatremia caused by iatrogenic salt intake, and it confirms the importance of adequate fluid supplementation in severe hypernatremia. PMID:26240598

  17. Solute coupled diffusion in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Nathan T; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2009-09-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging water treatment technology with potential applications in desalination and wastewater reclamation. In FO, water is extracted from a feed solution using the high osmotic pressure of a hypertonic solution that flows on the opposite side of a semipermeable membrane; however, solutes diffuse simultaneously through the membrane in both directions and may jeopardize the process. In this study, we have comprehensively explored the effects of different operating conditions on the forward diffusion of solutes commonly found in brackish water and seawater, and reverse diffusion of common draw solution solutes. Results show that reverse transport of solutes through commercially available FO membranes range between 80 mg to nearly 3,000 mg per liter of water produced. Divalent feed solutes have low permeation rates (less than 1 mmol/m2-hr) while monovalent ions and uncharged solutes exhibit higher permeation. Findings have significant implications on the performance and sustainability of the FO process.

  18. Hypo-osmotic shock induces nuclear export and proteasome-dependent decrease of UBL5

    SciTech Connect

    Hatanaka, Ken; Ikegami, Koji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi . E-mail: setou@nips.ac.jp

    2006-11-24

    The osmolarity of body fluid is strictly controlled through the action of diuretic hormones, which are secreted in the hypothalamus. In the mammalian brain, ubiquitin-like 5 (UBL5) is expressed in oxytocin- and vasopressin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus, and these neurons play a role in regulating osmolarity. We examined the dynamics of UBL5 levels in response to hyper- or hypo-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic conditions led to significantly reduced levels of UBL5 both in brain slices from the hypothalamus and in NIH-3T3 cells. This decrease in UBL5 was transcription-independent and proteasome-dependent. Time-course immunocytochemical studies using exogenous UBL5 revealed that the protein was exported from the nucleus under hypo-osmotic conditions and decreased in a proteasome-dependent manner. This report is the first to describe changes in the intracellular and subcellular localization of UBL5 in response to hypo-osmotic conditions. Our results imply osmoregulation of UBL5.

  19. Equilibrium and dynamic osmotic behaviour of aqueous solutions with varied concentration at constant and variable volume.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Ivan L; Manev, Emil D; Sazdanova, Svetla V; Kolikov, Kiril H

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05-0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment.

  20. Osmotic tolerance limits and effects of cryoprotectants on motility of bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Liu, J; Critser, J K

    2002-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the osmotic properties of bull spermatozoa, including the effects of osmotic stress and cryoprotectant agent (CPA) addition and removal, on sperm motility. Semen from beef bulls was collected by electroejaculation and extended 1:3 in TL-Hepes containing 100 micro g/ml pyruvate and 6 mg/ml BSA. In solutions of 150-1200 mOsmolal (mOsm), bull spermatozoa behaved as linear osmometers (r(2) = 0.97) with an osmotically inactive cell volume of 61%. The isosmotic cell volume was 23.5 micro m(3). Motility was determined after exposure to anisosmotic solutions ranging from 35 to 2400 mOsm and after return to isosmotic conditions. Retention of at least 90% of isosmotic motility could be maintained only between 270-360 mOsm. Bull spermatozoa were calculated to retain 90% of their isosmotic motility at 92-103% of their isosmotic cell volume. Motility following a one-step addition and removal of 1 M glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and ethylene glycol was reduced by 31%, 90%, and 6%, respectively, compared with CPA addition only. These data indicate that, during bull spermatozoa cryopreservation, osmotically driven cell volume excursions must be limited by exposure to a very narrow range that may be facilitated by the use of ethylene glycol as a CPA.

  1. Design and evaluation of osmotic pump-based controlled release system of Ambroxol Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiongkai; Sun, Min; Gao, Yan; Cao, Fengliang; Zhai, Guangxi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and evaluate an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of Ambroxol Hydrochloride (Amb). Citric acid, lactose and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) were employed as osmotic agents. Surelease EC containing polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400) controlling the membrane porosity was used as semi-permeable membrane. The formulation of tablet core was optimized by orthogonal design and evaluated by weighted mark method. The influences of the amount of PEG 400 and membrane thickness on Amb release were investigated. The optimal osmotic pump tablet (OPT) was evaluated in different release media and at different stirring rates. The major release power confirmed was osmotic pressure. The release of Amb from OPT was verified at a rate of approximately zero-order, and cumulative release percentage at 12?h was 92.6%. The relative bioavailability of Amb OPT in rabbits relative to the commercial sustained capsule was 109.6%. Our results showed that Amb OPT could be a practical preparation with a good prospect.

  2. Direct lipid extraction from wet Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass using osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gursong; Park, Won-Kun; Kim, Chul Woong; Choi, Yoon-E; Yang, Ji-Won

    2012-11-01

    High-cost downstream process is a major bottleneck for producing microalgal biodiesel at reasonable price. Conventional lipid extraction process necessitates biomass drying process, which requires substantial amount of energy. In this regard, lipid extraction from wet biomass must be an attractive solution. However, it is almost impossible to recover lipid directly from wet microalgae with current technology. In this study, we conceived osmotic shock treatment as a novel method to extract lipid efficiently. Osmotic shock treatment was applied directly to wet Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass with water content >99%, along with both polar and non-polar organic solvents. Our results demonstrated that osmotic shock could increase lipid recovery approximately 2 times. We also investigated whether the presence of cell wall or different cell stages could have any impact on lipid recovery. Cell wall-less mutant stains and senescent cell phase could display significantly increased lipid recovery. Taken together, our results suggested that osmotic shock is a promising technique for wet lipid extraction from microalgal biomass and successfully determined that specific manipulation of biomass in certain cell phase could enhance lipid recovery further.

  3. Proteomic analysis of rice leaves shows the different regulations to osmotic stress and stress signals.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lie-Bo; Ding, Wei; Wu, Jin-Hong; Feng, Fang-Jun; Luo, Li-Jun; Mei, Han-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Following the idea of partial root-zone drying (PRD) in crop cultivation, the morphological and physiological responses to partial root osmotic stress (PROS) and whole root osmotic stress (WROS) were investigated in rice. WROS caused stress symptoms like leaf rolling and membrane leakage. PROS stimulated stress signals, but did not cause severe leaf damage. By proteomic analysis, a total of 58 proteins showed differential expression after one or both treatments, and functional classification of these proteins suggests that stress signals regulate photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism. Two other proteins (anthranilate synthase and submergence-induced nickel-binding protein) were upregulated only in the PROS plants, indicating their important roles in stress resistance. Additionally, more enzymes were involved in stress defense, redox homeostasis, lignin and ethylene synthesis in WROS leaves, suggesting a more comprehensive regulatory mechanism induced by osmotic stress. This study provides new insights into the complex molecular networks within plant leaves involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress and stress signals.

  4. Accumulation of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) by renal cells: Osmotic regulation of GPC:choline phosphodiesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Zablocki, K.; Miller, S.P.F.; Garcia-Perez, A.; Burg, M.B. )

    1991-09-01

    Although GPC has long been recognized as a degradation product of phosphatidylcholine, only recently is there wide appreciation of its role as a compatible and counteracting osmolyte that protects cells from osmotic stress. GPC is osmotically regulated in renal cells. Its level varies directly with extracellular osmolality. Cells in the kidney medulla in vivo and in renal epithelial cell cultures (MDCK) accumulate large amounts of GPC when exposed to high concentrations of NaCl and urea. Osmotic regulation of GPC requires choline in the medium, presumably as a precursor for synthesis of GPC. Choline transport into the cells, however, is not osmoregulated. The purpose of the present studies was to use MDCK cell cultures as a defined model to distinguish whether osmotically induced accumulation of GPC results from increased GPC synthesis or decreased GPC disappearance. The rate of incorporation of {sup 14}C from ({sup 14}C)choline into GPC, the steady-state GPC synthesis rate, and the activity of phospholipase A{sub 2} are not increased by high NaCl and urea. In fact all are decreased by approximately one-third. Therefore, the authors find no evidence that high NaCl and urea increases the GPC synthesis rate. They conclude that high NaCl and urea increase the level of GPC by inhibiting its enzymatic degradation.

  5. Development and Optimization of Osmotically Controlled Asymmetric Membrane Capsules for Delivery of Solid Dispersion of Lycopene

    PubMed Central

    Mahindroo, Neeraj; Dhar, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to develop and statistically optimize the osmotically controlled asymmetric membrane capsules of solid dispersion of lycopene. Solid dispersions of lycopene with β-cyclodextrin in different ratios were prepared using solvent evaporation method. Solubility studies showed that the solid dispersion with 1 : 5 (lycopene : β-cyclodextrin) exhibited optimum solubility (56.25 mg/mL) for osmotic controlled delivery. Asymmetric membrane capsules (AMCs) were prepared on glass mold pins via dip coating method. Membrane characterization by scanning electron microscopy showed inner porous region and outer dense region. Central composite design response surface methodology was applied for the optimization of AMCs. The independent variables were ethyl cellulose (X1), glycerol (X2), and NaCl (X3) which were varied at different levels to analyze the effect on dependent variables (percentage of cumulative drug release (Y1) and correlation coefficient of drug release (Y2)). The effect of independent variables on the response was significantly influential. The F18 was selected as optimized formulation based on percentage of CDR (cumulative drug release) of 85.63% and correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The optimized formulation was subjected to analyze the effect of osmotic pressure and agitational intensity on percentage of CDR. The drug release was independent of agitational intensity but was dependent on osmotic pressure of dissolution medium. PMID:24605053

  6. Studies of embryotoxicity and the incidence of external malformations after continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-chaconine in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Hellenäs, K E; Cekan, E; Slanina, P; Bergman, K

    1992-05-01

    Embryotoxicity and effects on the incidence of external malformations of the major potato glycoalkaloid alpha-chaconine (alpha-cha) were studied in rats. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 17) were given a continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-cha via implanted osmotic minipumps (1.7 mg/kg/day), to maintain a stable blood concentration on days 6-13 of gestation. Control animals received physiological saline solution or were left untreated, respectively. Blood serum levels of alpha-cha were monitored at selected time intervals during the treatment using a specific HPLC method. The foetal body weights and the number of resorbed or dead foetuses per litter in the alpha-cha treated group were not significantly different from the control groups. No case of malformation was detected among 143 foetuses inspected in the treated group. The average maternal blood serum concentration of alpha-cha measured during the experiment was 340 ng/ml. This is more than 20 times the average peak serum level previously reported for human volunteers after intake of potatoes with a total glycoalkaloid content at the upper safe limit for acute adverse effects. The results support the view that potato glycoalkaloids, at levels normally found in potatoes, do not present a risk for teratogenicity in humans.

  7. Feasibility of localized immunosuppression: 1. Exploratory studies with glucocorticoids in a biohybrid device designed for cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, P; Bocca, N; Marzorati, S; Hochhaus, G; Bodor, N; Stabler, C; Kenyon, N S; Inverardi, L; Molano, R D; Ricordi, C; Pileggi, A

    2010-06-01

    Emerging biotechnologies, such as the use of biohybrid devices for cellular therapies, are showing increasing therapeutic promise for the treatment of various diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus. The functionality of such devices could be greatly enhanced if successful localized immunosuppression regimens could be established, since they would eliminate the many otherwise unavoidable side effects of currently used systemic immunosuppressive therapies. The existence of local immune privilege at some specialized tissues, such as the eye, CNS, or pregnant uterus, supports the feasibility of localized immunomodulation, and such an approach is particularly well-suited for cell transplant therapies where all transplanted tissue is localized within a device. Following the success of syngeneic transplantation in a subcutaneous prevascularized device as a bioartificial pancreas in a rodent model, we now report the first results of exploratory in vivo islet allograft studies in rats using locally delivered glucocorticoids (dexamethasone phosphate and the soft steroid loteprednol etabonate). Following in vitro assessments, in silico drug distribution models were used to establish tentative therapeutic dose ranges. Sustained local delivery was achieved via implantable osmotic mini-pumps through a central sprinkler, as well as with a sustained-delivery formulation for loteprednol etabonate using poly(D,L-lactic) acid (PLA) microspheres. Doses delivered locally were approximately hundred-fold smaller than those typically used in systemic treatments. While several solubility, stability, and implantation problems still remain to be addressed, both compounds showed promise in their ability to prolong graft survival after tapering of systemic immunosuppression, compared to control groups.

  8. Reparameterization of Protein Force Field Nonbonded Interactions Guided by Osmotic Coefficient Measurements from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Lay, Wesley Kayser; Li, Shuxiang; Hacker, William Charles; An, Jiadi; Ren, Jianlan; Elcock, Adrian Hamilton

    2017-03-15

    There is a small, but growing, body of literature describing the use of osmotic coefficient measurements to validate and reparameterize simulation force fields. Here we have investigated the ability of five very commonly used force field and water model combinations to reproduce the osmotic coefficients of seven neutral amino acids and five small molecules. The force fields tested include AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, CHARMM36, GROMOS54a7, and OPLS-AA, with the first of these tested in conjunction with the TIP3P and TIP4P-Ew water models. In general, for both the amino acids and the small molecules, the tested force fields produce computed osmotic coefficients that are lower than experiment; this is indicative of excessively favorable solute-solute interactions. The sole exception to this general trend is provided by GROMOS54a7 when applied to amino acids: in this case, the computed osmotic coefficients are consistently too high. Importantly, we show that all of the force fields tested can be made to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic coefficients of the amino acids when minor modifications - some previously reported by others and some that are new to this study - are made to the van der Waals interactions of the charged terminal groups. Special care is required, however, when simulating Proline with a number of the force fields, and a hydroxyl-group specific modification is required in order to correct Serine and Threonine when simulated with AMBER ff99SB-ILDN. Interestingly, an alternative parameterization of the van der Waals interactions in the latter force field, proposed by the Nerenberg and Head-Gordon groups, is shown to immediately produce osmotic coefficients that are in excellent agreement with experiment. Overall, this study reinforces the idea that osmotic coefficient measurements can be used to identify general shortcomings in commonly used force fields' descriptions of solute-solute interactions, and further demonstrates that modifications to van der

  9. The effect of cell size distribution on predicted osmotic responses of cells.

    PubMed

    Elmoazzen, H Y; Chan, C C V; Acker, J P; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the kinetics of the osmotic response of cells is important in understanding permeability properties of cell membranes and predicting cell responses during exposure to anisotonic conditions. Traditionally, a mathematical model of cell osmotic response is obtained by applying mass transport and Boyle-vant Hoff equations using numerical methods. In the usual application of these equations, it is assumed that all cells are the same size equal to the mean or mode of the population. However, biological cells (even if they had identical membranes and hence identical permeability characteristics--which they do not) have a distribution in cell size and will therefore shrink or swell at different rates when exposed to anisotonic conditions. A population of cells may therefore exhibit a different average osmotic response than that of a single cell. In this study, a mathematical model using mass transport and Boyle-van't Hoff equations was applied to measured size distributions of cells. Chinese hamster fibroblast cells (V-79W) and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK), were placed in hypertonic solutions and the kinetics of cell shrinkage were monitored. Consistent with the theoretical predictions, the size distributions of these cells were found to change over time, therefore the selection of the measure of central tendency for the population may affect the calculated osmotic parameters. After examining three different average volumes (mean, median, and mode) using four different theoretical cell size distributions, it was determined that, for the assumptions used in this study, the mean or median were the best measures of central tendency to describe osmotic volume changes in cell suspensions.

  10. [Design push-pull osmotic pump tablets of famotidine based on an expert system for the formulation design of osmotic pump of poor water-soluble drug].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Jin, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Xin, Wei; Jia, Guo-Bin; Wu, Wen-Fang; Pan, Wei-San

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design push-pull osmotic pump (PPOP) tablets of famotidine using the expert system for the formulation design of osmotic pump of poor water-soluble drug which had been established by the authors. Firstly, the parameters which were requisite of the system input were obtained from literatures and experimental tests. Then the parameters were input into the system, and the program was run. The system displayed the designed formulations sequential. Finally, famotidine PPOP was prepared according to the designed formulations and the in vitro dissolution was carried out. It was found out that the target formulation of famotidine PPOP which could release for 24 hours was obtained in a very short period. Meanwhile, the practicability of the established expert system was proved.

  11. Osmotic virial coefficients of hydroxyethyl starch from aqueous hydroxyethyl starch-sodium chloride vapor pressure osmometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jingjiang; Gier, Martin; Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U; Prasad, Vinay; Elliott, Janet A W; Sputtek, Andreas

    2013-09-05

    Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is an important industrial additive in the paper, textile, food, and cosmetic industries and has been shown to be an effective cryoprotectant for red blood cells; however, little is known about its thermodynamic solution properties. In many applications, in particular those in biology, HES is used in an aqueous solution with sodium chloride (NaCl). The osmotic virial solution thermodynamics approach accurately captures the dependence of osmolality on molality for many types of solutes in aqueous systems, including electrolytes, sugars, alcohols, proteins, and starches. Elliott et al. proposed mixing rules for the osmotic virial equation to be used for osmolality of multisolute aqueous solutions [Elliott, J. A. W.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 1775-1785] and recently applied this approach to the fitting of one set of aqueous HES-NaCl solution data reported by Jochem and Körber [Cryobiology 1987, 24, 513-536], indicating that the HES osmotic virial coefficients are dependent on HES-to-NaCl mass ratios. The current study reports new aqueous HES-NaCl vapor pressure osmometry data which are analyzed using the osmotic virial equation. HES modifications were measured after dialysis (membrane cut off: 10,000 g/mol) and freeze-drying using vapor pressure osmometry at different mass ratios of HES to NaCl for HES up to 50% and NaCl up to 25% with three different HES modifications (weight average molecular weights [g/mol]/degree of substitution: 40,000/0.5; 200,000/0.5; 450,000/0.7). Equations were then fit to the data to provide a model for HES osmotic virial coefficient dependence on mass ratio of HES to NaCl. The osmolality data of the three HES modifications were accurately described over a broad range of HES-to-NaCl mass ratios using only four parameters, illustrating the power of the osmotic virial approach in analyzing complex data sets. As expected, the second osmotic virial coefficients increase with molecular weight of the HES and

  12. Osmotic tolerance limits and effects of cryoprotectants on the motility, plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity of rat sperm.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Benson, James D; Men, Hongsheng; Critser, John K

    2006-12-01

    Osmotic stress is an important factor that can result in cell damage during cryopreservation. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) isosmotic sperm cell volume; (2) osmotically inactive volume; (3) osmotic tolerance limits of rat sperm; and (4) the effects of addition and removal of glycerol (Gly), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG) or dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) on rat sperm function. Sperm from Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. An electronic particle counter was used to measure the cell volume of rat sperm. Computer-assisted sperm motility analysis and flow-cytometric analysis were used to assess sperm motility, plasma membrane and acrosomal integrity. The isosmotic sperm cell volumes of the two strains were 37.0+/-0.1 and 36.2+/-0.2 microm(3), respectively. Rat sperm behaved as linear osmometers from 260 to 450 mOsm, and the osmotically inactive sperm volumes of the two strains were 79.8+/-1.5% and 81.4+/-2.2%, respectively. Rat sperm have very limited osmotic tolerances. The sperm motility and the sperm plasma membranes of both strains were sensitive to anisosmotic treatments, but the acrosomes of both strains were more sensitive to hyposmotic than hyperosmotic conditions. The one-step addition and removal of Me(2)SO showed the most deleterious effect on rat sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosomal integrity among the four cryoprotectants. These data characterizing rat sperm osmotic behavior, osmotic and cryoprotectant tolerance will be used to design cryopreservation protocols for rat sperm.

  13. Controlled release of cyclosporine A self-nanoemulsifying systems from osmotic pump tablets: near zero-order release and pharmacokinetics in dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Yi, Yueneng; Qi, Jianping; Lu, Yi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Xie, Yunchang; Yuan, Hailong; Wu, Wei

    2013-08-16

    It is very important to enhance the absorption simultaneously while designing controlled release delivery systems for poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs (BCS IV). In this study, controlled release of cyclosporine (CyA) was achieved by the osmotic release strategy taking advantage of the absorption-enhancing capacity of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDSs). The liquid SNEDDS consisting of Labrafil M 1944CS, Transcutol P and Cremophor EL was absorbed by the osmotic tablet core excipients (sucrose, lactose monohydrate, polyethylene oxide, and partly pregelatinized starch) and then transformed into osmotic tablets. Near zero-order release could be achieved for CyA-loaded nanoemulsions reconstituted from the SNEDDS. In general, the influencing factor study indicated that the release rate increased with increase of inner osmotic pressure, ratio of osmotic agent to suspending agent, content of pore-forming agent, and size of release orifice, whereas the thickness of the membrane impeded the release of CyA nanoemulsion. Pharmacokinetic study showed steady blood CyA profiles with prolonged Tmax and MRT, and significantly reduced Cmax for self-nanoemulsifying osmotic pump tablet (SNEOPT) in comparison with highly fluctuating profiles of the core tablet and Sandimmune Neoral(®). However, similar oral bioavailability was observed for either controlled release or non-controlled release formulations. It was concluded that simultaneous controlling on CyA release and absorption-enhancing had been achieved by a combination of osmotic tablet and SNEDDS.

  14. On the osmotically unresponsive water compartment in cells.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Gary D; Kanal, Kalpana M; Cameron, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    Differences in colligative properties (freezing point, boiling point, vapor pressure and osmotic behavior) between water in living cells and pure bulk water were investigated by re-evaluating reports of the osmotic behavior of mammalian cells. In five different animal cells, osmotically unresponsive water (OUW) values ranged from 1.1 to 2.2 g per g dry mass. Detailed analysis of human red blood cell (RBC) data indicates a major role for hemoglobin OUW-values, aggregation and packing in cell volume regulation that can be explained for the first time in relevant molecular terms.

  15. Osmotic potential calculations of inorganic and organic aqueous solutions over wide solute concentration levels and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, T. T.; Cochrane, T. A.

    2016-01-15

    } using recorded relative density data at 20 °C. They were subsequently used to estimate N{sub f} values at temperatures up to and excess of body temperatures. Those values, together with t values at temperatures up to and in excess of body temperatures recorded in the literature, were substituted in the authors’ equation for the provisional calculation of osmotic potentials. The calculations indicated that solution temperatures and solute concentrations have a marked effect on osmotic potentials. Conclusions: Following work to measure the relative densities of aqueous solutions for the calculation of N{sub f} values and the determination of definitive t values up to and beyond bodily temperatures, the authors’ equation would enable the accurate estimations of the osmotic potentials of wide concentrations of aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic solutes over the temperature range. The study illustrates that not only solute concentrations but also temperatures have a marked effect on osmotic potentials, an observation of medical and biological significance.

  16. Controlled release of metformin hydrochloride and repaglinide from sandwiched osmotic pump tablet.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Wei; Zhu, Chunli; Wu, Mengmeng; Jin, Zhu; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang

    2014-05-15

    The marketed compound tablet of metformin hydrochloride (MH) and repaglinide (RG) exhibits perfect multidrug therapeutic effect of type 2 diabetes. However, due to the short half life of the drugs, the tablet has to be administered 2 to 3 times a day, causing inconvenience to patient and fluctuations of plasma concentration. Here, a sandwiched osmotic pump tablet was developed to deliver the two drugs simultaneously at zero-order rate, in which MH and RG were loaded in different layers separated by a push layer. The osmotic pump tablet was prepared by a combination of three tableting procedure and film coating method. The factors including type and amount of propellant, osmotic active agents, amount of porogenic agent, coating weight, orifice diameter were optimized. The pharmacokinetic study was performed in beagle dogs, and the drug concentration in plasma samples was assayed by HPLC-MS/MS method. Simultaneous, controlled release of MH and RG in the first 12 and 8h was achieved from the optimized formulation. A significantly decreased Cmax, prolonged Tmax and satisfactory bioavailability of the osmotic pump tablet were obtained, and a good in vivo-in vitro correlation of the two drugs was also established. In summary, the sandwiched osmotic pump tablet released the MH and RG simultaneously at zero-order rate, and exhibited significant sustained release effect in vivo and good in vivo-in vitro correlation. The designed controlled release system for MH and RG proposed a promising replacement for the marked compound product in the therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  17. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    PubMed

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality.

  18. Use of scoring to induce reproducible drug delivery from osmotic pulsatile tablets.

    PubMed

    Rahemba, Tara Ryan; Bell, Samuel; Connolly, Emilia K; Waterman, Kenneth C

    2009-01-01

    An osmotic-controlled pulsatile delivery technology was developed for targeted drug delivery. This novel system consists of a tablet core surrounded by an osmotic coating that has been mechanically compromised in strategic locations to facilitate reliable drug release at a given time point after administration. The tablet core contains a high drug load in addition to several osmotic agents and swellable polymers, and the surrounding mechanically-compromised osmotic coating consists of a semipermeable membrane that has been scored with a razor blade in several key locations. The components in the tablet core attract water into the core, causing it to swell and propagate the scores in the coating along the length of the tablet. After the scores have fully propagated, the coating bursts open, releasing the tablet core's contents, including the drug, into the surrounding media. The variables that were investigated in this study included the configuration of the scores in the coating, the length of the scores, and the distance between the scores. The delivery system developed in this work is able to generate a reproducible dissolution profile consisting of a specific targeted lag time, between five minutes and two hours, followed by immediate release of the drug from the core. The performance of the system was validated in vitro using the drug salicylic acid. Unlike previously developed osmotic pulsatile delivery systems, the present system is able to accommodate higher drug loading levels, it is easier to manufacture, and has demonstrated more reproducible burst times (i.e. burst time) than several other pulsatile systems.

  19. Betaine and L-carnitine transport by Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in response to osmotic signals.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A; Glaasker, E; Poolman, B; Abee, T

    1997-01-01

    The naturally occurring compatible solutes betaine and L-carnitine allow the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to adjust to environments of high osmotic strength. Previously, it was demonstrated that L. monocytogenes possesses an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter (A. Verheul, F. M. Rombouts, R. R. Beumer, and T. Abee, J. Bacteriol. 177:3205-3212, 1995). The present study reveals that betaine and L-carnitine are taken up by separate highly specific transport systems and support a secondary transport mechanism for betaine uptake in L. monocytogenes. The initial uptake rates of betaine and L-carnitine are not influenced by an osmotic upshock, but the duration of transport of both osmolytes is directly related to the osmotic strength of the medium. Regulation of uptake of both betaine and L-carnitine is subject to inhibition by preaccumulated solute. Internal betaine inhibits not only transport of external betaine but also that of L-carnitine and, similarly, internal L-carnitine inhibits transport of both betaine and L-carnitine. The inhibition is alleviated upon osmotic upshock, which suggests that alterations in membrane structure are transmitted to the allosteric binding sites for betaine and L-carnitine of both transporters at the inner surface of the membrane. Upon osmotic downshock, betaine and L-carnitine are rapidly released by L. monocytogenes as a consequence of activation of a channel-like activity. The osmolyte-sensing mechanism described is new and is consistent with various unexplained observations of osmoregulation in other bacteria. PMID:9371443

  20. Osmotic Adjustment of Cultured Tobacco Cells (Nicotiana tabacum var. Samsum) Grown on Sodium Chloride 1

    PubMed Central

    Heyser, James W.; Nabors, Murray W.

    1981-01-01

    Tobacco cell cultures (var. Samsum) were grown on increasing levels of NaCl to select variants for increased salt tolerance. The osmotic adjustment of NaCl-adapted and nonadapted cell lines was studied. Both cell lines were grown on modified Linsmaier and Skoog medium with or without NaCl. Few differences were found in the response of adapted and nonadapted lines to NaCl. The concentrations of sugars, Na+, Cl−, and NO3− were identical in the cells and medium. Potassium and amino acids were accumulated by the cells. All of the above solutes accounted for 80 to 90% of the osmotic potential for both cell lines when grown on basal medium with or without NaCl. The osmotic potential of growing cells was always 1 to 3 bars more negative than that of the medium. During the first 10 days culture, the cells hydrolyzed the 117 millimolar sucrose present in the fresh media, and the media became more negative by 3 bars. Growing cells absorbed and metabolized the sugars, NH4+, and NO3− during the next 25 days, and the osmotic potential of the media and cells became less negative. The addition of 130 millimolar NaCl made the media and cells osmotically more negative by 6 bars throughout the growth cycle, as compared with cells growing on basal medium. The efflux of cellular solutes during distilled H2O washes was resolved into two components. The fast component (0.6 to 1.7 minutes half-time) included solutes of the free space and cytoplasm, whereas the slow component (1.6 to 4.9 hours half-time) represented the vacuolar solutes. Sodium and Cl− were present in the vacuole. No differences were observed in the solute efflux between the adapted and nonadapted cell lines. PMID:16661743

  1. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, S.D. ); Oosterhuis, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  2. Osmotic second virial cross coefficients for star and linear polystyrenes

    SciTech Connect

    Striolo, Alberto; Prausnitz, John M. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720

    2000-08-15

    Experimental osmotic second virial cross coefficients are reported for linear and 8-arm star polystyrenes in three solvents: toluene, cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane. The osmotic second virial cross coefficient for 8-arm star and linear polystyrene is always positive and within the osmotic second virial coefficients measured for the single polymers. The positive cross coefficient indicates net repulsion between the two different polymers in dilute solution. The extent of repulsion is greatest in toluene and least in cyclohexane. To relate the macroscopic second virial coefficient to microscopic interactions, the potential of mean force between linear and 6-arm star polymers was computed by molecular simulation. The interaction between nonbonded polymer segments is given by a square-well potential. Well width was set equal to one half of the segment diameter. Different solvent conditions were investigated by using different well depths. Potentials of mean force were then used to compute the osmotic second virial cross coefficients. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Physiological and genetic responses of bacteria to osmotic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Csonka, L N

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of organisms to respond to fluctuations in their osmotic environments is an important physiological process that determines their abilities to thrive in a variety of habitats. The primary response of bacteria to exposure to a high osmotic environment is the accumulation of certain solutes, K+, glutamate, trehalose, proline, and glycinebetaine, at concentrations that are proportional to the osmolarity of the medium. The supposed function of these solutes is to maintain the osmolarity of the cytoplasm at a value greater than the osmolarity of the medium and thus provide turgor pressure within the cells. Accumulation of these metabolites is accomplished by de novo synthesis or by uptake from the medium. Production of proteins that mediate accumulation or uptake of these metabolites is under osmotic control. This review is an account of the processes that mediate adaptation of bacteria to changes in their osmotic environment. PMID:2651863

  4. Exposure to ozone and erythrocyte osmotic resistance in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ikemi, Y.; Ohmori, K.; Ito, T.; Osaka, F.; Matuura, Y. )

    1992-10-01

    In order to learn the biological effect of photochemical oxidants on living bodies, we exposed newborn and adult rats, of both sexes, to ozone at a concentration of 0.25 ppm, which can be encountered in an urban environment, and then measured the osmotic resistance of their erythrocytes. The results of experiments using newborn rats indicated a positive increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in whole blood following ozone exposure for 4 weeks. An increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in the top part obtained by centrifugation was observed following ozone exposure for 12 weeks. This tendency was especially evident among male rats. On the other hand, no increase in the osmotic resistance of erythrocytes was recognized in the adult animals which had been exposed to the same concentration of ozone for 18 months.

  5. Phenotypic variation and quantitative trait locus identification for osmotic potential in an interspecific hybrid inbred F2 poplar pedigree grown in contrasting environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Sewell, Mitchell; Gebre, G; Todd Jr, Donald E; Pendley, Carrie D

    2006-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms of dehydration tolerance in popular (Populus sp.) trees will permit development of biochemical and molecular indicators to indentify dehydration-tolerant genotypes during genetic selection. The objectives of the study were to characterize the degree of phenotypic variation in osmotic potential (a determinant of dehydration tolerance), determine the relationship between osmotic potential at full turgor and relative growth rate, and identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for osmotic potential in an advanced-generation, interpsecific popular pedigree established in contrasting environments.

  6. Experimental Support for a Predictive Osmotic Model of Clay Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, S.J.

    2001-08-29

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures.

  7. Movement disorders and the osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    With the advent of MRI, osmotic demyelination syndromes (ODS) are increasingly recognised to affect varied sites in the brain in addition to the classical central pontine lesion. Striatal involvement is seen in a large proportion of cases and results in a wide variety of movement disorders. Movement disorders and cognitive problems resulting from ODS affecting the basal ganglia may occur early in the course of the illness, or may present as delayed manifestations after the patient survives the acute phase. Such delayed symptoms may evolve over time, and may even progress despite treatment. Improved survival of patients in the last few decades due to better intensive care has led to an increase in the incidence of such delayed manifestations of ODS. While the outcome of ODS is not as dismal as hitherto believed - with the acute akinetic-rigid syndrome associated with striatal myelinolysis often responding to dopaminergic therapy - the delayed symptoms often prove refractory to medical therapy. This article presents a review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, imaging, and therapy of movement disorders associated with involvement of the basal ganglia in ODS. A comprehensive review of 54 previously published cases of movement disorders due to ODS, and a video recording depicting the spectrum of delayed movement disorders seen after recovery from ODS are also presented.

  8. Osmotic regulation of airway reactivity by epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fedan, J S; Yuan, L X; Chang, V C; Viola, J O; Cutler, D; Pettit, L L

    1999-05-01

    Inhalation of nonisotonic solutions can elicit pulmonary obstruction in asthmatic airways. We evaluated the hypothesis that the respiratory epithelium is involved in responses of the airways to nonisotonic solutions using the guinea pig isolated, perfused trachea preparation to restrict applied agents to the mucosal (intraluminal) or serosal (extraluminal) surface of the airway. In methacholine-contracted tracheae, intraluminally applied NaCl or KCl equipotently caused relaxation that was unaffected by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but was attenuated by removal of the epithelium and Na+ and Cl- channel blockers. Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter and nitric oxide synthase blockers caused a slight inhibition of relaxation, whereas Na+,K+-pump inhibition produced a small potentiation. Intraluminal hyperosmolar KCl and NaCl inhibited contractions in response to intra- or extraluminally applied methacholine, as well as neurogenic cholinergic contractions elicited with electric field stimulation (+/- indomethacin). Extraluminally applied NaCl and KCl elicited epithelium-dependent relaxation (which for KCl was followed by contraction). In contrast to the effects of hyperosmolarity, intraluminal hypo-osmolarity caused papaverine-inhibitable contractions (+/- epithelium). These findings suggest that the epithelium is an osmotic sensor which, through the release of epithelium-derived relaxing factor, can regulate airway diameter by modulating smooth muscle responsiveness and excitatory neurotransmission.

  9. Comparative analysis on the key enzymes of the glycerol cycle metabolic pathway in Dunaliella salina under osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments.

  10. ABA- and ethylene-mediated responses in osmotically stressed tomato are regulated by the TSS2 and TOS1 loci.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Abel; Amaya, Iraida; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Cuartero, Jesús; Botella, Miguel A; Borsani, Omar

    2006-01-01

    The study of mutants impaired in the sensitivity or synthesis of abscisic acid (ABA) has become a powerful tool to analyse the interactions occurring between the ABA and ethylene signalling pathways, with potential to change the traditional view of the role of ABA as just being involved in growth inhibition. The tss2 tomato mutant, which is hypersensitive to NaCl and osmotic stress, shows enhanced growth inhibition in the presence of exogenous ABA. The tos1 tomato mutant is also hypersensitive to osmotic stress, but in contrast to tss2, shows decreased sensitivity to ABA. Surprisingly, blocking ethylene signalling suppresses the growth defect of tss2 seedlings on ABA, NaCl, and osmotic stress, but not the osmotic hypersensitivity of tos1. The ethylene production of tss2 seedlings is increased compared with that of control seedlings under osmotic stress. In addition, the tss2 plants are hypersensitive to root growth inhibition by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). This suggests that, in addition to ABA regulation, TSS2 acts as a negative regulator of endogenous ethylene accumulation. As previously shown in Arabidopsis, it is shown here that extensive cross-talk occurs between the ABA and ethylene signalling pathways in tomato and that the TSS2 and TOS1 loci appear as regulators of this cross-talk.

  11. An experimental approach to assess Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774) resistance to osmotic stress in estuarine habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Rodríguez, Noé; Pardo, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Corbicula fluminea arrived in the Miño Estuary in 1989 and, from there, colonized more than 150 km upstream. Our aim was to test the capacity of C. fluminea to cope with osmotic stress conditions previously to invade new freshwater habitats through estuaries. Based on previously collected information, the experiment aims to study the response of the species to marine osmotic stress, evaluated by survival and behaviour. Experiments determined the resistance by the species to various levels of osmotic stress, and recovery time after exposure to high salinity levels, representative of the temporal and spatial salinity variation existing in the estuary. Under osmotic stress the semi-maximum response was reached after 19 days exposure. The species tolerance range, measured by individual maintained activity, was at salinity ∼20 when exposed to winter temperatures, while when animals were exposed to summer ones its tolerance was reduced to salinity lower than 15. C. fluminea show a large physiological flexibility to cope with salinity variations in estuaries. In summer, the temperature increases the metabolic rate thus making the species more vulnerable to osmotic stress exposure. These findings are relevant to preventing new invasions through ship ballast waters ensuring complete mortality if individuals are retained for >26 days.

  12. Neurites outgrowth and amino acids levels in goldfish retina under hypo-osmotic or hyper-osmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cubillán, Lisbeth; Obregón, Francisco; Lima, Lucimey

    2012-02-01

    Amino acids are known to play relevant roles as osmolytes in various tissues, including the retina. Taurine is one of these active molecules. In addition, taurine stimulates outgrowth from the goldfish retina by mechanisms that include extracellular matrix, calcium fluxes and protein phosphorylation. The present report aims to explore the effect of medium osmolarity on goldfish retinal outgrowth and the possible modifications produced by changing eye osmolarity on amino acid levels in the retina. Goldfish retinal explants were obtained 10 days after crush of the optic nerve and cultured under iso-, hypo- or hyper-osmotic conditions. Hypo-osmotic medium was prepared by diluting the solutions 10% twice, preserving fetal calf serum concentration. Hyper-osmotic medium was done by adding 50 or 100 mM urea or mannitol. Evaluation of length and density of neurites was performed 5 days after plating. Outgrowth was reduced in hypo- and in hyper-osmotic conditions. Taurine, 4 mM, increased length and density of neurites in iso-osmotic, and produced stimulatory effects under both hyper-osmotic conditions. The in vivo modification of osmolarity by intraocular injection of water or 100 mM urea modified levels of free amino acids in the retina. Taurine and aspartate retinal levels increased in a time-dependent manner after hypo- and hyper-osmotic solution injections. Serine, threonine, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, alanine and tyrosine were elevated in hyper-osmotic conditions. Outgrowth in vitro, after in vivo osmolarity changes, was higher in the absence of taurine, but did not increase in the presence of the amino acid. The fact that certain outgrowth took place in these conditions support that the impairment was not due to tissue damage. Rather, the effects might be related to the cascade of kinase events described during osmolarity variations. The time course under these conditions produced adjustments in ganglion cells probably related to taurine transporter, and

  13. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  14. Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) plants grown at various salinity levels.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Yuda; Marandon, Karl; Tian, Yu; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) were studied by exposing plants to six salinity levels (0-500 mM NaCl range) for 70 d. Salt stress was administered either by pre-mixing of the calculated amount of NaCl with the potting mix before seeds were planted or by the gradual increase of NaCl levels in the irrigation water. For both methods, the optimal plant growth and biomass was achieved between 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, suggesting that quinoa possess a very efficient system to adjust osmotically for abrupt increases in NaCl stress. Up to 95% of osmotic adjustment in old leaves and between 80% and 85% of osmotic adjustment in young leaves was achieved by means of accumulation of inorganic ions (Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-)) at these NaCl levels, whilst the contribution of organic osmolytes was very limited. Consistently higher K(+) and lower Na(+) levels were found in young, as compared with old leaves, for all salinity treatments. The shoot sap K(+) progressively increased with increased salinity in old leaves; this is interpreted as evidence for the important role of free K(+) in leaf osmotic adjustment under saline conditions. A 5-fold increase in salinity level (from 100 mM to 500 mM) resulted in only a 50% increase in the sap Na(+) content, suggesting either a very strict control of xylem Na(+) loading or an efficient Na(+) removal from leaves. A very strong correlation between NaCl-induced K(+) and H(+) fluxes was observed in quinoa root, suggesting that a rapid NaCl-induced activation of H(+)-ATPase is needed to restore otherwise depolarized membrane potential and prevent further K(+) leak from the cytosol. Taken together, this work emphasizes the role of inorganic ions for osmotic adjustment in halophytes and calls for more in-depth studies of the mechanisms of vacuolar Na(+) sequestration, control of Na(+) and K(+) xylem loading, and their transport to the shoot.

  15. Alleviation of Osmotic Stress Effects by Exogenous Application of Salicylic or Abscisic Acid on Wheat Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Marcińska, Izabela; Czyczyło-Mysza, Ilona; Skrzypek, Edyta; Grzesiak, Maciej T.; Janowiak, Franciszek; Filek, Maria; Dziurka, Michał; Dziurka, Kinga; Waligórski, Piotr; Juzoń, Katarzyna; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Grzesiak, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in osmotic stress tolerance of wheat seedlings. This was accomplished by determining the impact of the acids applied exogenously on seedlings grown under osmotic stress in hydroponics. The investigation was unique in its comprehensiveness, examining changes under osmotic stress and other conditions, and testing a number of parameters simultaneously. In both drought susceptible (SQ1) and drought resistant (CS) wheat cultivars, significant physiological and biochemical changes were observed upon the addition of SA (0.05 mM) or ABA (0.1 μM) to solutions containing half-strength Hoagland medium and PEG 6000 (−0.75 MPa). The most noticeable result of supplementing SA or ABA to the medium (PEG + SA and PEG + ABA) was a decrease in the length of leaves and roots in both cultivars. While PEG treatment reduced gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content in CS, and osmotic potential, and conversely, increased lipid peroxidation, soluble carbohydrates in SQ1, proline content in both cultivars and total antioxidants activity in SQ1, PEG + SA or PEG + ABA did not change the values of these parameters. Furthermore, PEG caused a two-fold increase of endogenous ABA content in SQ1 and a four-fold increase in CS. PEG + ABA increased endogenous ABA only in SQ1, whereas PEG + SA caused a greater increase of ABA content in both cultivars compared to PEG. In PEG-treated plants growing until the harvest, a greater decrease of yield components was observed in SQ1 than in CS. PEG + SA, and particularly PEG + ABA, caused a greater increase of these yield parameters in CS compared to SQ1. In conclusion, SA and ABA ameliorate, particularly in the tolerant wheat cultivar, the harmful effects and after effects of osmotic stress induced by PEG in hydroponics through better osmotic adjustment achieved by an increase in proline and carbohydrate content as well as by an increase in antioxidant activity

  16. [Osmotic modification of thermal damage in Escherichia coli bacteria at various pH values of the media].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I I; Petin, V G

    2000-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of media with different osmotic pressure on cell survival and on optic density of supernatants from Escherichia coli B/r and E. coli Bs-1 cell suspensions heated under different pH values of media. Hyperthermia induced cell death accompanied with the loss of optically active (lambda = 260 nm) material. Both cell damage effects were increased in acid and alkaline conditions, compared to neutral condition of heating. Hypertonic media results in a decrease in thermic cell death and loss of cell substances. Under this condition, the protection influence of high osmotic pressure was seen to increase significantly in acid and alkaline conditions of heating, compared to neutral condition. It has been proposed that a higher thermal damage of microorganisms in acid and alkaline beating conditions and protection influence of hypertonic media, especially expressed in acid and alkaline medium, is caused to a great extent by the status of osmotic cell homeostasis.

  17. Osmotic stress responses of individual white oak (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) genotypes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Demeter, Zita; Kanalas, Péter; Máthé, Csaba; Cseke, Klára; Szőllősi, Erzsébet; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jámbrik, Katalin; Kiss, Zoltán; Mészáros, Ilona

    2014-01-15

    White oaks (Quercus section, Quercus subgenus) are widely distributed in Europe. Quercus petraea (sessile oak), an economically important species is predicted to be affected by climate change. Q. pubescens (pubescent oak) and Q. virgiliana (Italian pubescent oak) are economically less important, drought tolerant species. Frequent hybridization of white oaks was observed and currently the introgression of Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana in non-mediterranean regions of Europe has been reported. Our goal was to use tissue cultures established from individual trees of the above taxa and their putative hybrids, all present in the forest stand of Síkfőkút LTER Research Area (NE Hungary) as simple experimental model systems for studying drought/osmotic stress tolerance. Tissue cultures are more suitable models for such studies, than seedlings, because they are genetically identical to the parent plants. Polyethylene glycol (PEG6000) treatments were used for this purpose. The identification of taxa was based on leaf morphological traits and microsatellite analysis and showed that Q. petraea is genetically distinct to all other taxa examined. We established six callus lines of Quercus. As expected, in Q. petraea cultures PEG6000 induced severe loss of fresh weight and the ability to recover after removal of the osmoticum, which was not characteristic for Q. pubescens and Q. virgiliana. Putative hybrids exhibited an intermediate response to osmotic stress. Activity gels showed the increase of single-strand preferring (SSP) nuclease and no significant change of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-sensitive genotypes/cultures and no significant increase of SSP nuclease activities accompanied with increases of guaiacol-peroxidase activities in drought-tolerant ones. This indicates that drought/osmotic stress tolerance is associated to increased capacity of scavenging reactive oxygen species and hence less susceptibility to DNA damage. Our results confirm that tissue

  18. Concomitant Production of Lipids and Carotenoids in Rhodosporidium toruloides under Osmotic Stress Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gunjan; Jawed, Arshad; Paul, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Kalyan K.; Kumari, Abha; Haque, Shafiul

    2016-01-01

    As a replacement to existing fossil fuels, biofuels, have proven their worth; however, their widespread use is limited due to inconsistent yields, higher costs and poor productivity. An oleaginous yeast, Rhodosporidium toruloides has been reported to accumulate substantial amounts of lipids (that can be converted to biofuels) and therefore, it was selected for study and optimization. Apart from lipids, R. toruloides is also reported to produce carotene that can be used as a therapeutic agent. In this study, the culture medium was statistically modeled and optimized for concomitant production of lipids and carotenoids and for improving and maximizing the productivity of lipids as well as carotenes. The two metabolites were expressed differentially in the growth cycle of the organism. Culture medium components were simultaneously varied at five different levels using statistical modeling employing response surface methodology (RSM). Osmotic stress was introduced in order to simulate saline conditions and optimize the carotenoid as well as lipid production process, to be used in conditions with high salt contents. We observed a 10% (w/v) increase in carotenoid production in initial experiments under osmotic stress due to high salt concentration, while the increase in lipid synthesis was not pronounced. In this study, we demonstrate 36.2% (w/v) lipid production and 27.2% (w/v) carotenoid production, under osmotic stress with high salt concentrations, for the first time. PMID:27826295

  19. The value of osmotic conductance and free water transport in the prediction of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sampimon, Denise E; Barreto, Deirisa Lopes; Coester, Annemieke M; Struijk, Dirk G; Krediet, Raymond T

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative assessments in long-term patients and in those with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) have shown that impaired osmotic conductance is likely a factor contributing to the presence of ultrafiltration failure in those individuals. In the present study, we investigated the value of osmotic conductance, its components LpA and the reflection coefficient sigma, and free water transport (FWT) in 12 patients with EPS, in 21 patients with long-term ultrafiltration failure, and in 26 time-restricted control subjects with normal ultrafiltration. A decrease in all parameters was observed during a period of 4 years in patients with EPS and ultrafiltration failure, with FWT showing the largest difference between all three groups; however, the receiver operating curves showed that only FWT appeared to be a significant predictor of EPS. Because its measurement is simple, FWT should be included in the regular assessment of peritoneal function.

  20. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  1. Quantification of osmotic water transport in vivo using fluorescent albumin.

    PubMed

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Vertommen, Didier; Jamar, François; Rippe, Bengt; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane is applied during peritoneal dialysis to remove the excess water accumulated in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery of aquaporin water channels and the generation of transgenic animals have stressed the need for novel and accurate methods to unravel molecular mechanisms of water permeability in vivo. Here, we describe the use of fluorescently labeled albumin as a reliable indicator of osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane in a well-established mouse model of peritoneal dialysis. After detailed evaluation of intraperitoneal tracer mass kinetics, the technique was validated against direct volumetry, considered as the gold standard. The pH-insensitive dye Alexa Fluor 555-albumin was applied to quantify osmotic water transport across the mouse peritoneal membrane resulting from modulating dialysate osmolality and genetic silencing of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Quantification of osmotic water transport using Alexa Fluor 555-albumin closely correlated with direct volumetry and with estimations based on radioiodinated ((125)I) serum albumin (RISA). The low intraperitoneal pressure probably accounts for the negligible disappearance of the tracer from the peritoneal cavity in this model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the appropriateness of pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 555-albumin as a practical and reliable intraperitoneal volume tracer to quantify osmotic water transport in vivo.

  2. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  3. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, Mary M.; Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R.

    2015-01-21

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  4. Modelling of mass transfer kinetic in osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabrayili, Sharokh; Farzaneh, Vahid; Zare, Zahra; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra; Mokhtarian, Mohsen; Carvalho, Isabel S.

    2016-04-01

    Osmotic dehydration characteristics of kiwifruit were predicted by different activation functions of an artificial neural network. Osmotic solution concentration (y1), osmotic solution temperature (y2), and immersion time (y3) were considered as the input parameters and solid gain value (x1) and water loss value (x2) were selected as the outlet parameters of the network. The result showed that logarithm sigmoid activation function has greater performance than tangent hyperbolic activation function for the prediction of osmotic dehydration parameters of kiwifruit. The minimum mean relative error for the solid gain and water loss parameters with one hidden layer and 19 nods were 0.00574 and 0.0062% for logarithm sigmoid activation function, respectively, which introduced logarithm sigmoid function as a more appropriate tool in the prediction of the osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit slices. As a result, it is concluded that this network is capable in the prediction of solid gain and water loss parameters (responses) with the correlation coefficient values of 0.986 and 0.989, respectively.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the potential of osmotic energy for power production.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adel O; Merdaw, Ali A; Aryafar, Maryam; Nicoll, Peter

    2014-08-08

    This paper presents a study on the potential of osmotic energy for power production. The study includes both pilot plant testing and theoretical modelling as well as cost estimation. A projected cost of £30/MWh of clean electricity could be achieved by using a Hydro-Osmotic Power (HOP) plant if a suitable membrane is used and the osmotic potential difference between the two solutions is greater than 25 bar; a condition that can be readily found in many sites around the world. Results have shown that the membrane system accounts for 50%-80% of the HOP plant cost depending on the salinity difference level. Thus, further development in membrane technology and identifying suitable membranes would have a significant impact on the feasibility of the process and the route to market. As the membrane permeability determines the HOP process feasibility, this paper also describes the effect of the interaction between the fluid and the membrane on the system permeability. It has been shown that both the fluid physical properties as well as the membrane micro-structural parameters need to be considered if further development of the HOP process is to be achieved.

  6. Osmotically regulated flow of flurbiprofen through in situ formed asymmetric membrane capsule.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anil K

    2008-04-01

    An in situ formed non-disintegrating controlled release asymmetric membrane capsular system, offering improved osmotic effect, was used to deliver poorly water soluble drug flurbiprofen (model drug) to demonstrate how controlled release characteristics could be manipulated by design of polymeric capsule with an asymmetric membrane. In situ formed asymmetric membrane capsule was made by dry method via precipitation of asymmetric membrane on the walls of hard gelatin capsule. Effect of different formulation variables were studied based on 2(3) factorial design, namely, level of osmogen, ethylcellulose and pore former apart from studying the effect of varying osmotic pressure on drug release. Scanning Electron Microscopy showed an outer dense non porous region and an inner lighter porous region for the prepared asymmetric membrane inside and a gelatin layer outside. Statistical test (Dunnett Multiple Comparison Test) was applied for in vitro drug release at P>0.05. The best formulation closely corresponded to the extra design checkpoint formulation by a similarity (f(2)) value of 96.88. The drug release was independent of pH but dependent on the osmotic pressure of the dissolution medium. The release kinetics followed Higuchi model and mechanism of release was Fickian diffusion.

  7. In vitro-in vivo evaluation of nanosuspension release from subcutaneously implantable osmotic pumps.

    PubMed

    Hill, A; Geissler, S; Meyring, M; Hecht, S; Weigandt, M; Mäder, K

    2013-07-15

    Utilizing poorly soluble drug candidates in pharmacokinetic studies remains challenging in preclinical drug development. We investigated a nanosuspension-based delivery system to achieve constant drug plasma levels by applying the nanoparticles via subcutaneously implanted micro-osmotic pumps. Various nanosuspension formulations were characterized in vitro prior to Alzet® pump release by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and rheological measurements. In vitro formulation release was checked by HPLC/UV. The in vivo experiments compared plasma-concentration time profiles of subcutaneously injected nanosuspensions with those of formulations delivered by pumps. Two Poloxamer 338 containing nanosuspensions with different viscosities were found to be stable over observation time, physically resistant against biorelevant media and showed only a low amorphous part after preparation. The more viscous nanosuspension with 31.65 mPas revealed in vitro the expected zero-order release, while the low viscous formulation with 2.18 mPas showed first order release. In in vivo experiments, the higher viscous nanosuspension released from osmotic pumps exhibited elevated plasma levels compared to the lower viscous formulation. Compared to bolus injected nanosuspensions constant plasma levels could be maintained by adapting the viscosity of the nanosuspension. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps prove to be a valuable delivery system for nanosuspensions in pharmacokinetic studies by consideration of the key parameter viscosity in release kinetics.

  8. Effects of osmotic stress on predation behaviour of Asterias rubens L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüera, Antonio; Schellekens, Tim; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-05-01

    Environmental stress plays an important role in determining ecosystem functioning and structure. In estuarine areas both tidal and seasonal salinity changes may cause osmotic stress on predators, affecting their behaviour and survival. The interaction between these predators and their prey may affect performance, thus influencing predator impact on prey populations. The common starfish, Asterias rubens, inhabits estuarine areas, such as the Dutch Wadden Sea, that exhibit large seasonal variation in salinity (10-32 PSU). In those areas A. rubens exerts top down control on its prey, thus representing an important shellfish predator. This predation may impact on cultured and natural shellfish populations. However, the effects of osmotic stress on A. rubens performance may influence its effect on prey. Although the effect of salinity in A. rubens survival has been extensively studied, the impact on its predation behaviour and acclimation capacity remains unclear. In this study, we analyse the performance of A. rubens preying on mussels (Mytilus edulis) after a salinity decrease and monitor its acclimation capacity over a period of 22 days. Our experiments demonstrated that salinity affected performance by reducing feeding activity and altering size prey selection. Moreover, as acclimation occurred, A. rubens predation performance improved in all sub-lethal treatments. We conclude that osmotic stress caused by decreasing salinity potentially influences A. rubens distribution, abundance, and potential impact on prey populations. However the magnitude of the change in salinity (from 31 to a minimum of 10 PSU) and its timescale (3 weeks) mediate this effect.

  9. Physcomitrella patens DNA methyltransferase 2 is required for recovery from salt and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepshikha; Kapoor, Sanjay; Kapoor, Meenu

    2016-02-01

    DNA methyltransferase 2 (DNMT2) unlike other members of the cytosine DNA methyltransferase gene family has dual substrate specificity and it methylates cytosines in both the DNA and transfer RNA (tRNA). Its role in plants, however, has remained obscure to date. In this study, we demonstrate that DNMT2 from Physcomitrella patens accumulates in a temporal manner under salt and osmotic stress showing maximum accumulation during recovery, i.e. 24 h after plants are transferred to normal growth medium. Therefore, to study its role in stress tolerance, we generated PpDNMT2 targeted knockout plants (ppdnmt2ko). Mutant plants show increased sensitivity to salt and osmotic stress and are unable to recover even after 21 days of growth on optimal growth media. ppdnmt2ko, however, accumulate normal levels of dehydrin-like and small heat shock protein encoding transcripts under stress but show dramatic reduction in levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) . The levels of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) , in contrast, increase ~ 25-30-fold in ppdnmt2ko under non-stress conditions and > 1200-fold in wild-type plants under stress. The role of PpDNMT2 in modulating biogenesis/stability of tRNA(A) (sp-) (GUC) under salt and osmotic stress is discussed in the light of these observations.

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of the Potential of Osmotic Energy for Power Production †

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Adel O.; Merdaw, Ali A.; Aryafar, Maryam; Nicoll, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the potential of osmotic energy for power production. The study includes both pilot plant testing and theoretical modelling as well as cost estimation. A projected cost of £30/MWh of clean electricity could be achieved by using a Hydro-Osmotic Power (HOP) plant if a suitable membrane is used and the osmotic potential difference between the two solutions is greater than 25 bar; a condition that can be readily found in many sites around the world. Results have shown that the membrane system accounts for 50%–80% of the HOP plant cost depending on the salinity difference level. Thus, further development in membrane technology and identifying suitable membranes would have a significant impact on the feasibility of the process and the route to market. As the membrane permeability determines the HOP process feasibility, this paper also describes the effect of the interaction between the fluid and the membrane on the system permeability. It has been shown that both the fluid physical properties as well as the membrane micro-structural parameters need to be considered if further development of the HOP process is to be achieved. PMID:25110959

  11. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; Pino, James C.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra; Ramanathan, Arvind; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Berthelier, Valerie; Stanley, Christopher B.

    2016-10-11

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR). Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain a-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. In conclusion, by focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding.

  12. The colloid osmotic pressures of invertebrate body fluids.

    PubMed

    Mangum, C P; Johansen, K

    1975-12-01

    Colloid osmotic pressures of the body fluids of twenty invertebrate species were measured directly. The results, which are generally lower than predicted values for the same species, pertain to several physiological questions: (1) they do not quantitatively explain the frequently observed hyperosmoticity of body fluids in species believed to be osmoconformers, indicating that the condition cannot be merely a consequence of a Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium; (2) the excess of hydrostatic over colloid osmotic pressure is very small. This result supports the hypothesis that the oxygen transport function of bloods with extracellular haemocyanins and haem proteins is limited by their colligative properties; (3) the pressure relationships and the absence of colloid osmotic activity in urine indicates that filtration contributes to urine formation in several species.

  13. Closed cycle osmotic power plants for electric power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, M.

    1980-04-01

    The paper deals with closed-cycle osmotic power plants (CCOPPs), which are not meant for the exploitation of natural salinity gradients but, rather, for the exploitation of those abundant heat sources having temperatures slightly higher than ambient temperature, e.g., geothermal fields, ocean temperature gradients, waste heat from power plants, and solar energy. The paper gives a general description of the CCOPP, along with some indications of its potential for energy generation. The concept of the CCOPP lies in producing electric power by means of the osmotic flows of suitable solvents and subsequently in separating them again from their solutes by means of thermal energy obtained from any available heat source. The discussion covers osmotic phenomena and the CCOPP, as well as important features of the CCOPP.

  14. Nanofluidic Osmotic Diodes: Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picallo, Clara B.; Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-12-01

    Osmosis describes the flow of water across semipermeable membranes powered by the chemical free energy extracted from salinity gradients. While osmosis can be expressed in simple terms via the van ’t Hoff ideal gas formula for the osmotic pressure, it is a complex phenomenon taking its roots in the subtle interactions occurring at the scale of the membrane nanopores. Here we use new opportunities offered by nanofluidic systems to create an osmotic diode exhibiting asymmetric water flow under reversal of osmotic driving. We show that a surface charge asymmetry built on a nanochannel surface leads to nonlinear couplings between water flow and the ion dynamics, which are capable of water flow rectification. This phenomenon opens new opportunities for water purification and complex flow control in nanochannels.

  15. Osmotic, controlled-release methylphenidate for the treatment of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Coghill, David; Seth, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is the most commonly used and best-studied stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, its short duration of action usually results in a requirement to administer multiple daily doses in order to achieve optimal clinical benefit. Although a wax-matrix-based SR formulation of MPH has been available since the 1990s, it was not well accepted into clinical practice. The variable absorption profile and lack of an immediate-release component results in a slower onset of action compared with immediate-release MPH. Hence, there was a need to develop alternative longer-lasting preparations of MPH that were as efficacious as IR MPH, but which also addressed the problems inherent in multiple daily dosing. An osmotic, controlled-release (OROS) formulation of MPH HCl has been developed over the past 10 years for once-daily administration. OROS MPH has been widely accepted by clinicians and is now the most widely prescribed MPH product in North America. Clinical trials have shown OROS MPH to have a continued action over a 12-h period, to be superior to placebo and to be as effective as immediate-release MPH dosed three times daily, in reducing symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, with similar incidence of side effects. There have been a smaller number of trials comparing OROS MPH with non-stimulant treatments, such as atomoxetine.

  16. Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.J.; McNab, W.W.; Wildenschild, D.; Ruiz, R.; Elsholz, A.

    1999-11-22

    The coupled-flow phenomenon, electro-osmosis, whereby water flow results from an applied electrical potential gradient, is being used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to induce water flow through deep (25-40 meters below surface) fine-grained sediments. The scoping work described here lays the groundwork for implementation of this technology to remediate solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) measured in-situ between two 37 m deep wells, 3 m apart of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V is in good agreement with the value determined from bench-top studies on the core extracted from one of the wells of 0.94 {+-} 0.29 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V. Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core is measured to be 2.03 {+-} 0.36 x 10{sup -10} m/s. Thus, a voltage gradient of 1 V/cm produces an effective hydraulic conductivity of {approx}1 x 10{sup -7} m/s; an increase in conductivity of nearly three orders of magnitude.

  17. Osmotic stress regulates the strength and kinetics of sugar binding to the maltoporin channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Harries, Daniel; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the effect of osmotic stress, exerted by salts, on carbohydrate binding to the sugar-specific bacterial channel maltoporin. When the channel is reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers, single events of its occlusion by sugar are seen as transient interruptions in the flow of small ions. We find that, for most salts, changes in the free energy of maltoporin-sugar binding vary linearly with solution osmotic pressure. Such a change in binding with solution osmolarity indicates that for each salt a constant number of salt-excluding water molecules is released upon sugar-maltoporin association at all salt concentrations. We find that larger numbers of water molecules are released upon binding of the cyclic carbohydrate β-cyclodextrin (CD) than upon binding of the corresponding linear homologue maltoheptaose (m7). Remarkably, the extent to which salts affect the binding constants and rates depends sensitively on the type of salt; dehydration in solutions of different anions corresponds to the Hofmeister series. In sodium sulfate solutions, CD and m7 respectively release about 120 and 35 salt-excluding water molecules; in sodium chloride solutions, 35 and 15 waters. No water release is observed with sodium bromide. Finally, by adding adamantane, known to form an inclusion complex with CD, we can infer that CD not only dehydrates but also undergoes a conformational change upon binding to the channel. As a practical outcome, our results also demonstrate how osmotic stress can improve single-molecule detection of different solutes using protein-based nanopores.

  18. Trehalose enhances osmotic tolerance and suppresses lysophosphatidylcholine-induced acrosome reaction in ram spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, E; Naseer, Z; Aksoy, M; Küçük, N; Uçan, U; Serin, I; Ceylan, A

    2015-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of trehalose on osmotic tolerance and the ability of ram spermatozoon to undergo acrosome reaction induced by lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In experiment 1, the diluted ejaculates were exposed to anisosmotic fructose solutions (70, 500, 750 and 1000 mOsm l(-1) ) with or without 50 mm trehalose. The presence of trehalose in hyperosmotic conditions enhanced (P < 0.05) the percentage of live, live-intact and intact spermatozoa. Similarly, trehalose enhanced (P < 0.05) the live and live-intact spermatozoa during hypo-osmotic conditions. In experiment 2, the centrifuged ejaculates were diluted with TCG only or TCG containing either 50 or 100 mm trehalose. The acrosome reaction was induced by LPC. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoon was less (P < 0.05) in trehalose-supplemented groups compared to control. In experiment 3, the ejaculates were cryopreserved in an extender containing 0 mm (control), 50 mm or 100 mm trehalose. Supplementation of extender with trehalose, either 50 mm or 100 mm, enhanced the cryosurvival rate (P < 0.05) compared to the control. In conclusion, the presence of trehalose in anisosmotic conditions enhances the osmotic tolerance, cryosurvival rate of ram spermatozoon and suppresses their ability to undergo LPC and cryo-induced acrosome reaction.

  19. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  20. Osmotic swelling characteristics of glial cells in the murine hippocampus, cerebellum, and retina in situ.

    PubMed

    Hirrlinger, Petra G; Wurm, Antje; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Bringmann, Andreas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2008-05-01

    Glial cells are proposed to play a major role in the ionic and osmotic homeostasis in the CNS. Swelling of glial cells contributes to the development of edema in neural tissue under pathological conditions such as trauma and ischemia. In this study, we compared the osmotic swelling characteristics of murine hippocampal astrocytes, cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, and retinal Müller glial cells in acutely isolated tissue slices in response to hypoosmotic stress and pharmacological blockade of Kir channels. Hypoosmotic challenge induced an immediate swelling of somata in the majority of Bergmann glial cells and hippocampal astrocytes investigated, whereas Müller cell bodies displayed a substantial delay in the onset of swelling and hippocampal astroglial processes remained unaffected. Blockade of Kir channels under isoosmotic conditions had no swelling-inducing effect in Müller cell somata but caused a swelling in brain astrocytic somata and processes. Blockade of Kir channels under hypoosmotic conditions induced an immediate and strong swelling in Müller cell somata, but had no cumulative effect to brain astroglial somata. No regulatory volume decrease could be observed in all cell types. The data suggest that Kir channels are differently implicated in cell volume homeostasis of retinal Müller cells and brain astrocytes and that Müller cells and brain astrocytes differ in their osmotic swelling properties.

  1. Concentration of Tea Extracts by Osmotic Evaporation: Optimisation of Process Parameters and Effect on Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Marisa P.; Alves, Vítor D.; Coelhoso, Isabel M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the concentration process of three different tea extracts (medicinal Rosil No. 6, Black, and Forest Fruit teas) using the osmotic evaporation (OE) process, was studied. The effect of the OE process on the content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity was evaluated. The concentration process was carried out in a hollow-fibre membrane contactor with an effective surface area of 0.54 m2. The tea extract was circulated through the shell side of the contactor, while a concentrated osmotic solution (CaCl2 5 M) was circulated inside the fibres. The flux, the driving force, and the mass transfer coefficient were evaluated. A decrease of the water flux over time was observed and was attributed only to the decrease of the driving force, caused by the dilution of the osmotic solution. Using a surface area/feed volume ratio of 774 m2·m−3, it is possible to reach a tea concentration of 40% (w/w) in 5 h, with a constant water flux and without losing the phenolic content and antioxidant potential in most teas. PMID:28036043

  2. Design and Development of Clopidogrel Bisulfate Gastroretentive Osmotic Formulation Using Quality by Design Tools.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nilesh; Purohit, Ravindra

    2017-02-28

    Clopidogrel bisulfate (CBS) is antiplatelet drug and it is becoming a drug of choice in the treatment and management of prevention of heart attacks and strokes. CBS is stable and soluble in acidic pH; therefore, retention in stomach for prolonged period appears to be beneficial for controlling the bioavailability. The gastroretentive osmotic system (GROS) facilitates prolonged retention of drug in stomach and provides zero-order drug release. A complex formulation like GROS poses many challenges, and QbD tools can help in designing robust formulation which takes all aspects of product and process development in order to deliver a robust product. The GROS was formulated in three steps: core tablet, osmotic tablet, and gastroretentive osmotic tablet. The design of experiment was used for screening and optimization of formulation and process-related parameters. The dissolution study was carried out to analyze the release pattern of tablet. The optimized batch O-4 showed cumulative drug release of 19.43, 30.49, 64.41, and 85.11% at 2, 4, 8, and 12 h which is in the range of QTPP predictions. The novel technique of GROS was implemented successfully which demonstrates robust design giving consistent and desired results.

  3. Controlled delivery of nanosuspensions from osmotic pumps: zero order and non-zero order kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alexandra; Geissler, Simon; Weigandt, Markus; Mäder, Karsten

    2012-03-28

    Nanosuspensions have gained great interest in the last decade as a formulation tool for poorly soluble drugs. By decreasing particle sizes nanosuspensions enhance dissolution rate and bioavailability of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. Micro-osmotic pumps are widely used in experimental pharmacology and offer a tool of interest for the sustained release of nanosuspensions via the intraperitoneal or subcutaneous application site. The purpose of the present study was to investigate in-vitro the influence of (1) nanosuspension viscosity, (2) pump orifice position and (3) formulation osmolality on the delivery behavior of formulations in implantable osmotic systems. Therefore fenofibrate nanosuspension, methylene blue and fluorescein sodium solutions were chosen as model formulations. They were released in water or isotonic saline solution and drug/dye concentrations were determined by HPLC/UV. Release of nanosuspension particles in low viscous formulations resulted in a burst whereas increasing the viscosity led to the expected zero order delivery. Pumps with upward-positioned orifices released the nanosuspension in a zero order manner. Within the release of dyes, constant delivery could be ensured up to an osmolality of 486 mO sm/kg; above this value premature release of formulation was observed. The results indicate the requirement of in-vitro experiments prior to in-vivo animal testing for determining the release profiles of osmotic pumps.

  4. Both water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption increase brain water content in rats.

    PubMed

    Kozler, P; Riljak, V; Pokorný, J

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments revealed that water intoxication and osmotic BBB disruption in the rat allow penetration of high-molecular substances into the brain and that resulting changes in the internal environment of the CNS lead to pathological development, such as the loss of integrity of myelin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the previously described phenomena are associated with increased water content in the brain. To answer the question following methods were used: a) water intoxication: intraperitoneal administration of distilled water, b) osmotic BBB disruption: application of mannitol (20 %) selectively into the internal carotid artery, c) brain wet weight was measured after decapitation, and subsequently (after six days in thermostat set at 86 °C) the dry weight were estimated d) in animals with 20 % and 30 % hyperhydration the degree of myelin deterioration was estimated e) animal locomotor activity was tested by continuous behavior tracking and analysis. Brain water content after water intoxication and following the administration of mannitol was higher than in the control group. Different degrees of hyperhydration led to different levels of brain water content and to different degrees of myelin impairment. Hyperhydration corresponding to 20 % of the body weight brought about lower locomotor activity. Increased water content in the brain after the BBB osmotic disruption is surprising because this method is frequently used in the clinical practice.

  5. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  6. Evaluation of the response of Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 to sucrose-induced osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sunny-Roberts, E O; Knorr, D

    2008-02-01

    Environmental osmotic changes are one of the stresses live probiotics may encounter either in their natural habitats or as a result of usage in food formulations and processing. Response to osmotic stress, induced by sucrose, of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 (E800) was investigated. The fluorescence-based approach used, by combined staining with caboxyfluorescein (cFDA) and propidium iodide (PI) could give insights on the osmotic-induced changes of microbial esterase activity and membrane integrity; also the extrusion of intracellular accumulated carboxyfluorescein (cF) upon energizing with glucose. Comparison of the flowcytometric viability assessment with the conventional culture techniques revealed that sucrose-stressed cells had a slight loss of culturability (logN/N(0) approximately -0.3) at 1.2 and 1.5M sucrose concentration though they could perform an enzymatic conversion of cFDA into cF. The presence of such metabolically active bacteria in food might be critical as they may excrete toxic or food spoilage metabolites. Moreover, the perturbation of cF extrusion activities became a limiting factor for reproductive capacities. There was no change in the cell morphology. These results proved the ability of the strain of study to tolerate sucrose, even at extreme concentrations and these must be taken into consideration for its usage in the formulation/processing of sugar-based foods, e.g. jams, candies, etc.

  7. Osmotic potential of several hardwood species as affected by manipulation of throughfall precipitation in an upland oak forest during a dry year.

    PubMed

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gebre, G. Michael; Shirshac, Terri L.

    1998-05-01

    Components of dehydration tolerance, including osmotic potential at full turgor (Psi(pio)) and osmotic adjustment (lowering of Psi(pio)), of several deciduous species were investigated in a mature, upland oak forest in eastern Tennessee. Beginning July 1993, the trees were subjected to one of three throughfall precipitation treatments: ambient, ambient minus 33% (dry treatment), and ambient plus 33% (wet treatment). During the dry 1995 growing season, leaf water potentials of all species declined to between -2.5 and -3.1 MPa in the dry treatment. There was considerable variation in Psi(pio) among species (-1.0 to -2.0 MPa). Based on Psi(pio) values, American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), dogwood (Cornus florida L.), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) were least dehydration tolerant, red maple (A. rubrum L.) was intermediate in tolerance, and white oak (Quercus alba L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.) were most tolerant. During severe drought, overstory chestnut oak and understory dogwood, red maple and chestnut oak displayed osmotic adjustment (-0.12 to -0.20 MPa) in the dry treatment relative to the wet treatment. (No osmotic adjustment was evident in understory red maple and chestnut oak during the previous wet year.) Osmotic potential at full turgor was generally correlated with leaf water potential, with both declining over the growing season, especially in species that displayed osmotic adjustment. However, osmotic adjustment was not restricted to species considered dehydration tolerant; for example, dogwood typically maintained high Psi(pio) and displayed osmotic adjustment to drought, but had the highest mortality rates of the species studied. Understory saplings tended to have higher Psi(pio) than overstory trees when water availability was high, but Psi(pio) of understory trees declined to values observed for overstory trees during severe drought. We conclude that Psi(pio) varies among deciduous hardwood species and is dependent on canopy

  8. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  9. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  10. Osmotic adjustment, symplast volume, and nonstomatally mediated water stress inhibition of photosynthesis in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A S; Berkowitz, G A

    1987-12-01

    At low water potential (psi(w)), dehydration reduces the symplast volume of leaf tissue. The effect of this reduction on photosynthetic capacity was investigated. The influence of osmotic adjustment on this relationship was also examined. To examine these relationships, comparative studies were undertaken on two wheat cultivars, one that osmotically adjusts in response to water deficits (;Condor'), and one that lacks this capacity (;Capelle Desprez'). During a 9-day stress cycle, when water was withheld from plants grown in a growth chamber, the relative water content of leaves declined by 30% in both cultivars. Leaf osmotic potential (psi(s)) declined to a greater degree in Condor plants. Measuring psi(s) at full turgor indicated that osmotic adjustment occurred in stressed Condor, but not in Capelle plants. Two methods were used to examine the degree of symplast (i.e. protoplast) volume reduction in tissue rapidly equilibrated to increasingly low psi(w). Both techniques gave similar results. With well-watered plants, symplast volume reduction from the maximum (found at high psi(w) for each cultivar) was the same for Condor and Capelle. After a stress cycle, volume was maintained to a greater degree at low psi(w) in Condor leaf tissue than in Capelle. Nonstomatally controlled photosynthesis was inhibited to the same degree at low psi(w) in leaf tissue prepared from well-watered Condor and Capelle plants. However, photosynthetic capacity was maintained to a greater degree at low psi(w) in tissue prepared from stressed Condor plants than in tissue from stressed Capelle plants. Net CO(2) uptake in attached leaves was monitored using an infrared gas analyzer. These studies indicated that in water stressed plants, photosynthesis was 106.5% higher in Condor than Capelle at ambient [CO(2)] and 21.8% higher at elevated external [CO(2)]. The results presented in this report were interpreted as consistent with the hypothesis that there is a causal association between

  11. Carrizo citrange Plants Do Not Require the Presence of Roots to Modulate the Response to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Clemente, Rosa M.; Montoliu, Almudena; Zandalinas, Sara I.; de Ollas, Carlos; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The study of the effects of a specific stress condition on the performance of plants grown under field conditions is difficult due to interactions among multiple abiotic and biotic factors affecting the system. In vitro tissue-culture-based techniques allow the study of each adverse condition independently and also make possible to investigate the performance of genotypes of interest under stress conditions avoiding the effect of the root. In this paper, the response of Carrizo citrange, a commercial citrus rootstock, to osmotic stress was evaluated by culturing in vitro intact plants and micropropagated shoots. The osmotic stress was generated by adding two different concentrations of polyethyleneglycol to the culture media. Different parameters such as plant performance, organ length, antioxidant activities, and endogenous contents of proline, malondialdehyde, and hormones were determined. Differently to that observed under high salinity, when subjected to osmotic stress conditions, Carrizo citrange showed increased endogenous levels of MDA, proline, and ABA. These results evidence that the mechanisms of response of Carrizo citrange to saline or osmotic stress are different. The presence of roots was not necessary to activate any of the plant responses which indicates that the organs involved in the stress perception and signaling depends on the type of adverse condition to which plants are subjected. PMID:22919353

  12. Carrizo citrange plants do not require the presence of roots to modulate the response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Clemente, Rosa M; Montoliu, Almudena; Zandalinas, Sara I; de Ollas, Carlos; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    The study of the effects of a specific stress condition on the performance of plants grown under field conditions is difficult due to interactions among multiple abiotic and biotic factors affecting the system. In vitro tissue-culture-based techniques allow the study of each adverse condition independently and also make possible to investigate the performance of genotypes of interest under stress conditions avoiding the effect of the root. In this paper, the response of Carrizo citrange, a commercial citrus rootstock, to osmotic stress was evaluated by culturing in vitro intact plants and micropropagated shoots. The osmotic stress was generated by adding two different concentrations of polyethyleneglycol to the culture media. Different parameters such as plant performance, organ length, antioxidant activities, and endogenous contents of proline, malondialdehyde, and hormones were determined. Differently to that observed under high salinity, when subjected to osmotic stress conditions, Carrizo citrange showed increased endogenous levels of MDA, proline, and ABA. These results evidence that the mechanisms of response of Carrizo citrange to saline or osmotic stress are different. The presence of roots was not necessary to activate any of the plant responses which indicates that the organs involved in the stress perception and signaling depends on the type of adverse condition to which plants are subjected.

  13. Comparative physiological and transcriptomic analyses provide integrated insight into osmotic, cold, and salt stress tolerance mechanisms in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Juhua; Wang, Jiashui; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The growth, development, and production of banana plants are constrained by multiple abiotic stressors. However, it remains elusive for the tolerance mechanisms of banana responding to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, we found that Fen Jiao (FJ) was more tolerant to osmotic, cold, and salt stresses than BaXi Jiao (BX) by phenotypic and physiological analyses. Comparative transcriptomic analyses highlighted stress tolerance genes that either specifically regulated in FJ or changed more than twofold in FJ relative to BX after treatments. In total, 933, 1644, and 133 stress tolerance genes were identified after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments, respectively. Further integrated analyses found that 30 tolerance genes, including transcription factor, heat shock protein, and E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, could be commonly regulated by osmotic, cold, and salt stresses. Finally, ABA and ROS signaling networks were found to be more active in FJ than in BX under osmotic, cold, and salt treatments, which may contribute to the strong stress tolerances of FJ. Together, this study provides new insights into the tolerance mechanism of banana responding to multiple stresses, thus leading to potential applications in the genetic improvement of multiple abiotic stress tolerances in banana. PMID:28223714

  14. Stabilization of liposomes in frozen solutions through control of osmotic flow and internal solution freezing by trehalose.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-ichi; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of trehalose distribution across the membrane on the freeze-related physical changes of liposome suspensions and their functional stability upon freeze-thawing. Cooling thermal analysis of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposome suspensions showed exotherm peaks of bulk (-15 °C to -25 °C) and intraliposomal (approx. -45 °C) solution freezing initiated by heterogeneous and homogeneous ice nucleation, respectively. The extent of the intraliposomal solution freezing exotherm depended on liposome size, lipid composition, cosolutes, and thermal history, suggesting that osmotic dehydration occurred due to the increasing difference in solute concentrations across the membrane. A freeze-thawing study of carboxyfluorescein-encapsulated liposomes suggested that controlling the osmotic properties to avoid the freeze-induced intraliposomal solution loss either by rapid cooling of suspensions containing trehalose in both sides of the membrane (retention of the intraliposomal supercooled solution) or by cooling of suspensions containing trehalose in the extraliposomal media prior to freezing (e.g., osmotic shrinkage) led to higher retention of the water-soluble marker. Evaluation and control of the osmotically mediated freezing behavior by optimizing the formulation and process factors should be relevant to the cryopreservation and freeze-drying of liposomes.

  15. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  16. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, D.J.; Anex, D.S.; Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1999-08-24

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-{micro}L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-{micro}L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column. 4 figs.

  17. Vocal Fold Epithelial Response to Luminal Osmotic Perturbation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dry-air challenges increase the osmolarity of fluid lining the luminal surface of the proximal airway. The homeostasis of surface fluid is thought to be essential for voice production and laryngeal defense. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that viable vocal fold epithelium would generate a water flux to reduce an osmotic challenge (150…

  18. Wet-spinning of osmotically stressed silk fibroin.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sungkyun; Gido, Samuel P

    2009-08-10

    Based on the phase diagram constructed for water-silk fibroin-LiBr using the osmotic stress method, wet-spinning of osmotically stressed, regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin was performed, without the necessity of using expensive or toxic organic solvents. The osmotic stress was applied to prestructure the regenerated silk fibroin molecule from its original random coil state to a more oriented state, manipulating the phase of the silk solution in the phase diagram before the start of spinning. Various starting points for spinning were selected from the phase diagram to evaluate the spinning performance and also physical properties of fibers produced. Monofilament fiber with a diameter of 20 microm was produced. It was found that the fibers whose starting point in the phase diagram were around the phase boundary between silk I and silk II, at very low LiBr concentrations, showed the best spinning process stability and physical properties. This underpins the prediction that the enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using the osmotic stress method helps improve the physical properties of wet-spun regenerated silk fibroin fibers.

  19. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, David J.; Anex, Deon S.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, Rajeev; Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-.mu.L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-.mu.L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column.

  20. Density-Gradient Determination of Osmotic Potential in Plant Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Murray W.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring osmotic potential which is suitable for high school and college biology classes. This method introduces students to the hard-to-visualize technique of using density gradients to separate cells or cell constituents of differing densities. (JR)

  1. Osmotically induced reversible transitions in lipid-DNA mesophases.

    PubMed

    Danino, Dganit; Kesselman, Ellina; Saper, Gadiel; Petrache, Horia I; Harries, Daniel

    2009-04-08

    We follow the effect of osmotic pressure on isoelectric complexes that self-assemble from mixtures of DNA and mixed neutral and cationic lipids. Using small angle x-ray diffraction and freeze-fracture cryo-electron microscopy, we find that lamellar complexes known to form in aqueous solutions can reversibly transition to hexagonal mesophases under high enough osmotic stress exerted by adding a neutral polymer. Using molecular spacings derived from x-ray diffraction, we estimate the reversible osmotic pressure-volume (Pi-V) work needed to induce this transition. We find that the transition free energy is comparable to the work required to elastically bend lipid layers around DNA. Consistent with this, the required work is significantly lowered by an addition of hexanol, which is known to soften lipid bilayers. Our findings not only help to resolve the free-energy contributions associated with lipid-DNA complex formation, but they also demonstrate the importance that osmotic stress can have to the macromolecular phase geometry in realistic biological environments.

  2. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  3. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  4. A Simple Membrane Osmometer System & Experiments that Quantitatively Measure Osmotic Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvel, Stephen C.; Kepler, Megan V.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for students to be exposed to the concept of osmotic pressure. Understanding this concept lays the foundation for deeper discussions that lead to more theoretical aspects of water movement associated with the concepts of free energy, water potential, osmotic potential, pressure potential, and osmotic adjustment. The concept of…

  5. [Effects of 6-BA and AsA on photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached poplar leaves under osmotic stress of root].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yulong; Ma, Yongshuang; Feng, Zhili

    2004-12-01

    In order to know more about the relationships between photosynthesis photoinhibition and reactive oxygen species metabolism, the effects of 6-benzyladenine (6-BA) and ascorbate (AsA) on net photosynthetic rate (Pn), apparent quantum yield (AQY), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities, O2-* generation rate, and H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were studied with attached leaves of poplar clone seedlings under osmotic stress of root. Under osmotic stress, the photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached poplar leaves, judged by the significant decrease of Pn and AQY, was aggravated, and the balance of reactive oxygen species metabolism was destroyed. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased, but ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity decreased. In the meantime, the O2-* generation rate and the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. When osmotic stressed poplar seedlings were pretreated with 6-BA and AsA, the activities of SOD and APX increased, O2-* generation rate and H2O2 and MDA contents decreased, and photosynthesis photoinhibition was alleviated. The contents of reactive oxygen species and MDA in poplar leaves were negatively correlated with net photosynthetic rate and apparent quantum yield. It's indicated that the photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached leaves of poplar clone seedlings had intrinsic relations with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species under osmotic stress of root, and the alleviation effects of 6-BA and AsA on photosynthesis photoinhibition were related to their promotion effects to the scavenging system of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Changes in content of free, conjugated and bound polyamines and osmotic adjustment in adaptation of vetiver grass to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiang; Yu, Bingjun

    2010-06-01

    Osmotic adjustment and alteration of polyamines (PAs) have been suggested to play roles in plant adaptation to water deficit/drought stress. In this study, the changes in cell intactness, photosynthesis, compatible solutes and PAs [including putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) each in free, conjugated and bound forms] were investigated in leaves of vetiver grass exposed to different intensity of water deficit stress and subsequent rewatering. The results showed that, when vetiver grass was exposed to the moderate (20% and 40% PEG-6000 solutions) and severe (60% PEG solution) water deficit for 6days, the plant injury degree (expressed as the parameters of plant growth, cell membrane integrity, water relations and photosynthesis) increased and contents of free and conjugated Put decreased with the rise of PEG concentration. Under the moderate water deficit, the plants could survive by the reduced osmotic potential (psi(s)), increased free and conjugated Spd and Spm in leaves. After subsequent rewatering, the osmotic balance was re-established, most of the above investigated physiological parameters were fully or partly recovered to the control levels. However, it was not the case for the severely-stressed and rewatering plants. It indicates that, vetiver grass can cope well with the moderate water deficit/drought stress by using the strategies of osmotic adjustment and maintenance of total contents of free, conjugated and bound PAs in leaves.

  7. Model Dependency of TMAO's Counteracting Effect Against Action of Urea: Kast Model versus Osmotic Model of TMAO.

    PubMed

    Borgohain, Gargi; Paul, Sandip

    2016-03-10

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation of GB1 peptide (a 16-residue β-hairpin) in different osmotic environments is studied. Urea is used for denaturation of the peptide, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is used to offset the effect of urea. Protein-urea electrostatic interactions are found to play a major role in protein-denaturation. To emphasize on protein protecting action of TMAO against urea, two different models of TMAO are used, viz., the Kast model and the Osmotic model. We observe that the Osmotic model of TMAO gives the best protection to counteract urea's action when used in ratio 1:2 of urea:TMAO (i.e., reverse ratio). This is because the presence of TMAO makes urea-protein electrostatic interactions more unfavorable. Preferential solvation of TMAO molecules by urea (and water) molecules is also observed, which causes depletion in the number of urea molecules in the vicinity of the protein. The calculations of intraprotein hydrogen bonds between different residues of protein further reveal the breaking of backbone hydrogen bonds of residues 2 and 15 in the presence of urea, and the same is preserved in the presence of TMAO. Free energy landscapes show that the narrowest distribution is obtained for the osmotic TMAO model when used in reverse ratio.

  8. Sixteen-Day Bedrest Significantly Increases Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Hsieh, S. T.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Convertino, V. A.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure to microgravity, astronauts lose up to 10% of their total plasma volume, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after space flight. Because plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a primary factor maintaining plasma volume, our objective was to measure time course changes in COP during microgravity simulated by 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy male subjects (30-55 years of age) were placed in HDT for 16 days. For the purpose of another study, three of the seven subjects were chosen to exercise on a cycle ergometer on day 16. Blood samples were drawn immediately before bedrest on day 14 of bedrest, 18-24 hours following exercise while all subjects were still in HDT and 1 hour following bedrest termination. Plasma COP was measured in all 20 microliter EDTA-treated samples using an osmometer fitted with a PM 30 membrane. Data were analyzed with paired and unpaired t-tests. Plasma COP on day 14 of bedrest (29.9 +/- 0.69 mmHg) was significantly higher (p less than 0.005) than the control, pre-bedrest value (23.1 +/- 0.76 mmHg). At one hour of upright recovery after HDT, plasma COP remained significantly elevated (exercise: 26.9 +/- 0.87 mmHg; no exercise: 26.3 +/- 0.85 mmHg). Additionally, exercise had no significant effect on plasma COP 18-24 hours following exercise (exercise: 27.8 +/- 1.09 mmHg; no exercise: 27.1 +/- 0.78 mmHg). Our results demonstrate that plasma COP increases significantly with microgravity simulated by HDT. However, preliminary results indicate exercise during HDT does not significantly affect plasma COP.

  9. Assessment of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic effects related to abuse potential of a unique oral osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate formulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Parasrampuria, Dolly A; Schoedel, Kerri A; Schuller, Reinhard; Gu, Joan; Ciccone, Patrick; Silber, Steven A; Sellers, Edward M

    2007-12-01

    This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, 5-period crossover study in 49 healthy subjects with a history of light (occasional) recreational stimulant use, to evaluate the abuse-related subjective effects of oral osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate with comparable doses of immediate-release methylphenidate. Healthy subjects with a history of light recreational stimulant use were enrolled in the study if they demonstrated a positive response to a 20-mg dose of d-amphetamine and a negative placebo response. Enrolled subjects received single doses of placebo, 54 and 108 mg osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate, and 50 and 90 mg immediate-release methylphenidate. For each treatment, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety were assessed for 24 hours. Subjective data were collected through standard questionnaires and visual analog scales for positive, stimulant, negative, and other effects. Immediate-release and osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate produced expected plasma concentration-time profiles of d-methylphenidate. Both doses of immediate-release methylphenidate (50 and 90 mg) produced statistically significantly higher subjective effects (eg, positive, stimulant) with respect to placebo for all measures. The higher osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate dose of 108 mg also produced statistically significant differences from placebo for most measures. However, the most commonly prescribed therapeutic dose of osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate (54 mg) did not produce significant differences from placebo for most measures. In addition, for comparable dose levels, osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate produced lower positive and stimulant subjective effects than immediate-release methylphenidate, and low-dose immediate-release methylphenidate (50 mg) produced greater subjective effects than high-dose osmotic-controlled extended-release methylphenidate, with

  10. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  11. Decreased brain reward function during nicotine withdrawal in C57BL6 mice: evidence from intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) studies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul M; Hollander, Jonathan A; Kenny, Paul J

    2008-09-01

    Deficits in brain reward function during nicotine withdrawal may serve as an important substrate for negative reinforcement that contributes to the persistence of the tobacco habit in human smokers. The ability to assess withdrawal-associated reward deficits in genetically modified mice may facilitate understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of nicotine dependence. Here, we assessed the effects of nicotine withdrawal on brain reward function in mice, as measured by intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds. Male C57BL6 mice were trained in a discrete-trial current-threshold ICSS procedure until stable reward thresholds were obtained. Mice then received experimenter-administered saline or nicotine (2 mg/kg/injection salt; x4 daily) injections for 7 consecutive days, and ICSS thresholds assessed for 3 days after cessation of injections. Thresholds were unaltered in nicotine- and saline-treated mice after cessation of injections, indicating that this treatment regimen was not sufficient to induce withdrawal-associated reward deficits. Next, mice were implanted subcutaneously with osmotic minipumps delivering a constant daily amount of saline or nicotine (24 mg/kg/day; free-base), with pumps surgically removed 13 days later. The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (2 mg/kg) elevated ICSS thresholds in nicotine- but not saline-treated mice when administered 8-10 days after pump implantation. Similarly, reward thresholds were elevated in nicotine-treated mice 12-72 h after minipump removal. These data demonstrate that antagonist-precipitated or spontaneous withdrawal from nicotine delivered via osmotic minipumps induced reward deficits in mice. Further, these findings highlight the potential utility of the ICSS procedure for assessing this important affective component of nicotine withdrawal in genetically modified mice.

  12. Involvement of nitrate reductase (NR) in osmotic stress-induced NO generation of Arabidopsis thaliana L. roots.

    PubMed

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Ortega, Leandro; Erdei, László

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is undoubtedly a potential signal molecule in diverse developmental processes and stress responses. Despite our extensive knowledge about the role of NO in physiological and stress responses, the source of this gaseous molecule is still unresolved. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of nitrate reductase (NR) as the source of NO accumulation in the root system of wild-type and NR-deficient nia1, nia2 mutant Arabidopsis plants under osmotic stress conditions induced by a polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) treatment. Reduction of primary root (PR) length was detected as the effect of osmotic stress in wild-type and NR-deficient plants. We found that osmotic stress-induced lateral root (LR) initiation in wild-type, but not in NR-mutant plants. High levels of NO formation occurred in roots of Col-1 plants as the effect of PEG treatment. The mammalian nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) had no effect on LR initiation or NO generation, while tungstate, an NR inhibitor, inhibited the later phase of osmotic stress-induced NO accumulation and slightly decreased the LR development. In nia1, nia2 roots, the PEG treatment induced the first phase of NO production, but later NO production was inhibited. We conclude that the first phase of PEG-induced NO generation is not dependent on NOS-like or NR activity. It is also suggested that the activity of NR in roots is required for the later phase of osmotic stress-induced NO formation.

  13. Are conformational changes, induced by osmotic pressure variations, the underlying mechanism of controlling the adhesive activity of mussel adhesive proteins?

    PubMed

    van der Leeden, Mieke C

    2005-11-22

    The mussel adhesive protein Mefp-1, under physiological conditions, presumably has a self-avoiding random walk conformation with helix-like or turned deca-peptide segments. Such a conformation may coil up under osmotic pressure induced by surrounding macromolecules. As a consequence, the orientation of the 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine groups (dopa), essential for the adhesive strength as well as the cohesive strength in Mefp-1, will be altered. Changing the concentration of the protein itself or of different-type surrounding macromolecules may therefore be a tool to control the protein's adhesive activity. The effect of osmotic pressure on the conformation and dopa reactivity of Mefp-1 is studied by the addition of (poly)ethylene oxide (PEO) as a model macromolecule (Mw = 100 kD). From UV-spectroscopy measurements, it can be concluded that dopa reactivity in Mefp-1 changes with increasing PEO concentration. Fitting of the measured absorbance intensity data of the oxidation product dopaquinone versus time with a kinetic model points to the decreased accessibility of dopa groups in the Mefp-1 structure, a faster oxidation, and diminished cross linking under the influence of increasing PEO concentration up to 2.4 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 73 Pa. At higher PEO concentrations, the accessibility of the dopa groups for oxidation as well as cross-link formation decreases until about 20% of the dopa groups are oxidized at a PEO concentration of 3.8 g/L, corresponding to an osmotic pressure of approximately 113 Pa. FTIR measurements on the basis of amide I shifts qualitatively point to a transition to a more continuously turned structure of Mefp-1 in the presence of PEO. Therefore, it seems that conformational changes caused by variations of osmotic pressure determine the extent of steric hindrance of the dopa groups and hence the adhesive reactivity of Mefp-1.

  14. Aquaporin-mediated increase in root hydraulic conductance is involved in silicon-induced improved root water uptake under osmotic stress in Sorghum bicolor L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Yin, Lina; Deng, Xiping; Wang, Shiwen; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Zhang, Suiqi

    2014-09-01

    The fact that silicon application alleviates water deficit stress has been widely reported, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here the effects of silicon on water uptake and transport of sorghum seedlings (Sorghum bicolor L.) growing under polyethylene glycol-simulated osmotic stress in hydroponic culture and water deficit stress in sand culture were investigated. Osmotic stress dramatically decreased dry weight, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and leaf water content, but silicon application reduced these stress-induced decreases. Although silicon application had no effect on stem water transport capacity, whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and root hydraulic conductance (Lp) were higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in those without silicon treatment under osmotic stress. Furthermore, the extent of changes in transpiration rate was similar to the changes in Kplant and Lp. The contribution of aquaporin to Lp was characterized using the aquaporin inhibitor mercury. Under osmotic stress, the exogenous application of HgCl2 decreased the transpiration rates of seedlings with and without silicon to the same level; after recovery induced by dithiothreitol (DTT), however, the transpiration rate was higher in silicon-treated seedlings than in untreated seedlings. In addition, transcription levels of several root aquaporin genes were increased by silicon application under osmotic stress. These results indicate that the silicon-induced up-regulation of aquaporin, which was thought to increase Lp, was involved in improving root water uptake under osmotic stress. This study also suggests that silicon plays a modulating role in improving plant resistance to osmotic stress in addition to its role as a mere physical barrier.

  15. Modeling microbial spoilage and quality of gilthead seabream fillets: combined effect of osmotic pretreatment, modified atmosphere packaging, and nisin on shelf life.

    PubMed

    Tsironi, Theofania N; Taoukis, Petros S

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study was the kinetic modeling of the effect of storage temperature on the quality and shelf life of chilled fish, modified atmosphere-packed (MAP), and osmotically pretreated with the addition of nisin as antimicrobial agent. Fresh gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) fillets were osmotically treated with 50% high dextrose equivalent maltodextrin (DE 47) plus 5% NaCl. Water loss, solid gain, salt content, and water activity were monitored throughout treatment and treatment conditions were selected for the shelf life study. Untreated and osmotically pretreated slices with and without nisin (2 x 10(4) IU/100 g osmotic solution), packed in air or modified atmosphere (50% CO(2)-50% air), and stored at controlled isothermal conditions (0, 5, 10, and 15 degrees C) were studied. Quality assessment and modeling were based on growth of several microbial indices, total volatile nitrogen, trimethylamine nitrogen, lipid oxidation (TBARS), and sensory scoring. Temperature dependence of quality loss rates was modeled by the Arrhenius equation, validated under dynamic conditions. Pretreated samples showed improved quality stability during subsequent refrigerated storage, in terms of microbial growth, chemical changes, and organoleptic degradation. Osmotic pretreatment with the addition of nisin in combination with MAP was the most effective treatment resulting in significant shelf life extension of gilthead seabream fillets (48 days compared to 10 days for the control at 0 degrees C).

  16. Growth of protein crystals in hydrogels prevents osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sazaki, Gen; Hirose, Mika; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2012-04-04

    High-throughput protein X-ray crystallography offers a significant opportunity to facilitate drug discovery. The most reliable approach is to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein-ligand complex by soaking the ligand in apo crystals. However, protein apo crystals produced by conventional crystallization in a solution are fatally damaged by osmotic shock during soaking. To overcome this difficulty, we present a novel technique for growing protein crystals in a high-concentration hydrogel that is completely gellified and exhibits high strength. This technique allowed us essentially to increase the mechanical stability of the crystals, preventing serious damage to the crystals caused by osmotic shock. Thus, this method may accelerate structure-based drug discoveries.

  17. Extensional instability in electro-osmotic microflows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, R. M.; Freeman, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Fluid transport in microfluidic systems typically is laminar due to the low Reynolds number characteristic of the flow. The inclusion of suspended polymers imparts elasticity to fluids, allowing instabilities to be excited when substantial polymer stretching occurs. For high molecular weight polymer chains we find that flow velocities achievable by standard electro-osmotic pumping are sufficient to excite extensional instabilities in dilute polymer solutions. We observe a dependence in measured fluctuations on polymer concentration which plateaus at a threshold corresponding to the onset of significant molecular crowding in macromolecular solutions; plateauing occurs well below the overlap concentration. Our results show that electro-osmotic flows of complex fluids are disturbed from the steady regime, suggesting potential for enhanced mixing and requiring care in modeling the flow of complex liquids such as biopolymer suspensions.

  18. Giant Osmotic Pressure in the Forced Wetting of Hydrophobic Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Michelin-Jamois, Millan; Picard, Cyril; Vigier, Gérard; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2015-07-17

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate, on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  19. Organic ionic salt draw solutions for osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Katie S; Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E

    2012-10-01

    This investigation evaluates the use of organic ionic salt solutions as draw solutions for specific use in osmotic membrane bioreactors. Also, this investigation presents a simple method for determining the diffusion coefficient of ionic salt solutions using only a characterized membrane. A selection of organic ionic draw solutions underwent a desktop screening process before being tested in the laboratory and evaluated for performance using specific salt flux (reverse salt flux per unit water flux), biodegradation potential, and replenishment cost. Two of the salts were found to have specific salt fluxes three to six times lower than two commonly used inorganic draw solutions, NaCl and MgCl(2). All of the salts tested have organic anions with the potential to degrade in the bioreactor as a carbon source and aid in nutrient removal. Results demonstrate the potential benefits of organic ionic salt draw solutions over currently implemented inorganics in osmotic membrane bioreactor systems.

  20. A computer simulation of the classic experiment on osmosis and osmotic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, S. ); Powles, J.G. )

    1993-11-01

    A novel computer simulation technique for studying fluids in confined geometries has been developed and used to replicate Pfeffer's experiment on osmosis in semipermeable membranes in 1877. Our results confirm the validity of van't Hoff's famous relationship for osmotic pressure over a wide range of concentrations, and also clearly establish its validity even for molecular systems. We believe this is the first theoretical validation of this result for such a wide range of concentrations, where no explicit assumption of ideality is made for the interactions of the solute molecules.

  1. Time Periodic Electro-Osmotic-Flow of Jeffrey Fluid in a Circular Microtube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Y. J.; Liu, Q. S.; Duan, H. Z.; Chang, L.; Yang, L. G.

    2011-09-01

    Flow behavior of time periodic electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of non-Newtonian (Jeffrey) fluids in a circular microtube is investigated based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, together with the Cauchy momentum equation and the Jeffrey constitutive equation. Taking near-wall depletion effects of macromolecules into account, we divided the flow region into skimming layer and the bulk. Analytical solutions of EOF velocity distribution are obtained. By numerical computations, the influences of the related parameters on the velocity amplitude are studied.

  2. Characterization of osmotically induced filaments of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Zachary L; Chen, Bingming; Czuprynski, Charles J; Wong, Amy C L; Kaspar, Charles W

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica forms aseptate filaments with multiple nucleoids when cultured in hyperosmotic conditions. These osmotic-induced filaments are viable and form single colonies on agar plates even though they contain multiple genomes and have the potential to divide into multiple daughter cells. Introducing filaments that are formed during osmotic stress into culture conditions without additional humectants results in the formation of septa and their division into individual cells, which could present challenges to retrospective analyses of infectious dose and risk assessments. We sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms of osmotic-induced filament formation. The concentration of proteins and chromosomal DNA in filaments and control cells was similar when standardized by biomass. Furthermore, penicillin-binding proteins in the membrane of salmonellae were active in vitro. The activity of penicillin-binding protein 2 was greater in filaments than in control cells, suggesting that it may have a role in osmotic-induced filament formation. Filaments contained more ATP than did control cells in standardized cell suspensions, though the levels of two F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase subunits were reduced. Furthermore, filaments could septate and divide within 8 h in 0.2 × Luria-Bertani broth at 23°C, while nonfilamentous control cells did not replicate. Based upon the ability of filaments to septate and divide in this diluted broth, a method was developed to enumerate by plate count the number of individual, viable cells within a population of filaments. This method could aid in retrospective analyses of infectious dose of filamented salmonellae.

  3. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress

    DOE PAGES

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; ...

    2016-10-11

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR). Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain a-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scatteringmore » (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. In conclusion, by focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding.« less

  4. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. I. Relation to protoplast viability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Masdeu, M. A.; Dumortier, F. M.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Cereal leaves subjected to the osmotica routinely used for protoplast isolation show a rapid increase in arginine decarboxylase activity, a massive accumulation of putrescine, and slow conversion of putrescine to the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine (HE Flores, AW Galston 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 102). Mesophyll protoplasts from these leaves, which have a high putrescine:polyamine ratio, do not undergo sustained division. By contrast, in Nicotiana, Capsicum, Datura, Trigonella, and Vigna, dicot genera that readily regenerate plants from mesophyll protoplasts, the response of leaves to osmotic stress is opposite to that in cereals. Putrescine titer as well as arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities decline in these osmotically stressed dicot leaves, while spermidine and spermine titers increase. Thus, the putrescine:polyamine ratio in Vigna protoplasts, which divide readily, is 4-fold lower than in oat protoplasts, which divide poorly. We suggest that this differing response of polyamine metabolism to osmotic stress may account in part for the failure of cereal mesophyll protoplasts to develop readily in vitro.

  5. GABA Not Only a Neurotransmitter: Osmotic Regulation by GABAAR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cesetti, Tiziana; Ciccolini, Francesca; Li, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Mature macroglia and almost all neural progenitor types express γ-aminobutyric (GABA) A receptors (GABAARs), whose activation by ambient or synaptic GABA, leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl−) depending on its electro-chemical gradient (ECl). Since the flux of Cl− is indissolubly associated to that of osmotically obliged water, GABAARs regulate water movements by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signaling could affect the movement of water by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. We will here review recent observations indicating that in neural cells GABAAR-mediated osmotic regulation affects the cellular volume thereby activating multiple intracellular signaling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation, and survival. In addition, we will discuss evidence that the osmotic regulation exerted by GABA may contribute to brain water homeostasis in physiological and in pathological conditions causing brain edema, in which the GABAergic transmission is often altered. PMID:22319472

  6. Osmotic water transport with glucose in GLUT2 and SGLT.

    PubMed

    Naftalin, Richard J

    2008-05-15

    Carrier-mediated water cotransport is currently a favored explanation for water movement against an osmotic gradient. The vestibule within the central pore of Na(+)-dependent cotransporters or GLUT2 provides the necessary precondition for an osmotic mechanism, explaining this phenomenon without carriers. Simulating equilibrative glucose inflow via the narrow external orifice of GLUT2 raises vestibular tonicity relative to the external solution. Vestibular hypertonicity causes osmotic water inflow, which raises vestibular hydrostatic pressure and forces water, salt, and glucose into the outer cytosolic layer via its wide endofacial exit. Glucose uptake via GLUT2 also raises oocyte tonicity. Glucose exit from preloaded cells depletes the vestibule of glucose, making it hypotonic and thereby inducing water efflux. Inhibiting glucose exit with phloretin reestablishes vestibular hypertonicity, as it reequilibrates with the cytosolic glucose and net water inflow recommences. Simulated Na(+)-glucose cotransport demonstrates that active glucose accumulation within the vestibule generates water flows simultaneously with the onset of glucose flow and before any flow external to the transporter caused by hypertonicity in the outer cytosolic layers. The molar ratio of water/glucose flow is seen now to relate to the ratio of hydraulic and glucose permeability rather than to water storage capacity of putative water carriers.

  7. Folding propensity of intrinsically disordered proteins by osmotic stress†

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Amanda L.; Grese, Laura N.; Rowe, Erica L.; Pino, James C.; Chennubhotla, S. Chakra; Ramanathan, Arvind; O’Neill, Hugh M.; Berthelier, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Proteins imparted with intrinsic disorder conduct a range of essential cellular functions. To better understand the folding and hydration properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), we used osmotic stress to induce conformational changes in nuclear co-activator binding domain (NCBD) and activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptor (ACTR) separate from their mutual binding. Osmotic stress was applied by the addition of small and polymeric osmolytes, where we discovered that water contributions to NCBD folding always exceeded those for ACTR. Both NCBD and ACTR were found to gain α-helical structure with increasing osmotic stress, consistent with their folding upon NCBD/ACTR complex formation. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we further characterized NCBD structural changes with the osmolyte ethylene glycol. Here a large reduction in overall size initially occurred before substantial secondary structural change. By focusing on folding propensity, and linked hydration changes, we uncover new insights that may be important for how IDP folding contributes to binding. PMID:27752679

  8. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  10. Active osmotic exchanger for advanced filtration at the nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    One of the main functions of the kidney is to remove the waste products of an organism, mostly by excreting concentrated urea while reabsorbing water and other molecules. The human kidney is capable of recycling about 200 liters of water per day, at the relatively low cost of 0.5 kJ/L (standard dialysis requiring at least 150 kJ/L). Kidneys are constituted of millions of parallel filtration networks called nephrons. The nephrons of all mammalian kidneys present a specific loop geometry, the Loop of Henle, that is believed to play a key role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. One limb of the loop is permeable to water and the other contains sodium pumps that exchange with a common interstitium. In this work, we take inspiration from this osmotic exchanger design to propose new nanofiltration principles. We first establish simple analytical results to derive general operating principles, based on coupled water permeable pores and osmotic pumps. The best filtration geometry, in terms of power required for a given water recycling ratio, is comparable in many ways to the mammalian nephron. It is not only more efficient than traditional reverse osmosis systems, but can also work at much smaller pressures (of the order of the blood pressure, 0.13 bar, as compared to more than 30 bars for pressure-retarded osmosis systems). We anticipate that our proof of principle will be a starting point for the development of new filtration systems relying on the active osmotic exchanger principle.

  11. Changes in Osmotic Pressure and Mucilage during Low-Temperature Acclimation of Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, G; Nobel, P S

    1991-11-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism plant cultivated for its fruits and cladodes, was used to examine chemical and physiological events accompanying low-temperature acclimation. Changes in osmotic pressure, water content, low molecular weight solutes, and extracellular mucilage were monitored in the photosynthetic chlorenchyma and the water-storage parenchyma when plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30/20 degrees C were shifted to 10/0 degrees C. An increase in osmotic pressure of 0.13 megapascal occurred after 13 days at 10/0 degrees C. Synthesis of glucose, fructose, and glycerol accounted for most of the observed increase in osmotic pressure during the low-temperature acclimation. Extracellular mucilage and the relative apoplastic water content increased by 24 and 10%, respectively, during exposure to low temperatures. These increases apparently favor the extracellular nucleation of ice closer to the equilibrium freezing temperature for plants at 10/0 degrees C, which could make the cellular dehydration more gradual and less damaging. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies helped elucidate the cellular processes during ice formation, such as those revealed by changes in the relaxation times of two water fractions in the chlorenchyma. The latter results suggested a restricted mobility of intracellular water and an increased mobility of extracellular water for plants at 10/0 degrees C compared with those at 30/20 degrees C. Increased mobility of extracellular water could facilitate extracellular ice growth and thus delay the potentially lethal intracellular freezing during low-temperature acclimation.

  12. The osmotic tolerance of boar spermatozoa and its usefulness as sperm quality parameter.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Briz, Mailo; Pinart, Elisabeth; Sancho, Sílvia; Bussalleu, Eva; Bonet, Sergi

    2010-06-01

    Predicting the fertility outcome of ejaculates is very important in the field of porcine reproduction. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of different osmotic treatments on boar spermatozoa and to correlate them with fertility and prolificacy, assessed as non-return rates within 60 days (NRR(60d)) of the first inseminations, and litter size (LS), respectively. Sperm samples (n=100) from one hundred healthy Piétrain boars were used to assess 48 treatments combining different osmolalities (ranged between 100 and 4000 mOsm kg(-1)), different compounds used to prepare anisotonic solutions, and two different modalities: return and non-return to isotonic conditions. Sperm quality was evaluated before and after applying the treatments on the basis of analyses of sperm viability, motility, morphology and percentages of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. Statistical analyses were performed using a one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's test, linear regression analyses (Pearson correlation and multiple regression) and Jackknife cross-validation. Although three conventional parameters: sperm viability, sperm morphology and the percentages of acrosome-intact spermatozoa were significantly correlated with NRR(60d) and with LS, their respective osmotic tolerance parameters (defined for each parameter and treatment regarding with negative control) presented a higher Pearson coefficient with both fertility and prolificacy in three treatments (150 mOsm kg(-1) with non-return to isotonic conditions, 200 mOsm kg(-1) with return and 500 mOsm kg(-1) using sodium citrate and non-return to isotonic conditions). We conclude that osmotic resistance in sperm viability, sperm morphology and acrosome-intactness in the treatments mentioned above could be assessed along with classical parameters to better predict the fertilising ability of a given ejaculate.

  13. Negatively charged hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted membranes for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Cai, Tao; Chen, Chunyan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-02-01

    Osmotic power holds great promise as a clean, sustainable and largely unexploited energy resource. Recent membrane development for pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) is making the osmotic power generation more and more realistic. However, severe performance declines have been observed because the porous layer of PRO membranes is fouled by the feed stream. To overcome it, a negatively charged antifouling PRO hollow fiber membrane has been designed and studied in this work. An antifouling polymer, derived from hyperbranched polyglycerol and functionalized by α-lipoic acid and succinic anhydride, was synthesized and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) modified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber membranes. In comparison to unmodified membranes, the charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (CHPG) grafted membrane is much less affected by organic deposition, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, and highly resistant to microbial growths, demonstrated by Escherichia coli adhesion and Staphylococcus aureus attachment. CHPG-g-TFC was also examined in PRO tests using a concentrated wastewater as the feed. Comparing to the plain PES-TFC and non-charged HPG-g-TFC, the newly developed membrane exhibits not only the smallest decline in water flux but also the highest recovery rate. When using 0.81 M NaCl and wastewater as the feed pair in PRO tests at 15 bar, the average power density remains at 5.6 W/m(2) in comparison to an average value of 3.6 W/m(2) for unmodified membranes after four PRO runs. In summary, osmotic power generation may be sustained by properly designing and anchoring the functional polymers to PRO membranes.

  14. Relating reverse and forward solute diffusion to membrane fouling in osmotically driven membrane processes.

    PubMed

    She, Qianhong; Jin, Xue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-05-01

    Osmotically driven membrane processes, such as forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), are attracting increasing interest in research and applications in environment and energy related fields. In this study, we systematically investigated the alginate fouling on an osmotic membrane during FO operation using four types of draw solutions (NaCl, MgCl(2), CaCl(2) and Ca(NO(3))(2)) to elucidate the relationships between reverse (from draw solution to feed solution) and forward (from feed solution to draw solution) solute diffusion, and membrane fouling. At the same water flux level (achieved by adjusting the draw solution concentration), the greatest reverse solute diffusion rate was observed for NaCl draw solution, followed by Ca(NO(3))(2) draw solution, and then CaCl(2) draw solution and MgCl(2) draw solution, the order of which was consistent with that of their solute permeability coefficients. Moreover, the reverse solute diffusion of draw solute (especially divalent cation) can change the feed solution chemistry and thus enhance membrane fouling by alginate, the extent of which is related to the rate of the reverse draw solute diffusion and its ability to interact with the foulant. The extent of fouling for the four types of draw solution followed an order of Ca(NO(3))(2) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl. On the other hand, the rate of forward diffusion of feed solute (e.g., Na(+)) was in turn promoted under severe membrane fouling in active layer facing draw solution orientation, which may be attributed to the fouling enhanced concentration polarization (pore clogging enhanced ICP and cake enhanced concentration polarization). The enhanced concentration polarization can lead to additional water flux reduction and is an important mechanism governing the water flux behavior during FO membrane fouling. Findings have significant implications for the draw solution selection and membrane fouling control in osmotically driven membrane processes.

  15. Osmotic modulation of stimulus-evoked responses in the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Bhumbra, G S; Orlans, H O; Dyball, R E J

    2008-04-01

    Neural information is conveyed by action potentials along axons to downstream synaptic targets. Synapses permit functionally relevant modulation of the information transmitted by converging inputs. Previous studies have measured the amount of information associated with a given stimulus based either on spike counts or on the relative frequencies of spike sequences represented as binary strings. Here we apply information theory to the phase-interval stimulus histogram (PhISH) to measure the extent of the stimulus-evoked response using the statistical relationship between each interspike interval and its phase within the stimulus cycle. We used the PhISH as a novel approach to investigate how different osmotic states affect the flow of information through the osmoreceptor complex of the hypothalamus. The amount of information conveyed from one (afferent) element of the complex, the anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V), to another (an efferent element), the supraoptic nucleus, was increased by hypertonic stimulation (intravenous mannitol, z = 4.39, P < 0.001) and decreased by hypotonic stimulation (intragastric water, z = -3.37, P < 0.001). Supraoptic responses to AV3V stimulation differed from those that follow stimulation of a hypothalamic element outside the osmoreceptor complex, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which also projects to the supraoptic nucleus. Thus osmosensitive gain control mechanisms differentially modulate osmotically dependent and osmotically independent inputs, and enhance the osmoresponsiveness of supraoptic cells within a physiological range. The value of the novel approach is that its use is not limited to the osmoreceptor ensemble but it can be used to investigate the flow of information throughout the central nervous system.

  16. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on the osmotic stability of erythrocyte membrane of competitive swimmers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of acute and chronic exercise on erythrocyte membrane stability and various blood indices in a population consisting of five national-level male swimmers, over 18 weeks of training. The evaluations were made at the beginning and end of the 1st, 7th, 13th and 18th weeks, when volume and training intensity have changed. The effects manifested at the beginning of those weeks were considered due to chronic adaptations, while the effects observed at the end of the weeks were considered due to acute manifestations of the exercise load of that week. Acute changes resulting from the exercise comprised increases in creatine kinase activity (CK) and leukocyte count (Leu), and decrease in hematocrit (Ht) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV), at the end of the first week; increase in the activities of CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), in the uric acid (UA) concentration and Leu count, at the end of the seventh week; increases in CK and LDH activities and in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), at the end of the 13th week; and decrease in the value of the osmotic stability index 1/H50 and increases in the CK activity and platelets (Plt) count, at the end of the 18th week. Chronic changes due to training comprised increase in the values of 1/H50, CK, LDH, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), serum iron (Fe), MCV and Plt. Although acute training has resulted in decrease in the osmotic stability of erythrocytes, possibly associated with exacerbation of the oxidative processes during intense exercise, chronic training over 18 weeks resulted in increased osmotic stability of erythrocytes, possibly by modulation in the membrane cholesterol content by low and high density lipoproteins. PMID:28151958

  17. Effects of acute and chronic exercise on the osmotic stability of erythrocyte membrane of competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Paraiso, Lara Ferreira; Gonçalves-E-Oliveira, Ana Flávia Mayrink; Cunha, Lucas Moreira; de Almeida Neto, Omar Pereira; Pacheco, Adriana Garcia; Araújo, Karinne Beatriz Gonçalves; Garrote-Filho, Mário da Silva; Bernardino Neto, Morun; Penha-Silva, Nilson

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of acute and chronic exercise on erythrocyte membrane stability and various blood indices in a population consisting of five national-level male swimmers, over 18 weeks of training. The evaluations were made at the beginning and end of the 1st, 7th, 13th and 18th weeks, when volume and training intensity have changed. The effects manifested at the beginning of those weeks were considered due to chronic adaptations, while the effects observed at the end of the weeks were considered due to acute manifestations of the exercise load of that week. Acute changes resulting from the exercise comprised increases in creatine kinase activity (CK) and leukocyte count (Leu), and decrease in hematocrit (Ht) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV), at the end of the first week; increase in the activities of CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), in the uric acid (UA) concentration and Leu count, at the end of the seventh week; increases in CK and LDH activities and in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), at the end of the 13th week; and decrease in the value of the osmotic stability index 1/H50 and increases in the CK activity and platelets (Plt) count, at the end of the 18th week. Chronic changes due to training comprised increase in the values of 1/H50, CK, LDH, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), serum iron (Fe), MCV and Plt. Although acute training has resulted in decrease in the osmotic stability of erythrocytes, possibly associated with exacerbation of the oxidative processes during intense exercise, chronic training over 18 weeks resulted in increased osmotic stability of erythrocytes, possibly by modulation in the membrane cholesterol content by low and high density lipoproteins.

  18. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.; Provost, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty about the origin of anomalous fluid pressures in certain geologic settings has caused researchers to take a second look at osmosis, or flow driven by chemical potential differences, as a pressure-generating process in the subsurface. Interest in geological osmosis has also increased because of an in situ experiment by Neuzil (2000) suggesting that Pierre Shale could generate large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations, but they have not been systematically examined. In this paper we compile these data and explore their implications for osmotic pressure generation in subsurface systems. Rather than base our analysis on osmotic efficiencies, which depend strongly on concentration, we calculated values of a quantity we term osmotic specific surface area (Aso) that, in principle, is a property of the porous medium only. The Aso values are consistent with a surprisingly broad spectrum of osmotic behavior in argillaceous formations, and all the formations tested exhibited at least a modest ability to generate osmotic pressure. It appears possible that under appropriate conditions some formations can be highly effective osmotic membranes able to generate osmotic pressures exceeding 30 MPa (3 km of head) at porosities as high as ??0.1 and pressures exceeding 10 MPa at porosities as high as ??0.2. These findings are difficult to reconcile with the lack of compelling field evidence for osmotic pressures, and we propose three explanations for the disparity: (1) Our analysis is flawed and argillaceous formations are less effective osmotic membranes than it suggests; (2) the necessary subsurface conditions, significant salinity differences within intact argillaceous formations, are rare; or (3) osmotic pressures are unlikely to be detected and are not recognized when encountered. The last possibility, that

  19. Osmotic phenomena in application for hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    PubMed

    Babchin, A; Levich, E; Melamed M D, Y; Sivashinsky, G

    2011-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment defines the medical procedure when the patient inhales pure oxygen at elevated pressure conditions. Many diseases and all injuries are associated with a lack of oxygen in tissues, known as hypoxia. HBO provides an effective method for fast oxygen delivery in medical practice. The exact mechanism of the oxygen transport under HBO conditions is not fully identified. The objective of this article is to extend the colloid and surface science basis for the oxygen transport in HBO conditions beyond the molecular diffusion transport mechanism. At a pressure in the hyperbaric chamber of two atmospheres, the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood plasma increases 10 times. The sharp increase of oxygen concentration in the blood plasma creates a considerable concentration gradient between the oxygen dissolved in the plasma and in the tissue. The concentration gradient of oxygen as a non-electrolyte solute causes an osmotic flow of blood plasma with dissolved oxygen. In other words, the molecular diffusion transport of oxygen is supplemented by the convective diffusion raised due to the osmotic flow, accelerating the oxygen delivery from blood to tissue. A non steady state equation for non-electrolyte osmosis is solved asymptotically. The solution clearly demonstrates two modes of osmotic flow: normal osmosis, directed from lower to higher solute concentrations, and anomalous osmosis, directed from higher to lower solute concentrations. The fast delivery of oxygen from blood to tissue is explained on the basis of the strong molecular interaction between the oxygen and the tissue, causing an influx of oxygen into the tissue by convective diffusion in the anomalous osmosis process. The transport of the second gas, nitrogen, dissolved in the blood plasma, is also taken into the consideration. As the patient does not inhale nitrogen during HBO treatment, but exhales it along with oxygen and carbon dioxide, the concentration of nitrogen in blood

  20. Cognitive Improvement of Attention and Inhibition in the Late Afternoon in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Treated With Osmotic-Release Oral System Methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Slama, Hichem; Fery, Patrick; Verheulpen, Denis; Vanzeveren, Nathalie; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Long-acting medications have been developed and approved for use in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These compounds are intended to optimize and maintain symptoms control throughout the day. We tested prolonged effects of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate on both attention and inhibition, in the late afternoon. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 36 boys (7-12 years) with ADHD and 40 typically developing children. The ADHD children received an individualized dose of placebo or osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate. They were tested about 8 hours after taking with 2 continuous performance tests (continuous performance test-X [CPT-X] and continuous performance test-AX [CPT-AX]) and a counting Stroop. A positive effect of osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate was present in CPT-AX with faster and less variable reaction times under osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate than under placebo, and no difference with typically developing children. In the counting Stroop, we found a decreased interference with osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate but no difference between children with ADHD under placebo and typically developing children.

  1. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K+ loss, decreased Na+ accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na+ and K+ homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  2. The heat-shock transcription factor HSF1 is rapidly activated by either hyper- or hypo-osmotic stress in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Caruccio, L; Bae, S; Liu, A Y; Chen, K Y

    1997-10-15

    Osmoregulation, the cellular response to environmental changes of osmolarity and ionic strength, is important for the survival of living organisms. We have demonstrated previously that an exposure of mammalian cells to hypo-osmotic stress, either in growth medium (30% growth medium and 70% water) or in binary solution containing sorbitol and water, prominently induced the DNA-binding activity of the heat-shock transcription factor (HSF1) [Huang, Caruccio, Liu and Chen (1995) Biochem. J. 307, 347-352]. Since hyperosmotic and hypo-osmotic stress usually elicit opposite biological responses, we wondered what would be the effect of hyperosmotic stress on HSF activation. In this study we have examined the HSF DNA-binding activity in HeLa cells maintained in the sorbitol/water binary solution over a wide concentration range (0.1-0.9 M) and in Dulbecco's medium supplemented with sorbitol or NaCl. We found that HSF-binding activity could be induced prominently under both hypo-osmotic (0.1-0.25 M) and hyperosmotic conditions (0.50-0.90 M). In both cases, HSF activation was observed within 5 min after changing the osmotic pressure. The activation was accompanied by both HSF trimerization and nuclear translocation, and appeared to be independent of protein synthesis. The effects of hypo- or hyper-osmotic stress on HSF activation could be reversed once the cells were returned to iso-osmotic conditions (0.30M) with a half-life (t12) of 25 min or less. This rapid turnover of the osmotic-stress-induced HSF-binding activity was inhibited by cycloheximide, a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis. Unlike heat shock, activation of HSF by either hypo- or hyper-osmotic stress did not lead to an accumulation of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) mRNA in HeLa cells. We propose that HSF activation during osmotic stress may serve physiological functions independent of the synthesis of heat-shock proteins.

  3. Differentially Methylated Epiloci Generated from Numerous Genotypes of Contrasting Tolerances Are Associated with Osmotic-Tolerance in Rice Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Huang, Weixia; Xiong, Jie; Yan, Shuaigang; Tao, Tao; Li, Jiajia; Wu, Jinhong; Luo, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an essential role in plant responses to environmental stress. Since drought develops into a rising problem in rice cultivation, investigations on genome-wide DNA methylation in responses to drought stress and in-depth explorations of its association with drought-tolerance are required. For this study, 68 rice accessions were used for an evaluation of their osmotic-tolerance related to 20% PEG6000 simulated physiological traits. The tolerant group revealed significantly higher levels of total antioxidant capacity and higher contents of H2O2 in both normal and osmotic-stressed treatments, as well as higher survival ratios. We furthermore investigated the DNA methylation status in normal, osmotic-stressed, and re-watering treatments via the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP). The averaged similarity between two rice accessions from tolerant and susceptible groups was approximately 50%, similar with that between two accessions within the tolerant/susceptible group. However, the proportion of overall tolerance-associated epiloci was only 5.2% of total epiloci. The drought-tolerant accessions revealed lower DNA methylation levels in the stressed condition and more de-methylation events when they encountered osmotic stress, compared to the susceptible group. During the recovery process, the drought-tolerant accessions possessed more re-methylation events. Fourteen differentially methylated epiloci (DME) were, respectively, generated in normal, osmotic-stressed, and re-watering treatments. Approximately, 35.7% DME were determined as tolerance-associated epiloci. Additionally, rice accessions with lower methylation degrees on DME in the stressed conditions had a higher survival ratio compared to these with higher methylation degrees. This result is consistent with the lower DNA methylation levels of tolerant accessions observed in the stressed treatment. Methylation degrees on a differentially methylated epilocus may further

  4. Bacterial Dispersal Promotes Biodegradation in Heterogeneous Systems Exposed to Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Worrich, Anja; König, Sara; Banitz, Thomas; Centler, Florian; Frank, Karin; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke; Miltner, Anja; Wick, Lukas Y.; Kästner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Contaminant biodegradation in soils is hampered by the heterogeneous distribution of degrading communities colonizing isolated microenvironments as a result of the soil architecture. Over the last years, soil salinization was recognized as an additional problem especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems as it drastically reduces the activity and motility of bacteria. Here, we studied the importance of different spatial processes for benzoate biodegradation at an environmentally relevant range of osmotic potentials (ΔΨo) using model ecosystems exhibiting a heterogeneous distribution of the soil-borne bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Three systematically manipulated scenarios allowed us to cover the effects of (i) substrate diffusion, (ii) substrate diffusion and autonomous bacterial dispersal, and (iii) substrate diffusion and autonomous as well as mediated bacterial dispersal along glass fiber networks mimicking fungal hyphae. To quantify the relative importance of the different spatial processes, we compared these heterogeneous scenarios to a reference value obtained for each ΔΨo by means of a quasi-optimal scenario in which degraders were ab initio homogeneously distributed. Substrate diffusion as the sole spatial process was insufficient to counteract the disadvantage due to spatial degrader heterogeneity at ΔΨo ranging from 0 to −1 MPa. In this scenario, only 13.8−21.3% of the quasi-optimal biodegradation performance could be achieved. In the same range of ΔΨo values, substrate diffusion in combination with bacterial dispersal allowed between 68.6 and 36.2% of the performance showing a clear downwards trend with decreasing ΔΨo. At −1.5 MPa, however, this scenario performed worse than the diffusion scenario, possibly as a result of energetic disadvantages associated with flagellum synthesis and emerging requirements to exceed a critical population density to resist osmotic stress. Network-mediated bacterial dispersal kept biodegradation

  5. Osmotic Stress Confers Enhanced Cell Integrity to Hydrostatic Pressure but Impairs Growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2

    PubMed Central

    Scoma, Alberto; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea oil-contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory studies highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs). In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg-1, respectively) were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg-1, or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively), under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10 MPa). Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation) and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10 MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1 MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10 MPa under isosmotic conditions. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-days incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in terms of hydrocarbon degradation was lowered by the effects of osmotic stress alone or combined with increased HP

  6. Chloroplast osmotic adjustment allows for acclimation of photosynthesis to low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.S.; Berkowitz, G.

    1987-04-01

    Previously in this laboratory, studies indicated that photosynthesis (PS) of chloroplasts isolated from spinach plants which underwent osmotic adjustment during in situ water deficits was inhibited less at low osmotic potentials (Psi/sub s/) in vitro than PS of plastids isolated from well watered plants. In this study, an attempt was made to determine if chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ was associated with in situ stromal solute accumulation. During a 14d stress cycle, in situ stromal volume was estimated by measuring (using the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, /sup 14/C-sorbitol silicon oil centrifugation technique) the stromal space of plastids in solutions which had the Psi/sub s/ adjusted to the leaf Psi/sub s/. During the first lid of the cycle, stromal volume did not decline, despite a decrease of over 20% in the leaf RWC. After this time, stromal volume dropped rapidly. In situ stromal Psi/sub s/ was also estimated during a stress cycle. These studies indicated that stromal Psi/sub s/ was lowered by net solute accumulation. The data presented in this report suggest that chloroplast acclimation to low Psi/sub s/ may involve stromal solute accumulation and volume maintenance during cell water loss.

  7. Influence of acute exercise on the osmotic stability of the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Paraiso, L F; de Freitas, M V; Gonçalves-E-Oliveira, A F M; de Almeida Neto, O P; Pereira, E A; Mascarenhas Netto, R C; Cunha, L M; Bernardino Neto, M; de Agostini, G G; Resende, E S; Penha-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 2 different types of acute aerobic exercise on the osmotic stability of human erythrocyte membrane and on different hematological and biochemical variables that are associated with this membrane property. The study population consisted of 20 healthy and active men. Participants performed single sessions of 2 types of exercise. The first session consisted of 60 min of moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE). The second session, executed a week later, consisted of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) until exhaustion. The osmotic stability of the erythrocyte membrane was represented by the inverse of the salt concentration (1/H50) at the midpoint of the sigmoidal curve of dependence between the absorbance of hemoglobin and the NaCl concentration. The values of 1/H50 changed from 2.29±0.1 to 2.33±0.09 after MICE and from 2.30±0.08 to 2.23±0.12 after HIIE. During MICE mean corpuscular volume increased, probably due to in vivo lysis of older erythrocytes, with preservation of cells that were larger and more resistant to in vitro lysis. The study showed that a single bout of acute exercise affected erythrocyte stability, which increased after MICE and decreased after HIIE.

  8. Development, evaluation, and influence of formulation and process variables on in vitro performance of oral elementary osmotic device of atenolol

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, N.; Narendar, D.; Sunitha, K.; Harika, K.; Nagaraj, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy-based systems for controlled drug delivery. By optimizing formulation and processing parameters, possible to develop osmotic systems to deliver drugs at predetermined rate with high in vitro-in vivo correlation. The aim of the present investigation was to develop an oral elementary osmotic pump (EOP) of atenolol with zero-order or near zero-order drug release profile. Materials and Methods: Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies did not show any evidence of interaction between the drug and excipients. Formulations were prepared by wet granulation method and coated with cellulose acetate (CA)/ethyl cellulose containing varying amounts of dibutyl phthalate (DBP)/poly (ethylene glycol)-400 as a plasticizer. The effect of different formulation variables on drug release: type and concentration of osmogen and plasticizer, size of the delivery orifice, nature of the rate controlling membrane, and membrane weight gain were studied. The release studies also compared with marketed immediate release formulation. Results: Formulations containing NaCl, mannitol, and combination of both as osmogens in the drug:osmogen ratio of 1:3 and 1:4 showed zero-order drug release. Marketed tablet releases more than 95% drug in different media in 90 min. The 4% CA in acetone with DBP as a plasticizer (at a concentration of 15% w/w of polymer), with orifice diameter 565 μm, and 8.05% increase in weight on coating were found to control the drug release independent of pH and agitational intensity. The formulations were stable for 3 months as per the International Council for Harmonisation guidelines. Conclusion: Atenolol containing EOPs and process parameters on release studies were studied and confirmed based on osmotic technology. PMID:28123994

  9. Viable count estimates of lag time responses for Salmonella typhimurium M48 subjected to abrupt osmotic shifts.

    PubMed

    Mellefont, L A; McMeekin, T A; Ross, T

    2005-12-15

    Generally, relative lag times (RLT; lag time divided by generation time) become extended as conditions become less favourable for growth. Mellefont et al. (2003, 2004) [Mellefont, L.A., McMeekin, T.A., Ross, T., 2003. The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of foodborne bacteria. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 83(3), 281-293; Mellefont, L.A., McMeekin, T.A., Ross, T., 2004. The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of physiologically distinct populations of Salmonella typhimurium. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 92, 111-120] reported that abrupt osmotic shifts of Salmonella typhimurium M48 from optimal to low aw led to unexpectedly small RLTs at low aw. In this study, RLTs resulting from similar osmotic shifts were estimated by viable count (VC) and compared to turbidimetric estimates to test the hypothesis that the 'downturn' in RLT is an artefact of the turbidimetric technique used. No 'downturn' in RLT was observed with VC data and RLTs increased with increasing magnitude of osmotic shift. Anomalous turbidimetric estimates of lag time at low aw were confirmed as the likely source of the 'downturn' in RLT. The abrupt osmotic shifts resulted in a complex pattern of microbial population behaviour. Immediately after transfer from optimal aw to low aw, inactivation of a portion of the population occurred for all the conditions tested. The degree of inactivation became progressively larger with larger shifts in aw. The initial decline in population was followed by a period during which no change in numbers occurred, followed by growth that appeared, in most cases, to be exponential. At the lowest aws tested (< or =0.954), the growth response after the initial decline was at a rate slower than that of exponential phase growth. Due to the use of non-selective media containing pyruvate (to eliminate oxygen radicals), the observed patterns of inactivation, lag and regrowth at most aw conditions are unlikely to result from a temporary loss of

  10. Differences in the osmotic fragility of recycling and reserve synaptic vesicles from the cholinergic electromotor nerve terminals of Torpedo and their possible significance for vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Giompres, P E; Whittaker, V P

    1984-03-14

    In this study we demonstrate differences in the osmotic fragility of two metabolically and physically heterogeneous synaptic vesicle populations from stimulated electromotor nerve terminals. When synaptic vesicles isolated on sucrose density gradients are submitted to solutions of decreasing osmolarity 50% of VP2-type vesicles lysed at (mean + S.E. (number of experiments] 332 +/- 14 (4) mosM and 50% of VP1-type vesicles lysed at 573 +/- 8 (3) mosM. These results indicate that recycling vesicles are more resistant to hypo-osmotic lysis and they are consistent with our earlier conclusion that changes in water content on recycling are secondary to changes in the content of the osmotically active small-molecular-mass constituents acetylcholine and ATP.

  11. Species variation in osmotic, cryoprotectant, and cooling rate tolerance in poultry, eagle, and Peregrine Falcon spermatozoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanco, J.M.; Gee, G.; Wildt, D.E.; Donoghue, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Potential factors influencing spermatozoa survival to cryopreservation and thawing were analyzed across a range of the following avian species: domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus), imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), and peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). Studies focused on spermatozoa tolerance to the following: 1) osmotic stress, 2) different extracellular concentrations of the cryoprotectant dimethylacetamide (DMA), 3) equilibration times of 1 versus 4 h, 4) equilibration temperature of 4 versus 21 degrees C, and 5) rapid versus slow cooling before cryopreservation and standard thawing. Sperm viability was assessed with the live/dead stain (SYBR14/ propidium iodine). Sperm viability at osmolalities >/=800 mOsm was higher (P: /=2.06 M), experienced decreased (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species, except the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. Number of surviving spermatozoa diminished progressively with increasing DMA concentrations in all species. Increased equilibration temperature (from 4 to 21 degrees C) markedly reduced (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species except the Bonelli's eagle and turkey. Rapid cooling was detrimental (P: < 0.05) to spermatozoa from all species except the imperial eagle and the chicken. These results demonstrate that avian spermatozoa differ remarkably in response to osmotic changes, DMA concentrations, equilibration time, temperature, and survival after fast or slow freezing. These differences emphasize the need for species-specific studies in the development and enhancement of assisted breeding for poultry and endangered species.

  12. The peritoneal osmotic conductance is low well before the diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is made.

    PubMed

    Lambie, Mark L; John, Biju; Mushahar, Lily; Huckvale, Christopher; Davies, Simon J

    2010-09-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a serious condition whose frequency is increasing the longer the duration of peritoneal dialysis. To identify prognostic indicators of EPS, we studied here longitudinal changes in peritoneal membrane function of patients who later developed this complication. We identified all patients with an unequivocal diagnosis of EPS who began their peritoneal dialysis in our unit over a 20-year period and matched each of them for dialysis duration and age with four control patients who completed their dialysis. The dialysate/plasma creatinine ratio increased with time in both groups but was significantly higher in the patients with EPS only at the time their dialysis was discontinued. The ultrafiltration capacity was significantly worse for at least 2 years before stopping dialysis, diverging further at the time dialysis ceased, suggesting reduced osmotic conductance in the EPS patients. Both the glucose exposure rate for the 5 years preceding stoppage of dialysis and exposure to the osmotic agent icodextrin were significantly higher. Residual renal function was less in the EPS group, but there was no significant difference in the rates of peritonitis compared to the control group. The 24 h peritoneal protein clearance was not significantly different in EPS patients, possibly due to a greater fibrous matrix. Thus, our study shows that regular peritoneal membrane function tests can identify most patients at high risk of developing EPS before its occurrence.

  13. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients.

  14. Effects of an angelica extract on human erythrocyte aggregation, deformation and osmotic fragility.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wei, L; Ouyang, J P; Muller, S; Gentils, M; Cauchois, G; Stoltz, J F

    2001-01-01

    In Chinese traditional medicine, angelica is widely used for its known clinical effects of ameliorating blood microcirculation. But the mechanism of these beneficial effects still remains unclear. In this work the rheological behaviour of human erythrocytes treated by angelica was studied in vitro. Normal RBCs incubated with an angelica extract at different concentrations (5, 10 or 20 mg/ml) for 60 min at 37 degrees C and then their aggregation, deformation and osmotic fragility were measured with different recently developed optical techniques, namely Erythroaggregometer (Regulest, Florange, France), LORCA (Mechatronics, Amsterdam) and Fragilimeter (Regulest, Florange, France). Experimental results show that angelica (20 mg/ml) significantly decreased normal RBCs' aggregation speed (p<0.01) and could inhibit the hyperaggregability caused by dextran 500. However, the strength of normal RBCs aggregates were not influenced by angelica. When a calcium ionophore A23187 (1.9 microM) was used to harden cell membrane, angelica (20 mg/ml) could significantly (p<0.01) protect erythrocytes against the loss of their deformability even it had no effects on normal RBCs deformation. Finally angelica (5 and 10 mg/ml) decreased significantly (p<0.01) normal RBCs osmotic fragility. In conclusion angelica plays a rheologically active role on human erythrocytes, and this study suggests a possible mechanism for angelica's positive effects against certain cardiovascular diseases.

  15. [Electro-osmotic phenomena in plant tissues].

    PubMed

    Polevoĭ, V V; Bilova, T E; Shevtsov, Iu I

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a direct electric current on electrolyte transport through plant tissues was studied by applying it to 10-mm fragments of the mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings, similar fragments of one-year linden shoots with the normal conducting system and without vascular bundles, and isolated elements of the xylem and cell wall segments. At the current density and voltage of 9-38 microA/mm2 and 10-20 V, electrolyte solutions in plant tissues always moved toward the cathode. The results suggest that electroosmosis is one of the factors responsible for changes in solution transport through the conducting plant tissues that occur under the effect of electric current.

  16. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  17. Tissue damage detection by osmotic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Enyedi, Balázs; Kala, Snigdha; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Niethammer, Philipp

    2013-09-01

    How tissue damage is detected to induce inflammatory responses is unclear. Most studies have focused on damage signals released by cell breakage and necrosis. Whether tissues use other cues in addition to cell lysis to detect that they are damaged is unknown. We find that osmolarity differences between interstitial fluid and the external environment mediate rapid leukocyte recruitment to sites of tissue damage in zebrafish by activating cytosolic phospholipase a2 (cPLA2) at injury sites. cPLA2 initiates the production of non-canonical arachidonate metabolites that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis through a 5-oxo-ETE receptor (OXE-R). Thus, tissues can detect damage through direct surveillance of barrier integrity, with cell swelling probably functioning as a pro-inflammatory intermediate in the process.

  18. Effect of acid stress on sodium transport by isolated skins and on osmotic permeability of intact frogs

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, P.O.

    1981-08-01

    The experiments reported here were designed to determine the effects of increased external hydrogen ion concentrations on the ion transport capability of isolated frog skins measured as short-circuit current and to determine the nature of the interaction of hydrogen ions to sodium transport. Results from a study of the effects of acid exposure on the osmotic permeability of intact frogs are also reported.

  19. The effect of osmotic swelling and hemolysis of erythrocytes on the transmission spectra of radiation by a layer of diluted blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, E. K.; Davydovskii, A. G.

    2010-08-01

    We study how the degree of violation of osmotic equilibrium affects the spectral characteristics of radiation scattered by erythrocyte suspensions in media of various osmolarity. The transmission spectra were measured in the wavelength range of 450-860 nm for blood samples diluted with NaCl water solutions of various concentration. From an analysis of numerical simulation results and experimental data, we show that measuring the light scattering characteristics constitutes the basis of a new optical method for determining erythrocyte osmotic resistance. The method excludes the necessity of strong action on erythrocytes, differs in its simplicity and expressivity, and can be implemented using standard spectrometers.

  20. Osmotic behaviour of polyhedral non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes).

    PubMed

    Arunothayanun, P; Uchegbu, I F; Florence, A T

    1999-06-01

    In addition to common spherical non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes), disc-like, tubular, and polyhedral niosomes have also been reported. The permeability and osmotic activity of niosomes are important in determining their use as controlled-release drug-delivery systems. These properties have been compared for polyhedral niosomes prepared by hydrating a mixture of a hexadecyl diglycerol ether (C16G2), a poly(24)oxyethylene cholesteryl ether (Solulan C24), 91:9 or 98:2, and conventional spherical niosomes prepared from the same surfactants but with cholesterol. When subjected to osmotic gradients, polyhedral niosomes, the membranes of which are in the gel phase, swell and shrink less than their spherical counterparts and they are more permeable to the hydrophilic solute 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein. In 2 M NaCl the rate of release of carboxyfluorescein from polyhedral niosomes (both containing 9% Solulan C24) into either a hypotonic (water) or an isotonic medium (2 M NaCl) was low. This contrasted with similarly loaded spherical niosomes and polyhedral niosomes containing 2% Solulan C24, from which release was high in hypotonic media (e.g. water) but less in an isotonic medium (2 M NaCl). For both polyhedral and spherical niosomes encapsulating carboxyfluorescein (pKa = 6.4), release rates were higher at pH 8 than at pH 5. Polyhedral niosomes are thus, in general, less osmotically active than spherical niosomes because of their rigid but highly permeable membranes. The unusual polyhedral membrane impermeability to carboxyfluorescein co-entrapped with salt in hypotonic media is a function of Solulan C24 content, and is possibly a result of salting out of the polyoxyethylene chains; this is, therefore, a property that might be manipulated in the design of a drug-delivery system.

  1. An Osmotic Model of the Growing Pollen Tube

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adrian E.; Shachar-Hill, Bruria; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Powell, Janet; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Pollen tube growth is central to the sexual reproduction of plants and is a longstanding model for cellular tip growth. For rapid tip growth, cell wall deposition and hardening must balance the rate of osmotic water uptake, and this involves the control of turgor pressure. Pressure contributes directly to both the driving force for water entry and tip expansion causing thinning of wall material. Understanding tip growth requires an analysis of the coordination of these processes and their regulation. Here we develop a quantitative physiological model which includes water entry by osmosis, the incorporation of cell wall material and the spreading of that material as a film at the tip. Parameters of the model have been determined from the literature and from measurements, by light, confocal and electron microscopy, together with results from experiments made on dye entry and plasmolysis in Lilium longiflorum. The model yields values of variables such as osmotic and turgor pressure, growth rates and wall thickness. The model and its predictive capacity were tested by comparing programmed simulations with experimental observations following perturbations of the growth medium. The model explains the role of turgor pressure and its observed constancy during oscillations; the stability of wall thickness under different conditions, without which the cell would burst; and some surprising properties such as the need for restricting osmotic permeability to a constant area near the tip, which was experimentally confirmed. To achieve both constancy of pressure and wall thickness under the range of conditions observed in steady-state growth the model reveals the need for a sensor that detects the driving potential for water entry and controls the deposition rate of wall material at the tip. PMID:22615784

  2. Determination of the moisture sorption behavior of osmotically dehydrated mackerel fillets by means of binary and ternary solutions.

    PubMed

    Agustinelli, Silvina Paola; Salvadori, Viviana Olga; Yeannes, Maria Isabel

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the moisture sorption isotherm of osmotically dehydrated mackerel fillets (Scomber japonicus) was experimentally determined. The fillets were osmotically dehydrated with solutions of salt (NaCl) (120 and 180 g per liter of solution) or in combination with sugar (350 to 700 g per liter of solution). The sorption isotherms were determined using the static gravimetric methodology with six salts for the water activity range of 0.33-0.98 at 5 degrees C and 25 degrees C. All the sorption curves were found to be type III. Temperature and the final tissue salt content had significant (p < 0.05) effects on the sorption isotherms. A regression program was used to fit the Halsey, Oswin and Smith moisture sorption isotherm models. Oswin equation gave the best fit for the whole range of water activity and temperatures. The Smith equation only presented valuable results for the mackerel fillets samples with the higher salt content.

  3. Controlled delivery of carvedilol nanosuspension from osmotic pump capsule: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Yu, Shihui; Zhu, Zhihong; Lyu, Chunyang; Bai, Chunping; Ge, Huiqi; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2014-11-20

    This study intended to develop a novel controlled delivery osmotic pump capsule of carvedilol nanosuspension. The capsule is assembled using a semi-permeable capsule shell with contents including nanosuspension drying powder, mannitol and Plasdone S-630. The physical characteristics of semi-permeable capsule walls were compared among different coating solutions under different temperature. The composition of the coating solution and drying temperature appeared to be important for the formation of the shells. Carvedilol nanosuspension was prepared by precipitation-ultrasonication technique and was further lyophilized. Response surface methodology was used to investigate the influence of factors on the responses. The optimized formulation displayed complete drug delivery and zero-order release rate. The TEM and particle size analysis indicated that the morphology of the resultant nanoparticle in the capsule was spherical shaped with a mean size of 252±19 nm. The in vivo test in beagle dogs demonstrated that the relative bioavailability of the novel system was 203.5% in comparison to that of the marketed preparation. The capsule successfully controlled the release of carvedilol and the fluctuation of plasma concentration was minimized. The system is a promising strategy to improve the oral bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs and preparing it into elementary osmotic pump conveniently.

  4. Water Transport in Aquaporins: Osmotic Permeability Matrix Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hashido, Masanori; Kidera, Akinori; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2007-01-01

    Single-channel osmotic water permeability (pf) is a key quantity for investigating the transport capability of the water channel protein, aquaporin. However, the direct connection between the single scalar quantity pf and the channel structure remains unclear. In this study, based on molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a pf-matrix method, in which pf is decomposed into contributions from each local region of the channel. Diagonal elements of the pf matrix are equivalent to the local permeability at each region of the channel, and off-diagonal elements represent correlated motions of water molecules in different regions. Averaging both diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the pf matrix recovers pf for the entire channel; this implies that correlated motions between distantly-separated water molecules, as well as adjacent water molecules, influence the osmotic permeability. The pf matrices from molecular dynamics simulations of five aquaporins (AQP0, AQP1, AQP4, AqpZ, and GlpF) indicated that the reduction in the water correlation across the Asn-Pro-Ala region, and the small local permeability around the ar/R region, characterize the transport efficiency of water. These structural determinants in water permeation were confirmed in molecular dynamics simulations of three mutants of AqpZ, which mimic AQP1. PMID:17449664

  5. Osmotically driven membrane process for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Abu-Ghdaib, Muhannad; Zhan, Tong; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Amy, Gary

    2014-01-01

    An osmotic detention pond was proposed for the management of urban runoff in coastal regions. Forward osmosis was employed as a bridge to utilize natural osmotic energy from seawater for concentrating and reusing urban runoff water, and as a barrier to reject runoff-derived contaminants. The process was demonstrated by a lab scale testing using synthetic urban runoff (as the feed solution) and synthetic seawater (as the draw solution). The submerged forward osmosis process was conducted under neutral, acidic and natural organic matter fouling condition, respectively. Forward osmosis flux decline was mainly attributed to the dilution of seawater during a semi-batch process in lab scale testing. However, it is possible to minimize flux decrease by maintaining a constant salinity at the draw solution side. Various changes in urban runoff water quality, including acidic conditions (acid rain) and natural organic matter presence, did not show significant effects on the rejection of trace metals and phosphorus, but influenced salt leakage and the rejection of nitrate and total nitrogen. Rejection of trace metals varied from 98% to 100%, phosphorus varied from 97% to 100, nitrate varied from 52% to 94% and total nitrogen varied from 65% to 85% under different feed water conditions. The work described in this study contributes to an integrated system of urban runoff management, seawater desalination and possible power generation in coastal regions to achieve a sustainable solution to the water-energy nexus.

  6. Distinct patterns of cell motion inside a micro-channel under different osmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Kaneko, Makoto; Sakuma, Shinya; Arai, Fumihito

    2013-01-01

    The effect of osmotic condition on a living cell inside a micro-channel is firstly studied in this work. By utilizing a high-speed camera, we observed distinct patterns of cell motion under different osmotic conditions, which are established by saline with different concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl). The cell motions are tracked by a computer, and are presented by the coordinates of location and time (x-t chart). The motions of cells under hypotonic condition (NaCl% < 0.9%) are convex curves on the chart while the ones under isotonic and hypertonic conditions (NaCl% ≥ 0.9%) are concave curves. Since saline is widely used in both medical practices and cell-related researches, our results point out two important facts: 1) Cells are sensitive to the percentage of NaCl. One percent difference in overall concentration makes dramatic changes in cell characteristics, such as cell stiffness. 2) The micro-channel method can clearly tell the difference between hypotonic, isotonic and hypertonic conditions according to the pattern of cell motion. Interpretations of the phenomena from different perspectives are also discussed in this paper.

  7. The osmotic pressure of highly concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions: effect of solution conditions.

    PubMed

    Binabaji, Elaheh; Rao, Suma; Zydney, Andrew L

    2014-03-01

    The behavior of monoclonal antibodies at high concentrations is important in downstream processing, drug formulation, and drug delivery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the osmotic pressure of a highly purified monoclonal antibody at concentrations up to 250 g/L over a range of pH and ionic strength, and in the presence of specific excipients, using membrane osmometry. Independent measurements of the second virial coefficient were obtained using self-interaction chromatography, and the net protein charge was evaluated using electrophoretic light scattering. The osmotic pressure at pH 5 and low ionic strength was >50 kPa for antibody concentrations above 200 g/L. The second virial coefficients determined from the oncotic pressure (after subtracting the Donnan contribution) were in good qualitative agreement with those determined by self-interaction chromatography. The second virial coefficient decreased with increasing ionic strength and increasing pH due to the reduction in intermolecular electrostatic repulsion. The third virial coefficient was negative under all conditions, suggesting that multi-body interactions in this system are attractive. The virial coefficients were essentially unaffected by addition of sucrose or proline. These results have important implications for the analysis of protein-protein interactions in downstream processing at high protein concentrations.

  8. Osmotic stress stimulates generation of superoxide anion by spermatozoa in horses.

    PubMed

    Burnaugh, L; Ball, B A; Sabeur, K; Thomas, A D; Meyers, S A

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the interplay between osmotic and oxidative stress as well as to determine mechanisms by which osmotic stress increases superoxide generation in spermatozoa of horses. Superoxide production, as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE), increased when spermatozoa of horses were incubated under either hyperosmotic or hyposmotic conditions. This increase in superoxide production was inhibited by the MAP kinase p38 inhibitor, SB203580, and by the superoxide scavenger, tiron. Incubation of spermatozoa under hyperosmotic conditions increased overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation as measured by western blotting techniques; however, a similar increase was not detected when spermatozoa were incubated under hyposmotic conditions. The general protein kinase C (PKC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor staurosporine inhibited (P<0.05) tyrosine phosphorylation in samples from cells under hyperosmotic conditions. In addition, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) also inhibited (P<0.05) protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cells under hyperosmotic conditions. In summary, these data indicate that incubation of equine spermatozoa under both hyposmotic and hyperosmotic conditions can increase superoxide anion generation. Under hyperosmotic conditions, this increased generation of superoxide anion was accompanied by increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  9. Controlling the extent of viral genome release by a combination of osmotic stress and polyvalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yan; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2015-08-01

    While several in vitro experiments on viral genome release have specifically studied the effects of external osmotic pressure and of the presence of polyvalent cations on the ejection of DNA from bacteriophages, few have systematically investigated how the extent of ejection is controlled by a combination of these effects. In this work we quantify the effect of osmotic pressure on the extent of DNA ejection from bacteriophage lambda as a function of polyvalent cation concentration (in particular, the tetravalent polyamine spermine). We find that the pressure required to completely inhibit ejection decreases from 38 to 17 atm as the spermine concentration is increased from 0 to 1.5 mM. Further, incubation of the phage particles in spermine concentrations as low as 0.15 mM—the threshold for DNA condensation in bulk solution—is sufficient to significantly limit the extent of ejection in the absence of osmolyte; for spermine concentrations below this threshold, the ejection is complete. In accord with recent investigations on the packaging of DNA in the presence of a condensing agent, we observe that the self-attraction induced by the polyvalent cation affects the ordering of the genome, causing it to get stuck in a broad range of nonequilibrated structures.

  10. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5'RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa.

  11. Electro-osmotic-based catholyte production by Microbial Fuel Cells for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Li, Baikun; Cristiani, Pierangela; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-01

    In Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), the recovery of water can be achieved with the help of both active (electro-osmosis), and passive (osmosis) transport pathways of electrolyte through the semi-permeable selective separator. The electrical current-dependent transport, results in cations and electro-osmotically dragged water molecules reaching the cathode. The present study reports on the production of catholyte on the surface of the cathode, which was achieved as a direct result of electricity generation using MFCs fed with wastewater, and employing Pt-free carbon based cathode electrodes. The highest pH levels (>13) of produced liquid were achieved by the MFCs with the activated carbon cathodes producing the highest power (309 μW). Caustic catholyte formation is presented in the context of beneficial cathode flooding and transport mechanisms, in an attempt to understand the effects of active and passive diffusion. Active transport was dominant under closed circuit conditions and showed a linear correlation with power performance, whereas osmotic (passive) transport was governing the passive flux of liquid in open circuit conditions. Caustic catholyte was mineralised to a mixture of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (trona) thus demonstrating an active carbon capture mechanism as a result of the MFC energy-generating performance. Carbon capture would be valuable for establishing a carbon negative economy and environmental sustainability of the wastewater treatment process.

  12. Effect of temperature and cultivar on polyphenol retention and mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apples.

    PubMed

    Devic, Emilie; Guyot, Sylvain; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Bonazzi, Catherine

    2010-01-13

    Several cultivars of apples (Malus domestica) were chosen for their variable concentrations and compositions in phenolic compounds. Cubed samples (1 cm3) were subjected to osmotic dehydration, and the effect of temperature was studied at 45 and 60 degrees C. Water loss, sucrose impregnation, and the evolution of some natural components of the product were followed to quantify mass transfer. Ascorbic acid and polyphenols were quantified by HPLC for several osmotic dehydration times and regardless of the quantity of impregnated sugar. Changes in antioxidant components differed as a function of the nature of molecules. Their concentrations decreased in line with temperature, and few differences were observed between cultivars. Processing at a lower temperature (45 degrees C) caused a total loss in ascorbic acid but allowed the retention of between 74 and 85% of initial polyphenols, depending on the cultivar. Cultivars containing highly polymerized procyanidins (such as Guillevic) experienced less loss. Hydroxycinnamic acids and monomeric catechins displayed the most marked changes. Leaching with water into the soaking solution was the principal mechanism retained to explain these losses.

  13. Adaptation of an osmotically pumped continuous in situ water sampler for application in riverine environments.

    PubMed

    Gkritzalis-Papadopoulos, A; Palmer, M R; Mowlem, M C

    2012-07-03

    We present the design of an osmotic water sampler that is adapted to and validated in freshwater. The sample is drawn into and stored in a continuous narrow bore tube. This geometry and slow pump rate (which is temperature dependent: 0.8 mL/d at 4 °C to 2.0 mL/d at 28 °C) minimizes sample dispersion. We have implemented in situ time-stamping which enables accurate study of pump rates and sample time defining procedures in field deployments and comparison with laboratory measurements. Temperature variations are common in rivers, and without an accurate time-stamping, or other defining procedure, time of sampling is ambiguous. The sampler was deployed for one month in a river, and its performance was evaluated by comparison with manually collected samples. Samples were analyzed for major ions using Ion Chromatography and collision reaction Inductively Couple Mass Spectrometry. Despite the differences of the two sampling methods (osmotic sampler averages, while manual samples provide snapshots), the two data sets show good agreement (average R(2) ≈ 0.7), indicating the reliability of the sampler and at the same time highlighting the advantages of high frequency sampling in dynamic environments.

  14. Development and evaluation of controlled porosity osmotic pump for Nifedipine and Metoprolol combination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A system that can deliver multi-drug at a prolonged rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma and heart disease. Controlled porosity osmotic pump tablet (CPOP) system was designed to deliver Nifedipine (NP) and Metoprolol (MP) in a controlled manner up to 12 h. It was prepared by incorporating drugs in the core and coated with various types (PVP, PEG-400 and HPMC) and levels (30, 40 and 50% w/w of polymer) of pore former at a weight gain of 8, 12 & 15%. Results Formulation variables like type and level of pore former and percent weight gain of membrane was found to affect the drug release from the developed formulations. Drug release was inversely proportional to the membrane weight but directly related to the level of pore former. Burst strength of the exhausted shell was inversely proportional to the level of pore former, but directly affected by the membrane weight. Results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed the formation of pores in the membrane from where the drug release occurred. Dissolution models were applied to drug release data in order to establish the mechanism of drug release kinetics. In vitro release kinetics was subjected to superposition method to predict in vivo performance of the developed formulation. Conclusion The developed osmotic system is effective in the multi-drug therapy of hypertension by delivering both drugs in a controlled manner. PMID:21477386

  15. Simulation of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple: a power law approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Souraki, B.; Tondro, H.; Ghavami, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, unsteady one-dimensional mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple was modeled using an approximate mathematical model. The mathematical model has been developed based on a power law profile approximation for moisture and solute concentrations in the spatial direction. The proposed model was validated by the experimental water loss and solute gain data, obtained from osmotic dehydration of infinite slab and cylindrical shape samples of apple in sucrose solutions (30, 40 and 50 % w/w), at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C). The proposed model's predictions were also compared with the exact analytical and also a parabolic approximation model's predictions. The values of mean relative errors respect to the experimental data were estimated between 4.5 and 8.1 %, 6.5 and 10.2 %, and 15.0 and 19.1 %, for exact analytical, power law and parabolic approximation methods, respectively. Although the parabolic approximation leads to simpler relations, the power law approximation method results in higher accuracy of average concentrations over the whole domain of dehydration time. Considering both simplicity and precision of the mathematical models, the power law model for short dehydration times and the simplified exact analytical model for long dehydration times could be used for explanation of the variations of the average water loss and solute gain in the whole domain of dimensionless times.

  16. Oscillatory phase separation in giant lipid vesicles induced by transmembrane osmotic differentials

    PubMed Central

    Oglęcka, Kamila; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Kraut, Rachel S; Parikh, Atul N

    2014-01-01

    Giant lipid vesicles are closed compartments consisting of semi-permeable shells, which isolate femto- to pico-liter quantities of aqueous core from the bulk. Although water permeates readily across vesicular walls, passive permeation of solutes is hindered. In this study, we show that, when subject to a hypotonic bath, giant vesicles consisting of phase separating lipid mixtures undergo osmotic relaxation exhibiting damped oscillations in phase behavior, which is synchronized with swell–burst lytic cycles: in the swelled state, osmotic pressure and elevated membrane tension due to the influx of water promote domain formation. During bursting, solute leakage through transient pores relaxes the pressure and tension, replacing the domain texture by a uniform one. This isothermal phase transition—resulting from a well-coordinated sequence of mechanochemical events—suggests a complex emergent behavior allowing synthetic vesicles produced from simple components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids to sense and regulate their micro-environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03695.001 PMID:25318069

  17. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  18. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  19. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5’RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa. PMID:28095469

  20. Modulation of mouse macrophage polarization in vitro using IL-4 delivery by osmotic pumps.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, Jukka; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Antonios, Joseph K; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Takagi, Michiaki; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Goodman, Stuart B

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization is emerging as promising means to mitigate wear particle-induced inflammation and periprosthetic osteolysis. As a model for continuous local drug delivery, we used miniature osmotic pumps to deliver IL-4 in order to modulate macrophage polarization in vitro from nonactivated M0 and inflammatory M1 phenotypes towards a tissue regenerative M2 phenotype. Pumps delivered IL-4 into vials containing mouse bone marrow macrophage (mBMM) media. This conditioned media (CM) was collected at seven day intervals up to four weeks (week 1 to week 4 samples). IL-4 concentration in the CM was determined by ELISA and its biological activity was assayed by exposing M0 and M1 mBMMs to week 1 or week 4 CM. The IL-4 concentration in the CM approximated the mathematically calculated amount, and its biological activity was well retained, as both M0 and M1 macrophages exposed to either the week 1 or week 4 CM assumed M2-like phenotype as determined by qRT-PCR, ELISA, and immunocytochemistry. The results show that IL-4 can be delivered using osmotic pumps and that IL-4 delivered can modulate macrophage phenotype. Results build a foundation for in vivo studies using our previously validated animal models and provide possible strategies to locally mitigate wear particle-induced macrophage activation and periprosthetic osteolysis.

  1. Sporadic hypokalemic paralysis caused by osmotic diuresis in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Kattadimmal, Anoop; Rao, Suparna A; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of neurological manifestations are known in patients with diabetes mellitus. We describe a 40-year-old man who presented with hypokalemic paralysis. On evaluation, we found that the cause of the hypokalemia was osmotic diuresis induced by marked hyperglycemia due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The patient had an uneventful recovery with potassium replacement, followed by glycemic control with insulin. Barring a few instances of symptomatic hypokalemia in the setting of diabetic emergencies, to our knowledge uncomplicated hyperglycemia has not been reported to result in hypokalemic paralysis.

  2. Differential effects of osmotic and SSR149415 challenges in maternally separated and control rats: the role of vasopressin on spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Vito S; Ruíz-Velazco, Silvia; Zhang, Limei

    2012-10-24

    Maternal separation (MS) has been demonstrated to up-regulate the hypothalamic vasopressin (VP) system. Intracerebrally released VP has been demonstrated to affect several types of animal behaviour, such as active/passive avoidance, social recognition, and learning and memory. However, the role of VP in spatial learning remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an osmotic challenge and a V1b receptor-specific (V1bR) antagonist, SSR149415, on spatial learning of maternally separated and animal facility reared (AFR) adult male Wistar rats. The osmotic challenge was applied by injecting a hypertonic saline solution, 1h before the Morris water maze test (MWM). V1bR antagonist SSR149415 (5mg/kg) was injected i.p. twice (1h and 30 min) previous to the MWM. A combined treatment with both osmotic challenge and the SSR149415 was applied to the third group whereas rats for basal condition were injected with isotonic saline. Under basal condition no differences between AFR and MS groups were observed. MS rats showed severe impairment during the MWM after the osmotic challenge, but not after the administration of SSR149415. For AFR rats, the opposite phenomenon was observed. The joint application of SSR149415 and osmotic challenge restored the spatial learning ability for both groups. The differential impairment produced by osmotic stress-induced up-regulation and SSR149415 induced V1bR blockage in MS and control rats suggested that VP involvement in spatial learning depends on the individual intrinsic ligand-receptor functional state.

  3. Effect of sulphur deprivation on osmotic potential components and nitrogen metabolism in oilseed rape leaves: identification of a new early indicator.

    PubMed

    Sorin, Elise; Etienne, Philippe; Maillard, Anne; Zamarreño, Angel-Mari; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Arkoun, Mustapha; Jamois, Frank; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Identification of early sulphur (S) deficiency indicators is important for species such as Brassica napus, an S-demanding crop in which yield and the nutritional quality of seeds are negatively affected by S deficiency. Because S is mostly stored as SO4 (2-) in leaf cell vacuoles and can be mobilized during S deficiency, this study investigated the impact of S deprivation on leaf osmotic potential in order to identify compensation processes. Plants were exposed for 28 days to S or to chlorine deprivation in order to differentiate osmotic and metabolic responses. While chlorine deprivation had no significant effects on growth, osmotic potential and nitrogen metabolism, Brassica napus revealed two response periods to S deprivation. The first one occurred during the first 13 days during which plant growth was maintained as a result of vacuolar SO4 (2-) mobilization. In the meantime, leaf osmotic potential of S-deprived plants remained similar to control plants despite a reduction in the SO4 (2-) osmotic contribution, which was fully compensated by an increase in NO3 (-), PO4 (3-) and Cl(-) accumulation. The second response occurred after 13 days of S deprivation with a significant reduction in growth, leaf osmotic potential, NO3 (-) uptake and NO3 (-) reductase activity, whereas amino acids and NO3 (-) were accumulated. This kinetic analysis of S deprivation suggested that a ([Cl(-)]+[NO3 (-)]+[PO4 (3-)]):[SO4 (2-)] ratio could provide a relevant indicator of S deficiency, modified nearly as early as the over-expression of genes encoding SO4 (2-) tonoplastic or plasmalemmal transporters, with the added advantage that it can be easily quantified under field conditions.

  4. Mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pump tablets of trimetazidine for controlled drug delivery and reduced variability in oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Alam, Naushad; Beg, Sarwar; Rizwan, Mohammad; Ahmad, Akifa; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Ali, Asgar; Aqil, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this work was preparation and evaluation of the mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pump tablets of trimetazidine hydrochloride to achieve desired controlled release action and augmentation of oral drug absorption. The drug-loaded core tablets were prepared employing the suitable tableting excipients and coated with polymeric blend of ethyl cellulose and hydroxypropyl methylethylcellulose E5 (4:1). The prepared tablets were characterized for various quality control tests and in vitro drug release. Evaluation of drug release kinetics through model fitting suggested the Fickian mechanism of drug release, which was regulated by osmosis and diffusion as the predominant mechanism. Evaluation of mucoadhesion property using texture analyzer suggested good mucoadhesion potential of the developed osmotic systems. Solid state characterization using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy confirmed the absence of any physiochemical incompatibilities between drug and excipients. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed the smooth surface appearance of the coated tablets with intact polymeric membrane without any fracture. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits revealed 3.01-fold enhancement in the oral bioavailability vis-à-vis the marketed formulation (Vastarel MR®). These studies successfully demonstrate the bioavailability enhancement potential of the mucoadhesive elementary osmotic pumps as novel therapeutic systems for other drugs too.

  5. Simultaneous And Extended Delivery Of Stavudine, Lamivudine And Nevirapine In Fixed Dose Combination Using Sandwiched Osmotic Tablets For Hiv Therapy.

    PubMed

    Priya, M Ranga; Rajendran, N N

    2015-01-01

    Current HIV-therapy recommends combination of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. Stavudine and lamivudine are administered as fixed combination while nevirapine as separate dosage form which often results in poor compliance and adherence to therapy by patients and therefore, there is a need to develop dosage forms that can overcome the problems of currently available dosage forms for treatment of HIV infection. The present study developed a single unit osmotic system for simultaneous and extended delivery of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine that can ensure patients compliance and adherence to HIV-therapy. Sandwich osmotic pump tablets (SOPTs) of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine in fixed dose combination were designed and evaluated for the effect of variables such as PEO (polymer), KCl (osmogen), and orifice diameter on the physicochemical characteristics and the release behavior of the drugs. A 24 h zero order release of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine from the formulations was observed and the release rate of the drugs was found to be affected by PEO, KCl, and orifice diameter. The in vitro release data of SOPT correlated with in vivo predictions by super - position method. The results of the study propose that a single unit osmotic system (SOPT) of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine is beneficial to overcome the disadvantages of currently available dosage forms for effective control of HIV infection.

  6. Functional and population genomic divergence within and between two species of killifish adapted to different osmotic niches.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Genevieve M; Brennan, Reid S; Berdan, Emma L; Fuller, Rebecca C; Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to salinity affects species distributions, promotes speciation, and guides many evolutionary patterns in fishes. To uncover the basis of a complex trait like osmoregulation, genome-level analyses are sensible. We combine population genomic scans with genome expression profiling to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with divergence between osmotic environments. We compared transcriptome sequence divergence between multiple freshwater and saltwater populations of the rainwater killifish, Lucania parva. We also compared sequence divergence between L. parva and its sister species, Lucania goodei, a freshwater specialist. We found highly differentiated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between freshwater and saltwater L. parva populations in cell junction and ion transport genes, including V-type H(+) ATPase. Between species, we found divergence in reproduction and osmotic stress genes. Genes that were differentially expressed between species during osmotic acclimation included genes involved in ion transport and cell volume regulation. Gene sets that were divergent in coding sequence and divergent in expression did not overlap, although they did converge in function. Like many studies using genomic scans, our approach may miss some loci that contribute to adaptation but have complicated patterns of allelic variation. Our study suggests that gene expression and coding sequence may evolve independently as populations adapt to a complex physiological challenge.

  7. The Arabidopsis Gene zinc finger protein 3(ZFP3) Is Involved in Salt Stress and Osmotic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aidong; Liu, Dongdong; Hua, Changmei; Yan, An; Liu, Bohan; Wu, Minjie; Liu, Yihua; Huang, Linli; Ali, Imran; Gan, Yinbo

    2016-01-01

    Plants are continuously challenged by various abiotic and biotic stresses. To tide over these adversities, plants evolved intricate regulatory networks to adapt these unfavorable environments. So far, many researchers have clarified the molecular and genetic pathways involved in regulation of stress responses. However, the mechanism through which these regulatory networks operate is largely unknown. In this study, we cloned a C2H2-type zinc finger protein gene ZFP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana and investigated its function in salt and osmotic stress response. Our results showed that the expression level of ZFP3 was highly suppressed by NaCl, mannitol and sucrose. Constitutive expression of ZFP3 enhanced tolerance of plants to salt and osmotic stress while the zfp3 mutant plants displays reduced tolerance in Arabidopsis. Gain- and Loss-of-function studies of ZFP3 showed that ZFP3 significantly changes proline accumulation and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, over-expression of ZFP3 induced the expressions of stress-related gene KIN1, RD22, RD29B and AtP5CS1. These results suggest that ZFP3 is involved in salt and osmotic stress response. PMID:27977750

  8. Osmotic and osmotic-loop diuresis in brain surgery. Effects on plasma and CSF electrolytes and ion excretion.

    PubMed

    Schettini, A; Stahurski, B; Young, H F

    1982-05-01

    In 22 patients to be operated on for brain tumors or cerebral aneurysms, the effect of osmotic diuresis was compared with that of osmotic-loop diuresis on plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) electrolytes, and water and ion excretion. Mannitol or mannitol plus furosemide were used to reduce brain bulk. After treatment with thiopental and hyperventilation, patients received randomly a rapid infusion of mannitol (1.4 gm/kg), or mannitol (1.4 gm/kg) plus furosemide (0.3 mg/kg). Brain shrinkage was considerably greater and more consistent with mannitol plus furosemide than with mannitol alone. However, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and hyperosmolality were also more marked (p less than 0.05) with mannitol plus furosemide than with mannitol. The rate of water and ion excretion was even more striking. At 30 minutes after absorption of mannitol alone, water excretion peaked at 17 ml/min, and gradually decreased to 3.8 ml/min 70 minutes later. With mannitol plus furosemide, during an identical time course, initial water excretion was 30 ml/min, followed by a further rise to 42 ml/min and then a decline to 17 ml/min. At peak diuresis after mannitol, Na+ and Cl- excretion average 0.57 and 0.62 mEq/min, respectively. This compares with mean values of 3.7 and 4.12 mEq/min for Na+ and Cl-, respectively, after mannitol plus furosemide. Although optimum brain shrinkage is achieved with osmotic-loop diuresis, the rapid electrolyte depletion (Na+ and Cl-) must be corrected to avoid altered sensorium during the patients' postoperative course.

  9. Role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in the effect of osmotic pressure on myocardial contractility in rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Ming-Huan; Wang, Le; Tian, Yang; Duan, Ya-Qi; Luo, Hong-Yan; Hu, Xin-Wu; Hescheler, Jüergen; Tang, Ming

    2008-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of osmotic pressure on myocardial contractility and the possible mechanism. Electrical stimulation was used to excite papillary muscles of the left ventricle of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The contractilities of myocardium in hyposmotic, isosmotic, and hyperosmotic perfusates were recorded. The influences of agonist and antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) on the contractility of myocardium under hyposmotic, isosmotic and hyperosmotic conditions were observed. The results were as follows: (1) Compared with that under isosmotic condition (310 mOsm/L), the myocardial contractility was increased by 11.5%, 21.5% and 25.0% (P<0.05) under hyposmotic conditions when the osmotic pressure was at 290, 270 and 230 mOsm/L, respectively; and was decreased by 16.0%, 23.7% and 55.2% (P<0.05) under hyperosmotic conditions when the osmotic pressure was at 350, 370 and 390 mOsm/L, respectively. (2) When ruthenium red (RR), an antagonist of TRPV4, was added to the hyposmotic perfusate (270 mOsm/L), the positive inotropic effect of hyposmia was restrained by 36% (P<0.01); and when RR was added to the hyperosmotic perfusate (390 mOsm/L), the inhibitory effect of hyperosmia on myocardial contractility was increased by 56.1% (P<0.01). (3) When 4-α-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD), an agonist of TRPV4, was added to the isosmotic perfusate (310 mOsm/L), the myocardial contractility did not change; and when 4α-PDD was added to the hyperosmotic perfusate (390 mOsm/L), the inhibition of myocardial contractility by hyperosmia was increased by 27.1% (P<0.01). These results obtained indicate that TRPV4 is possibly involved in the osmotic pressure-induced inotropic effect.

  10. Silicon alleviates salt and drought stress of Glycyrrhiza uralensis seedling by altering antioxidant metabolism and osmotic adjustment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjin; Xie, Zhicai; Wang, Lianhong; Li, Ming; Lang, Duoyong; Zhang, Xinhui

    2017-03-13

    This study was conducted to determine effect and mechanism of exogenous silicon (Si) on salt and drought tolerance of Glycyrrhiza uralensis seedling by focusing on the pathways of antioxidant defense and osmotic adjustment. Seedling growth, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant metabolism, osmolytes concentration and Si content of G. uralensis seedlings were analyzed under control, salt and drought stress [100 mM NaCl with 0, 10 and 20% of PEG-6000 (Polyethylene glycol-6000)] with or without 1 mM Si. Si addition markedly affected the G. uralensis growth in a combined dose of NaCl and PEG dependent manner. In brief, Si addition improved germination rate, germination index, seedling vitality index and biomass under control and NaCl; Si also increased radicle length under control, NaCl and NaCl-10% PEG, decreased radicle length, seedling vitality index and germination parameters under NaCl-20% PEG. The salt and drought stress-induced-oxidative stress was modulated by Si application. Generally, Si application increased catalase (CAT) activity under control and NaCl-10% PEG, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity under all treatments and glutathione (GSH) content under salt combined drought stress as compared with non-Si treatments, which resisted to the increase of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide caused by salt and drought stress and further decreased membrane permeability and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. Si application also increased proline concentration under NaCl and NaCl-20% PEG, but decreased it under NaCl-10% PEG, indicating proline play an important role in G. uralensis seedling response to osmotic stress. In conclusion, Si could ameliorate adverse effects of salt and drought stress on G. uralensis likely by reducing oxidative stress and osmotic stress, and the oxidative stress was regulated through enhancing of antioxidants (mainly CAT, APX and GSH) and osmotic stress was regulated by proline.

  11. Generation of Wheat Transcription Factor FOX Rice Lines and Systematic Screening for Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinxia; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yayun; Zhu, Butuo; Cao, Jian; Li, Zhanpeng; Han, Longzhi; Jia, Jizeng; Zhao, Guangyao; Sun, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stress. In this study, we collected 1,455 full-length (FL) cDNAs of TFs, representing 45 families, from wheat and its relatives Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops tauschii, Triticum carthlicum, and Triticum aestivum. More than 15,000 T0 TF FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressing) rice lines were generated; of these, 10,496 lines set seeds. About 14.88% of the T0 plants showed obvious phenotypic changes. T1 lines (5,232 lines) were screened for salt and osmotic stress tolerance using 150 mM NaCl and 20% (v/v) PEG-4000, respectively. Among them, five lines (591, 746, 1647, 1812, and J4065) showed enhanced salt stress tolerance, five lines (591, 746, 898, 1078, and 1647) showed enhanced osmotic stress tolerance, and three lines (591, 746, and 1647) showed both salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Further analysis of the T-DNA flanking sequences showed that line 746 over-expressed TaEREB1, line 898 over-expressed TabZIPD, and lines 1812 and J4065 over-expressed TaOBF1a and TaOBF1b, respectively. The enhanced salt and osmotic stress tolerance of lines 898 and 1812 was confirmed by retransformation of the respective genes. Our results demonstrate that a heterologous FOX system may be used as an alternative genetic resource for the systematic functional analysis of the wheat genome.

  12. Involvement of elevated proline accumulation in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis conferred by chimeric repressor gene silencing technology.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Daisuke; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Tada, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis plants transformed with a chimeric repressor for 6 transcription factors (TFs), including ADA2b, Msantd, DDF1, DREB26, AtGeBP, and ATHB23, that were converted by Chimeric REpressor gene Silencing Technology (CRES-T), show elevated salt and osmotic stress tolerance compared with wild type (WT) plants. However, the roles of TFs in salt and osmotic signaling remain largely unknown. Their hyper-osmotic stress tolerance was evaluated using 3 criteria: germination rate, root length, and rate of seedlings with visible cotyledons at the germination stage. All CRES-T lines tested exhibited better performance than WT, at least for one criterion under stress conditions. Under 600 mM mannitol stress, 3-week-old CRES-T lines accumulated proline, which is a major compatible solute involved in osmoregulation, at higher levels than WT. Expression levels of the delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase gene in CRES-T lines were similar to or lower than those in WT. In contrast, expression of the proline dehydrogenase (PHD) gene in DREB26-SRDX was significantly downregulated and that in ADA2b-SRDX and AtGeBP-SRDX was also rather downregulated compared with that in WT. Although plants at different stages were used for stress tolerance test and proline measurement in this study, we previously reported that 4 out of the 6 CRES-T lines showed better growth than WT after 4 weeks of incubation under 400 mM mannitol. These results suggest that proline accumulation caused by PHD gene suppression may be involved in enhanced osmotic stress tolerance in the CRES-T lines, and that these TFs may be involved in regulating proline metabolism in Arabidopsis.

  13. Osmotic membrane bioreactor for phenol biodegradation under continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2016-03-15

    Continuous phenol biodegradation was accomplished in a two-phase partitioning osmotic membrane bioreactor (TPPOMBR) system, using extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) as the partitioning phase. The EIMs alleviated substrate inhibition during prolonged operation at influent phenol concentrations of 600-2000mg/L, and also at spiked concentrations of 2500mg/L phenol restricted to 2 days. Filtration of the effluent through forward osmosis maintained high biomass concentration in the bioreactor and improved effluent quality. Steady state was reached in 5-6 days at removal rates varying between 2000 and 5500mg/L-day under various conditions. Due to biofouling and salt accumulation, the permeate flux varied from 1.2-7.2 LMH during 54 days of operation, while maintaining an average hydraulic retention time of 7.4h. A washing cycle, comprising 1h osmotic backwashing using 0.5M NaCl and 2h washing with water, facilitated biofilm removal from the membranes. Characterization of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) through FTIR showed peaks between 1700 and 1500cm(-1), 1450-1450cm(-1) and 1200-1000cm(-1), indicating the presence of proteins, phenols and polysaccharides, respectively. The carbohydrate to protein ratio in the EPS was estimated to be 0.3. These results indicate that TPPOMBR can be promising in continuous treatment of phenolic wastewater.

  14. The innovative osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) for reuse of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, E R; Harmsen, D; Beerendonk, E F; Qin, J J; Oo, H; de Korte, K F; Kappelhof, J W M N

    2011-01-01

    An innovative osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) is currently under development for the reclamation of wastewater, which combines activated sludge treatment and forward osmosis (FO) membrane separation with a RO post-treatment. The research focus is FO membrane fouling and performance using different activated sludge investigated both at laboratory scale (membrane area of 112cm2) and at on-site bench scale (flat sheet membrane area of 0.1 m2). FO performance on laboratory-scale (i) increased with temperature due to a decrease in viscosity and (ii) was independent of the type of activated sludge. Draw solution leakage increased with temperature and varied for different activated sludge. FO performance on bench-scale (i) increased with osmotic driving force, (ii) depended on the membrane orientation due to internal concentration polarization and (iii) was invariant to feed flow decrease and air injection at the feed and draw side. Draw solution leakage could not be evaluated on bench-scale due to experimental limitation. Membrane fouling was not found on laboratory scale and bench-scale, however, partially reversible fouling was found on laboratory scale for FO membranes facing the draw solution. Economic assessment indicated a minimum flux of 15L.m-2 h-1 at 0.5M NaCl for OMBR-RO to be cost effective, depending on the FO membrane price.

  15. Osmotic effects on vacuolar ion release in guard cells.

    PubMed

    MacRobbie, Enid A C

    2006-01-24

    Tracer flux experiments in isolated guard cells of Commelina communis L. suggest that the vacuolar ion content is regulated and is reset to a reduced fixed point by abscisic acid (ABA) with no significant change in cytoplasmic content. The effects of changes in external osmotic pressure were investigated by adding and removing mannitol from the bathing solution. Two effects were distinguished. In the new steady state of volume and turgor, the vacuolar ion efflux was sensitive to turgor: efflux increased at high turgor and reduced at lower turgor after the addition of mannitol. These changes were inhibited by phenylarsine oxide and are likely to involve the same channel that is involved in the response to ABA. After a hypoosmotic transfer, there was an additional effect: a fast transient stimulation of vacuolar efflux during the period of water flow into the cell; the size of this hypopeak increased with the size of the hypoosmotic shock, with increased water flow. No corresponding transient in reduced vacuolar efflux was observed upon hyperosmotic transfer. The fast hypopeak was not inhibited by phenylarsine oxide and appears to involve a different ion channel from that involved in the resting efflux, the response to ABA, or the turgor sensitivity. Thus, the tonoplast can sense an osmotic gradient and respond to water flow into the vacuole by increased vacuolar ion efflux, thereby minimizing cytoplasmic dilution. An aquaporin is the most likely sensor and may also be involved in the signal transduction chain.

  16. Characterization of the mechanism of prolonged adaptation to osmotic stress of Jeotgalibacillus malaysiensis via genome and transcriptome sequencing analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan Lue; Lee, Siew-Kim; Manan, Fazilah Abd; Goh, Kian Mau

    2016-01-01

    Jeotgalibacillus malaysiensis, a moderate halophilic bacterium isolated from a pelagic area, can endure higher concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl) than other Jeotgalibacillus type strains. In this study, we therefore chose to sequence and assemble the entire J. malaysiensis genome. This is the first report to provide a detailed analysis of the genomic features of J. malaysiensis, and to perform genetic comparisons between this microorganism and other halophiles. J. malaysiensis encodes a native megaplasmid (pJeoMA), which is greater than 600 kilobases in size, that is absent from other sequenced species of Jeotgalibacillus. Subsequently, RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analysis was utilised to examine adaptations of J. malaysiensis to osmotic stress. Specifically, the eggNOG (evolutionary genealogy of genes: Non-supervised Orthologous Groups) and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes) databases were used to elucidate the overall effects of osmotic stress on the organism. Generally, saline stress significantly affected carbohydrate, energy, and amino acid metabolism, as well as fatty acid biosynthesis. Our findings also indicate that J. malaysiensis adopted a combination of approaches, including the uptake or synthesis of osmoprotectants, for surviving salt stress. Among these, proline synthesis appeared to be the preferred method for withstanding prolonged osmotic stress in J. malaysiensis. PMID:27641516

  17. Differential effects of salinity and osmotic stress on the plant growth-promoting bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, Marcos Vinicius V; Intorne, Aline C; Vespoli, Luciano de S; Madureira, Hérika C; Leandro, Mariana R; Pereira, Telma N S; Olivares, Fábio L; Berbert-Molina, Marília A; De Souza Filho, Gonçalo A

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) represent a promising alternative to the massive use of industrial fertilizers in agriculture. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a PGPB that colonizes several plant species. Although this bacterium is able to grow at high sucrose concentrations, its response to environmental stresses is poorly understood. The present study evaluated G. diazotrophicus PAL5 response to stresses caused by sucrose, PEG 400, NaCl, KCl, Na2SO4 and K2SO4. Morphological, ultrastructural and cell growth analysis revealed that G. diazotrophicus PAL5 is more sensitive to salt than osmotic stress. Growth inhibition and strong morphological changes were caused by salinity, in consequence of Cl ion-specific toxic effect. Interestingly, low osmotic stress levels were beneficial for bacterial multiplication, which was able to tolerate high sucrose concentrations, Na2SO4 and K2SO4. Our data show that G. diazotrophicus PAL5 has differential response to osmotic and salinity stress, which may influence its use as inoculant in saline environments.

  18. Effect of Osmotic-Release Oral System Methylphenidate on Different Domains of Attention and Executive Functioning in Children with Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Nathan J.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Clarke, Angela T.; Power, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated whether components of attention and executive functioning improve when children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are treated with osmotic-release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate. Method: Thirty children (24 males, six females; mean age 8y 6mo, SD 1y 11mo; range 6y 5mo-12y 6mo) with ADHD combined…

  19. Changes in osmotic fragility of nucleated erythrocytes resulting from blood storage.

    PubMed

    Oyewale, J O

    1994-08-01

    The storage of blood for 24 h at 10 degrees C caused significant changes in osmotic fragility of nucleated erythrocytes of pigeons, peafowls, domestic fowls, lizards and toads. Significant decreases in fragility were seen with pigeon and peafowl erythrocytes. However, the osmotic fragility of domestic fowl, lizard and toad erythrocytes increased significantly.

  20. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  1. A tracer study with systemically and locally administered dinitrophenylated osteopontin.

    PubMed

    Nanci, Antonio; Wazen, Rima M; Zalzal, Sylvia F; Fortin, Micheline; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K; Ghitescu, Dorin-Lucian

    2004-12-01

    Osteopontin (OPN), a major non-collagenous matrix protein of bone, is also found in tissue fluids and in the circulation. It is still not clear whether circulating OPN contributes to bone formation. To elucidate this question, rat OPN was tagged with dinitrophenol groups and administered to rats either intravenously or by infusion with an osmotic minipump through a "surgical window" in the bone of the hemimandible. Dinitrophenylated rat albumin (ALB) was used as a control. The presence and distribution of tagged proteins were revealed by immunogold labeling on sections of tibia and alveolar bone. Tagged molecules of OPN were found in mineralization foci, surfaces and interfaces, and matrix accumulations among calcified collagen fibrils. Even though dinitrophenylated ALB was administered at several-fold higher concentrations, it did not accumulate in these sites. These results show that circulating OPN can be incorporated into specific compartments of forming bone and suggest that such molecules may play a more important role than previously suspected.

  2. A multisolute osmotic virial equation for solutions of interest in biology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J A W; Prickett, R C; Elmoazzen, H Y; Porter, K R; McGann, L E

    2007-02-22

    The osmotic virial equation was used to predict osmolalities of solutions of interest in biology. The second osmotic virial coefficients, Bi, account for the interactions between identical solute molecules. For multisolute solutions, the second osmotic virial cross coefficient, Bij, describes the interaction between two different solutes. We propose to use as a mixing rule for the cross coefficient the arithmetic average of the second osmotic virial coefficients of the pure species, so that only binary solution measurements are required for multisolute solution predictions. Single-solute data were fit to obtain the osmotic virial coefficients of the pure species. Using those coefficients with the proposed mixing rule, predictions were made of ternary solution osmolality, without any fitting parameters. This method is shown to make reasonably accurate predictions for three very different ternary aqueous solutions: (i) glycerol + dimethyl sulfoxide + water, (ii) hemoglobin + an ideal, dilute solute + water, and (iii) bovine serum albumin + ovalbumin + water.

  3. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation.

  4. Swellable elementary osmotic pump (SEOP): an effective device for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Javad; Ahmadi, Parinaz; Rashidi, Parisa; Shahsavari, Mahbobeh; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2008-02-01

    A new type of elementary osmotic pump (EOP) tablet for efficient delivery of poorly water-soluble/practically insoluble drugs has been designed. Drug release from the system, called swellable elementary osmotic pump (SEOP), is through a delivery orifice in the form of a very fine dispersion ready for dissolution and absorption. SEOP tablets were prepared by compressing the mixture of micronized drug and excipients into convex tablets. Factors affecting the release of drug from the SEOP tablets containing a poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, have been explored. The release behaviour of indomethacin from different formulations of this dosage form was studied at pH 6.8 for a period of 24h. The formulations were compared based on four comparative parameters, namely, D(24h) (total release after 24h), t(L) (lag time), RSQ(zero) (R square of zero order equation) and D%(zero) (percentage deviation from zero order kinetics). The drug release profile from osmotic devices showed that the type of polymer in the core formulation can markedly affect the drug release. The results showed that concentration of wetting agent in the core formulation was a very important parameter in D(24h) and release pattern of indomethacin from SEOP system. Increasing the amount of wetting agent to an optimum level (60mg) significantly increased D(24h) and improved zero order release pattern of indomethacin. Increasing concentration of caster oil (hydrophobic) in the semipermeable membrane of the device or hydrophilic plasticizer (glycerin) in coating formulation markedly increased t(L) and decreased D(24h). The results also demonstrated that aperture size is a critical parameter and should be optimized for each SEOP system. Optimum aperture diameter for the formulations studied here was determined to be 650microm for zero order release pattern. t(L) and D%(zero) were dramatically decreased whereas D(24h) and RSQ(zero) increased with increasing the aperture size to optimum level. This study

  5. Isohydric and anisohydric strategies of wheat genotypes under osmotic stress: biosynthesis and function of ABA in stress responses.

    PubMed

    Gallé, Ágnes; Csiszár, Jolán; Benyó, Dániel; Laskay, Gábor; Leviczky, Tünde; Erdei, László; Tari, Irma

    2013-11-01

    Changes in water potential (ψw), stomatal conductance, abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation, expression of the major genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, activities of abscisic aldehyde oxidase (AO, EC 1.2.3.1) and antioxidant enzymes were studied in two wheat cultivars with contrasting acclimation strategies subjected to medium strength osmotic stress (-0.976MPa) induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000). Because the biosynthetic pathway of ABA involves multiple gene products, the aim of this study was to unravel how these genes are regulated in isohydric and anisohydric wheat genotypes. In the root tissues of the isohydric cultivar, Triticum aestivum cv. Kobomugi, osmotic stress increased the transcript levels of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) gene, controlling the rate limiting step of ABA biosynthesis. Moreover, this cultivar exhibited a higher basal activity and a higher induction of aldehyde oxidase isoenzymes (AAO2-AAO3), responsible for converting ABAldehyde to ABA. It was found that the fast activation of the ABA biosynthesis in the roots generated an enhanced ABA pool in the shoot, which brought about a faster closure of the stomata upon increasing osmotic stress and, as a result, the plants could maintain ψw in the tissues close to the control level. In contrast, the anisohydric genotype, cv. GK Öthalom, exhibited a moderate induction of ABA biosynthesis in the roots, leading to the maintenance but no increase in the concentration of ABA on the basis of tissue water content in the leaves. Due to the slower response of their stomata to water deficit, the tissues of cv. GK Öthalom have to acclimate to much more negative water potentials during increasing osmotic stress. A decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found in the leaves and roots of both cultivars exposed to osmotic stress, but in the roots elevated activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione transferase (GST) were detected in

  6. Real-time characterization of the neuronal response to osmotic shock by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomariz, Maria; Garcia, Isabel; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Martínez-Navarrete, Gema; Fernández, Eduardo; Fimia, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy has numerous applications in biology for visualizing living cells and 3D tissues. This technique allows for the direct visualization of biological structures avoiding invasive and phototoxic procedures such as fixation and dying processing. In this study we have characterized the morphometry changes of neurons subject to osmolarity changes. For this purpose, we have measured the variations of the amplitude and the oscillation frequency of the plasmatic membrane, as well as the volume changes of the cells before the osmotic shock. There was a relation between the neural culture ageing and its behavioral changes. "Long-term" cultures that had not previously been studied were used to analyze the behavioral changes in aged cells.

  7. Microbial fuel cells and osmotic membrane bioreactors have mutual benefits for wastewater treatment and energy production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianxun; Lu, Lu; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates that microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) can be mutually beneficial when integrated together for wastewater treatment. When connecting MFCs with OMBRs, the solute buildup increased conductivity and buffer capacity, which greatly increased MFC power density from 3 W/m(3) up to 11.5 W/m(3). In turn, the MFCs conditioned and reduced sludge production and therefore reduced forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling. The MFC-OMBR equipped with new thin-film composite (TFC) membrane showed excellent organic (>95%) and phosphorus removal (>99%) and therefore maintained effluent sCOD below 20 mg/L. However, the nitrogen removal was limited due to the negative surface charge of the thin-film composite membrane and solution chemistry, which led to higher flux of ammonium toward the OMBR draw solution. Further studies are needed to improve nitrogen removal, reduce fouling, and optimize system integration.

  8. Effect of drought and osmotic stress on gene expression in Jack Pine. [Pinus banksiana

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, M.; Mayne, M.; Coleman, J.R.; Blumwald, E. )

    1991-05-01

    The effect of drought and osmotic stress was studied in Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana) seedlings and cultured cell suspensions, respectively. The pattern of protein syntheses during stress was studied. Seedlings and cells were in vivo labeled with ({sup 35}S)methionine and membrane-bound proteins were isolated. proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE, and identified by staining and autoradiography. Several changes in protein profiles were induced by stress. Messenger RNAs were isolated, translated in vitro, and complementary DNA libraries from control and stressed plants and cells were constructed in E. coli strain JM109. Antibodies, raised against electroeluted membrane-bound proteins that were significantly induced and/or enhanced during stress, were used to isolate stress-related genes from cDNA libraries.

  9. Sorbitol required for cell growth and ethanol production by Zymomonas mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During ethanol fermentation, the ethanologenic bacterium, Zymomonas mobilis may encounter several environmental stresses such as heat, ethanol and osmotic stresses due to high sugar concentration. Although supplementation of the compatible solute sorbitol into culture medium enhances cell growth of Z. mobilis under osmotic stress, the protective function of this compound on cell growth and ethanol production by this organism under other stresses such as heat and ethanol has not been described yet. The formation of sorbitol in Z. mobilis was carried out by the action of the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) enzyme which is regulated by the gfo gene. Therefore, the gfo gene in Z. mobilis was disrupted by the fusion-PCR-based construction technique in the present study, and the protective function of sorbitol on cell growth, protein synthesis and ethanol production by Z. mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses was investigated. Results Based on the fusion-PCR-based construction technique, the gfo gene in Z. mobilis was disrupted. Disruption of the Z. mobilis gfo gene resulted in the reduction of cell growth and ethanol production not only under osmotic stress but also under heat and ethanol stresses. Under these stress conditions, the transcription level of pdc, adhA, and adhB genes involved in the pyruvate-to-ethanol (PE) pathway as well as the synthesis of proteins particularly in Z. mobilis disruptant strain were decreased compared to those of the parent. These findings suggest that sorbitol plays a crucial role not only on cell growth and ethanol production but also on the protection of cellular proteins from stress responses. Conclusion We showed for the first time that supplementation of the compatible solute sorbitol not only promoted cell growth but also increased the ethanol fermentation capability of Z. mobilis under heat, ethanol, and osmotic stresses. Although the molecular mechanism involved in tolerance to stress conditions

  10. Cellular mechanisms involved in iso-osmotic high K+ solutions-induced contraction of the estrogen-primed rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, M M; Ausina, P; Savineau, J P; Marthan, R; Strippoli, G; Advenier, C; Pinto, F M; Candenas, M L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in the contraction evoked by iso-osmotic high K+ solutions in the estrogen-primed rat uterus. In Ca2+-containing solution, iso-osmotic addition of KCl (30, 60 or 90 mM K+) induced a rapid, phasic contraction followed by a prolonged sustained plateau (tonic component) of smaller amplitude. The KCl (60 mM)-induced contraction was unaffected by tetrodotoxin (3 microM), omega-conotoxin MVIIC (1 microM), GF 109203X (1 microM) or calphostin C (3 microM) but was markedly reduced by tissue treatment with neomycin (1 mM), mepacrine (10 microM) or U-73122 (10 microM). Nifedipine (0.01-0.1 microM) was significantly more effective as an inhibitor of the tonic component than of the phasic component. After 60 min incubation in Ca2+-free solution containing 3 mM EGTA, iso-osmotic KCl did not cause any increase in tension but potentiated contractions evoked by oxytocin (1 microM), sodium orthovanadate (160 micrM) or okadaic acid (20 microM) in these experimental conditions. In freshly dispersed myometrial cells maintained in Ca2+-containing solution and loaded with indo 1, iso-osmotic KCl (60 mM) caused a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). In cells superfused for 60 min in Ca2+-free solution containing EGTA (1 mM), KCl did not increase [Ca2+]i. In Ca2+-containing solution, KCl (60 mM) produced a 76.0 +/- 16.2% increase in total [3H]inositol phosphates above basal levels and increased the intracellular levels of free arachidonic acid. These results suggest that, in the estrogen-primed rat uterus, iso-osmotic high K+ solutions, in addition to their well known effect on Ca2+ influx, activate other cellular processes leading to an increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile machinery by a mechanism independent of extracellular Ca2+.

  11. Mechanosensitive Channel Activation by Diffusio-Osmotic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-10-01

    For ion channel gating, the appearance of two distinct conformational states and the discrete transitions between them are essential, and therefore of crucial importance to all living organisms. We show that the physical interplay between two structural elements that are commonly present in bacterial mechanosensitive channels—namely, a charged vestibule and a hydrophobic constriction—creates two distinct conformational states, open and closed, as well as the gating between them. We solve the nonequilibrium Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, extended to include a molecular potential of mean force, and show that a first order transition between the closed and open states arises naturally from the diffusio-osmotic stress caused by the ions and the water inside the channel and the elastic restoring force from the membrane.

  12. Serum albumin induces osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Silvana; Wurm, Antje; Kutzera, Franziska; Pannicke, Thomas; Krügel, Katja; Linnertz, Regina; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-03-04

    Edema in the ischemic neural tissue develops by increased vascular permeability associated with extravasation of albumin, and by glial swelling. Here, we show that bovine serum albumin acutely administered to slices of the rat retina causes swelling of glial somata under hypoosmotic conditions. The effect of albumin was dose-dependent, with half-maximal and maximal effects at 10 nM and 1 microM, respectively, and was mediated by activation of transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, oxidative stress, and the production of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins. Albumin-induced glial swelling was prevented by glutamate and purinergic receptor agonists. The data suggest that serum albumin may induce glial swelling in the presence of osmotic gradients.

  13. Sex steroids inhibit osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Florian; Wurm, Antje; Linnertz, Regina; Pannicke, Thomas; Iandiev, Ianors; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    Osmotic swelling of glial cells may contribute to the development of retinal edema. We investigated whether sex steroids inhibit the swelling of glial somata in acutely isolated retinal slices and glial cells of the rat. Superfusion of retinal slices or cells from control animals with a hypoosmolar solution did not induce glial swelling, whereas glial swelling was observed in slices of postischemic and diabetic retinas. Progesterone, testosterone, estriol, and 17beta-estradiol prevented glial swelling with half-maximal effects at approximately 0.3, 0.6, 6, and 20 microM, respectively. The effect of progesterone was apparently mediated by transactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, P2Y1, and adenosine A1 receptors. The data suggest that sex steroids may inhibit cytotoxic edema in the retina.

  14. Osmotic stress, plasma renin activity, and spermatogenesis in Vipera aspis.

    PubMed

    Uva, B; Ghiani, P; Masini, M A; Mandich, A

    1987-12-01

    Circulating electrolytes (Na+, K+), plasma renin-like activity, testosterone, and testis morphology were investigated in early summer during the spermatogenic progressive phase in Vipera aspis subjected to sodium loading and sodium depletion. After sodium loading, plasma sodium and plasma testosterone levels were significantly elevated compared with those of controls, while plasma renin-like activity was depressed, spermiogenesis was increased, the epithelium lining the epididymis was very thick, and the Leydig cells were hypertrophied. After sodium depletion, plasma sodium and plasma testosterone levels were significantly depressed and plasma renin-like activity was significantly elevated. Spermiogenesis seemed to be slightly regressed: the epithelium lining the epididymis was very thin, and the lumen was devoid of spermatozoa. The Leydig cells were hardly visible. All the data strongly suggest that osmotic stress affects gonadal activity in the snake. V. aspis.

  15. Mechanosensitive channel activation by diffusio-osmotic force.

    PubMed

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    For ion channel gating, the appearance of two distinct conformational states and the discrete transitions between them are essential, and therefore of crucial importance to all living organisms. We show that the physical interplay between two structural elements that are commonly present in bacterial mechanosensitive channels--namely, a charged vestibule and a hydrophobic constriction--creates two distinct conformational states, open and closed, as well as the gating between them. We solve the nonequilibrium Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, extended to include a molecular potential of mean force, and show that a first order transition between the closed and open states arises naturally from the diffusio-osmotic stress caused by the ions and the water inside the channel and the elastic restoring force from the membrane.

  16. Universality of osmotically driven sap-flow in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Tomas; Hartvig Jensen, Kåre; Berg Sørensen, Kirstine; Mørch Friis, Søren; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Since Ernst Münch in the 1920s proposed that sugar transport in the phloem vascular system of plants is driven by passive osmotic pressure gradients, it has been strongly debated whether this hypothesis can account even for long distance translocation. Recently, it was shown that theoretical optimization of the Münch mechanism leads to surprisingly simple predictions for the dimensions of the phloem sieve elements in relation to those of the plants [Jensen et. al., J. Roy. Soc. Interface 8, pp. 1155-1165 (2011)]. We show that the theoretical results are very insensitive to the details of the sugar-loading (in leaves) and unloading (in shoots or roots) and can even be obtained from a simple coupled resistor model. We have compiled anatomical data for a wide group of plants and find good agreement with theory, even for conifer trees, in which the sugar translocation is substantially slower than hardwood trees.

  17. Electrostatic interactions and electro-osmotic properties of semipermeable surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduar, Salim R.; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2016-10-01

    We consider two charged semipermeable membranes which bound bulk electrolyte solutions and are separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Small ions permeate into the gap, which leads to a steric charge separation in the system. To quantify the problem, we define an effective surface charge density of an imaginary impermeable surface, which mimics an actual semipermeable membrane and greatly simplifies the analysis. The effective charge depends on separation, generally differs from the real one, and could even be of the opposite sign. From the exact and asymptotic solutions of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions in the system. We then derive explicit formulae for the disjoining pressure in the gap and electro-osmotic velocity and show that both are controlled by the effective surface charge.

  18. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  19. Sensitivity of Nematode Life-History Groups to Ions and Osmotic Tensions of Nitrogenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Tenuta, Mario; Ferris, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Guild designation of nematodes of similar trophic function and life-history strategy provides a basis for using nematode faunal analyses in an integrative assessment of soil food web condition. Omnivorous and predaceous nematodes, categorized at the upper end of a colonizer-persister (c-p) continuum of nematode functional guilds are generally not abundant in cropped soil. These nematodes are more sensitive to heavy metal concentrations than those in other c-p groups, but whether sensitivity to agrochemicals contributes to the observed low abundance of high c-p groups in cropped soils is less well understood. An exposure assay in solution was used to compare the sensitivity of nematodes representing various guilds obtained from field soils and from laboratory culture to several nitrogen sources. Nematodes in c-p groups 4 and 5 were more sensitive to nitrogen solutions than nematodes representing lower c-p groups. There were both osmotic and specific ion effects—the latter most evident in exposure of nematodes to NaNO₂ and (NH₄)₂SO₄. The RC₅₀ (concentration resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for (NH₄)₂SO₄ was < 0.052 M-N for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to much greater values (0.34 to 0.81 M-N) for c-p groups 1 to 3. In non-ionic polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions, osmotic tensions of 0.40 to 0.43 MPa reduced the recovery of exposed nematodes by half (RT₅₀; water potential of solution resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to > 1.93 MPa for c-p groups 1 to 3. RT₅₀ values for urea solutions, also non-ionic, were greater than for PEG. Caenorhabditis elegans N2 (c-p 1) and Meloidogyne javanica (c-p 3) reared on solid medium and in hydroponic culture, respectively, were slightly more sensitive to specific ion and osmotic effects than nematodes of similar c-p groups obtained from soil. The greater sensitivity of c-p 4 and 5 nematodes to nitrogen

  20. The Photosynthesis, Na+/K+ Homeostasis and Osmotic Adjustment of Atriplex canescens in Response to Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ya-Qing; Guo, Huan; Wang, Suo-Min; Zhao, Bingyu; Zhang, Jin-Lin; Ma, Qing; Yin, Hong-Ju; Bao, Ai-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atriplex canescens (fourwing saltbush) is a C4 perennial fodder shrub with excellent resistance to salinity. However, the mechanisms underlying the salt tolerance in A. canescens are poorly understood. In this study, 5-weeks-old A. canescens seedlings were treated with various concentrations of external NaCl (0–400 mM). The results showed that the growth of A. canescens seedlings was significantly stimulated by moderate salinity (100 mM NaCl) and unaffected by high salinity (200 or 400 mM NaCl). Furthermore, A. canescens seedlings showed higher photosynthetic capacity under NaCl treatments (except for 100 mM NaCl treatment) with significant increases in net photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency. Under saline conditions, the A. canescens seedlings accumulated more Na+ in either plant tissues or salt bladders, and also retained relatively constant K+ in leaf tissues and bladders by enhancing the selective transport capacity for K+ over Na+ (ST value) from stem to leaf and from leaf to bladder. External NaCl treatments on A. canescens seedlings had no adverse impact on leaf relative water content, and this resulted from lower leaf osmotic potential under the salinity conditions. The contribution of Na+ to the leaf osmotic potential (Ψs) was sharply enhanced from 2% in control plants to 49% in plants subjected to 400 mM NaCl. However, the contribution of K+ to Ψs showed a significant decrease from 34% (control) to 9% under 400 mM NaCl. Interestingly, concentrations of betaine and free proline showed significant increase in the leaves of A. canescens seedlings, these compatible solutes presented up to 12% of contribution to Ψs under high salinity. These findings suggest that, under saline environments, A. canescens is able to enhance photosynthetic capacity, increase Na+ accumulation in tissues and salt bladders, maintain relative K+ homeostasis in leaves, and use inorganic ions and compatible solutes for osmotic adjustment which may contribute to the

  1. Interstitial Fibrosis Restricts Osmotic Water Transport in Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Hautem, Nicolas; Bouzin, Caroline; Crott, Ralph; Devuyst, Olivier; Goffin, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) characterized by extensive fibrosis of the peritoneum. Changes in peritoneal water transport may precede EPS, but the mechanisms and potential predictive value of that transport defect are unknown. Among 234 patients with ESRD who initiated PD at our institution over a 20-year period, 7 subsequently developed EPS. We evaluated changes in peritoneal transport over time on PD in these 7 patients and in 28 matched controls using 3.86% glucose peritoneal equilibration tests. Compared with long-term PD controls, patients with EPS showed early loss of ultrafiltration capacity and sodium sieving before the onset of overt EPS. Multivariate analysis revealed that loss of sodium sieving was the most powerful predictor of EPS. Compared with long-term PD control and uremic peritoneum, EPS peritoneum showed thicker submesothelial fibrosis, with increased collagen density and a greater amount of thick collagen fibers. Reduced osmotic conductance strongly correlated with the degree of peritoneal fibrosis, but not with vasculopathy. Peritoneal fibrosis was paralleled by an excessive upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, but the expression of endothelial aquaporin-1 water channels was unaltered. Our findings suggest that an early and disproportionate reduction in osmotic conductance during the course of PD is an independent predictor of EPS. This functional change is linked to specific alterations of the collagen matrix in the peritoneal membrane of patients with EPS, thereby validating the serial three-pore membrane/fiber matrix and distributed models of peritoneal transport.

  2. Osmotic and hydraulic adjustment of mangrove saplings to extreme salinity.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Alonzo, Rodrigo; López-Portillo, Jorge; Moctezuma, Coral; Bartlett, Megan K; Sack, Lawren

    2016-12-01

    Salinity tolerance in plant species varies widely due to adaptation and acclimation processes at the cellular and whole-plant scales. In mangroves, extreme substrate salinity induces hydraulic failure and ion excess toxicity and reduces growth and survival, thus suggesting a potentially critical role for physiological acclimation to salinity. We tested the hypothesis that osmotic adjustment, a key type of plasticity that mitigates salinity shock, would take place in coordination with declines in whole-plant hydraulic conductance in a common garden experiment using saplings of three mangrove species with different salinity tolerances (Avicennia germinans L., Rhizophora mangle L. and Laguncularia racemosa (L.) C.F. Gaertn., ordered from higher to lower salinity tolerance). For each mangrove species, four salinity treatments (1, 10, 30 and 50 practical salinity units) were established and the time trajectories were determined for leaf osmotic potential (Ψs), stomatal conductance (gs), whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant) and predawn disequilibrium between xylem and substrate water potentials (Ψpdd). We expected that, for all three species, salinity increments would result in coordinated declines in Ψs, gs and Kplant, and that the Ψpdd would increase with substrate salinity and time of exposure. In concordance with our predictions, reductions in substrate water potential promoted a coordinated decline in Ψs, gs and Kplant, whereas the Ψpdd increased substantially during the first 4 days but dissipated after 7 days, indicating a time lag for equilibration after a change in substratum salinity. Our results show that mangroves confront and partially ameliorate acute salinity stress via simultaneous reductions in Ψs, gs and Kplant, thus developing synergistic physiological responses at the cell and whole-plant scales.

  3. Nitric acid: modeling osmotic coefficients and acid-base dissociation using the BIMSA theory.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Pochon, Patrick; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2010-11-14

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of highly concentrated aqueous solutions of nitric acid salts at 25 °C within the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory. The predictive capability of this model was examined. First, Raman spectroscopy was used to study the proportion of associated nitric acid as a function of concentration. The corresponding apparent association constant values were compared with literature values. Besides, the BIMSA model, taking into account complex formation, was used to represent literature experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration. This theoretical description led to an assessment of the degree of association. The so calculated amount of associated nitric acid coincides accurately with our Raman experimental results up to a high concentration of acid.

  4. Effects of pretreatments on the diffusion kinetics and some quality parameters of osmotically dehydrated apple slices.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, K A; Angersbach, A; Ade-Omowaye, B I; Knorr, D

    2001-06-01

    This study compared mass transfer during osmotic dehydration (OD) and some quality indices of untreated apple slices to those of apple slices pretreated by either blanching, freezing, or applying high-intensity electric field pulses (HELP) or high pressure (HP). HP, HELP, and blanching increased water loss. Untreated and HELP-treated samples had comparable solids gains, which were lower (P < 0.05) than in the other samples. Apple slices turned brown after pretreatment but the L values of these samples increased with OD. The breaking force of dried samples increased with OD time, and pretreated samples had firmer dried texture than the untreated. Vitamin C content decreased with OD time, but HP- and HELP-treated apples had better retention of vitamin C.

  5. Variation in Populus euphratica foliar carbon isotope composition and osmotic solute for different groundwater depths in an arid region of China.

    PubMed

    Si, Jianhua; Feng, Qi; Yu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is an important trait associated with plant acclimation caused by water deficits, and δ13C is a good surrogate of WUE under conditions of water deficits. Water deficiency also enhances the accumulation of compatible solutes in the leaves. In this study, variations in foliar δ(13)C values and main osmotic solutes were investigated. Those included total soluble sugar (TSS), sucrose, free proline, glycine betaine (GB), and inorganic ionic (K+, Ca2+, and Cl-) content of Populus euphratica for different groundwater depths in a Ejina desert riparian forest, China. Results indicated that foliar δ13C values in the P. euphratica for different groundwater depths ranged from -29.14±0.06 to -25.84±0.04 ‰. Foliar δ13C signatures became richer as groundwater levels declined. TSS, sucrose, free proline, GB, and K+ were accumulated in P. euphratica foliage with developing plant growth and increasing groundwater depth. Ca2+ and Cl- content increased under stronger P. euphratica transpiration rates for shallower groundwater depths (1-2.5 m) and decreased for deeper groundwater depths (greater than 3.0 m). Moreover, correlations between δ13C, osmotic solutes, and groundwater depths showed that the primary osmotic solutes were TSS, sucrose, proline, GB, and K+. Correlations also showed that δ13C was not only a useful measure for P. euphratica-integrated WUE but also could be used as an indicator reflecting some physiological osmotic indexes.

  6. Genetic Variation of Drought Tolerance in Pinus pinaster at Three Hierarchical Levels: A Comparison of Induced Osmotic Stress and Field Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Maria João; Velasco, Tania; Feito, Isabel; Alía, Ricardo; Majada, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the survival capacity of forest trees to periods of severe water stress could improve knowledge of the adaptive potential of different species under future climatic scenarios. In long lived organisms, like forest trees, the combination of induced osmotic stress treatments and field testing can elucidate the role of drought tolerance during the early stages of establishment, the most critical in the life of the species. We performed a Polyethylene glycol-osmotic induced stress experiment and evaluated two common garden experiments (xeric and mesic sites) to test for survival and growth of a wide range clonal collection of Maritime pine. This study demonstrates the importance of additive vs non additive effects for drought tolerance traits in Pinus pinaster, and shows differences in parameters determining the adaptive trajectories of populations and family and clones within populations. The results show that osmotic adjustment plays an important role in population variation, while biomass allocation and hydric content greatly influence survival at population level. Survival in the induced osmotic stress experiment presented significant correlations with survival in the xeric site, and height growth at the mesic site, at population level, indicating constraints of adaptation for those traits, while at the within population level no significant correlation existed. These results demonstrate that population differentiation and within population genetic variation for drought tolerance follow different patterns. PMID:24223885

  7. Osmotic induced stimulation of the reduction of the viability dye 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride by maize roots and callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Duncan, David R; Widholm, Jack M

    2004-04-01

    Live cells can reduce colorless 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) to a red insoluble compound, formazan. Maize (Zea mays) callus, when osmotically stressed by 0.53 mol/L mannitol, produced 7-times or more formazan than untreated control callus. This result was seen with all osmotica tested and could not be attributed to differences in TTC uptake rate or accumulation, increased respiration rate as measured by O2 uptake, or to de novo protein synthesis. Increased formazan production could be detected after 2.5 h of exposure to osmotic stress and leveled off after 48 h of exposure. The increased formazan production was only detected when callus was moved from high osmotic medium to low osmotic, TTC-containing medium. Abscisic acid increased TTC reduction only when added in combination with 0.53 mol/L mannitol. Incubation of maize seedling roots with 0.53 mol/L mannitol also increased formazan production as seen visually. Further studies are needed to determine the cause of the increased formazan production. These results show that TTC viability measurements must be carefully evaluated with appropriate controls to confirm their validity.

  8. Genetic variation of drought tolerance in Pinus pinaster at three hierarchical levels: a comparison of induced osmotic stress and field testing.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria João; Velasco, Tania; Feito, Isabel; Alía, Ricardo; Majada, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the survival capacity of forest trees to periods of severe water stress could improve knowledge of the adaptive potential of different species under future climatic scenarios. In long lived organisms, like forest trees, the combination of induced osmotic stress treatments and field testing can elucidate the role of drought tolerance during the early stages of establishment, the most critical in the life of the species. We performed a Polyethylene glycol-osmotic induced stress experiment and evaluated two common garden experiments (xeric and mesic sites) to test for survival and growth of a wide range clonal collection of Maritime pine. This study demonstrates the importance of additive vs non additive effects for drought tolerance traits in Pinus pinaster, and shows differences in parameters determining the adaptive trajectories of populations and family and clones within populations. The results show that osmotic adjustment plays an important role in population variation, while biomass allocation and hydric content greatly influence survival at population level. Survival in the induced osmotic stress experiment presented significant correlations with survival in the xeric site, and height growth at the mesic site, at population level, indicating constraints of adaptation for those traits, while at the within population level no significant correlation existed. These results demonstrate that population differentiation and within population genetic variation for drought tolerance follow different patterns.

  9. Transport and reaction of nanoliter samples in a microfluidic reactor using electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumbuliyur Comandur, Kaushik; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Dasgupta, Subhashish; Papautsky, Ian; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2010-03-01

    The primary focus of the paper is to establish both numerical and experimental methods to control the concentration of samples in a microreactor well. The concentration of the reacting samples is controlled by varying the initial sample size and electric field. Further, the paper numerically investigates the feasibility of mixing and reacting nanoliter samples with a wide variation in reaction rates in the microreactor driven by electro-osmotic pumping. Two discrete samples are measured and transported to the microreactor simultaneously by electro-osmotic pinching and switching. The transported samples are mixed in the microreactor and floated for 4.5 s for reaction to occur. It is seen that the normalized concentration of the product increases from 0.25 to 0.45 during that period. Also the effects of sample size and applied electric field on sample concentration during the switching process are studied. It is found that the normalized final sample concentration increases from 0.03 to 0.11 with an increase in sample size from 60 to 150 µm, at a constant electric field. Further, by increasing the electric field from 100 to 1000 V cm-1, at a constant sample size, there is a significant decrease in the final concentration of the sample from 0.14 to 0.04. Our studies also show that the normalized product concentration depends on the reaction rate and increases from 0.28 to 0.48 as the reaction rate increases from 10 L mol-1 s-1 to 105 L mol-1 s-1. However, the increase in the reaction rate beyond 105 L mol-1 s-1 does not influence the product concentration for the present design of the microreactor. Our microreactor with improved mixing can be used for assessing reactions of biological samples. The optimized sample size along with a controlled electric field for sample injection forms the basis for developing a prototype of a microreactor device for high throughput drug screening.

  10. Preparation and characterization of silymarin synchronized-release microporous osmotic pump tablets

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qi-ping; Liu, Zhi-hong; Huang, Ai-wen; Zhang, Jing; Song, Hong-tao

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of herbal medicine is an overall action of each component in accordance with their original proportion. An efficient, sustained, and controlled-release drug delivery system of herbal medicine should ensure the synchronized drug release of each active component during the entire release procedure. In this study, silymarin (SM), a poorly soluble herbal medicine, was selected as a model drug to develop a synchronized-release drug delivery system: an SM microporous osmotic pump (MPOP) tablet. The SM was conjugated with phospholipid (SM phytosome complex, SM-PC) to improve the solubility, and the difference in the apparent octanol–water partition coefficient between the two components was significantly reduced. The dissolution rate of SM-PC was significantly higher than SM active pharmaceutical ingredients and was the same as that of the commercial SM capsule. The SM-PC was used to generate the MPOP tablet. SM was mixed with poly(ethylene) oxide and sodium chloride (an osmotic agent) to form the MPOP core, followed by coating with cellulose acetate and poly(ethylene) oxide to generate the SM MPOP. The results demonstrated that SM MPOP could synchronically and sustainably release the five active components within 12 hours (the similar coefficient f2 between two components was >65), and the average cumulative release rate was 85%. Fitting of the drug-release curve showed a zero-order release profile for SM MPOP. Our study showed that the phytosome complex technique combined with the MPOP system will achieve synchronized release of the various active components of herbal medicine and have potential applications in developing sustained release preparations in herbal medicine. PMID:26889080

  11. A novel subcutaneous infusion delivery system based on osmotic pump: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Ma, Rui; Mei, Danyu; Jing, Pei; Dong, Xiao; Li, Bingsheng; Yang, Yanfang; Du, Lina; Mei, Xing-Guo; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2014-02-01

    An economical, convenient portable drug delivery system combining osmotic pump with subcutaneous infusion was developed, which was composed of three primary components: water chamber, osmotic pump chamber and support base. Ceftriaxone sodium (CRO) was selected as the model drug and osmotic pump tablets were prepared. The influence of osmotic agents on drug release profiles was evaluated. As the adjustment made by the osmotic agents was limited, the compositions of semipermeable membrane were investigated to determine significant associations of factors based on orthogonal design. The in vitro release profiles of the optimum formulation achieved to the predetermined value (15 ± 3 min for the initial release time T(i) and 5.75 ± 0.25 h for the extent release time T(e)). The pharmacokinetic profiles of this drug delivery system were evaluated in Beagle dogs. In vivo results demonstrated that the osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion administration was equivalent to intravenous injection administration in terms of bioavailability. Moreover, constant drug plasma levels with minimized fluctuations could be achieved with this osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion system, compared with intravenous injection.

  12. Experimental examination of the relationships among chemico-osmotic, hydraulic, and diffusion parameters of Wakkanai mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Manaka, M.; Finsterle, S.; Ito, K.

    2014-05-01

    Sequential permeability and chemical osmosis experiments on Wakkanai mudstones were performed to explore the relationships between the semipermeability of clayey rocks and the hydraulic and diffusion parameters as well as the pore structure characteristics. The wide ranges in osmotic efficiency (0.0004-0.046) and intrinsic permeability (8.92 × 10-20 to 1.24 × 10-17 m2) reflect the variation in the pore size distributions of the Wakkanai mudstones. A regression analysis between osmotic efficiency and permeability shows that the osmotic efficiency is proportional to the inverse of permeability, suggesting that the permeability is indeed indicative of the degree of semipermeability. Osmotic efficiency was determined invariant with the effective diffusion coefficient for the Wakkanai mudstones (3.59-8.36 × 10-11 m2/s) due to their small osmotic efficiencies (≤0.046). The wide variation in osmotic efficiencies and pore structure characteristics of Wakkanai mudstones indicates that the nanoscale pores enable semipermeability in Wakkanai mudstones. However, the pressure evolution caused by chemical osmosis is limited by the connected wide pores that are the main conduits for water, thus dissipating the osmotic pressure buildup induced by the semipermeability of nanoscale pores.

  13. A high pressure cell for simultaneous osmotic pressure and x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthé, Béatrice L. L. E.; Heron, Andrew J.; Seddon, John M.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel osmotic cell, developed to simultaneously subject a sample to osmotic stress and measure structural changes by small angle x-ray diffraction. The osmotic cell offers many advantages over more conventional methods of osmotically stressing soft materials to measure their structural response. In particular, a full osmotic analysis can be performed with a single small sample (25 μl). This reduces sample handling and the associated systematic errors, as well as enabling tight control and monitoring of the thermodynamic environment during osmosis, thereby increasing measurement precision. The cell design enables control of osmotic pressure to ±0.04 bar over a pressure range of 1-100 bar, and temperature control to ±0.05 °C. Under these conditions, the lattice spacing in lyotropic structures was resolved to better than ±0.005 Å. Using the osmotic cell, we demonstrate good agreement with previous conventional measurements on the energy of dehydrating the fluid lamellar phase of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water.

  14. A high pressure cell for simultaneous osmotic pressure and x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Heron, Andrew J.; Seddon, John M.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, we report on a novel osmotic cell, developed to simultaneously subject a sample to osmotic stress and measure structural changes by small angle x-ray diffraction. The osmotic cell offers many advantages over more conventional methods of osmotically stressing soft materials to measure their structural response. In particular, a full osmotic analysis can be performed with a single small sample (25 {mu}l). This reduces sample handling and the associated systematic errors, as well as enabling tight control and monitoring of the thermodynamic environment during osmosis, thereby increasing measurement precision. The cell design enables control of osmotic pressure to {+-}0.04 bar over a pressure range of 1-100 bar, and temperature control to {+-}0.05 deg. C. Under these conditions, the lattice spacing in lyotropic structures was resolved to better than {+-}0.005 A. Using the osmotic cell, we demonstrate good agreement with previous conventional measurements on the energy of dehydrating the fluid lamellar phase of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water.

  15. Preferential Osmolyte Accumulation: a Mechanism of Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Diazotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Magdy A.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Smith, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    A common cellular mechanism of osmotic-stress adaptation is the intracellular accumulation of organic solutes (osmolytes). We investigated the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in the diazotrophic bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are adversely affected by high osmotic strength (i.e., soil salinity and/or drought). We used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify all the osmolytes accumulating in these strains during osmotic stress generated by 0.5 M NaCl. Evidence is presented for the accumulation of trehalose and glutamate in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4, proline and glutamate in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6, and trehalose and proline in K. pneumoniae. Glycine betaine was accumulated in all strains grown in culture media containing yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source. Alternative nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4Cl or casamino acids) in the culture medium did not result in measurable glycine betaine accumulation. We suggest that the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in these organisms entails the accumulation of osmolytes in hyperosmotically stressed cells resulting from either enhanced uptake from the medium (of glycine betaine, proline, and glutamate) or increased net biosynthesis (of trehalose, proline, and glutamate) or both. The preferred osmolyte in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4 shifted from glutamate to trehalose as a consequence of a prolonged osmotic stress. Also, the dominant osmolyte in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6 shifted from glutamate to proline accumulation as the osmotic strength of the medium increased. PMID:16348295

  16. Osmotic Concentration of Gooseberry Fruits – The Influence of Temperature, Time and Pretreatment Methods on Mass Transfer and Total Polyphenol and Organic Acid Content

    PubMed Central

    Kucner, Anna; Sójka, Michał; Klewicka, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of the study is to assess the influence of temperature, time and enzymatic pretreatment on the osmotic concentration of gooseberry fruits (cultivar Biały Triumf). The fruits were osmotically concentrated in a sucrose solution at 65 °Brix and 40 to 70 °C for 5 to 240 min. Two experimental procedures were employed. In the first procedure, prior to concentration the fruits were immersed in the solution containing lipolytic enzymes, and then in the solution containing pectinolytic enzymes. In the second procedure, pectinolytic enzymes were added to the sucrose solution. The kinetics of the osmotic concentration was studied based on the changes in dry matter content, water loss, and solid gain. Higher temperature and longer process time led to higher values of the mentioned parameters. After 1 h of concentration at 40 °C, dry matter content was 13.9%, while at 70 °C it was 20.4%. The use of pectinolytic enzymes during osmotic concentration resulted in higher effectiveness of the process. After 2 h of concentration with the use of pectinolytic enzymes, solid gain was seven times higher than that in the control sample. Enzymatic treatment with lipase and pectinase before concentration also increased solid gain during osmotic concentration (up to twelve times after 2 h at 40 °C). The lower processing temperature, the higher retention of phenolic compounds in fruits was observed. The retention of phenolics was the highest at 40 °C (92.2% at 2 h). Among organic acids (malic, shikimic and citric), the highest retention was exhibited by citric acid; at 1 h of concentration, its fraction in the obtained fruit syrup content was from 95.9 to 83.1% as compared to the starting material. PMID:27904314

  17. Characterization of CIPK Family in Asian Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd) and Co-expression Analysis Related to Salt and Osmotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lin, Jing; Li, Hui; Li, Xiaogang; Yang, Qingsong; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Chang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    Asian pear (Pyrus bretschneideri) is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and its growth and productivity are frequently affected by abiotic stresses. Calcineurin B-like interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) as caladium-sensor protein kinases interact with Ca2+-binding CBLs to extensively mediate abiotic stress responses in plants. Although the pear genome sequence has been released, little information is available about the CIPK genes in pear, especially in response to salt and osmotic stresses. In this study, we systematically identified 28 CIPK family members from the sequenced pear genome and analyzed their organization, phylogeny, gene structure, protein motif, and synteny duplication divergences. Most duplicated PbCIPKs underwent purifying selection, and their evolutionary divergences accompanied with the pear whole genome duplication. We also investigated stress -responsive expression patterns and co-expression networks of CIPK family under salt and osmotic stresses, and the distribution of stress-related cis-regulatory elements in promoter regions. Our results suggest that most PbCIPKs could play important roles in the abiotic stress responses. Some PbCIPKs, such as PbCIPK22, -19, -18, -15, -8, and -6 can serve as core regulators in response to salt and osmotic stresses based on co-expression networks of PbCIPKs. Some sets of genes that were involved in response to salt did not overlap with those in response to osmotic responses, suggesting the sub-functionalization of CIPK genes in stress responses. This study revealed some candidate genes that play roles in early responses to salt and osmotic stress for further characterization of abiotic stress responses medicated by CIPKs in pear. PMID:27656193

  18. Characterization of CIPK Family in Asian Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd) and Co-expression Analysis Related to Salt and Osmotic Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Lin, Jing; Li, Hui; Li, Xiaogang; Yang, Qingsong; Cheng, Zong-Ming; Chang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    Asian pear (Pyrus bretschneideri) is one of the most important fruit crops in the world, and its growth and productivity are frequently affected by abiotic stresses. Calcineurin B-like interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) as caladium-sensor protein kinases interact with Ca(2+)-binding CBLs to extensively mediate abiotic stress responses in plants. Although the pear genome sequence has been released, little information is available about the CIPK genes in pear, especially in response to salt and osmotic stresses. In this study, we systematically identified 28 CIPK family members from the sequenced pear genome and analyzed their organization, phylogeny, gene structure, protein motif, and synteny duplication divergences. Most duplicated PbCIPKs underwent purifying selection, and their evolutionary divergences accompanied with the pear whole genome duplication. We also investigated stress -responsive expression patterns and co-expression networks of CIPK family under salt and osmotic stresses, and the distribution of stress-related cis-regulatory elements in promoter regions. Our results suggest that most PbCIPKs could play important roles in the abiotic stress responses. Some PbCIPKs, such as PbCIPK22, -19, -18, -15, -8, and -6 can serve as core regulators in response to salt and osmotic stresses based on co-expression networks of PbCIPKs. Some sets of genes that were involved in response to salt did not overlap with those in response to osmotic responses, suggesting the sub-functionalization of CIPK genes in stress responses. This study revealed some candidate genes that play roles in early responses to salt and osmotic stress for further characterization of abiotic stress responses medicated by CIPKs in pear.

  19. Plastid Osmotic Stress Activates Cellular Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Margaret E.; Basu, Meera R.; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Verslues, Paul E.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about cytoplasmic osmoregulatory mechanisms in plants, and even less is understood about how the osmotic properties of the cytoplasm and organelles are coordinately regulated. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants lacking functional versions of the plastid-localized mechanosensitive ion channels Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance-Like2 (MSL2) and MSL3 contain leaf epidermal plastids under hypoosmotic stress, even during normal growth and development. Here, we use the msl2 msl3 mutant as a model to investigate the cellular response to constitutive plastid osmotic stress. Under unstressed conditions, msl2 msl3 seedlings exhibited several hallmarks of drought or environmental osmotic stress, including solute accumulation, elevated levels of the compatible osmolyte proline (Pro), and accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, msl2 msl3 mutants expressed Pro and ABA metabolism genes in a pattern normally seen under drought or osmotic stress. Pro accumulation in the msl2 msl3 mutant was suppressed by conditions that reduce plastid osmotic stress or inhibition of ABA biosynthesis. Finally, treatment of unstressed msl2 msl3 plants with exogenous ABA elicited a much greater Pro accumulation response than in the wild type, similar to that observed in plants under drought or osmotic stress. These results suggest that osmotic imbalance across the plastid envelope can elicit a response similar to that elicited by osmotic imbalance across the plasma membrane and provide evidence for the integration of the osmotic state of an organelle into that of the cell in which it resides. PMID:24676856

  20. Multiple Osmotic Stress Responses in Acidihalobacter prosperus Result in Tolerance to Chloride Ions.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S; Lazcano, Marcelo; McCredden, Timothy J; Bryan, Christopher G; Mulroney, Kieran T; Steuart, Robert; Jackaman, Connie; Watkin, Elizabeth L J

    2016-01-01

    Extremely acidophilic microorganisms (pH optima for growth of ≤3) are utilized for the extraction of metals from sulfide minerals in the industrial biotechnology of "biomining." A long term goal for biomining has been development of microbial consortia able to withstand increased chloride concentrations for use in regions where freshwater is scarce. However, when challenged by elevated salt, acidophiles experience both osmotic stress and an acidification of the cytoplasm due to a collapse of the inside positive membrane potential, leading to an influx of protons. In this study, we tested the ability of the halotolerant acidophile Acidihalobacter prosperus to grow and catalyze sulfide mineral dissolution in elevated concentrations of salt and identified chloride tolerance mechanisms in Ac. prosperus as well as the chloride susceptible species, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Ac. prosperus had optimum iron oxidation at 20 g L(-1) NaCl while At. ferrooxidans iron oxidation was inhibited in the presence of 6 g L(-1) NaCl. The tolerance to chloride in Ac. prosperus was consistent with electron microscopy, determination of cell viability, and bioleaching capability. The Ac. prosperus proteomic response to elevated chloride concentrations included the production of osmotic stress regulators that potentially induced production of the compatible solute, ectoine uptake protein, and increased iron oxidation resulting in heightened electron flow to drive proton export by the F0F1 ATPase. In contrast, At. ferrooxidans responded to low levels of Cl(-) with a generalized stress response, decreased iron oxidation, and an increase in central carbon metabolism. One potential adaptation to high chloride in the Ac. prosperus Rus protein involved in ferrous iron oxidation was an increase in the negativity of the surface potential of Rus Form I (and Form II) that could help explain how it can be active under elevated chloride concentrations. These data have been used to create a model

  1. Direct relationship between osmotic and ionic conforming behavior and tissue water regulatory capacity in echinoids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ivonete A; Castellano, Giovanna C; Freire, Carolina A

    2013-03-01

    Echinoderms are considered marine osmoconforming invertebrates. However, many are intertidal or live next to estuaries, tolerating salinity changes and showing extracellular gradients to dilute seawater. Three species of echinoids - Lytechinus variegatus, which can occur next to estuarine areas, the rocky intertidal Echinometra lucunter, and the mostly subtidal Arbacia lixula - were submitted to a protocol of stepwise (rate of 2-3 psu/h) dilution, down to 15 psu, or concentration, up to 45 psu, of control seawater (35 psu). Coelomic fluid samples were obtained every hour. The seawater dilution experiment lasted 8h, while the seawater concentration experiment lasted 6h. Significant gradients (40-90% above value in 15 psu seawater) for osmolality, sodium, magnesium, and potassium were shown by L. variegatus and E. lucunter. A. lixula showed the smallest gradients, displaying the strongest conforming behavior. The esophagus of the three species was challenged in vitro with 20 and 50% osmotic shocks (hypo- and hyperosmotic). A. lixula, the most "conforming" species, showed the highest capacity to avoid swelling of its tissues upon the -50% hyposmotic shock, and was also the species less affected by salinity changes concerning the observation of spines and ambulacral feet movement in the whole-animal experiments. Thus, the most conforming species (A. lixula) displayed the highest capacity to regulate tissue water/volume, and was also the most euryhaline among the three studied species. In addition, tissues from all three species swelled much more than they shrank under osmotic shocks of same magnitude. This distinct trend to gain water, despite the capacity to hold some gradients upon seawater dilution, helps to explain why echinoderms cannot be fully estuarine, or ever enter fresh water.

  2. Multiple Osmotic Stress Responses in Acidihalobacter prosperus Result in Tolerance to Chloride Ions

    PubMed Central

    Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S.; Lazcano, Marcelo; McCredden, Timothy J.; Bryan, Christopher G.; Mulroney, Kieran T.; Steuart, Robert; Jackaman, Connie; Watkin, Elizabeth L. J.

    2017-01-01

    Extremely acidophilic microorganisms (pH optima for growth of ≤3) are utilized for the extraction of metals from sulfide minerals in the industrial biotechnology of “biomining.” A long term goal for biomining has been development of microbial consortia able to withstand increased chloride concentrations for use in regions where freshwater is scarce. However, when challenged by elevated salt, acidophiles experience both osmotic stress and an acidification of the cytoplasm due to a collapse of the inside positive membrane potential, leading to an influx of protons. In this study, we tested the ability of the halotolerant acidophile Acidihalobacter prosperus to grow and catalyze sulfide mineral dissolution in elevated concentrations of salt and identified chloride tolerance mechanisms in Ac. prosperus as well as the chloride susceptible species, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Ac. prosperus had optimum iron oxidation at 20 g L−1 NaCl while At. ferrooxidans iron oxidation was inhibited in the presence of 6 g L−1 NaCl. The tolerance to chloride in Ac. prosperus was consistent with electron microscopy, determination of cell viability, and bioleaching capability. The Ac. prosperus proteomic response to elevated chloride concentrations included the production of osmotic stress regulators that potentially induced production of the compatible solute, ectoine uptake protein, and increased iron oxidation resulting in heightened electron flow to drive proton export by the F0F1 ATPase. In contrast, At. ferrooxidans responded to low levels of Cl− with a generalized stress response, decreased iron oxidation, and an increase in central carbon metabolism. One potential adaptation to high chloride in the Ac. prosperus Rus protein involved in ferrous iron oxidation was an increase in the negativity of the surface potential of Rus Form I (and Form II) that could help explain how it can be active under elevated chloride concentrations. These data have been used to create a

  3. Laboratory Investigation of Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.; Wildenschild, D.; Elsholz, A.

    2000-02-23

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. We plan to use this technology to remediate chlorinated solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) determined from bench-top studies for a core extracted from a sediment zone 36.4-36.6 m below surface was initially 7.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, decreasing to 3.44 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, after electro-osmotically transporting 0.70 pore volumes of water through it (195 ml). Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core was initially measured to be 5.00 x 10{sup -10} m/s, decreasing to 4.08 x 10{sup -10} m/s at the end of processing. This decline in permeability is likely due to formation of a chemical precipitation zone within the core. Water splitting products and ions electromigrate and precipitate within the core; H{sup +} and metal cations migrate toward the cathode, and OH{sup -} from the cathode moves toward the anode. We are now exploring how to minimize this effect using pH control. The significance of this technology is that for this core, a 3 V/cm voltage gradient produced an initial effective hydraulic conductivity of 2.21 x 10{sup -7} m/s, >400x greater than the initial hydraulic conductivity.

  4. [Acid and osmotic erythrocyte resistance in workers at a petroleum factory].

    PubMed

    Shakirov, D F; Samsonov, V M; Kudriavtsev, V P; Gil'manov, A Zh

    2003-07-01

    Data on the impact exerted by industrial products, i.e. pyromellitic dianhydride, on the acidic and osmotic resistance of erythrocytes in workers are described. The influence of hazardous factors of the oil-and-chemical production was found to result in a changing erythrocytes' resistance (of workers) to the osmotic and acidic hemolytics with regard for a labor record and duration of contact with toxicants. The shifts in acidic and osmotic resistance can serve as an early marker of changes in the functional erythron's status in workers occupied under hazardous industrial factors.

  5. The osmotic virial formulation of the free energy of polymer mixing.

    PubMed

    Bosse, August W; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-09-14

    We derive an alternative formulation of the free energy of polymer mixing in terms of an osmotic virial expansion. Starting from a generalized free energy of mixing, and the assumption that the internal energy of mixing is analytic in the polymer composition variable, we demonstrate that the free energy of mixing can be represented as an infinite series in the osmotic virial coefficients. This osmotic virial formulation is consistent with, but more general than, a relationship derived for polymer blends with structured monomers by Dudowicz, Freed, and Douglas [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9983 (2002)] and Douglas, Dudowicz, and Freed [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 224901 (2007)].

  6. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  7. Osmotic pressure-adaptive responses in the eye tissues of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax)

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Paradis, Hélène; Haines, Lacey; Desjardins, Mariève; Short, Connie E.; Clow, Kathy A.; Driedzic, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), is a teleost fish, which avoids freezing by becoming virtually isosmotic with seawater. The effects that such massive changes in osmolarity have on both its visual system and its highly evolved and specialized circulation are not known. New knowledge about the osmotic adaptation of the rainbow smelt eye is highly relevant to the adaptation and survival of this species and to its ability to feed as a visual predator in the face of environmental pressures. Moreover, the molecular physiologic response of the smelt to osmotic stress might provide valuable insights into understanding and managing mammalian pathological hyperosmolarity conditions, such as diabetes. We undertook the present study to provide an initial assessment of gene expression in ocular vasculature during osmotic adaptation in rainbow smelt. Methods Immunohistochemistry with species cross reactive antibodies was used to assess blood vessel protein expression in paraffin sections. Western blotting was used to further verify antibody specificity for orthologs of mammalian blood vessel proteins in rainbow smelt. Thermal hysteresis and the analysis of glycerol concentrations in vitreous fluid were used to assess the physiologic adaptive properties of cold stressed eyes. Results Glycerol levels and osmotic pressure were significantly increased in the vitreal fluid of smelt maintained at <0.5 °C versus those maintained at 8–10 °C. Compared to the 8–10 °C adapted specimens, the rete mirabile blood vessels and connecting regions of the endothelial linings of the choroidal vessels of the <0.5 °C adapted specimens showed a higher expression level of Tubedown (Tbdn) protein, a marker of the endothelial transcellular permeability pathway. Expression of the zonula occludens protein ZO-1, a marker of the endothelial paracellular permeability pathway showed a reciprocal expression pattern and was downregulated in rete mirabile blood vessels and connecting

  8. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (GM1)-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16×105 N/m2 by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without GM1, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing GM1 shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of GM1 is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of GM1 in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  9. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings.

  10. Effect of osmotic dehydration of olives as pre-fermentation treatment and partial substitution of sodium chloride by monosodium glutamate in the fermentation profile of Kalamata natural black olives.

    PubMed

    Bonatsou, Stamatoula; Iliopoulos, Vasilis; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Gogou, Eleni; Oikonomopoulou, Vasiliki; Krokida, Magdalini; Taoukis, Petros; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the effect of osmotic dehydration of Kalamata natural black olives as pre-fermentation treatment in combination with partial substitution of NaCl by monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the fermentation profile of olives. Osmotic dehydration was undertaken by immersing the olives in 70% (w/w) glucose syrup overnight at room temperature. Further on, three different mixtures of NaCl and MSG with/without prior osmotic dehydration of olives were investigated, namely (i) 6.65% NaCl - 0.35% MSG (5% substitution), (ii) 6.30% NaCl - 0.70% MSG (10% substitution), (iii) 5.95% NaCl - 1.05% MSG (15% substitution), and (iv) 7% NaCl without osmotic dehydration (control treatment). Changes in the microbial association (lactic acid bacteria [LAB], yeasts, Enterobacteriaceae), pH, titratable acidity, organic acids, sugars, and volatile compounds in the brine were analyzed for a period of 4 months. The final product was subjected to sensory analysis and the content of MSG in olives was determined. Results demonstrated that osmotic dehydration of olives prior to brining led to vigorous lactic acid processes as indicated by the obtained values of pH (3.7-4.1) and acidity (0.7-0.8%) regardless of the amount of MSG used. However, in non-osmotically dehydrated olives, the highest substitution level of MSG resulted in a final pH (4.5) that was beyond specification for this type of olives. MSG was degraded in the brines being almost completely converted to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the end of fermentation. Finally, the sensory assessment of fermented olives with/without osmotic dehydration and at all levels of MSG did not show any deviation compared to the control treatment.

  11. Role of Glycine Betaine and Related Osmolytes in Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Yersinia enterocolitica ATCC 9610

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Smith, L. T.; Smith, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a gram-negative, food-borne pathogen that can grow in 5% NaCl and at refrigerator temperatures. In this report, the compatible solutes (osmolytes) which accumulate intracellularly and confer the observed osmotic tolerance to this pathogen were identified. In minimal medium, glutamate was the only detectable osmolyte that accumulated in osmotically stressed cells. However, when the growth medium was supplemented with glycine betaine, dimethylglycine, or carnitine, the respective osmolyte accumulated intracellularly to high levels and the growth rates of the osmotically stressed cultures improved from 2.4- to 3.5-fold. Chill stress also stimulated the intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine, but the growth rate was only slightly improved by this osmolyte. Both osmotic upshock and temperature downshock stimulated the rate of uptake of [(sup14)C]glycine betaine by more than 30-fold, consistent with other data indicating that the osmolytes are accumulated from the growth medium via transport. PMID:16535192

  12. Suppression of ion conductance by electro-osmotic flow in nano-channels with weakly overlapping electrical double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Lingzi; Zhu, Xin; Ran, Qiushi; Dutton, Robert

    2016-08-01

    This theoretical study investigates the nonlinear ionic current-voltage characteristics of nano-channels that have weakly overlapping electrical double layers. Numerical simulations as well as a 1-D mathematical model are developed to reveal that the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) interplays with the concentration-polarization process and depletes the ion concentration inside the channels, thus significantly suppressing the channel conductance. The conductance may be restored at high electrical biases in the presence of recirculating vortices within the channels. As a result of the EOF-driven ion depletion, a limiting-conductance behavior is identified, which is intrinsically different from the classical limiting-current behavior.

  13. Influence of the partitioning of osmolytes by the cytoplasm on the passive response of cells to osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Albro, Michael B; Petersen, Leah E; Li, Roland; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2009-12-02

    Due to the dense organization of organelles, cytoskeletal elements, and protein complexes that make up the intracellular environment, it is likely that membrane-permeant solutes may be excluded from a fraction of the interstitial space of the cytoplasm via steric restrictions, electrostatic interactions, and other long-range intermolecular forces. This study investigates the hypothesis that the intracellular partitioning of membrane-permeant solutes manifests itself as a partial volume recovery in response to hyperosmotic loading, based on prior theoretical and biomimetic experimental studies. Osmotic loading experiments are performed on immature bovine chondrocytes using culture conditions where regulatory volume responses are shown to be insignificant. Osmotic loading with membrane-permeant glycerol (92 Da) and urea (60 Da) are observed to produce partial volume recoveries consistent with the proposed hypothesis, whereas loading with 1,2-propanediol (76 Da) produces complete volume recovery. Combining these experimental results with the previous theoretical framework produces a measure for the intracellular partition coefficient of each of these solutes. At 1000 mOsm, 1,2-propanediol is the only osmolyte to yield a partition coefficient not statistically different from unity, kappa(p)(i) = 1.00 +/- 0.02. For glycerol, the partition coefficient increases with osmolarity from kappa(p)(i) = 0.48 +/- 0.19 at 200 mOsm to kappa(p)(i) = 0.80 +/- 0.07 at 1000 mOsm; urea exhibits no such dependence, with an average value of kappa(p)(i) = 0.87 +/- 0.07 for all osmolarities from 200 to 1000 mOsm. The finding that intracellular partitioning of membrane-permeant solutes manifests itself as a partial volume recovery under osmotic loading offers a simple method for characterizing the partition coefficient. These measurements suggest that significant partitioning may occur even for small membrane-permeant osmolytes. Furthermore, a positive correlation is observed, suggesting

  14. The "Le Chatelier's principle"-governed response of actin filaments to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tadanao; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2006-07-13

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotic stress-driven water flow across a semipermeable membrane in proportion to the filament concentration (Ito, T.; Zaner, K. S.; Stossel, T. P. Biophys. J. 1987, 51, 745). When the filaments are cross-linked by F-actin binding protein, filamin A, this flow is stopped completely (Ito, T.; Suzuki, A.; Stossel, T. P. Biophys. J. 1992, 61, 1301). No conventional theory accurately accounts for these results. Here, this response is analyzed by formulating the entropy of the system under osmotic stress. Results demonstrate that the response of the actin filaments to osmotic stress is governed by the Le Chatelier's principle, which states that an external interaction that disturbs the equilibrium brings about processes in the body that tend to reduce the effects of this interaction. In the present case, disrupting equilibrium by osmotic stress brings about a reaction that decreases the chemical potential of water in the F-actin solution, reducing the effect of the applied osmotic disturbance. This decrease in the chemical potential of the water in the F-actin solution is caused by an increase in the chemical potential of F-actin, which is induced by isothermal absorption of heat by F-actin aided by work done by osmotic stress. As a result, F-actin has an inhibitory effect on the osmotic stress-driven water flow, and can even completely stop the flow when it is cross-linked. This is the first report demonstrating that the Le Chatelier's principle applies to the reaction of biopolymers against equilibrium disturbances such as osmotic stress.

  15. The effects of osmotic stress on the structure and function of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Finan, John D; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-02-15

    Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of the normal function of cells that are exposed to osmotically active environments under physiologic or pathologic conditions. The ability of cells to alter gene expression and metabolic activity in response to changes in the osmotic environment provides an additional regulatory mechanism for a diverse array of tissues and organs in the human body. In addition to the activation of various osmotically- or volume-activated ion channels, osmotic stress may also act on the genome via a direct biophysical pathway. Changes in extracellular osmolality alter cell volume, and therefore, the concentration of intracellular macromolecules. In turn, intracellular macromolecule concentration is a key physical parameter affecting the spatial organization and pressurization of the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress shrinks the nucleus and causes it to assume a convoluted shape, whereas hypo-osmotic stress swells the nucleus to a size that is limited by stretch of the nuclear lamina and induces a smooth, round shape of the nucleus. These behaviors are consistent with a model of the nucleus as a charged core/shell structure pressurized by uneven partition of macromolecules between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm. These osmotically-induced alterations in the internal structure and arrangement of chromatin, as well as potential changes in the nuclear membrane and pores are hypothesized to influence gene transcription and/or nucleocytoplasmic transport. A further understanding of the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms involved in these processes would have important ramifications for a range of fields including differentiation, migration, mechanotransduction, DNA repair, and tumorigenesis.

  16. TRP channels activated by extracellular hypo-osmoticity in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Harteneck, C; Reiter, B

    2007-02-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels comprise a superfamily of non-selective cation channels with at least seven subfamilies. The variety of subfamilies corresponds to the differences in the activation mechanisms and functions. TRPM3 (TRP melastatin 3) and TRPV4 (TRP vanilloid 3) have been characterized as cation channels activated by extracellular hypo-osmoticity. In addition, TRPV4 is activated by metabolites of arachidonic acid as well as alpha-isomers of phorbol esters known to be ineffective in stimulating proteins of the protein kinase C family. TRPM3 is responsive to sphingosine derivatives. The detection of splice variants with probably different activation mechanisms supports the idea that TRPM3 may have diverse cellular functions depending on the expression of a particular variant. The expression of TRPV4 in many epithelial cell types raised the question of the role of TRPV4 in epithelial physiology. Single-cell experiments as well as approaches using epithelial layers show that multiple cellular responses are triggered by TRPV4 activation and subsequent elevation of intracellular calcium. The TRPV4-induced responses increasing transcellular ion flux as well as paracellular permeability may allow the cells to adjust to changes in extracellular osmolarity. In summary, TRPV4 plays a central role in epithelial homoeostasis by modulating epithelial barrier function.

  17. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.

  18. Measurement of colloid osmotic pressure in submicrolitre samples.

    PubMed

    Wiig, H; Halleland, E G; Fjaertoft, M; Aukland, K

    1988-04-01

    A colloid osmometer for submicrolitre samples was constructed from solid polymethylmetacrylate and acrylnitrilmethylmetacrylate blocks, exposing a 0.85 mm diameter area of a Diaflo PM-30 ultrafiltration membrane. The unknown sample, contained in a 1-microliter glass micropipette, was applied to the membrane by suction, providing minimal exposure to air. The lower limit for successful application was 0.1-0.2 microliter. The accuracy of colloid osmotic pressure (COP) measurement depends strongly on the effective compliance of the pressure transducer. We tested three different systems: (i) A Hewlett-Packard 1280 'medical' transducer gave acceptable measurements on 1-microliter samples. In smaller samples (0.1-0.5 microliter) COP was underestimated, especially at COP greater than 10 mmHg. The equilibration time was 10-30 min. (ii) As (i), but with air pressure applied to the sample by a servoregulated pump, minimizing fluid transport through the membrane. Accurate measurements on 0.2-microliter samples were obtained in the course of 2-3 min, but the system required special instrumentation and some operating experience. (iii) An 'industrial' transducer, SensoNor AE-88o, with very low compliance, gave accurate measurements in the course of 1-3 min on samples as small as 0.1-0.2 microliter and COP up to 37 mmHg. We recommend system (iii) for samples smaller than 1 microliter.

  19. Performance of porous inorganic membranes in non-osmotic desalination.

    PubMed

    Duke, M C; Mee, S; da Costa, J C Diniz

    2007-09-01

    The supply security of fresh drinking water is decreasing and raising a critical situation for communities worldwide. Inorganic membranes such as alumina and molecular sieve silica have in the past been shown to be highly effective at separating gases and could offer promise as liquid separators due to their high flux and stability. In this work, we develop a range of inorganic membranes with pore size ranging from 0.3 to 500nm and relate this to separation and transport performance. Best separation results were achieved for the silica membrane pressurised to only 7bar, exhibiting a flux of around 1.8kgm(-2)h(-1) and NaCl rejection of 98% with 3.5wt% (seawater-like) feed. Potable water from seawater-like feed was achieved from the membrane in a single stage after regeneration. Conditions such as pressure and temperature were also modified showing performance characteristics and diffusion mechanisms. The non-osmotic set-up for inorganic membranes is therefore a viable technology for desalination.

  20. Osmotic second virial coefficient of methane in water.

    PubMed

    Koga, K

    2013-10-17

    A correlation-function-based scheme is proposed for calculating the osmotic second virial coefficient B for solutes that dissolve very little in a solvent. The short-distance contribution to B, a volume integral of the solute-solute pair correlation function h(r) from 0 to some finite distance rc, is evaluated with h(r) obtained by molecular simulation. The remaining contribution to B from rc to ∞ is calculated with an asymptotic form of h(r) (Evans, R.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 1994, 100, 591). It is shown here that B for a model system of methane in water is obtained accurately in the temperature range between 238 and 373 K at 1 bar, with a result that B is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature, and the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules measured by B is repulsive (B > 0) in supercooled water, virtually null (B ≃ 0) at around 0 °C, and attractive (B < 0) at higher temperatures. It is also remarked that a nearly linear relation holds between B and the first-peak height of the solute-solute radial distribution function.

  1. Convergent Induction of Osmotic Stress-Responses 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; McElwain, Elizabeth F.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    In Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, salt stress induces the accumulation of proline and a specific isoform of the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) prior to the switch from C3 to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). To determine whether plant growth regulators initiate or imitate these responses, we have compared the effects elicited by NaCl, abscisic acid (ABA), and cytokinins using PEPCase and proline levels as diagnostic tools. Exogenously applied ABA is a poor substitute for NaCl in inducing proline and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation. Even though ABA levels increase 8- to 10-fold in leaves during salt stress, inhibition of ABA accumulation does not affect these salt-induced responses. In contrast, the addition of cytokinins (6-benzylaminopurine, zeatin, 2-isopentyladenine) mimic salt by greatly increasing proline and PEPCase amounts. Endogenous zeatin levels remain unchanged during salt stress. We conclude: (a) The salt-induced accumulation of proline and PEPCase is coincident with, but is not attributable to, the rise in ABA or zeatin concentration. (b) For the first time, cytokinins and NaCl are implicated as independent initiators of a sensing pathway that signals leaves to alter PEPCase gene expression. (c) During stress, the sensing of osmotic imbalances leading to ABA, proline, and CAM-specific PEPCase accumulation may be mediated directly by NaCl. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:16652978

  2. [Physiological analysis of various types of osmotic diuresis].

    PubMed

    Marina, A S; Kutina, A V; Natochin, Iu V

    2011-12-01

    Efficacy of drugs reduced proximal reabsorption was compared in experiments with female Wistar rats. Urine flow rate for the 1st h of experiment was enhanced after polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG) and 6% Na2SO4 infusion by over 30-fold, exenatide--40-fold, glycerol--11-fold as compared with the control. The maximal values of Na+ excretion were observed during Na2SO4 and exenatide administration (280 +/- 31 micromol/h vs. 3.2 +/- 0.6 Imol/h/100 g bw). The highest K+ excretion was revealed in experiments with glycerol administration (41 +/- 5 micromol/h vs. 7 +/- 2 micromol/h/100 g bw), Mg2+ --after exenatide injection (5.3 +/- 1.3 micromol/h vs. 0.16 +/- 0.03 micromol/ h/100 g bw). Diuretic effects were additive after combined administration of maximal doses of exenatide and PEG which suggests a different mechanism of action of solutes filtrated (PEG) to the proximal nephron segment and generated due to Na+/HW-exchange inhibition (exenatide). Osmotic diuretics differ by potency, mechanism of diuretic action and selectivity of ion excretion).

  3. Weak microwave can alleviate water deficit induced by osmotic stress in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Jia, Jing-Fen; Han, Xiao-Ling

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to determine the effect of microwave pretreatment of wheat seeds on the resistance of seedlings to osmotic stress. Changes in biophysical, physiological and biochemical characters were measured. The results showed: (1) The magnetic field intensity and seeds temperature increased progressively with microwave pretreatments of 5, 10, 15, 20 s and 25 s compared with controls. Although each microwave pretreatment resulted in an increase in alpha-amylase activity and photon emission intensity, the increase of alpha-amylase activity and photon emission intensity was maximal at a microwave pretreatment of 10 s. (2) Osmotic stress induced by PEG treatment enhanced the concentration of malondialdehyde, while decreasing the activities of nitricoxide synthase, catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and the concentration of nitric oxide, ascorbic acid, glutathione in the seedlings compared with controls. However, compared to osmotic stress alone, in the seedlings treated with microwave irradiation plus osmotic stress the concentration of malondialdehyde decreased, while the activities of nitricoxide synthase, catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and the concentration of nitric oxide, ascorbic acid and glutathione increased. These results suggest that a suitable dose of microwave radiation can enhance the capability to eliminate free radicals induced by osmotic stress in wheat seedlings resulting in an increase in resistance to osmotic stress.

  4. Protein osmotic pressure and the state of water in frog myoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, D W; Godt, R E

    2001-01-01

    We measured the osmotic pressure of diffusible myoplasmic proteins in frog (Rana temporaria) skeletal muscle fibers by using single Sephadex beads as osmometers and dialysis membranes as protein filters. The state of the myoplasmic water was probed by determining the osmotic coefficient of parvalbumin, a small, abundant diffusible protein distributed throughout the fluid myoplasm. Tiny sections of membrane (3.5- and 12-14-kDa cutoffs) were juxtaposed between the Sephadex beads and skinned semitendinosus muscle fibers under oil. After equilibration, the beads were removed and calibrated by comparing the diameter of each bead to its diameter measured in solutions containing 3-12% Dextran T500 (a long-chain polymer). The method was validated using 4% agarose cylinders loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or parvalbumin. The measured osmotic pressures for 1.5 and 3.0 mM BSA were similar to those calculated by others. The mean osmotic pressure produced by the myoplasmic proteins was 9.7 mOsm (4 degrees C). The osmotic pressure attributable to parvalbumin was estimated to be 3.4 mOsm. The osmotic coefficient of the parvalbumin in fibers is approximately 3.7 mOsm mM(-1), i.e., roughly the same as obtained from parvalbumin-loaded agarose cylinders under comparable conditions, suggesting that the fluid interior of muscle resembles a simple salt solution as in a 4% agarose gel. PMID:11159414

  5. Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation of glycol ethers for forward osmotic control.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Daichi; Mok, Yeongbong; Noh, Minwoo; Park, Jeongseon; Kang, Sunyoung; Lee, Yan

    2014-03-21

    Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase transition of glycol ether (GE)-water mixtures induces an abrupt change in osmotic pressure driven by a mild temperature change. The temperature-controlled osmotic change was applied for the forward osmosis (FO) desalination. Among three GEs evaluated, di(ethylene glycol) n-hexyl ether (DEH) was selected as a potential FO draw solute. A DEH-water mixture with a high osmotic pressure could draw fresh water from a high-salt feed solution such as seawater through a semipermeable membrane at around 10 °C. The water-drawn DEH-water mixture was phase-separated into a water-rich phase and a DEH-rich phase at around 30 °C. The water-rich phase with a much reduced osmotic pressure released water into a low-salt solution, and the DEH-rich phase was recovered into the initial DEH-water mixture. The phase separation behaviour, the residual GE concentration in the water-rich phase, the osmotic pressure of the DEH-water mixture, and the osmotic flux between the DEH-water mixture and salt solutions were carefully analysed for FO desalination. The liquid-liquid phase separation of the GE-water mixture driven by the mild temperature change between 10 °C and 30 °C is very attractive for the development of an ideal draw solute for future practical FO desalination.

  6. Influence of soil types and osmotic pressure on growth and (137)Cs accumulation in blackgram (Vigna mungo L.).

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Thuzar; Oo, Aung Zaw; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of soil types and osmotic levels on growth and (137)Cs accumulation in two blackgram varieties differing in salinity tolerance grown in Fukushima contaminated soils. The contamination levels of the sandy clay loam and clay soil were 1084 and 2046 Bq kg(-1) DW, respectively. The (137)Cs activity was higher in both plants grown on the sandy clay loam than on the clay soil regardless of soil (137)Cs activity concentration. No significant differences were observed in all measured growth parameters between the two varieties under optimal water conditions for both types of soil. However, the growth, leaf water contents and (137)Cs activity concentrations in both plants were lower in both soil types when there was water stress induced by addition of polyethylene glycol. Water stress-induced reduction in total leaf area and total biomass, in addition to leaf relative water content, were higher in salt sensitive 'Mut Pe Khaing To' than in salt tolerant 'U-Taung-2' plants for both soil types. Varietal difference in decreased (137)Cs uptake under water stress was statically significant in the sandy clay loam soil, however, it was not in the clay soil. The transfer of (137)Cs from soil to plants (i.e., root, stem and leaf) was higher for the sandy clay loam for both plants when compared with those of the clay soil. The decreased activity of (137)Cs in the above ground samples (leaf and stem) in both plants in response to osmotic stress suggested that plant available (137)Cs decreased when soil water is limited by osmotic stress.

  7. Adaptive responses to osmotic stress in kidney-derived cell lines from Scatophagus argus, a euryhaline fish.

    PubMed

    Gui, Lang; Zhang, Peipei; Liang, Xuemei; Su, Maoliang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Junbin

    2016-06-01

    The euryhaline fish, the spotted scat (Scatophagus argus), is exceptional for its ability to tolerate rapid fluctuations in salinity. To better understand fish osmoregulation and enable more precise analyses of specific features of adaptive responses to the osmotic stress in fish, a S. argus kidney-derived cell line (SK) was developed and subcultured for more than 70 passages. The cells were mostly fibroblast-like, with a normal diploid karyotype (2n=48). A low-osmolarity-adapted SK cell line (SK-la) was induced by growth in a hypotonic solution (150 mOsm). Effects of different osmotic stresses (150, 300 and 450 mOsm) on cell growth, cell morphology, cell volume changes and cell damage in SK, SK-la and CIK (a kidney-derived cell line from freshwater grass carp) cells were studied. These were compared by use of microscopic observation, flow cytometry and a Na-K-ATPase (NKA) assay. SK cells became smaller and grew rapidly in response to hypotonic stress (150 mOsm), and exhibited no visible morphological changes in response to hypertonic stress (450 mOsm). SK-la grew well by moderate hypertonicity (300 mOsm) but depressed in severe hypertonicity (450 mOsm), the number of unhealthy SK-la cells rose as osmolarity increased. In contrast, CIK cells became unhealthy with anisotonic challenge. The NKA activities of SK and CIK cells were assayed after exposure to anisotonic conditions, and rapid decreases were detected immediately except SK cells which were not affected in hypotonicity. Unlike in SK and CIK, an increase following a down-regulation of NKA activity was observed in SK-la cells upon moderate hypertonic stress. These results suggested that SK and SK-la cells had stronger osmoregulatory capacity than CIK cells, and provided new insights on the osmosensing and osmotic adaption in euryhaline fish kidney.

  8. Changes in Osmotic Pressure and Mucilage during Low-Temperature Acclimation of Opuntia ficus-indica 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Guillermo; Nobel, Park S.

    1991-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism plant cultivated for its fruits and cladodes, was used to examine chemical and physiological events accompanying low-temperature acclimation. Changes in osmotic pressure, water content, low molecular weight solutes, and extracellular mucilage were monitored in the photosynthetic chlorenchyma and the water-storage parenchyma when plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30/20°C were shifted to 10/0°C. An increase in osmotic pressure of 0.13 megapascal occurred after 13 days at 10/0°C. Synthesis of glucose, fructose, and glycerol accounted for most of the observed increase in osmotic pressure during the low-temperature acclimation. Extracellular mucilage and the relative apoplastic water content increased by 24 and 10%, respectively, during exposure to low temperatures. These increases apparently favor the extracellular nucleation of ice closer to the equilibrium freezing temperature for plants at 10/0°C, which could make the cellular dehydration more gradual and less damaging. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies helped elucidate the cellular processes during ice formation, such as those revealed by changes in the relaxation times of two water fractions in the chlorenchyma. The latter results suggested a restricted mobility of intracellular water and an increased mobility of extracellular water for plants at 10/0°C compared with those at 30/20°C. Increased mobility of extracellular water could facilitate extracellular ice growth and thus delay the potentially lethal intracellular freezing during low-temperature acclimation. PMID:16668536

  9. The mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa are more sensitive than the plasmalemma to osmotic-induced stress: role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway.

    PubMed

    García, Beatriz Macías; Moran, Alvaro Miró; Fernández, Lauro González; Ferrusola, Cristina Ortega; Rodriguez, Antolin Morillo; Bolaños, Juan Maria Gallardo; da Silva, Carolina Maria Balao; Martínez, Heriberto Rodríguez; Tapia, Jose A; Peña, Fernando J

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation introduces extreme temperature and osmolality changes that impart lethal and sublethal effects on spermatozoa. Additionally, there is evidence that the osmotic stress induced by cryopreservation causes oxidative stress to spermatozoa. The main sources of reactive oxygen species in mammalian sperm are the mitochondria. In view of this, the aim of our study was to test whether or not osmotic stress was able to induce mitochondrial damage and to explore the osmotic tolerance of the mitochondria of stallion spermatozoa. Ejaculates from 7 stallions were subjected to osmolalities ranging from 75 to 1500 mOsm/kg, and the effect on sperm membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential was studied. Additionally, the effects of changes in osmolality from hyposmotic to isosmotic and from hyperosmotic to isosmotic solutions were studied (osmotic excursions). The cellular volume of stallion spermatozoa under isosmotic conditions was 20.4 ± 0.33 μm(3). When exposed to low osmolality, the stallion spermatozoa behaved like a linear osmometer, whereas exposure to high osmolalities up to 900 mOsm/kg resulted in decreased sperm volume. Although sperm membranes were relatively resistant to changes in osmolality, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased when osmolalities were low or very high (10.7 ± 1.74 and 16.5 ± 1.70 at 75 and 150 mOsm/kg, respectively, and 13.1 ± 1.83 at 1500 mOsm/kg), whereas in isosmolar controls the percentage of stallion sperm mitochondria with a high membrane potential was 41.1 ± 1.69 (P < .01). Osmotic excursions induced greater damage than exposure of spermatozoa to a given nonphysiologic osmolality, and again the mitochondria were more prone to damage induced by osmotic excursions than was the sperm plasma membrane. In search of intracellular components that could mediate these changes, we have detected for the first time the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 in stallion spermatozoa, which are apparently involved in the

  10. Nitric oxide is involved in light-specific responses of tomato during germination under normal and osmotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Hofman, Jakub; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Petřivalský, Marek; Fellner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the signalling and regulation of plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The photoperiod-sensitive mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) showing abscisic acid (ABA) overproduction and blue light (BL)-specific tolerance to osmotic stress represents a valuable model to study the interaction between light, hormones and stress signalling. The role of NO as a regulator of seed germination and ABA-dependent responses to osmotic stress was explored in wild-type and 7B-1 tomato under white light (WL) and BL. Methods Germination data were obtained from the incubation of seeds on germinating media of different composition. Histochemical analysis of NO production in germinating seeds was performed by fluorescence microscopy using a cell-permeable NO probe, and endogenous ABA was analysed by mass spectrometry. Key Results The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione stimulated seed germination, whereas the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) had an inhibitory effect. Under WL in both genotypes, PTIO strongly suppressed germination stimulated by fluridone, an ABA inhibitor. The stimulatory effect of the NO donor was also observed under osmotic stress for 7B-1 seeds under WL and BL. Seed germination inhibited by osmotic stress was restored by fluridone under WL, but less so under BL, in both genotypes. This effect of fluridone was further modulated by the NO donor and NO scavenger, but only to a minor extent. Fluorescence microscopy using the cell-permeable NO probe DAF-FM DA (4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate) revealed a higher level of NO in stressed 7B-1 compared with wild-type seeds. Conclusions As well as defective BL signalling, the differential NO-dependent responses of the 7B-1 mutant are probably associated with its high endogenous ABA concentration and related impact on hormonal cross-talk in germinating seeds. These

  11. Genetic similarity of the Hainan medaka populations collected from hyper- and hypo-osmotic environments in northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hideki; Le, Quang Dung; Kinoshita, Masato; Takehana, Yusuke; Sakuma, Kei; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Kojima, Shigeaki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Ricefishes of the genus Oryzias, including Japanese medaka ( O. latipes), are known as excellent model organisms for studies in various fields of science. Some species of the genus inhabit brackish water, and such species are recognized to be useful to investigate physiological phenomena in seawater. However, only a limited number of species have been recorded from brackish waters. In addition, there is no information about the genetic relationship among populations inhabiting sites with different salinities. Here we report the discovery of Oryzias fish in two locations near Haiphong, northern Vietnam, a brackish mangrove planting area and a freshwater pond. A phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences indicated that the fish from the two localities are the same species, Hainan medaka, O. curvinotus. Population genetic analysis using the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a close genetic relationship between the two populations. These results suggest that O. curvinotus is adaptable to both hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic environments. Due to its osmotic adaptability and ease of rearing in the laboratory, this species is expected to become a model for marine environmental and toxicological studies, as well as for studies of osmotic adaptation mechanisms.

  12. In vivo performance evaluation and establishment of IVIVC for osmotic pump based extended release formulation of milnacipran HCl.

    PubMed

    Parejiya, Punit B; Barot, Bhavesh S; Patel, Hetal K; Chorawala, Mehul R; Shelat, Pragna K; Shukla, Arunkumar

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to carry out a pharmacokinetics evaluation of an oral modified release formulation [Aquarius EKX 19102 SRX-2 based osmotic pump (OP)] containing highly soluble milnacipran HCl (MH) as a model drug. It was also aimed at developing an in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) model for a developed OP. In vivo plasma concentration data were obtained from six healthy male New Zealand albino rabbits after administration of immediate-release milnacipran HCl solution (IRMHSOL) and milnacipran HCl osmotic pump (MHOP). In vitro samples were analysed using an in house developed spectrophotometry method and in vivo samples were analysed using a RP-HPLC method developed by the author. A deconvolution based Level A model was attempted through a correlation of the percent in vivo input obtained through deconvolution and the percent in vitro dissolution obtained experimentally. A good correlation between the percentages dissolved vs absorbed (R(2) = 0.978) was obtained using level A correlation. Evaluation of the internal predictability of level A correlation was calculated in terms of the percent prediction error, which was found to be below 15%. In a nutshell, the success of the present study warrants further studies in patient volunteers to assess the ability of the MHOP to provide an effective therapy for depression.

  13. A mechanistic view of the non-ideal osmotic and motional behavior of intracellular water.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I L; Kanal, K M; Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that essentially all of the water in cells has the same ideal motional and colligative properties as does water in bulk liquid state. This assumption is used in studies of volume regulation, transmembrane movement of solutes and electrical potentials, solute and solution motion, solute solubility and other phenomena. To get at the extent and the source of non-ideally behaved water (an operational term dependent on the measurement method), we studied the motional and colligative properties of water in cells, in solutions of amino acids and glycine peptides whose surface characteristics are known, and in solution of bovine serum albumin, hemoglobin and some synthetic polypeptides. Solutions of individual amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains showed one perturbed water molecule (structured-slowed in motion) per nine square angstroms of hydrophobic surface area. Water molecules adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces form pentagonal structural arrays, as shown by X-ray diffraction studies, that are reported to be disrupted by heat, electric field, hydrostatic pressure and phosphorylation state. Hydrophilic amino acids demonstrated water destructuring (increased motion) that was attributed to dielectric realignment of dipolar water molecules in the electric field between charge groups. In solutions of proteins, several methods indicate the equivalent of 2-8 layers of structured water molecules extending beyond the protein surface, and we have recently demonstrated that induced protein conformational change modifies the extent of non-ideally behaved water. Water self-diffusion rate as measured in three different cell types was about half that of bulk water, indicating that most of the water in these cells was slower in motion than bulk water. In different cell types the extent of osmotically perturbed water ranged from less that half to almost all of the intracellular water. The assumption that essentially all intracellular water

  14. Hypothyroidism increases osmotic water permeability (Pf) in the developing renal brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Jaap; Haddad, Maha N; Vernon, Kimberly; Baum, Michel; Quigley, Raymond

    2003-06-01

    The osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the rabbit proximal tubule brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) increases during maturation and is mediated by an increase in aquaporin-1 (AQP1) protein expression. Serum thyroid hormone levels increase after birth and have been shown to play a role in the maturation of other renal transport functions. We examined the hypothesis that thyroid hormone plays a role in the maturational increase in osmotic water permeability. Hypothyroidism was induced by addition of 0.1% propylthiouracil (PTU) to the drinking water of pregnant rabbits (starting 9 d before delivery) and was continued until the rabbits were studied as adults (9-11 wk). Some animals received thyroid hormone replacement by daily injection with triiodothyronine (T3; 10 microg/100 g body weight) for three days before study. Pf was found to be higher in BBMV from hypothyroid (82.7 +/- 5.5 microm/s) than from euthyroid (60.6 +/- 4.0 microm/s) and T3-replacement rabbits (69.0 +/- 5.0 microm/s) (p < 0.05). The activation energy (Ea; in kcal/deg.mol) of Pf was not different among the three experimental groups (euthyroid 5.6 +/- 0.9, hypothyroid 4.9 +/- 0.8, T3-replacement 5.0 +/- 1.0; p = NS), nor was the percentage mercury inhibition of Pf (euthyroid 66.5 +/- 5.3, hypothyroid 74.2 +/- 3.2 and T3-replacement 73.1 +/- 4.3; p = NS). AQP1 expression, measured by immunoblotting, was highest in BBMV from hypothyroid rabbits (p < 0.05). Membrane fluidity, measured as steady-state generalized polarization (GP) of Laurdan, which is inversely related to membrane fluidity, was significantly different between the three groups (GP: euthyroid 0.307 +/- 0.004, hypothyroid 0.271 +/- 0.004 and T3-replacement 0.287 +/- 0.003; for all p < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the maturational increase in thyroid hormone levels is not responsible for the maturational increase in water transport. Surprisingly, congenital hypothyroidism in rabbits is associated with an increased Pf when rabbits

  15. Applications of Electro-Osmotic Transport in the Processing of Textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.; Hopper, R.; Cherepy, N.

    1999-11-29

    We report development of a pilot process for the industrial rinsing of fabrics. This process combines hydraulic (pressure-driven) transport with electro-osmotic transport. It reduces the total amount of water required in certain rinsing operations by a factor of about five. Cotton exhibits an electro-osmotic transport coefficient of about 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V resulting from a partial ionization of hydroxyl groups on the cellulose polymer substrate. This process applies a field transverse to the fabric to effect the movement of water in the spaces between the 10 {micro}m cotton fibers which constitute the yam. The field strength is adjusted so that the induced electro-osmotic flux is comparable to a pressure-driven flux, which moves preferentially in the more open channels between the yams. For a fixed current density, solution conductivity and electro-osmotic transport vary inversely. The process is most practical for removal of liquids of relatively low conductivity (<500 {micro}S/cm). For removal of solutions of conductivity greater than 1200 {micro}S/cm, the rate of electro-osmotic flow may be too low to benefit the rinsing process if current densities are restricted to practical levels of about 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. Electra-osmotic transport may have important applications in wet processing of extremely fine textiles, such as micro fiber fabrics. In addition to rinsing, electro-osmotic transport may also be used to speed the penetration of chemicals and dyestuffs that are applied to the surface of wet textiles.

  16. Release mechanisms of a sparingly water-soluble drug from controlled porosity-osmotic pump pellets using sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin as both a solubilizing and osmotic agent.

    PubMed

    Sotthivirat, Sutthilug; Haslam, John L; Lee, Ping I; Rao, Venkatramana M; Stella, Valentino J

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to delineate the release mechanisms of a sparingly water-soluble drug, prednisolone (PDL), from a microporous or controlled porosity-osmotic pump pellet (CP-OPP) using sulfobutylether-beta-cyclodextrin (CD) as both a solubilizing and osmotic agent. All factors, osmotic and diffusional, influencing drug release as described by the Theeuwes and Zentner equation were partially demonstrated in an earlier paper1 and are further quantitatively evaluated here to determine whether the equation may be applied to CP-OPPs. The PDL release rate from the CP-OPPs containing precomplexed PDL follows the zero-order kinetics for up to 30-40% of drug release during the first 1-2 h and subsequently nonzero order kinetics. The zero-order drug release phase reveals the main contribution is from osmotic pumping with a negligible diffusion component, resulting from the nearly constant driving forces in the system. The nonzero order drug release phase is associated with the dynamic changes in the system (e.g., declining osmotic driving force and greater diffusion component with time). In addition, the parameters related to membrane characteristics were determined, and the effect of viscosity was evaluated for the pellet system. The membranes coated on the CP-OPPs are less permeable to water or solutes than the membranes coated on the previously reported tablets. The viscosity due to the CD decreases as a function of CD concentration, which partly affects the observed drug release profiles. The viscosity effect of CD is significant and captured in a hydraulic permeability term.

  17. Quantifying the sensitivity of G. oxydans ATCC 621H and DSM 3504 to osmotic stress triggered by soluble buffers.

    PubMed

    Luchterhand, B; Fischöder, T; Grimm, A R; Wewetzer, S; Wunderlich, M; Schlepütz, T; Büchs, J

    2015-04-01

    In Gluconobacter oxydans cultivations on glucose, CaCO3 is typically used as pH-buffer. This buffer, however, has disadvantages: suspended CaCO3 particles make the medium turbid, thereby, obstructing analysis of microbial growth via optical density and scattered light. Upon searching for alternative soluble pH-buffers, bacterial growth and productivity was inhibited most probably due to osmotic stress. Thus, this study investigates in detail the osmotic sensitivity of G. oxydans ATCC 621H and DSM 3504 using the Respiratory Activity MOnitoring System. The tested soluble pH-buffers and other salts attained osmolalities of 0.32-1.19 osmol kg(-1). This study shows that G. oxydans ATCC 621H and DSM 3504 respond quite sensitively to increased osmolality in comparison to other microbial strains of industrial interest. Osmolality values of >0.5 osmol kg(-1) should not be exceeded to avoid inhibition of growth and product formation. This osmolality threshold needs to be considered when working with soluble pH-buffers.

  18. A Laterally Acquired Galactose Oxidase-Like Gene Is Required for Aerial Development during Osmotic Stress in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Liman, Recep; Facey, Paul D.; van Keulen, Geertje; Dyson, Paul J.; Del Sol, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that most Actinobacterial orthologs of S. coelicolor SCO2837, encoding a metal-dependent galactose oxidase-like protein, are found within Streptomyces and were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer from fungi. Disruption of SCO2837 (glxA) caused a conditional bld phenotype that could not be reversed by extracellular complementation. Studies aimed at characterising the regulation of expression of glxA showed that it is not a target for other bld genes. We provide evidence that glxA is required for osmotic adaptation, although independently from the known osmotic stress response element SigB. glxA has been predicted to be part of an operon with the transcription unit comprising the upstream cslA gene and glxA. However, both phenotypic and expression studies indicate that it is also expressed from an independent promoter region internal to cslA. GlxA displays an in situ localisation pattern similar to that one observed for CslA at hyphal tips, but localisation of the former is independent of the latter. The functional role of GlxA in relation to CslA is discussed. PMID:23326581

  19. Calcineurin B-Like Protein-Interacting Protein Kinase CIPK21 Regulates Osmotic and Salt Stress Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Girdhar K; Kanwar, Poonam; Singh, Amarjeet; Steinhorst, Leonie; Pandey, Amita; Yadav, Akhlilesh K; Tokas, Indu; Sanyal, Sibaji K; Kim, Beom-Gi; Lee, Sung-Chul; Cheong, Yong-Hwa; Kudla, Jörg; Luan, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The role of calcium-mediated signaling has been extensively studied in plant responses to abiotic stress signals. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) and CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) constitute a complex signaling network acting in diverse plant stress responses. Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought is a major abiotic stress that impedes plant growth and development and involves calcium-signaling processes. In this study, we report the functional analysis of CIPK21, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CBL-interacting protein kinase, ubiquitously expressed in plant tissues and up-regulated under multiple abiotic stress conditions. The growth of a loss-of-function mutant of CIPK21, cipk21, was hypersensitive to high salt and osmotic stress conditions. The calcium sensors CBL2 and CBL3 were found to physically interact with CIPK21 and target this kinase to the tonoplast. Moreover, preferential localization of CIPK21 to the tonoplast was detected under salt stress condition when coexpressed with CBL2 or CBL3. These findings suggest that CIPK21 mediates responses to salt stress condition in Arabidopsis, at least in part, by regulating ion and water homeostasis across the vacuolar membranes.

  20. Time-scale estimation of unstirred layer formation in osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Tomoaki; Inagaki, Taishi; Konno, Keito; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2016-11-01

    We study the osmotic solvent flow driven by solute concentration difference across a semi-permeable membrane. The concentration difference across the membrane drives the solvent flow penetrating from the low concentration side through pores of the membrane. This spontaneous solvent flow transports solutes away from the membrane in the opposite side, which locally reduces the solute concentration in the vicinity of the membrane. The concentration boundary layer developed locally near the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process was termed as "unstirred layer" in the previous studies, which has been recognized as a key of the unfavorable virtual resistance and membrane fouling in the water filtration of the desalination process. In the previous studies, the formation of the unstirred layer was analyzed under the assumption that the thickness of the unstirred layer is steady, which however contradicts the smoothness of the solute concentration at the end of the layer. In the present study, in order to resolve the contradiction, we assume the unsteadiness in the layer development so that the thickness of the unstirred layer may be estimated analytically.

  1. A novel osmotic pump-based controlled delivery system consisting of pH-modulated solid dispersion for poorly soluble drug flurbiprofen: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Qianqian; Zhang, Lina; Yang, Xinggang; Liu, Dandan; Pan, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel controlled release osmotic pump capsule consisting of pH-modulated solid dispersion for poorly soluble drug flurbiprofen (FP) was developed to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of FP and to minimize the fluctuation of plasma concentration. The pH-modulated solid dispersion containing FP, Kollidon® 12 PF and Na2CO3 at a weight ratio of 1/4.5/0.02 was prepared using the solvent evaporation method. The osmotic pump capsule was assembled by semi-permeable capsule shell of cellulose acetate (CA) prepared by the perfusion method. Then, the solid dispersion, penetration enhancer, and suspending agents were tableted and filled into the capsule. Central composite design-response surface methodology was used to evaluate the influence of factors on the responses. A second-order polynomial model and a multiple linear model were fitted to correlation coefficient of drug release profile and ultimate cumulative release in 12 h, respectively. The actual response values were in good accordance with the predicted ones. The optimized formulation showed a complete drug delivery and zero-order release rate. Beagle dogs were used to be conducted in the pharmacokinetic study. The in vivo study indicated that the relative bioavailability of the novel osmotic pump system was 133.99% compared with the commercial preparation. The novel controlled delivery system with combination of pH-modulated solid dispersion and osmotic pump system is not only a promising strategy to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly soluble ionizable drugs but also an effective way to reduce dosing frequency and minimize the plasma fluctuation.

  2. Assessment of chronic administration of Aloe vera gel on haematology, plasma biochemistry, lipid profiles and erythrocyte osmotic resistance in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Iji, O T; Oyagbemi, A A; Azeez, O I

    2010-11-28

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of Aloe vera gel extract on markers of hepatic damage, lipid profiles and erythrocyte osmotic fragility using the Wistar rats. Forty male Wistar rats divided into four groups of ten rats per group were used in the study. Group I which served as the control received 0.9% physiological saline while those in groups II, III and IV received Aloe vera gel (100, 250 and 500mg/kg), respectively, for four weeks. There was significant increase in the haemoglobin concentration while the PCV, RBC count, MCH and MCHC though showed some marginal increases but the increases were not significant in all the treated rats. No significant change was also observed in the erythrocyte osmotic fragility. However, there were significant reductions in plasma ALT, AST and ALP levels in animals that received the gel compared with the control while the plasma albumin and total protein values were higher than those of the control. All the animals that received the gel also showed significant reduction in plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol ratio compared with the control. In a similar manner, those animals that were administered with 500mg/kg gel had significantly higher HDL-cholesterol ratio than those of the control. This study showed that, chronic administration of Aloe vera gel extract had no significant effects on the haematological parameters of the rats and did not affect erythrocyte osmotic resistance. It however showed some cholesterol lowering action.

  3. Specific regulation of SOD isoforms by NaCl and osmotic stress in leaves of the C3 halophyte Suaeda salsa L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoshan; Lüttge, Ulrich; Ratajczak, Rafael

    2004-03-01

    The halophyte Suaeda salsa L., exposed to different NaCl concentrations (100 and 400 mmol/L) and polyethylene glycol (isoosomotic to 100 mmol/L NaCl) containing nutrient solutions under normal or K+-deficient conditions for 7 days, was used to study effects of NaCl salinity and osmotic stress on chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, malonedialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoform activities. Photosynthetic capacity was not decreased by NaCl treatment, indicating that S. salsa possesses an effective antioxidative response system for avoiding oxidative damage. Seven SOD activity bands were detected in S. salsa leaf extracts, including an Mn-SOD and several isoforms of Fe-SOD and CuZn-SOD. It turned out that NaCl salinity and osmotic stress lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD isoenzymes. This differential regulation is suggested to play a major role in stress tolerance of S. salsa.

  4. Floating elementary osmotic pump tablet (FEOPT) for controlled delivery of diethylcarbamazine citrate: a water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zulfequar Ahamad; Tripathi, Rahul; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2011-12-01

    The present work investigates the feasibility of the design of a novel floating elementary osmotic pump tablet (FEOPT) to prolong the gastric residence of a highly water-soluble drug. Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) was chosen as a model drug. The FEOPT consisted of an osmotic core (DEC, mannitol, and hydrophilic polymers) coated with a semipermeable layer (cellulose acetate) and a gas-generating gelling layer (sodium bicarbonate, hydrophilic polymers) followed by a polymeric film (Eudragit RL 30D). The effect of formulation variables such as concentration of polymers, types of diluent, and coat thickness of semipermeable membrane was evaluated in terms of physical parameters, floating lag time, duration of floatation, and in vitro drug release. The Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analysis were carried out to study the physicochemical changes in the drug excipients powder blend. The integrity of the orifice and polymeric film layer was confirmed from scanning electron microscopy image. All the developed FEOPT showed floating lag time of less than 8 min and floating duration of 24 h. A zero-order drug release could be attained for DEC. The formulations were found to be stable up to 3 months of stability testing at 40°C/75% relative humidity.

  5. A perturbative thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a slit microchannel based on a Lubrication theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Ali; Mendez, Federico; Bautista, Oscar; Lizardi, José

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a rectangular microchannel. The central idea is very simple: the Debye length that defines the length of the electrical double-layer depends on temperature T. Therefore, if exists any reason to include variable temperature effects, the above length should be utilized with caution because it appears in any electro-osmotic mathematical model. For instance, the presence of the Joule effect is a source that can generate important longitudinal temperature gradients along the microchannel and the isothermal hypothesis is no longer valid. In this manner, the Debye length is altered and as a consequence, new longitudinal temperature gradient terms appear into the resulting governing equations. These terms are enough to change the electric potential and the flow field. Taking into account the above comments, in the present study the momentum equations together with the energy, Poisson and Ohmic current conservation equations are solved by using a regular perturbation technique. For this purpose, we introduce a dimensionless parameter α that measures the temperature deviations of a reference temperature.

  6. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  7. Process optimization of the integrated synthesis and secretion of ectoine and hydroxyectoine under hyper/hypo-osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Fallet, C; Rohe, P; Franco-Lara, E

    2010-09-01

    The synthesis and secretion of the industrial relevant compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine using the halophile bacterium Chromohalobacter salexigens were studied and optimized. For this purpose, a cascade of two continuously operated bioreactors was used. In the first bioreactor, cells were grown under constant hyperosmotic conditions and thermal stress driving the cells to accumulate large amounts of ectoines. To enhance the overall productivity, high cell densities up to 61 g L(-1) were achieved using a cross-flow ultrafiltration connected to the first bioreactor. In the coupled second bioreactor the concentrated cell broth was subjected to an osmotic and thermal down-shock by addition of fresh distilled water. Under these conditions, the cells are forced to secrete the accumulated intracellular ectoines into the medium to avoid bursting. The cultivation conditions in the first bioreactor were optimized with respect to growth temperature and medium salinity to reach the highest synthesis (productivity); the second bioreactor was optimized using a multi-objective approach to attain maximal ectoine secretion with simultaneous minimization of cell death and product dilution caused by the osmotic and thermal down-shock. Depending on the cultivation conditions, intracellular ectoine and hydroxyectoine contents up to 540 and 400 mg per g cell dry weight, respectively, were attained. With a maximum specific growth rate of 0.3 h(-1) in defined medium, productivities of approximately 2.1 g L(-1) h(-1) secreted ectoines in continuous operation were reached.

  8. Optimizing osmotic pressure removes EBV particles from B95-8 host cells while maintaining normal activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Shen, Jing; Cai, Jie

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the removal of virus particles from B95-8 host cells that maintain normal activity under optimal osmotic pressure. After infecting B95-8 cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) particles, the cells were treated with isosmotic solution [0.90% NaCl (330 mOsm/kg H(2)O)], hyposmotic solutions [0.36% NaCl (115 mOsm/kg H(2)O) and 0.27% NaCl (93 mOsm/kg H(2)O)] and distilled water. The pumping levels of virus particles were observed by inverse phase contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment with the hyposmotic solutions, the following results were observed: firstly, after culturing for 24 and 48 h, the B95-8 cells in the hyposmotic solutions grew as well as the cells cultured in the isosmotic solution. Secondly, the virus particles in the B95-8 host cells overflowed onto the surface of the cells, while the organelle structures remained intact. This phenomenon was repeated in the removal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from leukomonocytes. By optimizing the osmotic pressure, the activity of the B95-8 host cells was retained and the EBV particles were transported from the cells onto the cell surface.

  9. Acclimation to salt modifies the activation of several osmotic stress-activated lipid signalling pathways in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; van Himbergen, John A J; Musgrave, Alan; Munnik, Teun

    2017-03-01

    Osmotic stress rapidly activates several phospholipid signalling pathways in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas. In this report, we have studied the effects of salt-acclimation on growth and phospholipid signalling. Growing cells on media containing 100 mM NaCl increased their salt-tolerance but did not affect the overall phospholipid content, except that levels of phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] were reduced by one-third. When these NaCl-acclimated cells were treated with increasing concentrations of salt, the same lipid signalling pathways as in non-acclimated cells were activated. This was witnessed as increases in phosphatidic acid (PA), lyso-phosphatidic acid (L-PA), diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DGPP), PI(4,5)P2 and its isomer PI(3,5)P2. However, all dose-dependent responses were shifted to higher osmotic-stress levels, and the responses were lower than in non-acclimated cells. When NaCl-acclimated cells were treated with other osmotica, such as KCl and sucrose, the same effects were found, illustrating that they were due to hyperosmotic rather than hyperionic acclimation. The results indicate that acclimation to moderate salt stress modifies stress perception and the activation of several downstream pathways.

  10. Overexpression of the Malus hupehensis MhNPR1 gene increased tolerance to salt and osmotic stress in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Qu, Shen-Chun; Qiao, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2014-03-01

    Earlier, we have reported that overexpression of Malus hupehensis Non-expressor of pathogenesis related gene 1 (MhNPR1) gene in tobacco could induce the expression of pathogenesis-related genes and enhance resistance to fungus Botrytis cinerea. In this study, we showed that MhNPR1 can be induced by NaCl, PEG6000, low temperature (4 °C), abscisic acid and apple aphids' treatments in M. hupehensis. Heterogonous expression of MhNPR1 gene in tobacco conferred enhanced resistance to NaCl at the stage of seed germination, and conferred resistance to mannitol at the stage of seed germination and to PEG6000 at the stage of seedlings. Furthermore, overexpression of MhNPR1 in transgenic tobacco led to higher expression levels of osmotic-stress related genes compared with wild-type plants. This was the first report of a novel function of NPR1 that overexpression of MhNPR1 gene has a positive effect on salt and osmotic stress in tobacco, which differs from the function that overexpressing of AtNPR1 gene has a negative effect on dehydration and salt stress in rice.

  11. Deciphering dynamic dose responses of natural promoters and single cis elements upon osmotic and oxidative stress in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dolz-Edo, Laura; Rienzo, Alessandro; Poveda-Huertes, Daniel; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2013-06-01

    Fine-tuned activation of gene expression in response to stress is the result of dynamic interactions of transcription factors with specific promoter binding sites. In the study described here we used a time-resolved luciferase reporter assay in living Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells to gain insights into how osmotic and oxidative stress signals modulate gene expression in a dose-sensitive manner. Specifically, the dose-response behavior of four different natural promoters (GRE2, CTT1, SOD2, and CCP1) reveals differences in their sensitivity and dynamics in response to different salt and oxidative stimuli. Characteristic dose-response profiles were also obtained for artificial promoters driven by only one type of stress-regulated consensus element, such as the cyclic AMP-responsive element, stress response element, or AP-1 site. Oxidative and osmotic stress signals activate these elements separately and with different sensitivities through different signaling molecules. Combination of stress-activated cis elements does not, in general, enhance the absolute expression levels; however, specific combinations can increase the inducibility of the promoter in response to different stress doses. Finally, we show that the stress tolerance of the cell critically modulates the dynamics of its transcriptional response in the case of oxidative stress.

  12. A comparative life cycle assessment of hybrid osmotic dilution desalination and established seawater desalination and wastewater reclamation processes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Nathan T; Black, Nathan D; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative environmental impacts of coupled seawater desalination and water reclamation using a novel hybrid system that consist of an osmotically driven membrane process and established membrane desalination technologies. A comparative life cycle assessment methodology was used to differentiate between a novel hybrid process consisting of forward osmosis (FO) operated in osmotic dilution (ODN) mode and seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO), and two other processes: a stand alone conventional SWRO desalination system, and a combined SWRO and dual barrier impaired water purification system consisting of nanofiltration followed by reverse osmosis. Each process was evaluated using ten baseline impact categories. It was demonstrated that from a life cycle perspective two hurdles exist to further development of the ODN-SWRO process: module design of FO membranes and cleaning intensity of the FO membranes. System optimization analysis revealed that doubling FO membrane packing density, tripling FO membrane permeability, and optimizing system operation, all of which are technically feasible at the time of this publication, could reduce the environmental impact of the hybrid ODN-SWRO process compared to SWRO by more than 25%; yet, novel hybrid nanofiltration-RO treatment of seawater and wastewater can achieve almost similar levels of environmental impact.

  13. Changes in haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte osmotic fragility of the Nigerian laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Azeez, O I; Oyagbemi, A A; Olawuwo, O S; Oyewale, J O

    2013-06-30

    The haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte osmotic fragility of the Nigerian laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis) were studied after 4 and 8 weeks in captivity. At 8 weeks, there was a normocytic hypochromic anaemia characterized by reduced values for packed cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count (RBC), haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), but the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was unaltered compared with the corresponding values at 4 weeks. The platelet count, total white blood cell count, heterophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts were also lower at 8 weeks than those of the birds sampled at 4 weeks in captivity. There was also a stress induced increased heterophil/lymphocyte ratio and the erythrocytes were more fragile in hypotonic solution in birds sampled at 8 weeks. Plasma aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphate (ALP) increased at 8 weeks, though non-significantly, which might have been due to muscle wasting consequent upon decreased muscular activities associated with prolonged captivity. The results suggest that maintaining wild birds in captivity for a prolonged period could be stressful as shown by the heterophil/lymphocytes ratio and reduced erythrocyte osmotic resistance, and could lead to decreases in erythrocyte parameters and muscle wasting.

  14. An Ethylene-responsive Factor BpERF11 Negatively Modulates Salt and Osmotic Tolerance in Betula platyphylla

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhui; Yang, Guiyan; Mu, Dan; Li, Hongyan; Zang, Dandan; Xu, Hongyun; Zou, Xuezhong; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene responsive factors (ERFs) play important roles in the abiotic stress; however, only a few ERF genes from woody plants have been functionally characterized. In the present study, an ERF gene from Betula platyphylla (birch), BpERF11, was functionally characterized in response to abiotic stress. BpERF11 is a nuclear protein, which could specifically bind to GCC boxes and DRE motifs. BpERF11-overexpressing and BpERF11 RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown plants were generated for gain- and loss-of-function analysis. BpERF11 negatively regulates resistance to salt and severe osmotic stress, and the transgenic birch plants overexpressing BpERF11 shows increased electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents. BpERF11 inhibits the expression of an AtMYB61 homologous gene, resulting in increased stomatal aperture, which elevated the transpiration rate. Furthermore, BpERF11 downregulates the expression of P5CS, SOD and POD genes, but upregulates the expression of PRODH and P5CDH, which results in reduced proline levels and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. BpERF11 also significantly inhibits the expression of LEA and dehydrin genes that involve in abiotic stress tolerance. Therefore, BpERF11 serves as a transcription factor that negatively regulates salt and severe osmotic tolerance by modulating various physiological processes. PMID:26980058

  15. Experimental investigation of a spiral-wound pressure-retarded osmosis membrane module for osmotic power generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Chang; Kim, Young; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Kong Hoon

    2013-03-19

    Pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) uses a semipermeable membrane to produce renewable energy from salinity-gradient energy. A spiral-wound (SW) design is one module configuration of the PRO membrane. The SW PRO membrane module has two different flow paths, axial and spiral, and two different spacers, net and tricot, for draw- and feed-solution streams, respectively. This study used an experimental approach to investigate the relationship between two interacting flow streams in a prototype SW PRO membrane module, and the adverse impact of a tricot fabric spacer (as a feed spacer) on the PRO performance, including water flux and power density. The presence of the tricot spacer inside the membrane envelope caused a pressure drop due to flow resistance and reduced osmotic water permeation due to the shadow effect. The dilution of the draw solution by water permeation resulted in the reduction of the osmotic pressure difference along a pressure vessel. For a 0.6 M NaCl solution and tap water, the water flux and corresponding maximum power density were 3.7 L m(-2)h(-1) and 1.0 W/m(2) respectively at a hydraulic pressure difference of 9.8 bar. The thickness and porosity of the tricot spacer should be optimized to achieve high SW PRO module performance.

  16. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function.

  17. Application of Hollow Fiber Forward Osmosis Membranes for Produced and Process Water Volume Reduction: An Osmotic Concentration Process.

    PubMed

    Minier-Matar, Joel; Santos, Ana; Hussain, Altaf; Janson, Arnold; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G; Adham, Samer

    2016-06-07

    Produced and process water (PPW) from oil and gas operations, specifically in Qatar, are disposed of by deep well injection in onshore facilities. Disposing large volumes of PPW may affect deep well formation sustainability highlighting the need for effective PPW management. Forward osmosis (FO) was applied as an "osmotic concentration" process to reduce PPW injection volumes by 50% using brines and seawater as draw solutions (DS). The energy intensive step of restoring the salinity of the DS was eliminated; the diluted DS would be simply discharged to the ocean. Both hollow fiber and flat sheet FO membranes were tested and the former exhibited better flux and rejection; they are the focus of this study. Optimization experiments, conducted using Box-Behnken statistical design, confirmed that temperature and DS concentration had a substantial effect on performance. To validate the concept, a long-term experiment, under optimized conditions, was conducted with PPW as feed and brine from thermal desalination plant as DS which yielded an average flux of 24 L/m(2)h. The results confirmed that low-energy osmotic concentration FO has the potential for full-scale implementation to reduce PPW injection volumes. Pilot testing opportunities are being evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology under field conditions.

  18. Expression analysis and promoter methylation under osmotic and salinity stress of TaGAPC1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum L).

    PubMed

    Fei, Ying; Xue, Yuanxia; Du, Peixiu; Yang, Shushen; Deng, Xiping

    2017-03-01

    Cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis and encoded by a multi-gene family which showed instability expression under abiotic stress. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. The comprehension of DNA methylation at promoter region of TaGAPC1 can provide insights into the transcription regulation mechanisms of plant genes under abiotic stress. In this study, we cloned TaGAPC1 genes and its promoters from two wheat genomes, then investigated the expression patterns of TaGAPC1 under osmotic and salinity stress, and analyzed the promoter sequences. Moreover, the methylation patterns of promoters under stress were confirmed. Expression analysis indicated that TaGAPC1 was induced inordinately by stresses in two wheat genotypes with contrasting drought tolerance. Several stress-related cis-acting elements (MBS, DRE, GT1 and LTR et al.) were located in its promoters. Furthermore, the osmotic and salinity stress induced the demethylation of CG and CHG nucleotide in the promoter region of Changwu134. The methylation level of CHG and CHH in promoter of Zhengyin1 was always increased under stresses, and the CG contexts remained unchanged. The cytosine loci of stress-related cis-acting elements also showed different methylation changes in this process. These results provide insights into the relationship between promoter methylation and gene expression, promoting the function investigation of GAPC.

  19. High throughput sequencing of small RNAs transcriptomes in two Crassostrea oysters identifies microRNAs involved in osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelin; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Liu, Shikai; Li, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stress. However, the role of miRNAs involved in osmotic plasticity remains largely unknown in marine bivalves. In the present study, we performed low salinity challenge with two Crassostrea species (C. gigas and C. hongkongensis), and conducted high-throughput sequencing of four small RNA libraries constructed from the gill tissues. A total of 202 and 87 miRNAs were identified from C. gigas and C. hongkongensis, respectively. Six miRNAs in C. gigas and two in C. hongkongensis were differentially expressed in response to osmotic stress. The expression profiles of these eight miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Based on GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, genes associated with microtubule-based process and cellular component movement were enriched in both species. In addition, five miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs that showed opposite expression patterns were identified in the C. hongkongensis, Differential expression analysis identified the miRNAs that play important regulatory roles in response to low salinity stress, providing insights into molecular mechanisms that are essential for salinity tolerance in marine bivalves. PMID:26940974

  20. Assessment of Full-Eye Response to Osmotic Stress in Mouse Model In Vivo Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yang; Xu, Baisheng; Wu, Lan; Du, Chixin; Jiang, Bo; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    NaCl based solutions were applied as osmotic stress agents to alter the hydration state of the mouse eye. Full-eye responses to these osmotic challenges were monitored in vivo using a custom-built optical coherence tomography (OCT) with an extended imaging range of 12.38 mm. Dynamic changes in the mouse eye were quantified based on the OCT images using several parameters, including the central corneal thickness (CCT), the anterior chamber depth (ACD), the crystalline lens thickness (LT), the cornea-retina distance (CRD), the iris curvature (IC), and the lens scattering intensity (LSI). Apparent but reversible changes in the morphology of almost all the ocular components and the light transparency of the lens are exhibited. Particularly, the ocular dehydration induced by the hypertonic challenges resulted in a closing of the iridocorneal angle and an opacification of the lens. Our results indicated that the ocular hydration is an important physiological process which might be correlated with various ocular disorders, such as dry eye, cataract, and angle-closure glaucoma, and would affect the biometry and imaging of the eye. OCT uniquely enables the comprehensive study of the dynamic full-eye responses to the ocular hydration in vivo. PMID:26491552

  1. Cystic fibrosis airway secretions exhibit mucin hyperconcentration and increased osmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ashley G; Ehre, Camille; Button, Brian; Abdullah, Lubna H; Cai, Li-Heng; Leigh, Margaret W; DeMaria, Genevieve C; Matsui, Hiro; Donaldson, Scott H; Davis, C William; Sheehan, John K; Boucher, Richard C; Kesimer, Mehmet

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of mucoinfective lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients likely involves poor mucus clearance. A recent model of mucus clearance predicts that mucus flow depends on the relative mucin concentration of the mucus layer compared with that of the periciliary layer; however, mucin concentrations have been difficult to measure in CF secretions. Here, we have shown that the concentration of mucin in CF sputum is low when measured by immunologically based techniques, and mass spectrometric analyses of CF mucins revealed mucin cleavage at antibody recognition sites. Using physical size exclusion chromatography/differential refractometry (SEC/dRI) techniques, we determined that mucin concentrations in CF secretions were higher than those in normal secretions. Measurements of partial osmotic pressures revealed that the partial osmotic pressure of CF sputum and the retained mucus in excised CF lungs were substantially greater than the partial osmotic pressure of normal secretions. Our data reveal that mucin concentration cannot be accurately measured immunologically in proteolytically active CF secretions; mucins are hyperconcentrated in CF secretions; and CF secretion osmotic pressures predict mucus layer-dependent osmotic compression of the periciliary liquid layer in CF lungs. Consequently, mucin hypersecretion likely produces mucus stasis, which contributes to key infectious and inflammatory components of CF lung disease.

  2. Osmotic Gradients Induce Bio-Reminiscent Morphological Transformations in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Oglęcka, Kamila; Sanborn, Jeremy; Parikh, Atul N.; Kraut, Rachel S.

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of large-scale, in-plane and out-of-plane membrane deformations in giant uni- and multilamellar vesicles composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of net transvesicular osmotic gradients. The lipid mixtures we examined consisted of binary mixtures of DOPC and DPPC lipids and ternary mixtures comprising POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol over a range of compositions – both of which produce co-existing phases for selected ranges of compositions at room temperature under thermodynamic equilibrium. In the presence of net osmotic gradients, we find that the in-plane phase separation potential of these mixtures is non-trivially altered and a variety of out-of-plane morphological remodeling events occur. The repertoire of membrane deformations we observe display striking resemblance to their biological counterparts in live cells encompassing vesiculation, membrane fission and fusion, tubulation and pearling, as well as expulsion of entrapped vesicles from multicompartmental giant unilamellar vesicles through large, self-healing transient pores. These observations suggest that the forces introduced by simple osmotic gradients across membrane boundaries could act as a trigger for shape-dependent membrane and vesicle trafficking activities. We speculate that such coupling of osmotic gradients with membrane properties might have provided lipid-mediated mechanisms to compensate for osmotic stress during the early evolution of membrane compartmentalization in the absence of osmoregulatory protein machinery. PMID:22586404

  3. Osmotic gradients induce bio-reminiscent morphological transformations in giant unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Oglęcka, Kamila; Sanborn, Jeremy; Parikh, Atul N; Kraut, Rachel S

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of large-scale, in-plane and out-of-plane membrane deformations in giant uni- and multilamellar vesicles composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of net transvesicular osmotic gradients. The lipid mixtures we examined consisted of binary mixtures of DOPC and DPPC lipids and ternary mixtures comprising POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol over a range of compositions - both of which produce co-existing phases for selected ranges of compositions at room temperature under thermodynamic equilibrium. In the presence of net osmotic gradients, we find that the in-plane phase separation potential of these mixtures is non-trivially altered and a variety of out-of-plane morphological remodeling events occur. The repertoire of membrane deformations we observe display striking resemblance to their biological counterparts in live cells encompassing vesiculation, membrane fission and fusion, tubulation and pearling, as well as expulsion of entrapped vesicles from multicompartmental giant unilamellar vesicles through large, self-healing transient pores. These observations suggest that the forces introduced by simple osmotic gradients across membrane boundaries could act as a trigger for shape-dependent membrane and vesicle trafficking activities. We speculate that such coupling of osmotic gradients with membrane properties might have provided lipid-mediated mechanisms to compensate for osmotic stress during the early evolution of membrane compartmentalization in the absence of osmoregulatory protein machinery.

  4. Osmotic stress inhibits proteasome by p38 MAPK-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Yoon; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Yoon, Jong-Bok

    2010-12-31

    Osmotic stress causes profound perturbations of cell functions. Although the adaptive responses required for cell survival upon osmotic stress are being unraveled, little is known about the effects of osmotic stress on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We now report that hyperosmotic stress inhibits proteasome activity by activating p38 MAPK. Osmotic stress increased the level of polyubiquitinated proteins in the cell. The selective p38 inhibitor SB202190 decreased osmotic stress-associated accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, indicating that p38 MAPK plays an inhibitory role in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Activated p38 MAPK stabilized various substrates of the proteasome and increased polyubiquitinated proteins. Proteasome preparations purified from cells expressing activated p38 MAPK had substantially lower peptidase activities than control proteasome samples. Proteasome phosphorylation sites dependent on p38 were identified by measuring changes in the extent of proteasome phosphorylation in response to p38 MAPK activation. The residue Thr-273 of Rpn2 is the major phosphorylation site affected by p38 MAPK. The mutation T273A in Rpn2 blocked the proteasome inhibition that is mediated by p38 MAPK. These results suggest that p38 MAPK negatively regulates the proteasome activity by phosphorylating Thr-273 of Rpn2.

  5. Deriving Second Osmotic Virial Coefficients from Equations of State and from Experiment.

    PubMed

    Koga, K; Holten, Vincent; Widom, B

    2015-10-22

    The osmotic virial coefficients, which are measures of the effective interactions between solute molecules in dilute solution, may be obtained from expansions of the osmotic pressure or of the solute activity in powers of the solute concentration. In these expansions, the temperature is held fixed, and one additional constraint is imposed. When the additional constraint is that of fixed chemical potential of the solvent, the coefficient of the second-order term yields directly the second osmotic virial coefficient itself. Alternative constraints, such as fixed pressure, fixed solvent density, or the specification of liquid-vapor equilibrium, yield alternative measures of the solute-solute interaction, different from but related to the osmotic virial coefficient. These relations are summarized and, where new, are derived here. The coefficient in question may be calculated from equations of state in which the parameters have been obtained by fitting to other experimental properties. Alternatively, the coefficients may be calculated from direct experimental measurements of the deviations from Henry's law based on measurements of the activity of the solute in a coexisting gas phase. It is seen for propane in water as a test case that with the latter method, even with what appear to be the best available experimental data, there are still large uncertainties in the resulting second osmotic virial coefficient. With the former method, by contrast, the coefficient may be obtained with high numerical precision but then depends for its accuracy on the quality of the equation of state from which it is derived.

  6. Osmotic properties of internally perfused barnacle muscle cells. I. Isosmotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bitner, J B; Peña-Rasgado, C; Ruiz, J; Cardona, J; Rasgado-Flores, H

    2001-07-01

    Barnacle muscle cells regulate their volume when exposed to anisotonic conditions. Due to their large size, these cells can be internally perfused. Interestingly, perfused cells maintain their volume regulatory properties (17,21). Thus, the osmotic properties of barnacle muscle cells can be studied under conditions in which the intracellular and extracellular osmolalities, the membrane potential (V(M)), the cell volume and the intracellular pressure can all be measured simultaneously. In this manuscript we report the effect that various rates of isosmotic (1000 mOsm x kg H2O(-1)) intracellular perfusion have on cell volume, intracellular pressure, intracellular osmolality, V(M), and the apparent sarcolemmal hydraulic water permeability (L'p). Replacement of the cytosol with the perfusate at a perfusion rate of 0.83 microl x min(-1) took 120 min. During this transition period, the cell volume increased from 45.1+/-6.9 microl to 73.7+/-5.8 microl, the intracellular osmolality decreased from 1406+/-133 to 1188+/-64 mOsm x kg H2O(-1), and the intracellular pressure underwent a transient drop of 2.8 cm H2O. After 2.5 hr of continuous perfusion at 0.83 microl min(-1), the above mentioned parameters reached steady values: the L'p was 1.35 x 10(-5) cm x sec(-1) x Osm(-1) x kg H2O(-1); cell volume was 67.2+/-6 microl; the intracellular osmolality was 1052+/-10 mOsm x kg H2O(-1); the intracellular pressure was 5.6+/-0.4 cm H2O; V(M) depolarized slowly at a rate of 0.03 mV x min(-1). Stepwise increases in the rate of perfusion (from 0.83 to 3.18 microl min(-1)) produced reversible increases in the intracellular pressure, L'p and cell volume and decreases in intracellular osmolality. We conclude that intracellular perfusion: i/ produces a transient removal of intracellular osmotically active components; ii/ promotes sarcolemmal water filtration; iii/ induces a laminar flow of perfusate at the center of the cell, and iv/ enables calculations of sarcolemmal L'p values under

  7. The effects of dietary oils on the fatty acid composition and osmotic fragility of rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, M; Stangl, G I; Reichlmayr-Lais, A M; Eder, K

    1994-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of different dietary oils representing special fatty acids which varied in chain length, position and number of double bonds on fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and on the osmotic fragility of rat erythrocytes after incubation in NaCl solutions of different concentrations. For this purpose all animals were initially fed a control diet (CO) containing 10% coconut oil and 0.4% safflower oil for 28 days. After that 10 groups of 10 animals each were switched to test diets for another 20 days in which 50% or 100% of the coconut oil was exchanged for one of the following oils: olive oil (OO 5, OO 10), safflower oil (SFO 5, SFO 10), evening primrose oil (EPO 5, EPO 10), linseed oil (LO 5, LO 10) or salmon oil (SLO 5, SLO 10). The results show that the fatty acid composition of rat erythrocyte membranes was affected by the fatty acid composition of the dietary fats. Rats fed OO 10, EPO 10, LO 5 and LO 10 had a slightly lower concentration of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in erythrocyte membranes than control rats. Groups fed olive oil showed the highest level of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the erythrocyte membrane. This increase in MUFA at the expense of SFA and (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was most pronounced with respect to 18:1 and occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. Rats fed SFO, EPO or LO had higher linoleic acid levels in the erythrocyte membrane than control rats. This increase in 18:2 (n-6) was mainly at the expense of 18:1 and occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. The proportion of 20:4 (n-6) did not remarkably change feeding diets with (n-6) PUFA-rich oils. The (n-3) PUFA concentration in the erythrocyte membranes considerably increased, whereas (n-6) PUFA decreased feeding linseed oil or salmon oil rich in (n-3) PUFA. Linseed oil and salmon oil caused similar changes in the membrane, which were more pronounced in rats fed salmon oil than in rats fed linseed oil. The

  8. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine.

  9. Effect of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on osmotic responses of pig iliac endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Cui; Zhao, Gang; Yi, Jingru; Gao, Cai; Shen, Lingxiao; Zhang, Yuntian; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    In order to fully explore the potential applications of nanoparticles in biopreservation, it is necessary to study the effect of nanoparticles on cell membrane permeabilities. The aim of this study is therefore to comparatively evaluate the osmotic responses of pig iliac endothelial cells in the absence and presence of commercially available hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. The results indicate that, after the introduction of 0.0 1 wt% hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, the dependence of cell membrane hydraulic conductivity (Lp) on temperature still obeys the Arrhenius relationship, while the reference value of the hydraulic conductivity of the cell membrane at 273.15K (Lpg) and the activation energy for water transport across cell membrane (ELp) change from 0.77 × 10(-14)m/Pa/s and 15.65 kJ/mol to 0.65 × 10(-14)m/Pa/s and 26.14 kJ/mol. That is to say, the reference value of the hydraulic conductivity of the cell membrane has been slightly decreased while the activation energy for water transport across cell membrane has been greatly enhanced, and thus it implies that the hydraulic conductivity of cell membrane are more sensitive to temperature in the presence of nanoparticles. These findings are of potential significance to the optimization of nanoparticles-aided cryopreservation.

  10. Development of Osmotically Controlled Mucoadhesive Cup-Core (OCMC) Tablet for The Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Ranchhodbhai Patel, Hitesh; Manordas Patel, Madhabhai

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate an osmotically controlled mucoadhesive cup-core (OCMC) containing aceclofenac. A special technique was used while preparing an OCMC. Stability of OCMC was determined in natural human saliva, and it was found that both pH and device are stable in human saliva. OCMC was evaluated by weight uniformity, thickness, hardness, friability, swelling, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release. Swelling index was higher with formulations containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M alone, and it decreases with its decreasing concentration in the OCMC. The in vitro drug release studies showed a release with the composition of formulation up to 12 h. The mechanism of drug release was found to be zero order kinetics with diffusion controlled drug release. It has shown significant anti-inflammatory activity (P<0.001) and no hypersensitive reaction. It can be concluded that by changing the content of OCMC system, a desire effect is generated and it overcomes the drawback associated with the conventional buccal adhesive tablet.

  11. [The dependence of the osmotic properties of Escherichia coli bacteria on temperature].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I I; Morozova, G V; Petin, V G

    1996-01-01

    The influence of water solutions of NaCl on the osmoresistance and reproduction of E. coli B/r and E. coli Bs-1 at different temperatures was studied. The increase in cell resistance was studied. The increase in cell resistance to NaCl hypertonia was noticed after the temperature rise from 20 to 37 degrees C. In this case the concentration of NaCl in the medium, which made this medium isotonic, was seen to increase too. On the contrary, when the temperature decreased to 0 degrees, the cell resistance to high concentrations of NaCl was found suppressed. In this case the concentration of NaCl in the medium, which made this medium isotonic, was seen to decrease. The salt tolerance of bacteria reproduction was found to depend on the temperature: the tolerance increased with the temperature rise, and vice versa. It is concluded that the solution temperature was to be considered as one of the major factors governing the osmotic bacterial cell homeostasis.

  12. SKIP Confers Osmotic Tolerance during Salt Stress by Controlling Alternative Gene Splicing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Jingjing; Gao, Zhaoxu; Lu, Yaru; Yu, Junya; Zheng, Qian; Yan, Shuning; Zhang, Wenjiao; He, Hang; Ma, Ligeng; Zhu, Zhengge

    2015-07-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms underlying plant responses to abiotic stress is key for improving plant stress resistance. Much is known about the regulation of gene expression in response to salt stress at the transcriptional level; however, little is known about this process at the posttranscriptional level. Recently, we demonstrated that SKIP is a component of spliceosome that interacts with clock gene pre-mRNAs and is essential for regulating their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. In this study, we found that skip-1 plants are hypersensitive to both salt and osmotic stresses, and that SKIP is required for the alternative splicing and mRNA maturation of several salt-tolerance genes, including NHX1, CBL1, P5CS1, RCI2A, and PAT10. A genome-wide analysis revealed that SKIP mediates the alternative splicing of many genes under salt-stress conditions, and that most of the alternative splicing events in skip-1 involve intron retention and can generate a premature termination codon in the transcribed mRNA. SKIP also controls alternative splicing by modulating the recognition or cleavage of 5' and 3' splice donor and acceptor sites under salt-stress conditions. Therefore, this study addresses the fundamental question of how the mRNA splicing machinery in plants contributes to salt-stress responses at the posttranscriptional level, and provides a link between alternative splicing and salt tolerance.

  13. Overexpression of a Cytosolic Abiotic Stress Responsive Universal Stress Protein (SbUSP) Mitigates Salt and Osmotic Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Udawat, Pushpika; Jha, Rajesh K.; Sinha, Dinkar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein (USP) is a ubiquitous protein and plays an indispensable role in plant abiotic stress tolerance. The genome of Salicornia brachiata contains two homologs of intron less SbUSP gene which encodes for salt and osmotic responsive USP. In vivo localization reveals that SbUSP is a membrane bound cytosolic protein. The role of the gene was functionally validated by developing transgenic tobacco and compared with control [wild-type (WT) and vector control (VC)] plants under different abiotic stress condition. Transgenic lines (T1) exhibited higher chlorophyll, relative water, proline, total sugar, reducing sugar, free amino acids, polyphenol contents, osmotic potential, membrane stability, and lower electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde content) under stress treatments than control (WT and VC) plants. Lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2− radicals was also detected in transgenic lines compared to control plants under stress conditions. Present study confers that overexpression of the SbUSP gene enhances plant growth, alleviates ROS buildup, maintains ion homeostasis and improves the physiological status of the plant under salt and osmotic stresses. Principal component analysis exhibited a statistical distinction of plant response to salinity stress, and a significant response was observed for transgenic lines under stress, which provides stress endurance to the plant. A possible signaling role is proposed that some downstream genes may get activated by abiotic stress responsive cytosolic SbUSP, which leads to the protection of cell from oxidative damages. The study unveils that ectopic expression of the gene mitigates salt or osmotic stress by scavenging ROS and modulating the physiological process of the plant. PMID:27148338

  14. Screening for MCL-PHA-producing fluorescent pseudomonads and comparison of MCL-PHA production under iso-osmotic conditions induced by PEG and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ekta; Chopra, Jyotsana; Arora, Naveen Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (MCL-PHA) have attracted much attention from academic and industrial communities for their interesting applications in medical field. The aim of this study was to screen high MCL-PHA-producing fluorescent pseudomonads, and to compare the effect of osmotic stress generated by NaCl (ionic) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, non-ionic inert polymer) on PHA production. A total of 50 fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from rhizospheric soil were screened for PHA production by Sudan Black staining. Out of all the PHA-producing isolates only five were MCL-PHA producers as detected by MCL-PCR. Isolate Bar1 identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was selected for further analysis due to its high MCL-PHA production ability. The iso-osmotic stress generated by NaCl and PEG-6000 showed 5.75- and 3.19-fold enhanced production of PHA at -2 bar osmotic potential, over control (0 bar), respectively. There was 1.8-fold enhanced production of PHA at -2 bar osmotic stress induced by NaCl over PEG. PEG reduces availability of water to microorganisms without reducing exogenously provided nutrients which appear to be responsible for its down performance over NaCl. The FTIR analysis of PHA sample purified from cells showed strong marker bands near 1742, 2870, 1170, 1099, and 2926 cm(-1), corresponding to MCL-PHA. The study reported that supplementation of NaCl (electrolyte) in growth media enhances the production of MCL-PHA which can be very useful for its industrial production.

  15. Role of sigma B factor in the alkaline tolerance response of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and cross-protection against subsequent ethanol and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Giotis, Efstathios S; Julotok, Mudcharee; Wilkinson, Brian J; Blair, Ian S; McDowell, David A

    2008-07-01

    Many of the considerable abilities of Listeria monocytogenes to persist and grow in a wide range of adverse environmental conditions are thought to be at least partly under the control of the alternative sigma factor (sigmaB), encoded by the sigB gene. However, little is known about the role of this master regulon in the impressive ability of Listeria to persist and grow under conditions of alkaline pH. In this study, Northern blot analysis of parent Listeria mRNA revealed that alkali adaptation (pH 9.5 for 1 h) significantly increased the expression of sigB-derived mRNA. The study included a comparison of the relative survival of mid-exponential populations of adapted and nonadapted parent type (sigmaB expressing) and mutant (not sigmaB expressing, deltasigB) Listeria strains during subsequent alkaline (pH 12.0), osmotic (25% NaCl, wt/vol), or ethanol (16.5%) stress. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were adapted deltasigB type strains, but both alkali-adapted parent and deltasigB strains were more resistant to pH 12.0 than were nonadapted strains. Alkali-adapted parent strains were more resistant to osmotic stress than were adapted deltasigB type strains. No significant differences in viability were observed between alkali-adapted parent and deltasigB strains after ethanol stress, suggesting that cross-protection against osmotic stress is mediated by sigmaB whereas cross-protection against ethanol is sigmaB independent. Overall, alkali-induced cross-protection against osmotic and ethanol challenges may have serious implications for food safety and human health because such stress conditions are routinely used as part of food preservation and surface cleaning processes.

  16. A novel asymmetric membrane osmotic pump capsule with in situ formed delivery orifices for controlled release of gliclazide solid dispersion system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Zhinan; Wang, Yongfei; Yang, Lu; Liu, Dandan; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, a novel asymmetric membrane osmotic pump capsule of gliclazide (GLC) solid dispersion was developed to achieve a controlled drug release. The capsule shells were obtained by wet phase inversion process using cellulose acetate as semi-permeable membrane, glycerol and kolliphor P188 as pore formers, then filled with the mixture of GLC solid dispersion and pH modifiers. Differentiate from the conventional formulations, sodium carbonate was chosen as the osmotic agent and effervescent agent simultaneously to control the drug release, instead of the polymer materials. The ternary solid dispersion of GLC, with polyethylene glycol 6000 and kolliphor P188 as carriers, was prepared by solvent-evaporation method, realizing a 2.09-fold increment in solubility and dissolution rate in comparison with unprocessed GLC. Influence of the composition of the coating solution and pH modifiers on the drug release from the asymmetric membrane capsule (AMC) was investigated. The ultimate cumulative release of the optimal formulation reached 91.32% in an approximately zero-order manner. The osmotic pressure test and dye test were conducted to validate the drug release mechanism from the AMC. The in vivo pharmacokinetic study of the AMC indicated a 102.66±10.95% relative bioavailability compared with the commercial tablet, suggesting the bioequivalence between the two formulations. Consequently, the novel controlled delivery system with combination of solid dispersion and AMC system is capable of providing a satisfactory alternative to release the water-insoluble drugs in a controlled manner.

  17. Effects of Adrenal Cortical Steroids and Osmotic Blood-Brain Barrier Opening on Methotrexate Delivery to Gliomas in the Rodent: The Factor of the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuwelt, Edward A.; Barnett, Peggy A.; Bigner, Darrell D.; Frenkel, Eugene P.

    1982-07-01

    The effect of adrenal cortical steroids and osmotic blood-brain barrier modification on methotrexate delivery to normal and glioma-bearing rats was studied. In animals with the avian sarcoma virus-induced glioma, osmotic blood-brain barrier modification resulted in significantly increased delivery of methotrexate to the tumor-bearing hemisphere (including the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor), compared to the nonmodified hemisphere or to control animals. The administration of adrenal steroids, followed by intracarotid methotrexate, resulted in slightly decreased chemotherapeutic agent (methotrexate) delivery to the tumor, the brain around the tumor, and the brain distant to the tumor. When adrenal steroids were given prior to barrier modification and methotrexate therapy, the level of methotrexate was significantly less in the tumor. These studies provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier exists in tumors and is a factor in drug delivery to tumors. Steroid administration greatly interferes with the enhancement of drug delivery to tumors that can be achieved with osmotic blood-brain barrier modification.

  18. Micro-osmotic pumps for continuous release of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib in juvenile rats and its impact on bone growth

    PubMed Central

    Tauer, Josephine Tabea; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Jung, Roland; Erben, Reinhold G.; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bosutinib is a third-generation dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) inhibiting Abl and Src kinases. It was developed to act on up-regulated tyrosine kinases (TKs) like BCR-ABL in Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) when resistance to first- and second-generation TKIs developed. However, first- and second-generation TKIs show off-target effects on bone metabolism, whereas studies on skeletal adverse effects of bosutinib are still lacking. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to continuously expose juvenile rats to bosutinib and to analyze its influence on the growing bone. Material/Methods Starting after weaning, 4-week-old Wistar rats were chronically exposed over a 28-day period to varying concentrations of bosutinib, which were continuously administered subcutaneously via implanted Alzet® micro-osmotic pumps. After necropsy, the length of the femora and tibiae were analyzed. Results Continuous administration of bosutinib by micro-osmotic pumps led to serum drug levels in the lower therapeutic range, was well tolerated, and exhibited only minor adverse effects on the growing skeleton. Conclusions Micro-osmotic pumps represent a convenient system for continuous TKI release in young growing rats. Compared to first- and second-generation TKIs, bosutinib seems to exert fewer adverse effects on the growing bone. PMID:24185529

  19. Methods to increase the rate of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of foods.

    PubMed

    Chwastek, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Traditional methods of food preservation such as freezing, freeze drying (lyophilization), vacuum drying, convection drying are often supplemented by new technologies that enable obtaining of high quality products. Osmotic dehydration is more and more often used during processing of fruits and vegetables. This method allows maintaining good organoleptic and functional properties in the finished product. Obtaining the desired degree of dehydration or saturation of the material with an osmoactive substance often requires  elongation of time or use of high temperatures. In recent years much attention was devoted to techniques aimed at increasing the mass transfer between the dehydrated material and the hypertonic solution. The work reviews the literature focused on methods of streamlining the process of osmotic dehydration which include the use of: ultrasound, high hydrostatic pressure, vacuum osmotic dehydration and pulsed electric field.

  20. Co-ordination of osmotic stress responses through osmosensing and signal transduction events in fishes.

    PubMed

    Evans, T G

    2010-05-01

    This review centres upon the molecular regulation of osmotic stress responses in fishes, focusing on how osmosensing and signal transduction events co-ordinate changes in the activity and abundance of effector proteins during osmotic stress and how these events integrate into osmotic stress responses of varying magnitude. The concluding sections discuss the relevance of osmosensory signal transduction to the evolution of euryhalinity and present experimental approaches that may best stimulate future research. Iterating the importance of osmosensing and signal transduction during fish osmoregulation may be pertinent amidst the increased use of genomic technologies that typically focus solely on changes in the abundances of gene products, and may limit insight into critical upstream events that occur mainly through post-translational mechanisms.

  1. OSMOTIC RELATIONSHIPS IN THE HEN'S EGG, AS DETERMINED BY COLLIGATIVE PROPERTIES OF YOLK AND WHITE.

    PubMed

    Howard, E

    1932-09-20

    The osmotic pressure of the yolk and white of the hen's egg have been shown to be identical, by means of direct freezing point determinations, dialyses, and vapor pressure measurements. Dialysates of egg yolk slow the rate of ice formation compared with NaCl solutions. They also show a marked change of freezing rate as the freezing point is approached. The anomalous freezing behavior of this material may lead to errors in the determination of the true freezing point which would tend to make the value for the yolk erroneously low. The postulate of a vital activity at the yolk membrane maintaining an osmotic pressure difference is thus shown to be unnecessary, since a simple osmotic equilibrium exists between the yolk and the white.

  2. Vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC), a candidate vertebrate osmoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Choe, Yong; Martí-Renom, Marc A.; Bell, Andrea M.; Denis, Charlotte S.; Šali, Andrej; Hudspeth, A. J.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.; Heller, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The detection of osmotic stimuli is essential for all organisms, yet few osmoreceptive proteins are known, none of them in vertebrates. By employing a candidate-gene approach based on genes encoding members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels, we cloned cDNAs encoding the vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC) from the rat, mouse, human, and chicken. This novel cation-selective channel is gated by exposure to hypotonicity within the physiological range. In the central nevous system, the channel is expressed neurons of the circumventricular organs, neurosensory cells responsive to systemic osmotic pressure. The channel also occurs in other neurosensory cells, including inner-ear hair cells, sensory neurons, and Merkel cells. PMID:11081638

  3. Vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC), a candidate vertebrate osmoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, W; Choe, Y; Martí-Renom, M A; Bell, A M; Denis, C S; Sali, A; Hudspeth, A J; Friedman, J M; Heller, S

    2000-10-27

    The detection of osmotic stimuli is essential for all organisms, yet few osmoreceptive proteins are known, none of them in vertebrates. By employing a candidate-gene approach based on genes encoding members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels, we cloned cDNAs encoding the vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC) from the rat, mouse, human, and chicken. This novel cation-selective channel is gated by exposure to hypotonicity within the physiological range. In the central nervous system, the channel is expressed in neurons of the circumventricular organs, neurosensory cells responsive to systemic osmotic pressure. The channel also occurs in other neurosensory cells, including inner-ear hair cells, sensory neurons, and Merkel cells.

  4. Osmotic pressures and second virial coefficients for aqueous saline solutions of lysozyme

    DOE PAGES

    Moon, Y. U.; Anderson, C. O.; Blanch, H. W.; ...

    2000-03-27

    Experimental data at 25 °C are reported for osmotic pressures of aqueous solutions containing lysozyme and any one of the following salts: ammonium sulfate, ammonium oxalate and ammonium phosphate at ionic strength 1 or 3M. Data were obtained using a Wescor Colloid Membrane Osmometer at lysozyme concentrations from about 4 to 20 grams per liter at pH 4, 7 or 8. Osmotic second virial coefficients for lysozyme were calculated from the osmotic-pressure data. All coefficients were negative, increasing in magnitude with ionic strength. Furthermore, tesults are insensitive to the nature of the anion, but rise slightly in magnitude as themore » size of the anion increases.« less

  5. The Effect of Low Osmotic Potential on Nitrite Reduction in Intact Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Paul W.; Xu, Fujuan; Werner, Marisa; Hoffman, Teresa; Marsho, Thomas V.; MacKay, A. Bryan

    1985-01-01

    The effect of water stress (reduced osmotic potential) on photosynthetic nitrite reduction was investigated using intact, isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. Nitrite-dependent O2 evolution was inhibited 39% at −29.5 bars osmotic potential, relative to a control at −11 bars. In the presence of an uncoupler of photophosphorylation this inhibition was not seen. Reduced osmotic potential did not inhibit either methyl viologen reduction or photosynthetic O2 reduction. These results indicate that an inhibition of electron transport to ferredoxin cannot account for the observed inhibition of nitrite-dependent O2 evolution. In vitro assay of nitrite reductase activity showed that the interaction of the enzyme with nitrite was not affected by changes in the concentrations of ions or molecules that might be caused by water stress conditions. These results indicate that the most likely site for the effect of water stress on chloroplastic nitrite reduction is the interaction of ferredoxin with nitrite reductase. PMID:16664429

  6. Ambient salinity modifies the action of triiodothyronine in the air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch: effects on mitochondria-rich cell distribution, osmotic and metabolic regulations.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash; Leji, J; Peter, Valsa S

    2011-04-01

    The hydromineral and metabolic actions of thyroid hormone on osmotic acclimation in fish is less understood. We, therefore, studied the short-term action of triiodothyronine (T(3)), the potent thyroid hormone, on the distribution and the function of gill mitochondria-rich (MR) cells and on the whole body hydromineral and metabolic regulations of air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus) adapted to either freshwater (FW) or acclimated to seawater (SA; 30 g L(-1)). As expected, 24 h T(3) injection (100 ng g(-1)) elevated (P<0.05) plasma T(3) but classically reduced (P<0.05) plasma T(4). The higher Na(+), K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity and the varied distribution pattern of MR cells in the gills of T(3)-treated FW and SA fish, suggest an action of T(3) on gill MR cell migration, though the density of these cells remained unchanged after T(3) treatment. The ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, a measure of hydromineral competence, showed increases (P<0.05) in the gills of both FW and SA fish after T(3) administration, but inhibited (P<0.05) in the kidney of the FW fish and not in the SA fish. Exogenous T(3) reduced glucose (P<0.05) and urea (P<0.05) in the plasma of FW fish, whereas these metabolites were elevated (P<0.05) in the SA fish, suggesting a modulatory effect of ambient salinity on the T(3)-driven metabolic actions. Our data identify gill MR cell as a target for T(3) action as it promotes the spatial distribution and the osmotic function of these cells in both fresh water and in seawater. The results besides confirming the metabolic and osmotic actions of T(3) in fish support the hypothesis that the differential actions of T(3) may be due to the direct influence of ambient salinity, a major environmental determinant that alters the osmotic and metabolic strategies of fish.

  7. Mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of celery stalks in a batch osmo-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareban, M.; Abbasi Souraki, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, dehydration behavior of bulk of celery stalks, during osmotic drying in a limited volume of salt solution, was investigated. Experiments were carried out in the three initial solution concentrations of 10, 18 and 25 % (w/w) and at the three temperatures of 35, 45 and 55 °C. The volume ratio of the fruit to the solution was considered 1:3. A two-parameter model was used for prediction of kinetics of mass transfer and values of equilibrium moisture loss and solid gain. Moisture and salt effective diffusivities in celery stalks were estimated by fitting the experimental data of moisture loss and solute gain to the analytical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion. The analytical model was solved by defining a partition factor, K, assuming that the concentration of solute just within the surface of the material is K times that in the solution. Results showed that moisture and salt effective diffusivities and equilibrium values of moisture loss and solute gain increased with increasing the temperature and solution concentration. Results showed a good agreement between the two parameter model (with mean relative error of 4.016 % for moisture loss and 5.977 % for solid gain), analytical solution of Fick's second law (with mean relative error of 8.924 % for moisture loss and 9.164 % for solid gain) and experimental data.

  8. Direct measurement of protein osmotic second virial cross coefficients by cross-interaction chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Peter M.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of weak protein interactions, such as protein self-association, is widely recognized in a variety of biological and technological processes. Although protein self-association has been studied extensively, much less attention has been devoted to weak protein cross-association, mainly due to the difficulties in measuring weak interactions between different proteins in solution. Here a framework is presented for quantifying the osmotic second virial cross coefficient directly using a modified form of self-interaction chromatography called cross-interaction chromatography. A theoretical relationship is developed between the virial cross coefficient and the chromatographic retention using statistical mechanics. Measurements of bovine serum albumin (BSA)/lysozyme cross-association using cross-interaction chromatography agree well with the few osmometry measurements available in the literature. Lysozyme/α-chymotrypsinogen interactions were also measured over a wide range of solution conditions, and some counterintuitive trends were observed that may provide new insight into the molecular origins of weak protein interactions. The virial cross coefficients presented in this work may also provide insight into separation processes that are influenced by protein cross-interactions, such as crystallization, precipitation, and ultrafiltration. PMID:15075404

  9. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome as the Initial Manifestation of a Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Velver, Karla Victoria; Soto-Garcia, Analy J.; Zapata-Rivera, María Azucena; Montes-Villarreal, Juan; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) is a life-threatening demyelinating syndrome. The association of ODS with hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) has been seldom reported. The aim of this study was to present and discuss previous cases and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in ODS secondary to HHS. A 47-year-old man arrived to the emergency room due to generalized tonic-clonic seizures and altered mental status. The patient was lethargic and had a Glasgow coma scale of 11/15, muscle strength was 4/5 in both lower extremities, and deep tendon reflexes were diminished. Glucose was 838 mg/dL; serum sodium and venous blood gas analyses were normal. Urinary and plasma ketones were negative. Brain magnetic resonance revealed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted FLAIR images with restricted diffusion on the medulla and central pons. Supportive therapy was started and during the next 3 weeks the patient progressively regained consciousness and muscle strength and was able to feed himself. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and MRI showed no residual damage. In conclusion, the association of ODS with HHS is extremely rare. The exact mechanism by which HHS produces ODS still needs to be elucidated, but we favor a rapid hypertonic insult as the most plausible mechanism. PMID:25431711

  10. Mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of celery stalks in a batch osmo-reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareban, M.; Abbasi Souraki, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, dehydration behavior of bulk of celery stalks, during osmotic drying in a limited volume of salt solution, was investigated. Experiments were carried out in the three initial solution concentrations of 10, 18 and 25 % (w/w) and at the three temperatures of 35, 45 and 55 °C. The volume ratio of the fruit to the solution was considered 1:3. A two-parameter model was used for prediction of kinetics of mass transfer and values of equilibrium moisture loss and solid gain. Moisture and salt effective diffusivities in celery stalks were estimated by fitting the experimental data of moisture loss and solute gain to the analytical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion. The analytical model was solved by defining a partition factor, K, assuming that the concentration of solute just within the surface of the material is K times that in the solution. Results showed that moisture and salt effective diffusivities and equilibrium values of moisture loss and solute gain increased with increasing the temperature and solution concentration. Results showed a good agreement between the two parameter model (with mean relative error of 4.016 % for moisture loss and 5.977 % for solid gain), analytical solution of Fick's second law (with mean relative error of 8.924 % for moisture loss and 9.164 % for solid gain) and experimental data.

  11. Applicability of a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor using a specific draw solution in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Hao, Chan Wen; Lin, Po-Hsun

    2015-06-15

    This study aims to develop a new osmotic membrane bioreactor by combining a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (FOMBR) to treat wastewater. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt coupled with polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether was used as an innovative draw solution in this membrane hybrid system (MBBR-OsMBR) for minimizing the reverse salt flux and maintaining a healthy environment for the microorganism community. The results showed that the hybrid system achieved a stable water flux of 6.94 L/m(2) h and low salt accumulation in the bioreactor for 68 days of operation. At a filling rate of 40% (by volume of the bioreactor) of the polyethylene balls used as carriers, NH4(+)-N and PO4(3-)-P were almost removed (>99%) while producing relatively low NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N in the effluent (e.g. <0.56 and 0.96 mg/L, respectively). Furthermore, from analysis based on scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence emission-excitation matrix spectrophotometry, there was a thin gel-like fouling layer on the FO membrane, which composed of bacteria as well as biopolymers and protein-like substances. Nonetheless, the formation of these fouling layers of the FO membrane in MBBR-OsMBR was reversible and removed by a physical cleaning technique.

  12. Effects of Salinity on growth and osmotic regulation substances of callus induced from Reaumuria soongorica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Huijuan; Li, Xinrong; Liu, Yubing; Zhao, Xin

    2014-05-01

    Reaumuria soongorica (Pall.) Maxim is the strong xerophils plant in the northwest arid and semiarid regions in China. It plays very important roles in stabilizing sand dunes and in construction of agricultural shelter belts in north-west China.The present study aimed to evaluate the response to salinity of R. soongorica, which is more salt-resistant than other valuable shrub species used for afforestation on saline and alkaline desert, at the cellular level. To this purpose, callus was induced from shoot segments of R. soongorica on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.2 mgL-16-benzyladenine (BA) and 2.0 mg mgL-1 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2 ,4-D). The relative growth rate of callus reached a maximum in the presence of 100 mmol L-1NaCl and growth was inhibited with increasing NaCl concentrations. Examination of the changes of osmotic substances under salt stress showed that accumulation of proline, trehalose, Glycine betain and flavonoids increased with increasing salt concentrations. The results indicate that the response of the callus of R. soongorica to salt stress is similar to that of the whole plant. .

  13. 3-D measurement of osmotic dehydration of isolated and adhered PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshimori, Takashi; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Cell dehydration during freezing results from an elevated concentration of electrolytes in the extracellular medium that is deeply involved in cellular injury. We undertook real-time threedimensional (3-D) observation of osmotic dehydration of cells, motivated by a comparison of cellular responses between isolated cells in suspension and cultured cells adhering to a surface since several studies have suggested a difference in freeze tolerance between cell suspensions and monolayers. A laser confocal scanner was used with a perfusion microscope to capture sectional images of chloromethylbenzamido (DiI)-stained PC-3 cells that were exposed to an increase in NaCl concentration from 0.15 to 0.5M at 23 degrees C. Change in cell volume was determined from reconstructed 3-D images taken every 2.5s. When cells were exposed to an elevated NaCl concentration, isolated cells contracted and markedly distorted from their original spherical shape. In contrast, adhered cells showed only a reduction in height and kept their basal area constant. Apparent membrane hydraulic conductivity did not vary considerably between isolated and adhered cells, suggesting a negligible effect of the cytoskeletal structure on the rate of water transport. The surface area that contributed to water transport in adhered PC-3 cells was nearly equal to or slightly smaller than that present in isolated cells. Therefore, the similarity in properties and dimensions between isolated and adhered cells indicate that there will be similar extents of dehydration, resulting in a similar degree of supercooling during freezing.

  14. Non-isothermal electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with charge-modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Oscar; Sanchez, Salvador; Mendez, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In this work, w