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Sample records for osteochondral implant coupled

  1. Mechanical and morphological evaluation of osteochondral implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bavaresco, Vanessa P; Garrido, Luiz; Batista, Nilza A; Malmonge, Sônia M; Belangero, William D

    2008-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of osteochondral defects was evaluated in this study with the intention of developing alternative procedures. Cylindrical pins (5.00 mm in diameter and in height) made of pHEMA hydrogel covered ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) or beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) matrix were used. Ostoechondral defects were caused in the knees of adult dogs and the evaluation was carried out after a 9-month follow-up period. The mechanical behavior of the implants was evaluated by means of an indentation creep test that showed that the UHMWPE matrix maintained its viscoelastic behavior even after follow-up time, while the beta-TCP matrix osteochondral implants presented significant alterations. It is believed that the beta-TCP osteochondral implants were unable to withstand the load applied, causing an increase of complacency when compared to the UHMWPE osteochondral implants. Based on micro and macroscopic analysis, no significant wear was observed in either of the osteochondral implants when compared to the controls. However, morphological alterations, with fragmentation indices in the patella, were observed either due to friction with the hydrogel in the first postoperative months or due to forming of a dense conjunctive tissue. This wear mechanism caused on the counterface of the implant (patella) was observed, notwithstanding the osteochondral implant studied.

  2. Tissue engineering osteochondral implants for temporomandibular joint repair.

    PubMed

    Schek, R M; Taboas, J M; Hollister, S J; Krebsbach, P H

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering has provided an alternative to traditional strategies to repair and regenerate temporomandibular joints (TMJ). A successful strategy to engineer osteochondral tissue, such as that found in the TMJ, will produce tissue that is both biologically and mechanically functional. Image-based design (IBD) and solid free-form (SFF) fabrication can be used to generate scaffolds that are load bearing and match patient and defect site geometry. The objective of this study was to demonstrate how scaffold design, materials, and biological factors can be used in an integrated approach to regenerate a multi-tissue interface. IBD and SFF were first used to create biomimetic scaffolds with appropriate bulk geometry and microarchitecture. Biphasic composite scaffolds were then manufactured with the same techniques and used to simultaneously generate bone and cartilage in discrete regions and provide for the development of a stable interface between cartilage and subchondral bone. Poly-l-lactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were differentially seeded with fibroblasts transduced with an adenovirus expressing bone morphogenetic protein-7 in the ceramic phase and fully differentiated chondrocytes in the polymeric phase, and were subcutaneously implanted into mice. Following implantation in the ectopic site, the biphasic scaffolds promoted the simultaneous growth of bone, cartilage, and a mineralized interface tissue. Within the ceramic phase, the pockets of tissue generated included blood vessels, marrow stroma, and adipose tissue. This combination of IBD and SFF-fabricated biphasic scaffolds with gene and cell therapy is a promising approach to regenerate osteochondral defects and, ultimately, the TMJ.

  3. Evaluation of oriented electrospun fibers for periosteal flap regeneration in biomimetic triphasic osteochondral implant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Liu, Shen; Liu, Shenghe; Cui, Wenguo

    2014-10-01

    Osteochondral defects represent a serious clinical problem. Although the cell-scaffold complexes have been reported to be effective for repairing osteochondral defects, a periosteal flap is frequently needed to arrest leakage of the implanted cells into the defect and to contribute to the secretion of cytokines to stimulate cartilage repair. The electrospun mesh mimicking the function of the flap assists tissue regeneration by preventing cell leakage and merits favorable outcomes in the cartilaginous region. In this study, an oriented poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous membrane (OEM) was fabricated by electrospinning as a periosteal scaffold and then freeze-dried with a collagen type I and hyaluronic acid cartilage scaffold (CH) and finally, freeze-dried with a tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bone substratum. Scanning electron microscopic images show obvious microstructure formation of the trilayered scaffolds, and electrospun fibrous membranes have an oriented fibrous network structure for the periosteal phase. Also shown are opened and interconnected pores with well designed three-dimensional structure, able to be bound in the CH (chondral phase) and TCP (osseous phase) scaffolds. In vitro results showed that the OEM can promote the orientation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs) and BMSCs can penetrate into the CH and TCP. After successfully combining the BMSCs, the tissue-engineered cartilage which contained the OEM and TCP complex was successfully used to regenerate the osteochondral defects in the rabbit model with greatly improved repair effects.

  4. Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogel Irradiated and Acetalized for Osteochondral Defect Repair: Mechanical, Chemical, and Histological Evaluation after Implantation in Rat Knees

    PubMed Central

    Batista, N. A.; Rodrigues, A. A.; Bavaresco, V. P.; Mariolani, J. R. L.; Belangero, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) hydrogel plugs were implanted in artificial osteochondral defects on the trochlear groove of rat knees. After 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of followup, samples containing the implants were mechanically evaluated by creep indentation test, chemically, and histologically by optical microscopy. The mechanical test pointed towards an increase of the implant creep modulus and the chemical analysis exhibited an increasing concentration of calcium and phosphorus within the implants over time. Optical microscopy showed no foreign body reaction and revealed formation, differentiation, and maintenance of new tissue at the defect/implant interface. The absence of implant wear indicated that the natural articular lubrication process was not disturbed by the implant. The performance of the irradiated and acetalized PVA was considered satisfactory for the proposed application. PMID:23197982

  5. Microsphere-based gradient implants for osteochondral regeneration: a long-term study in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, Banu Priya; Mellott, Adam J; Easley, Jeremiah T; Palmer, Ross H; Galbraith, Richard A; Key, Vincent H; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Background: The microfracture technique for cartilage repair has limited ability to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Aim: The current study made a direct comparison between microfracture and an osteochondral approach with microsphere-based gradient plugs. Materials & methods: The PLGA-based scaffolds had opposing gradients of chondroitin sulfate and β-tricalcium phosphate. A 1-year repair study in sheep was conducted. Results: The repair tissues in the microfracture were mostly fibrous and had scattered fissures with degenerative changes. Cartilage regenerated with the gradient plugs had equal or superior mechanical properties; had lacunated cells and stable matrix as in hyaline cartilage. Conclusion: This first report of gradient scaffolds in a long-term, large animal, osteochondral defect demonstrated potential for equal or better cartilage repair than microfracture. PMID:26418471

  6. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  7. Osteochondritis Dissecans

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptom of osteochondritis dissecans might be triggered by physical activity — walking up stairs, climbing a hill or playing sports. Swelling and tenderness. The skin around your joint might be swollen and tender. ...

  8. Acid Ceramidase Treatment Enhances the Outcome of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Frohbergh, Michael E.; Guevara, Johana M.; Grelsamer, Ronald P.; Barbe, Mary F.; He, Xingxuan; Simonaro, Calogera M.; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The overall aim of this study was to evaluate how supplementation of chondrocyte media with recombinant acid ceramidase (rhAC) influenced cartilage repair in a rat osteochondral defect model. Methods Primary chondrocytes were grown as monolayers in polystyrene culture dishes with and without rhAC (added once at the time of cell plating) for 7 days, and then seeded onto Bio-Gide® collagen scaffolds and grown for an additional 3 days. The scaffolds were then introduced into osteochondroal defects created in Sprague-Dawley rat trochlea by a micordrilling procedure. Analysis was performed 6 weeks post-surgery macroscopically, by micro-CT, histologically, and by immunohistochemistry. Results Treatment with rhAC led to increased cell numbers and glycosaminoglycan production (~2 and 3-fold, respectively) following 7 days of expansion in vitro. Gene expression of collagen 2, aggrecan and Sox-9 also was significantly elevated. After seeding onto Bio-Gide®, more rhAC treated cells were evident within 4 hours. At 6 weeks post-surgery, defects containing rhAC-treated cells exhibited more soft tissue formation at the articular surface, as evidenced by microCT, as well as histological evidence of enhanced cartilage repair. Notably, collagen 2 immunostaining revealed greater surface expression in animals receiving rhAC treated cells as well. Collagen 10 staining was not enhanced. Conclusion The results further demonstrate the positive effects of rhAC treatment on chondrocyte growth and phenotype in vitro, and reveal for the first time the in vivo effects of the treated cells on cartilage repair. PMID:26524412

  9. Osteochondral repair using a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells and a hydroxyapatite-based artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Ando, Wataru; Nansai, Ryosuke; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A; Gobbi, Alberto; Kita, Keisuke; Horibe, Shuji; Shino, Konsei; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2014-09-01

    For an ideal osteochondral repair, it is important to facilitate zonal restoration of the subchondral bone and the cartilage, layer by layer. Specifically, restoration of the osteochondral junction and secure integration with adjacent cartilage could be considered key factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of a combined material comprising a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and a hydroxyapatite (HA) artificial bone using a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Osteochondral defects were created on the femoral groove of skeletally mature rabbits. The TEC and HA artificial bone were hybridized to develop a combined implant just before use, which was then implanted into defects (N=23). In the control group, HA alone was implanted (N=18). Histological evaluation and micro-indentation testing was performed for the evaluation of repair tissue. Normal knees were used as an additional control group for biomechanical testing (N=5). At hybridization, the TEC rapidly attached onto the surface of HA artificial bone block, which was implantable to osteochondral defects. Osteochondral defects treated with the combined implants exhibited more rapid subchondral bone repair coupled with the development of cartilaginous tissue with good tissue integration to the adjacent host cartilage when assessed at 6 months post implantation. Conversely, the control group exhibited delayed subchondral bone repair. In addition, the repair cartilaginous tissue in this group had poor integration to adjacent cartilage and contained clustered chondrocytes, suggesting an early osteoarthritis (OA)-like degenerative change at 6 months post implantation. Biomechanically, the osteochondral repair tissue treated with the combined implants at 6 months restored tissue stiffness, similar to normal osteochondral tissue. The combined implants significantly accelerated and improved osteochondral repair

  10. Matrix generation within a macroporous non-degradable implant for osteochondral defects is not enhanced with partial enzymatic digestion of the surrounding tissue: evaluation in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Ng, Kenneth W; Doty, Stephen; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2013-10-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a significant source of pain, have limited ability to heal, and can lead to the development of osteoarthritis. However, a surgical solution is not available. To tackle this clinical problem, non-degradable implants capable of carrying mechanical load immediately after implantation and for the duration of implantation, while integrating with the host tissue, may be viable option. But integration between articular cartilage and non-degradable implants is not well studied. Our objective was to assess the in vivo performance of a novel macroporous, nondegradable, polyvinyl alcohol construct. We hypothesized that matrix generation within the implant would be enhanced with partial digestion of the edges of articular cartilage. Our hypothesis was tested by randomizing an osteochondral defect created in the trochlea of 14 New Zealand white rabbits to treatment with: (i) collagenase or (ii) saline, prior to insertion of the implant. At 1 and 3-month post-operatively, the gross morphology and histologic appearance of the implants and the surrounding tissue were assessed. At 3 months, the mechanical properties of the implant were also quantified. Overall, the hydrogel implants performed favorably; at all time-points and in all groups the implants remained well fixed, did not cause inflammation or synovitis, and did not cause extensive damage to the opposing articular cartilage. Regardless of treatment with saline or collagenase, at 1 month post-operatively implants from both groups had a contiguous interface with adjacent cartilage and were populated with chondrocyte-like cells. At 3 months fibrous encapsulation of all implants was evident, there was no difference between area of aggrecan staining in the collagenase versus saline groups, and implant modulus was similar in both groups; leading us to reject our hypothesis. In summary, a porous PVA osteochondral implant remained well fixed in a short term in vivo osteochondral defect model

  11. Osteochondritis dissecans of the talus

    PubMed Central

    ZANON, GIACOMO; DI VICO, GIOVANNI; MARULLO, MATTEO

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is an acquired idiopathic lesion of subchondral bone that can produce delamination and sequestration with or without articular cartilage involvement and instability. The cause of OCD is still debated: the most recognized etiology is the occurrence of repetitive micro-traumas associated with vascular impairment, causing progressive ankle pain and dysfunction in skeletally immature and young adult patients. Ankle OCD is classically located in the medial part of the talus, while lateral and posterior involvement is less frequent. Diagnosis of OCD, based on MRI findings, is quite straightforward; MRI examination can also be very useful for dating the defect and obtaining information about the associated bone bruise. Osteochondritis dissecans, if not recognized and treated appropriately, may lead to secondary osteoarthritis with pain and functional limitation. Surgical treatment is mandatory especially in young patients with unstable cartilage fragments. There are various surgical options: fixation, microfracture, or substitution using autologous chondrocyte implantation techniques. PMID:25606554

  12. [Chondral and osteochondral fractures].

    PubMed

    Kayaoğlu, E Esin; Binnet, Mehmet S

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic chondral and osteochondral fractures and their role in the development of joint degeneration are not fully elucidated. While assessing traumatic knee injuries, one important criterion for the diagnosis of chondral fractures is to remember the possibility of a chondral or osteochondral fracture. Symptoms in osteochondral fractures are more obvious and cause severe pain and difficulty in movement of knee with hemarthrosis. The presence of hemarthrosis facilitates the diagnosis of an osteochondral fracture. Chondral and osteochondral fractures may be associated with other intra-articular pathologies. There are two main mechanisms of these fractures, including a direct effect causing avulsion or impaction and, a more common mechanism, flexion-rotation force to the knee, which is also the mechanism for an acute patellar dislocation. It is known that arthroscopic treatment is the best method for the diagnosis and treatment of chondral and osteochondral fractures. In osteochondral lesions, the aim of treatment is to restore the congruity of articular surfaces. In agreement with literature data, our clinical experience favors internal fixation as the most effective method for the treatment of osteochondral fractures.

  13. Porous titanium bases for osteochondral tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Lee, Stephanie L.; Georgescu, Maria S.; Howard, Daniel R.; Saunders, Reuben A.; Yu, William T.; Klein, Robert W.; Napolitano, Anthony P.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of osteochondral grafts may offer a cell-based alternative to native allografts, which are in short supply. Previous studies promote the fabrication of grafts consisting of a viable cell-seeded hydrogel integrated atop a porous, bone-like metal. Advantages of the manufacturing process have led to the evaluation of porous titanium as the bone-like base material. Here, porous titanium was shown to support the growth of cartilage to produce native levels of Young’s modulus, using a clinically relevant cell source. Mechanical and biochemical properties were similar or higher for the osteochondral constructs compared to chondral-only controls. Further investigation into the mechanical influence of the base on the composite material suggests that underlying pores may decrease interstitial fluid pressurization and applied strains, which may be overcome by alterations to the base structure. Future studies aim to optimize titanium-based tissue engineered osteochondral constructs to best match the structural architecture and strength of native grafts. Statement of Significance The studies described in this manuscript follow up on previous studies from our lab pertaining to the fabrication of osteochondral grafts that consist of a bone-like porous metal and a chondrocyte-seeded hydrogel. Here, tissue engineered osteochondral grafts were cultured to native stiffness using adult chondrocytes, a clinically relevant cell source, and a porous titanium base, a material currently used in clinical implants. This porous titanium is manufactured via selective laser melting, offering the advantages of precise control over shape, pore size, and orientation. Additionally, this manuscript describes the mechanical influence of the porous base, which may have applicability to porous bases derived from other materials. PMID:26320541

  14. Refixation of osteochondral fractures by ultrasound-activated, resorbable pins

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, H.; Schulz, A. P.; Gille, J.; Klinger, M.; Jürgens, C.; Reimers, N.; Kienast, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Osteochondral injuries, if not treated adequately, often lead to severe osteoarthritis. Possible treatment options include refixation of the fragment or replacement therapies such as Pridie drilling, microfracture or osteochondral grafts, all of which have certain disadvantages. Only refixation of the fragment can produce a smooth and resilient joint surface. The aim of this study was the evaluation of an ultrasound-activated bioresorbable pin for the refixation of osteochondral fragments under physiological conditions. Methods In 16 Merino sheep, specific osteochondral fragments of the medial femoral condyle were produced and refixed with one of conventional bioresorbable pins, titanium screws or ultrasound-activated pins. Macro- and microscopic scoring was undertaken after three months. Results The healing ratio with ultrasound-activated pins was higher than with conventional pins. No negative heat effect on cartilage has been shown. Conclusion As the material is bioresorbable, no further surgery is required to remove the implant. MRI imaging is not compromised, as it is with implanted screws. The use of bioresorbable pins using ultrasound is a promising technology for the refixation of osteochondral fractures. PMID:23610699

  15. Electrochemical properties of suprastructures galvanically coupled to a titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2004-08-15

    In recent years, dental implants have been widely used for the aesthetic and functional restoration of edentulous patients. Dental implants and restorative alloys are required with high corrosion resistance. Suprastructures and implants of different compositions in electrical contact may develop galvanic or coupled corrosion problems. In addition to galvanic corrosion, crevice and pitting corrosion may occur in the marginal gap between dental implant assemblies. In this study, gold, silver-palladium, cobalt-chromium, and nickel-chromium suprastructures were used to investigate their galvanic and crevice corrosion characteristics in combination with titanium (Ti) implants. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic testing were performed in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic testing was carried out at the potential scan rate of 1 mV/s in the range of -600-1600 mV (SCE). Potentiostatic testing was performed with an open-circuit potential and current densities at -250, 0, and 250 mV (SCE) in artificial saliva. After electrochemical testing, surface morphologies and cross-sections were examined using micrographs of the samples. Potentiodynamic test results indicated that suprastructure/Ti implant couples produced passive current densities in the range of 0.5-12 microA/cm(2); Ti abutment/Ti implant and gold/Ti implant couples exhibited relatively low passive current densities; Co-Cr/Ti implant couples the highest. Co-Cr and Ni-Cr/Ti implant couples showed breakdown potentials of 700 and 570 mV (SCE), respectively. The open-circuit potentials of silver, Ti abutment, gold, Ni-Cr, and Co-Cr/Ti implant couples were -93.2 +/- 93.9, -123.7 +/- 58.8, -140.0 +/- 80.6, -223.5 +/- 35.1, and -312.7 +/- 29.8 mV (SCE), respectively, and did not change with immersion time. The couples exhibited cathodic current densities at -250 mV (SCE); in particular, gold and silver alloys showed high cathodic current densities of -3.18 and -6.63 microA/cm(2), respectively. At 250 mV (SCE

  16. Treatment of osteochondral injuries. Genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Martinek, V; Fu, F H; Lee, C W; Huard, J

    2001-04-01

    Articular cartilage injuries are commonly encountered problems in sports medicine and orthopaedics. The treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions, which possess only a very limited potential for healing, still represents a great challenge to clinicians and to scientists. Experimental investigations reported over the last 20 years have shown that a variety of methods, including implantation of periosteum, perichondrium, artificial matrices, growth factors, and transplanted cells, can stimulate formation of new cartilage. Genetic engineering--a combination of gene transfer techniques and tissue engineering--will facilitate new approaches to the treatment of articular cartilage injuries.

  17. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Brendan L.; Hung, Clark T.; Cook, James L.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Tan, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allograft implantation is an effective cartilage restoration technique for large defects (>10 cm2), though the demand far exceeds the supply of available quality donor tissue. Large bilayered engineered cartilage tissue constructs with accurate anatomical features (i.e. contours, thickness, architecture) could be beneficial in replacing damaged tissue. When creating these osteochondral constructs, however, it is pertinent to maintain biofidelity to restore functionality. Here, we describe a step-by-step framework for the fabrication of a large osteochondral construct with correct anatomical architecture and topology through a combination of high-resolution imaging, rapid prototyping, impression molding, and injection molding. PMID:25794950

  18. Gamete cytogenetic study in couples with implantation failure: aneuploidy rate is increased in both couple members

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, I.; Molina-Gomes, D.; Wainer, R.; Bergere, M.; Albert, M.; Bailly, M.; de Mazancourt, P.; Selva, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Implantation failure is known to be associated with an increased risk of aneuploidy in embryos, a situation leading to a pre-implantation genetic screening, not allowed in different countries like France. Our aim was to evaluate the gamete aneuploidy incidence in this context, using first polar body and spermatozoa aneuploidy screening. Methods Three groups were considered: 11 couples with pregnancy obtained after IVF for female infertility (group 1); 20 couples with pregnancy obtained after IVF for male infertility (group 2); and 35 couples with implantation failure (group 3). In group 3, 28 couples treated by ICSI volunteered for first polar body analysis (PB1). Results Spermatozoa aneuploidy rate was increased in groups 2 (1.6%) and 3 (2.1%) in comparison to group 1 (0.6%). PB1 aneuploidy rate was 35.4% in group 3. Finally, eight couples (32%) had no particular chromosomal risk in gametes, 15/25 (60%) presented an increased spermatic (>2%) or oocyte (>1/3) aneuploidy rate, and 2/25 (8%) had both. Conclusion Those results confirm that implantation failure has a heterogeneous origin, that gamete chromosome abnormality rate is one of the major contributing factors, and that 1st Polar body and spermatozoa aneuploidy screening or pre-implantation genetics screening may be indicated for these couples. PMID:18972203

  19. How I Manage Osteochondritis Dissecans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Vincent J.

    1986-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans, a lesion found most often on the femur at the knee joint, occurs most frequently in active adolescents. This article describes treatment for preadolescents, adolescents, and adults. Osteochondritus dissecans of the patella is also presented. (MT)

  20. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  1. Galvanic corrosion behavior of titanium implants coupled to dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cortada, M; Giner, L; Costa, S; Gil, F J; Rodríguez, D; Planell, J A

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Various electrochemical parameters E(CORR), i(CORR) Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. Besides, the metallic ions released in the saliva environment were quantified during the corrosion process by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique (ICP-MS). The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  2. Porous tantalum biocomposites for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Mrosek, E. H.; Chung, H-W.; Fitzsimmons, J. S.; Reinholz, G. G.; Schagemann, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine if a durable bilayer implant composed of trabecular metal with autologous periosteum on top would be suitable to reconstitute large osteochondral defects. This design would allow for secure implant fixation, subsequent integration and remodeling. Materials and Methods Adult sheep were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 8/group): 1. trabecular metal/periosteal graft (TMPG), 2. trabecular metal (TM), 3. empty defect (ED). Cartilage and bone healing were assessed macroscopically, biochemically (type II collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) content) and histologically. Results At 16 weeks post-operatively, histological scores amongst treatment groups were not statistically different (TMPG: overall 12.7, cartilage 8.6, bone 4.1; TM: overall 14.2, cartilage 9.5, bone 4.9; ED: overall 13.6, cartilage 9.1, bone 4.5). Metal scaffolds were incorporated into the surrounding bone, both in TM and TMPG. The sGAG yield was lower in the neo-cartilage regions compared with the articular cartilage (AC) controls (TMPG 20.8/AC 39.5, TM 25.6/AC 33.3, ED 32.2/AC 40.2 µg sGAG/1 mg respectively), with statistical significance being achieved for the TMPG group (p < 0.05). Hypercellularity of the neo-cartilage was found in TM and ED, as the dsDNA content was significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with contralateral AC controls (TM 126.7/AC 71.1, ED 99.3/AC 62.8 ng dsDNA/1 mg). The highest type II collagen content was found in neo-cartilage after TM compared with TMPG and ED (TM 60%/TMPG 40%/ED 39%). Inter-treatment differences were not significant. Conclusions TM is a highly suitable material for the reconstitution of osseous defects. TM enables excellent bony ingrowth and fast integration. However, combined with autologous periosteum, such a biocomposite failed to promote satisfactory neo-cartilage formation. Cite this article: E. H. Mrosek, H-W. Chung, J. S. Fitzsimmons, S. W. O’Driscoll, G. G

  3. Biomimetic biphasic scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral defects caused by vigorous trauma or physical disease are difficult to be managed. Tissue engineering provides a possible option to regenerate the damaged osteochondral tissues. For osteochondral reconstruction, one intact scaffold should be considered to support the regeneration of both cartilage and subchondral bone. Therefore, the biphasic scaffolds with the mimic structures of osteochondral tissues have been developed to close this chasm. A variety of biomimetic bilayer scaffolds fabricated from natural or synthetic polymers, or the ones loading with growth factors, cells, or both of them make great progresses in osteochondral defect repair. In this review, the preparation and in vitro and/or in vivo verification of bioinspired biphasic scaffolds are summarized and discussed, as well as the prospect is predicted. PMID:26816644

  4. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  5. Repair of osteochondral defects with in vitro engineered cartilage based on autologous bone marrow stromal cells in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    He, Aijuan; Liu, Lina; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-01-01

    Functional reconstruction of large osteochondral defects is always a major challenge in articular surgery. Some studies have reported the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and biodegradable scaffolds. However, no significant breakthroughs have been achieved in clinical translation due to the instability of in vivo cartilage regeneration based on direct cell-scaffold construct implantation. To overcome the disadvantages of direct cell-scaffold construct implantation, the current study proposed an in vitro cartilage regeneration strategy, providing relatively mature cartilage-like tissue with superior mechanical properties. Our strategy involved in vitro cartilage engineering, repair of osteochondral defects, and evaluation of in vivo repair efficacy. The results demonstrated that BMSC engineered cartilage in vitro (BEC-vitro) presented a time-depended maturation process. The implantation of BEC-vitro alone could successfully realize tissue-specific repair of osteochondral defects with both cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, the maturity level of BEC-vitro had significant influence on the repaired results. These results indicated that in vitro cartilage regeneration using BMSCs is a promising strategy for functional reconstruction of osteochondral defect, thus promoting the clinical translation of cartilage regeneration techniques incorporating BMSCs. PMID:28084417

  6. Implantable flexible pressure measurement system based on inductive coupling.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristina C; Sepúlveda, Alexandra T; Almeida, Nuno; Wardle, Brian L; da Silva, José Machado; Rocha, Luís A

    2015-02-01

    One of the currently available treatments for aortic aneurysms is endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). In spite of major advances in the operating techniques, complications still occur and lifelong surveillance is recommended. In order to reduce and even eliminate the commonly used surveillance imaging exams, as well as to reduce follow-up costs, new technological solutions are being pursued. In this paper, we describe the development, including design and performance characterization, of a flexible remote pressure measurement system based on inductive-coupling for post-EVAR monitoring purposes. The telemetry system architecture and operation are described and main performance characteristics discussed. The implantable sensor details are provided and its model is presented. Simulations with the reading circuit and the sensor's model were performed and compared with measurements carried out with air and a phantom as media, in order to characterize the telemetry system and validate the models. The transfer characteristic curve (pressure versus frequency) of the monitoring system was obtained with measurements performed with the sensor inside a controlled pressure vacuum chamber. Additional experimental results which proof the system functionality were obtained within a hydraulic test bench that emulates the aorta. Several innovative aspects, when compared to the state of the art, both in the sensor and in the telemetry system were achieved.

  7. Drilling techniques for osteochondritis dissecans.

    PubMed

    Heyworth, Benton E; Edmonds, Eric W; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Kocher, Mininder S

    2014-04-01

    Although the advanced stages of osteochondritis dissecans remain challenging to treat, most early-stage lesions in skeletally immature patients, if managed appropriately, can be stimulated to heal. For stable lesions that do not demonstrate adequate healing with nonoperative measures, such as activity modification, weight-bearing protection, or bracing, drilling of the subchondral bone has emerged as the gold standard of management. Several techniques of drilling exist, including transarticular drilling, retroarticular drilling, and notch drilling. Although each technique has been shown to be effective in small retrospective studies, higher-powered prospective comparative studies are needed to better elucidate their relative advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Biphasic nanofibrous constructs with seeded cell layers for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang-Zhen; Kim, Jung-Ju; Park, Jeong-Hui; Seo, Seog-Jin; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-11-01

    Biphasic scaffolds have gained increasing attention for the regeneration of osteochondral interfacial tissue because they are expected to effectively define the interfacial structure of tissue that comprises stratified cartilage with a degree of calcification. Here, we propose a biphasic nanofiber construct made of poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) and its mineralized form (mPLCL) populated with cells. Primary rat articular chondrocytes (ACs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the layers of bare PLCL and mPLCL nanofibers, respectively, for 7 days, and the biphasic cell-nanofiber construct was investigated at 4 weeks after implantation into nude mice. Before implantation, the ACs and MSCs grown on each layer of PLCL and mPLCL nanofibers exhibited phenotypes typical of chondrocytes and osteoblasts, respectively, under proper culture conditions, as analyzed by electron microscopy, histological staining, cell growth kinetics, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The biphasic constructs also showed the development of a possible formation of cartilage and bone tissue in vivo. Results demonstrated that the cell-laden biphasic nanofiber constructs may be useful for the repair of osteochondral interfacial tissue structure.

  9. Viral Inactivation of Human Osteochondral Grafts with Methylene Blue and Light

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhixing; Call, Gazell M.; Gao, Jizong; Yao, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cartilage injury is one of the most common disorders of synovial joints. Fresh osteochondral allografts are becoming a standard treatment; however, they are supply constrained with a potential risk of disease transmission. There are no known virucidal processes available for osteochondral allografts and most methods presently available are detrimental to cartilage. Methylene blue light treatment has been shown to be successful in the literature for viral inactivation of fresh frozen plasma. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of methylene blue light treatment to inactivate a panel of clinically relevant viruses inoculated onto osteochondral allografts. Design: Osteochondral grafts recovered from human cadaveric knees were inoculated with one of the following viruses: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), porcine parvovirus (PPV), and pseudorabies virus (PrV). The samples were processed through a methylene blue light treatment, which consisted of an initial soak in nonilluminated circulating methylene blue at ambient temperature, followed by light exposure with circulating methylene blue at cool temperatures. The final titer was compared with the recovery control for the viral log reduction. Results: HIV-1, BVDV, and PrV were reduced to nondetectable levels while HAV and PPV were reduced by 3.1 and 5.6 logs, respectively. Conclusions: The methylene blue light treatment was effective in reducing (a) enveloped DNA and RNA viruses to nondetectable levels and (b) nonenveloped DNA and RNA viruses of inoculated human osteochondral grafts by 3.1 to 5.6 logs. This study demonstrates the first practical method for significantly reducing viral load in osteochondral implants. PMID:26069682

  10. THE ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF FOUR DENTAL CASTING SUPRASTRUCTURE ALLOYS COUPLED WITH TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Pekmez, Nuran Ozcícek; Keyf, Filiz; Canlí, Fulya

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: As the choice of suprastructure alloy to be combined with titanium for the oral cavity is still a much debated issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical interaction of the suprastructure/implant couples under the determined experiment conditions. Material and Methods: The potentiodynamic polarization curves and open-circuit potentials (OCP) of four UCLA type suprastructures coupled with straight Swiss Plus implant fixtures were taken in Afnor type artificial saliva solution at 37°C. The concentration of ions leached into artificial saliva solutions was estimated with ICP-MS. SEM images of the margins of suprastructure/implant couples were obtained before and after the electrochemical tests. Results: The OCP value of titanium became passive at the most negative potential. The lowest difference between the initial and constant OCP value was exhibited by the Au based suprastructure. Suprastructures made greater contributions to the potentiodynamic polarization curves of the implant/suprastructure couples. According to the ICP-MS results, Pd based and Au based couples dissolved less than Co-Ni based and Co-Cr based couples. Conclusions: Within the conditions this study, it may be concluded that the titanium implant forms a stable passive oxide layer in artificial saliva exposed to open air and does not affect the corrosion properties of the suprastructures. Pd based and Au based couples have been found to be more corrosion-resistant than base alloy couples. PMID:19936528

  11. Posterosuperior osteochondritis of the calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramón; Cuscó, Xavier; García, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2007-09-01

    Osteochondritis of the posterosuperior area of the talocalcaneal surface is a relatively uncommon injury, and only 1 case has been described in the literature. We present a 37-year-old man who complained of pain in the tarsal canal area during walking and when standing up. The magnetic resonance imaging study showed an osteochondral signal in the posterosuperior medial area of the calcaneus on the talocalcaneal surface. The persistence of pain and lack of improvement with conservative treatment made arthroscopic debridement of the injury necessary. The arthroscopic procedure was performed through 2 medial portals, made under fluoroscopy, marked with needles, and dissected with mosquito clamps, and the affected surface could be fully visualized, showing a chondral lesion. Debridement of the osteonecrotic area was performed, and the Steadman technique was used on the injured bone surface. The patient was pain-free, and limited activity (i.e., standing up and walking without symptoms) was allowed. After 24 months, the patient remains asymptomatic with weight-bearing working activities and when standing. Arthroscopic curettage and scission of the injury have been shown to yield good or excellent outcomes in 75% to 80% of patients with regard to the talar surface.

  12. Dual growth factor delivery from bilayered, biodegradable hydrogel composites for spatially-guided osteochondral tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E.; Lee, Esther J.; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Wong, Mark E.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigated the use of biodegradable hydrogel composite scaffolds, based on the macromer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), to deliver growth factors for the repair of osteochondral tissue in a rabbit model. In particular, bilayered OPF composites were used to mimic the structural layers of the osteochondral unit, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were loaded into gelatin microparticles and embedded within the OPF hydrogel matrix in a spatially controlled manner. Three different scaffold formations were implanted in a medial femoral condyle osteochondral defect: 1) IGF-1 in the chondral layer, 2) BMP-2 in the subchondral layer, and 3) IGF-1 and BMP-2 in their respective separate layers. The quantity and quality of osteochondral repair was evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks with histological scoring and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). While histological scoring results at 6 weeks showed no differences between experimental groups, micro-CT analysis revealed that the delivery of BMP-2 alone increased the number of bony trabecular islets formed, an indication of early bone formation, over that of IGF-1 delivery alone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, minimal differences were detected between the three groups for cartilage repair. However, the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 had a higher proportion of subchondral bone repair, greater bone growth at the defect margins, and lower bone specific surface than the single delivery of IGF-1. These results suggest that the delivery of BMP-2 enhances subchondral bone formation and that, while the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in separate layers does not improve cartilage repair under the conditions studied, they may synergistically enhance the degree of subchondral bone formation. Overall, bilayered OPF hydrogel composites demonstrate potential as spatially-guided, multiple growth factor release vehicles for osteochondral tissue repair. PMID:25047629

  13. Dual growth factor delivery from bilayered, biodegradable hydrogel composites for spatially-guided osteochondral tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2014-10-01

    The present work investigated the use of biodegradable hydrogel composite scaffolds, based on the macromer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), to deliver growth factors for the repair of osteochondral tissue in a rabbit model. In particular, bilayered OPF composites were used to mimic the structural layers of the osteochondral unit, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were loaded into gelatin microparticles and embedded within the OPF hydrogel matrix in a spatially controlled manner. Three different scaffold formulations were implanted in a medial femoral condyle osteochondral defect: 1) IGF-1 in the chondral layer, 2) BMP-2 in the subchondral layer, and 3) IGF-1 and BMP-2 in their respective separate layers. The quantity and quality of osteochondral repair was evaluated at 6 and 12 weeks with histological scoring and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). While histological scoring results at 6 weeks showed no differences between experimental groups, micro-CT analysis revealed that the delivery of BMP-2 alone increased the number of bony trabecular islets formed, an indication of early bone formation, over that of IGF-1 delivery alone. At 12 weeks post-implantation, minimal differences were detected between the three groups for cartilage repair. However, the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 had a higher proportion of subchondral bone repair, greater bone growth at the defect margins, and lower bone specific surface than the single delivery of IGF-1. These results suggest that the delivery of BMP-2 enhances subchondral bone formation and that, while the dual delivery of IGF-1 and BMP-2 in separate layers does not improve cartilage repair under the conditions studied, they may synergistically enhance the degree of subchondral bone formation. Overall, bilayered OPF hydrogel composites demonstrate potential as spatially-guided, multiple growth factor release vehicles for osteochondral tissue repair.

  14. Partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint--a new approach to treat local osteochondral defects?

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Begg, Malcom J W; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2006-12-01

    There is currently renewed interest in articular resurfacing for the treatment of damaged hip-joint cartilage. In contrast to these implants, which involve endoprosthetic replacement of both articulating surfaces, we present a new joint-preserving technique that allows treatment of local osteochondral defects of the femoral head by partial hemi-resurfacing. In this study we describe the operative and technical aspects and problems for partial hemi-resurfacing of the hip joint and critically discuss indications for this procedure in one case. To guarantee an adequate view of the situs, we recommend a surgical approach involving trochanter flip osteotomy, followed by surgical dislocation of the hip joint. Besides partial hemi-resurfacing of the osteochondral defect, this approach allows treatment of associated labral tears and cartilage defects of the hip joint at the same time. For adequate implant fixation, good bone quality is required. Furthermore, osteochondral defects of limited extent and excellent patient compliance are essential for clinical success. In particular, prominence of the implant has to be avoided, which can lead to an irregular joint surface and may induce further cartilage destruction. Long-term studies on statistical populations will show if partial articular hemi-resurfacing is a bone-preserving and useful therapeutic alternative to hemi-resurfacing caps in the treatment of osteochondral hip-joint defects, especially in young patients.

  15. Strategies for osteochondral repair: Focus on scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Interest in osteochondral repair has been increasing with the growing number of sports-related injuries, accident traumas, and congenital diseases and disorders. Although therapeutic interventions are entering an advanced stage, current surgical procedures are still in their infancy. Unlike other tissues, the osteochondral zone shows a high level of gradient and interfacial tissue organization between bone and cartilage, and thus has unique characteristics related to the ability to resist mechanical compression and restoration. Among the possible therapies, tissue engineering of osteochondral tissues has shown considerable promise where multiple approaches of utilizing cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules have been pursued. This review focuses particularly on the importance of scaffold design and its role in the success of osteochondral tissue engineering. Biphasic and gradient composition with proper pore configurations are the basic design consideration for scaffolds. Surface modification is an essential technique to improve the scaffold function associated with cell regulation or delivery of signaling molecules. The use of functional scaffolds with a controllable delivery strategy of multiple signaling molecules is also considered a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we updated the recent advances in scaffolding approaches for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25343021

  16. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  17. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  18. Osteochondral repair in hemophilic ankle arthropathy: from current options to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Cavallo, Marco; Castagnini, Francesco; Ferranti, Enrico; Natali, Simone; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Young hemophilic patients are frequently affected by ankle arthropathy. At the end stage of the disease, the current treatments are arthrodesis and arthroplasty, which have significant drawbacks. Validated procedures capable of slowing down or even arresting the progression towards the end stage are currently lacking. This review aims to discuss the rationale for and feasibility of applying, in mild hemophilic ankle arthropathy, the main techniques currently used to treat osteochondral defects, focusing in particular on ankle distraction, chondrocyte implantation, mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, allograft transplantation and the use of growth factors. To date, ankle distraction is the only procedure that has been successfully used in hemophilic ankle arthropathy. The use of mesenchymal stem cells have recently been evaluated as feasible for osteochondral repair in hemophilic patients. There may be a rationale for the use of growth factors if they are combined with the previous techniques, which could be useful to arrest the progression of the degeneration or delay end-stage procedures.

  19. Fresh-Stored Osteochondral Allograft for Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans the Femoral Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    longevity and sur- vivorship [7, 30, 31]. A rotational osteotomy is another viable option because it is a joint-preserving procedure and delays the need...Osteochondral defects of the femoral head are exceedingly rare, with limited treatment options. Restora- tion procedures for similar defects involving the...develop secondary to trauma and underwent subsequent treatment using a fresh-stored osteochondral allograft via a trochanteric osteotomy . At the 1-year

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial osteochondritis dissecans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Familial osteochondritis dissecans Seattle Children's TeensHealth from Nemours: Knee Injuries University of Connecticut Health Center Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (1 link) American College of Rheumatology: Osteoarthritis ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles ...

  1. S53P4 bioactive glass and fibrin glue for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee - a preliminary in vivo study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zazgyva, AncuŢa Marilena; Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Nagy, Örs; Mühlfay, Gheorghe; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-01-01

    The role of the subchondral bone and the importance of treating both bone and cartilage in cases of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee have been highly emphasized. There are no current studies on the experimental use of bioactive glass S53P4 (BonAlive®) as granules in the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee. Our preliminary study was designed to establish an experimental model and assesses the effect of glass granules fixed with fibrin compared to fibrin alone as fillers of the osteochondral defects created in the weight-bearing and partial weight-bearing regions of the distal femur in six adult rabbits. We found that the size of the distal femur in adult domestic rabbits allows the creation of 4 mm diameter and 5 mm deep osteochondral defects on both the medial femoral condyle and the trochlea, bilaterally, without significantly affecting the activity level of the animals. Retention of the glass granules in the defects was achieved successfully using a commercially available fibrin sealant. At five weeks post-implantation, we found macroscopic and microscopic differences between the four types of defects. The use of bioactive glass S53P4 for filling condylar osteochondral defects in rabbit femora led to the initiation of an early bone repair process, observed at five weeks after implantation, while the filling of trochlear defects with fibrin glue resulted in the appearance of cartilaginous tissue characteristic of endochondral ossification.

  2. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  3. Evaluation and analysis of graft hypertrophy by means of arthroscopy, biochemical MRI and osteochondral biopsies in a patient following autologous chondrocyte implantation for treatment of a full-thickness-cartilage defect of the knee.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Uhl, Markus; Salzmann, Gian M; Morscheid, Yannik P; Südkamp, Norbert P; Madry, Henning

    2015-06-01

    Graft hypertrophy represents a characteristic complication following autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for treatment of cartilage defects. Although some epidemiological data suggest that incidence is associated with first-generation ACI using autologous chondrocyte implantation, it has also been reported in other technical modifications of ACI using different biomaterials. Nevertheless, it has not been described in autologous, non-periosteum, implant-free associated ACI. In addition, little is known about histological and T2-relaxation appearance of graft hypertrophy. The present case report provides a rare case of extensive graft hypertrophy following ACI using an autologous spheres technique with clinical progression over time. Detailed clinical, MR tomographic and histological evaluation has been performed, which demonstrates a high quality of repair tissue within the hypertrophic as well as non-hypertrophic transplanted areas of the repair tissue. No expression of collagen type X (a sign of chondrocyte hypertrophy), only slight changes of the subchondral bone and a nearly normal cell-matrix ratio suggest that tissue within the hypertrophic area does not significantly differ from intact and high-quality repair tissue and therefore seems not to cause graft hypertrophy. This is in contrast to the assumption that histological hypertrophy might cause or contribute to an overwhelming growth of the repair tissue within the transplantation site. Data presented in this manuscript might contribute to further explain the etiology of graft hypertrophy following ACI.

  4. Osteochondral grafting for cartilage defects in the patellar grooves of bilateral knee joints.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    Autogenous osteochondral grafts have become popular recently for use in small, isolated, contained articular cartilage defects. We treated a 35-year-old man who had cartilage defects, which were the same shape and probably the result of overuse, in the patellar grooves of both knee joints. The left side was 30 x 25 mm, and the right side was 17 x 17 mm in his right patellar groove, and 15 x 7 mm in his right medial femoral condyle. Therefore, we performed multiple osteochondral grafting of the bilateral lesions. Thirty-two months after his right knee operation (37 months after his left one), he had no pain or symptoms in his left knee and occasional mild pain and catching in his right knee. At second-look arthroscopy, the joint surface of the articular cartilage in the bilateral patellar groove was almost completely smooth. However, the whole of the weight-bearing area around the grafted plugs in the medial femoral condyle showed cartilage degeneration. Approximately 3 years after implantation of osteochondral grafts into similarly shaped cartilage lesions in the bilateral patellar grooves, the operative results were good. However, careful follow up is needed.

  5. Osteochondritis of the Distal Tibial Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    EL Hajj, Firass; Sebaaly, Amer; Kharrat, Khalil; Ghanem, Ismat

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis is a very rare entity. 9 cases have been described in 7 articles and 8 other cases have been mentioned in textbooks. This paper describes the 10th case of osteochondritis of the distal tibial epiphysis and summarizes the clinical and radiological presentations of the 9 other cases. The etiology of this entity is well debated in the literature. We believe that it results from a vascular abnormality in the distal tibial epiphysis associated with a mechanical stress (trauma, excessive overload, etc.). Since it is a self-limited disease, the prognosis is good and the younger the patient is the better the prognosis will be. In general, this entity responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:23193412

  6. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-05-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage.

  7. Osteochondral allografts in arm and forearm surgery.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; De Nayer, P; Vincent, A

    1991-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting can restore the skeletal continuity anatomically after a limb salvage procedure. Evaluation of the clinical function indicates that a good result can be anticipated. Fracture was the most frequent complication, and the fixation technique we used initially predisposed the problem. The major advantage of allograft is the possibility of reinsertion of soft tissue to help stabilize the new joint. In addition, any part of the limb can potentially be reconstructed with an allograft.

  8. Repair of porcine articular cartilage defect with a biphasic osteochondral composite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Chiang, Hongsen; Liao, Chun-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ju; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Shieh, Chang-Shun; Huang, Yi-You; Tuan, Rocky S

    2007-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been recently used to treat cartilage defects. Partly because of the success of mosaicplasty, a procedure that involves the implantation of native osteochondral plugs, it is of potential significance to consider the application of ACI in the form of biphasic osteochondral composites. To test the clinical applicability of such composite construct, we repaired osteochondral defect with ACI at low cell-seeding density on a biphasic scaffold, and combined graft harvest and implantation in a single surgery. We fabricated a biphasic cylindrical porous plug of DL-poly-lactide-co-glycolide, with its lower body impregnated with beta-tricalcium phosphate as the osseous phase. Osteochondral defects were surgically created at the weight-bearing surface of femoral condyles of Lee-Sung mini-pigs. Autologous chondrocytes isolated from the cartilage were seeded into the upper, chondral phase of the plug, which was inserted by press-fitting to fill the defect. Defects treated with cell-free plugs served as control. Outcome of repair was examined 6 months after surgery. In the osseous phase, the biomaterial retained in the center and cancellous bone formed in the periphery, integrating well with native subchondral bone with extensive remodeling, as depicted on X-ray roentgenography by higher radiolucency. In the chondral phase, collagen type II immunohistochemistry and Safranin O histological staining showed hyaline cartilage regeneration in the experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue formed in the control group. On the International Cartilage Repair Society Scale, the experimental group had higher mean scores in surface, matrix, cell distribution, and cell viability than control, but was comparable with the control group in subchondral bone and mineralization. Tensile stress-relaxation behavior determined by uni-axial indentation test revealed similar creep property between the surface of the experimental specimen and native

  9. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering.

  10. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  11. Cylindrical Costal Osteochondral Autograft for Reconstruction of Large Defects of the Capitellum Due to Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Kozo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Taiichi; Miyake, Junichi; Higuchi, Haruhisa; Gamo, Kazushige; Fuji, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a need to clarify the usefulness of and problems associated with cylindrical costal osteochondral autograft for reconstruction of large defects of the capitellum due to osteochondritis dissecans. Methods: Twenty-six patients with advanced osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum were treated with use of cylindrical costal osteochondral autograft. All were males with elbow pain and full-thickness articular cartilage lesions of ≥15 mm in diameter. Clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes were evaluated at a mean follow-up of thirty-six months (range, twenty-four to fifty-one months). Results: All patients had rapid functional improvement after treatment with costal osteochondral autograft and returned to their former activities, including sports. Five patients needed additional minor surgical procedures, including screw removal, loose body removal, and shaving of protruded articular cartilage. Mean elbow function, assessed with use of the clinical rating system of Timmerman and Andrews, was 111 points preoperatively and improved to 180 points at the time of follow-up and to 190 points after the five patients underwent the additional operations. Mean elbow motion was 126° of flexion with 16° of extension loss preoperatively and improved to 133° of flexion with 3° of extension loss at the time of follow-up. Osseous union of the graft on radiographs was obtained within three months in all patients. Revascularization of the graft depicted on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and congruity of the reconstructed articular surface depicted on T2-weighted or short tau inversion recovery imaging were assessed at twelve and twenty-four months postoperatively. Functional recovery was good, and all patients were satisfied with the final outcomes. Conclusions: Cylindrical costal osteochondral autograft was useful for the treatment of advanced osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum. Functional recovery

  12. Cartilage repair: A review of Stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Bentley, G; Briggs, Twr; Skinner, Ja; Carrington, Rwj; Pollock, R; Flanagan, Am

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years.

  13. Cartilage repair: A review of Stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, S; Bentley, G; Briggs, TWR; Skinner, JA; Carrington, RWJ; Pollock, R; Flanagan, AM

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years. PMID:20697474

  14. The effects of the coupling of titanium implants and dissimilar metal abutments on osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Anderson, G I; Sutow, E J; Driscoll, C F; Mackey, D C

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of titanium endosseous dental implants coupled to dissimilar materials on the capacity of preosteoblasts in bone marrow culture to differentiate, to form alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies, and to mineralize. Ten UCLA abutments were cast in each of 4 alloys: Type III gold, ceramometal gold, commercially pure grade I titanium, and titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V); 10 ceramic abutments and 30 sterile Brånemark System implants were also used. Five abutments of each material and 5 implants were incubated individually in rat bone marrow culture, as were 5 of each abutment attached to an implant; bone marrow cultures not containing test samples were used as controls. Following 17 days of culture, the solution potentials of individual abutments (except ceramic), the implant, and the implant-abutment couples were measured in the test medium. One dish of each group of 5 was then stained for bone nodule mineralization; the remainder were quantified by area for alkaline phosphatase staining. Statistical analysis of measured in vitro potentials showed that the uncoupled samples formed 2 groups, and coupled samples formed 3 groups. Analysis of variance for alkaline phosphatase-positive area values showed no significant differences between coupled or uncoupled groups and the control. Normal cell differentiation and morphology as well as a lack of zones of inhibition, were observed. Bone nodule mineralization was evident in all groups. It was concluded that the presence of these commonly used implant abutment biomaterials coupled to titanium endosseous dental implants had no adverse effects on the in vitro capacity of preosteoblasts in marrow to differentiate and to form mineralized bone nodules, despite measured differences in solution potentials.

  15. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  16. Biodegradable poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide copolymer pin fixation of a traumatic patellar osteochondral fragment in an 11-year-old child: A novel surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Serlo, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Treating displaced patellar bone fractures in growing children remains a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Removal of loose bone fragments may prolong healing time and result in early onset osteoarthrosis. Therefore, primary fixation of osteochondral fragments is preferred. Metallic pin and screw implants are typically used for fixation, as there is little evidence available regarding the use of modern biodegradable implants in traumatic patellar fractures of a premature skeleton. The present report describes a novel operative technique using headless poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) pins in treating an 11-year-old girl with a patellar fracture from a cycling injury. The surgical technique of this procedure is described in detail in the current report. Excellent subjective outcomes were achieved from this surgery, with superb bone healing according to follow-up radiographic and computerized tomography scans. In conclusion, the results of this case indicate that, similarly to osteochondritis, intra-articular osteochondral fractures in children may be fixed using biodegradable PLGA pins. Randomized clinical trials should be performed to confirm this finding and evaluate the use of PLGA pins as a treatment for adolescent osteochondral fractures. PMID:28123496

  17. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  18. Emerging genetic basis of osteochondritis dissecans.

    PubMed

    Bates, J Tyler; Jacobs, John C; Shea, Kevin G; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an unbiased approach in the identification of genes that increase the risk for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Recent GWAS in humans, horses, and pigs are reviewed and genes identified. The identified genes tended to cluster with respect to function and biologic processes. GWAS in humans are a critical next step in the effort to provide a better understanding of the causes of OCD, which will, in turn, allow preventive strategies for treatment of adolescents and young adults who are at risk for the development of degenerative joint disease due to the effects of OCD.

  19. [Ossicular coupling of an implantable hearing aid transducer using an Er:YAG laser].

    PubMed

    Lehner, R L; Maassen, M M; Plester, D; Zenner, H P

    1997-10-01

    Special coupling devices made of pure gold or titanium have been developed to connect a new implantable hearing aid transducer (Tübingen implant) to the ossicular chain. They allow piezotransducer probe-tip connection to the long process of the incus or the stapedial head. Similar to the design of conventional PORPs (partial ossicular replacement prostheses), the coupling devices can be fixed at the ossicular chain, e.g., with the eye loop of stapedial piston prostheses or the bell element of golden wire PORPs. A crimp technique allows connection between coupling device and transducer probe tip [5]. The main disadvantage in connecting the long process of the incus or the stapes having is to drill a dorsal tympanotomy in the posterior wall of the ear canal during surgery. The short distance between tympanotomy and N. facialis contains serious surgical risks. To avoid the risk of facial paralysis, Fredrickson's alternative coupling technique for the body of the incus is investigated in this paper [2]. In this case, the transducer probe tip will be positioned to the incus body and placed on its surface with controlled elastic displacement of the ossicular chain. The simple direct attachment of the probe-tip end on the surface of the incus, however, will not guarantee a stable long-term connection. Thus, by creating a conical, 0.5-to 0.7-mm-deep hole in the incus, the probe tip will be fitted much better. With a novel surgical Erbium-YAG laser this can be done in a contactless procedure. In this paper, first results of microsurgical laser applications with human temporal bones will be shown.

  20. Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation Surgery for Metacarpal Head Defects.

    PubMed

    Kitay, Alison; Waters, Peter M; Bae, Donald S

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the metacarpal head is a challenging problem, particularly in younger patients in whom arthroplasty may not be a durable option. Although several osteochondral reconstructive options have been proposed, some are associated with considerable donor site morbidity and/or require the use of internal fixation. We present an application of osteochondral autograft transplantation surgery as a treatment option for focal metacarpal head lesions. An osteochondral plug from the non-weight-bearing articular surface of the knee is transferred and press-fit to resurface a focal metacarpal head defect. The technical pearls and pitfalls are reviewed, and an illustrative case is presented.

  1. Osteochondral Lesions of the Talar Dome.

    PubMed

    Stone

    1996-03-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talar dome are relatively common causes of ankle pain and disability. Trauma is the most common cause, but ischemic necrosis, en-docrine disorders, and genetic factors may have etiologic significance. Medial lesions are usually located posteriorly on the dome of the talus, whereas lateral lesions are most frequently located anteriorly. Although the staging system described by Berndt and Harty remains popular, it may not accurately reflect the integrity of the articular cartilage. Small lesions of the talar dome may be present despite a normal appearance on plain radiography. Bone scintigraphy may show increased radionuclide uptake in the talar dome. Magnetic resonance imaging is also sensitive for identifying intraosseous abnormalities in the talus and has the added benefit of revealing other types of soft-tissue lesions not visible on routine radiographic studies. Computed tomography remains the imaging technique of choice when delineation of a bone fragment is desired. Nonoperative management of osteochondral lesions, including restricted weight-bearing and/or immobilization, is recommended unless a loose fragment is clearly present. Surgical options include drilling (usually reserved for intact lesions), debridement of the lesion with curettage or abrasion of the bone bed, internal fixation of the fragment, and bone grafting. Recent technical advances allow these procedures to be performed arthroscopically, with potential reduction of surgical trauma, length of hospital stay, and complication rates.

  2. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; van den Ende, Kimberly IM; ten Brinke, Bart; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a disorder of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. In the elbow, an OCD is localized most commonly at the humeral capitellum. Teenagers engaged in sports that involve repetitive stress on the elbow are at risk. A high index of suspicion is warranted to prevent delay in the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may disclose the lesion but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are more accurate in the detection of OCD. To determine the best treatment option it is important to differentiate between stable and unstable OCD lesions. Stable lesions can be initially treated nonoperatively with elbow rest or activity modification and physical therapy. Unstable lesions and stable lesions not responding to conservative therapy require a surgical approach. Arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing has become the standard initial procedure for treatment of capitellar OCD. Numerous other surgical options have been reported, including internal fixation of large fragments and osteochondral autograft transfer. The aim of this article is to provide a current concepts review of the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of elbow OCD. PMID:26925381

  3. Current management of talar osteochondral lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gianakos, Arianna L; Yasui, Youichi; Hannon, Charles P; Kennedy, John G

    2017-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) occur in up to 70% of acute ankle sprains and fractures. OLT have become increasingly recognized with the advancements in cartilage-sensitive diagnostic imaging modalities. Although OLT may be treated nonoperatively, a number of surgical techniques have been described for patients whom surgery is indicated. Traditionally, treatment of symptomatic OLT have included either reparative procedures, such as bone marrow stimulation (BMS), or replacement procedures, such as autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT). Reparative procedures are generally indicated for OLT < 150 mm2 in area. Replacement strategies are used for large lesions or after failed primary repair procedures. Although short- and medium-term results have been reported, long-term studies on OLT treatment strategies are lacking. Biological augmentation including platelet-rich plasma and concentrated bone marrow aspirate is becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of OLT to enhance the biological environment during healing. In this review, we describe the most up-to-date clinical evidence of surgical outcomes, as well as both the mechanical and biological concerns associated with BMS and AOT. In addition, we will review the recent evidence for biological adjunct therapies that aim to improve outcomes and longevity of both BMS and AOT procedures. PMID:28144574

  4. Modeling of the Near Field Coupling Between an External Loop and an Implantable Spiral Chip Antennas in Biosensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the near field coupling between an external hand-held loop antenna and an implantable miniature (1x1 mm) printed square spiral chip antenna used in bio-MEMS sensors for contact-less powering and RF telemetry is investigated. The loop and the spiral are inductively coupled and effectively form a transformer. The numerical results include the quasi-stationary magnetic field pattern of the implanted antenna, near zone wave impedance as a function of the radial distance and the values of the lumped elements in the equivalent circuit model for the transformer.

  5. The maturity of tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro affects the repairability for osteochondral defect.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng Zhe; Cho, Jae-Ho; Choi, Byung Hyune; Wang, Li Ming; Kim, Moon Suk; Park, So Ra; Yoon, Jeong Ho; Yun, Jung Ho; Oh, Hyun Ju; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering using cells and biocompatible scaffolds has emerged as a promising approach to repair of cartilage damage. To date, however, no engineered cartilage has proven to be equivalent to native cartilage in terms of biochemical and compression properties, as well as histological features. An alternative strategy for cartilage engineering is to focus on the in vivo regeneration potential of immature engineered cartilage. Here, we used a rabbit model to evaluate the extent to which the maturity of engineered cartilage influenced the remodeling and integration of implanted extracellular matrix scaffolds containing allogenous chondrocytes. Full-thickness osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of New Zealand white rabbits. Left knee defects were left untreated as a control (group 1), and right knee defects were implanted with tissue-engineered cartilage cultured in vitro for 2 days (group 2), 2 weeks (group 3), or 4 weeks (group 4). Histological, chemical, and compression assays of engineered cartilage in vitro showed that biochemical composition became more cartilagenous, and biomechanical property for compression gradually increased with culture time. In an in vivo study, gross imaging and histological observation at 1 and 3 months after implanting in vitro-cultured engineered cartilage showed that defects in groups 3 and 4 were repaired with hyaline cartilage-like tissue, whereas defects were only partially filled with fibrocartilage after 1 month in groups 1 and 2. At 3 months, group 4 showed striking features of hyaline cartilage tissue, with a mature matrix and a columnar arrangement of chondrocytes. Zonal distribution of type II collagen was most prominent, and the International Cartilage Repair Society score was also highest at this time. In addition, the subchondral bone was well ossified. In conclusion, in vivo engineered cartilage was remodeled when implanted; however, its extent to maturity varied with cultivation

  6. Current Concepts: Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum and the Role of Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Jacob M; Thomas, Jared; Bedi, Asheesh; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2016-12-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is a painful condition, which often affects young throwing athletes. Our current understanding regarding the etiology, risks factors, diagnosis, and efficacy of the available treatment options has expanded over recent years, however remains suboptimal. Recent data on patient-reported outcomes following osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) for the treatment of large osteochondral lesions of the capitellum have been promising but limited. This review seeks to critically analyze and summarize the available literature on the etiology, diagnosis, and reported outcomes associated with OCD of the capitellum and the use of OAT for its treatment. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted. Unique and customized search strategies were formulated in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and CENTRAL. Combinations of keywords and controlled vocabulary terms were utilized in order to cast a broad net. Relevant clinical, biomechanical, anatomic and imaging studies were reviewed along with recent review articles, and case series. Results: Forty-three articles from our initial literature search were found to be relevant for this review. The majority of these articles were either review articles, clinical studies, anatomic or imaging studies or biomechanical studies. Conclusions: Current evidence suggests that OAT may lead to better and more consistent outcomes than previously described methods for treating large OCD lesions of the capitellum.

  7. [Osteochondritis dissecans of the acetabulum. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Hardy, P; Hinojosa, J F; Coudane, H; Sommelet, J; Benoit, J

    1992-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans acetabuli is a rare affection. The observation presented is one of a 23 year old man, who presented hip blockages in external flexion rotation. X-ray only allowed to find a sequestrum in the acetabulum by tomography-Arthroscanner confirmed the osteochondritis without cartilage rupture. Arthroscopy eliminated a cartilage lesion and directed towards a cavity filled by spongious bone through an extra articular approach.

  8. Cartilage repair with osteochondral autografts in sheep: effect of biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Franco; Cadossi, Matteo; Cavani, Francesco; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Giardino, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on the integration of osteochondral autografts was evaluated in sheep. After osteochondral grafts were performed, the animals were treated with PEMFs for 6 h/day or sham-treated. Six animals were sacrificed at 1 month. Fourteen animals were treated for 2 months and sacrificed at 6 months. At 1 month, the osteogenic activity at the transplant-host subchondral bone interface was increased in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. Articular cartilage was healthy in controls and stimulated animals. At 6 months, complete resorption was observed in four control grafts only. Cyst-like resorption areas were more frequent within the graft of sham-treated animals versus PEMF-treated. The average volume of the cysts was not significantly different between the two groups; nevertheless, analysis of the variance of the volumes demonstrated a significant difference. The histological score showed no significant differences between controls and stimulated animals, but the percentage of surface covered by fibrous tissue was higher in the control group than in the stimulated one. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentration in the synovial fluid was significantly lower, and transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly higher, in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. One month after osteochondral graft implantation, we observed larger bone formation in PEMF-treated grafts which favors early graft stabilization. In the long term, PEMF exposure limited the bone resorption in subchondral bone; furthermore, the cytokine profile in the synovial fluid was indicative of a more favorable articular environment for the graft.

  9. Optical integration of laterally modified multiple quantum well structures by implantation enhanced intermixing to realize gain coupled DFB lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäß, V.; Kuhn, J.; Kaden, C.; Härle, V.; Bolay, H.; Scholz, F.; Schweizer, H.; Hillmer, H.; Lösch, R.; Schlapp, W.

    1995-12-01

    We report on the realization of gain coupled distributed feedback (GC-DFB) lasers using masked implantation enhanced intermixing (MIEI) in a full planar technology. The process requires only planar epitaxy steps to minimize ion straggling. We present a detailed investigation on the integration processing steps as implantation, subsequent annealing and regrowth with InP (MOCVD). We also discuss critical technology steps. Surface morphology depends very sensitive on implantation and annealing. Nonradiative recombination caused by defects leads to high losses in optical devices. We achieve good results for an AsH 3 stabilized annealing step in a MOCVD equipment, compared to rapid thermal annealing (RTA), which proceeds as the second epitaxial step. Photoluminescence (PL) studies show the excellent interface quality. High homogeneity and small linewidth after the integration process indicate sufficient quality to realize electrical gain coupled DFB-laser devices by IEI.

  10. Effect of lateral meniscectomy and osteochondral grafting of a lateral femoral condylar defect on contact mechanics: a cadaveric study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteochondral autograft transfer (OAT) aims at restoring normal articular cartilage surface geometry and articular contact mechanics. To date, no studies have evaluated the contact mechanics of the canine stifle following OAT. Additionally, there are no studies that evaluated the role of the meniscus in contact mechanics following OAT in human or canine femorotibial joints. The objective of this study was to measure the changes in femorotibial contact areas (CA), mean contact pressure (MCP) and peak contact pressure (PCP) before and after osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) of a simulated lateral femoral condylar cartilage defect with an intact lateral meniscus and following lateral meniscectomy. Results With an intact lateral meniscus, creation of an osteochondral defect caused a decrease in MCP and PCP by 11% and 30%, respectively, compared to the intact stifle (p < 0.01). With an intact meniscus, implanting an osteochondral graft restored MCP and PCP to 96% (p = 0.56) and 92% (p = 0.41) of the control values. Lateral meniscectomy with grafting decreased CA by 54% and increased PCP by 79% compared to the intact stifle (p < 0.01). Conclusions OAT restored contact pressures in stifles with a simulated lateral condylar defect when the meniscus was intact. The lateral meniscus has a significant role in maintaining normal contact pressures in both stifles with a defect or following OAT. Meniscectomy should be avoided when a femoral condylar defect is present and when performing OAT. PMID:23522348

  11. Osteochondral repair in hemophilic ankle arthropathy: from current options to future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    BUDA, ROBERTO; CAVALLO, MARCO; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; FERRANTI, ENRICO; NATALI, SIMONE; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2015-01-01

    Young hemophilic patients are frequently affected by ankle arthropathy. At the end stage of the disease, the current treatments are arthrodesis and arthroplasty, which have significant drawbacks. Validated procedures capable of slowing down or even arresting the progression towards the end stage are currently lacking. This review aims to discuss the rationale for and feasibility of applying, in mild hemophilic ankle arthropathy, the main techniques currently used to treat osteochondral defects, focusing in particular on ankle distraction, chondrocyte implantation, mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, allograft transplantation and the use of growth factors. To date, ankle distraction is the only procedure that has been successfully used in hemophilic ankle arthropathy. The use of mesenchymal stem cells have recently been evaluated as feasible for osteochondral repair in hemophilic patients. There may be a rationale for the use of growth factors if they are combined with the previous techniques, which could be useful to arrest the progression of the degeneration or delay end-stage procedures. PMID:26904526

  12. Effect of porosities of bilayered porous scaffolds on spontaneous osteochondral repair in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-bilayered scaffolds with the same porosity or different ones on the two layers were fabricated, and the porosity effect on in vivo repairing of the osteochondral defect was examined in a comparative way for the first time. The constructs of scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were implanted into pre-created osteochondral defects in the femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. After 12 weeks, all experimental groups exhibited good cartilage repairing according to macroscopic appearance, cross-section view, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction of characteristic genes. The group of 92% porosity in the cartilage layer and 77% porosity in the bone layer resulted in the best efficacy, which was understood by more biomechanical mimicking of the natural cartilage and subchondral bone. This study illustrates unambiguously that cartilage tissue engineering allows for a wide range of scaffold porosity, yet some porosity group is optimal. It is also revealed that the biomechanical matching with the natural composite tissue should be taken into consideration in the design of practical biomaterials, which is especially important for porosities of a multi-compartment scaffold concerning connected tissues. PMID:26813511

  13. Engineered osteochondral grafts using biphasic composite solid free-form fabricated scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Schek, Rachel M; Taboas, Juan M; Segvich, Sharon J; Hollister, Scott J; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2004-01-01

    Tissue engineering has provided an alternative to traditional strategies to repair cartilage damaged by injury or degenerative disease. A successful strategy to engineer osteochondral tissue will mimic the natural contour of the articulating surface, achieve native mechanical properties and functional load-bearing ability, and lead to integration with host cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. Image-based design (IBD) and solid free-form (SFF) fabrication can be used to generate scaffolds that are load bearing and match articular geometry. The objective of this study was to utilize materials and biological factors in an integrated approach to regenerate a multitissue interface. Biphasic composite scaffolds manufactured by IBD and SFF fabrication were used to simultaneously generate bone and cartilage in discrete regions and provide for the development of a stable interface between cartilage and subchondral bone. Poly-L-lactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were differentially seeded with fibroblasts transduced with an adenovirus expressing bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) in the ceramic phase and fully differentiated chondrocytes in the polymeric phase. After subcutaneous implantation into mice, the biphasic scaffolds promoted the simultaneous growth of bone, cartilage, and a mineralized interface tissue. Within the ceramic phase, the pockets of tissue generated included blood vessels, marrow stroma, and adipose tissue. This combination of IBD and SFF-fabricated biphasic scaffolds with gene and cell therapy is a promising approach to regenerate osteochondral defects.

  14. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology.

  15. COMPARATIVE MACROSCOPIC STUDY OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS PRODUCED IN FEMURS OF RABBITS REPAIRED WITH BIOPOLYMER GEL CANE SUGAR

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Paulo Cezar Vidal Carneiro; dos Santos, Saulo Monteiro; de Andrade Aguiar, José Lamartine; Filho, Nicodemus Pontes; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira; Costa, Mariana Lúcia Correia Ramos; de Albuquerque Olbertz, Clarissa Miranda Carneiro; de Souza Almeida, Tarciana Mendonça; da Silva Santos, Alessandro Henrique; da Silva, Joacil Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of osteochondral defects produced in the femoral condyles of rabbits and filled with sugar cane biopolymer gel (SCBG), after 90, 120 and 180 days, and in comparison with a control group. Method: Sixteen adult New Zealand white rabbits aged 6 to 7 months, weighing between 2 and 2.5 kg and without locomotor system abnormalities were studied. In all the animals, a defect was made in the femoral condyles of the right and left knees, measuring 3.2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth, using a trephine. The animals were divided into two groups: study group formed by the right knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles received implants of SCBG; and control group formed by the left knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles were allowed to heal naturally. The knees were assessed 90, 120 and 180 days after the operation. After the animals had been sacrificed, the anatomical specimens were resected and placed in Bouin's solution. They were then photographed with a Nikon Coolpix 5400® coupled to a Nikon SM2800® stereoscopic loupe, to analyze the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing. Results: The results were evaluated using the chi-square test. There were no significant differences in the macroscopic assessments of healing between the study and control groups. Conclusion: With regard to the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of the defects, the macroscopic appearance of the tissue repaired with SCBG was similar to that of the control group. PMID:27027057

  16. Evaluation of a hybrid scaffold/cell construct in repair of high-load-bearing osteochondral defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin Xin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Ho, Saey Tuan; Goh, James C H; Lee, Eng Hin

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential of a hybrid scaffold system in large- and high-load-bearing osteochondral defects repair. The implants were made of medical-grade PCL (mPCL) for the bone compartment whereas fibrin glue was used for the cartilage part. Both matrices were seeded with allogenic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSC) and implanted in the defect (4 mm diameter x 5 mm depth) on medial femoral condyle of adult New Zealand White rabbits. Empty scaffolds were used at the control side. Cell survival was tracked via fluorescent labeling. The regeneration process was evaluated by several techniques at 3 and 6 months post-implantation. Mature trabecular bone regularly formed in the mPCL scaffold at both 3 and 6 months post-operation. Micro-Computed Tomography showed progression of mineralization from the host-tissue interface towards the inner region of the grafts. At 3 months time point, the specimens showed good cartilage repair. In contrast, the majority of 6 months specimens revealed poor remodeling and fissured integration with host cartilage while other samples could maintain good cartilage appearance. In vivo viability of the transplanted cells was demonstrated for the duration of 5 weeks. The results demonstrated that mPCL scaffold is a potential matrix for osteochondral bone regeneration and that fibrin glue does not inherit the physical properties to allow for cartilage regeneration in a large and high-load-bearing defect site.

  17. Osteochondral tissue engineering with biphasic scaffold: current strategies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Murawski, Christopher D; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2014-10-01

    The management of osteoarthritis (OA) remains challenging and controversial. Although several clinical options exist for the treatment of OA, regeneration of the damaged articular cartilage has proved difficult due to the limited healing capacity. With the advancements in tissue engineering and cell-based technologies over the past decade, new therapeutic options for patients with osteochondral lesions potentially exist. This review will focus on the feasibility of tissue-engineered biphasic scaffolds, which can mimic the native osteochondral complex, for osteochondral repair and highlight the recent development of these techniques toward tissue regeneration. Moreover, basic anatomy, strategy for osteochondral repair, the design and fabrication methods of scaffolds, as well as the choice of cells, growth factor, and materials will be discussed. Specifically, we focus on the latest preclinical animal studies using large animals and clinical trials with high clinical relevance. In turn, this will facilitate an understanding of the latest trends in osteochondral repair and contribute to the future application of such clinical therapies in patients with OA.

  18. [Long-term follow-up of osteochondritis dissecans].

    PubMed

    Gudas, Rimtautas; Kunigiskis, Giedrius; Kalesinskas, Romas Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with osteochondritis dissecans lesions were evaluated after 7-25 years after excision of a partially detached (grade III) fragment or loose (grade IV) fragment from the medial femoral condyles. Average follow-up time was 17.2 (range 7-25 years). Two homogenic groups based on special inclusion criteria were formed; 31 patient was in the first and 21--in the second group. The only difference between the groups was the age; the age average in the first group was--25.6 years (range 15-35 years), and -45.2 years (range 35-55 years) in the second group. Patients were evaluated through ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society), modified HSS and KOOS (Knee injury and osteoarthritis Outcome score) scales, and with X-rays. Evaluation with the ICRS, modified HSS and KOOS rating scales for osteochondritis dissecans revealed in 9 cases (17%) good results, 32 cases (62%)--fair, and 11 cases (21%)--failure results. Final ICRS and modified HSS evaluation showed statistically significantly better results in the younger patient group at the 21 years (p < 0.04). At an average 17.2 year follow-up X-rays and KOOS evaluation form showed initial and second-degree (according to Ahlbäck) osteoarthritis signs in the knees. The long-term results of the natural history of osteochondritis dissecans are extremely poor. Consequently, we recommend autologous osteochondral grafting for the replacement of the osteochondritis dissecans defects in the knee joint.

  19. The effects of ion implantation on the tribology of perfluoropolyether-lubricated 440C stainless steel couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wilbur, Paul J.; Pilar, Herrera-Fierro; Williamson, Don L.

    1995-01-01

    The lubricating lifetime of thin films of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) based on hexafluoropropene oxide in the presence of ion implanted 440C stainless steel is presented. Stainless steel discs, either unimplanted or implanted with N2, C, Ti, Ti + N2, or Ti + C had a thin film of PFPE (60-400 A) applied to them reproducibly (+/- 20 percent) and uniformly (+/- 15 percent) using a device developed for this study. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding-wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unimplanted couple. The tests were performed in a dry nitrogen atmosphere (less than 1 percent RH) at room temperature using a 3 N normal load with a relative sliding speed of 0.05 m/s. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was increased by an order of magnitude by implanting the disc with Ti. Ranked from most to least effective, the implanted species were: Ti; Ti+C; unimplanted; N2; C approximately equals Ti+N2. The mechanism postulated to explain these results involves the formation of a passivating or reactive layer which inhibits or facilitates the production of active sites. The corresponding surface microstructures induced by ion implantation, obtained using x-ray diffraction and conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy, ranked from most to least effective in enhancing lubricant lifetime were: amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti; amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-C + TiC; unimplanted; epsilon-(Fe,Cr)(sub x)N, x = 2 or 3; amorphous Fe-Cr-C approximately equals amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-N.

  20. Treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee with a biomimetic scaffold. A prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DELCOGLIANO, MARCO; MENGHI, AMERIGO; PLACELLA, GIACOMO; SPEZIALI, ANDREA; CERULLI, GIULIANO; CARIMATI, GIULIA; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; BERRUTO, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee with a type-I collagen-hydroxyapatite nanostructural biomimetic osteochondral scaffold. Methods twenty-three patients affected by symptomatic knee OCD of the femoral condyles, grade 3 or 4 of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale, underwent biomimetic scaffold implantation. The site of the defect was the medial femoral condyle in 14 patients, whereas in 9 patients the lateral femoral condyle was involved. The average size of the defects was 3.5±1.43 cm2. All patients were clinically evaluated using the ICRS subjective score, the IKDC objective score, the EQ-VAS and the Tegner Activity Score. Minimum follow-up was two years. MRI was performed at 12 and 24 months after surgery and then every 12 months thereafter. Results the ICRS subjective score improved from the baseline value of 50.93±20.6 to 76.44±18.03 at the 12 months (p<0.0005) and 82.23± 17.36 at the two-year follow-up (p<0.0005). The IKDC objective score confirmed the results. The EQ-VAS showed a significant improvement from 3.15±1.09 to 8.15±1.04 (p<0.0005) at two years of follow-up. The Tegner Activity Score improvement was statistically significant (p<0.0005). Conclusions biomimetic scaffold implantation was a good procedure for treating grade 3 and 4 OCD, in which other classic techniques are burdened by different limitations. This open one-step surgery gave promising stable results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:25606552

  1. Clinical outcomes following osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS).

    PubMed

    Lahav, Amit; Burks, Robert T; Greis, Patrick E; Chapman, Andrew W; Ford, Gregory M; Fink, Barbara P

    2006-07-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcome in 21 patients (22 knees) undergoing osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS) in the knee over a 5-year period. Sixteen knees in 15 patients were available for follow-up at an average of 40 months after the procedure. The clinical outcome was analyzed using the IKDC and Knee and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) evaluation forms, a subjective questionnaire, and a clinical examination. At final follow-up, the average KOOS result for pain was 80.6 (range: 56-94), symptoms 53.6 (range: 25-71), function of activities of daily living 93.4 (range: 79-100), function of sports and recreational activities 65.3 (range: 20-100), and quality of life 51.0 (range: 6-88). The average IKDC score was 68.2. On our subjective questionnaire, the average preoperative grade given was 3.1 (range: 1-7) with an improvement at the most recent follow-up to a grade of 8.0 (range: 5-10) (P < .00001). Thirteen (86%) patients reported that they would have the surgery again if they had to make the decision a second time. Age did not correlate with subjective results on the IKDC evaluation (P = .7048) or score difference on our questionnaire (P = .9175). This procedure provides an option for articular resurfacing of the femoral condyles for focal areas of chondral defects with promising results regarding subjective improvement.

  2. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. Design The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Results Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months’ follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D’Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months’ follow-up. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program. PMID:27375837

  3. The European Court legitimates access of Italian couples to assisted reproductive techniques and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Gulino, Matteo; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-07-01

    On 28 August 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) issued a judgment regarding the requirements for the legitimate access of couples to assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This judgment concerns the case of an Italian couple who found out after their first child was born with cystic fibrosis that they were healthy carriers of the disease. When the woman became pregnant again in 2010 and underwent fetal screening, it was found that the unborn child also had cystic fibrosis, whereupon she had the pregnancy terminated on medical grounds. In order to have the embryo genetically screened prior to implantation under the procedure of PGD, the couple sought to use in vitro fertilisation to have another child. Since article 1 of the Italian law strictly limits access to ART to sterile/infertile couples or those in which the man has a sexually transmissible disease, the couple appealed to the European court, raising the question of the violation of articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicants lodged a complaint that they were not allowed legitimate access to ART and to PGD to select an embryo not affected by the disease. The European Court affirmed that the prohibition imposed by Italian law violated article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Focusing on important regulatory and legal differences among EU Nations in providing ART treatments and PGD, we derived some important similarities and differences.

  4. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  5. MRI scanning in patients implanted with a round window or stapes coupled floating mass transducer of the Vibrant Soundbridge.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Daniel; Ernst, Arne; Todt, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion MRI examinations in patients with an alternatively coupled VSB can lead to unpleasant side-effects. However, the residual hearing was not impaired, whereas the hearing performance with the VSB was decreased in one patient which could be fixed by a surgical revision. Different experiences for the VSB 503 can be expected. Objective To investigate the in vivo effects of MRI scanning on the Vibrant Soundbridge system (VSB) with an alternatively coupled Floating Mass Transducer (FMT). Method Sixty-five VSB (502) implantees were included in this study. Of them, 42 questionnaires could be evaluated with the patients' statements about their medical, otological, and general condition before, during, and after an MRI scan which was indicated for different medical reasons, despite the previous implantation of an alternatively coupled Vibrant Soundbridge System. Results In four patients (9.5%), five MRI examinations were performed. These were done for different indications (e.g. knee and shoulder joint diagnostics). During the scanning, noise and subjectively perceived distortion of the implant were described. A deterioration of the hearing gain with the VSB in place was found in one patient. A decrease of the hearing threshold was not observed.

  6. Inactivation of Vhl in Osteochondral Progenitor Cells Causes High Bone Mass Phenotype and Protects Against Age-Related Bone Loss in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Yi, Lingxian; He, Qifen; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of von Hippel–Lindau gene (Vhl) coincides with activation of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) signaling in bone cells and plays an important role in bone development, homeostasis, and regeneration. It is known that activation of HIF1α signaling in mature osteoblasts is central to the coupling between angiogenesis and bone formation. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the coupling between skeletal angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone remodeling are only partially elucidated. To evaluate the role of Vhl in bone homeostasis and the coupling between vascular physiology and bone, we generated mice lacking Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells (referred to as Vhl cKO mice) at postnatal and adult stages in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and changes in skeletal morphology were assessed by micro–computed tomography (µCT), histology, and bone histomorphometry. We found that mice with inactivation of Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells at the postnatal stage largely phenocopied that of mice lacking Vhl in mature osteoblasts, developing striking and progressive accumulation of cancellous bone with increased microvascular density and bone formation. These were accompanied with a significant increase in osteoblast proliferation, upregulation of differentiation marker Runx2 and osteocalcin, and elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In addition, we found that Vhl deletion in osteochondral progenitor cells in adult bone protects mice from aging-induced bone loss. Our data suggest that the VHL-mediated signaling in osteochondral progenitor cells plays a critical role in bone remodeling at postnatal/adult stages through coupling osteogenesis and angiogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:23999831

  7. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; ...

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  8. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  9. Osteochondral Lesion of the Bilateral Femoral Heads in a Young Athletic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Cho, Yoon Je; Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young; Jin, Wook; Lee, Kyung Ryeol

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the femoral head are uncommon and few studies have reported their imaging findings. Since joints are at risk of early degeneration after osteochondral damage, timely recognition is important. Osteochondral lesions of femoral head may often be necessary to differentiate from avascular necrosis. Here, we report a case of osteochondral lesions on bilateral femoral heads. This lesion manifested as subchondral cysts in initial radiographs, which led to further evaluation by computed tomography arthrography and magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed overlying cartilage defects. PMID:25469091

  10. Inductive coupling links for lowest misalignment effects in transcutaneous implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saad Mutashar; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-06-01

    Use of transcutaneous inductive links is a widely known method for the wireless powering of bio-implanted devices such as implanted microsystems. The design of the coil for inductive links is generally not optimal. In this study, inductive links were used on the basis of the small loop antenna theory to reduce the effects of lateral coil misalignments on the biological human tissue model at 13.56 MHz. The tissue, which measures 60 mm×70 mm×5 mm, separates the reader and the implanted coils. The aligned coils and the lateral misalignment coils were investigated in different parametric x-distance misalignments. The optimal coil layout was developed on the basis of the layout rules presented in previous studies. Results show that the gain around the coils, which were separated by wet and dry skin, was constant and confirmed the omnidirectional radiation pattern even though the lateral misalignment between coils was smaller or greater than the implanted coil radius. This misalignment can be <4 mm or >6 mm up to 8 mm. Moreover, coil misalignments and skin condition do not affect the efficient performance of the coil.

  11. Osteochondral defect repair using a polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid (PVA-PAAc) hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bichara, David A; Bodugoz-Sentruk, Hatice; Ling, Doris; Malchau, Erik; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2014-08-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels can be candidates for articular cartilage repair due to their high water content. We synthesized a PVA-poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel formulation and determined its ability to function as a treatment option for condylar osteochondral (OC) defects in a New Zealand white rabbit (NZWR) model for 12 weeks and 24 weeks. In addition to hydrogel OC implants, tensile bar-shaped hydrogels were also implanted subcutaneously to evaluate changes in mechanical properties as a function of in vivo duration. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in the water content measured in the OC hydrogel implant that was harvested after 12 weeks and 24 weeks, and non-implanted controls. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in the break stress, strain at break or modulus of the tensile bars either between groups. Histological analysis of the OC defect, synovial capsule and fibrous tissue around the tensile bars determined hydrogel biocompatibility. Twelve-week hydrogels were found to be in situ flush with the articular cartilage; meniscal tissue demonstrated an intact surface. Twenty-four week hydrogels protruded from the defect site due to lack of integration with subchondral tissue, causing fibrillation to the meniscal surface. Condylar micro-CT scans ruled out osteolysis and bone cysts of the subchondral bone, and no PVA-PAAc hydrogel contents were found in the synovial fluid. The PVA-PAAc hydrogel was determined to be fully biocompatible, maintained its properties over time, and performed well at the 12 week time point. Physical fixation of the PVA-PAAc hydrogel to the subchondral bone is required to ensure long-term performance of hydrogel plugs for OC defect repair.

  12. Effect of fluoride on the corrosion behavior of Ti and Ti6Al4V dental implants coupled with different superstructures.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Eman M; Kheiralla, Lamia S; Tammam, Riham H

    2011-06-01

    The effect of fluoride ion concentration on the corrosion behavior of Ti and Ti6Al4V implant alloys, when coupled with either metal/ceramic or all-ceramic superstructure, was examined by different electrochemical methods in artificial saliva solutions. It was concluded that increased fluoride concentration leads to a decrease in the corrosion resistance of all tested couples. The type of the superstructure also showed a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the couple.

  13. Recent Advances in Egypt for Treatment of Talar Osteochondral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Amgad M; AbouSayed, Mostafa M; Gomaa, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of osteochondral defects (OCLs) of the talus is a challenging orthopedic surgery. Treatment of talar OCLs has evolved through the 3 "R" paradigm: reconstruction, repair, and replacement. This article highlights current state-of-the-art techniques and reviews recent advances in the literature about articular cartilage repair using various novel tissue engineering approaches, including various scaffolds, growth factors, and cell niches; which include chondrocytes and culture-expanded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  14. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Margaret A.; Castro, Nathan J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  15. Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering Using Macroscopic Gradients of Bioactive Signals

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, Nathan H.; Singh, Milind; Wang, Limin; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous gradients exist at osteochondral interfaces, which may be engineered by applying spatially patterned gradients of biological cues. In the present study, a protein-loaded microsphere-based scaffold fabrication strategy was applied to achieve spatially and temporally controlled delivery of bioactive signals in three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering scaffolds. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-β1-loaded poly(d,llactic- co-glycolic acid) microspheres were utilized with a gradient scaffold fabrication technology to produce microsphere-based scaffolds containing opposing gradients of these signals. Constructs were then seeded with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) or human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCMSCs), and osteochondral tissue regeneration was assessed in gradient scaffolds and compared to multiple control groups. Following a 6-week cell culture, the gradient scaffolds produced regionalized extracellular matrix, and outperformed the blank control scaffolds in cell number, glycosaminoglycan production, collagen content, alkaline phosphatase activity, and in some instances, gene expression of major osteogenic and chondrogenic markers. These results suggest that engineered signal gradients may be beneficial for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:20379780

  16. Review of the biomechanics and biotribology of osteochondral grafts used for surgical interventions in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Bowland, Philippa; Ingham, E; Jennings, Louise; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    A review of research undertaken to evaluate the biomechanical stability and biotribological behaviour of osteochondral grafts in the knee joint and a brief discussion of areas requiring further improvement in future studies are presented. The review takes into consideration osteochondral autografts, allografts, tissue engineered constructs and synthetic and biological scaffolds. PMID:26614801

  17. Subchondral nacre implant in the articular zone of the sheep's knee: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Marthe; Delattre, Olivier; Gillet, Pierre; Lopez, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to analyze the intra-articular behaviour of nacre, when implanted in the subchondral bone area in the sheep knee. We implanted nacre blocks in sheep's trochlea by replacing the half of the femoral trochlea (nacre group). For comparison we used complete cartilage resection (resection group) down to the subchondral bone. In the "nacre group", implants were well tolerated without any synovial inflammation. In addition, we observed centripetal regrowth of new cartilage after 3 months. In the "resection group", no chondral regrowth was observed, but, in contrast, a thin layer of fibrous tissue was formed. After 6 months, a new tissue covered the nacre implant formed by an osteochondral regrowth. Nacre, as a subchondral implant, exerts benefic potential for osteochondral repair.

  18. Improvement in magnetic field immunity of externally-coupled transcutaneous energy transmission system for a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) that uses electromagnetic induction between the external and internal coils of a transformer is the most promising method to supply driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart without invasion. Induction-heating (IH) cookers generate magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with the external and internal coils of the transcutaneous transformer. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. Hence, it is necessary to improve the magnetic field immunity of the TET system. During operation of the system, if the transcutaneous transformer is in close proximity to an IH cooker, the electric power generated by the cooker and coupled to the transformer can drive the artificial heart system. To prevent this coupling, the external coil was shielded with a conductive shield that had a slit in it. This reduces the coupling between the transformer and the magnetic field generated by the induction cooker. However, the temperature of the shield increased due to heating by eddy currents. The temperature of the shield can be reduced by separating the IH cooker and the shield.

  19. Ultrafast all-optical switch with cross-phase modulation by area-selective ion implantation in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jijun; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Hasama, Toshifumi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-12-10

    We have developed a compact gate switch with monolithic integration of all-optical cross-phase modulation (XPM) in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). XPM is caused by intersubband transition (ISBT) in InGaAs/AlAsSb coupled double quantum wells (CDQWs) by area-selective silicon ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). While injecting pump light through a transverse electric/transverse magnetic (TE/TM) beam combiner, XPM is induced in one MZI arm and gating operation can be realized. The RTA condition is optimized, and the sample is annealed at 780 °C for 8 s with an implantation dose of 5 × 10(13) cm(-2). Dependence of XPM efficiency on the length of the implanted mesa is also analyzed, and there exists an optimum implantation length to fulfill both high efficiency of ISBT modulation and low loss of the probe and pump signals.

  20. Solcoseryl, a tissue respiration stimulating agent, significantly enhances the effect of capacitively coupled electric field on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Morio; Wang, Pao-Li; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Takashima, Shigenori; Kagami, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Yukito; Kaku, Tohru; Sakaguchi, Kunihiko

    2003-06-01

    In the present study we examined the combined effect of application of a capacitively coupled electric field (CCEF) and the tissue respiration stimulating agent, Solcoseryl, on the promotion of bone formation around dental implants histologically and mechanically. After a dental implant was inserted into each femur of Japanese white rabbits, Solcoseryl (2 ml/kg) was administered intravenously in the ear vein and a CCEF was applied for 4 h per day for 14 days. The degree of bone formation on microscopic observation, bone contact ratio, bone surface area ratio, and the level of removal torque of the implant in the Solcoseryl- and CCEF-treated group were significantly higher than the respective value in the control group, which had not been treated with Solcoseryl nor CCEF. Thus, the combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl effectively promoted the formation of new bone. It is suggested that the clinical use of a combination of CCEF stimulation and Solcoseryl for dental implants promotes osseointegration.

  1. Technique: Osteochondral Grafting of Capitate Chondrosis in PRC

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Peter; Imbriglia, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a useful treatment option for wrist arthritis, but the operation is contraindicated when there is arthritis of the capitate head. We describe a technique that involves resurfacing of a capitate that has focal chondrosis, using an osteochondral graft harvested from the resected carpal bones. Materials and Methods PRC patients who had a focal area of capitate chondrosis underwent osteochondral grafting of the capitate. Pre- and postoperative pain level, employment status, motion, grip strength, and Modified Mayo Wrist Scores (MMWS) were assessed. Postoperative Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores were also calculated. Description of Technique The articular surface of the capitate is assessed for need for grafting. The proximal row is resected with the lunate removed intact. The arthritic area is prepared. The graft is taken from the lunate and placed in the prepared site of the capitate. Results Eight patients (average age of 53 years) were followed for 18 months. Pain: Preoperatively, moderate to severe in 7 patients; postoperatively, mild to no pain in 7 patients. Motion: Preoperative, 84° (74% of the contralateral side); postoperative 75° (66%). Grip Strength: Preoperative, 29 kg (62%); postoperative, 34 kg (71%). Mayo Wrist Score: Preoperative, 51 (poor); postoperative, 68 (fair). Average postoperative DASH score was 19.5. Follow-up radiographs showed that 75% of patients had mild to no degeneration. Conclusions Osteochondral grafting in PRC offers satisfactory results in terms of pain relief, return to work, motion, and grip strength. Level of Evidence Therapeutic IV, Case series PMID:24436818

  2. Hydrogels for osteochondral repair based on photocrosslinkable carbamate dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Degoricija, Lovorka; Bansal, Prashant N; Söntjens, Serge H M; Joshi, Neel S; Takahashi, Masaya; Snyder, Brian; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2008-10-01

    First generation, photocrosslinkable dendrimers consisting of natural metabolites (i.e., succinic acid, glycerol, and beta-alanine) and nonimmunogenic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were synthesized divergently in high yields using ester and carbamate forming reactions. Aqueous solutions of these dendrimers were photocrosslinked with an eosin-based photoinitiator to afford hydrogels. The hydrogels displayed a range of mechanical properties based on their structure, generation size, and concentration in solution. All of the hydrogels showed minimal swelling characteristics. The dendrimer solutions were then photocrosslinked in situ in an ex vivo rabbit osteochondral defect (3 mm diameter and 10 mm depth), and the resulting hydrogels were subjected to physiologically relevant dynamic loads. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the hydrogels to be fixated in the defect site after the repetitive loading regimen. The ([G1]-PGLBA-MA) 2-PEG hydrogel was chosen for the 6 month pilot in vivo rabbit study because this hydrogel scaffold could be prepared at low polymer weight (10 wt %) and possessed the largest compressive modulus of the 10% formulations, a low swelling ratio, and contained carbamate linkages, which are more hydrolytically stable than the ester linkages. The hydrogel-treated osteochondral defects showed good attachment in the defect site and histological analysis showed the presence of collagen II and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the treated defects. By contrast, the contralateral unfilled defects showed poor healing and negligible GAG or collagen II production. Good mechanical properties, low swelling, good attachment to the defect site, and positive in vivo results illustrate the potential of these dendrimer-based hydrogels as scaffolds for osteochondral defect repair.

  3. Knee hemarthros secondary to osteochondritis dissecans (König disease).

    PubMed

    Guillén Astete, Carlos; Alva García, Patricia; Carpena Zafrilla, Maria; Medina Quiñones, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    A case is presented of a hemarthrosis associated with osteochondritis dissecans in a young man who arrived in the Emergency unit due to tender and swelling of his right knee one hour after a slightly rotational gesture of the lower limb. Many years before the patient suffered a sports injury in the same knee, but it was never assessed. Radiography studies showed bone fragments inside the synovial capsule, and the joint aspiration was compatible with hemarthrosis. A review of the available information of this uncommon condition is also presented.

  4. Measurement and analysis of channel attenuation characteristics for an implantable galvanic coupling human-body communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Qin, Yu-Ping; Liu, Yi-He; Vai, Mang I

    2016-11-14

    In this study, an experiment was designed to verify the low power consumption of galvanic coupling human-body communication. A silver electrode (silver content: 99%) is placed in a pig leg and a sine wave signal with the power of 0 dBm is input. Compared with radio frequency communication and antenna transmission communication, attenuation is reduced by approximately 10 to 15 dB, so channel characteristics are highly improved.

  5. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginefri, J.-C.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemaï, B.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Lethimonnier, F.; Darrasse, L.; Dufour-Gergam, E.

    2012-11-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micromolding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by PolyDimethylSiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm)2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures.

  6. Perilesional changes of focal osteochondral defects in an ovine model and their relevance to human osteochondral injuries.

    PubMed

    Hepp, P; Osterhoff, G; Niederhagen, M; Marquass, B; Aigner, T; Bader, A; Josten, C; Schulz, R

    2009-08-01

    Perilesional changes of chronic focal osteochondral defects were assessed in the knees of 23 sheep. An osteochondral defect was created in the main load-bearing region of the medial condyle of the knees in a controlled, standardised manner. The perilesional cartilage was evaluated macroscopically and biopsies were taken at the time of production of the defect (T0), during a second operation one month later (T1), and after killing animals at three (T3; n = 8), four (T4; n = 8), and seven (T7; n = 8) months. All the samples were histologically assessed by the International Cartilage Repair Society grading system and Mankin histological scores. Biopsies were taken from human patients (n = 10) with chronic articular cartilage lesions and compared with the ovine specimens. The ovine perilesional cartilage presented with macroscopic and histological signs of degeneration. At T1 the International Cartilage Repair Society 'Subchondral Bone' score decreased from a mean of 3.0 (SD 0) to a mean of 1.9 (SD 0.3) and the 'Matrix' score from a mean of 3.0 (SD 0) to a mean of 2.5 (SD 0.5). This progressed further at T3, with the International Cartilage Repair Society 'Surface' grading, the 'Matrix' grading, 'Cell Distribution' and 'Cell Viability' grading further decreasing and the Mankin score rising from a mean of 1.3 (SD 1.4) to a mean of 5.1 (SD 1.6). Human biopsies achieved Mankin grading of a mean of 4.2 (SD 1.6) and were comparable with the ovine histology at T1 and T3. The perilesional cartilage in the animal model became chronic at one month and its histological appearance may be considered comparable with that seen in human osteochondral defects after trauma.

  7. Bone Marrow Aspiration Concentrate and Platelet Rich Plasma for Osteochondral Repair in a Porcine Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Betsch, Marcel; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Thuns, Simon; Herten, Monika; Sager, Martin; Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) may possess a high potency for cartilage and osseous defect healing because it contains stem cells and multiple growth factors. Alternatively, platelet rich plasma (PRP), which contains a cocktail of multiple growth factors released from enriched activated thrombocytes may potentially stimulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow to proliferate and differentiate. Methods A critical size osteochondral defect (10×6 mm) in both medial femoral condyles was created in 14 Goettinger mini-pigs. All animals were randomized into the following four groups: biphasic scaffold alone (TRUFIT BGS, Smith & Nephew, USA), scaffold with PRP, scaffold with BMAC and scaffold in combination with BMAC and PRP. After 26 weeks all animals were euthanized and histological slides were cut, stained and evaluated using a histological score and immunohistochemistry. Results The thrombocyte number was significantly increased (p = 0.049) in PRP compared to whole blood. In addition the concentration of the measured growth factors in PRP such as BMP-2, BMP-7, VEGF, TGF-β1 and PDGF were significantly increased when compared to whole blood (p<0.05). In the defects of the therapy groups areas of chondrogenic tissue were present, which stained blue with toluidine blue and positively for collagen type II. Adding BMAC or PRP in a biphasic scaffold led to a significant improvement of the histological score compared to the control group, but the combination of BMAC and PRP did not further enhance the histological score. Conclusions The clinical application of BMAC or PRP in osteochondral defect healing is attractive because of their autologous origin and cost-effectiveness. Adding either PRP or BMAC to a biphasic scaffold led to a significantly better healing of osteochondral defects compared with the control group. However, the combination of both therapies did not further enhance healing. PMID:23951201

  8. Salvage of a post-traumatic arthritic wrist using the scaphoid as an osteochondral graft.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Ozben, H; Russomando, A

    2014-09-01

    The authors describe a case of post-traumatic wrist arthritis with an osteochondral defect in the scaphoid fossa of the radius. The patient was treated with proximal row carpectomy, radial styloidectomy and reconstruction of the defect using the proximal half of the scaphoid as an autologous osteochondral graft. Pain relief was achieved while wrist motion and strength were improved. The carpal bones are a source of osteochondral grafts and can be used to expand the indications of motion-preserving wrist salvage procedures.

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Mariana Korbage; de Cillo, Mario Sergio Paulillo; Bittar, Cinthia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Cezar, Caroliny Nociti Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess pain and function of the ankle in patients with injuries up to 1.5 cm diameter by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score after arthroscopic treatment. Methods: The AOFAS scale was applied before and after arthroscopy, as well as the degree of subjective satisfaction of ambulatory patients. Patients with type I osteochondral injuries, acute trauma, using plaster, presenting lesions in other joints of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment that would prevent the application of the satisfaction questionnaire were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t test with Welch correction, Mann Whitney test, and ANOVA, with Kruskal Wallis test and Dun test, considering p value lower than 0.05. Results: There was an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment in 52 (94.5%) patients. The mean values of AOFAS score in 55 patients was 77.32 ± 6.67 points preoperative and 93.10± 8.24 points postoperative, with a mean variation of 15.8 points, p<0.001. Patients with stage II, III and IV injuries showed an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment, p<0.001. No difference was found between medial and lateral injuries, p >0.05. Conclusion: Patients with stage II, III or IV osteochondral injuries of the talus of up to 1.5 cm diameter, whether medial or lateral, showed a significant improvement after arthroscopic treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:26997911

  10. A functional agarose-hydroxyapatite scaffold for osteochondral interface regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khanarian, Nora T.; Haney, Nora M.; Burga, Rachel A.; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of the osteochondral interface is critical for integrative and functional cartilage repair. This study focuses on the design and optimization of a hydrogel-ceramic composite scaffold of agarose and hydroxyapatite (HA) for calcified cartilage formation. The first study objective was to compare the effects of HA on non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes cultured in the composite scaffold. Specifically, cell growth, biosynthesis, hypertrophy, and scaffold mechanical properties were evaluated. Next, the ceramic phase of the scaffold was optimized in terms of particle size (200 nm vs. 25 µm) and dose (0–6 w/v%). It was observed that while deep zone chondrocyte (DZC) biosynthesis and hypertrophy remained unaffected, hypertrophic chondrocytes measured higher matrix deposition and mineralization potential with the addition of HA. Most importantly, higher matrix content translated into significant increases in both compressive and shear mechanical properties. While cell hypertrophy was independent of ceramic size, matrix deposition was higher only with the addition of micron-sized ceramic particles. In addition, the highest matrix content, mechanical properties and mineralization potential were found in scaffolds with 3% micro-HA, which approximates both the mineral aggregate size and content of the native interface. These results demonstrate that the biomimetic hydrogel-ceramic composite is optimal for calcified cartilage formation and is a promising design strategy for osteochondral interface regeneration. PMID:22531222

  11. Integrated Bi-Layered Scaffold for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Anna; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Florczyk, Stephen J.; Bryers, James D.; Zhang, Miqin

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering poses the challenge of combining both cartilage and bone tissue engineering fundamentals. In this study, a sphere-templating technique was applied to fabricate an integrated bi-layered scaffold based on degradable poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel. One layer of the integrated scaffold was designed with a single defined, monodispersed pore size of 38 μm and pore surfaces coated with hydroxyapatite particles to promote regrowth of subchondral bone while the second layer had 200 μm pores with surfaces decorated with hyaluronan for articular cartilage regeneration. Mechanical properties of the construct as well as cyto-compatibility of the scaffold and its degradation products were elucidated. To examine the potential of the biphasic scaffold for regeneration of osteochondral tissue the designated cartilage and bone layers of the integrated bi-layered scaffold were seeded with chondrocytes differentiated from human mesenchymal stem cells and primary human mesenchymal stem cells, respectively. Both types of cells were co-cultured within the scaffold in standard medium without soluble growth/differentiation factors over four weeks. The ability of the integrated bi-layered scaffold to support simultaneous matrix deposition and adequate cell growth of two distinct cell lineages in each layer during four weeks of co-culture in vitro in the absence of soluble growth factors was demonstrated. PMID:23225568

  12. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of osteochondral lesions of the ankle: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marcelo Pires; Kennedy, John G; Raduan, Fernando; Nery, Caio

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a wide-ranging review of the literature regarding osteochondral lesions of the ankle, with the aim of presenting the current concepts, treatment options, trends and future perspectives relating to this topic.

  14. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  15. The use of embryonic cells in the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee: an ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PILICCHI, SUSANNA; ROCCA, STEFANO; POOL, ROY R.; DATTENA, MARIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; MARA, LAURA; CASU, SARA; SANNA, DANIELA; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; PASSINO, ERALDO SANNA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to determine whether local delivery of embryonic stem-like (ESL) cells into osteochondral defects in the femoral condyles of sheep would enhance regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. Methods male ESL cells embedded in fibrin glue were engrafted into osteochondral defects in the medial condyles (ESL-M) of the left femur in 22 ewes. An identical defect was created in the medial condyle of the contralateral stifle joint and left untreated as a control (empty defect, ED). The ewes were divided into 5 groups. Four sheep each were euthanized at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months from surgery, and 6 ewes were euthanized 24 months post-implantation. To study the effect of varying loads on the long-term regeneration process, an identical defect was also created and ESL cell engraftment performed in the lateral condyle (ESL-L) of the left stifle joint of the animals in the 12- and 24-month groups. The evaluation of regenerated tissue was performed by biomechanical, macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical (collagen type II) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays. Results no significant differences were found between treated and control sites in the biomechanical assays at any time point. ESL cell grafts showed significantly greater macroscopic evidence of regeneration as compared to controls at 24 months after surgery; significantly better histological evidence of repair in ESL-M samples versus controls was found throughout the considered period. At 24 months from surgery there was significantly improved integration of graft edges with the host tissue in the ESL-M as compared to the ESL-L samples, demonstrating that load bearing positively affects the long-term regeneration process. Conclusions ESL cells enhanced the regeneration of hyaline cartilage. FISH confirmed that the regenerative tissue originated from ESL cells. Clinical Relevance ESL cells are able to self-renew for prolonged periods without differentiation and, most

  16. Analysis and Optimization of Spiral Circular Inductive Coupling Link for Bio-Implanted Applications on Air and within Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  17. Analysis and optimization of spiral circular inductive coupling link for bio-implanted applications on air and within human tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-06-30

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore.

  18. Fixation of an osteochondral fragment after acute patellar dislocation in an immature skeleton☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Félix dos Santos Neto, José; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Pecegueiro do Amaral, Ney

    2014-01-01

    Fixation of an osteochondral fracture after acute patellar dislocation is an infrequent form of treatment. Likewise, the location of this fragment in the lateral region of the lateral femoral condyle, functioning as a free body, is uncommon. The aim of this study was to present a case of osteochondral fracture of the patella at an unusual site, along with the therapy used and the clinical follow-up. PMID:26229800

  19. Apparatus for simulating dynamic interactions between the spinal cord and soft-coupled intradural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljoen, S.; Oya, H.; Reddy, C. G.; Dalm, B. D.; Shurig, R.; Odden, K.; Gillies, G. T.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, built, and tested an apparatus used for investigating the biomechanical response of a novel intradural spinal cord stimulator to the simulated physiological movement of the spinal cord within the thecal sac. In this apparatus, the rostral-caudal displacements of an anthropomorphic spinal cord surrogate can be controlled with a resolution of approximately 0.1% of a target value for up to 107 lateral movement cycles occurring at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Using this system, we have been able to determine that the restoring force of the stimulator's suspension system works in concert with the frictional coupling between the electrode array and the surrogate to overcome the 0.42 μN inertial force associated with the lateral motion of the array. The result is a positional stability of the array on the surrogate (in air) of better than 0.2 mm over ˜500 000 movement cycles. Design modifications that might lead to improved physiological performance are discussed.

  20. The effects of prolonged deep freezing on the biomechanical properties of osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Benjamin; Brosh, Tamar; Salai, Moshe; Herman, Amir; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2009-02-01

    Musculo-skeletal allografts sterilized and deep frozen are among the most common human tissue to be preserved and utilized in modern medicine. The effects of a long deep freezing period on cortical bone has already been evaluated and found to be insignificant. However, there are no reports about the influences of a protracted deep freezing period on osteochondral allografts. One hundred osteochondral cylinders were taken from a fresh specimen and humeral heads of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years and 4 year old bones. Twenty chips from each period, with a minimum of 3 chips per humeral head. Each was mechanically tested by 3 point compression. The fresh osteochondral allografts were significantly mechanically better than the deep frozen osteochondral allografts. There was no statistical significant time dependent difference between the deep frozen groups in relation to the freezing period. Therefore, we conclude that, from the mechanical point of view deep freezing of osteochondral allografts over a period of 4 years, is safe without further deterioration of the biomechanical properties of the osteochondral allografts.

  1. [The future of treatment for chondral and osteochondral lesions].

    PubMed

    Cirpar, Meriç; Korkusuz, Feza

    2007-01-01

    The population of patients with symptomatic focal or generalized cartilage lesions is growing due to prolongation of life expectancy and to increasing frequency of sports injuries. Cartilage tissue lesions which were defined as untreatable in the past have now become treatable thanks to advances in basic scientific research. With the development of technologies regarding biomaterial, cell and local regulators, and with the introduction of new surgical techniques, it is estimated that, in the near future, clinical applications of cartilage tissue engineering will also receive particular attention in our country. Currently, all alternatives used in the treatment of cartilage lesions have merits and demerits, including arthroscopic debridement and lavage, mesenchymal stem cell stimulation, osteochondral replacement techniques, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Preliminary results of experimental cartilage tissue engineering are encouraging for the replacement of disrupted tissue with that having mechanical properties of hyaline cartilage. Clinical applications of cartilage tissue engineering include bioabsorbable scaffolds as extracellular collagen, hyaluronic acid matrices, and genetically engineered bioactive materials.

  2. Stifle osteochondritis dissecans in snow leopards (Uncia uncia).

    PubMed

    Herrin, Kimberly Vinette; Allan, Graeme; Black, Anthony; Aliah, Rhonda; Howlett, Cameron Rolfe

    2012-06-01

    Three snow leopard (Uncia uncia) cubs, female and male siblings and an unrelated female, had lameness attributed to osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions noted at 6, 8, and 10 mo of age, respectively. All cubs were diagnosed with OCD via radiographs. The sibling cubs both had lesions of the right lateral femoral condyles, while the unrelated cub had bilateral lesions of the lateral femoral condyles. Subsequently, OCD was confirmed in all three cases during surgical correction of the lateral femoral condyle lesions via lateral stifle arthrotomies, flap removal, and debridement of the defect sites. Histopathology also supported the diagnosis of OCD. Postoperatively, the sibling cubs developed seromas at the incision sites and mild lameness, which resolved within a month. To date, two cubs have been orthopedically sound, while one of the sibling cubs has developed mild osteoarthritis. OCD has rarely been reported in domestic felids, and to the authors' knowledge these are the first reported cases of OCD in nondomestic felids.

  3. The natural history of osteochondral lesions in the ankle.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, C Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J A

    2010-01-01

    Most osteochondral lesions (defects) of the talar dome are caused by trauma, which may be a single event or repeated, less intense events (microtrauma). A lesion may heal, remain asymptomatic, or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing, prolonged joint swelling, and the formation of subchondral bone cysts. During loading, compression of the cartilage forces water into the microfractured subchondral bone. The increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone can cause osteolysis and the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion but most likely is caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking and a concomitant decrease in pH produced by osteoclasts, which sensitize the highly innervated subchondral bone. Prevention of further degeneration depends on several factors, including the repair of the subchondral bone plate and the correct alignment of the ankle joint.

  4. Additive manufacturing for in situ repair of osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel L; Lipton, Jeffrey I; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Lipson, Hod

    2010-09-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for injury repair and replacement of defective body parts. While a number of techniques exist for creating living biological constructs in vitro, none have been demonstrated for in situ repair. Using novel geometric feedback-based approaches and through development of appropriate printing-material combinations, we demonstrate the in situ repair of both chondral and osteochondral defects that mimic naturally occurring pathologies. A calf femur was mounted in a custom jig and held within a robocasting-based additive manufacturing (AM) system. Two defects were induced: one a cartilage-only representation of a grade IV chondral lesion and the other a two-material bone and cartilage fracture of the femoral condyle. Alginate hydrogel was used for the repair of cartilage; a novel formulation of demineralized bone matrix was used for bone repair. Repair prints for both defects had mean surface errors less than 0.1 mm. For the chondral defect, 42.8+/-2.6% of the surface points had errors that were within a clinically acceptable error range; however, with 1 mm path planning shift, an estimated approximately 75% of surface points could likely fall within the benchmark envelope. For the osteochondral defect, 83.6+/-2.7% of surface points had errors that were within clinically acceptable limits. In addition to implications for minimally invasive AM-based clinical treatments, these proof-of-concept prints are some of the only in situ demonstrations to-date, wherein the substrate geometry was unknown a priori. The work presented herein demonstrates in situ AM, suggests potential biomedical applications and also explores in situ-specific issues, including geometric feedback, material selection and novel path planning techniques.

  5. Low Grade Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino, C.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a nosological entity acquired, idiopathic and potentially reversible. Dissects the subchondral bone tissue plane from the underlying bone, making a partial or complete osteochondral detachment, with a loose body. Consensus to treat none surgically poor symptomatic and stable lesions. If the lesion becomes instable or more symptomatic, surgical treatment will be best the option. Recently histological evidence holds is possible find sources of instability in deep layers sub chondral bone, even in patients with ¨stables lesions¨. This condition might be the reason of unfavorable evolution certain cases previously considered as ¨stable or incipient¨, treated with the classic non operative protocols. Objectives: The purpose of the present study consist in present a series of cases of young patients with symptomatic low grade juvenile OCD (grade I-II), treated surgically with subchondral debridement and fixation ¨in situ¨ describing the clinical and imaging findings. Methods: We evaluated 15 cases of symptomatic juvenile OCD of the knee, stables lesion (grade I/ II) according to Di Paola´s classification, who have not responded to conservative therapy for at least 6 months. Results: All patients were treated surgical consecutively with arthroscopically assisted ¨in situ¨ fixation with pins Smart Nail NR, ConMed-Linvatex and for the same group of surgeons. We evaluated the clinical and imagenologic outcomes with MRI for a minimum follow up of six month to one year. No looseness of fastening material or loose bodies in the submitted sample were recorded. The study by MRI imaging techniques using high definition chondral identification evidence allowed the consolidation of the fragment to the 6th month. Conclusion: All patients evolved asymptomatic and returned to the previous activity, with high level of satisfaction.

  6. Optical Clearing in Collagen- and Proteoglycan-Rich Osteochondral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Corey P.; Novak, Tyler; Gilliland, Kateri Fites; Marshall, Peter; Calve, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent developments in optical clearing and microscopy technology have enabled the imaging of intact tissues at the millimeter scale to characterize cells via fluorescence labeling. While these techniques have facilitated the three-dimensional cellular characterization within brain and heart, study of dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system have been largely unexplored. Here, we quantify how optical clearing impacted the cell and tissue morphology of collagen-, proteoglycan-, and mineral-rich cartilage and bone from the articulating knee joint. Methods Water-based fructose solutions were used for optical clearing of bovine osteochondral tissues, followed by imaging with transmission and confocal microscopy. To confirm preservation of tissue structure during the clearing process, samples were mechanically tested in unconfined compression and visualized by cryoSEM. Results Optical clearing enhanced light transmission through cartilage, but not subchondral bone regions. Fluorescent staining and immunolabeling was preserved through sample preparations, enabling imaging to cartilage depths 5 times deeper than previously reported, limited only by the working distance of the microscope objective. Chondrocyte volume remained unchanged in response to, and upon the reversal, of clearing. Equilibrium modulus increased in cleared samples, and was attributed to exchange of interstitial fluid with the more viscous fructose solution, but returned to control levels upon unclearing. In addition, cryoSEM-based analysis of cartilage showed no ultrastructural changes. Conclusion We anticipate large-scale microscopy of diverse connective tissues will enable the study of intact, three-dimensional interfaces (e.g. osteochondral) and cellular connectivity as a function of development, disease, and regeneration, which have been previously hindered by specimen opacity. PMID:25454370

  7. Evaluation of chitosan-GP hydrogel biocompatibility in osteochondral defects: an experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage, because of its avascular nature, has little capacity for spontaneous healing, and tissue engineering approaches, employing different biomaterials and cells, are under development. Among the investigated biomaterials are the chitosan-based hydrogels. Although thoroughly studied in other mammalian species, studies are scarce in equines. So, the aim of the present study was to investigate the biocompatibility of chitosan-GP in horse joints submitted to high mechanical loads. Results An osteochondral defect was created by arthroscopy in the medial surface of lateral trochlea of talus of left or right leg, randomly selected, from six healthy geldings. The defect was filled up with chitosan-GP. The contralateral joint received an identical defect with no implant. The chondral fragment removed to produce the defect was collected, processed and used as the “Initial” sample (normal cartilage) for histology, immunohistochemistry, and metabolic labelling of PGs. After 180 days, the repair tissues were collected, and also analyzed. At the end of the experiment (180 days after lesion), the total number of cells per field in repair tissues was equal to control, and macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells were not detected, suggesting that no significant inflammation was present. These cells were able to synthesize type II collagen and proteoglycans (PGs). Nevertheless, the cell population in these tissues, both in presence of chitosan-GP and in untreated controls, were heterogeneous, with a lower proportion of type II collagen-positives cells and some with a fibroblastic aspect. Moreover, the PGs synthesized in repair tissues formed in presence or absence of chitosan-GP were similar to those of normal cartilage. However, the chitosan-GP treated tissue had an disorganized appearance, and blood vessels were present. Conclusions Implanted chitosan-GP did not evoke an important inflammatory reaction, and permitted cell growth. These cells were

  8. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  9. Repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiding; Wang, Qing; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Shixiang; Chang, Qing; Zuo, Qiang; Ren, Kewei; Fan, Weimin

    2011-04-01

    To compare the results of repair of knee cartilage defects with tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs. Autologous chondrocytes and osteoblasts were seeded on scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) to generate tissue-engineered cartilage and tissue-engineered bone, respectively. The tissue-engineered osteochondral composite was formed by a chondrocyte-PLGA construct sutured to an osteoblast-TCP construct with an absorbable suture. Cartilage defects were surgically created at the weightbearing surface of the bilateral femoral medial condyles of 12 mini-pigs. Thus, 24 defects in 12 pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group, tissue-engineered cartilage group, and blank control group. Six months after surgery, the regenerated cartilage was scored macroscopically and histologically. The compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of the cartilage were also assessed. The gross grading scale indicated that the mean scores of the tissue-engineered osteochondral composite group were significantly higher than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. According to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Visual Histological Assessment Scale, the scores of the osteochondral composite group were significantly better than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group and blank control group. Assessment of compressive properties and GAG content showed better repair results in the osteochondral composite group than those of the tissue-engineered cartilage group. Using tissue-engineered osteochondral composites to repair cartilage defects was better than that of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  10. Dynamic regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins in engineered osteochondral constructs by biomechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin; Perera, Priyangi; Rath, Bjoern; Agarwal, Sudha

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondral tissue-engineered grafts are proposed to hold greater potential to repair/regenerate damaged cartilage through enhanced biochemical and mechanical interactions with underlying subchondral bone as compared to simple engineered cartilage. Additionally, biomechanical stimulation of articular chondrocytes (ACs) or osteoblasts (OBs) was shown to induce greater morphogenesis of the engineered tissues composed of these cells. In this report, to define the advantages of biomechanical stimulation to osteochondral grafts for tissue engineering, we examined whether (1) ACs and OBs in three-dimensional (3D) osteochondral constructs support functional development of each other at the molecular level, and (2) biomechanical stimulation of osteochondral constructs further promotes the regenerative potential of such grafts. Various configurations of cell/scaffold assemblies, including chondral, osseous, and osteochondral constructs, were engineered with mechano-responsive electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds. These constructs were subjected to either static or dynamic (10% cyclic compressive strain at 1 Hz for 3 h/day) culture conditions for 2 weeks. The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) was examined to assess the regenerative potential of each treatment on the cells. Biomechanical stimulation augmented a marked upregulation of Bmp2, Bmp6, and Bmp7 as well as downregulation of BMP antagonist, Bmp3, in a time-specific manner in the ACs and OBs of 3D osteochondral constructs. More importantly, the presence of biomechanically stimulated OBs was especially crucial for the induction of Bmp6 in ACs, a BMP required for chondrocytic growth and differentiation. Biomechanical stimulation led to enhanced tissue morphogenesis possibly through this BMP regulation, evident by the improved effective compressive modulus of the osteochondral constructs (710 kPa of dynamic culture vs. 280 kPa of static culture). Similar BMP regulation was observed in the

  11. Osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of full-thickness articular cartilage defects of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, M; Bartl, C; Magosch, P; Lichtenberg, S; Habermeyer, P

    2004-09-01

    We performed eight osteochondral autologous transplantations from the knee joint to the shoulder. All patients (six men, two women; mean age 43.1 years) were documented prospectively. In each patient the stage of the osteochondral lesion was Outerbridge grade IV with a mean size of the affected area of 150 mm2. All patients were assessed by using the Constant score for the shoulder and the Lysholm score for the knee. Standard radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging and second-look arthroscopy were used to assess the presence of glenohumeral osteoarthritis and the integrity of the grafts. After a mean of 32.6 months (8 to 47), the mean Constant score increased significantly. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed good osseointegration of the osteochondral plugs and congruent articular cartilage at the transplantation site in all but one patient. Second-look arthroscopy performed in two cases revealed a macroscopically good integration of the autograft with an intact articular surface. Osteochondral autologous transplantation in the shoulder appears to offer good clinical results for treating full-thickness osteochondral lesions of the glenohumeral joint. However, our study suggests that the development of osteoarthritis and the progression of pre-existing osteoarthritic changes cannot be altered by this technique.

  12. A biphasic scaffold based on silk and bioactive ceramic with stratified properties for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Kim, Kyungsook; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Guo, Jin; Kaplan, David L; Zreiqat, Hala

    2015-07-14

    Significant clinical challenges encountered in the effective long-term treatment of osteochondral defects have inspired advancements in scaffold-based tissue engineering techniques to aid repair and regeneration. This study reports the development of a biphasic scaffold produced via a rational combination of silk fibroin and bioactive ceramic with stratified properties to satisfy the complex and diverse regenerative requirements of osteochondral tissue. Structural examination showed that the biphasic scaffold contained two phases with different pore morphologies to match the cartilage and bone segments of osteochondral tissue, which were joined at a continuous interface. Mechanical assessment showed that the two phases of the biphasic scaffold imitated the load-bearing behaviour of native osteochondral tissue and matched its compressive properties. In vitro testing showed that different compositions in the two phases of the biphasic scaffold could direct the preferential differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the chondrogenic or osteogenic lineage. By featuring simple and reproducible fabrication and a well-integrated interface, the biphasic scaffold strategy established in this study circumvented the common problems experienced with integrated scaffold designs and could provide an effective approach for the regeneration of osteochondral tissue.

  13. Design of a Novel 3D Printed Bioactive Nanocomposite Scaffold for Improved Osteochondral Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Patel, Romil; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    Chronic and acute osteochondral defects as a result of osteoarthritis and trauma present a common and serious clinical problem due to the tissue's inherent complexity and poor regenerative capacity. In addition, cells within the osteochondral tissue are in intimate contact with a 3D nanostructured extracellular matrix composed of numerous bioactive organic and inorganic components. As an emerging manufacturing technique, 3D printing offers great precision and control over the microarchitecture, shape and composition of tissue scaffolds. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a biomimetic 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold with integrated differentiation cues for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. Through the combination of novel nano-inks composed of organic and inorganic bioactive factors and advanced 3D printing, we have successfully fabricated a series of novel constructs which closely mimic the native 3D extracellular environment with hierarchical nanoroughness, microstructure and spatiotemporal bioactive cues. Our results illustrate several key characteristics of the 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold to include improved mechanical properties as well as excellent cytocompatibility for enhanced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation in vitro. The present work further illustrates the effectiveness of the scaffolds developed here as a promising and highly tunable platform for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

  14. A biomimetic multi-layered collagen-based scaffold for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Levingstone, Tanya J; Matsiko, Amos; Dickson, Glenn R; O'Brien, Fergal J; Gleeson, John P

    2014-05-01

    Cartilage and osteochondral defects pose a significant challenge in orthopedics. Tissue engineering has shown promise as a potential method for the treatment of such defects; however, a long-lasting repair strategy has yet to be realized. This study focuses on the development of a layered construct for osteochondral repair, fabricated through a novel "iterative layering" freeze-drying technique. The process involved repeated steps of layer addition followed by freeze-drying, enabling control over material composition, pore size and substrate stiffness in each region of the construct, while also achieving a seamlessly integrated layer structure. The novel construct developed mimics the inherent gradient structure of healthy osteochondral tissue: a bone layer composed of type I collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA), an intermediate layer composed of type I collagen, type II collagen and HA and a cartilaginous region composed of type I collagen, type II collagen and hyaluronic acid. The material properties were designed to provide the biological cues required to encourage infiltration of host cells from the bone marrow while the biomechanical properties were designed to provide an environment optimized to promote differentiation of these cells towards the required lineage in each region. This novel osteochondral graft was shown to have a seamlessly integrated layer structure, high levels of porosity (>97%), a homogeneous pore structure and a high degree of pore interconnectivity. Moreover, homogeneous cellular distribution throughout the entire construct was evident following in vitro culture, demonstrating the potential of this multi-layered scaffold as an advanced strategy for osteochondral defect repair.

  15. Design of a Novel 3D Printed Bioactive Nanocomposite Scaffold for Improved Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Nathan J.; Patel, Romil; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and acute osteochondral defects as a result of osteoarthritis and trauma present a common and serious clinical problem due to the tissue's inherent complexity and poor regenerative capacity. In addition, cells within the osteochondral tissue are in intimate contact with a 3D nanostructured extracellular matrix composed of numerous bioactive organic and inorganic components. As an emerging manufacturing technique, 3D printing offers great precision and control over the microarchitecture, shape and composition of tissue scaffolds. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a biomimetic 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold with integrated differentiation cues for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. Through the combination of novel nano-inks composed of organic and inorganic bioactive factors and advanced 3D printing, we have successfully fabricated a series of novel constructs which closely mimic the native 3D extracellular environment with hierarchical nanoroughness, microstructure and spatiotemporal bioactive cues. Our results illustrate several key characteristics of the 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold to include improved mechanical properties as well as excellent cytocompatibility for enhanced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation in vitro. The present work further illustrates the effectiveness of the scaffolds developed here as a promising and highly tunable platform for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:26366231

  16. Development of an inductively-coupled MR coil system for imaging and spectroscopic analysis of an implantable bioartificial construct at 11.1T

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Nelly A.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Simpson, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing a method to non-invasively monitor tissue engineered constructs is critical for the optimization of construct design and for assessing therapeutic efficacy. For this purpose, NMR is a powerful technique that can be used to obtain both images and spectroscopic data. But the inherent sensitivity of NMR limits the observation of a bioartificial construct with current NMR surface coil technology. In this study, we address this limitation through the development of an inductively-coupled, implantable coil system, demonstrate its use at high field (11.1T), and investigate the use of this coil system for monitoring a bioartificial construct in vitro and in vivo. The results establish that large gains in signal-to-noise can be obtained with this coil system over that obtainable with a surface coil. This coil system provides a means to quantitatively analyze the structure and function of implanted bioartificial organs. PMID:20373400

  17. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  18. Acute Osteochondral Fractures in the Lower Extremities - Approach to Identification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, M.E; DaCambra, M.P; Jibri, Z; Dhillon, S; Jen, H; Jomha, N.M

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral fractures of the lower extremities are important injuries because they can cause pain and dysfunction and often lead to osteoarthritis. These injuries can be misdiagnosed initially which may impact on the healing potential and result in poor long-term outcome. This comprehensive review focuses on current pitfalls in diagnosing acute osteochondral lesions, potential investigative techniques to minimize diagnostic errors as well as surgical treatment options. Acute osteochondral fractures are frequently missed and can be identified more accurately with specific imaging techniques. A number of different methods can be used to fix these fractures but attention to early diagnosis is required to limit progression to osteoarthritis. These fractures are common with joint injuries and early diagnosis and treatment should lead to improved long term outcomes. PMID:26587063

  19. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  20. Mechanical integrity of subchondral bone in osteochondral autografts and allografts

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, Greg; Goplen, Gordon; Ford, Jason; Novak, Kelli; Hurtig, Mark; McPherson, Roger; McGann, Locksley; Schachar, Norman; Zernicke, Ronald F.

    1998-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of osteochondral graft preservation techniques on post-transplant biomechanics of graft and host subchondral bone in the knee joint. Design An experimental animal model (sheep), specifically the weight-bearing articular surface of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joints. Intervention Each sheep received, in the ipsilateral knee, an allograft that was (a) frozen without dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), (b) snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen or (c) frozen with DMSO. The contralateral knee received an autograft that was (a) snap-frozen, (b) treated with DMSO or (c) left untreated (fresh). Main outcome measures Mechanical and material properties of bone, including maximal compression stress, modulus of elasticity and bone mineral ash content of subchondral bone cores (from the graft centre and surrounding host bone). Results No significant differences were found in the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone under the graft, but there were significant changes in surrounding bone. Bone surrounding the grafts that were snap-frozen or frozen without DMSO was significantly stronger than the normal control bone. However, bone surrounding fresh autografts and cryoprotected allografts was not significantly different from normal control bone. Conclusions The changes in the mechanical behaviour of the host bone may be associated with graft cell viability. The greater stiffness of the subchondral host bone may have consequences for long-term graft integrity and for the development of degenerative osteoarthritis. PMID:9627549

  1. Results of Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sandra; Breederveld, Roelf S.; Tuinebreijer, Wim E.

    2010-01-01

    Repair of full thickness defects of articular cartilage in the knee is difficult but important to prevent progression to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical results of Osteochondral Autograft Transplant System (OATS) treatment for articular defects of the knee. Between 1999 and 2005, 15 knees (14 patients) were treated by the OATS technique. Age ranged from 27 to 52 years. Cartilage defects were up to 3.75 cm2. The mean follow-up was 42 months. Knee function was assessed by the Lysholmscore and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form. Six patients scored good or excellent. No patient had knee instability. Twelve of 13 patients returned to sports at an intermediate or high level. The subjective assessment score (0-10) changed from 4.7 before operation to 7.2 afterward (P=0.007). The OATS-technique resulted in a decrease in symptoms in patients with localized articular cartilage defects. We consider the OATS technique to be an appropriate treatment for cartilage defects to prevent progression of symptoms. PMID:20361003

  2. Hydrogen Supplementation of Preservation Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Onuma, Kenji; Kuzuno, Jun; Ujihira, Masanobu; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Sakai, Rina; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Allogenic osteochondral tissue (OCT) is used for the treatment of large cartilage defects. Typically, OCTs collected during the disease-screening period are preserved at 4°C; however, the gradual reduction in cell viability during cold preservation adversely affects transplantation outcomes. Therefore, improved storage methods that maintain the cell viability of OCTs are needed to increase the availability of high-quality OCTs and improve treatment outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether long-term hydrogen delivery to preservation solution improved the viability of rat OCTs during cold preservation. Hydrogen-supplemented Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) and University of Wisconsin (UW) solution both significantly improved the cell viability of OCTs during preservation at 4°C for 21 days compared to nonsupplemented media. However, the long-term cold preservation of OCTs in DMEM containing hydrogen was associated with the most optimal maintenance of chondrocytes with respect to viability and morphology. Our findings demonstrate that OCTs preserved in DMEM supplemented with hydrogen are a promising material for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:25506061

  3. The Wnt11 Signaling Pathway in Potential Cellular EMT and Osteochondral Differentiation Progression in Nephrolithiasis Formation.

    PubMed

    He, Deng; Lu, Yuchao; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Qin, Baolong; Wang, Yufeng; Xing, Shuai; Xi, Qilin; Wang, Shaogang

    2015-07-17

    The molecular events leading to nephrolithiasis are extremely complex. Previous studies demonstrated that calcium and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may participate in the pathogenesis of stone formation, but the explicit mechanism has not been defined. Using a self-created genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat model, we observed that the increased level of serous/uric TGF-β1 and elevated intracellular calcium in primary renal tubular epithelial cells (PRECs) was associated with nephrolithiasis progression in vivo. In the setting of high calcium plus high TGF-β1 in vitro, PRECs showed great potential epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression and osteochondral differentiation properties, representing the multifarious increased mesenchymal and osteochondral phenotypes (Zeb1, Snail1, Col2A1, OPN, Sox9, Runx2) and decreased epithelial phenotypes (E-cadherin, CK19) bythe detection of mRNAs and corresponding proteins. Moreover, TGF-β-dependent Wnt11 knockdown and L-type Ca2+ channel blocker could greatly reverse EMT progression and osteochondral differentiation in PRECs. TGF-β1 alone could effectively promote EMT, but it had no effect on osteochondral differentiation in NRK cells (Rat kidney epithelial cell line). Stimulation with Ca2+ alone did not accelerate differentiation of NRK. Co-incubation of extracellular Ca2+ and TGF-β1 synergistically promotes EMT and osteochondral differentiation in NRK control cells. Our data supplied a novel view that the pathogenesis of calcium stone development may be associated with synergic effects of TGF-β1 and Ca2+, which promote EMT and osteochondral differentiation via Wnt11 and the L-type calcium channel.

  4. Study on quantitative analysis of Ti, Al and V in clinical soft tissues after placing the dental implants by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajnóg, Adam; Hanć, Anetta; Makuch, Krzysztof; Koczorowski, Ryszard; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for in-situ quantitative analysis of oral mucosa of patients before and after implantation with titanium implants and a closing screw based on Ti6Al4V alloy. Two calibration strategies were applied, both were based on matrix matched solid standards with analytes addition. A novel approach was the application of powdered egg white proteins as a matrix material which have a similar composition to the examined tissue. In the another approach, certified reference material Bovine Muscle ERM-BB184 was used. The isotope 34S was found to be the most appropriate as an internal standard since it is homogenously distributed in the examined tissues and resulted in lower relative standard deviation values of signal of analytes of interest. Other isotopes (13C, 26Mg, 43Ca) were also evaluated as potential internal standards. The analytical performance parameters and microwave digestion of solid standards followed by solution nebulization ICP-MS analysis proved that both calibration methods are fit for their intended purpose. The LA-ICP-MS analysis on the surface of tissues after the implantation process revealed an elevated content of elements in comparison to the control group. Analytes are distributed inhomogeneously and display local maximal content of Ti up to ca. 900 μg g- 1, Al up to ca. 760 μg g- 1 and for V up to 160 μg g- 1.

  5. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  6. A new building block: costo-osteochondral graft for intra-articular incongruity after distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chris Yuk Kwan; Fung, Boris; Poon, T L; Fok, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Even with the invention of locking plates, intra-articular fractures of distal radius with extreme comminution remain a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Osteochondral graft is a potential choice to reconstruct the articular defect. We report a patient who had a fracture of distal radius with costo-osteochondral graft for articular reconstruction which has not yet been described in the English literature. At nine-year follow-up, he was pain free and had full range of movement of the wrist. The authors suggest that costo-osteochondral graft could be an option with satisfactory result.

  7. Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee. About A Case

    PubMed Central

    Astore, Ignacio; Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans is a pathology that affects the superficial articular cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with open physes. Treatment of this disease is based on patient’s age and the stage of the disease. Methods: 16-year-old patient, athlete, with a history of knee pain on the right side of acute onset, without traumatic history. A physical examination shows pain in the external compartment of the knee. MRI shows a stable lesion that involves the external femoral condyle, over a posterior area of 16 mm by 20mm. Crutches are indicate for walking without body burden. Symptoms continue for six months and there are no changes in MRI. It is decided to do a stabilization with a Herbert type screw. After the surgery, pain persists and in x-ray controls, osteointegration is not observed. Osteosynthesis material is extracted and mosaicplasty is performed. We used Guhl’s intraoperative classification. Results: In this case, for a young patient with Guhl’s lesion type III, the reduction with a Herbert type screw was indicated, as the lesion was stable, of a significant size and congruent. Lesion progressed to type IV in 6 months. Thus, mosaicplasty was performed, obtaining a good functional result according to the physical exam, with a complete range of flexion and extension. A second-look arthroscopic assessment was carried out 2 months after surgery, showing osteointegration and stability of the allogenic graft. Conclusion: The variable of stability of the fragment is very important when determining the treatment. Most of the stable lesions can be successfully treated with a conservative treatment. Also, it has been demonstrated that young patients have a higher rate of healing. Instead, unstable lesions require surgical treatment.

  8. The Augmentation of a Collagen/Glycosaminoglycan Biphasic Osteochondral Scaffold with Platelet-Rich Plasma and Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for Osteochondral Defect Repair in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Frances; Skelton, Carrie; Herrera, Emilio; Brooks, Roger; Fortier, Lisa A.; Rushton, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the combination of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or concentrated bone marrow aspirate (CBMA) with a biphasic collagen/glycosaminoglycan (GAG) osteochondral scaffold for the treatment of osteochondral defects in sheep. Design: Acute osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) and the lateral trochlea sulcus (LTS) of 24 sheep (n = 6). Defects were left empty or filled with a 6 × 6-mm scaffold, either on its own or in combination with PRP or CBMA. Outcome measures at 6 months included mechanical testing, International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) repair score, modified O’Driscoll histology score, qualitative histology, and immunohistochemistry for type I, II, and VI collagen. Results: No differences in mechanical properties, ICRS repair score, or modified O’Driscoll score were detected between the 4 groups. However, qualitative assessments of the histological architecture, Safranin O content, and collagen immunohistochemistry indicated that in the PRP/scaffold groups, there was a more hyaline cartilage–like tissue repair. In addition, the addition of CBMA and PRP to the scaffold reduced cyst formation in the subchondral bone of healed lesions. Conclusion: There was more hyaline cartilage–like tissue formed in the PRP/scaffold group and less subchondral cystic lesion formation in the CBMA and PRP/scaffold groups, although there were no quantitative differences in the repair tissue formed. PMID:26069645

  9. Treatment of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: current concepts review

    PubMed Central

    VANNINI, FRANCESCA; CAVALLO, MARCO; BALDASSARRI, MATTEO; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; OLIVIERI, ALESSANDRA; FERRANTI, ENRICO; BUDA, ROBERTO; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (JODT) affects the subchondral bone primarily and, in a skeletally immature population, articular cartilage secondarily. It probably consists of aseptic bone necrosis whose spontaneous healing is impaired by microtraumas, resulting in an osteochondral injury and, in some cases, in osteoarthritis. In many cases the clinical presentation is asymptomatic. Mild chronic pain is frequent, sometimes accompanied by swelling, stiffness or locking. Few data are currently available on this topic and, moreover, most existing data were obtained from mixed groups and populations; it is therefore difficult to outline a scheme for the treatment of JODT. However, the most suitable treatment in the first stages of the disease is conservative. The presence of a loose body is an indication for surgical fixation, drilling or regenerative procedures, depending on the presence/extent of subchondral bone sclerosis and the surgeon’s experience. Drilling has been shown to promote the healing of lesions with minimal surgical trauma. Microfractures, since they induce fibrocartilage repair, are to be considered only for small injuries. Mosaicplasty and osteochondral autograft transplantation may cause donor site morbidity and are techniques little reported in JODT. Regenerative techniques and fresh allografts give good results in osteochondral lesions, but further studies are required to describe the results that can be obtained in JODT alone. PMID:25750908

  10. Treatment of juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus: current concepts review.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Francesca; Cavallo, Marco; Baldassarri, Matteo; Castagnini, Francesco; Olivieri, Alessandra; Ferranti, Enrico; Buda, Roberto; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans of the talus (JODT) affects the subchondral bone primarily and, in a skeletally immature population, articular cartilage secondarily. It probably consists of aseptic bone necrosis whose spontaneous healing is impaired by microtraumas, resulting in an osteochondral injury and, in some cases, in osteoarthritis. In many cases the clinical presentation is asymptomatic. Mild chronic pain is frequent, sometimes accompanied by swelling, stiffness or locking. Few data are currently available on this topic and, moreover, most existing data were obtained from mixed groups and populations; it is therefore difficult to outline a scheme for the treatment of JODT. However, the most suitable treatment in the first stages of the disease is conservative. The presence of a loose body is an indication for surgical fixation, drilling or regenerative procedures, depending on the presence/extent of subchondral bone sclerosis and the surgeon's experience. Drilling has been shown to promote the healing of lesions with minimal surgical trauma. Microfractures, since they induce fibrocartilage repair, are to be considered only for small injuries. Mosaicplasty and osteochondral autograft transplantation may cause donor site morbidity and are techniques little reported in JODT. Regenerative techniques and fresh allografts give good results in osteochondral lesions, but further studies are required to describe the results that can be obtained in JODT alone.

  11. Design of a multiphase osteochondral scaffold. I. Control of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Andrew K; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E; Harley, Brendan A; Yannas, Ioannis V; Gibson, Lorna J; Bonfield, William

    2010-03-01

    This is the first in a series of articles that describe the design and development of a family of osteochondral scaffolds based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan (collagen-GAG) and calcium phosphate technologies, engineered for the regenerative repair of defects in articular cartilage. The osteochondral scaffolds consist of two layers: a mineralized type I collagen-GAG scaffold designed to regenerate the underlying subchondral bone and a nonmineralized type II collagen-GAG scaffold designed to regenerate cartilage. The subsequent articles in this series describe the fabrication and properties of a mineralized scaffold as well as a two-layer (one mineralized, the other not) osteochondral scaffold for regeneration of the underlying bone and cartilage, respectively. This article describes a technology through which the chemical composition-particularly the calcium phosphate mass fraction-of triple coprecipitated nanocomposites of collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and calcium phosphate can be accurately and reproducibly varied without the need for titrants or other additives. Here, we describe how the mineral:organic ratio can be altered over a range that includes that for articular cartilage (0 wt % mineral) and for bone (75 wt % mineral). This technology achieves the objective of mimicking the composition of two main tissue types found in articular joints, with particular emphasis on the osseous compartment of an osteochondral scaffold. Exclusion of titrants avoids the formation of potentially harmful contaminant phases during freeze-drying steps crucial for scaffold fabrication, ensuring that the potential for binding growth factors and drugs is maintained.

  12. Fixation of osteochondral fragments in the human knee using Meniscus Arrows.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Diederick B; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; de Hosson, Jeff T M; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the hold in bone of Meniscus Arrows and Smart Nails, followed by the report of the results of the clinical application of Meniscus Arrows as fixation devices. First, pull-out tests were performed to analyse the holdfast of both nails in bone. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference; therefore, the thinner Meniscus Arrow was chosen as fixation device in the patient series of two patients with a symptomatic Osteochondritis dissecans fragment and three patients with an osteochondral fracture of a femur condyle. The cartilage margins were glued with Tissuecoll. All fragments consolidated. Second look arthroscopy in three patients showed fixed fragments with stable, congruent cartilage edges. At an average follow-up period of 5 years no pain, effusion, locking, restricted range of motion or signs of osteoarthritis were reported. Based on the results of the pull-out tests and available clinical studies, Meniscus Arrows and Smart Nails are both likely to perform adequately as fixation devices in the treatment of Osteochondritis dissecans and osteochondral fractures in the knee. They both provide the advantage of one stage surgery. However, based on their smaller diameter, the Meniscus Arrows should be preferred for this indication.

  13. Nanomechanical mapping of the osteochondral interface with contact resonance force microscopy and nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sara E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Hurley, Donna C

    2012-12-01

    The bone-cartilage, or osteochondral, interface resists remarkably high shear stresses and rarely fails, yet its mechanical characteristics are largely unknown. A complete understanding of this hierarchical system requires mechanical-property information at the length scales of both the interface and the connecting tissues. Here, we combined nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods to investigate the multiscale mechanical properties across the osteochondral region. The nanoindentation modulus M ranged from that of the subchondral bone (M=22.8±1.8GPa) to that of hyaline articular cartilage embedded in PMMA (M=5.7±1.0GPa) across a narrow transition region <5μm wide. Contact resonance force microscopy (CR-FM), which measures the frequency and quality factor of the AFM cantilever's vibrational resonance in contact mode, was used to determine the relative storage modulus and loss tangent of the osteochondral interface. With better spatial resolution than nanoindentation, CR-FM measurements indicated an even narrower interface width of 2.3±1.2μm. Furthermore, CR-FM revealed a 24% increase in the viscoelastic loss tangent from the articular calcified cartilage into the PMMA-embedded hyaline articular cartilage. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging provided complementary measurement of mineral content. Our results provide insight into the multiscale functionality of the osteochondral interface that will advance understanding of disease states such as osteoarthritis and aid in the development of biomimetic interfaces.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum: Report of 5 female athletes.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, Matthijs R; Lim, Liesbeth; Willems, W Jaap

    2003-02-01

    The management of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum of the adolescent elbow is still controversial. We report on 5 cases of female high-level athletes aged from 10 to 19 years (4 gymnasts, 1 waterpolo player). All these athletes had a symptomatic osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, which was treated arthroscopically in all cases. Follow-up time averaged 5 months (1 to 6.5 months). During the arthroscopy, loose osteochondral fragments of the capitellum and radial head were removed, and the defect was debrided. Thorough evaluation of the anterior and posterior joint including the olecranon fossa was performed. One of the 5 patients had a loose body requiring arthroscopic removal. Within 6 months after surgery, all except 1 elbow, the elbow with a loose body, regained maximum range of motion. Two patients returned to a high level of gymnastics and 1 was considering return. The short-term results of this treatment suggest that arthroscopic debridement of the loose osteochondral fragments provides a good result.

  15. Is retrograde drilling really useful for osteochondral lesion of talus with subchondral cyst?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seong-Yup; Kim, Jong-Kil; Lee, Kwang-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Retrograde drilling is a well accepted procedure for osteochondral lesion of the talus and subchondral cyst with intact overlying cartilage. It has good results in most reports. Compared to anterograde drilling, retrograde drilling can protect the integrity of the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of using retrograde drilling for osteochondral lesion with subchondral cyst and discuss the mechanism involved in the development of subchondral cyst. Patient concerns: We report a 53-year-old man who had complained left ankle pain that lasted over 6 months which was exacerbated by walking. Diagnoses: We diagnosed it as osteochondral lesion of the talus with subchondral cyst. Interventions: Plain X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. Outcomes: He undertook retrograde drilling without debridement of cartilage. After the surgery, the pain had been subsided for 1 year, although arthritic change had progressed. However, after 5 years of retrograde drilling, he revisited our hospital due to severe ankle pain. Plain X-ray and MRI showed arthritic change of the ankle and multiple cystic formation of talus. Lessons: Retrograde drilling has some problem because this procedure is not theoretically correct when the development of a subchondral cyst in osteochondral lesion of the talus is considered. In addition, retrograde drilling may impair uninjured bone marrow of the talus, resulting in the development of multiple cystic formations. PMID:27930520

  16. A cadaveric analysis of contact stress restoration after osteochondral transplantation of a cylindrical cartilage defect.

    PubMed

    Kock, Niels B; Smolders, José M H; van Susante, Job L C; Buma, Pieter; van Kampen, Albert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2008-05-01

    Osteochondral transplantation is a successful treatment for full-thickness cartilage defects, which without treatment would lead to early osteoarthritis. Restoration of surface congruency and stability of the reconstruction may be jeopardized by early mobilization. To investigate the biomechanical effectiveness of osteochondral transplantation, we performed a standardized osteochondral transplantation in eight intact human cadaver knees, using three cylindrical plugs on a full-thickness cartilage defect, bottomed on one condyle, unbottomed on the contralateral condyle. Surface pressure measurements with Tekscan pressure transducers were performed after five conditions. In the presence of a defect the border contact pressure of the articular cartilage defect significantly increased to 192% as compared to the initially intact joint surface. This was partially restored with osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), as the rim stress subsequently decreased to 135% of the preoperative value. Following weight bearing motion two out of eight unbottomed mosaicplasties showed subsidence of the plugs according to Tekscan measurements. This study demonstrates that a three-plug mosaicplasty is effective in restoring the increased border contact pressure of a cartilage defect, which may postpone the development of early osteoarthritis. Unbottomed mosaicplasties may be more susceptible for subsidence below flush level after (unintended) weight bearing motion.

  17. Development of Novel Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds for Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Benjamin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jiaoyan; Lee, James D.

    2015-01-01

    As modern medicine advances, various methodologies are being explored and developed in order to treat severe osteochondral defects in joints. However, it is still very challenging to cure the osteochondral defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The objective of this study is to create novel three-dimensional (3D) printed osteochondral scaffolds with both excellent interfacial mechanical properties and biocompatibility for facilitating human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and chondrogenic differentiation. For this purpose, we designed and 3D printed a series of innovative bi-phasic 3D models that mimic the osteochondral region of articulate joints. Our mechanical testing results showed that our bi-phasic scaffolds with key structures have enhanced mechanical characteristics in compression (a maximum Young's modulus of 31 MPa) and shear (a maximum fracture strength of 5768 N/mm2) when compared with homogenous designs. These results are also correlated with numerical simulation. In order to improve their biocompatibility, the scaffolds' surfaces were further modified with acetylated collagen (one of the main components in osteochondral extracellular matrix). MSC proliferation results demonstrated that incorporation of a collagen, along with biomimetically designed micro-features, can greatly enhance MSC growth after 5 days in vitro. Two weeks' chondrogenic differentiation results showed that our novel scaffolds (dubbed “key” scaffolds), both with and without surface collagen modification, displayed enhanced chondrogenesis (e.g., 130%, 114%, and 236% increases in glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen deposition, and total protein content on collagen-modified key scaffolds when compared with homogeneous controls). PMID:25088966

  18. Effects of triamcinolone acetonide on an in vivo equine osteochondral fragment exercise model.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, D D; Kawcak, C E; Trotter, G W; Powers, B E; Walton, R M; McIlwraith, C W

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articularly administered triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in exercised equine athletes with carpal osteochondral fragmentation. Eighteen horses were randomly assigned to each of 3 groups. An osteochondral chip fragment was created in one randomly chosen intercarpal joint of each horse. Both intercarpal joints in the placebo control group (CNT) horses were injected with intra-articular administration (IA) of polyionic fluid. Both joints in the TA control group (TA CNT) horses were treated with 12 mg of TA in the intercarpal joint without an osteochondral fragment, and the opposite intercarpal joint was injected with a similar volume of polyionic fluid. The TA treated group (TA TX) horses were treated with 12 mg of TA in the joint that contained the osteochondral fragment and the opposite intercarpal joint was injected with a similar volume of polyionic fluid. All horses were treated IA on days 13 and 27 after surgery and exercised on a high speed treadmill for 6 weeks starting on Day 14. Horses in the TA TX group were significantly less lame than horses in the CNT and TA CNT groups. Horses in either TA CNT or TA TX groups had lower total protein, and higher hyaluronan, and glycosaminoglycan concentrations in synovial fluid than did those in the CNT group. Synovial membrane collected from subjects in TA CNT and TA TX groups had significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration, subintimal hyperplasia and subintimal fibrosis compared to the CNT group. Articular cartilage histomorphological parameters were significantly better from the TA CNT and TA TX groups compared to the CNT group. In conclusions, results from this study support favourable effects of TA on degree of clinically detectable lameness, and on synovial fluid, synovial membrane, and articular cartilage morphological parameters, both with direct intra-articular administration and remote site administration as compared to placebo treatment. The

  19. Open mosaicplasty in osteochondral lesions of the talus: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Ege, Tolga; Cift, Hakan Turan; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Seyhan, Bahadir; Uzun, Macit

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus present with symptoms of pain and painful motion, affecting the quality of the patient's daily life. We evaluated the 2-year short-term outcomes of patients whose large osteochondral lesions of the talus were treated with medial malleolar osteotomy and a mosaic graft harvested from the knee on the same side. A total of 32 patients who had cartilage lesions due to osteochondritis dissecans in the medial aspect of the talus underwent mosaicplasty after medial malleolar osteotomy. The patients were followed up for a mean period of 16.8 (range 12 to 24) months. The staging and treatment plan of the osteochondral lesions of the talus were made according to the Bristol classification. The follow-up protocol for the patients included direct radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scoring system was used to assess the patients during the pre- and postoperative periods. Of the 32 patients, 3 (9.4%) were female and 29 (90.6%) male, with a mean age of 27.5 (range 20 to 47) years. The mean preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 59.12 ± 7.72 but had increased to 87.94 ± 3.55 during the postoperative 2 years. The increase in American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was statistically significant (p < .05). We have concluded that open mosaicplasty is a reliable and effective method for the treatment of osteochondral lesions with subchondral cyst formation in the talus, exceeding 1.5 cm in diameter.

  20. Blocking of tumor necrosis factor activity promotes natural repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Osteochondral defects have a limited capacity for repair. We therefore investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signal blockade by etanercept (human recombinant soluble TNF receptor) on the repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knees. Material and methods Osteochondral defects (5 mm in diameter) were created in the femoral patellar groove in rabbits. Soon after the procedure, a first subcutaneous injection of etanercept was performed. This single injection or, alternatively, 4 injections in total (twice a week for 2 weeks) were given. Each of these 2 groups was divided further into 3 subgroups: a low-dose group (0.05 μg/kg), an intermediate-dose group (0.4 μ g/kg), and a high-dose group (1.6 μ g /kg) with 19 rabbits in each. As a control, 19 rabbits were injected with water alone. The rabbits in each subgroup were killed 4 weeks (6 rabbits), 8 weeks (6 rabbits), or 24 weeks (7 rabbits) after surgery and repair was assessed histologically. Results Histological examination revealed that the natural process of repair of the osteochondral defects was promoted by 4 subcutaneous injections of intermediate-dose etanercept and by 1 or 4 injections of high-dose etanercept at the various time points examined postoperatively (4, 8, and 24 weeks). Western blot showed that rabbit TNFα had a high affinity for etanercept. Interpretation Blocking of TNF by etanercept enabled repair of osteochondral defects in rabbit knee. Anti-TNF therapy could be a strategy for the use of tissue engineering for bone and cartilage repair. PMID:19916697

  1. [Intra-osseous and intra-articular cyst of the knee. Apropos of a case associated with osteochondritis dissecans].

    PubMed

    Lootvoet, L; Himmer, O; Defourny, A; Hamels, J; Jaucot, J; Ghosez, J P

    1995-01-01

    Subchondral bone cyst, intraarticular synovial cyst, and osteochondritis dissecans arising together are analyzed: this association has so far not been reported. If we accept the theory of a mechanical origin for subchondral bone cysts (leakage of joint fluid or intrusion of the synovial membrane through a breach in the cartilage), then the osteochondritis certainly provided the port of entry that allowed formation of the intraosseous synovial cyst in this patient.

  2. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the lateral tibial plateau treated with arthroscopically assisted removal and retrograde osteochondral grafting.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Shimose, Shoji; Nakamae, Atsuo; Okuhara, Atsushi; Kamei, Goki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma is sometimes challenging, because of its location. We report a patient with an intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the lateral tibial plateau which was excised under an arthroscopically assisted procedure. After total resection of the intra-articular osteoid osteoma, the osteochondral defect of the lateral tibial plateau was reconstructed with a retrograde autogenous osteochondral graft which was harvested from the non-weightbearing area of the distal femur.

  3. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Humeral Capitellum in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Kajiyama, Shiro; Muroi, Satoshi; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Norimasa; Matsuki, Keisuke; Kawai, Nobuaki; Osaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions are often observed in the humeral capitellum both in young baseball players and gymnasts. It is generally believed that capitellar OCD in baseball players can be seen on an anteroposterior (AP) radiograph with the elbow in 45° of flexion. However, the mechanism of injury seems to be different in baseball players and gymnasts. Repetitive valgus overload with the elbow in flexion is believed to be the cause of capitellar OCD lesions in baseball players, whereas weightbearing with the elbow in extension may be the cause of OCD in gymnasts. Purpose: To determine the difference in capitellar OCD location between baseball players and gymnasts and to propose the optimal AP radiographic angle of the elbow for visualization of early-stage OCD lesions in adolescent gymnasts. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Subjects consisted of 95 baseball players (95 elbows) and 21 gymnasts (24 elbows) with a mean age of 13.7 years (range, 11-18 years). To localize the lesion, inclination of the affected area in the humeral capitellum against the humeral axis was investigated using sagittal computed tomography images of the elbow. The inclination angle was defined as the angle between the long axis of the humerus and the line perpendicular to a line that connected the anterior and posterior margin of the lesion. The inclination angle in each group was compared and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean inclination angle was 57.6° ± 10.7° in baseball players and 28.0° ± 10.7° in gymnasts. Capitellar OCD lesions were located more anterior in baseball players when compared with gymnasts (P < .01). Conclusion: Due to differences in applied stress, capitellar OCD lesions in baseball players were located more anteriorly compared with those seen in gymnasts. Therefore, although AP radiographs with the elbow in 45° of flexion are optimal for detecting OCD lesions in baseball players, radiographs with

  4. Faster phonological processing and right occipito-temporal coupling in deaf adults signal poor cochlear implant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, Diane S.; Giraud, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of adult cochlear implantation is predicted positively by the involvement of visual cortex in speech processing, and negatively by the cross-modal recruitment of the right temporal cortex during and after deafness. How these two neurofunctional predictors concur to modulate cochlear implant (CI) performance remains unclear. In this fMRI study, we explore the joint involvement of occipital and right hemisphere regions in a visual-based phonological task in post-lingual deafness. Intriguingly, we show that some deaf subjects perform faster than controls. This behavioural effect is associated with reorganized connectivity across bilateral visual, right temporal and left inferior frontal cortices, but with poor CI outcome. Conversely, preserved normal-range reaction times are associated with left-lateralized phonological processing and good CI outcome. These results suggest that following deafness, involvement of visual cortex in the context of reorganized right-lateralized phonological processing compromises its availability for audio-visual synergy during adaptation to CI. PMID:28348400

  5. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  6. Two Patients with Osteochondral Injury of the Weight-Bearing Portion of the Lateral Femoral Condyle Associated with Lateral Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Satoru; Ichimaru, Shohei; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Complications of patellar dislocation include osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle and patella. Most cases of osteochondral injury occur in the anterior region, which is the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle. We describe two patients with osteochondral injury of the weight-bearing surface of the lateral femoral condyle associated with lateral dislocation of the patella. The patients were 18- and 11-year-old females. Osteochondral injury occurred on the weight-bearing surface distal to the lateral femoral condyle. The presence of a free osteochondral fragment and osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle was confirmed on MRI and reconstruction CT scan. Treatment consisted of osteochondral fragment fixation or microfracture, as well as patellar stabilization. Osteochondral injury was present in the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in both patients, suggesting that the injury was caused by friction between the patella and lateral femoral condyle when the patella was dislocated or reduced at about 90° flexion of the knee joint. These findings indicate that patellar dislocation may occur and osteochondral injury may extend to the weight-bearing portion of the femur even in deep flexion, when the patella is stabilized on the bones of the femoral groove. PMID:25506015

  7. Osteochondritis dessicans and subchondral cystic lesions in draft horses: a retrospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, C B; Scott, W M; Caron, J P; Fretz, P B; Bailey, J V; Barber, S M

    1998-01-01

    The clinical features, radiographic findings, treatment, and outcome in 51 draft horses with osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) or subchondral cystic lesions (SC) are reported. Clydesdale and Percheron were the most commonly affected breeds, and affected animals represented only 5% of the hospital population of draft horses. Horses were most frequently affected in the tibiotarsal joints and 73% (24 of 33 cases) of the horses with tibiotarsal effusion were affected bilaterally. Osteochondritis dessicans of the distal intermediate ridge was the most common lesion found in the tibiotarsal joint. The stifle was also frequently affected; 87% (13 of 15 cases) of horses with femoropatellar OCD only were lame, and lesions were most commonly located on the lateral trochlear ridge. Sixteen cases were managed conservatively, 30 received surgery, and 5 were euthanized. Lameness, effusion, or both clinical signs resolved in more than 50% of surgically treated cases, but clinical signs improved in 30% of conservatively-managed cases. PMID:9789673

  8. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively.

  9. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering.

  10. Variation of Mesenchymal Cells in Polylactic Acid Scaffold in an Osteochondral Repair Model

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Yasushi; Harwood, Frederick L.; Coutts, Richard D.; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To achieve osteochondral regeneration utilizing transplantation of cartilage-lineage cells and adequate scaffolds, it is essential to characterize the behavior of transplanted cells in the repair process. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the survival of mesenchymal cells (MCs). In a polylactic acid (PLA) scaffold and assess the possibility of MC/PLA constructs for osteochondral repair. Design Bone marrow from mature male rabbits was cultured for 2 weeks, and fibroblast-like MCs, which contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), were obtained. A cell/scaffold construct was prepared with one million MCs and a biodegradable PLA core using a rotator device. One week after culturing, the construct was transplanted into an osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle of female rabbits and the healing process examined histologically. To examine the survivability of transplanted MCs, the male-derived sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was assessed as a marker of MCs in the defect by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results In the groups of defects without any treatment, and the transplantation of PLA without cells, the defects were not repaired with hyaline cartilage. The cartilaginous matrix by safranin O staining and type II collagen by immunohistochemical staining were recognized, however the PLA matrix was still present in the defects at 24 weeks after transplantation of the construct. During the time passage, transplanted MCs numbers decreased from 7.8 × 105 at 1 week, to 3.5 × 105 at 4 weeks, and to 3.8 × 104 at 12 weeks. Transplanted MCs were not detectable at 24 weeks. Conclusions MCs contribute to the osteochondral repair expressing the cartilaginous matrix, however the number of MCs were decreasing with time (i.e. 24 weeks). These results could be essential for achieving cartilage regeneration by cell transplantation strategies with growth factors and/or gene therapy. PMID:19231922

  11. Stem cell-based microphysiological osteochondral system to model tissue response to interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Gottardi, Riccardo; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-07-07

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  12. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  13. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Humeral Head: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Davod; Shariatzadeh, Hooman; Mazhar, Farid Najd; Okhovatpour, Mohammad Ali; Razavipour, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a common joint disorder in knee, ankle and elbow, however it can be rarely found in glenohumeral joint. In this study, we report an asymptomatic case of humeral head OCD, which was detected incidentally following a trauma. X-rays showed an area of lucency around an oval bony fragment measuring about 1 cm on the superior aspect of the humeral head. However, the patient was pain-free and the shoulder range of motion was normal. PMID:28271091

  14. Osteochondral humeral head fracture after posterior shoulder subluxation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fandridis, Emmanouil; Stavropoulos, Spiros; Dimou, Leonidas; Spyridonos, Sarantis

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic posterior shoulder subluxations are rare entities which require clinical suspicion upon presentation. Although literature presents many sequels of posterior shoulder subluxations, we have not come across any shearing type osteochondral fracture in the literature. In this case report we present diagnosis, treatment and follow-up results of this rare fracture in a 26-year-old male following a fall from a motorcycle. PMID:25114417

  15. Percutaneous CT-Guided Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Sacroiliac Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Becce, Fabio; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Mosimann, Pascal John; Anaye, Anass; Letovanec, Igor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2012-08-15

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint disorder that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, most commonly at the knee. OCD of the sacroiliac joint is extremely rare. Management of OCD remains controversial, and surgery is often needed, especially when conservative treatment fails. We present a rare case of OCD involving the left sacroiliac joint successfully treated by percutaneous computed tomography-guided retrograde drilling and debridement.

  16. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O'Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion's proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided.

  17. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  18. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes.

  19. A review of terminology for equine juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) based on anatomical and functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Denoix, J-M; Jeffcott, L B; McIlwraith, C W; van Weeren, P R

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript describes a new classification of the various joint-related lesions that can be seen in the young, growing horse based on their anatomical and functional aetiopathogenesis. Juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) is a term that brings together specific disorders according to their location in the joint and their biomechanical origin. When a biomechanical insult affects the process of endochondral ossification different types of osteochondrosis (OC) lesions may occur, including osteochondral fragmentation of the articular surface or of the periarticular margins, or the formation of juvenile subchondral bone cysts. In severe cases, osteochondral collapse of the articular surface or the epiphysis or even an entire small bone may occur. Tension on ligament attachments may cause avulsion fractures of epiphyseal (or metaphyseal) ossifying bone, which are classified as JOCC, but do not result from a disturbance of the process of endochondral ossification and are not therefore classified as a form of OC. The same applies to 'physitis' which can result from damage to the physeal growth plate.

  20. Spatial Engineering of Osteochondral Tissue Constructs Through Microfluidically Directed Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stephen M; Barabino, Gilda A

    2016-01-01

    The development of tissue engineered osteochondral units has been slowed by a number of technical hurdles associated with recapitulating their heterogeneous nature ex vivo. Subsequently, numerous approaches with respect to cell sourcing, scaffolding composition, and culture media formulation have been pursued, which have led to high variability in outcomes and ultimately the lack of a consensus bioprocessing strategy. As such, the objective of this study was to standardize the design process by focusing on differentially supporting formation of cartilaginous and bony matrix by a single cell source in a spatially controlled manner within a single material system. A cell-polymer solution of bovine mesenchymal stem cells and agarose was cast against micromolds of a serpentine network and stacked to produce tissue constructs containing two independent microfluidic networks. Constructs were fluidically connected to two controlled flow loops and supplied with independently tuned differentiation parameters for chondrogenic and osteogenic induction, respectively. Constructs receiving inductive media showed differential gene expression of both chondrogenic and osteogenic markers in opposite directions along the thickness of the construct that was recapitulated at the protein level with respect to collagens I, II, and X. A control group receiving noninductive media showed homogeneous expression of these biomarkers measured in lower concentrations at both the mRNA and protein level. This work represents an important step in the rational design of engineered osteochondral units through establishment of an enabling technology for further optimization of scaffolding formulations and bioprocessing conditions toward the production of commercially viable osteochondral tissue products.

  1. The effect of devitalized trabecular bone on the formation of osteochondral tissue-engineered constructs

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eric G.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Bal, B. Sonny; Cook, James L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, evidence is presented demonstrating that devitalized trabecular bone has an inhibitory effect on in vitro chondral tissue development when used as a base material for the tissue-engineering of osteochondral constructs for cartilage repair. Chondrocyte-seeded agarose hydrogel constructs were cultured alone or attached to an underlying bony base in a chemically defined medium formulation that has been shown to yield engineered cartilaginous tissue with native Young's modulus (EY) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. By day 42 in culture the incorporation of a bony base significantly reduced these properties (EY = 87 ± 12 kPa, GAG = 1.9 ± 0.8%ww) compared to the gel-alone group (EY = 642 ± 97 kPa, GAG = 4.6 ± 1.4%ww). Similarly, the mechanical and biochemical properties of chondrocyte-seeded agarose constructs were inhibited when co-cultured adjacent to bone (unattached), suggesting that soluble factors rather than direct cell–bone interactions mediate the chondro-inhibitory bone effects. Altering the method of bone preparation, including demineralization, or the timing of bone introduction in co-culture did not ameliorate the effects. In contrast, osteochondral constructs with native cartilage properties (EY = 730 ± 65 kPa, GAG = 5.2 ± 0.9%ww) were achieved when a porous tantalum metal base material was adopted instead of bone. This work suggests that devitalized bone may not be a suitable substrate for long-term cultivation of osteochondral grafts. PMID:18718655

  2. Ovine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Morphologic, Phenotypic and Functional Characterization for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Castro-Viñuelas, Rocío; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fernández-Vázquez, Tania; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac Manuel; de Toro-Santos, Francisco Javier; Blanco-García, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge of ovine mesenchymal stromal cells (oMSCs) is currently expanding. Tissue engineering combining scaffolding with oMSCs provides promising therapies for the treatment of osteochondral diseases. Purpose The aim was to isolate and characterize oMSCs from bone marrow aspirates (oBMSCs) and to assess their usefulness for osteochondral repair using β-tricalcium phosphate (bTCP) and type I collagen (Col I) scaffolds. Methods Cells isolated from ovine bone marrow were characterized morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally. oBMSCs were cultured with osteogenic medium on bTCP and Col I scaffolds. The resulting constructs were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy studies. Furthermore, oBMSCs were cultured on Col I scaffolds to develop an in vitro cartilage repair model that was assessed using a modified International Cartilage Research Society (ICRS) II scale. Results oBMSCs presented morphology, surface marker pattern and multipotent capacities similar to those of human BMSCs. oBMSCs seeded on Col I gave rise to osteogenic neotissue. Assessment by the modified ICRS II scale revealed that fibrocartilage/hyaline cartilage was obtained in the in vitro repair model. Conclusions The isolated ovine cells were demonstrated to be oBMSCs. oBMSCs cultured on Col I sponges successfully synthesized osteochondral tissue. The data suggest that oBMSCs have potential for use in preclinical models prior to human clinical studies. PMID:28141815

  3. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head.

  4. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  5. Ion-implanted capacitively coupled silicon strip detectors with integrated polysilicon bias resistors processed on a 100 mm wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietanen, Iiro; Lindgren, Jukka; Orava, Risto; Tuuva, Tuure; Voutilainen, Martti; Brenner, Richard; Andersson, Mikael; Leinonen, Kari; Ronkainen, Hannu

    1991-12-01

    Double-sided silicon strip detectors with integrated coupling capacitors and polysilicon resistors have been processed on a 100 mm wafer. A detector with an active area of 19 × 19 mm 2 was connected to LSI readout electronics and tested. The strip pitch of the detector is 25 μm on the p-side and 50 μm on the n-side. The readout pitch is 50 μm on both sides. The number of readout strips is 774 and the total number of strips is 1161. On the p-side a signal-to-noise of 35 has been measured using a 90Sr β-source. The n-side has been studied using a laser.

  6. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  7. High-throughput bone and cartilage micropellet manufacture, followed by assembly of micropellets into biphasic osteochondral tissue.

    PubMed

    Babur, Betul Kul; Futrega, Kathryn; Lott, William B; Klein, Travis Jacob; Cooper-White, Justin; Doran, Michael Robert

    2015-09-01

    Engineered biphasic osteochondral tissues may have utility in cartilage defect repair. As bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have the capacity to make both bone-like and cartilage-like tissues, they are an ideal cell population for use in the manufacture of osteochondral tissues. Effective differentiation of MSC to bone-like and cartilage-like tissues requires two unique medium formulations and this presents a challenge both in achieving initial MSC differentiation and in maintaining tissue stability when the unified osteochondral tissue is subsequently cultured in a single medium formulation. In this proof-of-principle study, we used an in-house fabricated microwell platform to manufacture thousands of micropellets formed from 166 MSC each. We then characterized the development of bone-like and cartilage-like tissue formation in the micropellets maintained for 8-14 days in sequential combinations of osteogenic or chondrogenic induction medium. When bone-like or cartilage-like micropellets were induced for only 8 days, they displayed significant phenotypic changes when the osteogenic or chondrogenic induction medium, respectively, was swapped. Based on these data, we developed an extended 14-day protocol for the pre-culture of bone-like and cartilage-like micropellets in their respective induction medium. Unified osteochondral tissues were formed by layering 12,000 osteogenic micropellets and 12,000 chondrogenic micropellets into a biphasic structure and then further culture in chondrogenic induction medium. The assembled tissue was cultured for a further 8 days and characterized via histology. The micropellets had amalgamated into a continuous structure with distinctive bone-like and cartilage-like regions. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of micropellet assembly for the formation of osteochondral-like tissues for possible use in osteochondral defect repair.

  8. Chances to Have A Boy after Gender Selection by Pre-Implantation Genetic Screening Are Reduced in Couples with only Girls and without A Boy Sired by The Male Partner

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Soryya; Fahami, Fariba; Deemeh, Mohammad Reza; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Gourabi, Hamid; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossain

    2017-01-01

    Background Gender selection and family planning have their roots in human history. Despite great interest in these fields, very few scientific propositions exist which could explain why some family do not attain the desired sex. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether sex of previous child or children could affect the outcomes of pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS). Materials and Methods This historical cohort study including 218 PGS cases referring to Isfahan Fertility and Infertility Center (IFIC). Couples were grouped as those who their male child passed away or her husbands’ has a son(s) from their previous marriage (n=70) and couples who just have daughter (n=148). Male normal blastocysts were transferred for both groups. The outcomes of PGS including pregnancy, implantation and abortion rates, along with possible confounding factors were compared between the two groups. Results Significant differences in pregnancy, implantation and abortion rates were observed between couples whose their male partner had/has one boy (n=70) compared to those who have just girl(s) (n=148) despite similar number and quality of male normal blastocyst transferred in the two groups. Confounding factors were also considered. Conclusion The Ybearing spermatozoa in male partners with no history of previous boy have lower ability to support a normal development to term, compared to male partners with previous history of boy requesting family balancing. PMID:28042415

  9. Platelet-Rich Plasma May Improve Osteochondral Donor Site Healing in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Niall A.; Haleem, Amgad M.; Ross, Keir A.; Hannon, Charles P.; Murawski, Christopher D.; Do, Huong T.; Kennedy, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the effect(s) of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on osteochondral donor site healing in a rabbit model. Methods Osteochondral donor sites 3 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth were created bilaterally on the femoral condyles of 12 New Zealand White rabbits. Knees were randomized such that one knee in each rabbit received an intra-articular injection of PRP and the other received saline (placebo). Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6, and 12 weeks following surgery. Repair tissue was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) macroscopic and histological scores. Results No complications occurred as a result of the interventions. There was no significant difference in macroscopic scores between the 2 groups (5.5 ± 3.8 vs. 3.8 ± 3.5; P = 0.13). Subjective macroscopic assessment determined greater tissue infill with fewer fissures and a more cartilage-like appearance in PRP-treated knees. Overall ICRS histological scores were better in the PRP group compared with the placebo (9.8 ± 2.0 vs. 7.8 ± 1.8; P = 0.04). Histological scores were also higher in the PRP group compared with the placebo group at each time point. Greater glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen content were noted in the repair tissue of the PRP group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that PRP used as an intra-articular injection may improve osteochondral healing in a rabbit model. PMID:26958322

  10. The Use of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation for Primary Treatment of Cartilage Lesions in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Dustin T.; Sadr, Kamran N.; Pulido, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation as the primary treatment for cartilage injury in patients with no previous surgical treatment. Study Design: Case series. Patients were identified in our outcomes database. Patients undergoing primary OCA transplantation with no prior surgical treatment and a minimum of 2 years follow-up were selected. Pain and function were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Patient satisfaction was assessed. Reoperations following OCA transplantation were captured. Failure was defined as revision OCA or conversion to arthroplasty. Results: Fifty-five patients (61 knees) were included in the analysis. The study consisted of 30 males and 25 females (mean age = 32.9 years; range = 15.7-67.8 years). The most common diagnoses for the OCA transplantation were osteochondritis dissecans (44.3%) and avascular necrosis (31.1%). Pain and function improved preoperatively to postoperatively on all outcome scales (P < 0.01). The majority of patients (86%) were “extremely satisfied” or “satisfied.” OCA survivorship was 89.5% at 5 years and 74.7% at 10 years. At latest follow-up (mean = 7.6 years; range = 1.9-22.6 years), OCA remained in situ in 50 knees (82%). Eighteen knees (29.5%) had further surgery; 11 OCA failures and 7 other surgical procedure(s). Of the failed knees (mean time to failure = 3.5 years; range = 0.5-13.7 years), 8 were converted to arthroplasty, 2 had OCA revisions, and 1 had a patellectomy. Conclusions: OCA transplantation is an acceptable primary treatment method for some chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee. Failure of previous treatment(s) is not a prerequisite for OCA transplantation. PMID:26425257

  11. Construction of tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and repair of large joint defects in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tianzheng; Lv, Jing; Pang, Jianliang; Liu, Bing; Ke, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous/bilayered scaffold was constructed to repair large defects in rabbit joints. The scaffold includes two distinct but integrated layers corresponding to the cartilage and bone components. The upper layer consists of gelatin, chondroitin sulphate and sodium hyaluronate (GCH), and the lower layer consists of gelatin and ceramic bovine bone (GCBB). The two form a 3D bilayered scaffold (GCH-GCBB), which mimics the natural osteochondral matrix for use as a scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this novel scaffold, combined with chondrocytes and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) to repair large defects in rabbit joints. Thirty-six large defects in rabbit femoral condyles were created; 12 defects were treated with the same scaffold combined with cells (group A); another 12 defects were treated with cell-free scaffolds (group B); the others were untreated (group C). At 6 and 12 weeks, in group A hyaline-like cartilage formation could be observed by histological examination; the newly formed cartilage, which stained for type II collagen, was detected by RT-PCR at high-level expression. Most of the GCBB was replaced by bone, while little remained in the underlying cartilage. At 36 weeks, GCBB was completely resorbed and a tidemark was observed in some areas. In contrast, groups B and C showed no cartilage formation but a great amount of fibrous tissue, with only a little bone formation. In summary, this study demonstrated that a novel scaffold, comprising a top layer of GCH, having mechanical properties comparable to native cartilage, and a bottom layer composed of GCBB, could be used to repair large osteochondral defects in joints.

  12. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  13. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... are better able to hear, comprehend sound and music, and speak than their peers who receive implants ...

  14. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  15. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  16. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  17. Osteochondral Defects of the Knee treated with Mosaicplasty. Results at Eight Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Romoli, Agustin Molina; Revah, Mariano Agustin; Dere, Juan Jose; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: There are several surgical options described for osteochondral defects of the knee depending on the size, location and condition of subchondral bone. The main indication for a mosaicplasty procedure is a less than 4 cm2 femoral condyle lesion. The purpose of this study was to analyze a series of patients treated with mosaicplasty with average eight years of follow-up. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated sixty-two patients with osteochondral defects of the knee who underwent a mosaicplasty between 2001 and 2014 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patients were evaluated using the Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC) and Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. Results: The mean Lysholm score was 80.1 and IKDC was 66.7. Forty-two patients had isolated mosaicplasty and 20 patients presented an associated surgical procedure (osteotomy, ACL reconstruction, meniscectomy). There were no significant differences between the Lysholm and IKDC scores in these two groups. Conclusion: We consider that mosaicplasty is a satisfactory procedure with good functional results in patients with focal articular cartilage lesions of the knee.

  18. Alterations of the subchondral bone in osteochondral repair--translational data and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Orth, P; Cucchiarini, M; Kohn, D; Madry, H

    2013-06-28

    Alterations of the subchondral bone are pathological features associated with spontaneous osteochondral repair following an acute injury and with articular cartilage repair procedures. The aim of this review is to discuss their incidence, extent and relevance, focusing on recent knowledge gained from both translational models and clinical studies of articular cartilage repair. Efforts to unravel the complexity of subchondral bone alterations have identified (1) the upward migration of the subchondral bone plate, (2) the formation of intralesional osteophytes, (3) the appearance of subchondral bone cysts, and (4) the impairment of the osseous microarchitecture as potential problems. Their incidence and extent varies among the different small and large animal models of cartilage repair, operative principles, and over time. When placed in the context of recent clinical investigations, these deteriorations of the subchondral bone likely are an additional, previously underestimated, factor that influences the long-term outcome of cartilage repair strategies. Understanding the role of the subchondral bone in both experimental and clinical articular cartilage repair thus holds great promise of being translated into further improved cell- or biomaterial-based techniques to preserve and restore the entire osteochondral unit.

  19. Novel Vanadium-Loaded Ordered Collagen Scaffold Promotes Osteochondral Differentiation of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortizo, Ana M.; Ruderman, Graciela; Mazzini, Flavia N.; Molinuevo, M. Silvina; Mogilner, Ines G.

    2016-01-01

    Bone and cartilage regeneration can be improved by designing a functionalized biomaterial that includes bioactive drugs in a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold. Based on our previous studies, we designed a vanadium-loaded collagen scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. Collagen-vanadium loaded scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and permeability studies. Rat bone marrow progenitor cells were plated on collagen or vanadium-loaded membranes to evaluate differences in cell attachment, growth and osteogenic or chondrocytic differentiation. The potential cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay and by evaluation of morphological changes in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that loading of VOAsc did not alter the grooved ordered structure of the collagen membrane although it increased membrane permeability, suggesting a more open structure. The VOAsc was released to the media, suggesting diffusion-controlled drug release. Vanadium-loaded membranes proved to be a better substratum than C0 for all evaluated aspects of BMPC biocompatibility (adhesion, growth, and osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation). In addition, there was no detectable effect of collagen or vanadium-loaded scaffolds on macrophage viability or cytotoxicity. Based on these findings, we have developed a new ordered collagen scaffold loaded with VOAsc that shows potential for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:27293438

  20. A Hydrogel-Mineral Composite Scaffold for Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Khanarian, Nora T.; Jiang, Jie; Wan, Leo Q.; Mow, Van C.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of physical disability among Americans, and tissue engineered cartilage grafts have emerged as a promising treatment option for this debilitating condition. Currently, the formation of a stable interface between the cartilage graft and subchondral bone remains a significant challenge. This study evaluates the potential of a hybrid scaffold of hydroxyapatite (HA) and alginate hydrogel for the regeneration of the osteochondral interface. Specifically, the effects of HA on the response of chondrocytes were determined, focusing on changes in matrix production and mineralization, as well as scaffold mechanical properties over time. Additionally, the optimal chondrocyte population for interface tissue engineering was evaluated. It was observed that the HA phase of the composite scaffold promoted the formation of a proteoglycan- and type II collagen–rich matrix when seeded with deep zone chondrocytes. More importantly, the elevated biosynthesis translated into significant increases in both compressive and shear moduli relative to the mineral-free control. Presence of HA also promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy and type X collagen deposition. These results demonstrate that the hydrogel–calcium phosphate composite supported the formation of a calcified cartilage-like matrix and is a promising scaffold design for osteochondral interface tissue engineering. PMID:21919797

  1. Evaluation of cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue as cellular sources for osteochondral repair.

    PubMed

    Innes, J F; Gordon, C; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Rhodes, N P; Clegg, P D

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions are a major cause of pain and disability in several species including dogs, horses and human beings. The objective of this study was to assess three potential sources of canine cells for their osteochondral regenerative potential. Cartilage, synovium and adipose tissue cells were grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic or osteogenic media. Cartilage-derived pellets displayed the best chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by significantly higher COL2A1 and SOX9 mRNA expression, greater glycosaminoglycan content, and higher retention of Safranin-O stain compared to the synovium and adipose-derived cells. Following application of the osteogenic media, all three cell sources exhibited small areas of positive alizarin red staining. Poor intracellular alkaline phosphatase activity was found in all three cell types when stimulated although osteocalcin and RUNX2 expression were significantly increased. Cells isolated and cultured from canine articular cartilage retained their specific chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, canine adipocytes and synovial cells did not undergo chondrogenic differentiation and did not exhibit evidence of multipotency. Although osteogenic differentiation was initiated at a genomic level, phenotypic osteoblastic differentiation was not observed. The findings of this study suggest that cells isolated from canine adipose tissue and synovium are sub-optimal substitutes for chondrocytes when engineering articular cartilage in vitro.

  2. Joint laminate degradation assessed by reflected ultrasound from the cartilage surface and osteochondral junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. P.; Hughes, S. W.; Crawford, R. W.; Oloyede, A.

    2008-08-01

    The ability to quantify and qualify the progression of joint degeneration is becoming increasingly important in surgery. This paper examines the patterns of relative ultrasound reflection from normal, artificially and naturally degraded cartilage-on-bone, particularly investigating the potential of the ratio of reflection coefficients from the surface and osteochondral junction in distinguishing normal from osteoarthritic tissue. To this end, the reflection coefficients from the articular surface and osteochondral junction of normal cartilage-on-bone samples were calculated and compared to samples after the removal of proteoglycans, disruption of the collagen meshwork, delipidization of the articular surface and mechanical abrasion. Our results show that the large variation across normal and degraded joint samples negates the use of an isolated bone reflection measurement and to a lesser extent, an isolated surface reflection. The relative surface to bone reflections, calculated as a ratio of reflection coefficients, provided a more consistent and statistically significant (p < 0.001) method for distinguishing each type of degradation, especially osteoarthritic degradation, and due to the complementary relationship between surface and bone reflections was found to be an effective method for distinguishing degraded from normal tissue in the osteoarthritic joint, independent of the site of initiation of the osteoarthritic process.

  3. Three-dimensional osteogenic and chondrogenic systems to model osteochondral physiology and degenerative joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Peter G; Gottardi, Riccardo; Lin, Hang; Lozito, Thomas P; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-09-01

    Tissue engineered constructs have the potential to function as in vitro pre-clinical models of normal tissue function and disease pathogenesis for drug screening and toxicity assessment. Effective high throughput assays demand minimal systems with clearly defined performance parameters. These systems must accurately model the structure and function of the human organs and their physiological response to different stimuli. Musculoskeletal tissues present unique challenges in this respect, as they are load-bearing, matrix-rich tissues whose functionality is intimately connected to the extracellular matrix and its organization. Of particular clinical importance is the osteochondral junction, the target tissue affected in degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA), which consists of hyaline articular cartilage in close interaction with subchondral bone. In this review, we present an overview of currently available in vitro three-dimensional systems for bone and cartilage tissue engineering that mimic native physiology, and the utility and limitations of these systems. Specifically, we address the need to combine bone, cartilage and other tissues to form an interactive microphysiological system (MPS) to fully capture the biological complexity and mechanical functions of the osteochondral junction of the articular joint. The potential applications of three-dimensional MPSs for musculoskeletal biology and medicine are highlighted.

  4. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  5. Wireless power transfer to a cardiac implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Ho, John S.; Chen, Lisa Y.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze wireless power transfer between a source and a weakly coupled implant on the heart. Numerical studies show that mid-field wireless powering achieves much higher power transfer efficiency than traditional inductively coupled systems. With proper system design, power sufficient to operate typical cardiac implants can be received by millimeter-sized coils.

  6. Growth Factor Gradients via Microsphere Delivery in Biopolymer Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Wenk, Esther; Zhang, Xiaohui; Meinel, Lorenz; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Temporally and spatially controlled delivery of growth factors in polymeric scaffolds is crucial for engineering composite tissue structures, such as osteochondral constructs. In the present study, microsphere-mediated growth factor delivery in polymer scaffolds and its impact on osteochondral differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was evaluated. Two growth factors, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I), were incorporated as a single concentration gradient or reverse gradient combining two factors in the scaffolds. To assess the gradient making system and the delivery efficiency of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and silk fibroin microspheres, initially an alginate gel was fabricated into a cylinder shape with microspheres incorporated as gradients. Compared to PLGA microspheres, silk microspheres were more efficient in delivering rhBMP-2, probably due to sustained release of the growth factor, while less efficient in delivering rhIGF-I, likely due to loading efficiency. The growth factor gradients formed were shallow, inducing non-gradient trends in hMSC osteochondral differentiation. Aqueous-derived silk porous scaffolds were used to incorporate silk microspheres using the same gradient process. Both growth factors formed deep and linear concentration gradients in the scaffold, as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After seeding with hMSCs and culturing for 5 weeks in a medium containing osteogenic and chondrogenic components, hMSCs exhibited osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation along the concentration gradients of rhBMP-2 in the single gradient of rhBMP-2 and reverse gradient of rhBMP-2/rhIGF-I, but not the rhIGF-I gradient system, confirming that silk microspheres were more efficient in delivering rhBMP-2 than rhIGF-I for hMSCs osteochondrogenesis. This novel silk microsphere/scaffold system offers a new option for the delivery of multiple growth factors

  7. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications. PMID:27879873

  8. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  9. Gadopentetate-dimeglumine-enhanced MR imaging of osteonecrosis and osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Peiss, J; Adam, G; Casser, R; Urhahn, R; Günther, R W

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on seven patients with aseptic osteonecrosis (n = 4) and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD; n = 3) of the elbow. Precontrast MRI was superior to plain radiographs, which did not show any abnormality in three cases of osteonecrosis. On gadopentetate-dimeglumine-enhanced T1-weighted images, which were obtained in three patients with osteonecrosis and three patients with OCD, all cases of osteonecrosis demonstrated homogeneous enhancement of the lesions. All cases of OCD were diagnosed on plain radiographs. On MRI one showed significant enhancement of the loose body. In another case an incompletely enhancing loose body was surrounded by a diffusely enhancing region. In the third patient only a small marginal enhancement of the defect was observed. Our results suggest that MRI can improve the accuracy in diagnosis of aseptic osteonecrosis of the elbow. The use of gadopentetate dimeglumine allows the viability of the lesions or the loose bodies to be demonstrated and reparative tissue to be detected.

  10. Feasibility of ultrasound imaging of osteochondral defects in the ankle: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kok, A C; Terra, M P; Muller, S; Askeland, C; van Dijk, C N; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Tuijthof, G J M

    2014-10-01

    Talar osteochondral defects (OCDs) are imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). For extensive follow-up, ultrasound might be a fast, non-invasive alternative that images both bone and cartilage. In this study the potential of ultrasound, as compared with CT, in the imaging and grading of OCDs is explored. On the basis of prior CT scans, nine ankles of patients without OCDs and nine ankles of patients with anterocentral OCDs were selected and classified using the Loomer CT classification. A blinded expert skeletal radiologist imaged all ankles with ultrasound and recorded the presence of OCDs. Similarly to CT, ultrasound revealed typical morphologic OCD features, for example, cortex irregularities and loose fragments. Cartilage disruptions, Loomer grades IV (displaced fragment) and V (cyst with fibrous roof), were visible as well. This study encourages further research on the use of ultrasound as a follow-up imaging modality for OCDs located anteriorly or centrally on the talar dome.

  11. From loose body to osteochondritis dissecans: a historical account of disease definition

    PubMed Central

    TARABELLA, VITTORIO; FILARDO, GIUSEPPE; DI MATTEO, BERARDO; ANDRIOLO, LUCA; TOMBA, PATRIZIA; VIGANÒ, ANNA; MARCACCI, MAURILIO

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a rare yet fascinating disease affecting young, active patients. It remains a ‘mysterious disease’ whose etiopathology, still unclear, is the subject of ongoing studies aiming improving the knowledge of this condition and, therefore, treatment options, too. Even though the first descriptions of intra-articular loose bodies date back to very ancient times, it is only relatively recently that, thanks to the contribution of some very eminent physicians, it became recognized as a specific orthopaedic condition. The aim of the present manuscript is to trace the main steps in the journey that led to the acknowledgement of OCD as an autonomous clinical entity, and to recall the prominent figures involved. PMID:27900309

  12. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Methods Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. Results The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister), both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) were the predominating joint abnormalities. Conclusion We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints. PMID:19193224

  13. Non-destructive monitoring of viability in an ex vivo organ culture model of osteochondral tissue.

    PubMed

    Elson, K M; Fox, N; Tipper, J L; Kirkham, J; Hall, R M; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2015-06-30

    Organ culture is an increasingly important tool in research, with advantages over monolayer cell culture due to the inherent natural environment of tissues. Successful organ cultures must retain cell viability. The aim of this study was to produce viable and non-viable osteochondral organ cultures, to assess the accumulation of soluble markers in the conditioned medium for predicting tissue viability. Porcine femoral osteochondral plugs were cultured for 20 days, with the addition of Triton X-100 on day 6 (to induce necrosis), camptothecin (to induce apoptosis) or no toxic additives. Tissue viability was assessed by the tissue destructive XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide tetrazolium salt) assay method and LIVE/DEAD® staining of the cartilage at days 0, 6 and 20. Tissue structure was assessed by histological evaluation using haematoxylin & eosin and safranin O. Conditioned medium was assessed every 3-4 days for glucose depletion, and levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Necrotic cultures immediately showed a reduction in glucose consumption, and an immediate increase in LDH, GAG, MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels. Apoptotic cultures showed a delayed reduction in glucose consumption and delayed increase in LDH, a small rise in MMP-2 and MMP-9, but no significant effect on GAGs released into the conditioned medium. The data showed that tissue viability could be monitored by assessing the conditioned medium for the aforementioned markers, negating the need for tissue destructive assays. Physiologically relevant whole- or part-joint organ culture models, necessary for research and pre-clinical assessment of therapies, could be monitored this way, reducing the need to sacrifice tissues to determine viability, and hence reducing the sample numbers necessary.

  14. The osteochondral ligament: a fibrous attachment between bone and articular cartilage in Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Felisbino, S L; Carvalho, H F

    2000-12-01

    The anuran epiphyseal cartilage shows a lateral expansion that covers the external surface of the bone, besides other features that distinguish it from the corresponding avian and mammalian structures. The fibrous structure that attaches the lateral cartilage to the bone was characterized in this work. It was designated osteochondral ligament (OCL) and presented two main areas. There was an inner area that was closer to the periosteal bone and contained a layer of osteoblasts and elongated cells aligned to and interspersed with thin collagen fibers. The thin processes of the cells in this area showed strong alkaline phosphatase activity. The outer area, which was closer to the cartilage, was rich in blood vessels and contained a few cells amongst thick collagen fibers. TRITC-phaloidin staining showed the cells of the inner area to be rich in F-actin, and were observed to form a net around the cell nucleus and to fill the cell processes which extended between the collagen fibers. Cells of the outer area were poor in actin cytoskeleton, while those associated with the blood vessels showed intense staining. Tubulin-staining was weak, regardless of the OCL region. The main fibers of the extracellular matrix in the OCL extended obliquely upwards from the cartilage to the bone. The collagen fibers inserted into the bone matrix as Sharpey's fibers and became progressively thicker as they made their way through the outer area to the cartilage. Immunocytochemistry showed the presence of type I and type III collagen. Microfibrils were found around the cells and amongst the collagen fibrils. These microfibrils were composed of either type VI collagen or fibrilin, as shown by immunocytochemistry. The results presented in this paper show that the osteochondral ligament of Rana catesbeiana is a complex and specialized fibrous attachment which guarantees a strong and flexible anchorage of the lateral articular cartilage to the periosteal bone shaft, besides playing a role in bone

  15. Return to Sport After Operative Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W.; Hancock, Kyle J.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Kopp, Benjamin; Glass, Natalie; Wolf, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is commonly managed surgically in symptomatic adolesent throwers and gymnasts. Little is known about the impact that surgical technique has on return to sport. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and return-to-sport rates after operative management of OCD lesions in adolescent athletes. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus (EBSCO), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were queried for studies evaluating outcomes and return to sport after surgical management of OCD of the capitellum. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies reporting patient outcomes with return-to-sport data and minimum 6-month follow-up were included in the review. Results: After review, 24 studies reporting outcomes in 492 patients (mean age ± SD, 14.3 ± 0.9 years) were analyzed. The overall return-to-sport rate was 86% at a mean 5.6 months. Return to the highest preoperative level of sport was most common after osteochondral autograft procedures (94%) compared with debridement and marrow stimulation procedures (71%) or OCD fixation surgery (64%). Elbow range of motion improved by 15.9° after surgery. The Timmerman-Andrews subjective and objective scores significantly improved after surgery. Complications were low (<5%), with 2 cases of donor site morbidity after osteoarticular autograft transfer (OAT) autograft harvest. The most common indications for reoperation were repeat debridement/loose body removal. Conclusion: A high rate of return to sport was observed after operative management of capitellar OCD. Patients were more likely to return to their highest level of preoperative sport after OAT autograft compared with debridement or fixation. Significant improvements in elbow range of motion and patient outcomes are

  16. The contribution of bone and cartilage to the near-infrared spectrum of osteochondral tissue

    PubMed Central

    McGoverin, Cushla M.; Lewis, Karl; Yang, Xu; Bostrom, Mathias P. G.; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been utilized to assess hyaline cartilage quality in human and animal osteochondral tissues. However, due to the lack of NIR signal from bone phosphate, and the relatively deep penetration depth of the radiation, the separate contributions of cartilage and bone to the spectral signatures have not been well defined. The objectives of the current study were 1) to improve the understanding of the contributions of bone and cartilage to NIR spectra acquired from osteochondral tissue, and 2) to assess the ability of this non-destructive method to predict cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade of human tibial plateau articular cartilage. NIR spectra were acquired from samples of bovine bone and cartilage with varying thicknesses, and from twenty-two tibial plateaus harvested from patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Spectra were recorded from regions of the tibial plateaus with varying degrees of degradation, and the cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade of these regions were assessed histologically. Spectra from bone and cartilage samples of known thicknesses were investigated to identify spectral regions that were distinct for these two tissues. Univariate and multivariate linear regression methods were used to correlate modified Mankin grade and cartilage thickness with NIR spectral changes. The ratio of the NIR absorbances associated with water at 5270 and 7085 cm−1 were the best differentiator of cartilage and bone spectra. NIR prediction models for thickness and Mankin grade calculated using partial least squares regression were more accurate than univariate-based prediction models, with root mean square errors of cross validation of 0.42 mm (thickness) and 1.3 (modified Mankin grade), respectively. We conclude that NIR spectroscopy may be used to simultaneously assess articular cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade, based in part on differences in spectral contributions from bone and cartilage

  17. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... sale in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. They vary in size, shell thickness, ... implant them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a ...

  18. Costo-osteochondral graft for post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in an adolescent boy.

    PubMed

    Iwai, S; Sato, K; Nakamura, T; Okazaki, M; Itoh, Y; Toyama, Y; Ikegami, H

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in a 13-year-old boy which was treated with costo-osteochondral grafts. A satisfactory outcome was seen at a follow-up of two years and ten months. Although costo-osteochondral grafting has been used in the treatment of defects in articular cartilage, especially in the hand and the elbow, the extension of the technique to manage post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the radial head in a child has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Complete relief of pain was obtained and an improvement in the range of movement was observed. The long-term results remain uncertain.

  19. Transplant of mesenchymal stem cells and hydroxyapatite ceramics to treat severe osteochondral damage after septic arthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Deie, Masataka; Ito, Yohei

    2005-08-01

    We describe a 21-year-old man with a large osteochondral defect of the knee after septic arthritis, successfully treated by transplant of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow and a new type of interconnected porous hydroxyapatite ceramic (IP-CHA). We confirmed successful cartilage-like tissue regeneration by a second arthroscopy. Biopsy of the repaired tissue revealed cartilage-like regeneration and bone formation. We were able to regenerate new bone and cartilage-like tissue in a one-stage operation, without sacrificing autologous bone or other tissue. This cultured MSC and IP-CHA hybrid material transplant represents a novel treatment for a severe osteochondral defect after septic arthritis.

  20. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 and hyaluronic acid in experimentally produced osteochondral defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alemdar, Celil; Yücel, İstemi; Erbil, Barış; Erdem, Havva; Atiç, Ramazan; Özkul, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The common purpose of almost all methods used to treat the osteochondral injuries is to produce a normal cartilage matrix. However current methods are not sufficient to provide a normal cartilage matrix. For that reason, researchers have studied to increase the effectiveness of this methods using chondrogenic and chondroprotective molecules in recent experimental studies. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are two important agents used in this field. This study compared the effects of IGF-1 and HA in an experimental osteochondral defect in rat femora. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into three groups (n = 15 per group) as follows: The IGF-1 group, HA group, and control group. An osteochondral defect of a diameter of 1.5 mm and a depth of 2 mm was created on the patellar joint side of femoral condyles. The IGF-1 group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 15 μg/15 μl of IGF-1, and the HA group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 80 μg HA. The control group received only an absorbable gelatin sponge. Rats were sacrificed at the 6th week, and the femur condyles were evaluated histologically. Results: According to the total Mankin scale, there was a statistically significant difference between IGF-1 and HA groups and between IGF-1 and control groups. There was also a significant statistical difference between HA and control groups. Conclusion: It was shown histopathologically that IGF-1 is an effective molecule for osteochondral lesions. Although it is weaker than IGF-1, HA also strengthened the repair tissue. PMID:27512224

  1. Surface modification by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation into new steel 460Li-21Cr in a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, H.; Mändl, S.; Bora, B.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Maze, J. R.; Walczak, M.; Manova, D.

    2014-10-01

    A novel steel 460Li-21Cr belonging to a new generation of superferritic grade steel has been implanted with nitrogen in a low power 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasma by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique in order to study its physical and chemical properties under different experimental conditions. We observed improved hardness and wear behavior of 460Li-21Cr steel with a layer thickness between 1.5 and 4.0 μm after 60 min implantation in the temperature range from 350 to 550 °C. The modified surface layer containing nitrogen does not show CrN in X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared to untreated substrates, the hardness can be increased by a factor of 4, depending on the experimental conditions, and the wear behavior was also improved by two orders of magnitude. The results are very similar to those for austenitic stainless steel with a similar pronounced increase in wear resistance and plateau-like nitrogen depth profiles.

  2. In vitro generation of whole osteochondral constructs using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells, employing a two-chambered co-culture well design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Ng, Kian Siang; Ravi, Sujata; Goh, James C H; Toh, Siew Lok

    2016-04-01

    The regeneration of whole osteochondral constructs with a physiological structure has been a significant issue, both clinically and academically. In this study, we present a method using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on a silk-RADA peptide scaffold in a specially designed two-chambered co-culture well for the generation of multilayered osteochondral constructs in vitro. This specially designed two-chambered well can simultaneously provide osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation to cells located in different regions of the scaffold. We demonstrated that this co-culture approach could successfully provide specific chemical stimulation to BMSCs located on different layers within a single scaffold, resulting in the formation of multilayered osteochondral constructs containing cartilage-like and subchondral bone-like tissue, as well as the intermediate osteochondral interface. The cells in the intermediate region were found to be hypertrophic chondrocytes, embedded in a calcified extracellular matrix containing glycosaminoglycans and collagen types I, II and X. In conclusion, this study provides a single-step approach that highlights the feasibility of rabbit BMSCs as a single-cell source for multilayered osteochondral construct generation in vitro.

  3. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant (Supprelin LA) is used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP; a condition causing children to enter puberty too soon, resulting in faster than normal bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls ...

  4. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... placed inside the penis to allow men with erectile dysfunction (ED) to get an erection. Penile implants are ... complications and follow-up care. For most men, erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with medications or use ...

  5. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  6. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  7. The Incidence of Surgery in Osteochondritis Dissecans in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Nikizad, Hooman; Shea, Kevin G.; Gyurdzhyan, Samvel; Jacobs, John C.; Cannamela, Peter C.; Kessler, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), a disorder of the subchondral bone and articular cartilage, is not well described. Purpose: To assess the frequency of pediatric OCD lesions that progress to surgery based on sex, joint involvement, and age. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A retrospective chart review (2007-2011) was performed on OCD. Inclusion criteria included OCD of any joint and patients aged 2 to 19 years. Exclusion criteria included traumatic osteochondral fractures or coexistence of non-OCD intra-articular lesions. Differences in progression toward surgery were compared between age groups, sex, and joint location. Logistical regression analysis was performed by sex, age, and ethnicity. Results: Overall, 317 patients with a total of 334 OCD lesions were found. The majority of lesions (61.7%) were in the knee, with ankle, elbow, shoulder, and foot lesions representing 25.4%, 12.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3% of all lesions, respectively. The majority of joints needing surgery were in the knee (58.5%), with ankle and elbow lesions representing 22.9% and 18.6% of surgeries performed, respectively. The percentage of all OCD lesions progressing to surgery was 35.3%; surgical progression for knee, ankle, and elbow joints was 33.5%, 31.8%, and 55.0%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis found no statistically significant different risk of progressing to surgery for OCD of the knee, elbow, and ankle between sexes. Patients aged 12 to 19 years had a 7.4-times greater risk of progression to surgery for knee OCD lesions than 6- to 11-year-olds. Patients aged 12 to 19 years were 8.2 times more likely to progress to surgery for all OCD lesions than patients aged 6 to 11 years. Progression to surgery of ankle OCD did not significantly differ based on location. Three of 4 trochlear lesions progressed to surgery, along with 1 of 1 tibial, 1 of 3 patellar, 40.3% of lateral femoral condylar, and 28.2% of medial femoral condylar

  8. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  9. Challenges in engineering osteochondral tissue grafts with hierarchical structures Ivana Gadjanski, Gordana Vunjak Novakovic

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A major hurdle in treating osteochondral (OC) defects are the different healing abilities of two types of tissues involved - articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Biomimetic approaches to OC-construct-engineering, based on recapitulation of biological principles of tissue development and regeneration, have potential for providing new treatments and advancing fundamental studies of OC tissue repair. Areas covered This review on state of the art in hierarchical OC tissue graft engineering is focused on tissue engineering approaches designed to recapitulate the native milieu of cartilage and bone development. These biomimetic systems are discussed with relevance to bioreactor cultivation of clinically sized, anatomically shaped human cartilage/bone constructs with physiologic stratification and mechanical properties. The utility of engineered OC tissue constructs is evaluated for their use as grafts in regenerative medicine, and as high-fidelity models in biological research. Expert opinion A major challenge in engineering OC tissues is to generate a functionally integrated stratified cartilage-bone structure starting from one single population of mesenchymal cells, while incorporating perfusable vasculature into the bone, and in bone-cartilage interface. To this end, new generations of advanced scaffolds and bioreactors, implementation of mechanical loading regimens, and harnessing of inflammatory responses of the host will likely drive the further progress. PMID:26195329

  10. Lunate Osteochondral Fracture Treated by Excision: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sadegh; Arabzadeh, Aidin; Farhoud, Amir Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lunate fracture is a rare injury. Most reports are associated with other wrist injuries such as perilunate dislocation and distal radius fracture. Isolated lunate fracture has been reported even more rarely. The choice of treatment and outcomes are consequently undetermined. Case Presentation In this case report we will describe a lunate avulsion fracture as an isolated injury after a fall from nine meters treated operatively by excision of the comminuted avulsed fragment. After 33 months of follow-up radiographs showed no sign of degenerative joint disorder on simple X-ray, but slight Volar Intercalated Segment Instability (VISI) by a capitolunate angle of 26 degrees was noted. Clinically, the patient was pain free near full wrist and forearm range of motion and could perform his previous vocational and recreational tasks without any limitations. Conclusions Despite apparently good short and mid-term clinical outcome, slight volar intercalated segment instability after 33 months of follow-up revealed that lunotriquetral ligament function was probably lost, which led to static instability. This ligament injury may be missed primarily. Excision of the avulsed osteochondral fragment should be the last option of treatment and most attempts should be tried to fix and/or restore the normal anatomy of ligamentous structure. PMID:27626007

  11. Diagnostic Value of CT Arthrography for Evaluation of Osteochondral Lesions at the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Kirschke, Jan S.; Braun, Sepp; Baum, Thomas; Holwein, Christian; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. To retrospectively determine the diagnostic value of computed tomography arthrography (CTA) of the ankle in the evaluation of (osteo)chondral lesions in comparison to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings. Methods. A total of N = 79 patients had CTAs and MRI of the ankle; in 17/79 cases surgical reports with statements on cartilage integrity were available. Cartilage lesions and bony defects at talus and tibia were scored according to defect depth and size by two radiologists. Statistical analysis included sensitivity analyses and Cohen's kappa calculations. Results. On CTA, 41/79 and 31/79 patients had full thickness cartilage defects at the talus and at the tibia, respectively. MRI was able to detect 54% of these defects. For the detection of full thickness cartilage lesions, interobserver agreement was substantial (0.72 ± 0.05) for CTA and moderate (0.55 ± 0.07) for MRI. In surgical reports, 88–92% and 46–62% of full thickness defects detected by CTA and MRI were described. CTA findings changed the further clinical management in 15.4% of cases. Conclusions. As compared to conventional MRI, CTA improves detection and visualization of cartilage defects at the ankle and is a relevant tool for treatment decisions in unclear cases. PMID:27891511

  12. Design of a multiphase osteochondral scaffold. II. Fabrication of a mineralized collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold.

    PubMed

    Harley, Brendan A; Lynn, Andrew K; Wissner-Gross, Zachary; Bonfield, William; Yannas, Ioannis V; Gibson, Lorna J

    2010-03-01

    This paper is the second in a series of papers describing the design and development of an osteochondral scaffold using collagen-glycosaminoglycan and calcium phosphate technologies engineered for the regenerative repair of articular cartilage defects. The previous paper described a technology (concurrent mapping) for systematic variation and control of the chemical composition of triple coprecipitated collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and calcium phosphate (CGCaP) nanocomposites without using titrants. This paper describes (1) fabricating porous, three-dimensional scaffolds from the CGCaP suspensions, (2) characterizing the microstructure and mechanical properties of such scaffolds, and (3) modifying the calcium phosphate mineral phase. The methods build on the previously demonstrated ability to vary the composition of a CGCaP suspension (calcium phosphate mass fraction between 0 and 80 wt %) and enable the production of scaffolds whose pore architecture (mean pore size: 50-1000 microm), CaP phase chemistry (brushite, octacalcium phosphate, apatite) and crosslinking density (therefore mechanical properties and degradation rate) can be independently controlled. The scaffolds described in this paper combine the desirable biochemical properties and pore architecture of porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with the strength and direct bone-bonding properties of calcium phosphate biomaterials in a manner that can be tailored to meet the demands of a range of applications in orthopedics and regenerative medicine.

  13. Acute hyperextension/valgus trauma to the elbow in top-level adult male water polo goalkeepers: a cause of osteochondritis disecans of the capitellum?

    PubMed

    Rod, Eduard; Ivkovic, Alan; Boric, Igor; Jankovic, Sasa; Radic, Andrej; Hudetz, Damir

    2013-09-01

    We report on 2 cases of hyperextension/valgus elbow injuries in two adult male national team water polo goalkeepers. Both were healthy and had never sustained any major injuries of the elbow. Mechanism and type of injury in both of them was identical. Different medical treatment protocols of these injuries possibly have led to different outcomes, with one of them developing osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Inadequate medical treatment of acute impact elbow injuries could lead to osteochondritis disecans of the elbow in top-level adult male water polo goalkeepers.

  14. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants.

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  16. Influence of juvenile osteochondral conditions on racing performance in Thoroughbreds born in Normandy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Céline; Valette, Jean-Paul; Jacquet, Sandrine; Denoix, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-01

    The relationship between osteoarticular status and future athletic capacity is commonly accepted in equine practice, but there is little to support this belief in Thoroughbreds. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) in Thoroughbred yearlings and to investigate the significance of these with regard to subsequent racing performance. The radiographic files from 328 Thoroughbred yearlings born in Normandy were assessed in a consistent manner and entered into a database together with racing records. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the association between each radiographic parameter and racing performance (raced/not raced, placed/not placed, performer/not performer) at 2, 3, 4 and 5years of age. The front fetlock (30.2% of horses), the dorsal aspect of the hind fetlock (18%), the carpus (15.9%) and the distal part of the hock (15.5%) were the most commonly affected joints. Most horses (87.5%) raced either in turf flat races or in hurdle races. Starting a race at 2years old was more frequent for yearlings without radiographic findings (RF) on the carpus or with less than one RF of moderate severity. The proportions of horses placed at 3years old decreased with increasing number or severity of RF. In racing horses, there was no association between the presence of RF and earnings. The radiographic score, calculated as the sum of all the severity indices found on the radiographic file of the horse appeared well correlated with performance. Using this synthetic index might help veterinarians to evaluate radiographs of Thoroughbred yearlings for potential buyers.

  17. Photocrosslinked layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel with graded compositions for osteochondral defect repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengxuan; Yang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Yunhui; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    A layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel with graded composition was prepared via photocrosslinking to simulate the polysaccharide/collagen composition of the natural tissue and mimic the multi-layered gradient structure of the cartilage-bone interface tissue. Firstly, gelatin and carboxymethyl chitosan were reacted with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) to obtain methacrylated gelatin (Gtn-GMA) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CS-GMA). Then, the mixed solutions of Gtn-GMA in different methacrylation degrees with CS-GMA were prepared to form the superficial, transitional and deep layers of the hydrogel, respectively under the irradiation of ultraviolet light, while polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was introduced in the deep layer to improve the mechanical properties. Results suggested that the pore sizes of the superficial, transitional and deep layers of the layered hydrogel were 115 ± 30, 94 ± 34, 51 ± 12 μm, respectively and their porosities were all higher than 80 %. The compressive strengths of them were 165 ± 54, 565 ± 50 and 993 ± 108 kPa, respectively and the strain of the gradient hydrogel decreased along the thickness direction, similar to the natural tissue. The in vitro cytotoxicity results showed that the hydrogel had good cytocompatibility and the in vivo repair results of osteochondral defect demonstrated remarkable recovery by using the gradient gelatin-chitosan hydrogel, especially when the hydrogel loading transforming growth factor-β1. Therefore, it was suggested that the prepared layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel in this study could be potentially used to promote cartilage-bone interface tissue repair.

  18. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus in athletes: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    VANNINI, FRANCESCA; COSTA, GIUSEPPE GIANLUCA; CARAVELLI, SILVIO; PAGLIAZZI, GHERARDO; MOSCA, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose ankle injuries make up 15% of all sports injuries and osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) are an increasingly frequent problem in active patients. There exist no widely shared guidelines on OLT treatment in the athletic population. The aim of this paper is to review all the existing literature evidence on the surgical treatment of OLTs in athletes, in order to determine the current state of the art in this specific population, underlining both the limits and the potential of the strategies used. Methods a systematic review of the literature was performed focusing on the different types of surgical treatment used for OLTs in athletes. The screening process and analysis were performed separately by two independent researchers. The inclusion criteria for relevant articles were: clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English, with no time limitation, or clinical reports describing the treatment of OLTs in the athletic population. Results with the consensus of the two observers, relevant data were then extracted and collected in a single database to be analyzed for the purposes of the present manuscript. At the end of the process, 16 papers met the selection criteria. These papers report a total of 642 athletic patients with OCTs. Conclusions the ideal treatment for cartilage lesions in athletes is a controversial topic, due to the need for an early return to sports, especially in elite players; this need leads to extensive use of microfractures in this population, despite the poor quality of repair associated with this technique. None of the surgical strategies described in this paper seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence systematic review of level IV studies, level IV. PMID:27602351

  19. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  20. A genome-wide association study of osteochondritis dissecans in the Thoroughbred.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Laura J; Blott, Sarah C; Swinburne, June E; Sibbons, Charlene; Fox-Clipsham, Laura Y; Helwegen, Maud; Parkin, Tim D H; Newton, J Richard; Bramlage, Lawrence R; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Bishop, Stephen C; Woolliams, John A; Vaudin, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Osteochondrosis is a developmental orthopaedic disease that occurs in horses, other livestock species, companion animal species, and humans. The principal aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the Thoroughbred using a genome-wide association study. A secondary objective was to test the effect of previously identified QTL in the current population. Over 300 horses, classified as cases or controls according to clinical findings, were genotyped for the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip. An animal model was first implemented in order to adjust each horse's phenotypic status for average relatedness among horses and other potentially confounding factors which were present in the data. The genome-wide association test was then conducted on the residuals from the animal model. A single SNP on chromosome 3 was found to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide level of significance, as determined by permutation. According to the current sequence annotation, the SNP is located in an intergenic region of the genome. The effects of 24 SNPs, representing QTL previously identified in a sample of Hanoverian Warmblood horses, were tested directly in the animal model. When fitted alongside the significant SNP on ECA3, two of these SNPs were found to be associated with OCD. Confirmation of the putative QTL identified on ECA3 requires validation in an independent sample. The results of this study suggest that a significant challenge faced by equine researchers is the generation of sufficiently large data sets to effectively study complex diseases such as osteochondrosis.

  1. Combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with supra-condylar femoral varus osteotomy, following lateral growth-plate damage in an adolescent knee: 8-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the 8-year clinical and radiographic outcome of an adolescent patient with a large osteochondral defect of the lateral femoral condyle, and ipsilateral genu valgum secondary to an epiphyseal injury, managed with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and supracondylar re-alignment femoral osteotomy. Long-term clinical success was achieved using this method, illustrating the effective use of re-alignment osteotomy in correcting mal-alignment of the knee, protecting the ACI graft site and providing the optimum environment for cartilage repair and regeneration. This is the first report of the combined use of ACI and femoral osteotomy for such a case. PMID:21418566

  2. Combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with supra-condylar femoral varus osteotomy, following lateral growth-plate damage in an adolescent knee: 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sridhar; Bentley, George

    2011-03-18

    We report the 8-year clinical and radiographic outcome of an adolescent patient with a large osteochondral defect of the lateral femoral condyle, and ipsilateral genu valgum secondary to an epiphyseal injury, managed with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and supracondylar re-alignment femoral osteotomy. Long-term clinical success was achieved using this method, illustrating the effective use of re-alignment osteotomy in correcting mal-alignment of the knee, protecting the ACI graft site and providing the optimum environment for cartilage repair and regeneration. This is the first report of the combined use of ACI and femoral osteotomy for such a case.

  3. Biodegradable implants in traumatology: a review on the state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, G O

    1995-01-01

    Up to now the internal fixation of fractured bones and joints has been managed by metal implants. There are certain associated disadvantages: the mechanical properties of the metals are stronger than those of cortical bone ("stress-protection"); the removal of the implants requires a second operation; an increasing number of patients are confronted with problems of sensitivity to metal components of the implants, especially nickel. About 40 different biodegradable polymers, copolymers and composites have been developed as substitutes for metal implants in internal fracture fixation. The early experimental and clinical results demonstrate their limitations. From the current point of view, it is not possible to transfer the designs and assembling principles of metal implants in orthopaedic surgery to biodegradable polymers. The attempt to simply mimic metal implants in polymers is condemned to fail from the very beginning. This is a review of the literature and of our first 100 patients operated on using implants made of self-reinforced polyglycolide acid and polydioxanone. The main difficulty with the material is the loss of stiffness in a time interval which is not long enough to guarantee bone healing. The development of a sterile sinus over the site of implantation is a problem also reported by other groups. Certain additives have to be inserted into the polymers to make them visible on conventional X-radiographs. Despite these drawbacks, however, there are indications for the isolated or adjuvant implantation of biodegradable materials. They could be employed in the treatment of osteochondral fractures and other defined injuries. The available literature on these indications will be discussed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The use of autologous chondrocyte implantation following and combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, W.; Gooding, C. R.; Sood, M.; Skinner, J. A.; Carrington, R. W.J.; Briggs, T. W.R.; Bentley, G.

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience of using autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to treat osteochondral defects of the knee in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The outcome of symptomatic osteochondral lesions treated with ACI following previous successful ACL reconstruction is also reviewed. Patients were followed for a mean of 23 months. Nine patients underwent ACL reconstruction in combination with ACI. Mean modified Cincinnati knee scores improved from 42 to 69 following surgery. Seven patients described their knee as better and two as the same. A second group of nine patients underwent ACI for symptomatic articular cartilage defects following previous ACL reconstruction. In this group, the mean modified Cincinnati knee score improved from 53 to 62 after surgery. Six patients described their knee as better and three as worse. Combined treatment using ACI with ACL reconstruction is technically feasible and resulted in sustained improvement in pain and function. The results following previous ACL reconstruction also resulted in clinical improvement, although results were not as good as following the combined procedure. PMID:16320051

  5. The effects of early or late treatment of osteochondral defects on joint homoeostasis: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mehmet Hakan; Aydogdu, Semih; Taskiran, Dilek; Sezak, Murat; Hayran, Mutlu; Oztop, Fikri; Ozsoy, Arzu

    2009-06-01

    A 3.5 x 4 mm tubular osteochondral defect was created on the right medial femoral condyles of 51 adult rabbits. In the control group (CG), defects were left untreated. In the early-(ETG) and late-(LTG) treatment groups, defects were treated by an osteoperiosteal graft 1 and 12 weeks, respectively, after the index procedure. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were collected regularly and proteoglycan fragments (PF), total collagen (TC) and collagenase (MMP-1) levels were measured. Rabbits were killed at 4 (early period), 12 (intermediate period), or 24 (late period) weeks postoperatively. Histological examination indicated a more successful healing in both grafting groups than in the CG, but without any difference at any time period between the grafting groups. In the CG, PF, and TC levels in SF increased continuously until the late period, indicating an ongoing degenerative activity in the joints. In contrast, SF marker levels in both grafting groups indicated that normalization in joint metabolism could be achieved-at least partially-after treatment. However, PF levels in the SF showed that the treatment of defects in earlier stages might result in better outcomes since the negative effects were more prominent in chronic stages, presumably due to the more prolonged period of disturbed homeostasis. Thus, histological values and SF marker levels indicated that treatment of osteochondral defects at any time of the disease had a positive effect on healing when compared to no treatment. Early treatment might better assist the recovery of joint homeostasis than late treatment.

  6. AG-041R, a cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonist, stimulates the repair of osteochondral defect in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toru; Kawasaki, Kenzo; Uchio, Yuji; Kataoka, Hiroko; Terashima, Masaharu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2002-03-29

    A newly synthesized compound (AG-041R), 3R-1-(2,2Diethoxyethyl)-((4methylphenyl) amino-carbonyl methyl)-3-((4methylphenyl) ureido-indoline-2-one), is a cholecystokinin-B/gastrin receptor antagonist which has stimulatory effects on the matrix synthesis of chondrocytes in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of AG-041R on the repair of osteochondral defects (cylindrical, 4 mm diameter) in the patellar groove of the rabbit knee joint. At the time of operation, 100 microl of 1 microM of AG-041R was administered, followed by 200 microl with an osmotic pump for 14 days. Histological and biochemical evaluations were performed at 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. The histological score of the AG-041R-treated group, the quantity of glycosaminoglycan and the ratio of chondroitin sulfate in the AG-041R-treated tissue were significantly higher than in the untreated group. Moreover, the degeneration of cartilage around the defect was suppressed in the AG-041R-treated group. These findings suggest that AG-041R is effective for the repair of osteochondral defects.

  7. Composite scaffolds for osteochondral repair obtained by combination of additive manufacturing, leaching processes and hMSC-CM functionalization.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Alarcón Iniesta, Hernán; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación

    2016-02-01

    Articular repair is a relevant and challenging area for the emerging fields of tissue engineering and biofabrication. The need of significant gradients of properties, for the promotion of osteochondral repair, has led to the development of several families of composite biomaterials and scaffolds, using different effective approaches, although a perfect solution has not yet been found. In this study we present the design, modeling, rapid manufacturing and in vitro testing of a composite scaffold aimed at osteochondral repair. The presented composite scaffold stands out for having a functional gradient of density and stiffness in the bony phase, obtained in titanium by means of computer-aided design combined with additive manufacture using selective laser sintering. The chondral phase is obtained by sugar leaching, using a PDMS matrix and sugar as porogen, and is joined to the bony phase during the polymerization of PDMS, therefore avoiding the use of supporting adhesives or additional intermediate layers. The mechanical performance of the construct is biomimetic and the stiffness values of the bony and chondral phases can be tuned to the desired applications, by means of controlled modifications of different parameters. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is used for improving scaffold response. Cell culture results provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used.

  8. Reconfigurable Resonant Regulating Rectifier With Primary Equalization for Extended Coupling- and Loading-Range in Bio-Implant Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Meng, Xiaodong; Tsui, Chi-Ying; Ki, Wing-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Wireless power transfer using reconfigurable resonant regulating (R(3)) rectification suffers from limited range in accommodating varying coupling and loading conditions. A primary-assisted regulation principle is proposed to mitigate these limitations, of which the amplitude of the rectifier input voltage on the secondary side is regulated by accordingly adjusting the voltage amplitude Veq on the primary side. A novel current-sensing method and calibration scheme track Veq on the primary side. A ramp generator simultaneously provides three clock signals for different modules. Both the primary equalizer and the R(3) rectifier are implemented as custom integrated circuits fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process, with the global control implemented in FPGA. Measurements show that with the primary equalizer, the workable coupling and loading ranges are extended by 250% at 120 mW load and 300% at 1.2 cm coil distance compared to the same system without the primary equalizer. A maximum rectifier efficiency of 92.5% and a total system efficiency of 62.4% are demonstrated.

  9. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  10. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  11. Subchondral bone cysts, osteochondritis dissecans, and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: a correlation and proposal of their possible common etiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Levine, B; Kanat, I O

    1988-01-01

    Various theoretical hypotheses have been proposed for the nontraumatic etiology of osteochondritis dissecans, subchondral bone cyst formation, and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Although a direct relationship between these distinct clinical entities has sparse referral in the literature, their common theories of etiology and evolution have been extensively documented, although not correlated. The various etiologic theories of osteochondritis dissecans, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, and subchondral bone cyst formation have been individually presented. The conclusion drawn upon review of these theories would prove that all of the proposed etiologies for the above syndromes are remarkably similar. Furthermore, as referred to in the contents of this paper, the signs, symptoms, and roentgenographic findings also appear to be common to all three syndromes. Various clinicopathologic studies have demonstrated similar gross pathologic and histologic findings between osteochondritis dissecans, subchondral bone cysts formation, and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. The authors, therefore, contend that the most likely nontraumatic etiology of this condition is a common multifactorial causation with an identical pathogenesis. They propose a common etiology resulting in a pathologic process, originating in subchondral cyst formation. Eventually, a communication between the cysts and the joint will occur secondary to either the duration and progression of the cystic process, endogenous, or exogenous stress resulting in collapse of the articular surface. A complete or partially detached osteochondral fragment results from these forces. Osteochondritis dissecans and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease may represent the same stage in the pathologic process. Degenerative joint disease is the final stage of this pathologic process. Further studies need to be performed to explore this relationship and the proposed pathogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  13. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... devices available with different bearing surfaces. These are: Metal-on-Polyethylene: The ball is made of metal ...

  14. Hybrid quantum circuit with implanted erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Rotzinger, H.; Tkalčec, A.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Wünsch, S.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with focused ion beam implanted Er{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} coupled to an array of superconducting lumped element microwave resonators. The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal is divided into several areas with distinct erbium doping concentrations, each coupled to a separate resonator. The coupling strength is varied from 5 MHz to 18.7 MHz, while the linewidth ranges between 50 MHz and 130 MHz. We confirm the paramagnetic properties of the implanted spin ensemble by evaluating the temperature dependence of the coupling. The efficiency of the implantation process is analyzed and the results are compared to a bulk doped Er:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} sample. We demonstrate the integration of these engineered erbium spin ensembles with superconducting circuits.

  15. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  16. Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Treated by the AO Hook Fixation System: A Four Year Follow-Up of an Alternative Technique

    PubMed Central

    Pengas, Ioannis P; Assiotis, Angelos; Kokkinakis, Michail; Khan, Wasim S; Meyers, Paul; Arbuthnot, James; Mcnicholas, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fixation is recommended for stable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions that have failed nonoperative management and for all unstable lesions. In this study we set out to describe and evaluate an alternative method of surgical fixation for such lesions. Five knees with unstable OCD lesions in four male adolescent patients with open physes were treated with the AO Hook Fixation System. The outcome was evaluated both clinically and with three separate outcome systems (IKDC 2000, KOOS, Lysholm) at one and a mean four year follow-up. We demonstrated excellent clinical results in all patients. At four years, all scoring systems demonstrated statistically significant improvement when compared to the preoperative status. Our study suggests that the AO Hook Fixation System is an alternative method of surgical intervention with comparable medium term results with other existing modes of fixation and the added biomechanical advantage of the absence of distracting forces during hardware removal. PMID:25067976

  17. Functional evaluation of patients treated with osteochondral allograft transplantation for post-traumatic ankle arthritis: one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Berti, L; Vannini, F; Lullini, G; Caravaggi, P; Leardini, A; Giannini, S

    2013-09-01

    Severe post-traumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in active patients. Whereas traditional surgical treatments, i.e. arthrodesis and arthroplasty, provide good pain relief, arthrodesis is associated to functional and psychological limitations, and arthroplasty is prone to failure in the active patient. More recently the use of bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts transplantation has been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional treatments. Preliminary short- and long-term clinical outcomes for this procedure have been reported, but no functional evaluations have been performed to date. The clinical and functional outcomes of a series of 10 patients who underwent allograft transplantation at a mean follow-up of 14 months are reported. Clinical evaluation was performed with the AOFAS score, functional assessment by state-of-the-art gait analysis. The clinical score significantly improved from a median of 54 (range 12-65) pre-op to 76.5 (range 61-86) post-op (p=0.002). No significant changes were observed for the spatial-temporal parameters, but motion at the hip and knee joints during early stance, and the range of motion of the ankle joint in the frontal plane (control: 13.8°±2.9°; pre-op: 10.4°±3.1°, post-op: 12.9°±4.2°; p=0.02) showed significant improvements. EMG signals revealed a good recovery in activation of the biceps femoris. This study showed that osteochondral allograft transplantation improves gait patterns. Although re-evaluation at longer follow-ups is required, this technique may represent the right choice for patients who want to delay the need for more invasive joint reconstruction procedures.

  18. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ley, C J; Ekman, S; Hansson, K; Björnsdóttir, S; Boyde, A

    2014-03-25

    Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA) in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining) and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC), articular calcified cartilage (ACC), subchondral bone (SCB) and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  19. Distant energy transfer for artificial human implants.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, Michael P; Mollov, Stefan V

    2005-11-01

    The powering of human implants via inductive coupling has been an object of interest for the past two decades. This paper discusses some of the issues concerning a distant energy link used for supplying artificial human implants, operating at the frequency of 13.56 MHz. A procedure for the design of an energy-receiving coil is given for general applications. A design procedure is also developed, with focus on coils used for supplying human implants. The correctness of the analysis of this later design procedure has been verified by experimental results. Measurements with a human tissue simulant also show little deviation from the predictions.

  20. Cumulative Incidence of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum in Child and Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Iwame, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is high among individuals who have played baseball since childhood. Recently two cross-sectional studies according to prevalence of OCD have been published. In a study of 1040 baseball players aged 10 to 12 years, Matsuura et al found that 2.1% of players had OCD, with no differences in prevalence according to age or player position. Kida et al., in their study of 2433 baseball players aged 12 to 18 years, found OCD in 3.4% of subjects. Furthermore, they found that players with OCD began playing baseball at earlier ages, had played for longer periods, and had experienced more elbow pain. The player’s current baseball position may not be related to the existence of OCD lesions. Together, these findings led us to examine the longitudinal study for examining the risk factors for occurrence of OCD. Our objectives were to determine (1) cumulative incidence rates of OCD in the school child players aged 6-11 years old, (2) the relative risk of OCD by age, beginning age playing baseball, playing period, experimental hours per week, playing position, and elbow pain. Methods: A total of 1,275 players aged 6-11 years (mean, 9.4 years) belonged to youth baseball teams without OCD lesions received examination in the next year and were the subjects of this investigation. Subjects were examined by questionnaire, and ultrasonographic and radiographic examination. Questionnaire items included age, player position, beginning age of playing baseball, playing period of baseball, number of training hours per week and history of elbow pain. Ultrasonography of the lateral aspect of the elbow was performed. An irregularity of the subchondral bone of the capitellum was regarded as an abnormality. Radiographic examination was recommended to players who had an abnormal finding on ultrasonographic examination. We investigated the following risk factors for occurrence of OCD: age, player position, beginning age of

  1. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  2. Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2012-07-18

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  3. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed.

  4. Cartilage storage at 4 °C with regular culture medium replacement benefits chondrocyte viability of osteochondral grafts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianhong; Hu, Zunjie; Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Bin; Xie, Di; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of articular cartilage allografts in culture media is a common method of tissue storage; however, the technical parameters of graft storage remain controversial. In this study, we examined the optimal temperature and culture medium exchange rate for the storage of osteochondral allografts in vitro. Cylindrical osteochondral grafts (n = 120), harvested from the talar joint surface of ten Boer goats, were randomly classified into four groups and stored under the following conditions: Group A1 was maintained at 4 °C in culture medium that was refreshed every 2 days; Group A2 was maintained at 4 °C in the same culture medium, without refreshing; Group B1, was maintained at 37 °C in culture medium that was refreshed every 2 days; Group B2, was maintained at 37 °C in the same culture medium, without refreshing. Chondrocyte viability in the grafts was determined by ethidium bromide/fluorescein diacetate staining on days 7, 21, and 35. Proteoglycan content was measured by Safranin-O staining. Group A1 exhibited the highest chondrocyte survival rates of 90.88 %, 88.31 % and 78.69 % on days 7, 21, and 35, respectively. Safranin O staining revealed no significant differences between groups on days 21 and 35. These results suggest that storage of osteochondral grafts at 4 °C with regular culture medium replacement should be highly suitable for clinical application.

  5. A novel method for effective sodium ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Qiuyuan; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-07-15

    Although sodium ion implantation is useful to the surface modification of biomaterials and nano-electronic materials, it is a challenging to conduct effective sodium implantation by traditional implantation methods due to its high chemical reactivity. In this paper, we present a novel method by coupling a Na dispenser with plasma immersion ion implantation and radio frequency discharge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling reveals that sodium is effectively implanted into a silicon wafer using this apparatus. The Na 1s XPS spectra disclose Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} bonds and the implantation effects are confirmed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Our setup provides a feasible way to conduct sodium ion implantation effectively.

  6. A novel method for effective sodium ion implantation into silicon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiu Yuan; Chu, Paul K

    2012-07-01

    Although sodium ion implantation is useful to the surface modification of biomaterials and nano-electronic materials, it is a challenging to conduct effective sodium implantation by traditional implantation methods due to its high chemical reactivity. In this paper, we present a novel method by coupling a Na dispenser with plasma immersion ion implantation and radio frequency discharge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling reveals that sodium is effectively implanted into a silicon wafer using this apparatus. The Na 1s XPS spectra disclose Na(2)O-SiO(2) bonds and the implantation effects are confirmed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy. Our setup provides a feasible way to conduct sodium ion implantation effectively.

  7. The effect of defect localization on spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects in a Gottingen minipig model: a retrospective analysis of the medial patellar groove versus the medial femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Jung, Martin; Breusch, Steffen; Daecke, Wolfgang; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2009-04-01

    Various animal models for experimental osteochondral defect healing have been used in orthopaedic research. Two main defect locations were chosen: the patellar groove or the central part of the medial femoral condyles (MFC). To date, it is not clear whether both locations display similar patterns in critical size osteochondral defect healing. We retrospectively analysed both locations in our minipig model hypothesizing that they show similar healing pattern. Thirty-five defects were analysed after three or 12 months. Osteochondral defects were 10 mm deep and 6.3 mm (MFC, n = 19) in diameter or 8 mm and 5.4 mm, respectively (trochlear groove [TG], n = 16). Semi-quantitative histological scoring and histomorphological evaluation were carried out. Both defect locations showed fillings of fibrous and fibrocartilage-like repair tissue. The osseous defect was closed by endochondral bone formation in the MFC. Semi-quantitative scoring did not show differences, whereas qualitative histomorphological analysis more frequently showed cartilaginous repair tissue in MFC defects. There was more frequent subchondral bone cyst formation in MFC location (P = 0.05), TG defects resulted in lower postoperative pain. Both defect localizations are suitable for studies on osteochondral healing. Since regenerating with less hyaline-like repair tissue and less subchondral cyst formation, TG is more favourable for experimental osteochondral defect healing in this model.

  8. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  9. Effects of exercise and polysulfated glycosaminoglycan on the development of osteoarthritis in equine carpal joints with osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Todhunter, R J; Freeman, K P; Yeager, A E; Lust, G

    1993-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of postoperative exercise and intra-articular polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG) on the repair of osteochondral defects in the carpal joints of ponies. Eighteen ponies with normal carpi had osteochondral defects (mean dimensions 2.4 cm x 0.9 cm) created arthroscopically on the dorsal aspect of the distal articular surface of the radial carpal bone. The ponies were randomized (while balancing for age [range, 2 to 15 years; median, 5.0 years]) to two groups--nine ponies were exercised and nine were stall confined. Beginning at surgery, six ponies in each group received five weekly intra-articular injections of PSGAG (250 mg) in one joint and lactated Ringer's solution in the contralateral joint; the remaining three ponies in each group received lactated Ringer's solution in both joints. The incremental exercise schedule on a circular, rotating walker was begun six days after surgery and occurred twice daily, reaching a maximum of 0.7 miles of walking and 2.7 miles of trotting by the third postoperative month. The effects of treatment on the joint tissues were determined by weekly lameness examinations and measurement of the range of carpal joint motion, carpal radiographs at six and 17 weeks after surgery, synovial fluid analysis, and cytologic evaluation of alcohol-fixed synovial fluid specimens at weeks 1 through 4 and week 17, and histology of the synovial membrane. Ultrasound images of the carpi were acquired before operation and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 13, and 17. Ponies were euthanatized 17 weeks after surgery. Exercise, without medication, caused more lameness throughout the study compared with no exercise. Exercised, nonmedicated ponies had the greatest limitation to carpal flexion (more painful joints), and nonexercised, nonmedicated (control) ponies had the least limitation to flexion. Radiographic scores indicated that the exercised, nonmedicated ponies had significantly (p < .05) more signs of osteoarthritis than

  10. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to women of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with ... likely be inserted at the same time. Ruptured silicone implant If a silicone breast implant ruptures, you ...

  11. Implants for lucky few

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, David

    2011-08-01

    In his article "Vision of beauty" (May pp22-27), Richard Taylor points the way to fractal design for retinal implants and makes an enthusiastic case for incorporating such features into the next generation of such implants.

  12. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  13. Early loss of subchondral bone following microfracture is counteracted by bone marrow aspirate in a translational model of osteochondral repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Orth, Patrick; Müller-Brandt, Kathrin; Goebel, Lars K. H.; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Microfracture of cartilage defects may induce alterations of the subchondral bone in the mid- and long-term, yet very little is known about their onset. Possibly, these changes may be avoided by an enhanced microfracture technique with additional application of bone marrow aspirate. In this study, full-thickness chondral defects in the knee joints of minipigs were either treated with (1) debridement down to the subchondral bone plate alone, (2) debridement with microfracture, or (3) microfracture with additional application of bone marrow aspirate. At 4 weeks after microfracture, the loss of subchondral bone below the defects largely exceeded the original microfracture holes. Of note, a significant increase of osteoclast density was identified in defects treated with microfracture alone compared with debridement only. Both changes were significantly counteracted by the adjunct treatment with bone marrow. Debridement and microfracture without or with bone marrow were equivalent regarding the early cartilage repair. These data suggest that microfracture induced a substantial early resorption of the subchondral bone and also highlight the potential value of bone marrow aspirate as an adjunct to counteract these alterations. Clinical studies are warranted to further elucidate early events of osteochondral repair and the effect of enhanced microfracture techniques. PMID:28345610

  14. Management of Hepple Stage V Osteochondral Lesion of the Talus with a Platelet-Rich Plasma Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenqi; Li, Tanzhu; Mei, Guohua; Xue, Jianfeng; Zou, Jian; Wang, Xiaokang; Zhang, Haotong; Xu, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    There has been no consensus on the treatment or prognosis of Hepple stage V osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs), especially for lesions greater than 1.5 cm2 in size. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes achieved upon application of a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) scaffold with a cancellous bone autograft for Hepple stage V OLTs. Fourteen patients (mean age, 39 years) were treated with a cancellous bone graft and a PRP scaffold between 2013 and 2015. The mean time to surgical treatment was 23.5 months. Ankle X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging were performed at the final follow-up. Functional outcomes were evaluated according to the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, and Short Form 36 (SF-36) score. The range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint and complications also were recorded. Thirteen patients completed the full follow-up, with a mean follow-up duration of 18 months. MRI demonstrated the complete regeneration of subchondral bone and cartilage in all patients. The postoperative VAS, AOFAS ankle and hindfoot, and SF-36 scores were improved significantly (all P < 0.001) without obvious complications. We suggest that, for the Hepple stage V OLTs, management with cancellous bone graft and PRP scaffold may be a safe and effective treatment.

  15. Longitudinal long-term results of surgical treatment in patients with osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyles.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Juergen; Rayf, Mark; Steinhagen, Joern

    2008-05-01

    In a longitudinal study, we performed a second follow-up examination on patients suffering from osteochondritis dissecans at the femoral condyles 10 years after a first follow-up, which had been performed 10 years after surgical treatment. Results (clinical score; radiological signs of OA) were analysed depending on the stage of the epiphyseal plate at the time of surgery, the used surgical procedure was divided into retrograde and anterograde procedures, and removal of loose bodies depending on the stage of the lesion. The analysis clearly exhibited that JOCD patients demonstrated better results than AOCD patients. The clinical score obtained after 10 years improved significantly with time, particularly for JOCD patients. Overall, when a retrograde procedure had been used in cases with an intact cartilage layer clinical results were better than those obtained in patients in whom an anterograde procedure with restoration of the joint surface or simple removal of the loose fragments had been performed. After a mean follow-up of 20 years the mean OA-stage was 0.27 in JOCD patients, whereas in AOCD patients a mean OA-stage of 1.55 was detected. Worst OA-changes were detected in patients in whom acrylic glue had been used for refixation of the loose bodies.

  16. A novel ultrasound technique for detection of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint: a parametric and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J; van Dongen, Koen W A; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2014-12-24

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced.

  17. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  18. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  19. Germanium implanted Bragg gratings in silicon on insulator waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiacono, Renzo; Reed, Graham T.; Gwilliam, Russell; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas; Lulli, Giorgio; Jeynes, Chris; Jones, Richard

    2010-02-01

    Integrated Bragg gratings are an interesting candidate for waveguide coupling, telecommunication applications, and for the fabrication of integrated photonic sensors. These devices have a high potential for optical integration and are compatible with CMOS processing techniques if compared to their optical fibre counterpart. In this work we present design, fabrication, and testing of Germanium ion implanted Bragg gratings in silicon on insulator (SOI). A periodic refractive index modulation is produced in a 1μm wide SOI rib waveguide by implanting Germanium ions through an SiO2 hardmask. The implantation conditions have been analysed by 3D ion implantation modelling and the induced refractive index change has been investigated on implanted samples by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and ellipsometry analysis. An extinction ratio of up to 30dB in transmission, around the 1.55μm wavelength, has been demonstrated for Germanium implanted gratings on SOI waveguides.

  20. Totally Implantable Wireless Ultrasonic Doppler Blood Flowmeters: Toward Accurate Miniaturized Chronic Monitors.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Michael A; Unadkat, Jignesh V; Gimbel, Michael L; Mickle, Marlin H; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-03-01

    Totally implantable wireless ultrasonic blood flowmeters provide direct-access chronic vessel monitoring in hard-to-reach places without using wired bedside monitors or imaging equipment. Although wireless implantable Doppler devices are accurate for most applications, device size and implant lifetime remain vastly underdeveloped. We review past and current approaches to miniaturization and implant lifetime extension for wireless implantable Doppler devices and propose approaches to reduce device size and maximize implant lifetime for the next generation of devices. Additionally, we review current and past approaches to accurate blood flow measurements. This review points toward relying on increased levels of monolithic customization and integration to reduce size. Meanwhile, recommendations to maximize implant lifetime should include alternative sources of power, such as transcutaneous wireless power, that stand to extend lifetime indefinitely. Coupling together the results will pave the way for ultra-miniaturized totally implantable wireless blood flow monitors for truly chronic implantation.

  1. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  2. Posterior talar process as a suitable cell source for treatment of cartilage and osteochondral defects of the talus.

    PubMed

    Correia, S I; Silva-Correia, J; Pereira, H; Canadas, R F; da Silva Morais, A; Frias, A M; Sousa, R A; van Dijk, C N; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Reis, R L; Oliveira, J M

    2015-10-29

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle are common lesions affecting the talar cartilage and subchondral bone. Current treatments include cell-based therapies but are frequently associated with donor-site morbidity. Our objective is to characterize the posterior process of the talus (SP) and the os trigonum (OT) tissues and investigate their potential as a new source of viable cells for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. SP and OT tissues obtained from six patients were characterized by micro-computed tomography and histological, histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. Proliferation and viability of isolated cells were evaluated by MTS assay, DNA quantification and live/dead staining. The TUNEL assay was performed to evaluate cell death by apoptosis. Moreover, the production of extracellular matrix was evaluated by toluidine blue staining, whereas cells phenotype was investigated by flow cytometry. Characterization of ankle explants showed the presence of a cartilage tissue layer in both SP and OT tissues, which represented at least 20%, on average, of the explant. The presence of type II collagen was detected in the extracellular matrix. Isolated cells presented a round morphology typical of chondrocytes. In in vitro studies, cells were viable and proliferating for up to 21 days of culture. No signs of apoptosis were detected. Flow-cytometry analysis revealed that isolated cells maintained the expression of several chondrocytic markers during culture. The results indicated that the SP and OT tissues were a reliable source of viable chondrocytes, which could find promising applications in ACI/MACI strategies with minimal concerns regarding donor zone complications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  4. Osseointegrated implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Rogoff, G S

    1992-06-01

    This review covers recent literature on prosthodontic aspects of osseointegrated implants. Long-term prognosis, diagnosis and treatment planning, and clinical impression techniques and fabrication technology are discussed.

  5. Three-dimensional bioprinting of multilayered constructs containing human mesenchymal stromal cells for osteochondral tissue regeneration in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ki-Mo; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Hyuntae; Oh, Kyunghoon; Park, Kyeng Min; Yeom, Junseok; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-04

    The use of cell-rich hydrogels for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has shown great potential for a variety of biomedical applications. However, the fabrication of appropriate constructs has been challenging. In this study, we describe a 3D printing process for the preparation of a multilayered 3D construct containing human mesenchymal stromal cells with a hydrogel comprised of atelocollagen and supramolecular hyaluronic acid (HA). This construct showed outstanding regenerative ability for the reconstruction of an osteochondral tissue in the knee joints of rabbits. We found that the use of a mechanically stable, host-guest chemistry-based hydrogel was essential and allowed two different types of extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels to be easily printed and stacked into one multilayered construct without requiring the use of potentially harmful chemical reagents or physical stimuli for post-crosslinking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to validate the potential of a 3D printed multilayered construct consisting of two different ECM materials (atelocollagen and HA) for heterogeneous tissue regeneration using an in vivo animal model. We believe that this 3D printing-based platform technology can be effectively exploited for regeneration of various heterogeneous tissues as well as osteochondral tissue.

  6. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  7. Teeth and implants.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R

    1999-08-28

    An osseointegrated implant restoration may closely resemble a natural tooth. However, the absence of a periodontal ligament and connective tissue attachment via cementum, results in fundamental differences in the adaptation of the implant to occlusal forces, and the structure of the gingival cuff.

  8. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  9. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  10. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  11. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  12. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  13. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  14. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  15. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1987-01-01

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line, and electrode arrangment are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heated region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed switches.

  16. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line and electrode arrangement are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heat region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed swtiches. 5 figs.

  17. Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton N.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Smith, Stephen F.; Hylton, James O.

    2009-11-24

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  18. A fully implantable 96-channel neural data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-04-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface.

  19. A fully implantable 96-channel neural data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A.; Jochum, Thomas A.; Callender, Stephen H.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Turner, Dennis A.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2009-04-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface.

  20. A Fully Implantable 96-channel Neural Data Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively-coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed, and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. PMID:19255459

  1. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  2. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  3. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  4. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  5. SCIMITAR: subject-carried implant monitoring inductive telemetric ambulatory reader for remote data acquisition from implanted orthopaedic prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shiying; Gorjon, Jose; Taylor, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This work describes the functions of the external, portable part of a telemetry system for powering and interrogating implantable electrical devices built within orthopaedic implants for real-time data acquisition of strain, load, temperature, humidity and other relevant data (e.g. from inertial sensors). The system contains a battery powered inductive energiser and demodulator to remotely power the implant electronics and demodulate the signals transmitted from the implanted device. Due to the housing of the internal coil, sufficient inductive coupling is obtained between the external and internal tuned circuits to enable simultaneous power and data transmission over the same inductive link. The actual performance of this system when used with one specific implant was studied, and some correspondence made to the relevant theory. Performance factors relating to both power efficiency and data reconstruction were identified.

  6. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  7. CO2 laser waveguiding in proton implanted GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkinson, H. A.; Larson, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Surface layers capable of supporting optical modes at 10.6 microns have been produced in n-type GaAs wafers through 300 keV proton implantation. The dominant mechanism for this effect appears to be free carrier compensation. Characterization of the implanted layers by analysis of infrared reflectivity spectra and synchronous coupling at 10.6 microns produced results in good agreement with elementary models. These results of sample characterization by infrared reflectivity and by CO2 laser waveguiding as implanted are presented and evaluated.

  8. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Liliana F; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R; Guilak, Farshid; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  9. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  10. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  11. In vivo determination of aluminum, cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, titanium and vanadium in oral mucosa cells from orthodontic patients with mini-implants by Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Jos, Angeles; Puerto, Maria; Calleja, Ana; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-10-01

    Miniscrews are used as orthodontic anchorage devices in the dentistry clinical practice but the in vivo metallic release from these structures has been not previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the content of Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Ti and V in oral mucosa cells of control subjects, patients under orthodontic treatment and with both, orthodontic treatment and miniscrew, in order to know the contribution of these mini-implants to the total metallic content. ICP-MS measurements revealed the following ascending order: Cr

  12. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23265327 . Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  13. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  14. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... has traveled to other parts of the body. Connective Tissue Disease The FDA has not detected any association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and connective tissue disease, breast cancer, or reproductive problems. In order ...

  15. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  16. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  17. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  18. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Microsystem technologies for implantable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Receveur, Rogier A. M.; Lindemans, Fred W.; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2007-05-01

    implantable primary batteries, rechargeable batteries were introduced or concepts in which energy is provided from the outside based on inductive coupling. Long-term developments aiming at autonomous power are, for example, based on electrostatic conversion of mechanical vibrations. Communication with the implantable device is usually done using an inductive link. A large range of materials commonly used in microfabrication are also used for implantable microsystems.

  20. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Pot, Michiel W.; Gonzales, Veronica K.; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  1. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  2. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  3. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  4. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  5. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  6. [Larynx: implants and stents].

    PubMed

    Sittel, C

    2009-05-01

    There is a wide variety of devices and materials to be implanted into the human larynx. Some are intended to remain only for a period of time, like laryngeal stents. If removal is not intended the device meets the definition for a medical implant. The majority of implants is used for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold immobility. There a 2 types of implants serving this purpose: Implants in a stricter sense are devices of solid material, which are brought into the paraglottic space through a window in the laryngeal framework (medialization thyroplasty). Several different products are presented in this review. In contrast, there are different substances available for endoscopic injection into the paralyzed vocal fold (injection laryngoplasty). Since some of these substances show a corpuscular consistency and a high viscosity they need to be deposited into the lateral paraglottic space. Therefore, the term "injectable implants" has been coined for these materials. The different substances available are discussed in detail in this review. Laryngeal stents are primarily used in the early postoperative phase after open reconstruction of the larynx. The different devices available on the market are described with their specific characteristics and intended use.

  7. Osteochondral Biopsy Analysis Demonstrates That BST-CarGel Treatment Improves Structural and Cellular Characteristics of Cartilage Repair Tissue Compared With Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Méthot, Stéphane; Changoor, Adele; Tran-Khanh, Nicolas; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Stanish, William D.; Restrepo, Alberto; Shive, Matthew S.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel, a chitosan-based medical device for cartilage repair, was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in the knee. The quality of repair tissue of osteochondral biopsies collected from a subset of patients was compared using blinded histological assessments. Methods The international RCT evaluated repair tissue quantity and quality by 3-dimensional quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as co-primary endpoints at 12 months. At an average of 13 months posttreatment, 21/41 BST-CarGel and 17/39 microfracture patients underwent elective second look arthroscopies as a tertiary endpoint, during which ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) macroscopic scoring was carried out, and osteochondral biopsies were collected. Stained histological sections were evaluated by blinded readers using ICRS I and II histological scoring systems. Collagen organization was evaluated using a polarized light microscopy score. Results BST-CarGel treatment resulted in significantly better ICRS macroscopic scores (P = 0.0002) compared with microfracture alone, indicating better filling, integration, and tissue appearance. Histologically, BST-CarGel resulted in a significant improvement of structural parameters—Surface Architecture (P = 0.007) and Surface/Superficial Assessment (P = 0.042)—as well as cellular parameters—Cell Viability (P = 0.006) and Cell Distribution (P = 0.032). No histological parameters were significantly better for the microfracture group. BST-CarGel treatment also resulted in a more organized repair tissue with collagen stratification more similar to native hyaline cartilage, as measured by polarized light microscopy scoring (P = 0.0003). Conclusion Multiple and independent analyses in this biopsy substudy demonstrated that BST-CarGel treatment results in improved structural and cellular characteristics of repair tissue at 1 year posttreatment compared with

  8. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  9. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602347

  10. Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-06-20

    The development of implanted devices is essential because of their direct effect on the lives and safety of humanity. This paper presents the current issues and challenges related to all methods used to harvest energy for implantable biomedical devices. The advantages, disadvantages, and future trends of each method are discussed. The concept of harvesting energy from environmental sources and human body motion for implantable devices has gained a new relevance. In this review, the harvesting kinetic, electromagnetic, thermal and infrared radiant energies are discussed. Current issues and challenges related to the typical applications of these methods for energy harvesting are illustrated. Suggestions and discussion of the progress of research on implantable devices are also provided. This review is expected to increase research efforts to develop the battery-less implantable devices with reduced over hole size, low power, high efficiency, high data rate, and improved reliability and feasibility. Based on current literature, we believe that the inductive coupling link is the suitable method to be used to power the battery-less devices. Therefore, in this study, the power efficiency of the inductive coupling method is validated by MATLAB based on suggested values. By further researching and improvements, in the future the implantable and portable medical devices are expected to be free of batteries.

  11. Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices: issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The development of implanted devices is essential because of their direct effect on the lives and safety of humanity. This paper presents the current issues and challenges related to all methods used to harvest energy for implantable biomedical devices. The advantages, disadvantages, and future trends of each method are discussed. The concept of harvesting energy from environmental sources and human body motion for implantable devices has gained a new relevance. In this review, the harvesting kinetic, electromagnetic, thermal and infrared radiant energies are discussed. Current issues and challenges related to the typical applications of these methods for energy harvesting are illustrated. Suggestions and discussion of the progress of research on implantable devices are also provided. This review is expected to increase research efforts to develop the battery-less implantable devices with reduced over hole size, low power, high efficiency, high data rate, and improved reliability and feasibility. Based on current literature, we believe that the inductive coupling link is the suitable method to be used to power the battery-less devices. Therefore, in this study, the power efficiency of the inductive coupling method is validated by MATLAB based on suggested values. By further researching and improvements, in the future the implantable and portable medical devices are expected to be free of batteries. PMID:24950601

  12. Sequential outcome following autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee: A six-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    David, Lee A.; Briggs, Tim W. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective six-year longitudinal study reviews the clinical outcome of patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover for deep chondral defects of the knee. We present 57 patients (31 male, 26 female) with a mean age of 31.6 years (range 15–51 years) that have undergone ACI since July 1998. The mean size of the defect was 3.14 cm2 (range 1.0–7.0 cm2). All patients were assessed annually using seven independent validated clinical rating scores with the data analysed using ANOVA. ACI using a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover produced statistically significant improvements (p < 0.001), maintained for up to six years, in knee symptoms compared to pre-operative levels. This study provides evidence of the medium-term benefit achieved by transplanting autologous chondrocytes to osteochondral defects. PMID:19669763

  13. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  14. Extraoral prostheses using extraoral implants.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, G; Tuna, S H; Oghan, F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  15. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  16. The coupled atom transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, X.; Voisin, B.; Roche, B.; Dupont-Ferrier, E.; De Franceschi, S.; Sanquer, M.; Cobian, M.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Sklénard, B.; Cueto, O.; Wacquez, R.; Vinet, M.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the first implementation of a coupled atom transistor where two shallow donors (P or As) are implanted in a nanoscale silicon nanowire and their electronic levels are controlled with three gate voltages. Transport spectroscopy through these donors placed in series is performed both at zero and microwave frequencies. The coherence of the charge transfer between the two donors is probed by Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Single-charge transfer at zero bias (electron pumping) has been performed and the crossover between the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes is studied.

  17. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  18. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  19. Optical attenuation in ion-implanted silicon waveguide racetrack resonators.

    PubMed

    Doylend, J K; Jessop, P E; Knights, A P

    2011-08-01

    The optical absorption at wavelengths near 1550 nm has been quantified as a function of annealing temperature in ion-implanted silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators. The variation of the output characteristics of the bus waveguide versus the concentration of implantation-induced lattice disorder in the ring is used to develop a novel method for the determination of the coupling and round-trip loss of the resonator, independently. This experimental procedure has general applicability for the determination of these parameters. Significant propagation loss is found to persist following annealing at temperatures previously observed to remove the majority of ion implantation damage. It is suggested that these annealing characteristics are a consequence of an ion implantation range which is greater than the silicon waveguide layer thickness.

  20. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; García, J. A.; Mändl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernández, B.; Rodríguez, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  1. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  2. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  3. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  4. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Hunter, Jerry L.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-06-01

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500-1625 °C, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  5. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  6. The silicone breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Guerette, P H

    1995-02-01

    Feminists call it objectification. Consumer advocates call it victimization. Medical personnel call it augmentation. Women, implantation. Whatever the term, media hype and the increasing number of lawsuits against U.S. manufacturers of silicone breast implants has caused widespread concern among women and raised serious questions about the long term health risks and safety of breast implant devices.

  7. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  8. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  9. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  10. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  11. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  12. Practicing implant dentistry profitably.

    PubMed

    Stump, G; Adams, M; Alwan, M

    1997-03-01

    The success of dental implants has opened up countless treatment possibilities for restorative dentists to offer to their patients. Just as our clinical paradigms have had to change because of this new technology, so too must our paradigms concerning the way we communicate with our patients change if we are to get them to say "yes" to treatment that we know that they need. Success in clinical treatment using implants requires a systematic approach. A systematic approach to communicating with your patients will allow you to have the same high degree of success with treatment acceptance that is possible with dental implants. The key to the systems we have discussed is Relationship Centered Care. A relationship is fostered and enhanced through a Comprehensive Examination Process, a structured Consultation Process utilizing the influencing process and Financial Arrangements that allow the patient to receive what they want while the office maintains the profitability that it needs. A system for calculating rational fees can be utilized that allows the practice to have control over an area that traditionally was controlled by anecdotal factors. The Pride Institute has developed this material and is presenting it to the profession so that restorative dentists can truly practice implant dentistry profitably.

  13. Automatic frequency controller for power amplifiers used in bio-implanted applications: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussein, Hussein A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-12-11

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  14. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussein, Hussein A.; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  15. Swift and heavy ion implanted chalcogenide laser glass waveguides and their different refractive index distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Feng; Narusawa, Tadashi; Zheng Jie

    2011-02-10

    Planar waveguides have been fabricated in Nd- or Ho-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide laser glasses by 60 MeV Ar or 20 MeV N ion implantation. The refractive index profiles were reconstructed based on the results of prism coupling. The Ar implanted waveguides exhibit an approximate steplike distribution, while the N implanted ones show a ''well + barrier'' type. This difference can be attributed to the much lower dose of Ar ions. After annealing, the N implanted waveguides can support two modes at 1539 nm and have low propagation loss, which makes them candidates for novel waveguide lasers.

  16. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  17. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  18. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  19. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  20. Engineered porous metals for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  1. Wireless ultrasound-powered biotelemetry for implants.

    PubMed

    Towe, Bruce C; Larson, Patrick J; Gulick, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    A miniature piezoelectric receiver coupled to a diode is evaluated as a simple device for wireless transmission of bioelectric events to the body surface. The device converts the energy of a surface-applied ultrasound beam to a high frequency carrier current in solution. Bioelectrical currents near the implant modulate the carrier amplitude, and this signal is remotely detected and demodulated to recover the biopotential waveform. This technique achieves millivolt sensitivity in saline tank tests, and further attention to system design is expected to improve sensitivity.

  2. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  3. Biomechanics and strain mapping in bone as related to immediately-loaded dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Lee, Jihyun; Jang, Andrew; Gu, Allen; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Prevost, Richard; Curtis, Don; Ho, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The effects of alveolar bone socket geometry and bone-implant contact on implant biomechanics, and resulting strain distributions in bone were investigated. Following extraction of lateral incisors on a cadaver mandible, immediate implants were placed and bone-implant contact area, stability and bone strain were measured. In situ biomechanical testing coupled with micro X-ray microscope (μ-XRM) illustrated less stiff bone-implant complexes (701-822 N/mm) compared with bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth complexes (791-913 N/mm). X-ray tomograms illustrated that the cause of reduced stiffness was due to reduced and limited bone-implant contact. Heterogeneous elemental composition of bone was identified by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The novel aspect of this study was the application of a new experimental mechanics method, that is, digital volume correlation, which allowed mapping of strains in volumes of alveolar bone in contact with a loaded implant. The identified surface and subsurface strain concentrations were a manifestation of load transferred to bone through bone-implant contact based on bone-implant geometry, quality of bone, implant placement, and implant design. 3D strain mapping indicated that strain concentrations are not exclusive to the bone-implant contact regions, but also extend into bone not directly in contact with the implant. The implications of the observed strain concentrations are discussed in the context of mechanobiology. Although a plausible explanation of surgical complications for immediate implant treatment is provided, extrapolation of results is only warranted by future systematic studies on more cadaver specimens and/or in vivo small scale animal models. PMID:26162549

  4. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  5. Implanted contacts for diamond semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Soo-Hee; Beetz, C. P., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The key to future diamond semiconductor development are ohmic and Schottky contacts that are stable at high temperatures. Wide bandgap materials, such as diamond (5.5 eV), pose special problems and demand ingenious solutions. Prior to our work, recent research into stable ohmic and Schottky contacts had been primarily limited to e-beam evaporation of carbide forming metals such as Ti, Ta, and Mo. These approaches have been relatively successful at decreasing the specific contact resistivity to as low as 10(exp -5) ohm sq cm on natural semiconducting diamond with about 10(exp 16) boron atoms/cubic cm. In our Phase 1 SBIR program we investigated metal systems coupled with a shallow Si implant that would form low resistivity, high temperature stable metal silicides. We showed in our Phase 1 results that the barrier height of metals such as Pt, Ti and Mo were reduced when deposited on shallow Si implants and given a heat treatment at 500 C. The barrier height of Pt on diamond was reduced from 1.89 to 0.97 eV by annealing of a sputtered Pt contact on a Si implanted dose of 10(exp 15) cm(exp -2) sq A into the diamond surface. Using the same approach, the barrier height of Ti on diamond was reduced from 2.00 to 1.29 eV.

  6. Development of an implantable centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, A H; Pacella, J J; Trumble, D R; Clark, R E

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of centrifugal pumps for short-term (0-30 days) ventricular support has been widely reported and favorably compared with pulsatile systems. A small, durable, implantable centrifugal blood pump is being developed for medium-term use (up to 6 months). The pump is based on the Medtronic Hemadyne system that has existed in multiple forms over the past 30 years. The pump is approximately the size of a tennis ball, weighs 240 g, and is comprised of a 2.5 cm plastic impeller driven by a radially coupled brushless DC motor. In vitro hydraulic performance was recorded over a wide range of flow conditions on a mock circulatory loop. The pump generated 7 L/min flow against an afterload of 100 mmHg pressure, with a maximum power draw of 10.4 watts. Pulsatile flow was preserved when placed in conjunction with a simulated left ventricle. In vivo testing was performed in 10 healthy sheep for 10-292 hr. Heparin was used to facilitate cannulation, and no anticoagulation was administered after pump implantation. Blood chemistries reflecting hematologic, pulmonary, renal, and hepatic functions were recorded and demonstrated no adverse effects with normal pump operation. Complications were related to kinking of blood conduits and thrombus formation within the cannulae. These results are encouraging and warrant further studies to prove feasibility of this pump as a medium-term implantable ventricular assist device.

  7. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  8. The breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  9. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  10. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  11. Tubo-uterine implantation.

    PubMed

    Green-armytage, V G

    1957-02-01

    After characterizing 2 types of patients presenting with tubal infertility (1 that is "as a rule overweight (the uterus is fixed (and there is easily palpable tubo-uterine pathology," and 1 that is "slim, young, intelligent and often beautiful", 12 1-sentence suggestions are made to increase the success of tubo-uterine implantations in the second type of presenting patient (because the first group has, in the author's mind, disappointing prognosis). Figures are the bulk of the document, with 3 figures demonstrating the type of operation, 3 showing the scheme of the operation, 1 figure showing a posterior view of the implanted tube in utero with a polyethylene prosthesis in situ down to the cervix, and 1 figure showing the instruments used in the operation. A few points of experience the author shares are: 1) operate immediately after a menstrual period; 2) give antibiotics prophylactically and after the procedure; 3) use a Bonney Myomectomy Clamp to elevate the uterus; 4) never use a knife or bistoury at the cornua; 5) use polyethylene rods, when available; and 6) caesarean section is the indicated delivery route after tubo-uterine implantation. Out of 38 patients with the requisite history and findings who have been operated on by this author, 14 have gone to full-term, i.e., 36.1%; 2 have aborted, giving a pregnancy rate of 42.2%, and there was 1 ectopic pregnancy.

  12. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Telles, Cristino da Silva; Betoni Júnior, Walter; Chiacchio Buchignani, Vivian; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration. PMID:24454377

  13. Osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow: excellent mid-term follow-up results in teenage athletes treated by arthroscopic debridement and microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Bojanić, Ivan; Smoljanović, Tomislav; Dokuzović, Stjepan

    2012-01-01

    Aim To extend the microfracture procedure, which has been proven successful on osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions in the knee and ankle, to OCD lesions in the elbow. Methods Nine young patients were treated by arthroscopic debridement and microfracture by a single surgeon. The average age at operation was 15.0 years (median 15; range 12-19). The average length of the follow-up was 5.3 years (median 5; range 2-9). The follow-up included physical examination and patient interview with elbow function scoring. Success of treatment was determined according to pre-operative and follow-up Mayo Elbow Performance Index scores and the patients’ return to sports. Results Eight patients scored excellent results on the follow-up and 1 scored a good result. Four out of 9 patients were able to increase their training intensity, 2 returned to the same level of activity, 2 changed sports (due to reasons unrelated to the health of their elbow), and 1 left professional sports and started training only recreationally. No patients stopped participating in sports altogether. Conclusions We advocate arthroscopic microfracturing, followed by a strict rehabilitation regime, as a highly effective treatment for OCD of the humeral capitellum. PMID:22351577

  14. Modelling of charging effects in plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, William; Cheung, Nathan W.

    1995-03-01

    The charging effects of plasma immersion ion implantation on several device structures is simulated. The simulations use an analytical model which couples the interaction of the plasma and IC devices during plasma implantation. The plasma model is implemented within the circuit simulator SPICE, which allows the model to uses all of the IC device models existing within SPICE. The model of the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling current through thin gate oxides of MOS devices is demonstrated, and shown how it can be used to quantify the damage induced. Charging damage is shown to be strongly affected by the device structure.

  15. Ion Implanted GaAs I.C. Process Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    in ion implantation in GaAs, coupled with better control of the substrate material. 1 Once ion implantation became a reliable processing technology it... Processing Technology for Planar GaAs Integrated Circuits," GaAs IC Symposium, Lake Tahoe, CA., Sept. 1979. 20. R.C. Eden, "GaAs Integrated Circuit Device...1980. 25. B.M. Welch, "Advances in GaAs LSI!VLSI Processing Technology ," Sol. St. Tech., Feb. 1980, pp. 95-101. 27. R. Zucca, B.M. Welch, P.M

  16. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  17. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  18. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  19. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  20. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  1. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  2. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  3. [Implant rehabilitation of distal mandibular atrophy using a blade implant].

    PubMed

    Veron, C; Chanavaz, M

    1997-11-01

    After a brief revision of the anatomy of the posterior mandible and its natural resorption pattern, the ramus plate-form implant would be the implant of choice for the rehabilitation of this region. This "site specific" implant is inserted on the top of the crest and superficially impacted within the residual alveolar bone at the distal segment of the horizontal branch and guided to climb parallel to the anterior aspect of the ascending ramus. Its form and specific dimensions are perfectly compatible with the frequently limited quantity of available bone above the nerve canal in patients with advanced atrophy of the posterior mandible. It provides a predictable abutment for the implant-supported or dento-implant-supported prostheses of the posterior mandible.

  4. Wearable Wireless Telemetry System for Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Renita E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The wearable garment pick-up antenna and the implantable chip antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry, the relative RF magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the distance and angle, and the current density on the strip conductors, for the implantable chip antenna.

  5. Design considerations for developing biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Harpreet S.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Manuel, Michele V.

    2011-04-01

    The integration of biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants into the human body is a complex undertaking that faces major challenges. Candidate biomaterials must meet both engineering and physiological requirements to ensure the desired properties. Historically, efforts have been focused on the behavior of commercial magnesium alloys in biological environments and their resultant effect on cell-mediated processes. Developing causal relationships between alloy chemistry and microstructure, and effects as a cellular behavior can be a difficult and time-intensive process. A systems design approach has the power to provide significant contributions in the development of the next generation of magnesium alloy implants with controlled degradability, biocompatibility, and optimized mechanical properties, at reduced time and cost. This approach couples experimental research with theory and mechanistic modeling for the accelerated development of materials. The aim of this article is to enumerate this strategy, design considerations, and hurdles for developing new cast magnesium alloys for use as biodegradable implant materials.

  6. Wearable wireless telemetry system for implantable bio-MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Rainee N; Miranda, Félix A; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Renita E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The implantable chip antenna and the wearable garment pick-up antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry and the relative magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the angle, for the implantable chip antenna.

  7. Repair of Osteochondral Defects Using Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuyun; Jia, Yanhui; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Weimin; Huang, Jingxiang; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Jiang; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi; Guo, Quanyi

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cell (WJMSC) is a new-found mesenchymal stem cell in recent years with multiple lineage potential. Due to its abundant resources, no damage procurement, and lower immunogenicity than other adult MSCs, WJMSC promises to be a good xenogenous cell candidate for tissue engineering. This in vivo pilot study explored the use of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) containing a tissue engineering construct xenotransplant in rabbits to repair full-thickness cartilage defects in the femoral patellar groove. We observed orderly spatial-temporal remodeling of hWJMSCs into cartilage tissues during repair over 16 months, with characteristic architectural features, including a hyaline-like neocartilage layer with good surface regularity, complete integration with adjacent host cartilage, and regenerated subchondral bone. No immune rejection was detected when xenograft hWJMSCs were implanted into rabbit cartilage defects. The repair results using hWJMSCs were superior to those of chondrogenically induced hWJMSCs after assessing gross appearance and histological grading scores. These preliminary results suggest that using novel undifferentiated hWJMSCs as seed cells might be a better approach than using transforming growth factor-β-induced differentiated hWJMSCs for in vivo tissue engineering treatment of cartilage defects. hWJMSC allografts may be promising for clinical applications.

  8. Repair of Osteochondral Defects Using Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanhui; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Weimin; Huang, Jingxiang; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cell (WJMSC) is a new-found mesenchymal stem cell in recent years with multiple lineage potential. Due to its abundant resources, no damage procurement, and lower immunogenicity than other adult MSCs, WJMSC promises to be a good xenogenous cell candidate for tissue engineering. This in vivo pilot study explored the use of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) containing a tissue engineering construct xenotransplant in rabbits to repair full-thickness cartilage defects in the femoral patellar groove. We observed orderly spatial-temporal remodeling of hWJMSCs into cartilage tissues during repair over 16 months, with characteristic architectural features, including a hyaline-like neocartilage layer with good surface regularity, complete integration with adjacent host cartilage, and regenerated subchondral bone. No immune rejection was detected when xenograft hWJMSCs were implanted into rabbit cartilage defects. The repair results using hWJMSCs were superior to those of chondrogenically induced hWJMSCs after assessing gross appearance and histological grading scores. These preliminary results suggest that using novel undifferentiated hWJMSCs as seed cells might be a better approach than using transforming growth factor-β-induced differentiated hWJMSCs for in vivo tissue engineering treatment of cartilage defects. hWJMSC allografts may be promising for clinical applications. PMID:28261617

  9. In vivo biocompatibility of Mg implants surface modified by nanostructured merwinite/PEO.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been suggested as biodegradable bone implant materials due to their good intrinsic biocompatibility and great mechanical properties. Although magnesium has attractive properties as an orthopedic implant material, its quick degradation and low bioactivity may lead to the loss of mechanical integrity of the implant during the bone healing process. In this paper, we endeavor to surmount the abovementioned defects using the surface coating technique. We have recently coated AZ91 magnesium implants with merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) through the coupling of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and electrophoretic deposition method. In this work, we are specifically focused on the in vivo examinations of the coated implants in comparison with the uncoated one. For the in vivo experiment, the rod samples, including the uncoated and merwinite/PEO coated implants, were imbedded into the greater trochanter of rabbits. The results of the in vivo animal test indicated an improvement in biodegradability including slower implant weight loss, reduction in Mg ion released from the coated implants in the blood plasma, lesser release of hydrogen bubbles and an improvement in biocompatibility including an increase in the amount of bone formation and ultimately a mild bone inflammation after the surgery according to the histological images. In summary, proper surface treatment of magnesium implants such as silicate bioactive ceramics may improve their biocompatibility under physiological conditions to making them suitable and applicable for future clinical applications.

  10. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  11. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  12. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  13. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  14. Progestin implants for female contraception.

    PubMed

    Croxatt, Horacio B

    2002-01-01

    Four different implants, in the form of capsules or covered rods, that release one of the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, etonogestrel, Nestorone, or Elcometrine and nomegestrol acetate were reviewed. Biocompatible polymers or copolymers of polydimethyl/polymethylvinyl-siloxanes or ethylvinylacetate are used to hold the steroid crystals and to control the rate of release. Once inserted under the skin, these implants release the corresponding steroid continuously over prolonged periods, a process that can be readily interrupted by implant removal. During long-term use of the implant, the released steroid circulates in blood at a fairly stable level. The physical characteristics of the implants, including drug contents and rate of release, serum levels of the progestin during use, and the duration of their effective life are described. Total steroid loads vary in the range of 50 mg to 216 mg; average release rates are in the range of 30-100 ug/day, and effective lives from 6 months to 7 years.

  15. Bimodal fitting or bilateral implantation?

    PubMed

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Massie, Robyn; Van Wanrooy, Emma; Rushbrooke, Emma; Psarros, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarises findings from studies that evaluated the benefits of bimodal fitting (combining a hearing aid and a cochlear implant in opposite ears) or bilateral cochlear implantation, relative to unilateral implantation, for children (Ching et al., 2007). On average, the size of binaural speech intelligibility advantages due to redundancy and head shadow was similar for the two bilateral conditions. An added advantage of bimodal fitting was that the low-frequency cues provided by acoustic hearing complemented the high-frequency cues conveyed by electric hearing in perception of voice and music. Some children with bilateral cochlear implants were able to use spatial separation between speech and noise to improve speech perception in noise. This is possibly a combined effect of the directional microphones in their implant systems and their ability to use spatial cues. The evidence to date supports the provision of hearing in two ears as the standard of care.

  16. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  17. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  18. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  19. The Effect of Exercise on the Early Stages of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Induced Cartilage Repair in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shoki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kiyan, Wataru; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage is challenging owing to the restriction in the ability of articular cartilage to repair itself. Therefore, cell supplementation therapy is possible cartilage repair method. However, few studies have verified the efficacy and safety of cell supplementation therapy. The current study assessed the effect of exercise on early the phase of cartilage repair following cell supplementation utilizing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) intra-articular injection. An osteochondral defect was created on the femoral grooves bilaterally of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stromal cells that were obtained from male Wistar rats were cultured in monolayer. After 4 weeks, MSCs were injected into the right knee joint and the rats were randomized into an exercise or no-exercise intervention group. The femurs were divided as follows: C group (no exercise without MSC injection); E group (exercise without MSC injection); M group (no exercise with MSC injection); and ME group (exercise with MSC injection). At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the injection, the femurs were sectioned and histologically graded using the Wakitani cartilage repair scoring system. At 2 weeks after the injection, the total histological scores of the M and ME groups improved significantly compared with those of the C group. Four weeks after the injection, the scores of both the M and ME groups improved significantly. Additionally, the scores in the ME group showed a significant improvement compared to those in the M group. The improvement in the scores of the E, M, and ME groups at 8 weeks were not significantly different. The findings indicate that exercise may enhance cartilage repair after an MSC intra-articular injection. This study highlights the importance of exercise following cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26968036

  20. Hydrogen Implants for Layer Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherekdjian, S.; Couillard, J. G.; Wilcox, C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Corning Incorporated have developed a process whereby single crystal silicon thin films are transferred onto a flat panel display glass substrate using hydrogen ion implantation. The energy of the implant controls the effective exfoliation thickness, agreeing well with SRIM calculations, while the hydrogen ion dose controls the size of the platelets formed. The ion dose was found to influence the final void defect count in exfoliated films. Finally, the ion beam and ion implant end-station cooling characteristics were investigated. These parameters control the effective implant heat load generated during ion beam processing. The temperature at which exfoliation occurs during an exfoliation heat cycle was found to be inversely proportional to the hydrogen ion dose when the temperature during ion implantation is <100 °C. The most sensitive exfoliation temperature to ion dose dependence was observed for cooler implants, i.e. <35 °C. Data indicates that at the minimum exfoliation dose the exfoliation temperature is reduced significantly by increasing the implant heat generated during ion beam processing. Higher hydrogen doses than the minimum required for exfoliation exhibit only a small exfoliation temperature variation with ion dose. By optimizing the implant heat load generated during ion beam processing it is observed that the efficiency of the exfoliation process is also enhanced. Implant temperatures of 150 to 160 °C were found to further reduce the minimum implant dose required for exfoliation by an additional 5%, as verified by calorimetric measurements. These results enable us to further conclude that hydrogen out-diffusion is not significant in this process.

  1. Indications and candidacy for active middle ear implants.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F; Todt, I; Wagner, J; Ernst, A

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there are two active middle ear implants available commercially: the Vibrant Soundbridge system and the Carina system. A third active middle ear implant, the Esteem, is under clinical evaluation. All devices are indicated for patients with moderate-to-severe hearing loss. Because active middle ear implants are directly coupled to middle ear structures, many of the problems that patients with conventional hearing aids report, such as acoustic feedback, occlusion, and irritation of the outer ear canal, are avoided. In addition, AMEI patients perform well in background noise. However, indications for AMEIs are selective and candidates should be carefully evaluated before surgery. Before considering an AMEI, patients should be provided with conventional hearing aids. Only when benefit is insufficient and audiological selection criteria are met is further candidacy evaluation indicated. Since Colletti described coupling the Vibrant Soundbridge directly onto the round window membrane in 2006, the indications for the Vibrant Soundbridge have expanded and the VSB is implanted in patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. Patients have often undergone middle ear surgery before. Especially mixed hearing loss cases with 30-60 dB HL sensorineural hearing impairment and 30-40 dB HL air-bone gaps may be helped by this new application.

  2. Tribological properties of nitrogen implanted and boron implanted steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, K.T.; Walter, K.C.; Griffin, A.J. Jr.; Kung, H.; Lu, Y.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Fayeulle, S.

    1996-06-01

    Samples of a steel with high chrome content was implanted separately with 75 keV nitrogen ions and with 75 keV boron ions. Implanted doses of each ion species were 2-, 4-, and 8 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. Retained doses were measured using resonant non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Tribological properties were determined using a pin-on-disk test with a 6-mm diameter ruby pin with a velocity of 0.94 m/min. Testing was done at 10% humidity with a load of 377 g. Wear rate and coefficient of friction were determined from these tests. While reduction in the wear rate for nitrogen implanted materials was observed, greater reduction (more than an order of magnitude) was observed for boron implanted materials. In addition, reduction in the coefficient of friction for high-dose boron implanted materials was observed. Nano-indentation revealed a hardened layer near the surface of the material. Results from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of Fe{sub 2}N and Fe{sub 3}N in the nitrogen implanted materials and Fe{sub 3}B in the boron implanted materials. Results from transmission electron microscopy will be presented.

  3. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  4. Double valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Stassano, Paolo; Mannacio, Vito; Musumeci, Antonino; Golino, Alessandro; Maida, Piero; Ferrigno, Vincenzo; Buonocore, Gaetano; Spampinato, Nicola

    1991-01-01

    From January 1976 through December 1987, 194 patients with a mean age of 43.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 11 to 74 years) underwent double (mitral and aortic) replacement of native valves with 8 types of bioprostheses: Carpentier-Edwards, 127 valves; Hancock, 76 valves; Liotta-Bioimplant, 57 valves; Ionescu-Shiley, 53 valves; Vascor, 27 valves; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 22 valves; Angell-Shiley, 20 valves; and Implamedic, 6 valves. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 25 patients (12.8%). There were 18 operative deaths (9.27%). Our retrospective analysis was restricted to 352 bioprostheses implanted in the 176 patients who survived surgery and were considered at risk for valve tissue failure. The overall cumulative duration of follow-up was 1,174.1 patient-years (range, 1 to 13 years). The durations of follow-up for specific valves were: Carpentier-Edwards, 920.2 valve-years; Hancock, 383.8 valve-years; Liotta-Bioimplant, 310.2 valve-years; Ionescu-Shiley, 357.7 valve-years; Vascor, 131.2 valve-years; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 52.0 valve-years; Angell-Shiley, 167.0 valve-years; and Implamedic, 31.0 valve-years. Thirty patients had thromboembolic accidents, for a linearized incidence of 2.5% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from thromboembolic accidents was 85.8% ± 10.7%. Nine patients had endocarditis, for a linearized incidence of 0.7% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from endocarditis was 92.0% ± 1.5%. Twenty-four patients had valve tissue failure, for a cumulative linearized incidence of 1.87% per valve-year. The cumulative actuarial probability of freedom from valve tissue failure was 78.6% ± 3.7% at 10 years and 51.2% ± 10.7% at 13 years. The 24 patients with valve tissue failure all underwent reoperation: 20 of these had double valve replacement, 3 had aortic valve replacement alone, and 1 had mitral valve replacement alone. The mean interval between initial valve implantation and reoperation was

  5. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton N.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Smith, Stephen F.; Hylton, James O.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  6. Management of fluocinolone implant dissociation during implant exchange.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Steven; Cebulla, Colleen M; Witherspoon, S Robert; Emerson, Geoffrey G; Emerson, M Vaughn; Suhler, Eric B; Albini, Thomas A; Flaxel, Christina J

    2009-09-01

    Three patients with chronic, noninfectious uveitis requiring immunosuppressive therapy underwent fluocinolone acetonide (FA) implant exchange complicated by dissociation of the medication reservoir from its anchoring strut. In 2 patients, the medication reservoir descended into the vitreous cavity and required pars plana vitrectomy with intraocular foreign body removal techniques for its retrieval. The use of viscoelastic or perfluorocarbon to elevate the device was helpful in the safe removal of the FA implant device. Surgeons performing FA implant exchange should be aware of this potential complication and anticipate the possible need for vitreoretinal instrumentation and personnel. Patients undergoing FA explantation or exchange should be counseled regarding this potential complication prior to surgery.

  7. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  8. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  9. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  10. Visible and near-infrared planar waveguide structure of polycrystalline zinc sulfide from C ions implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Lian; Zhou, Yu-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-02-25

    We report the fabrication of a planar waveguide in polycrystalline zinc sulfide by 6.0 MeV C ions implantation with a fluence of 5 × 10¹⁴ ion/cm² at room temperature. The near-field light intensity profiles in the visible and near-infrared bands are measured by the end-face coupling method with different laser sources. Investigation of the Raman spectra demonstrates that the microstructure of the polycrystalline zinc sulfide has no significant change after C ion implantation. The absorption spectra show that the implantation processes have no influence on the visible and infrared bands.

  11. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  12. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  13. [Considerations for optimizing joint implants].

    PubMed

    Tensi, H M; Orloff, S; Gese, H; Hooputra, H

    1994-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of orthopaedic implants, there is still a lack of adequate testing procedures and legal guidelines. Examples of the consequences of this neglect are given. Modern techniques for the calculation of stresses (finite element method [FEM]) and the prediction of life cycle duration are presented. Such methods, applied in the development and manufacturing phases of standard and special implants, may ensure an adequate prosthetic life cycle, with particular emphasis being placed on the biomedical optimization of the implant/bone interface and surrounding bone.

  14. FISH for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Scriven, Paul N; Kirby, Toby L; Ogilvie, Caroline Mackie

    2011-02-23

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an established alternative to pre-natal diagnosis, and involves selecting pre-implantation embryos from a cohort generated by assisted reproduction technology (ART). This selection may be required because of familial monogenic disease (e.g. cystic fibrosis), or because one partner carries a chromosome rearrangement (e.g. a two-way reciprocal translocation). PGD is available for couples who have had previous affected children, and/or in the case of chromosome rearrangements, recurrent miscarriages, or infertility. Oocytes aspirated following ovarian stimulation are fertilized by in vitro immersion in semen (IVF) or by intracytoplasmic injection of an individual spermatozoon (ICSI). Pre-implantation cleavage-stage embryos are biopsied, usually by the removal of a single cell on day 3 post-fertilization, and the biopsied cell is tested to establish the genetic status of the embryo. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the fixed nuclei of biopsied cells with target-specific DNA probes is the technique of choice to detect chromosome imbalance associated with chromosome rearrangements, and to select female embryos in families with X-linked disease for which there is no mutation-specific test. FISH has also been used to screen embryos for spontaneous chromosome aneuploidy (also known as PGS or PGD-AS) in order to try and improve the efficiency of assisted reproduction; however, the predictive value of this test using the spreading and FISH technique described here is likely to be unacceptably low in most people's hands and it is not recommended for routine clinical use. We describe the selection of suitable probes for single-cell FISH, spreading techniques for blastomere nuclei, and in situ hybridization and signal scoring, applied to PGD in a clinical setting.

  15. Accidental Implant Screwdriver Ingestion: A Rare Complication during Implant Placement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Baliga, Shridhar D

    2014-01-01

    One of the complications during a routine dental implant placement is accidental ingestion of the implant instruments, which can happen when proper precautions are not taken. Appropriate radiographs should be taken to locate the correct position of foreign body; usually the foreign body passes asymptomatically from gastrointestinal tract but sometimes it may lead to intestinal obstruction, perforations and impactions. The aim of this article is to report accidental ingestion of 19 mm long screw driver by a senile patient. PMID:25628702

  16. Occlusion on oral implants: current clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Koyano, K; Esaki, D

    2015-02-01

    Proper implant occlusion is essential for adequate oral function and the prevention of adverse consequences, such as implant overloading. Dental implants are thought to be more prone to occlusal overloading than natural teeth because of the loss of the periodontal ligament, which provides shock absorption and periodontal mechanoreceptors, which provide tactile sensitivity and proprioceptive motion feedback. Although many guidelines and theories on implant occlusion have been proposed, few have provided strong supportive evidence. Thus, we performed a narrative literature review to ascertain the influence of implant occlusion on the occurrence of complications of implant treatment and discuss the clinical considerations focused on the overloading factors at present. The search terms were 'dental implant', 'dental implantation', 'dental occlusion' and 'dental prosthesis'. The inclusion criteria were literature published in English up to September 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies and case-control studies with at least 20 cases and 12 months follow-up interval were included. Based on the selected literature, this review explores factors related to the implant prosthesis (cantilever, crown/implant ratio, premature contact, occlusal scheme, implant-abutment connection, splinting implants and tooth-implant connection) and other considerations, such as the number, diameter, length and angulation of implants. Over 700 abstracts were reviewed, from which more than 30 manuscripts were included. We found insufficient evidence to establish firm clinical guidelines for implant occlusion. To discuss the ideal occlusion for implants, further well-designed RCTs are required in the future.

  17. Rehabilitation of malpositioned implants with a CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Mauricio S; Duff, Renee E; Razzoog, Michael E

    2011-03-01

    Dentists may be faced with the challenge of restoring unfavorably placed implants. In some instances, previously integrated implants may be from different manufacturers. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a maxillary CAD/CAM implant bar-supported overdenture that presented with malpositioned implants, from different manufacturers, including one from a discontinued implant system.

  18. Implantable micropump technologies for murine intracochlear infusions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Waldron, M J; Frisina, R D; Borkholder, D A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice.

  19. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  20. Miniscrew implant applications in contemporary orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Po; Tseng, Yu-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    The need for orthodontic treatment modalities that provide maximal anchorage control but with minimal patient compliance requirements has led to the development of implant-assisted orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Skeletal anchorage with miniscrew implants has no patient compliance requirements and has been widely incorporated in orthodontic practice. Miniscrew implants are now routinely used as anchorage devices in orthodontic treatment. This review summarizes recent data regarding the interpretation of bone data (i.e., bone quantity and quality) obtained by preoperative diagnostic computed tomography (CT) or by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) prior to miniscrew implant placement. Such data are essential when selecting appropriate sites for miniscrew implant placement. Bone characteristics that are indications and contraindications for treatment with miniscrew implants are discussed. Additionally, bicortical orthodontic skeletal anchorage, risks associated with miniscrew implant failure, and miniscrew implants for nonsurgical correction of occlusal cant or vertical excess are reviewed. Finally, implant stability is compared between titanium alloy and stainless steel miniscrew implants.

  1. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  2. Advances in lens implant technology

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

  3. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  4. Wireless microsensor network solutions for neurological implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    The design and development of wireless mocrosensor network systems for the treatment of many degenerative as well as traumatic neurological disorders is presented in this paper. Due to the advances in micro and nano sensors and wireless systems, the biomedical sensors have the potential to revolutionize many areas in healthcare systems. The integration of nanodevices with neurons that are in communication with smart microsensor systems has great potential in the treatment of many neurodegenerative brain disorders. It is well established that patients suffering from either Parkinson"s disease (PD) or Epilepsy have benefited from the advantages of implantable devices in the neural pathways of the brain to alter the undesired signals thus restoring proper function. In addition, implantable devices have successfully blocked pain signals and controlled various pelvic muscles in patients with urinary and fecal incontinence. Even though the existing technology has made a tremendous impact on controlling the deleterious effects of disease, it is still in its infancy. This paper presents solutions of many problems of today's implantable and neural-electronic interface devices by combining nanowires and microelectronics with BioMEMS and applying them at cellular level for the development of a total wireless feedback control system. The only device that will actually be implanted in this research is the electrodes. All necessary controllers will be housed in accessories that are outside the body that communicate with the implanted electrodes through tiny inductively-coupled antennas. A Parkinson disease patient can just wear a hat-system close to the implantable neural probe so that the patient is free to move around, while the sensors continually monitor, record, transmit all vital information to health care specialist. In the event of a problem, the system provides an early warning to the patient while they are still mobile thus providing them the opportunity to react and

  5. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-15

    and identify by block number) --- This Annual Report summarizes progress to date on a long-term implant study of a serrated ceramic dental implant...upper two parts of the implant, post and core and crown, are conventional metaT materials. A series of graded dental implants have been produced to...throughout the experimental period. Periodic radio- graphic analyses of dental implants verify this observation. Gross and microscopic patho- logic analyses

  6. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-15

    development of dental implantology must not be overlooked. The early stages of this project clearly defined that rigid fixation of an implant device...block number) .-... This report summarizes progress on a long-ter implant study of a serrated ceramic dental implant designed for fresh extraction...implant, post and core and crown, are conventional metal materials, A series of graded dental implants have been produced to provide an interference fit

  7. [Guidelines for nursing methodology implantation].

    PubMed

    Alberdi Castell, Rosamaría; Artigas Lelong, Berta; Cuxart Ainaud, Núria; Agüera Ponce, Ana

    2003-09-01

    The authors introduce three guidelines as part of the process to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; they propose to help nurses adopt the aforementioned method in their daily practice. These three guidelines shall be published in successive articles: Guidelines to identify attitudes and aptitudes related to the nursing profession; Guidelines to implant the nursing methodology based on the Virginia Henderson Conceptual Model; and Guidelines to plan areas for improvement.

  8. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  9. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  10. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability.

  11. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  12. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  13. Behavior tests and immunohistochemical retinal response analyses in RCS rats with subretinal implantation of Okayama-University-type retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alamusi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hosoya, Osamu; Tsutsui, Kimiko M; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film as a prototype of retinal prosthesis, which we named Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis. The purposes of this study are to conduct behavior tests to assess vision in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats that underwent subretinal implantation of the dye-coupled film and to reveal retinal response to the dye-coupled film by immunohistochemistry. Polyethylene films were made of polyethylene powder at refined purity, and photoelectric dyes were coupled to the film surface at higher density compared with the prototype. Either dye-coupled film or dye-uncoupled plain film used as a control was implanted subretinally from a scleral incision in both eyes of an RCS rat at 6 weeks of the age. Behavior tests 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after implantation were conducted by observing head turning or body turning in the direction consistent with clockwise or counterclockwise rotation of a black-and-white-striped drum around a transparent cage housed with the rat. After the behavior tests at 8 weeks, rats' eyes were enucleated to confirm subretinal implantation of the films and processed for immunohistochemistry. In the behavior tests, the number of head turnings consistent with the direction of the drum rotation was significantly larger in RCS rats with dye-coupled- compared with plain-film implantation [P < 0.05, repeated-measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), n = 7]. The number of apoptotic neurons was significantly smaller in eyes with dye-coupled- compared with plain-film implantation (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test, n = 6). In conclusion, subretinal implantation of photoelectric dye-coupled films restored vision in RCS rats and prevented the remaining retinal neurons from apoptosis.

  14. Visual evoked potential in RCS rats with Okayama University-type retinal prosthesis (OUReP™) implantation.

    PubMed

    Alamusi; Matsuo, Toshihiko; Hosoya, Osamu; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2017-02-08

    Photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, designated Okayama University type-retinal prosthesis or OUReP™, generates light-evoked surface electric potentials and stimulates neurons. The dye-coupled films or plain films were implanted subretinally in both eyes of 10 Royal College of Surgeons rats with hereditary retinal dystrophy at the age of 6 weeks. Visual evoked potentials in response to monocular flashing light stimuli were recorded from cranially-fixed electrodes, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after the implantation. After the recording, subretinal film implantation was confirmed histologically in 7 eyes with dye-coupled films and 7 eyes with plain films. The recordings from these 7 eyes in each group were used for statistical analysis. The amplitudes of visual evoked potentials in the consecutive time points from 125 to 250 ms after flash were significantly larger in the 7 eyes with dye-coupled film implantation, compared to the 7 eyes with plain film implantation at 8 weeks after the implantation (P < 0.05, repeated-measure ANOVA). The photoelectric dye-coupled polyethylene film, as retinal prosthesis, gave rise to visual evoked potential in response to flashing light.

  15. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  16. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  17. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  18. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer.

  19. Reasons for failures of oral implants.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2014-06-01

    This study reviews the literature regarding the factors contributing to failures of dental implants. An electronic search was undertaken including papers from 2004 onwards. The titles and abstracts from these results were read to identify studies within the selection criteria. All reference lists of the selected studies were then hand-searched, this time without time restrictions. A narrative review discussed some findings from the first two parts where separate data from non-comparative studies may have indicated conclusions different from those possible to draw in the systematic analysis. It may be suggested that the following situations are correlated to increase the implant failure rate: a low insertion torque of implants that are planned to be immediately or early loaded, inexperienced surgeons inserting the implants, implant insertion in the maxilla, implant insertion in the posterior region of the jaws, implants in heavy smokers, implant insertion in bone qualities type III and IV, implant insertion in places with small bone volumes, use of shorter length implants, greater number of implants placed per patient, lack of initial implant stability, use of cylindrical (non-threaded) implants and prosthetic rehabilitation with implant-supported overdentures. Moreover, it may be suggested that the following situations may be correlated with an increase in the implant failure rate: use of the non-submerged technique, immediate loading, implant insertion in fresh extraction sockets, smaller diameter implants. Some recently published studies suggest that modern, moderately rough implants may present with similar results irrespective if placed in maxillas, in smoking patients or using only short implants.

  20. [The Vibrant Soundbridge as an active implant in middle ear surgery].

    PubMed

    Beleites, T; Bornitz, M; Neudert, M; Zahnert, T

    2014-07-01

    Implantable hearing aids are not only gaining importance for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss, but also for treatment of mixed hearing loss. The most frequently used active middle ear implant is the Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) system (Fa. MED-EL, Innsbruck, Österrreich). Following widening of the spectrum of indications for the VBS, various new coupling systems have been established. Based on the literature, available petrosal bone investigations and finite element model (FEM) calculations, this article summarizes the current knowledge concerning mechanical excitation by the VSB. Important concomitant aspects related to coupling, transmission and measurement are also discussed.

  1. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Andreas; Klein, Anja; Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  2. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  3. Implant maintenance treatment and peri-implant health.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark-Steven

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline (PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases and a manual search of the Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontology and the International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry from January 2014 to February 2015.Study selectionProspective, retrospective, randomised or not, case-controlled or case series trials showing the incidence or recurrence of peri-implant disease plus or minus PIMT over more than six months.Data extraction and synthesisThree reviewers independently selected studies and abstracted data with two reviewers assessing study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). A multivariate binomial regression was used to examine the data.ResultsThirteen studies were included with ten contributing to the meta-analysis. The average quality assessment score (NOS) was 5.3 out of a possible nine, only one paper achieved eight. At patient level mucositis ranged from 18.5-74.2% and peri-implantitis from 8-28%, with significant effects being seen for treatment (z= -14.36, p<0.001). Mucositis was affected by history of periodontitis and mean PIMT at implant and patient levels, respectively. For peri-implantitis there were also significant effects of treatment (z = -16.63, p<0.001). Increased peri-implantitis was observed for patients with a history of periodontal disease. (z=3.76, p<0.001). Implants under PIMT have 0.958 the incident event compared to those with no PIMT.ConclusionsWithin the limitations of the present systematic review it can be concluded that implant therapy must not be limited to placement and restoration of dental implants, but to the implementation of PIMT to potentially prevent biological complications and heighten the long-term success rate. Although it must be tailored to a patients risk profiling, our findings suggest reason to claim a minimum recall PIMT interval of five to six

  4. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  5. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  6. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  7. Deuterium implantation in magnetic garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilts, C.H.; Urai, A.

    1988-11-01

    The magnetic effects of deuterium implantation and subsequent annealing were measured in Gd, Tm, and Ga-substituted yttrium iron garnet films for comparison with measurements made earlier with hydrogen implantation. Implantation energy was 60 keV and the dose ranged from 0.5 to 3 x 10/sup 16/ ions/cm/sup 2/ for D/sup +//sub 2/ ions, as compared to an energy of 120 keV and a dose from 0.3 to 4 x 10/sup 16/ ions/cm/sup 2/ for H/sup +//sub 2/ in the earlier study. Measurements made included x-ray rocking curves and ferromagnetic resonance spectra measured at 9.5 GHz. For all doses the implanted layer remained crystalline. Implanted layer thickness was about 4200 A and peak strain occured at a depth of 2600 A. Peak strain increased monotonically, but departed from a linear relation with dose. For the highest dose, the peak strain was 2.5%. Relaxation of strain with annealing was intermediate between that found earlier for hydrogen and neon implantation. As compared to all other implant elements, both deuterium and hydrogen show a large anomalous magnetic anisotropy which can exceed 10 000 Oe for either ion. The absence of this effect for He, Ne, and other ions supports the conjecture that the effect is chemical and related to electronic bonding rather than strain or disorder. The anomalous anisotropy for deuterium decreases and shifts location with annealing. It has largely disappeared at temperatures of 300--350 /sup 0/C. The shape of the profile is consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in anisotropy is associated with diffusion of the deuterium atoms to the surface of the garnet film. At the highest dose, crystalline damage in the region of highest strain is sufficient to radically alter magnetic properties and in particular reduces even the excess anisotropy so that a two-peak profile results until modified by annealing.

  8. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  9. Wireless energizing system for an automated implantable sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Biswaranjan; Nayak, Praveen P.; Kar, Durga P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Laxmi P.

    2016-07-01

    The wireless drive of an automated implantable electronic sensor has been explored for health monitoring applications. The proposed system comprises of an automated biomedical sensing system which is energized through resonant inductive coupling. The implantable sensor unit is able to monitor the body temperature parameter and sends back the corresponding telemetry data wirelessly to the data recoding unit. It has been observed that the wireless power delivery system is capable of energizing the automated biomedical implantable electronic sensor placed over a distance of 3 cm from the power transmitter with an energy transfer efficiency of 26% at the operating resonant frequency of 562 kHz. This proposed method ensures real-time monitoring of different human body temperatures around the clock. The monitored temperature data have been compared with a calibrated temperature measurement system to ascertain the accuracy of the proposed system. The investigated technique can also be useful for monitoring other body parameters such as blood pressure, bladder pressure, and physiological signals of the patient in vivo using various implantable sensors.

  10. Wireless energizing system for an automated implantable sensor.

    PubMed

    Swain, Biswaranjan; Nayak, Praveen P; Kar, Durga P; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Laxmi P

    2016-07-01

    The wireless drive of an automated implantable electronic sensor has been explored for health monitoring applications. The proposed system comprises of an automated biomedical sensing system which is energized through resonant inductive coupling. The implantable sensor unit is able to monitor the body temperature parameter and sends back the corresponding telemetry data wirelessly to the data recoding unit. It has been observed that the wireless power delivery system is capable of energizing the automated biomedical implantable electronic sensor placed over a distance of 3 cm from the power transmitter with an energy transfer efficiency of 26% at the operating resonant frequency of 562 kHz. This proposed method ensures real-time monitoring of different human body temperatures around the clock. The monitored temperature data have been compared with a calibrated temperature measurement system to ascertain the accuracy of the proposed system. The investigated technique can also be useful for monitoring other body parameters such as blood pressure, bladder pressure, and physiological signals of the patient in vivo using various implantable sensors.

  11. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  12. Corrosion of coupled metals in a dental magnetic attachment system.

    PubMed

    Iimuro, F T; Yoneyama, T; Okuno, O

    1993-12-01

    Implants and magnetic attachments are becoming widespread in dental treatment. Their associated use, implants and magnetic attachments, can be seen often too. In those cases, it is difficult to avoid coupling of different metals. The corrosion behavior of the metals is expected to be different depending on whether it is found in an isolated or a coupled condition. Potential corrosion couples in a dental magnetic attachment system among titanium, ferromagnetic stainless steel, gold alloy type IV, and gold-silver-palladium alloy were studied by an immersion test in 1% lactic acid for 7 days and potential/current density curves were measured. Corrosion of titanium and ferromagnetic stainless steel seemed to be accelerated by coupling with gold alloys or gold-silver-palladium alloys. On the other hand, the corrosion amount of gold alloy and gold-silver-palladium alloys were attenuated by coupling.

  13. Feasibility of an implanted microphone for cochlear implant listening.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Marc; Demanez, Laurent; Salmon, Caroline; Vanpoucke, Filiep; Walraevens, Joris; Plasmans, Anke; De Siati, Daniele; Lefèbvre, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of an implanted microphone for cochlear implants (CI) by comparison of hearing outcomes, sound quality and patient satisfaction of a subcutaneous microphone to a standard external microphone of a behind-the-ear sound processor. In this prospective feasibility study with a within-subject repeated measures design comparing the microphone modalities, ten experienced adult unilateral CI users received an implantable contralateral subcutaneous microphone attached to a percutaneous plug. The signal was pre-processed and fed into their CI sound processor. Subjects compared listening modes at home for a period of up to 4 months. At the end of the study the microphone was explanted. Aided audiometric thresholds, speech understanding in quiet, and sound quality questionnaires were assessed. On average thresholds (250, 500, 750, 1k, 2k, 3k, 4k and 6 kHz) with the subcutaneous microphone were 44.9 dB, compared to 36.4 dB for the external mode. Speech understanding on sentences in quiet was high, within approximately 90% of performance levels compared to hearing with an external microphone. Body sounds were audible but not annoying to almost all subjects. This feasibility study with a research device shows significantly better results than previous studies with implanted microphones. This is attributed to technology enhancements and careful fitting. Listening effort was somewhat increased with an implanted microphone. Under good sound conditions, speech performance is nearly similar to that of external microphones demonstrating that an implanted microphone is feasible in a range of normal listening conditions.

  14. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  15. Nasal dorsal augmentation with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Mark A; Parhiscar, Afshin

    2003-11-01

    Silicone rubber has been used safely and effectively for facial augmentation for nearly 5 decades in eastern Asia. We have used silicone rubber nasal implants in primary ethnic rhinoplasty and have found consistent and long-lasting results with low complication rates. Silicone dorsal nasal augmentation in primary rhinoplasty avoids donor site morbidity and implant resorption as seen with autogenous implants. Silicone nasal implants have a low extrusion and infection rate. In the appropriate patient with proper placement, silicone nasal implant is nearly the ideal implant material.

  16. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  17. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  18. Acidic pH resistance of grafted chitosan on dental implant.

    PubMed

    Campos, Doris M; Toury, Bérengère; D'Almeida, Mélanie; Attik, Ghania N; Ferrand, Alice; Renoud, Pauline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, access to dental care has increasingly become a service requested by the population, especially in the case of dental implants. However, the major cause of implant failure is an inflammatory disease: peri-implantitis. Currently, the adhesion strength of antibacterial coatings at implant surfaces remains a problem to solve. In order to propose a functionalized implant with a resistant antibacterial coating, a novel method of chitosan immobilization at implant surface has been investigated. Functionalization of the pre-active titanium (Ti) surface was performed using triethoxysilylpropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA) as a coupling agent which forms a stable double peptide bond with chitosan. The chitosan presence and the chemical resistibility of the coating under acid pH solutions (pH 5 and pH 3) were confirmed by FTIR-ATR and XPS analyses. Furthermore, peel test results showed high adhesive resistance of the TESPSA/chitosan coating at the substrate. Cytocompatibility was evaluated by cell morphology with confocal imaging. Images showed healthy morphology of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF-1). Finally, the reported method for chitosan immobilization on Ti surface via peptide bindings allows for the improvement of its adhesive capacities and resistibility while maintaining its cytocompatibility. Surface functionalization using the TESPSA/chitosan coupling method is noncytotoxic and stable even in drastic environments as found in oral cavity, thus making it a valuable candidate for clinical implantology applications.

  19. A simple implantation method for flexible, multisite microelectrodes into rat brains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anja; Xie, Yijing; Schumacher, Anett; Löffler, Susanne; Kirch, Robert D.; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Tronnier, Volker; Danner, Sandra; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    A long term functional and reliable coupling between neural tissue and implanted microelectrodes is the key issue in acquiring neural electrophysiological signals or therapeutically excite neural tissue. The currently often used rigid micro-electrodes are thought to cause a severe foreign body reaction resulting in a thick glial scar and consequently a poor tissue-electrode coupling in the chronic phase. We hypothesize, that this adverse effect might be remedied by probes compliant to the soft brain tissue, i.e., replacing rigid electrodes by flexible ones. Unfortunately, this flexibility comes at the price of a low stiffness, which makes targeted low trauma implantation very challenging. In this study, we demonstrate an adaptable and simple method to implant extremely flexible microprobes even to deep areas of rat's brain. Implantation of flexible probes is achieved by rod supported stereotactic insertion fostered by a hydrogel (2% agarose in PBS) cushion on the exposed skull. We were thus able to implant very flexible micro-probes in 70 rats as deep as the rodent's subthalamic nucleus. This work describes in detail the procedures and steps needed for minimal invasive, but reliable implantation of flexible probes. PMID:23898266

  20. A fully implantable stimulator for use in small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Rodney E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, single channel stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory. The stimulator generates charge-balanced biphasic current pulses which are delivered to a bipolar electrode array for chronic stimulation of neural tissue in free-running laboratory animals such as rats and mice. The system is magnetically coupled and contains no batteries or external leadwires. The subject is placed in a chamber surrounded by three orthogonal coils of wire which are driven to generate a magnetic field. Currents are induced in wire coils in the implanted stimulator then regulated to produce biphasic current pulses with fixed amplitude of up to 500 μA. Phase duration is adjustable from 25 – 250 μs per phase. Charge balance is maintained by capacitive coupling and shorting of the electrodes between pulses. Stimulus rate can be continuously varied, and the temporal precision of the stimulus means that the stimulator can be used in behavioural experiments or for generating electrically-evoked potentials. We describe the application of this stimulator for chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (i.e. a cochlear implant); however it will have application in other areas of neuroscience requiring controlled safe electrical stimulation of neural tissue over extended periods. Circuit diagrams and manufacturing details are provided as supplementary data. PMID:17897719

  1. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; ...

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated,more » including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.« less

  2. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  3. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-06-06

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported.

  4. Oral Implant Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Sarika; PATIL, Neelkant; SOLANKI, Jitender; SINGH, Ravinder; LALLER, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Selecting an appropriate implant imaging technique has become a challenging task since the advent of advanced imaging modalities, and many of these are used for implant imaging. On imaging, the modality should not only consider the anatomy but should also provide dimensional accuracy. Many dentists use the conventional method, mostly orthopantograph (OPG), in their routine practice of implant placement. However, because of the drawbacks associated with OPG, higher technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), are better accepted. These help improve image sharpness and reduce distortion. These techniques are not used widely due to the cost effect. Therefore, to decide on the type of imaging technique, all associated advantages and disadvantages should be considered, which will be broadly discussed in this review. PMID:26715891

  5. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  6. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10(-8)) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10(-4)), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  7. Superior biofunctionality of dental implant fixtures uniformly coated with durable bioglass films by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Enculescu, M; Tanase, C; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glasses are currently considered the suitable candidates to stir the quest for a new generation of osseous implants with superior biological/functional performance. In congruence with this vision, this contribution aims to introduce a reliable technological recipe for coating fairly complex 3D-shaped implants (e.g. dental screws) with uniform and mechanical resistant bioactive glass films by the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering method. The mechanical reliability of the bioactive glass films applied to real Ti dental implant fixtures has been evaluated by a procedure comprised of "cold" implantation in pig mandibular bone from a dead animal, followed by immediate tension-free extraction tests. The effects of the complex mechanical strains occurring during implantation were analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron dispersive spectroscopy. Extensive biocompatibility assays (MTS, immunofluorescence, Western blot) revealed that the bioactive glass films stimulated strong cellular adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells, without promoting their differentiation. The ability of the implant coatings to conserve a healthy stem cell pool is promising to further endorse the fabrication of new osseointegration implant designs with extended lifetime.

  8. Work function increase of Al-doped ZnO thin films by B+ ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang-Jin; Heo, Gi-Seok; Park, Jong-Woon; Lee, In-Hwan; Choi, Bum-Ho; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Se-Yeon; Shin, Dong-Chan

    2007-11-01

    The work function of an Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film can be increased via B+ ion implantation from 3.92 eV up to 4.22 eV. The ion implantation has been carried out with the ion dose of 1 x 10(16) cm(-2) and ion energy of 5 keV. The resistance of the B+ implanted AZO films has been a bit raised, while their transmittance is slightly lowered, compared to those of un-implanted AZO films. These behaviors can be explained by the doping profile and the resultant band diagram. It is concluded that the coupling between the B+ ions and oxygen vacancies would be the main reason for an increase in the work function and a change in the other properties. We also address that the work function is more effectively alterable if the defect density of the top transparent conducting oxide layer can be controlled.

  9. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  10. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  11. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  12. A reconnectable multiway implantable connector.

    PubMed

    Rushton, D N; Tromans, A M; Donaldson, N de N

    2002-12-01

    A well-tried plug-and-socket connector system designed for connecting multichannel implanted cables was adapted so as to allow disconnection and reconnection during surgery. Five different sealing techniques were tested in vitro, and it was found that only one of them had the required qualities of high leakage path impedance (taken as more than one megaohm for the worst sample) after three months of saline soak, together with demountability under surgical conditions. The system has subsequently been successfully implemented in a patient in whom reconnection was required two years after implantation.

  13. Implants and Ethnocide: Learning from the Cochlear Implant Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the fictional case of the "Babel fish" to explore and illustrate the issues involved in the controversy about the use of cochlear implants in prelinguistically deaf children. Analysis of this controversy suggests that the development of genetic tests for deafness poses a serious threat to the continued flourishing of Deaf…

  14. Educational Challenges for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Patricia M.; Nevins, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses educational challenges for children with severe to profound hearing loss who receive cochlear implants. Despite the implants, these children face acoustic challenges, academic challenges, attention challenges, associative challenges, and adjustment challenges. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  15. Scientists Design Heat-Activated Penis Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant, Le used a heat-activated exoskeleton of nitinol, a metal known for its elasticity. A urologist could do a simplified operation to insert the nitinol implant, which would remain flaccid at body temperature ...

  16. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... systems Will have to be careful of static electricity. Static electricity may temporarily or permanently damage a cochlear implant. ... more details regarding how to deal with static electricity, contact the manufacturer or implant center. Have less ...

  17. Physiological and molecular determinants of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Lin, Haiyan; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Haibin; Armant, D. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation involves the intimate interaction between an implantation-competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus, which occurs in a limited time period known as the window of implantation. Emerging evidence shows that defects originating during embryo implantation induce ripple effects with adverse consequences on later gestation events, highlighting the significance of this event for pregnancy success. Although a multitude of cellular events and molecular pathways involved in embryo-uterine crosstalk during implantation have been identified through gene expression studies and genetically engineered mouse models, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of embryo implantation is still missing. This review focuses on recent progress with particular attention to physiological and molecular determinants of blastocyst activation, uterine receptivity, blastocyst attachment and uterine decidualization. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms governing embryo implantation should generate new strategies to rectify implantation failure and improve pregnancy rates in women. PMID:23290997

  18. Resonant ultrasonic wireless power transmission for bio-implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Youm, Woosub; Hwang, Gunn; Moon, Kee S.; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present the ultrasonic wireless power transmission system as part of a brain-machine interface (BMI) system in development to supply the required electric power. Making a small-size implantable BMI, it is essential to design a low power unit with a rechargeable battery. The ultrasonic power transmission system has two piezoelectric transducers, facing each other between skin tissues converting electrical energy to mechanical vibrational energy or vice versa. Ultrasound is free from the electromagnetic coupling effect and medical frequency band limitations which making it a promising candidate for implantable purposes. In this paper, we present the design of piezoelectric composite transducer, the rectifier circuit, and rechargeable battery that all packaged in biocompatible titanium can. An initial prototype device was built for demonstration purpose. The early experimental results demonstrate the prototype device can reach 50% of energy transmission efficiency in a water medium at 20mm distance and 18% in animal skin tissue at 18mm distance, respectively.

  19. Ion implanted integrated Bragg gratings in SOI waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulk, M. P.; Knights, A. P.; Jessop, P. E.

    2007-06-01

    We report the realization of a Bragg grating optical filter at telecommunication wavelengths in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) through the use of ion implantation induced refractive index modulation. Silicon self-irradiation damage accumulation results in an increase of the refractive index to a saturated value, upon amorphization, of approximately 3.75. This makes it an interesting candidate for passive gratings as the silicon retains a planar surface, making it ideal for further processing. Monte Carlo simulations and coupled mode theory demonstrate the viability of the approach. Planar implanted SOI waveguides showed extinction ratios of -5 dB for TE and -2 dB for TM. An annealing study suggests complete amorphization was not achieved and future results should be improved dramatically.

  20. Initial experience with the Sophono Alpha 1 osseointegrated implant.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Pitarch-Ribas, Ignacia; Latorre-Monteagudo, Emilia; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In the last several years, bone anchored hearing aids have proven to be useful in treating conductive and mixed unilateral or bilateral hearing loss, as well as for sensorineural unilateral hearing loss. The Sophono Alpha 1 model has the advantage of not requiring an abutment, with it being coupled by magnetism instead. We report the cases of 3 infants with congenital malformations of external and middle ear. Audiometry showed conductive hearing loss. All 3 patients were implanted with Alpha 1 model (Sophono). Patients evolved satisfactorily. After 30 days we applied the processor and the control audiometry showed a marked improvement of hearing thresholds, although without a complete closure of the gap. With minimal care, the skin over the implant remained in excellent condition, with a very satisfactory cosmetic outcome.

  1. A Pelvic Implant Orthosis in Rodents, for Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, and for Brain Machine Interface Research: Construction, Surgical Implantation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Udoekwere, Ubong Ime; Oza, Chintan S.; Giszter, Simon F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rodents are important model systems used to explore Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) and rehabilitation, and Brain Machine Interfaces. We present a new method to provide mechanical interaction for BMI and rehabilitation in rat models of SCI. New Method We present the design and implantation procedures for a pelvic orthosis that allows direct force application to the skeleton in brain machine interface and robot rehabilitation applications in rodents. We detail the materials, construction, machining, surgery and validation of the device. Results We describe the statistical validation of the implant procedures by comparing stepping parameters of 8 rats prior to and after implantation and surgical recovery. An ANOVA showed no effects of the implantation on stepping. Paired tests in the individual rats also showed no effect in 7/8 rats and minor effects in the last rat, within the group's variance. Comparison with Existing Methods Our method allows interaction with rats at the pelvis without any perturbation of normal stepping in the intact rat. The method bypasses slings, and cuffs, avoiding cuff or slings squeezing the abdomen, or other altered sensory feedback. Our implant osseointegrates, and thus allows an efficient high bandwidth mechanical coupling to a robot. The implants support quadrupedal training and are readily integrated into either treadmill or overground contexts. Conclusions Our novel device and procedures support a range of novel experimental designs and motor tests for rehabilitative and augmentation devices in intact and SCI model rats, with the advantage of allowing direct force application at the pelvic bones. PMID:24269175

  2. A simplified impression technique for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Robert E

    2002-03-01

    Dental implants have been considered an acceptable form of dental treatment since the early 1980s. A number of studies have been published describing impression techniques for dental implants. Many of the techniques described are so complex that they may seem daunting to the average restorative dentist. Most general practitioners do not wish to attempt to restore dental implants. This article describes a very simple, yet extremely accurate, technique for making impressions of dental implant fixtures.

  3. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-15

    The upper two parts of the implant (post and core and crown) are conventional dental materials, usually gold. EX) 1473 MrION Of" I POV GS IS O&SOLETE...10 Clinical Examples of Baboon Dental Implants . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Histologic Analysis of the Bone-Implant Interface . . . . . . . . 16...Aluminum Oxide Dental Implant . . . . . . . . . . 2 Figure 2. Clinical Photograph of A29 and A30 in Baboon 469 at Necropsy

  4. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  5. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G. ); Sferlazzo, P. . SED Division)

    1992-01-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  6. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G.; Sferlazzo, P.

    1992-12-01

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  7. Optical waveguides in magneto-optical glasses fabricated by proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Yu-Wen; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Fu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liao-Lin; Guo, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Planar waveguides in magneto-optical glasses (Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glasses) have been produced by a 550-keV proton implantation at a dose of 4.0×1016 ions/cm2 for the first time to our knowledge. After annealing at 260 °C for 1.0 h, the dark-mode spectra and near-field intensity distributions are measured by the prism-coupling and end-face coupling methods. The damage profile, refractive index distribution and light propagation mode of the planar waveguide are numerically calculated by SRIM 2010, RCM and FD-BPM, respectively. The effects of implantation on the structural and optical properties are investigated by Raman and absorption spectra. It suggests that the proton-implanted Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glass waveguide is a good candidate for a waveguide isolator in optical fiber communication and all-optical communication.

  8. Status of surface modification techniques for artificial hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subir; Abanteriba, Sylvester

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Surface modification techniques have been developed significantly in the last couple of decades for enhanced tribological performance of artificial hip implants. Surface modification techniques improve biological, chemical and mechanical properties of implant surfaces. Some of the most effective techniques, namely surface texturing, surface coating, and surface grafting, are applied to reduce the friction and wear of artificial implants. This article reviews the status of the developments of surface modification techniques and their effects on commonly used artificial joint implants. This study focused only on artificial hip joint prostheses research of the last 10 years. A total of 27 articles were critically reviewed and categorized according to surface modification technique. The literature reveals that modified surfaces exhibit reduced friction and enhanced wear resistance of the contact surfaces. However, the wear rates are still noticeable in case of surface texturing and surface coating. The associated vortex flow aids to release entrapped wear debris and thus increase the wear particles generation in case of textured surfaces. The earlier delamination of coating materials due to poor adhesion and graphitization transformation has limited the use of coating techniques. Moreover, the produced wear debris has adverse effects on biological fluid. Conversely, the surface grafting technique provides phospholipid like layer that exhibited lower friction and almost zero wear rates even after a longer period of friction and wear test. The findings suggest that further investigations are required to identify the role of surface grafting on film formation and heat resistance ability under physiological hip joint conditions for improved performance and longevity of hip implants. PMID:28228866

  9. Status of surface modification techniques for artificial hip implants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subir; Abanteriba, Sylvester

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification techniques have been developed significantly in the last couple of decades for enhanced tribological performance of artificial hip implants. Surface modification techniques improve biological, chemical and mechanical properties of implant surfaces. Some of the most effective techniques, namely surface texturing, surface coating, and surface grafting, are applied to reduce the friction and wear of artificial implants. This article reviews the status of the developments of surface modification techniques and their effects on commonly used artificial joint implants. This study focused only on artificial hip joint prostheses research of the last 10 years. A total of 27 articles were critically reviewed and categorized according to surface modification technique. The literature reveals that modified surfaces exhibit reduced friction and enhanced wear resistance of the contact surfaces. However, the wear rates are still noticeable in case of surface texturing and surface coating. The associated vortex flow aids to release entrapped wear debris and thus increase the wear particles generation in case of textured surfaces. The earlier delamination of coating materials due to poor adhesion and graphitization transformation has limited the use of coating techniques. Moreover, the produced wear debris has adverse effects on biological fluid. Conversely, the surface grafting technique provides phospholipid like layer that exhibited lower friction and almost zero wear rates even after a longer period of friction and wear test. The findings suggest that further investigations are required to identify the role of surface grafting on film formation and heat resistance ability under physiological hip joint conditions for improved performance and longevity of hip implants.

  10. Development of a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Rowles, J R; Khanwilkar, P S; Diegel, P D; Hansen, A C; Bearnson, G B; Smith, K D; Tatsumi, E; Olsen, D B

    1992-01-01

    The first generation of an integrated, totally implantable electrohydraulic total artificial heart was designed for long-term cardiac replacement. The system consists of an elliptical blood pump with an interatrial shunt, Medtronic-Hall 27 mm and 25 mm inflow and outflow valves, respectively, an energy converter consisting of an axial-flow, hydraulic pump driven by a brushless DC motor, and an electronics system with transcutaneous energy transmission and telemetry. Energy is supplied by internal nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries that supply power for 20 min and external silver-zinc batteries that are designed to supply energy to run the system for 5 hr. The blood pump consists of a single layer diaphragm cast from Biolon, with joined right and left ventricles sharing a common base. The dynamic stroke volume is 84 ml, and maximum cardiac output is 9.2 L/min at a heart rate of 110 beats/min on the mock circulation. A 4.3 mm diameter interatrial shunt is used to balance the volumetrically coupled ventricles. The energy converter pumps hydraulic fluid alternately between ventricles, with controlled, active filling in one ventricle during the systolic phase of the other ventricle. Internal or external controllers adjust the heart rate and motor speed to maintain normal atrial filling pressures and full stroke. Electromagnetic induction is used to transfer energy through the skin and a bidirectional infrared data link incorporated within the transcutaneous energy transmission coils is used to transmit information. The entire system is being assembled and refined for long-term animal implant studies.

  11. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  13. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  14. Penile prosthesis implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Simmons, M; Montague, D K

    2008-01-01

    Penile prosthesis implantation is the oldest effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. This review examines the past, present and future of penile prosthesis implantation. Advances in prosthetic design and implantation techniques have resulted today in devices that produce nearly normal flaccid and erect states, and have remarkable freedom from mechanical failure. The future of prosthetic design holds promises for even more improvements.

  15. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    PubMed

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7 milligrams of melatonin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 053923 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  19. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  20. Orthodontic palatal implants: clinical technique.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, D; O'Dwyer, J J; Benson, P E; Doyle, P T; Sandler, J

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to familiarize the readers with some of the clinical considerations necessary to ensure successful use of mid-palatal implants. Both surgical and technical aspects will be discussed along with a description of impression techniques used.