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Sample records for osteochondral implant coupled

  1. Mechanical and morphological evaluation of osteochondral implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bavaresco, Vanessa P; Garrido, Luiz; Batista, Nilza A; Malmonge, Sônia M; Belangero, William D

    2008-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of osteochondral defects was evaluated in this study with the intention of developing alternative procedures. Cylindrical pins (5.00 mm in diameter and in height) made of pHEMA hydrogel covered ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) or beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) matrix were used. Ostoechondral defects were caused in the knees of adult dogs and the evaluation was carried out after a 9-month follow-up period. The mechanical behavior of the implants was evaluated by means of an indentation creep test that showed that the UHMWPE matrix maintained its viscoelastic behavior even after follow-up time, while the beta-TCP matrix osteochondral implants presented significant alterations. It is believed that the beta-TCP osteochondral implants were unable to withstand the load applied, causing an increase of complacency when compared to the UHMWPE osteochondral implants. Based on micro and macroscopic analysis, no significant wear was observed in either of the osteochondral implants when compared to the controls. However, morphological alterations, with fragmentation indices in the patella, were observed either due to friction with the hydrogel in the first postoperative months or due to forming of a dense conjunctive tissue. This wear mechanism caused on the counterface of the implant (patella) was observed, notwithstanding the osteochondral implant studied. PMID:18370946

  2. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  3. Treatment of osteochondral defects in the rabbit's knee joint by implantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin clots.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Markus T; Wexel, Gabriele; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Anton, Martina; Henning, Tobias D; Vogt, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of osteochondral articular defects has been challenging physicians for many years. The better understanding of interactions of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in recent years led to increased attention to restoration of the entire osteochondral unit. In comparison to chondral lesions the regeneration of osteochondral defects is much more complex and a far greater surgical and therapeutic challenge. The damaged tissue does not only include the superficial cartilage layer but also the subchondral bone. For deep, osteochondral damage, as it occurs for example with osteochondrosis dissecans, the full thickness of the defect needs to be replaced to restore the joint surface (1). Eligible therapeutic procedures have to consider these two different tissues with their different intrinsic healing potential (2). In the last decades, several surgical treatment options have emerged and have already been clinically established (3-6). Autologous or allogeneic osteochondral transplants consist of articular cartilage and subchondral bone and allow the replacement of the entire osteochondral unit. The defects are filled with cylindrical osteochondral grafts that aim to provide a congruent hyaline cartilage covered surface (3,7,8). Disadvantages are the limited amount of available grafts, donor site morbidity (for autologous transplants) and the incongruence of the surface; thereby the application of this method is especially limited for large defects. New approaches in the field of tissue engineering opened up promising possibilities for regenerative osteochondral therapy. The implantation of autologous chondrocytes marked the first cell based biological approach for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage lesions and is now worldwide established with good clinical results even 10 to 20 years after implantation (9,10). However, to date, this technique is not suitable for the treatment of all types of lesions such as deep defects involving the subchondral

  4. Polyvinyl Alcohol Hydrogel Irradiated and Acetalized for Osteochondral Defect Repair: Mechanical, Chemical, and Histological Evaluation after Implantation in Rat Knees

    PubMed Central

    Batista, N. A.; Rodrigues, A. A.; Bavaresco, V. P.; Mariolani, J. R. L.; Belangero, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) hydrogel plugs were implanted in artificial osteochondral defects on the trochlear groove of rat knees. After 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of followup, samples containing the implants were mechanically evaluated by creep indentation test, chemically, and histologically by optical microscopy. The mechanical test pointed towards an increase of the implant creep modulus and the chemical analysis exhibited an increasing concentration of calcium and phosphorus within the implants over time. Optical microscopy showed no foreign body reaction and revealed formation, differentiation, and maintenance of new tissue at the defect/implant interface. The absence of implant wear indicated that the natural articular lubrication process was not disturbed by the implant. The performance of the irradiated and acetalized PVA was considered satisfactory for the proposed application. PMID:23197982

  5. Costal osteochondral grafts for osteochondritis dissecans of the capitulum humeri.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Ikegami, Hiroyasu

    2008-06-01

    The objective of the treatment for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitulum is to prevent the occurrence of osteoarthritis and to allow the patients to return to throwing activities. In repairing osteochondral defects in advanced osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitulum after free body removal, we have performed block-shaped costal osteochondral grafting in 18 elbows since 1997. A block-shaped graft harvested from the transitional area between the rib and its associated cartilage was implanted to the osteochondral defect. This method allows the osteochondral defect to be repaired with uniform hyaline cartilaginous articular surface without any effect to other joints. Donor site no longer causes pain at 2 or 3 days after surgery. The purpose of this study is to describe the history, indications, and the surgical techniques of costal osteochondral grafting for advanced osteochondritis dissecans of the capitulum.

  6. Microsphere-based gradient implants for osteochondral regeneration: a long-term study in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, Banu Priya; Mellott, Adam J; Easley, Jeremiah T; Palmer, Ross H; Galbraith, Richard A; Key, Vincent H; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Background: The microfracture technique for cartilage repair has limited ability to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Aim: The current study made a direct comparison between microfracture and an osteochondral approach with microsphere-based gradient plugs. Materials & methods: The PLGA-based scaffolds had opposing gradients of chondroitin sulfate and β-tricalcium phosphate. A 1-year repair study in sheep was conducted. Results: The repair tissues in the microfracture were mostly fibrous and had scattered fissures with degenerative changes. Cartilage regenerated with the gradient plugs had equal or superior mechanical properties; had lacunated cells and stable matrix as in hyaline cartilage. Conclusion: This first report of gradient scaffolds in a long-term, large animal, osteochondral defect demonstrated potential for equal or better cartilage repair than microfracture. PMID:26418471

  7. Multiphasic construct studied in an ectopic osteochondral defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, June E.; Vaquette, Cédryck; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Klein, Travis J.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo osteochondral defect models predominantly consist of small animals, such as rabbits. Although they have an advantage of low cost and manageability, their joints are smaller and more easily healed compared with larger animals or humans. We hypothesized that osteochondral cores from large animals can be implanted subcutaneously in rats to create an ectopic osteochondral defect model for routine and high-throughput screening of multiphasic scaffold designs and/or tissue-engineered constructs (TECs). Bovine osteochondral plugs with 4 mm diameter osteochondral defect were fitted with novel multiphasic osteochondral grafts composed of chondrocyte-seeded alginate gels and osteoblast-seeded polycaprolactone scaffolds, prior to being implanted in rats subcutaneously with bone morphogenic protein-7. After 12 weeks of in vivo implantation, histological and micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrated that TECs are susceptible to mineralization. Additionally, there was limited bone formation in the scaffold. These results suggest that the current model requires optimization to facilitate robust bone regeneration and vascular infiltration into the defect site. Taken together, this study provides a proof-of-concept for a high-throughput osteochondral defect model. With further optimization, the presented hybrid in vivo model may address the growing need for a cost-effective way to screen osteochondral repair strategies before moving to large animal preclinical trials. PMID:24694896

  8. Influence of the gel thickness on in vivo hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by double-network gel implanted at the bottom of a large osteochondral defect: Short-term results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A double-network (DN) gel, which is composed of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) and poly(N,N’-dimethyl acrylamide), can induce hyaline cartilage regeneration in vivo in a large osteochondral defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the thickness of the implanted DN gel on the induction ability of hyaline cartilage regeneration. Methods Thirty-eight mature rabbits were used in this study. We created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 4.3-mm in the patellofemoral joint. The knees were randomly divided into 4 groups (Group I: 0.5-mm thick gel, Group II: 1.0-mm thick gel, Group III: 5.0-mm thick gel, and Group IV: untreated control). Animals in each group were further divided into 3 sub-groups depending on the gel implant position (2.0-, 3.0-, or 4.0-mm depth from the articular surface) in the defect. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the Wayne’s gross and histological grading scales and real time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 4 weeks. Results According to the total Wayne’s score, when the depth of the final vacant space was set at 2.0 mm, the scores in Groups I, II, and III were significantly greater than that Group IV (p < 0.05), although there were no significant differences between Groups I and IV at a 3.0-mm deep vacant space. The expression levels of type-2 collagen in Groups II and III were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in Group IV. Conclusions The 1.0-mm thick DN gel sheet had the same ability to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration as the 5.0-mm thick DN gel plug. However, the induction ability of the 0.5-mm thick sheet was significantly lower when compared with the 1.0-mm thick gel sheet. The 1.0-mm DN gel sheet is a promising device to establish a cell-free cartilage regeneration strategy that minimizes bone loss from the gel implantation. PMID:23369101

  9. Refixation of osteochondral fractures by ultrasound-activated, resorbable pins

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, H.; Schulz, A. P.; Gille, J.; Klinger, M.; Jürgens, C.; Reimers, N.; Kienast, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Osteochondral injuries, if not treated adequately, often lead to severe osteoarthritis. Possible treatment options include refixation of the fragment or replacement therapies such as Pridie drilling, microfracture or osteochondral grafts, all of which have certain disadvantages. Only refixation of the fragment can produce a smooth and resilient joint surface. The aim of this study was the evaluation of an ultrasound-activated bioresorbable pin for the refixation of osteochondral fragments under physiological conditions. Methods In 16 Merino sheep, specific osteochondral fragments of the medial femoral condyle were produced and refixed with one of conventional bioresorbable pins, titanium screws or ultrasound-activated pins. Macro- and microscopic scoring was undertaken after three months. Results The healing ratio with ultrasound-activated pins was higher than with conventional pins. No negative heat effect on cartilage has been shown. Conclusion As the material is bioresorbable, no further surgery is required to remove the implant. MRI imaging is not compromised, as it is with implanted screws. The use of bioresorbable pins using ultrasound is a promising technology for the refixation of osteochondral fractures. PMID:23610699

  10. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Brendan L.; Hung, Clark T.; Cook, James L.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Tan, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allograft implantation is an effective cartilage restoration technique for large defects (>10 cm2), though the demand far exceeds the supply of available quality donor tissue. Large bilayered engineered cartilage tissue constructs with accurate anatomical features (i.e. contours, thickness, architecture) could be beneficial in replacing damaged tissue. When creating these osteochondral constructs, however, it is pertinent to maintain biofidelity to restore functionality. Here, we describe a step-by-step framework for the fabrication of a large osteochondral construct with correct anatomical architecture and topology through a combination of high-resolution imaging, rapid prototyping, impression molding, and injection molding. PMID:25794950

  11. Fabrication of tissue engineered osteochondral grafts for restoring the articular surface of diarthrodial joints.

    PubMed

    Roach, Brendan L; Hung, Clark T; Cook, James L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Tan, Andrea R

    2015-08-01

    Osteochondral allograft implantation is an effective cartilage restoration technique for large defects (>10 cm(2)), though the demand far exceeds the supply of available quality donor tissue. Large bilayered engineered cartilage tissue constructs with accurate anatomical features (i.e. contours, thickness, architecture) could be beneficial in replacing damaged tissue. When creating these osteochondral constructs, however, it is pertinent to maintain biofidelity to restore functionality. Here, we describe a step-by-step framework for the fabrication of a large osteochondral construct with correct anatomical architecture and topology through a combination of high-resolution imaging, rapid prototyping, impression molding, and injection molding. PMID:25794950

  12. How I Manage Osteochondritis Dissecans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiStefano, Vincent J.

    1986-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans, a lesion found most often on the femur at the knee joint, occurs most frequently in active adolescents. This article describes treatment for preadolescents, adolescents, and adults. Osteochondritus dissecans of the patella is also presented. (MT)

  13. Osteochondral Lesions of Major Joints

    PubMed Central

    Durur-Subasi, Irmak; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Yildirim, Omer Selim

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides information about osteochondral lesions (OCL) and example cases of OCL occurring in major joints, some of which are rarely seen. This simple tutorial is presented in question and answer format. PMID:26180500

  14. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  15. Osteochondral lesions of the talus: Current concept.

    PubMed

    Laffenêtre, O

    2010-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OTL) are among those injuries that we should not fail to recognize, especially following any type of hindfoot injury. They were thoroughly described 15 years ago in a round table session organized by Doré and Rosset for the Société orthopédique de l'Ouest. Their physiopathology has not yet been definitely determined, even though some of the pathogenic mechanisms are known. They are best characterized using the fractures, osteonecroses, geodes (FOG) radiological classification. Both their diagnosis and their surgical treatment remain a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon: some basic surgical principles apply to all of the lesions, such as cartilage debridement and shaving of necrotic tissues, while others will be used depending on the location and size of the lesions as well as the surgeon's experience. Finally, no specific technique appears to be superior to the others. Arthroscopy appears to be the most effective procedure for lesions smaller than 1 cm(2), whereas larger lesions should be filled, either with cancellous bone or with an osteochondral graft or using autogenous chondrocyte implantation. The data available in the literature should also incite orthopaedists to consider the results of surgical management with some modesty, and conservative management should remain among the therapeutic options.

  16. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  17. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yougun; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  18. Pediatric Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aristides I; Shea, Kevin G; Ganley, Theodore J

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) can cause knee pain and dysfunction in children. The etiology of OCD remains unclear; theories on causes include inflammation, ischemia, ossification abnormalities, genetic factors, and repetitive microtrauma. Most OCD lesions in skeletally immature patients will heal with nonoperative treatment. The success of nonoperative treatment decreases once patients reach skeletal maturity. The goals of surgical treatment include maintenance of articular cartilage congruity, rigid fixation of unstable fragments, and repair of osteochondral defects with cells or tissues that can adequately replace lost or deficient cartilage. Unsalvageable OCD lesions can be treated with various surgical techniques. PMID:27637663

  19. Chondrogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Osteochondral Environment Is Mediated by the Subchondral Bone

    PubMed Central

    de Vries–van Melle, Marloes L.; Narcisi, Roberto; Kops, Nicole; Koevoet, Wendy J.L.M.; Bos, P. Koen; Murphy, J. Mary; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In articular cartilage repair, cells that will be responsible for the formation of repair tissue are often exposed to an osteochondral environment. To study cartilage repair mechanisms in vitro, we have recently developed a bovine osteochondral biopsy culture model in which cartilage defects can be simulated reproducibly. Using this model, we now aimed at studying the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in an osteochondral environment. In contrast to standard in vitro chondrogenesis, it was found that supplementing transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) to culture medium was not required to induce chondrogenesis of hBMSCs in an osteochondral environment. hBMSC culture in defects created in osteochondral biopsies or in bone-only biopsies resulted in comparable levels of cartilage-related gene expression, whereas culture in cartilage-only biopsies did not induce chondrogenesis. Subcutaneous implantation in nude mice of osteochondral biopsies containing hBMSCs in osteochondral defects resulted in the formation of more cartilaginous tissue than hBMSCs in chondral defects. The subchondral bone secreted TGFβ; however, the observed results could not be attributed to TGFβ, as either capturing TGFβ with an antibody or blocking the canonical TGFβ signaling pathway did not result in significant changes in cartilage-related gene expression of hBMSCs in the osteochondral culture model. Inhibition of BMP signaling did not prevent chondrogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that chondrogenesis of hBMSCs is induced by factors secreted from the bone. We have strong indications that this is not solely mediated by members of the TGFβ family but other, yet unknown, factors originating from the subchondral bone appeared to play a key role. PMID:23980750

  20. [Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee].

    PubMed

    Benedict, Shaike; Oron, Amir; Beer, Yiftah; Agar, Gavriel

    2008-07-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee is diagnosed at an increasing rate among adolescents and young adults. One of the reasons is due to the increasing number of sports participants among these populations. Although many theories exist, the cause of osteochondritis dissecans is unknown. Early diagnosis is very important. While adult type osteochondritis dissecans is unstable, in most young patients it is stable, and patients with an intact articular surface have a good chance to heal with non-operative treatment and cessation of physical activity. The value of complementary treatment (bed rest, partial weight bearing, bracing aimed at reducing weight bearing of the involved knee) is unknown. Patients with open physes and stable lesions, who failed non-operative treatment, may be treated with local bone drilling, encouraging lesion healing. As the disease progresses, more aggressive measures should to be taken, whilst decreasing success ratios are expected. The healing potential of the lesion may be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Most adult type osteochondritis dissecans patients, as most young patients, with unstable lesions and loose bodies within their knees, are treated with fixation of the lesions and even bone grafting. Many unstable lesions will heal after fixation, but the long-term prognosis is elusive. Chronic loose bodies are very difficult to fix, with less favorable outcomes. Excision of large lesions originating from weight bearing cartilage is not favorable and different rehabilitation measures of local cartilage damage are not encouraging. PMID:18814522

  1. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum.

    PubMed

    Baker, Champ L; Romeo, Anthony A; Baker, Champ L

    2010-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum is a well-recognized cause of elbow pain and disability in the adolescent athlete. This condition typically affects young athletes, such as throwers and gymnasts, involved in high-demand, repetitive overhead, or weightbearing activities. The true cause, natural history, and optimal treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum remain unknown. Suspicion of this condition warrants investigation with proper radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Prompt recognition of this disorder and institution of nonoperative treatment for early, stable lesions can result in healing with later resumption of sporting activities. Patients with unstable lesions or those failing nonoperative therapy require operative intervention with treatment based on lesion size and extent. Historically, surgical treatment included arthrotomy with loose body removal and curettage of the residual osteochondral defect base. The introduction of elbow arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum permits a thorough lesion assessment and evaluation of the entire elbow joint with the ability to treat the lesion and coexistent pathology in a minimally invasive fashion. Unfortunately, the prognosis for advanced lesions remains more guarded, but short-term results after newer reconstruction techniques are promising.

  2. Implantable flexible pressure measurement system based on inductive coupling.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristina C; Sepúlveda, Alexandra T; Almeida, Nuno; Wardle, Brian L; da Silva, José Machado; Rocha, Luís A

    2015-02-01

    One of the currently available treatments for aortic aneurysms is endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). In spite of major advances in the operating techniques, complications still occur and lifelong surveillance is recommended. In order to reduce and even eliminate the commonly used surveillance imaging exams, as well as to reduce follow-up costs, new technological solutions are being pursued. In this paper, we describe the development, including design and performance characterization, of a flexible remote pressure measurement system based on inductive-coupling for post-EVAR monitoring purposes. The telemetry system architecture and operation are described and main performance characteristics discussed. The implantable sensor details are provided and its model is presented. Simulations with the reading circuit and the sensor's model were performed and compared with measurements carried out with air and a phantom as media, in order to characterize the telemetry system and validate the models. The transfer characteristic curve (pressure versus frequency) of the monitoring system was obtained with measurements performed with the sensor inside a controlled pressure vacuum chamber. Additional experimental results which proof the system functionality were obtained within a hydraulic test bench that emulates the aorta. Several innovative aspects, when compared to the state of the art, both in the sensor and in the telemetry system were achieved. PMID:25347867

  3. Porous tantalum biocomposites for osteochondral defect repair

    PubMed Central

    Mrosek, E. H.; Chung, H-W.; Fitzsimmons, J. S.; Reinholz, G. G.; Schagemann, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine if a durable bilayer implant composed of trabecular metal with autologous periosteum on top would be suitable to reconstitute large osteochondral defects. This design would allow for secure implant fixation, subsequent integration and remodeling. Materials and Methods Adult sheep were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 8/group): 1. trabecular metal/periosteal graft (TMPG), 2. trabecular metal (TM), 3. empty defect (ED). Cartilage and bone healing were assessed macroscopically, biochemically (type II collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) content) and histologically. Results At 16 weeks post-operatively, histological scores amongst treatment groups were not statistically different (TMPG: overall 12.7, cartilage 8.6, bone 4.1; TM: overall 14.2, cartilage 9.5, bone 4.9; ED: overall 13.6, cartilage 9.1, bone 4.5). Metal scaffolds were incorporated into the surrounding bone, both in TM and TMPG. The sGAG yield was lower in the neo-cartilage regions compared with the articular cartilage (AC) controls (TMPG 20.8/AC 39.5, TM 25.6/AC 33.3, ED 32.2/AC 40.2 µg sGAG/1 mg respectively), with statistical significance being achieved for the TMPG group (p < 0.05). Hypercellularity of the neo-cartilage was found in TM and ED, as the dsDNA content was significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared with contralateral AC controls (TM 126.7/AC 71.1, ED 99.3/AC 62.8 ng dsDNA/1 mg). The highest type II collagen content was found in neo-cartilage after TM compared with TMPG and ED (TM 60%/TMPG 40%/ED 39%). Inter-treatment differences were not significant. Conclusions TM is a highly suitable material for the reconstitution of osseous defects. TM enables excellent bony ingrowth and fast integration. However, combined with autologous periosteum, such a biocomposite failed to promote satisfactory neo-cartilage formation. Cite this article: E. H. Mrosek, H-W. Chung, J. S. Fitzsimmons, S. W. O’Driscoll, G. G

  4. Autologous osteochondral transplantation for simple cyst in the patella.

    PubMed

    Lu, Allen P; Hame, Sharon L

    2005-08-01

    Treatment options for chondral and osteochondral defects of the patella have been few and results have been inconsistent at best. Autologous osteochondral transplantation presents a new way to revisit these patellar defects. We report the case of a young female softball player with a simple cyst in the patella and an osteochondral defect that serves as the indication for autograft osteochondral transplantation.

  5. An analytical model for inductively coupled implantable biomedical devices with ferrite rods.

    PubMed

    Theilmann, P T; Asbeck, P M

    2009-02-01

    Using approximations applicable to near field coupled implants simplified expressions for the complex mutual inductance of coaxial aligned coils with and without a cylindrical ferrite rod are derived. Experimental results for ferrite rods of various sizes and permeabilities are presented to verify the accuracy of this expression. An equivalent circuit model for the inductive link between an implant and power coil is then presented and used to investigate how ferrite size, permeability and loss affect the power available to the implant device. Enhancements in coupling provided by high frequency, low permeability nickel zinc rods are compared with low frequency high permeability manganese zinc rods.

  6. Osteochondral autograft transplantation for osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum in nonthrowing athletes.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Eiichi; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki; Sato, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Toh, Satoshi

    2005-10-01

    In this report, we present the cases of 3 nonthrowing athletes with osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum. Preoperatively, they complained of elbow pain during rhythmic gymnastics, table tennis, and basketball, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a completely separated osteochondral fragment or a full-thickness cartilage defect. All 3 patients were treated with transplantation of an osteochondral autograft harvested from the lateral femoral condyle. They returned fully to their sports activities within 6 months of surgery. The continuity of the cartilage layer between the osteochondral graft and the capitellum was shown on magnetic resonance images taken at 12 months postoperatively. We believe that osteochondral autograft transplantation provides successful results for nonthrowing athletes with end-stage osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum.

  7. Drilling techniques for osteochondritis dissecans.

    PubMed

    Heyworth, Benton E; Edmonds, Eric W; Murnaghan, M Lucas; Kocher, Mininder S

    2014-04-01

    Although the advanced stages of osteochondritis dissecans remain challenging to treat, most early-stage lesions in skeletally immature patients, if managed appropriately, can be stimulated to heal. For stable lesions that do not demonstrate adequate healing with nonoperative measures, such as activity modification, weight-bearing protection, or bracing, drilling of the subchondral bone has emerged as the gold standard of management. Several techniques of drilling exist, including transarticular drilling, retroarticular drilling, and notch drilling. Although each technique has been shown to be effective in small retrospective studies, higher-powered prospective comparative studies are needed to better elucidate their relative advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Viral Inactivation of Human Osteochondral Grafts with Methylene Blue and Light

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhixing; Call, Gazell M.; Gao, Jizong; Yao, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Cartilage injury is one of the most common disorders of synovial joints. Fresh osteochondral allografts are becoming a standard treatment; however, they are supply constrained with a potential risk of disease transmission. There are no known virucidal processes available for osteochondral allografts and most methods presently available are detrimental to cartilage. Methylene blue light treatment has been shown to be successful in the literature for viral inactivation of fresh frozen plasma. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of methylene blue light treatment to inactivate a panel of clinically relevant viruses inoculated onto osteochondral allografts. Design: Osteochondral grafts recovered from human cadaveric knees were inoculated with one of the following viruses: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), porcine parvovirus (PPV), and pseudorabies virus (PrV). The samples were processed through a methylene blue light treatment, which consisted of an initial soak in nonilluminated circulating methylene blue at ambient temperature, followed by light exposure with circulating methylene blue at cool temperatures. The final titer was compared with the recovery control for the viral log reduction. Results: HIV-1, BVDV, and PrV were reduced to nondetectable levels while HAV and PPV were reduced by 3.1 and 5.6 logs, respectively. Conclusions: The methylene blue light treatment was effective in reducing (a) enveloped DNA and RNA viruses to nondetectable levels and (b) nonenveloped DNA and RNA viruses of inoculated human osteochondral grafts by 3.1 to 5.6 logs. This study demonstrates the first practical method for significantly reducing viral load in osteochondral implants. PMID:26069682

  9. Calcaneal osteochondritis: a new overuse injury.

    PubMed

    Lokiec, F; Wientroub, S

    1998-07-01

    This is a case report of osteochondritis of the medial plantar apophysis of the calcaneus presenting as medial plantar heel pain in a 15-year-old basketball player. The lesion was detected radiographically and by increased focal uptake on bone scan. Conservative treatment resulted in complete pain relief and normal calcaneal appearance with union of the osteochondral fragment. No recurrence was noted during 3 years of follow-up.

  10. Treatment of severe osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow using osteochondral grafts from a rib.

    PubMed

    Oka, Y; Ikeda, M

    2001-07-01

    We treated a patient with extensive osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow by an osteochondral graft from a rib. It had consolidated seven months after operation. When seen at follow-up, after seven years and eight months, the elbow was free from pain with an improvement in the range of movement of 24 degrees.

  11. Biofabrication of osteochondral tissue equivalents by printing topologically defined, cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Schuurman, Wouter; Wijnberg, Hans M; Prins, Henk-Jan; van Weeren, P René; Malda, Jos; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral defects are prone to induce osteoarthritic degenerative changes. Many tissue-engineering approaches that aim to generate osteochondral implants suffer from poor tissue formation and compromised integration. This illustrates the need for further improvement of heterogeneous tissue constructs. Engineering of these structures is expected to profit from strategies addressing the complexity of tissue organization and the simultaneous use of multiple cell types. Moreover, this enables the investigation of the effects of three-dimensional (3D) organization and architecture on tissue function. In the present study, we characterize the use of a 3D fiber deposition (3DF) technique for the fabrication of cell-laden, heterogeneous hydrogel constructs for potential use as osteochondral grafts. Changing fiber spacing or angle of fiber deposition yielded scaffolds of varying porosity and elastic modulus. We encapsulated and printed fluorescently labeled human chondrocytes and osteogenic progenitors in alginate hydrogel yielding scaffolds of 1×2 cm with different parts for both cell types. Cell viability remained high throughout the printing process, and cells remained in their compartment of the printed scaffold for the whole culture period. Moreover, distinctive tissue formation was observed, both in vitro after 3 weeks and in vivo (6 weeks subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice), at different locations within one construct. These results demonstrate the possibility of manufacturing viable centimeter-scaled structured tissues by the 3DF technique, which could potentially be used for the repair of osteochondral defects. PMID:21854293

  12. A wireless batteryless deep-seated implantable ultrasonic pulser-receiver powered by magnetic coupling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai Chun; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Clement, Gregory T

    2011-06-01

    This study tests a deep-seated implantable ultrasonic pulser-receiver, powered wirelessly by magnetic coupling. A 30-cm energy-transmitting coil was designed to wrap around the body, and was driven by a current of 1.2 A rms at a frequency of 5.7 MHz to generate a magnetic field. A 2-cm receiving coil was positioned at the center of the primary coil for receiving the magnetic energy and powering the implantable device. A capacitor-diode voltage multiplier in the implantable circuit was used to step-up the receiving coil voltage from 12.5 to 50 V to operate an ultrasonic pulser. FEA magnetic field simulations, bench-top, and ex vivo rabbit measurements showed that the magnetic energy absorption in body tissue is negligible and that the magnetic coupling is not sensitive to receiving coil placement. The receiving coil and the power conditioning circuits in the implantable device do not contain ferromagnetic material, so a magnetic-resonance-compatible device can be achieved. A 5-MHz ultrasound transducer was used to test the implantable circuit, operating in pulse-echo mode. The received echo was amplified, envelope-detected, frequency-modulated, and transmitted out of the rabbit body by a radio wave. The modulated echo envelope signal was received by an external receiver located about 10 cm away from the primary coil. The study concludes that operation of a batteryless and wireless deep-seated implantable ultrasonic pulser-receiver powered by coplanar magnetic coupling is feasible.

  13. Strategies for osteochondral repair: Focus on scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Interest in osteochondral repair has been increasing with the growing number of sports-related injuries, accident traumas, and congenital diseases and disorders. Although therapeutic interventions are entering an advanced stage, current surgical procedures are still in their infancy. Unlike other tissues, the osteochondral zone shows a high level of gradient and interfacial tissue organization between bone and cartilage, and thus has unique characteristics related to the ability to resist mechanical compression and restoration. Among the possible therapies, tissue engineering of osteochondral tissues has shown considerable promise where multiple approaches of utilizing cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules have been pursued. This review focuses particularly on the importance of scaffold design and its role in the success of osteochondral tissue engineering. Biphasic and gradient composition with proper pore configurations are the basic design consideration for scaffolds. Surface modification is an essential technique to improve the scaffold function associated with cell regulation or delivery of signaling molecules. The use of functional scaffolds with a controllable delivery strategy of multiple signaling molecules is also considered a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we updated the recent advances in scaffolding approaches for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25343021

  14. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Wisby, I. Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Gwilliam, R.; Meeson, P. J.; Lindström, T.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1 MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65 MHz.

  15. Mechanical effects of surgical procedures on osteochondral grafts elucidated by osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondral grafts have become popular for treating small, isolated and full-thickness cartilage lesions. It is recommended that a slightly oversized, rather than an exact-sized, osteochondral plug is transplanted to achieve a tight fit. Consequently, impacting forces are required to insert the osteochondral plug into the recipient site. However, it remains controversial whether these impacting forces affect the biomechanical condition of the grafted articular cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanical effects of osteochondral plug implantation using osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound. Methods A full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defect (diameter, 3.5 mm; depth, 5 mm) was created in the lateral lower quarter of the patella. Using graft-harvesting instruments, an osteochondral plug (diameter, 3.5 mm as exact-size or 4.5 mm as oversize; depth, 5 mm) was harvested from the lateral upper quarter of the patella and transplanted into the defect. Intact patella was used as a control. The samples were monitored by real-time ultrasound during sequential changes of the bathing solution from 0.15 M to 2 M saline (shrinkage phase) and back to 0.15 M saline (swelling phase). For cartilage sample assessment, three indices were selected, namely the change in amplitude from the cartilage surface (amplitude recovery rate: ARR) and the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface. Results The ARR is closely related to the cartilage surface integrity, while the echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface are closely related to tissue deformation and NaCl diffusion, respectively. The ARR values of the oversized plugs were significantly lower than those of the control and exact-sized plugs. Regarding the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface, no significant differences were observed among the three groups. Conclusions These findings

  16. Bilateral osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow in a female pitcher.

    PubMed

    Williamson, L R; Albright, J P

    1996-11-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female pitcher with bilateral elbow osteochondritis dissecans. Osteochondritis of the elbow is a well-known disorder affecting pitchers and other individuals who sustain repetitive microtrauma to the elbow. Elbow osteochondritis has been described infrequently in female athletes. The incidence and reporting patterns of this disease are likely to increase as more female athletes participate in organized sports.

  17. Osteochondral Tissue Regeneration Through Polymeric Delivery of DNA Encoding for the SOX Trio and RUNX2

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Clark J.; Shah, Sarita R.; Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kinard, Lucas A.; Lam, Johnny; Watson, Brendan M.; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    Native osteochondral repair is often inadequate due to the inherent properties of the tissue and current clinical repair strategies can result in healing with a limited lifespan and donor site morbidity. This work investigates the use of polymeric gene therapy to address this problem by delivering DNA encoding for transcription factors complexed with the branched poly(ethylenimine)-hyaluronic acid (bPEI-HA) delivery vector via a porous oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) hydrogel scaffold. To evaluate the potential of this approach, a bilayered scaffold mimicking native osteochondral tissue organization was loaded with DNA/bPEI-HA complexes. Next, bilayered implants either unloaded or loaded in a spatial fashion with bPEI-HA and DNA encoding for either Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) or SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 5, 6, and 9 (the SOX trio), to generate bone and cartilage tissues respectively, were fabricated and implanted in a rat osteochondral defect. At 6 weeks post-implantation, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis and histological scoring were performed on the explants to evaluate the quality and quantity of tissue repair in each group. The incorporation of DNA encoding for RUNX2 in the bone layer of these scaffolds significantly increased bone growth. Additionally, a spatially loaded combination of RUNX2 and SOX trio DNA loading significantly improved healing relative to empty hydrogels or either factor alone. Finally, the results of this study suggest that subchondral bone formation is necessary for correct cartilage healing. PMID:24854956

  18. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    PubMed Central

    Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone plate. The ankle joint has a high congruency. During loading, compressed cartilage forces its water into the microfractured subchondral bone, leading to a localized high increased flow and pressure of fluid in the subchondral bone. This will result in local osteolysis and can explain the slow development of a subchondral cyst. The pain does not arise from the cartilage lesion, but is most probably caused by repetitive high fluid pressure during walking, which results in stimulation of the highly innervated subchondral bone underneath the cartilage defect. Understanding the natural history of osteochondral defects could lead to the development of strategies for preventing progressive joint damage. PMID:20151110

  19. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering. PMID:22677924

  20. Matching osteochondritis dissecans lesions in identical twin brothers.

    PubMed

    Richie, Lucas B; Sytsma, Mark J

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a disorder of unknown etiology that can result in fragmentation of osteochondral surfaces, most commonly of the knee, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. This may lead to sequelae of pain and an inability to participate in desired activities. Multiple theories exist as to the true cause of the disorder, but none have been fully proven. One such proposed etiology is genetic causation. Familial cases of osteochondritis dissecans are rare, yet these cases offer support to growing evidence that may support a genetic link. This article describes osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the femoral trochlea in monozygotic (identical) twins. Both twins presented with similar symptoms 1 year apart. Neither twin had any clear inciting trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteochondral lesions in similar positions of the lateral trochlear of the same knee in both brothers. Osteochondral autograft transfer and tibial tubercle anteromedialization were performed on both patients. An identical postoperative protocol was followed, and recovery with full return to sport was comparable for the brothers. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 other case report exists of osteochondritis dissecans lesions in monozygotic twins. Although debate continues regarding the true etiology of this disorder, cases of identical twins presenting with a similar disease process are highly suggestive of a genetic component and may lead to early identification and treatment of these lesions. Continued research in the area of osteochondritis dissecans and its genetic basis is needed to completely understand this disorder. PMID:24025016

  1. Repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits with ectopically produced cartilage.

    PubMed

    Emans, Pieter J; Hulsbosch, Martine; Wetzels, Gwendolyn M R; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; Kuijer, Roel

    2005-01-01

    Cartilage has poor regenerative capacity. Donor site morbidity and interference with joint homeostasis should be considered when applying the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique. The use of ectopically produced cartilage, derived from periosteum, might be a novel method to heal cartilage defects. Ectopic cartilage was produced by dissecting a piece of periosteum from the tibia of rabbits. After 14 days the reactive tissue at the dissection site was harvested and a graft was cored out and press-fit implanted in an osteochondral defect in the medial condyle of the femur with or without addition of hyaluronan. After 3 weeks and 3 months the repair reaction was evaluated by histology. Thionine- and collagen type II-stained sections were evaluated for graft viability, ingrowth of the graft, and joint surface repair. Empty defects remained empty 3 weeks after implantation, ectopic cartilage filled the defect to the level of the surrounding cartilage. Histologically, the grafts were viable, consisting mainly of cartilage, and showed a variable pattern of ingrowth. Three months after implantation empty defects with or without hyaluronan were filled primarily with fibrocartilaginous tissue. Defects treated with ectopic cartilage contained mixtures of fibrocartilaginous and hyaline cartilage. Sometimes a tidemark was observed in the new articular cartilage and the orientation of the cells resembled that of healthy articular cartilage. Subchondral bone repair was excellent. The modified O'Driscoll scores for empty defects without and with hyaluronan were 12.7 +/- 6.4 and 15.3 +/- 3.2; for treated defects scores were better (15.4 +/- 3.9 and 18.2 +/- 2.9). In this conceptual study the use of ectopic cartilage derived from periosteum appears to be a promising novel method for joint surface repair in rabbits.

  2. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  3. Modeling of the Near Field Coupling Between an External Loop and an Implantable Spiral Chip Antennas in Biosensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the near field coupling between an external hand-held loop antenna and an implantable miniature (1x1 mm) printed square spiral chip antenna used in bio-MEMS sensors for contact-less powering and RF telemetry is investigated. The loop and the spiral are inductively coupled and effectively form a transformer. The numerical results include the quasi-stationary magnetic field pattern of the implanted antenna, near zone wave impedance as a function of the radial distance and the values of the lumped elements in the equivalent circuit model for the transformer.

  4. OSTEOCHONDRAL INTERFACE REGENERATION OF THE RABBIT KNEE WITH MACROSCOPIC GRADIENTS OF BIOACTIVE SIGNALS

    PubMed Central

    Dormer, Nathan H.; Singh, Milind; Zhao, Liang; Mohan, Neethu; Berkland, Cory J.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    To date, most interfacial tissue engineering approaches have utilized stratified designs, in which there are two or more discrete layers comprising the interface. Continuously-graded interfacial designs, where there is no discrete transition from one tissue type to another, are gaining attention as an alternative to stratified designs. Given that osteochondral regeneration holds the potential to enhance cartilage regeneration by leveraging the healing capacity of the underlying bone, we endeavored to introduce a continuously graded approach to osteochondral regeneration. The purpose of this study was thus to evaluate the performance of a novel gradient-based scaffolding approach to regenerate osteochondral defects in the New Zealand White rabbit femoral condyle. Bioactive plugs were constructed from poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres with a continuous gradient transition between cartilage-promoting and bone-promoting growth factors. At six and 12 weeks of healing, results suggested that the implants provided support for the neo-synthesized tissue, and the gradient in bioactive signaling may have been beneficial for bone and cartilage regeneration compared to the blank control implant, as evidenced by histology. In addition, the effects of pre-seeding gradient scaffolds with umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UCMSCs) from the Wharton’s jelly of New Zealand White rabbits were evaluated. Results indicated that there may be regenerative benefits to pre-localizing UCMSCs within scaffold interiors. The inclusion of bioactive factors in a gradient-based scaffolding design is a promising new treatment strategy for defect repair in the femoral condyle. PMID:22009693

  5. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  6. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  7. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  8. Intraoral corrosion resulting from coupling dental implants and restorative metallic systems.

    PubMed

    Lemons, J E; Lucas, L C; Johansson, B I

    1992-01-01

    Materials used for the construction of dental restorations and implants include a wide range of metals and alloys, ceramics and carbons, and polymers. When metals and alloys are placed in direct contact in the oral cavity, a galvanic cell can be formed that may compromise the longevity of one or more of the materials in the couple. In vitro electrochemical corrosion analyses have proven to be a valuable tool for providing guidance on the selection of metallic materials. These analyses can provide basic data on electrochemical potentials, current rates, and the evaluation of galvanic corrosion conditions. This article seeks to provide the clinician with information that can be valuable in the selection of metallic materials that may be placed in direct contact with one another in the oral cavity.

  9. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthroscopy for Osteochondral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Thomas I; Kern, Michael; Marcel, John; Butler, Alexander; McGuigan, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Small-joint arthroscopy has supplanted open procedures because it offers the potential for improvement in joint visualization, reduced scarring, and accelerated recovery. Despite these advantages, arthroscopy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is not commonly performed and reports of its use are lacking. The reason for this is not clear but may be because of perceived technical complexity and poorly defined indications. In our experience, however, arthroscopy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint is a versatile procedure that facilitates treatment of many different pathologic processes through a minimally invasive approach with few complications. We present our technique for arthroscopic management of osteochondral lesions of the hallux. PMID:27656371

  10. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; da Rosa Pereira, Hamilton; de Sá Carneiro, Carlos Augusto; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Deffune, Elenice

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration) and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries. PMID:25518022

  11. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; van den Ende, Kimberly IM; ten Brinke, Bart; Eygendaal, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a disorder of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. In the elbow, an OCD is localized most commonly at the humeral capitellum. Teenagers engaged in sports that involve repetitive stress on the elbow are at risk. A high index of suspicion is warranted to prevent delay in the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may disclose the lesion but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are more accurate in the detection of OCD. To determine the best treatment option it is important to differentiate between stable and unstable OCD lesions. Stable lesions can be initially treated nonoperatively with elbow rest or activity modification and physical therapy. Unstable lesions and stable lesions not responding to conservative therapy require a surgical approach. Arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing has become the standard initial procedure for treatment of capitellar OCD. Numerous other surgical options have been reported, including internal fixation of large fragments and osteochondral autograft transfer. The aim of this article is to provide a current concepts review of the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of elbow OCD. PMID:26925381

  12. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant-abutment couples.

    PubMed

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant-abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt-chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (P<0.05). Titanium was the highest element to be released regardless of abutment size or connection (P<0.05). SEM images showed pitting corrosion prominent on the outer borders of the implant and abutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant-abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant-abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  13. Effects and complications of placement of motility coupling post in porous polyethylene orbital implants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hong-guang; Hu, Rong-rong; Li, Hui-yan; Han, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects and complications of primary and secondary placements of motility coupling post (MCP) in the unwrapped porous polyethylene orbital implant (PPOI) following enucleation. Methods: We investigated 198 patients who received PPOI implantation following the standard enucleation procedure in the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, from 2002 to 2004. These patients were subgrouped into PPOI-only patients (112 cases, received PPOI following enucleation), primary MCP patients (46 cases, received primary placement of MCP during PPOI operation), and secondary MCP patients (40 cases, received secondary placement of MCP 6 months after the initial surgery). Effects and complications among these three groups were compared. Results: The PPOI-only patients took shorter treatment course when compared with other two MCP groups (P<0.001), without significant difference noted between the two MCP groups. However, the two MCP groups had better prosthetic motility than PPOI-only group (P<0.001), without significant difference between the two MCP groups. In the early stage, 2 eyes in the PPOI-only group and 1 eye in the primary MCP group had PPOI infection. In PPOI-only group, 3 (2.68%) eyes had PPOI exposure, which occurred after fitting the prostheses; 4 eyes (8.70%) in primary MCP group and 1 eye (2.50%) in secondary MCP had PPOI exposure, which occurred before fitting the prostheses. After prosthesis was fit successfully, the excessive discharge and granuloma were 33.9% and 1.79% in PPOI group-only, 53.3% and 8.9% in primary MCP group, and 52.5% and 7.5% in secondary MCP group, respectively. Conclusion: Both primary and secondary placements of MCP into the PPOI following enucleation can help patients to obtain desirable prosthetic motility, but may be associated with more complications. The primary placement of MCP with skilled operation in selected patients is more recommendable than secondary

  14. Treatment of unstable osteochondritis dissecans in adults with autogenous osteochondral grafts (Mosaicplasty): long-term results

    PubMed Central

    RONGA, MARIO; STISSI, PLACIDO; LA BARBERA, GIUSEPPE; VALOROSO, MARCO; ANGERETTI, GLORIA; GENOVESE, EUGENIO; CHERUBINO, PAOLO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD-type II and III according to the ICRS classification) of the knee largher than > 2.5 cm2 in adults are uncommon lesions and there is no consensus on how to treat them. Medium-term studies have reported good results using autogenous osteochondral plugs (mosaicplasty). The aim of this study is to analyze the long-term results of this technique for the treatment of unstable OCD in a selected group of adult patients. Methods four patients with OCD at either one of the femoral condyles were included in this prospective study. The average age was 21.2 years (range, 18–24 years). The OCD lesions were classified as type II in three patients and type III in one patient and the average size was 3.8 cm2 (range, 2.55–5.1 cm2). The lesions were treated in situ with a variable number of autogenous osteochondral plugs (Ø 4.5 mm2). The Modified Cincinnati, Lysholm II and Tegner scores were used for clinical and functional evaluation. Magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) was performed before surgery and at 2, 5 and 10 years after surgery. A modified MOCART score was used to evaluate MRA findings. Results the average follow-up duration was ten years and 6 months (range, 10–11 years). No complications occurred. At the final follow-up, all scores (clinical, functional and MOCART) improved. In all but one of the patients MRA showed complete osteochondral repair. Conclusions the fixation of large and unstable OCD lesions with mosaicplasty may be a good option for treating type II or III OCD lesions in adults. The advantages of this technique include stable fixation, promotion of blood supply to the base of the OCD fragment, and grafting of autologous cancellous bone that stimulates healing with preservation of the articular surface. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26904522

  15. Design and characterization of a tissue-engineered bilayer scaffold for osteochondral tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Lazzarini, Erica; Ceseracciu, Luca; Barone, Alberto C; Quarto, Rodolfo; Scaglione, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects relies on osteochondral bilayer grafts, which mimic the microenvironment and structure of the two affected tissues: articular cartilage and subchondral bone. However, the integrity and stability of the grafts are hampered by the presence of a weak interphase, generated by the layering processes of scaffold manufacturing. We describe here the design and development of a bilayer monolithic osteochondral graft, avoiding delamination of the two distinct layers but preserving the cues for selective generation of cartilage and bone. A highly porous polycaprolactone-based graft was obtained by combining solvent casting/particulate leaching techniques. Pore structure and interconnections were designed to favour in vivo vascularization only at the bony layer. Hydroxyapatite granules were added as bioactive signals at the site of bone regeneration. Unconfined compressive tests displayed optimal elastic properties and low residual deformation of the graft after unloading (< 3%). The structural integrity of the graft was successfully validated by tension fracture tests, revealing high resistance to delamination, since fractures were never displayed at the interface of the layers (n = 8). Ectopic implantation of grafts in nude mice, after seeding with bovine trabecular bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, resulted in thick areas of mature bone surrounding ceramic granules within the bony layer, and a cartilaginous alcianophilic matrix in the chondral layer. Vascularization was mostly observed in the bony layer, with a statistically significant higher blood vessel density and mean area. Thus, the easily generated osteochondral scaffolds, since they are mechanically and biologically functional, are suitable for tissue-engineering applications for cartilage repair.

  16. Emerging genetic basis of osteochondritis dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Bates, J. Tyler; Jacobs, John C.; Shea, Kevin G.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies provide an unbiased approach in the identification of genes that increase the risk for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). OCD is a disorder of the bone and cartilage that affects humans, horses, pigs, dogs, and other mammals. Recent genome-wide association studies in humans, horses, and pigs are reviewed and genes identified. The identified genes tended to cluster with respect to function and biological processes such as the protein secretion pathway, extracellular matrix molecules, and growth plate maturation. Genome-wide association studies in humans are a critical next step in the effort to provide a better understanding of the causes of OCD, which will, in turn, allow preventive strategies for treatment of adolescent and young adults who are at risk for the development of degenerative joint disease due to the effects of OCD. PMID:24698039

  17. Osteochondral diseases and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Morales-Piga, Antonio; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias like thanatophoric dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfecta, achondroplasia, and other genetic skeletal disorders like fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are infrequently seen in clinical practice. In cases of sporadic achondroplasia as well as in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, there is a strong association with paternal age, a relationship that is less evident in other genetic osteochondral diseases. No other constitutional or environmental factor has proven to be associated with these disorders. The use of prenatal ultrasonography as a routine component of prenatal care is crucial in the early suspicion of osteochondrodysplasias whereas definitive diagnosis is usually obtained by pre-natal molecular analysis. In the case of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, recognition of congenital great toe malformations associated with rapidly-appearing soft tissue swelling is sufficient to make the proper clinical diagnosis, which can be confirmed by genetic testing. Large regional centres will improve diagnosis performance, provide accurate genetic counselling, and ensure an integral assistance for these often severe and incapacitating conditions.

  18. The effects of ion implantation on the tribology of perfluoropolyether-lubricated 440C stainless steel couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley; Jones, William R., Jr.; Wilbur, Paul J.; Pilar, Herrera-Fierro; Williamson, Don L.

    1995-01-01

    The lubricating lifetime of thin films of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) based on hexafluoropropene oxide in the presence of ion implanted 440C stainless steel is presented. Stainless steel discs, either unimplanted or implanted with N2, C, Ti, Ti + N2, or Ti + C had a thin film of PFPE (60-400 A) applied to them reproducibly (+/- 20 percent) and uniformly (+/- 15 percent) using a device developed for this study. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding-wear cycles required to induce an increase in the friction coefficient from an initial value characteristic of the lubricated wear couple to a final, or failure value, characteristic of an unlubricated, unimplanted couple. The tests were performed in a dry nitrogen atmosphere (less than 1 percent RH) at room temperature using a 3 N normal load with a relative sliding speed of 0.05 m/s. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was increased by an order of magnitude by implanting the disc with Ti. Ranked from most to least effective, the implanted species were: Ti; Ti+C; unimplanted; N2; C approximately equals Ti+N2. The mechanism postulated to explain these results involves the formation of a passivating or reactive layer which inhibits or facilitates the production of active sites. The corresponding surface microstructures induced by ion implantation, obtained using x-ray diffraction and conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy, ranked from most to least effective in enhancing lubricant lifetime were: amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti; amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-C + TiC; unimplanted; epsilon-(Fe,Cr)(sub x)N, x = 2 or 3; amorphous Fe-Cr-C approximately equals amorphous Fe-Cr-Ti-N.

  19. Effect of tissue culture storage on the in vivo survival of canine osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Oates, K M; Chen, A C; Young, E P; Kwan, M K; Amiel, D; Convery, F R

    1995-07-01

    In vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that the biomechanical and biochemical characteristics of osteochondral grafts can be preserved for as long as 28 days under tissue culture conditions. This study represents an attempt to extend these results to an in vivo model. In adult mongrel dogs, either an autograft, a fresh allograft, or a stored allograft was placed in a standardized defect on the weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle. The stored grafts were kept at 4 degrees C in tissue culture medium for 14 days prior to implantation. The animals were killed at 12 weeks. Cartilage from the contralateral knee served as a control. The modulus and permeability of the cartilage were assessed with confined compression creep tests. The collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents were measured, and the cartilage was analyzed histologically with hematoxylin and eosin and safranin O stains. Grossly, the cartilage appeared viable at harvest. The histologic results were similar in the treatment groups, with the same spectrum of mild degenerative changes being noted in each group. The glycosaminoglycan content was significantly less in the autograft group than in its control group and than in the fresh allograft group. The glycosaminoglycan content did not differ significantly between fresh and stored allografts. The collagen content, modulus, and permeability did not differ either between experimental and control groups or between graft types. Our results support the conclusion that osteochondral allografts can be stored for as many as 14 days without significantly affecting the results of the procedure.

  20. Effect of porosities of bilayered porous scaffolds on spontaneous osteochondral repair in cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-bilayered scaffolds with the same porosity or different ones on the two layers were fabricated, and the porosity effect on in vivo repairing of the osteochondral defect was examined in a comparative way for the first time. The constructs of scaffolds and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were implanted into pre-created osteochondral defects in the femoral condyle of New Zealand white rabbits. After 12 weeks, all experimental groups exhibited good cartilage repairing according to macroscopic appearance, cross-section view, haematoxylin and eosin staining, toluidine blue staining, immunohistochemical staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction of characteristic genes. The group of 92% porosity in the cartilage layer and 77% porosity in the bone layer resulted in the best efficacy, which was understood by more biomechanical mimicking of the natural cartilage and subchondral bone. This study illustrates unambiguously that cartilage tissue engineering allows for a wide range of scaffold porosity, yet some porosity group is optimal. It is also revealed that the biomechanical matching with the natural composite tissue should be taken into consideration in the design of practical biomaterials, which is especially important for porosities of a multi-compartment scaffold concerning connected tissues. PMID:26813511

  1. Continuous gradients of material composition and growth factors for effective regeneration of the osteochondral interface.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Neethu; Dormer, Nathan H; Caldwell, Kenneth L; Key, Vincent H; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2011-11-01

    Most contemporary biomaterial designs for osteochondral regeneration utilize monolithic, biphasic, or even multiphasic constructs. We have introduced a microsphere-based approach to create a continuous gradient in both material composition and encapsulated growth factors. The gradients were fabricated by filling a cylindrical mold with opposing gradients of two different types of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. The chondrogenic microspheres were loaded with transforming growth factor-β1, whereas the osteogenic microspheres contained bone morphogenetic protein-2 with or without nanophase hydroxyapatite. The gradient scaffolds (material gradient only, signal gradient only, or material/signal gradient combination) or blank control scaffolds were implanted in 3.5 mm-diameter defects in rabbit knees for 6 or 12 weeks. This is the first in vivo evaluation of these novel gradient scaffolds in the knee. The gross morphology, MRI, and histology indicated that the greatest extent of regeneration was achieved when both signal and material gradients were included together. This combination resulted in complete bone ingrowth, with an overlying cartilage layer with high glycosaminoglycan content, appropriate thickness, and integration with the surrounding cartilage and underlying bone. The results suggest that osteochondral regeneration may benefit from biomaterials that integrate a continuous gradient in both material composition and encapsulated growth factors.

  2. COMPARATIVE MACROSCOPIC STUDY OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS PRODUCED IN FEMURS OF RABBITS REPAIRED WITH BIOPOLYMER GEL CANE SUGAR

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque, Paulo Cezar Vidal Carneiro; dos Santos, Saulo Monteiro; de Andrade Aguiar, José Lamartine; Filho, Nicodemus Pontes; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira; Costa, Mariana Lúcia Correia Ramos; de Albuquerque Olbertz, Clarissa Miranda Carneiro; de Souza Almeida, Tarciana Mendonça; da Silva Santos, Alessandro Henrique; da Silva, Joacil Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of osteochondral defects produced in the femoral condyles of rabbits and filled with sugar cane biopolymer gel (SCBG), after 90, 120 and 180 days, and in comparison with a control group. Method: Sixteen adult New Zealand white rabbits aged 6 to 7 months, weighing between 2 and 2.5 kg and without locomotor system abnormalities were studied. In all the animals, a defect was made in the femoral condyles of the right and left knees, measuring 3.2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth, using a trephine. The animals were divided into two groups: study group formed by the right knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles received implants of SCBG; and control group formed by the left knees, in which the medial and lateral condyles were allowed to heal naturally. The knees were assessed 90, 120 and 180 days after the operation. After the animals had been sacrificed, the anatomical specimens were resected and placed in Bouin's solution. They were then photographed with a Nikon Coolpix 5400® coupled to a Nikon SM2800® stereoscopic loupe, to analyze the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing. Results: The results were evaluated using the chi-square test. There were no significant differences in the macroscopic assessments of healing between the study and control groups. Conclusion: With regard to the surface, coloring, consistency, continuity and healing of the defects, the macroscopic appearance of the tissue repaired with SCBG was similar to that of the control group. PMID:27027057

  3. The European Court legitimates access of Italian couples to assisted reproductive techniques and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Gulino, Matteo; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-07-01

    On 28 August 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) issued a judgment regarding the requirements for the legitimate access of couples to assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This judgment concerns the case of an Italian couple who found out after their first child was born with cystic fibrosis that they were healthy carriers of the disease. When the woman became pregnant again in 2010 and underwent fetal screening, it was found that the unborn child also had cystic fibrosis, whereupon she had the pregnancy terminated on medical grounds. In order to have the embryo genetically screened prior to implantation under the procedure of PGD, the couple sought to use in vitro fertilisation to have another child. Since article 1 of the Italian law strictly limits access to ART to sterile/infertile couples or those in which the man has a sexually transmissible disease, the couple appealed to the European court, raising the question of the violation of articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicants lodged a complaint that they were not allowed legitimate access to ART and to PGD to select an embryo not affected by the disease. The European Court affirmed that the prohibition imposed by Italian law violated article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Focusing on important regulatory and legal differences among EU Nations in providing ART treatments and PGD, we derived some important similarities and differences. PMID:24777348

  4. The European Court legitimates access of Italian couples to assisted reproductive techniques and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Frati, Paola; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Gulino, Matteo; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-07-01

    On 28 August 2012, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) issued a judgment regarding the requirements for the legitimate access of couples to assisted reproductive techniques (ART) and to pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This judgment concerns the case of an Italian couple who found out after their first child was born with cystic fibrosis that they were healthy carriers of the disease. When the woman became pregnant again in 2010 and underwent fetal screening, it was found that the unborn child also had cystic fibrosis, whereupon she had the pregnancy terminated on medical grounds. In order to have the embryo genetically screened prior to implantation under the procedure of PGD, the couple sought to use in vitro fertilisation to have another child. Since article 1 of the Italian law strictly limits access to ART to sterile/infertile couples or those in which the man has a sexually transmissible disease, the couple appealed to the European court, raising the question of the violation of articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The applicants lodged a complaint that they were not allowed legitimate access to ART and to PGD to select an embryo not affected by the disease. The European Court affirmed that the prohibition imposed by Italian law violated article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Focusing on important regulatory and legal differences among EU Nations in providing ART treatments and PGD, we derived some important similarities and differences.

  5. Repair of articular osteochondral defects of the knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Y. M.; Yu, Q. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The major problem with repair of an articular cartilage injury is the extensive difference in the structure and function of regenerated, compared with normal cartilage. Our work investigates the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects in the canine knee joint using a composite lamellar scaffold of nano-ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP)/collagen (col) I and II with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and assesses its biological compatibility. Methods The bone–cartilage scaffold was prepared as a laminated composite, using hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAP)/collagen I/copolymer of polylactic acid–hydroxyacetic acid as the bony scaffold, and sodium hyaluronate/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as the cartilaginous scaffold. Ten-to 12-month-old hybrid canines were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. BMSCs were obtained from the iliac crest of each animal, and only those of the third generation were used in experiments. An articular osteochondral defect was created in the right knee of dogs in both groups. Those in the experimental group were treated by implanting the composites consisting of the lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II/BMSCs. Those in the control group were left untreated. Results After 12 weeks of implantation, defects in the experimental group were filled with white semi-translucent tissue, protruding slightly over the peripheral cartilage surface. After 24 weeks, the defect space in the experimental group was filled with new cartilage tissues, finely integrated into surrounding normal cartilage. The lamellar scaffold of ß-TCP/col I/col II was gradually degraded and absorbed, while new cartilage tissue formed. In the control group, the defects were not repaired. Conclusion This method can be used as a suitable scaffold material for the tissue-engineered repair of articular cartilage defects. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:56–64 PMID:25837672

  6. Cell-free multi-layered collagen-based scaffolds demonstrate layer specific regeneration of functional osteochondral tissue in caprine joints.

    PubMed

    Levingstone, Tanya J; Ramesh, Ashwanth; Brady, Robert T; Brama, Pieter A J; Kearney, Clodagh; Gleeson, John P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2016-05-01

    Developing repair strategies for osteochondral tissue presents complex challenges due to its interfacial nature and complex zonal structure, consisting of subchondral bone, intermediate calcified cartilage and the superficial cartilage regions. In this study, the long term ability of a multi-layered biomimetic collagen-based scaffold to repair osteochondral defects is investigated in a large animal model: namely critical sized lateral trochlear ridge (TR) and medial femoral condyle (MC) defects in the caprine stifle joint. The study thus presents the first data in a clinically applicable large animal model. Scaffold fixation and early integration was demonstrated at 2 weeks post implantation. Macroscopic analysis demonstrated improved healing in the multi-layered scaffold group compared to empty defects and a market approved synthetic polymer osteochondral scaffold groups at 6 and 12 months post implantation. Radiological analysis demonstrated superior subchondral bone formation in both defect sites in the multi-layered scaffold group as early as 3 months, with complete regeneration of subchondral bone by 12 months. Histological analysis confirmed the formation of well-structured subchondral trabecular bone and hyaline-like cartilage tissue in the multi-layered scaffold group by 12 months with restoration of the anatomical tidemark. Demonstration of improved healing following treatment with this natural polymer scaffold, through the recruitment of host cells with no requirement for pre-culture, shows the potential of this device for the treatment of patients presenting with osteochondal lesions.

  7. [Femoral head chondroblastoma and reconstruction with osteochondral allograft. Case report].

    PubMed

    Orlando-Díaz, C; Guzmán-Vargas, R; Rincon-Cardozo, D F; Mantilla-León, N; Camacho-Casas, J A

    2014-01-01

    Femoral head chondroblastoma is an infrequent tumor, accounting for approximately 1-2% of benign bone tumors. It occurs more frequently in young male patients. It's most frequent locations include the proximal humerus, proximal femur, distal femur and proximal tibia. The femoral head is the third most frequent site of this tumor. There is no specific treatment for this entity; reported treatments range from acetabular osteotomies and osteochondral grafts, to vascularized fibular grafts, all of them with good results. However, this tumor is clinically unpredictable if left untreated. We report a case managed with osteochondral graft and followed-up for three years after the surgical procedure.

  8. [Femoral head chondroblastoma and reconstruction with osteochondral allograft. Case report].

    PubMed

    Orlando-Díaz, C; Guzmán-Vargas, R; Rincon-Cardozo, D F; Mantilla-León, N; Camacho-Casas, J A

    2014-01-01

    Femoral head chondroblastoma is an infrequent tumor, accounting for approximately 1-2% of benign bone tumors. It occurs more frequently in young male patients. It's most frequent locations include the proximal humerus, proximal femur, distal femur and proximal tibia. The femoral head is the third most frequent site of this tumor. There is no specific treatment for this entity; reported treatments range from acetabular osteotomies and osteochondral grafts, to vascularized fibular grafts, all of them with good results. However, this tumor is clinically unpredictable if left untreated. We report a case managed with osteochondral graft and followed-up for three years after the surgical procedure. PMID:26016291

  9. Arthroscopic Management of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral fractures of the ankle are typically caused by traumatic injuries of the ankle. Repetitive trauma can lead to further cartilage damage with subsequent increasing size of the lesion, ultimately leading to severe cartilage disorder and degenerative arthritis of the ankle. Arthroscopic bone marrow stimulation has been shown to be a highly successful option for patients with small osteochondral lesions. Studies show a higher failure rate for larger lesions and cystic changes that disrupt the subchondral plate. The threshold size seems to be 150 mm(2). PMID:27599437

  10. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqiu; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110mAg from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent experimental efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. The nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  11. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  12. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  13. Osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum. Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Petrie, R S

    2001-07-01

    be chosen based on the size of the lesion and the integrity of the subchondral bone. Subchondral drilling and microfracture can only resurface defects and cannot reconstitute subchondral bone. Autologous chondrocyte implantation has limited ability to address subchondral bone loss, whereas autograft and allograft osteochondral transplantation can restore subchondral bone. Most authors would agree that there is no role currently for reduction and fixation of long-standing, free loose bodies. No consensus exists regarding acute dislodging of an in situ loose fragment. Long-term results after radiographic changes are present suggest a degenerative course in about half the patients. Whether the newer techniques of cartilage resurfacing will significantly impact the natural history of this process remains to be seen.

  14. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim TM; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino MMJ

    2015-01-01

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available. PMID:26716090

  15. Isolated osteochondral fracture of the metatarsal head of lesser toes.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2015-06-01

    Isolated fracture of the metatarsal head is very rare and no consensus has been reached regarding their best management. We reported four cases of isolated osteochondral fracture of the metatarsal head with different method of treatment to achieve the common goal of restoration of the congruity of the metatarsal head.

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans affecting the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Olley, S F; Leopard, P J

    1978-07-01

    A case of a single loose body occurring in the temporo-mandibular joint is described. It is probable that this case represents the degenerative process of osteochondritis dissecans, a condition not previously described in this joint. The essential features of this condition are noted as a comparison to the condition of synovial chondromatosis.

  17. Diagnosing, planning and evaluating osteochondral ankle defects with imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Christiaan Ja; Gerards, Rogier M; Opdam, Kim Tm; Terra, Maaike P; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2015-12-18

    This current concepts review outlines the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis, preoperative planning, and follow-up of osteochondral ankle defects. An osteochondral ankle defect involves the articular cartilage and subchondral bone (usually of the talus) and is mostly caused by an ankle supination trauma. Conventional radiographs are useful as an initial imaging tool in the diagnostic process, but have only moderate sensitivity for the detection of osteochondral defects. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more accurate imaging modalities. Recently, ultrasonography and single photon emission CT have been described for the evaluation of osteochondral talar defects. CT is the most valuable modality for assessing the exact location and size of bony lesions. Cartilage and subchondral bone damage can be visualized using MRI, but the defect size tends to be overestimated due to bone edema. CT with the ankle in full plantar flexion has been shown a reliable tool for preoperative planning of the surgical approach. Postoperative imaging is useful for objective assessment of repair tissue or degenerative changes of the ankle joint. Plain radiography, CT and MRI have been used in outcome studies, and different scoring systems are available.

  18. Spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle using a novel double-network hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional repair of articular osteochondral defects remains a major challenge not only in the field of knee surgery but also in tissue regeneration medicine. The purpose is to clarify whether the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in a large osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting a novel double-network (DN) gel at the bottom of the defect. Methods Twenty-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In the bilateral knees of each animal, we created an osteochondral defect having a diameter of 2.4-mm in the medial condyle. Then, in 21 rabbits, we implanted a DN gel plug into a right knee defect so that a vacant space of 1.5-mm depth (in Group I), 2.5-mm depth (in Group II), or 3.5-mm depth (in Group III) was left. In the left knee, we did not apply any treatment to the defect to obtain the control data. All the rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the gross and histological evaluations were performed. The remaining 4 rabbits underwent the same treatment as used in Group II, and real-time PCR analysis was performed at 4 weeks. Results The defect in Group II was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen. The Wayne's gross appearance and histology scores showed that Group II was significantly greater than Group I, III, and Control (p < 0.012). The relative expression level of type-2 collagen, aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs was significantly greater in Group II than in the control group (p < 0.023). Conclusions This study demonstrated that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in vivo in an osteochondral defect created in the femoral condyle by means of implanting the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect so that an approximately 2-mm deep vacant space was intentionally left in the defect. This fact has prompted us to propose an innovative strategy without cell culture to repair osteochondral lesions in the femoral

  19. Osteochondral defect repair using a polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid (PVA-PAAc) hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bichara, David A; Bodugoz-Sentruk, Hatice; Ling, Doris; Malchau, Erik; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2014-08-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels can be candidates for articular cartilage repair due to their high water content. We synthesized a PVA-poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel formulation and determined its ability to function as a treatment option for condylar osteochondral (OC) defects in a New Zealand white rabbit (NZWR) model for 12 weeks and 24 weeks. In addition to hydrogel OC implants, tensile bar-shaped hydrogels were also implanted subcutaneously to evaluate changes in mechanical properties as a function of in vivo duration. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in the water content measured in the OC hydrogel implant that was harvested after 12 weeks and 24 weeks, and non-implanted controls. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in the break stress, strain at break or modulus of the tensile bars either between groups. Histological analysis of the OC defect, synovial capsule and fibrous tissue around the tensile bars determined hydrogel biocompatibility. Twelve-week hydrogels were found to be in situ flush with the articular cartilage; meniscal tissue demonstrated an intact surface. Twenty-four week hydrogels protruded from the defect site due to lack of integration with subchondral tissue, causing fibrillation to the meniscal surface. Condylar micro-CT scans ruled out osteolysis and bone cysts of the subchondral bone, and no PVA-PAAc hydrogel contents were found in the synovial fluid. The PVA-PAAc hydrogel was determined to be fully biocompatible, maintained its properties over time, and performed well at the 12 week time point. Physical fixation of the PVA-PAAc hydrogel to the subchondral bone is required to ensure long-term performance of hydrogel plugs for OC defect repair.

  20. Xenoimplantation of an Extracellular-Matrix-Derived, Biphasic, Cell-Scaffold Construct for Repairing a Large Femoral-Head High-Load-Bearing Osteochondral Defect in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Yang; Yanhong, Zhao; Jiang, Peng; Shibi, Lu; Quanyi, Guo; Xinlong, Ma; Qun, Xia; Baoshan, Xu; Bin, Zhao; Aiyuan, Wang; Li, Zhang; Wengjing, Xu; Chao, Zeng

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to develop an ECM-derived biphasic scaffold and to investigate its regeneration potential loaded with BM-MSCs in repair of large, high-load-bearing osteochondral defects of the canine femoral head. The scaffolds were fabricated using cartilage and bone ECM as a cartilage and bone layer, respectively. Osteochondral constructs were fabricated using induced BM-MSCs and the scaffold. Osteochondral defects (11 mm diameter × 10 mm depth) were created on femoral heads of canine and treated with the constructs. The repaired tissue was evaluated for gross morphology, radiography, histological, biomechanics at 3 and 6 months after implantation. Radiography revealed that femoral heads slightly collapsed at 3 months and severely collapsed at 6 months. Histology revealed that some defects in femoral heads were repaired, but with fibrous tissue or fibrocartilage, and femoral heads with different degrees of collapse. The bone volume fraction was lower for subchondral bone than normal femoral bone at 3 and 6 months. Rigidity was lower in repaired subchondral bone than normal femoral bone at 6 months. The ECM-derived, biphasic scaffold combined with induced BM-MSCs did not successfully repair large, high-load-bearing osteochondral defects of the canine femoral head. However, the experience can help improve the technique of scaffold fabrication and vascularization. PMID:24737955

  1. Improvement in magnetic field immunity of externally-coupled transcutaneous energy transmission system for a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) that uses electromagnetic induction between the external and internal coils of a transformer is the most promising method to supply driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart without invasion. Induction-heating (IH) cookers generate magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with the external and internal coils of the transcutaneous transformer. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. Hence, it is necessary to improve the magnetic field immunity of the TET system. During operation of the system, if the transcutaneous transformer is in close proximity to an IH cooker, the electric power generated by the cooker and coupled to the transformer can drive the artificial heart system. To prevent this coupling, the external coil was shielded with a conductive shield that had a slit in it. This reduces the coupling between the transformer and the magnetic field generated by the induction cooker. However, the temperature of the shield increased due to heating by eddy currents. The temperature of the shield can be reduced by separating the IH cooker and the shield.

  2. Capacitive-coupling-based information transmission system for implantable devices: investigation of transmission mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Enoki, Naomichi

    2013-10-01

    Many medical electronic devices that can be implanted deep inside the body have been developed recently. These devices are designed to transmit the information that is collected inside the body to receiving antennas outside the body. In this work, we examine a method that uses a high-frequency current in the transmitting electrodes of the implanted device for the transmission of information to receiving electrodes attached to the body surface. To investigate the transmission mechanism and the factors that determines the optimum frequency, the output voltage V2 and the input and output impedance ( Zin and Zout) were analyzed by conducting a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic simulation. The results clearly show that the receiving part (electrodes and wire), including biological tissue, acts as a loop antenna. The maximum V2 value was obtained at the first parallel resonance frequency of Zout at 370 MHz under a load resistance of 1 MΩ. In contrast, the output current of the source increased at the series resonance frequency of Zin. The series resonance frequency could be adjusted to move a target frequency by adding an inductance between the source and the transmitting electrodes.

  3. Advancement of the Subchondral Bone Plate in Translational Models of Osteochondral Repair: Implications for Tissue Engineering Approaches.

    PubMed

    Orth, Patrick; Madry, Henning

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone plate advancement is of increasing relevance for translational models of osteochondral repair in tissue engineering (TE). Especially for therapeutic TE approaches, a basic scientific knowledge of its chronological sequence, possible etiopathogenesis, and clinical implications are indispensable. This review summarizes the knowledge on this topic gained from a total of 31 translational investigations, including 1009 small and large animals. Experimental data indicate that the advancement of the subchondral bone plate frequently occurs during the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects and following established articular cartilage repair approaches for chondral lesions such as marrow stimulation and TE-based strategies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation. Importantly, this subchondral bone reaction proceeds in a defined chronological and spatial pattern, reflecting both endochondral ossification and intramembranous bone formation. Subchondral bone plate advancement arises earlier in small animals and defects, but is more pronounced at the long term in large animals. Possible etiopathologies comprise a disturbed subchondral bone/articular cartilage crosstalk and altered biomechanical conditions or neovascularization. Of note, no significant correlation was found so far between subchondral bone plate advancement and articular cartilage repair. This evidence from translational animal models adverts to an increasing awareness of this previously underestimated pathology. Future research will shed more light on the advancement of the subchondral bone plate in TE models of cartilage repair. PMID:26066580

  4. Advancement of the Subchondral Bone Plate in Translational Models of Osteochondral Repair: Implications for Tissue Engineering Approaches.

    PubMed

    Orth, Patrick; Madry, Henning

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone plate advancement is of increasing relevance for translational models of osteochondral repair in tissue engineering (TE). Especially for therapeutic TE approaches, a basic scientific knowledge of its chronological sequence, possible etiopathogenesis, and clinical implications are indispensable. This review summarizes the knowledge on this topic gained from a total of 31 translational investigations, including 1009 small and large animals. Experimental data indicate that the advancement of the subchondral bone plate frequently occurs during the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects and following established articular cartilage repair approaches for chondral lesions such as marrow stimulation and TE-based strategies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation. Importantly, this subchondral bone reaction proceeds in a defined chronological and spatial pattern, reflecting both endochondral ossification and intramembranous bone formation. Subchondral bone plate advancement arises earlier in small animals and defects, but is more pronounced at the long term in large animals. Possible etiopathologies comprise a disturbed subchondral bone/articular cartilage crosstalk and altered biomechanical conditions or neovascularization. Of note, no significant correlation was found so far between subchondral bone plate advancement and articular cartilage repair. This evidence from translational animal models adverts to an increasing awareness of this previously underestimated pathology. Future research will shed more light on the advancement of the subchondral bone plate in TE models of cartilage repair.

  5. A Predictive Factor in Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Robby Singh; Wechter, John Francis; Alwan, Mujtaba; Tompkins, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Knee alignment is thought to have some bearing on the development of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions.1 The effect of proximal tibial morphology on the risk of OCD, however, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate proximal tibial morphology and its relationship to OCD lesions. The null hypothesis was that patients with OCD lesions would have no difference in medial and posterior tibial slope when comparing the affected side to the unaffected side and age matched controls. Methods: Using CPT codes, we identified 61 patients with unilateral OCD lesions of the medial femoral condyle seen at our institution from 2005-2010. On plain radiographs, medial tibial slope and posterior tibial slope were assessed by 2 residents and 1 attending. (Figure 1) Measurements were completed on affected, contralateral normal, and control knees. The controls were height, weight, and gender matched. In addition, a comparison was made between OCD patients requiring surgery and those without surgery. Inter-observer reliability for each measurement was determined using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). A student’s t-test was used to compare the results of the affected and normal sides. Results: The average patient age was 15.1 years. There were 31 right-sided lesions and 30 left- sided lesions. Medial tibial slope of the affected knee averaged 67.81 ± 3.92 (ICC(2,1) =.771, p<.01) compared to 69.44 ±3.63 (ICC(2,1) =.785, p<.01) for the normal side (p=.0070). The average posterior tibial slope for the affected knee was 80.03 ± 3.91 (ICC(2,1) =.783, p<.01) and 79.62 ± 4.37 (ICC(2,1) =.844, p<.01) for the normal side (p=.19). Matched controls had an average medial tibial slope 68.73° ± 5.81° (ICC(2,1) =.732, p<.01) which was statistically different from affected knees (p=.043). Matched controls had an average posterior tibial slope 81.13° ± 2.90° (ICC(2,1) =.797, p<.01), which was also statistically different from affected knees (p=.0068

  6. Donor-site morbidity after osteochondral autograft transfer procedures.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Botker, Jesse C

    2004-09-01

    We report on 2 patients who had donor-site morbidity after an autogenous osteochondral grafting was performed. Both patients had fibrocartilage hypertrophy at the donor sites that contributed to knee pain and occasional locking; the second patient also had a lack of fibrocartilaginous regrowth with symptomatic residual osteocartilaginous defects. Additional arthroscopic surgery was required in both cases to trim the fibrocartilage. In addition, for the second case, a fresh osteoarticular allograft was used to transfer osteocartilaginous plugs back into the original knee donor sites due to continued knee pain. When performing an osteochondral autograft transfer, the benefits provided at the recipient site must be weighed against the possible donor-site morbidity that may result.

  7. Inorganic-organic hybrid scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; McMahon, Rebecca E; Kanzelberger, Melissa A; Jimenez-Vergara, Andrea C; Grunlan, Melissa A; Hahn, Mariah S

    2010-07-01

    Ligament graft failure frequently results from poor integration of the replacement tissue with associated bone. Thus, the ability to regenerate the bone-ligament osteochondral interface would be advantageous in ligament reconstruction. At the osteochondral interface, the tissue transitions from a bone-like matrix to fibrocartilage. Therefore, a scaffold which promotes a spatially regulated transition in cell behavior from osteoblast-like to chondrocyte-like would be desirable. Previous research indicates that addition of inorganic components to organic scaffolds can enhance the deposition of bone-like matrix by associated osteoblasts. We therefore reasoned that a gradient in the inorganic content of a hybrid inorganic-organic scaffold may induce an osteochondral-like transition in cell phenotype and matrix production. To test this hypothesis, hydrogels were prepared from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and star poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS(star)). As anticipated, both the matrix deposition and phenotype of encapsulated osteoblasts varied with scaffold inorganic content, although the directionality of this modulation was contrary to expectation. Specifically, osteoblasts appeared to transdifferentiate into chondrocyte-like cells with increasing scaffold inorganic content, as indicated by increased chondroitin sulfate and collagen type II production and by upregulation of sox9, a transcription factor associated with chondrocytic differentiation. Furthermore, the deposition of bone-like matrix (collagen type I, calcium phosphate, and osteocalcin) decreased with increasing PDMS(star) content. The resistance of the PDMS(star)-PEG scaffolds to protein adsorption and/or the changes in gel modulus/mesh structure accompanying PDMS(star) incorporation may underlie the unexpected increase in chondrocytic phenotype with increasing inorganic content. Combined, the present results indicate that PDMS(star)-PEG hybrid gels may prove promising for osteochondral regeneration. (c) 2010

  8. Human growth hormone and the development of osteochondritis dissecans lesions.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Waqas M; Hussain, Haroon M; Hussain, Mohammed S; Ho, Sherwin S W

    2011-12-01

    No single etiology regarding the cause of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions is unanimously accepted. This report documents a novel case of multiple OCD lesions affecting the left knee and a solitary defect of the right elbow in a patient with acquired human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency and supplementation. hGH deficiency and hormone replacement may be related to the development of OCD lesions.

  9. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret A; Castro, Nathan J; Plesniak, Michael W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-14

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds. PMID:27606933

  10. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Margaret A.; Castro, Nathan J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  11. 3D printing of novel osteochondral scaffolds with graded microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Margaret A; Castro, Nathan J; Plesniak, Michael W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-10-14

    Osteochondral tissue has a complex graded structure where biological, physiological, and mechanical properties vary significantly over the full thickness spanning from the subchondral bone region beneath the joint surface to the hyaline cartilage region at the joint surface. This presents a significant challenge for tissue-engineered structures addressing osteochondral defects. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D bioprinters present a unique solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to use FDM-based 3D bioprinting and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite for improved bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion, growth, and osteochondral differentiation. FDM printing parameters can be tuned through computer aided design and computer numerical control software to manipulate scaffold geometries in ways that are beneficial to mechanical performance without hindering cellular behavior. Additionally, the ability to fine-tune 3D printed scaffolds increases further through our investment casting procedure which facilitates the inclusion of nanoparticles with biochemical factors to further elicit desired hMSC differentiation. For this study, FDM was used to print investment-casting molds innovatively designed with varied pore distribution over the full thickness of the scaffold. The mechanical and biological impacts of the varied pore distributions were compared and evaluated to determine the benefits of this physical manipulation. The results indicate that both mechanical properties and cell performance improve in the graded pore structures when compared to homogeneously distributed porous and non-porous structures. Differentiation results indicated successful osteogenic and chondrogenic manipulation in engineered scaffolds.

  12. Osteochondral allograft transplantation for treatment of glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Chapovsky, Felix; Kelly, John D

    2005-08-01

    The intimate contact between articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid labrum contribute to glenohumeral stability. When the articular surface area of these 2 surfaces is decreased, as with the presence of a bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, the shoulder is more prone to dislocation. Although osteochondral allograft transplantation has become widely popular for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee, it is less used for treating bony defects of the humeral head. We present a case in which a 16-year-old male athlete with multiple anterior shoulder dislocations underwent arthroscopic repair of a Bankart lesion. His arthroscopic repair ultimately failed and on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging he was found to have a large, engaging Hill-Sachs defect. He underwent arthroscopic osteochondral allograft transplantation to correct the humeral head bony deformity. As of the 1-year follow-up, the patient has had no recurrences and had returned to his normal level of activity.

  13. Review of the biomechanics and biotribology of osteochondral grafts used for surgical interventions in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Bowland, Philippa; Ingham, E; Jennings, Louise; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    A review of research undertaken to evaluate the biomechanical stability and biotribological behaviour of osteochondral grafts in the knee joint and a brief discussion of areas requiring further improvement in future studies are presented. The review takes into consideration osteochondral autografts, allografts, tissue engineered constructs and synthetic and biological scaffolds. PMID:26614801

  14. Analysis and optimization of spiral circular inductive coupling link for bio-implanted applications on air and within human tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  15. Analysis and Optimization of Spiral Circular Inductive Coupling Link for Bio-Implanted Applications on Air and within Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mutashar, Saad; Hannan, Mahammad A.; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    The use of wireless communication using inductive links to transfer data and power to implantable microsystems to stimulate and monitor nerves and muscles is increasing. This paper deals with the development of the theoretical analysis and optimization of an inductive link based on coupling and on spiral circular coil geometry. The coil dimensions offer 22 mm of mutual distance in air. However, at 6 mm of distance, the coils offer a power transmission efficiency of 80% in the optimum case and 73% in the worst case via low input impedance, whereas, transmission efficiency is 45% and 32%, respectively, via high input impedance. The simulations were performed in air and with two types of simulated human biological tissues such as dry and wet-skin using a depth of 6 mm. The performance results expound that the combined magnitude of the electric field components surrounding the external coil is approximately 98% of that in air, and for an internal coil, it is approximately 50%, respectively. It can be seen that the gain surrounding coils is almost constant and confirms the omnidirectional pattern associated with such loop antennas which reduces the effect of non-alignment between the two coils. The results also show that the specific absorption rate (SAR) and power loss within the tissue are lower than that of the standard level. Thus, the tissue will not be damaged anymore. PMID:24984057

  16. Controlled surface modification of Ti-40Nb implant alloy by electrochemically assisted inductively coupled RF plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, Markus; Rohnke, Marcus; Helth, Arne; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Gebert, Annett; Eckert, Jürgen; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Low temperature metal oxidation induced by plasma in the absence of liquid electrolytes can be useful for the surface preparation of orthopedic devices since residues from these may be harmful and need to be removed before implantation. In this study the oxidation of Ti-40Nb for biomedical application was achieved by employing an inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The correlation between the growth mode of the surface oxide and the electric conductivity ratio of the plasma and the oxide phase were studied by varying the sample temperature, oxygen gas pressure and additional bias potential. The plasma treated samples were characterised by confocal laser microscopy, SEM, EBSD, XPS, TEM and ToF-SIMS. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. Well adhering oxide layers consisting of TiO2 and Nb2O5 with thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were obtained. Surface roughness values and microstructure indicate that the growth mode of the oxide can be well controlled by the sample temperature and oxygen gas pressure. At temperatures above 450°C a migration of Ti ions towards the surface controls the growth process. A bias potential higher than +50 V causes rough and defective surfaces with high surface energies. PMID:23891813

  17. Repair of large osteochondral defects in rabbits using porous hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAp/Col) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maehara, Hidetsugu; Sotome, Shinichi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Torigoe, Ichiro; Kawasaki, Yuichi; Sugata, Yumi; Yuasa, Masato; Hirano, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Naomi; Kikuchi, Masanori; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Okawa, Atsushi

    2010-05-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-renewal. This article reports the development of a porous hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAp/Col) scaffold as a bone void filler and a vehicle for drug administration. The scaffold consists of HAp nanocrystals and type I atelocollagen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of porous HAp/Col impregnated with FGF-2 to repair large osteochondral defects in a rabbit model. Ninety-six cylindrical osteochondral defects 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth were created in the femoral trochlear groove of the right knee. Animals were assigned to one of four treatment groups: porous HAp/Col impregnated with 50 microl of FGF-2 at a concentration of 10 or 100 microg/ml (FGF10 or FGF100 group); porous HAp/Col with 50 microl of PBS (HAp/Col group); and no implantation (defect group). The defect areas were examined grossly and histologically. Subchondral bone regeneration was quantified 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery. Abundant bone formation was observed in the HAp/Col implanted groups as compared to the defect group. The FGF10 group displayed not only the most abundant bone regeneration but also the most satisfactory cartilage regeneration, with cartilage presenting a hyaline-like appearance. These findings suggest that porous HAp/Col with FGF-2 augments the cartilage repair process.

  18. Isolated slipped-retroverted osteochondral fracture of second metatarsal head.

    PubMed

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin; Cicek, Engin Ilker; Kose, Ozkan

    2013-12-01

    Although metatarsal fractures are common, isolated intraarticular metatarsal head fractures are rare, and retroversion of the fracture segment is even rarer. Herein, a retroverted fracture of the second metatarsal head, which happened with a direct trauma from jumping from a height, was discussed with treatment options and finally a simple surgical trick was advised. There are only a few cases of isolated osteochondral and retroverted fractures of the metatarsal head in literature. The following is a rare case report of such an injury in a 19-year-old male.

  19. Osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hall, T L; Galea, A M

    1999-02-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is an inflammation of the bone and cartilage that usually affects adolescents and young adults. A 16-year-old baseball player who had chronic elbow pain illustrates the typical course of OCD of the elbow. Radiographs may be diagnostic, but bone scan is a more sensitive diagnostic tool, and magnetic resonance imaging offers information for staging and characterization of lesions. If symptoms do not resolve with rest, surgery is recommended, including loose-body removal with curettage or drilling. The prognosis is good with early diagnosis and treatment. Left untreated, OCD may progress to degenerative joint disease. Prevention includes strengthening and stretching exercises and limits on throwing activities.

  20. Apparatus for simulating dynamic interactions between the spinal cord and soft-coupled intradural implants.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, S; Oya, H; Reddy, C G; Dalm, B D; Shurig, R; Odden, K; Gillies, G T; Howard, M A

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, built, and tested an apparatus used for investigating the biomechanical response of a novel intradural spinal cord stimulator to the simulated physiological movement of the spinal cord within the thecal sac. In this apparatus, the rostral-caudal displacements of an anthropomorphic spinal cord surrogate can be controlled with a resolution of approximately 0.1% of a target value for up to 10(7) lateral movement cycles occurring at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Using this system, we have been able to determine that the restoring force of the stimulator's suspension system works in concert with the frictional coupling between the electrode array and the surrogate to overcome the 0.42 μN inertial force associated with the lateral motion of the array. The result is a positional stability of the array on the surrogate (in air) of better than 0.2 mm over ~500,000 movement cycles. Design modifications that might lead to improved physiological performance are discussed. PMID:24289414

  1. Apparatus for simulating dynamic interactions between the spinal cord and soft-coupled intradural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljoen, S.; Oya, H.; Reddy, C. G.; Dalm, B. D.; Shurig, R.; Odden, K.; Gillies, G. T.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    We have designed, built, and tested an apparatus used for investigating the biomechanical response of a novel intradural spinal cord stimulator to the simulated physiological movement of the spinal cord within the thecal sac. In this apparatus, the rostral-caudal displacements of an anthropomorphic spinal cord surrogate can be controlled with a resolution of approximately 0.1% of a target value for up to 107 lateral movement cycles occurring at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Using this system, we have been able to determine that the restoring force of the stimulator's suspension system works in concert with the frictional coupling between the electrode array and the surrogate to overcome the 0.42 μN inertial force associated with the lateral motion of the array. The result is a positional stability of the array on the surrogate (in air) of better than 0.2 mm over ˜500 000 movement cycles. Design modifications that might lead to improved physiological performance are discussed.

  2. Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings After Autologous Osteochondral Plug Grafts For Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Humeral Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Harada, Mikio; Satake, Hiroshi; Uno, Tomohiro; Takagi, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although good clinical outcomes of autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) have been reported, the timing of return to sports was various and still controversial. The period of graft incorporation and the lesion healing at repair site is important to establish the rehabilitation protocol, however there is little information. The aim of this study was to investigate early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical outcomes after autologous osteochondral plug grafts for capitellar OCD. Methods: Fifteen young baseball players with advanced lesions of capitellar OCD underwent a procedure using autologous osteochondral plug grafts and underwent MRI (1.5 T) scan at 3 and 6 months, postoperatively. Their mean age at the time of surgery was 13.5 years (range, 13-15 years). Four lesions were classified as International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) OCD III and 11 lesions as OCD IV. The mean size of the lesions (sagittal × coronal) was 16 × 14 mm and the mean surface area was 181 mm2. One to two osteochondral plug grafts, with a mean diameter of 7 mm (range, 6-8 mm), were harvested from the lateral femoral condyle and transplanted to the defects. The mean reconstruction rate was 41% (range, 12%-65%), which was calculated as (total surface area of the grafts × 100%)/ (surface area of the lesion). Patients were allowed to begin throwing after 3 months and to return to sports after 6 months. The mean follow-up was 21 months (range, 12-36 months). The MRI findings were assessed graft incorporation, which was indicated by no T1-low-signal-intensity at the graft and no fluid surrounding the graft on T2-weighted fat-suppression (Figure 1), and the lesion healing according to the scoring system of Henderson (4, complete healing; 16, no healing). MRI were blinded and randomized, and two observers reviewed independently and conferred when they differed. Clinical outcomes were evaluated as elbow pain

  3. Bone Marrow Aspiration Concentrate and Platelet Rich Plasma for Osteochondral Repair in a Porcine Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Betsch, Marcel; Schneppendahl, Johannes; Thuns, Simon; Herten, Monika; Sager, Martin; Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) may possess a high potency for cartilage and osseous defect healing because it contains stem cells and multiple growth factors. Alternatively, platelet rich plasma (PRP), which contains a cocktail of multiple growth factors released from enriched activated thrombocytes may potentially stimulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in bone marrow to proliferate and differentiate. Methods A critical size osteochondral defect (10×6 mm) in both medial femoral condyles was created in 14 Goettinger mini-pigs. All animals were randomized into the following four groups: biphasic scaffold alone (TRUFIT BGS, Smith & Nephew, USA), scaffold with PRP, scaffold with BMAC and scaffold in combination with BMAC and PRP. After 26 weeks all animals were euthanized and histological slides were cut, stained and evaluated using a histological score and immunohistochemistry. Results The thrombocyte number was significantly increased (p = 0.049) in PRP compared to whole blood. In addition the concentration of the measured growth factors in PRP such as BMP-2, BMP-7, VEGF, TGF-β1 and PDGF were significantly increased when compared to whole blood (p<0.05). In the defects of the therapy groups areas of chondrogenic tissue were present, which stained blue with toluidine blue and positively for collagen type II. Adding BMAC or PRP in a biphasic scaffold led to a significant improvement of the histological score compared to the control group, but the combination of BMAC and PRP did not further enhance the histological score. Conclusions The clinical application of BMAC or PRP in osteochondral defect healing is attractive because of their autologous origin and cost-effectiveness. Adding either PRP or BMAC to a biphasic scaffold led to a significantly better healing of osteochondral defects compared with the control group. However, the combination of both therapies did not further enhance healing. PMID:23951201

  4. Fibrin glue fixation of a digital osteochondral fracture: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Munir A; Ebert, Andrew M; Sanders, William E

    2002-05-01

    Surgical treatment options for digital osteochondral fractures are limited by the small amount of bone available for fixation and the propensity for digital stiffness with the introduction of hardware. Fibrin sealant is used in a variety of clinical settings as a biologic bonding agent and may circumvent the drawbacks of traditional fixation or simple excision for certain digital osteochondral injuries. Successful use of fibrin sealant fixation for a patient with an osteochondral fracture involving the proximal interphalangeal joint is documented, and the literature on fibrin sealant for osseous fixation is reviewed.

  5. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  6. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  7. Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Salih, Vehid; Beier, Justus P; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering has shown an increasing development to provide suitable strategies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage and underlying subchondral bone tissue. For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials. The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies. The objective of this review is to present and discuss approaches being proposed in osteochondral tissue engineering, which are focused on the application of various materials forming bilayered composite scaffolds, including polymers and ceramics, discussing the variety of scaffold designs and fabrication methods being developed. Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment. PMID:22452848

  8. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  9. The results of pregnancies after gender selection by pre implantation genetic diagnosis and its relation with couple's age

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Sorayya; Fahami, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-medical utilization of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), like sex selection, is increasing, therefore it is necessary to follow-up the health and outcome of fertilization and newborn's birth followed PGD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of fertilization after sex selection by PGD and the relation between the age of parents and the outcome of fertilization. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive correlative study conducted on 218 couples in Isfahan. Samples were selected through convenience sampling. The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and abortion, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns were gathered through reviewing medical files and phone interviews. Data was analyzed using independent t test and Pearson correlation test. Results: The rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy was 30.7% and 30.3% respectively, the rate of abortion was 26.9%, the frequency of success in achieving the desired sex was 100%, and the mean of gestational age and weight of newborns was 3260 (616) kg and 37.7 (2.07) weeks respectively. There was no significant relation between the age of parents and the rate of abortion, the rate of chemical and clinical pregnancy and newborn's gestational weight. But there was a significant relation between the age of men and gestational age of newborns (P = 0.04). Conclusions: PGD method was 100% successful in achieving the desired sex, but relatively high rate of abortion could indicate the effect of PGD on the embryo development process. PMID:26793251

  10. The use of embryonic cells in the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee: an ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PILICCHI, SUSANNA; ROCCA, STEFANO; POOL, ROY R.; DATTENA, MARIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; MARA, LAURA; CASU, SARA; SANNA, DANIELA; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; PASSINO, ERALDO SANNA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to determine whether local delivery of embryonic stem-like (ESL) cells into osteochondral defects in the femoral condyles of sheep would enhance regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. Methods male ESL cells embedded in fibrin glue were engrafted into osteochondral defects in the medial condyles (ESL-M) of the left femur in 22 ewes. An identical defect was created in the medial condyle of the contralateral stifle joint and left untreated as a control (empty defect, ED). The ewes were divided into 5 groups. Four sheep each were euthanized at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months from surgery, and 6 ewes were euthanized 24 months post-implantation. To study the effect of varying loads on the long-term regeneration process, an identical defect was also created and ESL cell engraftment performed in the lateral condyle (ESL-L) of the left stifle joint of the animals in the 12- and 24-month groups. The evaluation of regenerated tissue was performed by biomechanical, macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical (collagen type II) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays. Results no significant differences were found between treated and control sites in the biomechanical assays at any time point. ESL cell grafts showed significantly greater macroscopic evidence of regeneration as compared to controls at 24 months after surgery; significantly better histological evidence of repair in ESL-M samples versus controls was found throughout the considered period. At 24 months from surgery there was significantly improved integration of graft edges with the host tissue in the ESL-M as compared to the ESL-L samples, demonstrating that load bearing positively affects the long-term regeneration process. Conclusions ESL cells enhanced the regeneration of hyaline cartilage. FISH confirmed that the regenerative tissue originated from ESL cells. Clinical Relevance ESL cells are able to self-renew for prolonged periods without differentiation and, most

  11. The use of embryonic cells in the treatment of osteochondral defects of the knee: an ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PILICCHI, SUSANNA; ROCCA, STEFANO; POOL, ROY R.; DATTENA, MARIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; MARA, LAURA; CASU, SARA; SANNA, DANIELA; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; PASSINO, ERALDO SANNA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to determine whether local delivery of embryonic stem-like (ESL) cells into osteochondral defects in the femoral condyles of sheep would enhance regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. Methods male ESL cells embedded in fibrin glue were engrafted into osteochondral defects in the medial condyles (ESL-M) of the left femur in 22 ewes. An identical defect was created in the medial condyle of the contralateral stifle joint and left untreated as a control (empty defect, ED). The ewes were divided into 5 groups. Four sheep each were euthanized at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months from surgery, and 6 ewes were euthanized 24 months post-implantation. To study the effect of varying loads on the long-term regeneration process, an identical defect was also created and ESL cell engraftment performed in the lateral condyle (ESL-L) of the left stifle joint of the animals in the 12- and 24-month groups. The evaluation of regenerated tissue was performed by biomechanical, macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical (collagen type II) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assays. Results no significant differences were found between treated and control sites in the biomechanical assays at any time point. ESL cell grafts showed significantly greater macroscopic evidence of regeneration as compared to controls at 24 months after surgery; significantly better histological evidence of repair in ESL-M samples versus controls was found throughout the considered period. At 24 months from surgery there was significantly improved integration of graft edges with the host tissue in the ESL-M as compared to the ESL-L samples, demonstrating that load bearing positively affects the long-term regeneration process. Conclusions ESL cells enhanced the regeneration of hyaline cartilage. FISH confirmed that the regenerative tissue originated from ESL cells. Clinical Relevance ESL cells are able to self-renew for prolonged periods without differentiation and, most

  12. Evaluation of Cartilage Repair by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on a PEOT/PBT Scaffold in an Osteochondral Defect.

    PubMed

    Barron, V; Merghani, K; Shaw, G; Coleman, C M; Hayes, J S; Ansboro, S; Manian, A; O'Malley, G; Connolly, E; Nandakumar, A; van Blitterswijk, C A; Habibovic, P; Moroni, L; Shannon, F; Murphy, J M; Barry, F

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded polyethylene-oxide-terephthalate/polybutylene-terephthalate (PEOT/PBT) scaffold for cartilage tissue repair in an osteochondral defect using a rabbit model. Material characterisation using scanning electron microscopy indicated that the scaffold had a 3D architecture characteristic of the additive manufacturing fabrication method, with a strut diameter of 296 ± 52 μm and a pore size of 512 ± 22 μm × 476 ± 25 μm × 180 ± 30 μm. In vitro optimisation revealed that the scaffold did not generate an adverse cell response, optimal cell loading conditions were achieved using 50 μg/ml fibronectin and a cell seeding density of 25 × 10(6) cells/ml and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation after 28 days culture in the presence of TGFβ3 indicated positive chondrogenesis. Cell-seeded scaffolds were implanted in osteochondral defects for 12 weeks, with cell-free scaffolds and empty defects employed as controls. On examination of toluidine blue staining for chondrogenesis and GAG accumulation, both the empty defect and the cell-seeded scaffold appeared to promote repair. However, the empty defect and the cell-free scaffold stained positive for collagen type I or fibrocartilage, while the cell-seeded scaffold stained positive for collagen type II indicative of hyaline cartilage and was statistically better than the cell-free scaffold in the blinded histological evaluation. In summary, MSCs in combination with a 3D PEOT/PBT scaffold created a reparative environment for cartilage repair.

  13. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  14. Treatment of a traumatic osteochondral defect in the thumb carpometacarpal joint with a periosteal autograft.

    PubMed

    Stein, B E; Rosenwasser, M P

    1999-11-01

    We report a case in which an autogenous periosteal autograft was used to resurface a large osteochondral defect in the thumb carpometacarpal joint of a young woman. Good results were found at 4-year follow-up examination.

  15. Arthroscopic Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Thilo; Krauspe, Ruediger; Hufeland, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum is characterized by separation of a circumscript area of the articular surface and the subchondral bone in juvenile patients. In advanced lesions, arthroscopic fragment refixation or fragment removal with microfracturing or drilling can be successful. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an all-arthroscopic surgical technique for 3-dimensional purely autologous chondrocyte transplantation for osteochondral lesions of the humeral capitellum. PMID:27656389

  16. Biomarkers Affected by Impact Severity during Osteochondral Injury.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nicole Poythress; Stoker, Aaron M; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Cook, James L

    2015-06-01

    Osteochondral injury elevates the risk for developing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the relationship between impact severity during injury to cell viability and biomarkers possibly involved in PTOA. Osteochondral explants (6 mm, n = 72) were harvested from cadaveric femoral condyles (N = 6). Using a test machine, each explant (except for No Impact) was subjected to mechanical impact at a velocity of 100 mm/s to 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, or 1.25 mm maximum compression corresponding to Low, Low-Moderate, Moderate, Moderate-High, or High impact groups. Cartilage cell viability, collagen content, and proteoglycan content were assessed at either day 0 or after 12 days of culture. Culture media were assessed for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2); nitric oxide; granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); interferon gamma (IFNγ); interleukin (IL)-2, -4, -6, -7, -8, -10, -15, -18; interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10); keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (KC); monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1); tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα); and matrix metalloproteinase-2, -3, -8, -9, -13. There was increased impact energy absorbed for the High group compared with the Moderate-High group, Moderate group, and Low-Moderate group (p = 0.011, 0.048, 0.008, respectively). At day 0, there was decreased area cell viability for the High group compared with the Low-Moderate group (p = 0.035). At day 1, PGE2 was increased for the High group compared with the Moderate, Low-Moderate, Low, and No Impact groups (p ≤ 0.01). Cumulative PGE2 was increased for the Moderate-High and High groups compared with the Moderate, Low-Moderate, Low, and No Impact groups (p ≤ 0.036). At day 1, MCP-1 was increased for the Moderate-High and High groups compared with the Low and No Impact groups (p ≤ 0.032). Impact to osteochondral explants resulted in multiple levels of severity. PGE2 was sensitive to impact

  17. Adult osteochondritis dissecans and focussed ESWT: A successful treatment option.

    PubMed

    Thiele, S; Thiele, R; Gerdesmeyer, L

    2015-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has gained acceptance in the medical field and in the treatment of non-unions and delayed bone healing. ESWT has been used effectively for many years as a noninvasive surgical procedure. The idea of treating Osteochondritis dissecans of knee and talus arose in the middle of the 1990's. OCD is known as a pre-arthritic factor in the long-term and still there is no consistent treatment. In the literature there is still only a small number of publications but international societies for shockwave treatment are convinced that ESWT on OCD shows to be an effective and safe method in the treatment of OCD in the early stages. We want to summarize the actual data on the treatment of OCD by ESWT.

  18. Arthroscopic Microfracture for Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions of the Capitellum.

    PubMed

    Camp, Christopher L; Dines, Joshua S; Degen, Ryan M; Sinatro, Alec L; Altchek, David W

    2016-06-01

    Capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is one of the most common causes of elbow pain and dysfunction in adolescent athletes. It typically occurs in gymnasts and overhead throwers and presents along a wide spectrum of severity. Stable lesions can typically be treated with conservative therapy; however, those presenting with instability, fragmentation, or loose bodies generally require surgical intervention. Although there are a number of described surgical options used to treat capitellar OCD lesions, microfracture is one of the most commonly performed and well studied. Patients who are candidates for microfracture generally have favorable outcomes with high rates of return to athletic activity after postoperative rehabilitation. In this work, we present our preferred arthroscopic technique for microfracture of OCD lesions of the capitellum. This technique is most suitable for patients with unstable or fragmented OCD lesions that are less than 1 cm in diameter and do not violate the lateral-most articular margin of the capitellum. PMID:27656365

  19. Functionalized nanofibers as drug-delivery systems for osteochondral regeneration.

    PubMed

    Amler, Evžen; Filová, Eva; Buzgo, Matej; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Nečas, Alois; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-05-01

    A wide range of drug-delivery systems are currently attracting the attention of researchers. Nanofibers are very interesting carriers for drug delivery. This is because nanofibers are versatile, flexible, nanobiomimetic and similar to extracellular matrix components, possible to be functionalized both on their surface as well as in their core, and also because they can be produced easily and cost effectively. There have been increasing attempts to use nanofibers in the construction of a range of tissues, including cartilage and bone. Nanofibers have also been favorably engaged as a drug-delivery system in cell-free scaffolds. This short overview is devoted to current applications and to further perspectives of nanofibers as drug-delivery devices in the field of cartilage and bone regeneration, and also in osteochondral reconstruction. PMID:24978465

  20. Stifle osteochondritis dissecans in snow leopards (Uncia uncia).

    PubMed

    Herrin, Kimberly Vinette; Allan, Graeme; Black, Anthony; Aliah, Rhonda; Howlett, Cameron Rolfe

    2012-06-01

    Three snow leopard (Uncia uncia) cubs, female and male siblings and an unrelated female, had lameness attributed to osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions noted at 6, 8, and 10 mo of age, respectively. All cubs were diagnosed with OCD via radiographs. The sibling cubs both had lesions of the right lateral femoral condyles, while the unrelated cub had bilateral lesions of the lateral femoral condyles. Subsequently, OCD was confirmed in all three cases during surgical correction of the lateral femoral condyle lesions via lateral stifle arthrotomies, flap removal, and debridement of the defect sites. Histopathology also supported the diagnosis of OCD. Postoperatively, the sibling cubs developed seromas at the incision sites and mild lameness, which resolved within a month. To date, two cubs have been orthopedically sound, while one of the sibling cubs has developed mild osteoarthritis. OCD has rarely been reported in domestic felids, and to the authors' knowledge these are the first reported cases of OCD in nondomestic felids.

  1. Stifle osteochondritis dissecans in snow leopards (Uncia uncia).

    PubMed

    Herrin, Kimberly Vinette; Allan, Graeme; Black, Anthony; Aliah, Rhonda; Howlett, Cameron Rolfe

    2012-06-01

    Three snow leopard (Uncia uncia) cubs, female and male siblings and an unrelated female, had lameness attributed to osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions noted at 6, 8, and 10 mo of age, respectively. All cubs were diagnosed with OCD via radiographs. The sibling cubs both had lesions of the right lateral femoral condyles, while the unrelated cub had bilateral lesions of the lateral femoral condyles. Subsequently, OCD was confirmed in all three cases during surgical correction of the lateral femoral condyle lesions via lateral stifle arthrotomies, flap removal, and debridement of the defect sites. Histopathology also supported the diagnosis of OCD. Postoperatively, the sibling cubs developed seromas at the incision sites and mild lameness, which resolved within a month. To date, two cubs have been orthopedically sound, while one of the sibling cubs has developed mild osteoarthritis. OCD has rarely been reported in domestic felids, and to the authors' knowledge these are the first reported cases of OCD in nondomestic felids. PMID:22779240

  2. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  3. Approach alternatives for treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Navid, David O; Myerson, Mark S

    2002-09-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries, especially in the athletic population. Although multiple etiologies exist, lateral lesions have a higher incidence of association with a specific traumatic event. It has been postulated that lateral lesions are produced when the anterolateral aspect of the talar dome impacts the fibula on application of an inversion or dorsiflexion stress to the ankle [2]. There is general agreement that surgery should be performed only in symptomatic cases, as osteochondral lesions of the talar dome show little tendency to progression and do not seem to lead to osteoarthritis [10,42]. Appropriate preoperative imaging is extremely important. Standard radiographs of the ankle supplemented with lateral plantar flexion and dorsiflexion views and CT or Mr imaging can be helpful in evaluating the size, depth, and exact location of the lesion. This information is essential in planning the appropriate surgical procedure. Although many stage I and II lesions respond well to conservative therapy and a period of immobilization, some higher-grade lesions (stage III and IV) eventually require surgical intervention. Most lesions can be approached arthroscopically. Many arthroscopic procedures have been shown to be successful, including debridement with abrasion chondroplasty, subchondral drilling, and microfracture [18-20]. But certain larger or refractory lesions may require an open approach to the ankle joint to restore the articular cartilage. Most lateral lesions have an anterior location and are easily accessible through a standard anterolateral approach. Most medial lesions are located on the posterior talar dome, and a medial malleolar osteotomy is usually required. Osteotomies, in particular of the medial malleolus, should be approached carefully. The possible complications of nonunion and malunion can lead to progressive arthritis of the ankle joint.

  4. Surgical management of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum.

    PubMed

    Tivnon, M C; Anzel, S H; Waugh, T R

    1976-01-01

    Ten cases of osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum which were treated surgically are reviewed. All 10 cases were males and involved the dominant side. The ages at surgery ranged from 13 to 17 years. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 7 years. All of the youths had competed in organized athletics, either baseball or football. By position there were three pitchers, two catchers, two infielders, and one outfielder; in addition there were one quarterback and one linebacker. Only one patient presented with locking of the elbow, whereas the others presented with pain and limitation of extension. The locked elbow was explored immediately and the others were explored after immobilization failed to relieve their symptoms. In seven of the joints a loose fragment of the capitellum was found lying either in the joint or in a defect in the capitellum. The fragment had multiple small holes. In three cases there was no loose fragment. In this situation a corticol window was cut above the capitellum. The capitellum was then drilled and bone was grafted from above. Over all, there were one excellent, six good, one fair, and two poor results. There seemed to be little difference between curretting alone or curetting and drilling. The cases with the cartilage intact and bone grafted from above did worse, with one fair and one poor result of three cases. The two poor results required further surgery, which consisted of partial excision of the capitellum. All cases lacked elbow extension before and after surgery, but nine of 10 gained some motion after surgery. Pre- and postoperative x-rays are shown in this report and a brief review of the literature concerning osteochondritis dissecans is presented.

  5. Optical Clearing in Collagen- and Proteoglycan-Rich Osteochondral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Corey P.; Novak, Tyler; Gilliland, Kateri Fites; Marshall, Peter; Calve, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent developments in optical clearing and microscopy technology have enabled the imaging of intact tissues at the millimeter scale to characterize cells via fluorescence labeling. While these techniques have facilitated the three-dimensional cellular characterization within brain and heart, study of dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system have been largely unexplored. Here, we quantify how optical clearing impacted the cell and tissue morphology of collagen-, proteoglycan-, and mineral-rich cartilage and bone from the articulating knee joint. Methods Water-based fructose solutions were used for optical clearing of bovine osteochondral tissues, followed by imaging with transmission and confocal microscopy. To confirm preservation of tissue structure during the clearing process, samples were mechanically tested in unconfined compression and visualized by cryoSEM. Results Optical clearing enhanced light transmission through cartilage, but not subchondral bone regions. Fluorescent staining and immunolabeling was preserved through sample preparations, enabling imaging to cartilage depths 5 times deeper than previously reported, limited only by the working distance of the microscope objective. Chondrocyte volume remained unchanged in response to, and upon the reversal, of clearing. Equilibrium modulus increased in cleared samples, and was attributed to exchange of interstitial fluid with the more viscous fructose solution, but returned to control levels upon unclearing. In addition, cryoSEM-based analysis of cartilage showed no ultrastructural changes. Conclusion We anticipate large-scale microscopy of diverse connective tissues will enable the study of intact, three-dimensional interfaces (e.g. osteochondral) and cellular connectivity as a function of development, disease, and regeneration, which have been previously hindered by specimen opacity. PMID:25454370

  6. Cartilage resurfacing potential of PLGA scaffolds loaded with autologous cells from cartilage, fat, and bone marrow in an ovine model of osteochondral focal defect.

    PubMed

    Caminal, M; Peris, D; Fonseca, C; Barrachina, J; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Moll, X; Morist, A; García, F; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2016-08-01

    Current developments in tissue engineering strategies for articular cartilage regeneration focus on the design of supportive three-dimensional scaffolds and their use in combination with cells from different sources. The challenge of translating initial successes in small laboratory animals into the clinics involves pilot studies in large animal models, where safety and efficacy should be investigated during prolonged follow-up periods. Here we present, in a single study, the long-term (up to 1 year) effect of biocompatible porous scaffolds non-seeded and seeded with fresh ex vivo expanded autologous progenitor cells that were derived from three different cell sources [cartilage, fat and bone marrow (BM)] in order to evaluate their advantages as cartilage resurfacing agents. An ovine model of critical size osteochondral focal defect was used and the test items were implanted arthroscopically into the knees. Evidence of regeneration of hyaline quality tissue was observed at 6 and 12 months post-treatment with variable success depending on the cell source. Cartilage and BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), but not those derived from fat, resulted in the best quality of new cartilage, as judged qualitatively by magnetic resonance imaging and macroscopic assessment, and by histological quantitative scores. Given the limitations in sourcing cartilage tissue and the risk of donor site morbidity, BM emerges as a preferential source of MSC for novel cartilage resurfacing therapies of osteochondral defects using copolymeric poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds.

  7. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  8. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  9. Study on quantitative analysis of Ti, Al and V in clinical soft tissues after placing the dental implants by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajnóg, Adam; Hanć, Anetta; Makuch, Krzysztof; Koczorowski, Ryszard; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2016-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for in-situ quantitative analysis of oral mucosa of patients before and after implantation with titanium implants and a closing screw based on Ti6Al4V alloy. Two calibration strategies were applied, both were based on matrix matched solid standards with analytes addition. A novel approach was the application of powdered egg white proteins as a matrix material which have a similar composition to the examined tissue. In the another approach, certified reference material Bovine Muscle ERM-BB184 was used. The isotope 34S was found to be the most appropriate as an internal standard since it is homogenously distributed in the examined tissues and resulted in lower relative standard deviation values of signal of analytes of interest. Other isotopes (13C, 26Mg, 43Ca) were also evaluated as potential internal standards. The analytical performance parameters and microwave digestion of solid standards followed by solution nebulization ICP-MS analysis proved that both calibration methods are fit for their intended purpose. The LA-ICP-MS analysis on the surface of tissues after the implantation process revealed an elevated content of elements in comparison to the control group. Analytes are distributed inhomogeneously and display local maximal content of Ti up to ca. 900 μg g- 1, Al up to ca. 760 μg g- 1 and for V up to 160 μg g- 1.

  10. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  11. Dynamic regulation of bone morphogenetic proteins in engineered osteochondral constructs by biomechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jin; Perera, Priyangi; Rath, Bjoern; Agarwal, Sudha

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondral tissue-engineered grafts are proposed to hold greater potential to repair/regenerate damaged cartilage through enhanced biochemical and mechanical interactions with underlying subchondral bone as compared to simple engineered cartilage. Additionally, biomechanical stimulation of articular chondrocytes (ACs) or osteoblasts (OBs) was shown to induce greater morphogenesis of the engineered tissues composed of these cells. In this report, to define the advantages of biomechanical stimulation to osteochondral grafts for tissue engineering, we examined whether (1) ACs and OBs in three-dimensional (3D) osteochondral constructs support functional development of each other at the molecular level, and (2) biomechanical stimulation of osteochondral constructs further promotes the regenerative potential of such grafts. Various configurations of cell/scaffold assemblies, including chondral, osseous, and osteochondral constructs, were engineered with mechano-responsive electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds. These constructs were subjected to either static or dynamic (10% cyclic compressive strain at 1 Hz for 3 h/day) culture conditions for 2 weeks. The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) was examined to assess the regenerative potential of each treatment on the cells. Biomechanical stimulation augmented a marked upregulation of Bmp2, Bmp6, and Bmp7 as well as downregulation of BMP antagonist, Bmp3, in a time-specific manner in the ACs and OBs of 3D osteochondral constructs. More importantly, the presence of biomechanically stimulated OBs was especially crucial for the induction of Bmp6 in ACs, a BMP required for chondrocytic growth and differentiation. Biomechanical stimulation led to enhanced tissue morphogenesis possibly through this BMP regulation, evident by the improved effective compressive modulus of the osteochondral constructs (710 kPa of dynamic culture vs. 280 kPa of static culture). Similar BMP regulation was observed in the

  12. Design of a Novel 3D Printed Bioactive Nanocomposite Scaffold for Improved Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Nathan J.; Patel, Romil; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and acute osteochondral defects as a result of osteoarthritis and trauma present a common and serious clinical problem due to the tissue's inherent complexity and poor regenerative capacity. In addition, cells within the osteochondral tissue are in intimate contact with a 3D nanostructured extracellular matrix composed of numerous bioactive organic and inorganic components. As an emerging manufacturing technique, 3D printing offers great precision and control over the microarchitecture, shape and composition of tissue scaffolds. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a biomimetic 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold with integrated differentiation cues for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. Through the combination of novel nano-inks composed of organic and inorganic bioactive factors and advanced 3D printing, we have successfully fabricated a series of novel constructs which closely mimic the native 3D extracellular environment with hierarchical nanoroughness, microstructure and spatiotemporal bioactive cues. Our results illustrate several key characteristics of the 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold to include improved mechanical properties as well as excellent cytocompatibility for enhanced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation in vitro. The present work further illustrates the effectiveness of the scaffolds developed here as a promising and highly tunable platform for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:26366231

  13. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells in a sandwich approach for osteochondral tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Zhao, Liang; Detamore, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Cell sources and tissue integration between cartilage and bone regions are critical to successful osteochondral regeneration. In this study, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCMSCs), derived from Wharton’s jelly, were introduced to the field of osteochondral tissue engineering and a new strategy for osteochondral integration was developed by sandwiching a layer of cells between chondrogenic and osteogenic constructs before suturing them together. Specifically, hUCMSCs were cultured in biodegradable poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds for 3 weeks in either chondrogenic or osteogenic medium to differentiate cells toward cartilage or bone lineages, respectively. A highly concentrated cell solution containing undifferentiated hUCMSCs was pasted onto the surface of the bone layer at week 3 and the two layers were then sutured together to form an osteochondral composite for another 3 week culture period. Chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation was initiated during the first 3 weeks, as evidenced by the expression of type II collagen and runt-related transcription factor 2 genes, respectively, and continued with the increase of extracellular matrix during the last 3 weeks. Histological and immunohistochemical staining, such as for glycosaminoglycans, type I collagen and calcium, revealed better integration and transition of these matrices between two layers in the composite group containing sandwiched cells compared to other control composites. These results suggest that hUCMSCs may be a suitable cell source for osteochondral regeneration, and the strategy of sandwiching cells between two layers may facilitate scaffold and tissue integration. PMID:21953869

  14. Mechanical evaluation of a tissue-engineered zone of calcification in a bone-hydrogel osteochondral construct.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, Jérôme; Terrier, Alexandre; Cory, Esther; Chen, Albert C; Sah, Robert L; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that mechanical properties of artificial osteochondral constructs can be improved by a tissue-engineered zone of calcification (teZCC) at the bone-hydrogel interface. Experimental push-off tests were performed on osteochondral constructs with or without a teZCC. In parallel, a numerical model of the osteochondral defect treatment was developed and validated against experimental results. Experimental results showed that the shear strength at the bone-hydrogel interface increased by 100% with the teZCC. Numerical predictions of the osteochondral defect treatment showed that the shear stress at the bone-hydrogel interface was reduced with the teZCC. We conclude that a teZCC in osteochondral constructs can provide two improvements. First, it increases the strength of the bone-hydrogel interface and second, it reduces the stress at this interface.

  15. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  16. Field emission from Ni-disilicide nanorods formed by using implantation of Ni in Si coupled with laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Young-Woo; Seong, Tae-Yeon; Choi, Chel-Jong; Tu, K. N.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the formation of Ni-disilicide (NiSi2) nanorods using Ni and Si implantation combined with a laser annealing process. We found that NiSi2 nanorods are formed when the as-implanted Si samples are laser annealed at the energy density of 700mJ /cm2. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, field emission behavior of the NiSi2 nanorod samples has been characterized. The turn-on field and a field enhancement factor were measured to be 7.6V /μm and about 630, respectively. A possible mechanism is given to describe how the NiSi2 nanorods embedded in crystallized Si are formed during the laser annealing.

  17. Psychophysically based site selection coupled with dichotic stimulation improves speech recognition in noise with bilateral cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perceive important features of electrical stimulation varies across stimulation sites within a multichannel implant. The aim of this study was to optimize speech processor MAPs for bilateral implant users by identifying and removing sites with poor psychophysical performance. The psychophysical assessment involved amplitude-modulation detection with and without a masker, and a channel interaction measure quantified as the elevation in modulation detection thresholds in the presence of the masker. Three experimental MAPs were created on an individual-subject basis using data from one of the three psychophysical measures. These experimental MAPs improved the mean psychophysical acuity across the electrode array and provided additional advantages such as increasing spatial separations between electrodes and/or preserving frequency resolution. All 8 subjects showed improved speech recognition in noise with one or more experimental MAPs over their everyday-use clinical MAP. For most subjects, phoneme and sentence recognition in noise were significantly improved by a dichotic experimental MAP that provided better mean psychophysical acuity, a balanced distribution of selected stimulation sites, and preserved frequency resolution. The site-selection strategies serve as useful tools for evaluating the importance of psychophysical acuities needed for good speech recognition in implant users. PMID:22894220

  18. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  19. Acute Osteochondral Fractures in the Lower Extremities - Approach to Identification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, M.E; DaCambra, M.P; Jibri, Z; Dhillon, S; Jen, H; Jomha, N.M

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral fractures of the lower extremities are important injuries because they can cause pain and dysfunction and often lead to osteoarthritis. These injuries can be misdiagnosed initially which may impact on the healing potential and result in poor long-term outcome. This comprehensive review focuses on current pitfalls in diagnosing acute osteochondral lesions, potential investigative techniques to minimize diagnostic errors as well as surgical treatment options. Acute osteochondral fractures are frequently missed and can be identified more accurately with specific imaging techniques. A number of different methods can be used to fix these fractures but attention to early diagnosis is required to limit progression to osteoarthritis. These fractures are common with joint injuries and early diagnosis and treatment should lead to improved long term outcomes. PMID:26587063

  20. Acute Delamination of Commercially Available Decellularized Osteochondral Allograft Plugs: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Tetreault, Danielle; Mahony, Greg T; Williams, Riley J

    2016-10-01

    Articular cartilage injuries, and corresponding surgical procedures, are occurring with increasing frequency as identified by a review of recent surgical trends. Concerns have grown in recent years regarding the longevity of results following microfracture, with a shift toward cartilage restoration procedures in recent years. This case report describes 2 cases of acute failure following the use of commercially available osteochondral allograft plugs used for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the distal femur. In both cases the chondral surface of the plug delaminated from the underlying cancellous bone, resulting in persistent pain and swelling requiring reoperation and removal of the loose fragments. Caution should be employed when considering use of these plugs for the treatment of osteochondral lesions, as similar outcomes have not been noted with other cartilage restoration techniques. PMID:27688840

  1. TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS BY MEANS OF THEARTHROSCOPY-ASSISTED MICROPERFORATION TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Everton; de Queiroz, Felipe; Lopes, Osmar Valadão; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients affected by osteochondral fractures of the talus who were treated surgically by means of arthroscopy-assisted microperforation. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 24 patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus who underwent microperforation assisted by videoarthroscopy of the ankle. They were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score system before and after the operation. Results: There were 19 men and 5 women, with a mean age of 35.3 years (minimum of 17 years and maximum of 54 years). The minimum follow-up was two years (maximum of 39 months). All the patients showed an improvement in AOFAS score after surgery, with an average improvement of around 22.5 points. Conclusion: Videoarthroscopy-assisted microperforation is a good option for treating osteochondral lesions of the talus and provides good functional results. PMID:27027076

  2. Fragment fixation with a bone graft and dynamic staples for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum.

    PubMed

    Harada, Mikio; Ogino, Toshihiko; Takahara, Masatoshi; Ishigaki, Daisuke; Kashiwa, Hideo; Kanauchi, Yumiko

    2002-01-01

    To attain bony union of the fragment in osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum, fragment fixation was performed with a bone graft and dynamic staples in 4 patients. The staples were inserted not from the articular surface but from the lateral aspect of the capitellum. All patients achieved bony union without complication, and 3 of them returned to playing competitive baseball. At final follow-up after surgery (mean, 7.5 years [range, 2.1-11 years]), 3 patients were able to throw a ball without pain and the remaining patient felt elbow dullness after he played recreational-level baseball as a pitcher. These results suggest that the procedure of fragment fixation with a bone graft and dynamic staples can provide satisfactory results for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum with a large osteochondral fragment.

  3. Bilateral osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral trochlea of the femur: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Nawata, Koji; Hashiguchi, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Kei; Yamasaki, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hidetoshi

    2008-05-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the bilateral trochlea of femur is unusual case for orthopedic surgeon. The patient was a healthy 15-year-old male with symptomatic osteochondritis dissecans of the bilateral distal lateral femoral condyle of the trochlea. A surgery on the bilateral knee joints was performed simultaneously. The osteochondral free fragment of the right knee was resected by a minimum open surgery after arthroscopic evaluation. In the left knee the fragment was stabilized with multiple cortical bone pegs harvested from the proximal tibia. The surgery was successful, and the patient was able to play basketball 3 months postoperatively. The course of the right knee is currently under careful observation because of the possibility of recurrence. The left knee has remained in an excellent condition for 18 months following surgery with bone pegs.

  4. Hydrogen Supplementation of Preservation Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Onuma, Kenji; Kuzuno, Jun; Ujihira, Masanobu; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Sakai, Rina; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Allogenic osteochondral tissue (OCT) is used for the treatment of large cartilage defects. Typically, OCTs collected during the disease-screening period are preserved at 4°C; however, the gradual reduction in cell viability during cold preservation adversely affects transplantation outcomes. Therefore, improved storage methods that maintain the cell viability of OCTs are needed to increase the availability of high-quality OCTs and improve treatment outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether long-term hydrogen delivery to preservation solution improved the viability of rat OCTs during cold preservation. Hydrogen-supplemented Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) and University of Wisconsin (UW) solution both significantly improved the cell viability of OCTs during preservation at 4°C for 21 days compared to nonsupplemented media. However, the long-term cold preservation of OCTs in DMEM containing hydrogen was associated with the most optimal maintenance of chondrocytes with respect to viability and morphology. Our findings demonstrate that OCTs preserved in DMEM supplemented with hydrogen are a promising material for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:25506061

  5. Results of Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Sandra; Breederveld, Roelf S.; Tuinebreijer, Wim E.

    2010-01-01

    Repair of full thickness defects of articular cartilage in the knee is difficult but important to prevent progression to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical results of Osteochondral Autograft Transplant System (OATS) treatment for articular defects of the knee. Between 1999 and 2005, 15 knees (14 patients) were treated by the OATS technique. Age ranged from 27 to 52 years. Cartilage defects were up to 3.75 cm2. The mean follow-up was 42 months. Knee function was assessed by the Lysholmscore and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form. Six patients scored good or excellent. No patient had knee instability. Twelve of 13 patients returned to sports at an intermediate or high level. The subjective assessment score (0-10) changed from 4.7 before operation to 7.2 afterward (P=0.007). The OATS-technique resulted in a decrease in symptoms in patients with localized articular cartilage defects. We consider the OATS technique to be an appropriate treatment for cartilage defects to prevent progression of symptoms. PMID:20361003

  6. Citrate cross-linked gels with strain reversibility and viscoelastic behavior accelerate healing of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Paulomi; Rameshbabu, Arun Prabhu; Dhara, Santanu

    2014-07-22

    Most living tissues are viscoelastic in nature. Self-repair due to the dissipation of energy by reversible bonds prevents the rupture of the molecular backbone in these tissues. Recent studies, therefore, have aimed to synthesize biomaterials that approximate the mechanical performance of biological materials with self-recovery properties. We report an environmentally friendly method for the development of ionotropically cross-linked viscoelastic chitosan gels with a modulus comparable to that of living tissues. The strain recovery property was found to be highest for the gels with the lowest cross-linking density. The force-displacement curve showed significant hysteresis due to the presence of reversible bonds in the cross-linked gels. Nanoindentation studies demonstrated the creep phenomenon for the cross-linked chitosan gels. Creep, hysteresis, and plasticity index confirmed the viscoelastic behavior of the cross-linked gels. The viscoelastic gels were implanted at osteochondral defect sites to assess the tissue regeneration ability. In vivo results demonstrated early cartilage formation and woven bone deposition for defects filled with the gels compared to nontreated defects. PMID:24971647

  7. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  8. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur.

  9. Chondroblastoma of the knee treated with resection and osteochondral allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Chafey, David; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  10. Multiple osteochondral autograft transfer to the proximal interphalangeal joint: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozyurekoglu, Tuna

    2010-06-01

    A 17-year-old boy who played baseball presented with swelling, pain, and crepitation in the right ring finger proximal interphalangeal joint after a remote trauma. Multiple osteochondral defects were identified on opposing articular surfaces. Cylindrical osteochondral grafts of 2.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mm were applied to the defects and congruency was restored. We confirmed vascularity of the grafts by magnetic resonance. The boy returned to full sports activities. No signs of arthritis were seen at 4-year follow-up radiographs.

  11. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  12. Design of a multiphase osteochondral scaffold. I. Control of chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Andrew K; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E; Harley, Brendan A; Yannas, Ioannis V; Gibson, Lorna J; Bonfield, William

    2010-03-01

    This is the first in a series of articles that describe the design and development of a family of osteochondral scaffolds based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan (collagen-GAG) and calcium phosphate technologies, engineered for the regenerative repair of defects in articular cartilage. The osteochondral scaffolds consist of two layers: a mineralized type I collagen-GAG scaffold designed to regenerate the underlying subchondral bone and a nonmineralized type II collagen-GAG scaffold designed to regenerate cartilage. The subsequent articles in this series describe the fabrication and properties of a mineralized scaffold as well as a two-layer (one mineralized, the other not) osteochondral scaffold for regeneration of the underlying bone and cartilage, respectively. This article describes a technology through which the chemical composition-particularly the calcium phosphate mass fraction-of triple coprecipitated nanocomposites of collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and calcium phosphate can be accurately and reproducibly varied without the need for titrants or other additives. Here, we describe how the mineral:organic ratio can be altered over a range that includes that for articular cartilage (0 wt % mineral) and for bone (75 wt % mineral). This technology achieves the objective of mimicking the composition of two main tissue types found in articular joints, with particular emphasis on the osseous compartment of an osteochondral scaffold. Exclusion of titrants avoids the formation of potentially harmful contaminant phases during freeze-drying steps crucial for scaffold fabrication, ensuring that the potential for binding growth factors and drugs is maintained.

  13. Bioreactor-based engineering of osteochondral grafts: from model systems to tissue manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, David; Jakob, Marcel; Martin, Ivan

    2005-11-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., those that affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. The in vitro fabrication of osteochondral grafts of predefined size and shape, starting from autologous cells combined with three-dimensional porous biomaterials, is a promising approach for the treatment of osteochondral defects. However, the quality of ex vivo generated cartilage and bone-like tissues is currently restricted by a limited understanding of the regulatory role of physicochemical culture parameters on tissue development. By allowing reproducible and controlled changes in specific biochemical and biomechanical factors, bioreactor systems provide the technological means to reveal fundamental mechanisms of cell function in a three-dimensional environment and the potential to improve the quality of engineered tissues. In addition, by automating and standardizing the manufacturing process in controlled closed systems, bioreactors could reduce production costs and thus facilitate broader clinical impact of engineered osteochondral grafts.

  14. Development of Novel Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds for Osteochondral Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Benjamin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jiaoyan; Lee, James D.

    2015-01-01

    As modern medicine advances, various methodologies are being explored and developed in order to treat severe osteochondral defects in joints. However, it is still very challenging to cure the osteochondral defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The objective of this study is to create novel three-dimensional (3D) printed osteochondral scaffolds with both excellent interfacial mechanical properties and biocompatibility for facilitating human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and chondrogenic differentiation. For this purpose, we designed and 3D printed a series of innovative bi-phasic 3D models that mimic the osteochondral region of articulate joints. Our mechanical testing results showed that our bi-phasic scaffolds with key structures have enhanced mechanical characteristics in compression (a maximum Young's modulus of 31 MPa) and shear (a maximum fracture strength of 5768 N/mm2) when compared with homogenous designs. These results are also correlated with numerical simulation. In order to improve their biocompatibility, the scaffolds' surfaces were further modified with acetylated collagen (one of the main components in osteochondral extracellular matrix). MSC proliferation results demonstrated that incorporation of a collagen, along with biomimetically designed micro-features, can greatly enhance MSC growth after 5 days in vitro. Two weeks' chondrogenic differentiation results showed that our novel scaffolds (dubbed “key” scaffolds), both with and without surface collagen modification, displayed enhanced chondrogenesis (e.g., 130%, 114%, and 236% increases in glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen deposition, and total protein content on collagen-modified key scaffolds when compared with homogeneous controls). PMID:25088966

  15. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  16. A rare case of bilateral non-weight bearing posterior aspect of lateral femoral condyle osteochondral fracture and its management.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aamir Hassan; Stanclik, Jaroslaw; Murphy, Paul G D

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral fracture of the lateral femoral condyle can be a real challenging injury to diagnose on initial presentation. The authors report a rare case of bilateral involvement of posterior aspect of lateral femoral condyle osteochondral fracture in a young 15-year-old boy. This was managed with excision of these osteochondral fragments, as the site involved was on the posterior non-weight bearing area of the femur along with chronicity of the injury dictating excision as a reasonable choice of management. Good outcome for such injury is based on an early diagnosis and prompt treatment along with an early rehabilitation for such cases. Our patient has an excellent 2 years outcome with a Knee Society score of 95 after undergoing excision of these osteochondral fragments in both knees in succession.

  17. Detection of intraarticular loose osteochondral fragments by double-contrast wrist arthrography. A case report of a basketball injury.

    PubMed

    Tehranzadeh, J; Labosky, D A

    1984-01-01

    Gravity was used in a case of double-contrast wrist arthrography to demonstrate the intraarticular loose nature of osteochondral fracture fragments. These calcified loose bodies were successfully removed surgically.

  18. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  19. Osteochondral Regeneration: Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 14/2016).

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    A combination of human mesenchymal stem cells with additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of scaffolds with instructive properties is presented by Lorenzo Moroni and co-workers on page 1753. This new fiber deposition pattern allows the generation of pores of different shapes within the same construct. The most rhomboidal pore geometry sustained enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic related genes expression with respect to the other gradient zones when the gradient scaffold is cultured in a medium supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. This may contribute to enhance osteochondral regeneration in orthopedic treatments. PMID:27436107

  20. Arthroscopic Anatomic Humeral Head Reconstruction With Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation for Large Hill-Sachs Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Snir, Nimrod; Wolfson, Theodore S.; Hamula, Mathew J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Anatomic reconstruction of the humeral head with osteochondral allograft has been reported as a solution for large Hill-Sachs lesions with or without glenoid bone loss. However, to date, varying techniques have been used. This technical note describes an arthroscopic reconstruction technique using fresh-frozen, side- and size-matched osteochondral humeral head allograft. Allograft plugs are press fit into the defect without internal fixation and seated flush with the surrounding articular surface. This technique restores the native articular contour of the humeral head without compromising shoulder range of motion. Potential benefits of this all-arthroscopic approach include minimal trauma to the soft tissue and articular surface without the need for hardware or staged reoperation. PMID:24266001

  1. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  2. Evaluation of novel in situ synthesized nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/alginate hydrogels for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Jiang, Xianfang; Chen, Xuening; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-12-01

    Collagen hydrogel has been widely used for osteochondral repair, but its mechanical properties cannot meet the requirements of clinical application. Previous studies have shown that the addition of either polysaccharide or inorganic particles could reinforce the polymer matrix. However, their synergic effects on collagen-based hydrogel have seldom been studied, and the potential application of triple-phased composite gel in osteochondral regeneration has not been reported. In this study, nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) reinforced collagen-alginate hydrogel (nHCA) was prepared by the in situ synthesis of nano-HA in collagen gel followed by the addition of alginate and Ca(2+). The properties of triple-phased nHCA hydrogel were studied and compared with pure collagen and biphasic gels, and the triple-phased composite of collagen-alginate-HA gels showed a superiority in not only mechanical but also biological features, as evidenced by the enhanced tensile and compressive modulus, higher cell viability, faster cell proliferation and upregulated hyaline cartilage markers. In addition, it was found that the synthesis process could also affect the properties of the triple-phased composite, compared to blend-mixing HCA. The in situ-synthesized nHCA hydrogel showed an enhanced tensile modulus, as well as enhanced biological features compared with HCA. Our study demonstrated that the nHCA composite hydrogel holds promise in osteochondral regeneration. The addition of alginate and nano-HA contribute to the increase in both mechanical and biological properties. This study may provide a valuable reference for the design of an appropriate composite scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  3. Percutaneous CT-Guided Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Sacroiliac Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Becce, Fabio; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Mosimann, Pascal John; Anaye, Anass; Letovanec, Igor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2012-08-15

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint disorder that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, most commonly at the knee. OCD of the sacroiliac joint is extremely rare. Management of OCD remains controversial, and surgery is often needed, especially when conservative treatment fails. We present a rare case of OCD involving the left sacroiliac joint successfully treated by percutaneous computed tomography-guided retrograde drilling and debridement.

  4. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID

  5. The effect of devitalized trabecular bone on the formation of osteochondral tissue-engineered constructs

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eric G.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Bal, B. Sonny; Cook, James L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, evidence is presented demonstrating that devitalized trabecular bone has an inhibitory effect on in vitro chondral tissue development when used as a base material for the tissue-engineering of osteochondral constructs for cartilage repair. Chondrocyte-seeded agarose hydrogel constructs were cultured alone or attached to an underlying bony base in a chemically defined medium formulation that has been shown to yield engineered cartilaginous tissue with native Young's modulus (EY) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. By day 42 in culture the incorporation of a bony base significantly reduced these properties (EY = 87 ± 12 kPa, GAG = 1.9 ± 0.8%ww) compared to the gel-alone group (EY = 642 ± 97 kPa, GAG = 4.6 ± 1.4%ww). Similarly, the mechanical and biochemical properties of chondrocyte-seeded agarose constructs were inhibited when co-cultured adjacent to bone (unattached), suggesting that soluble factors rather than direct cell–bone interactions mediate the chondro-inhibitory bone effects. Altering the method of bone preparation, including demineralization, or the timing of bone introduction in co-culture did not ameliorate the effects. In contrast, osteochondral constructs with native cartilage properties (EY = 730 ± 65 kPa, GAG = 5.2 ± 0.9%ww) were achieved when a porous tantalum metal base material was adopted instead of bone. This work suggests that devitalized bone may not be a suitable substrate for long-term cultivation of osteochondral grafts. PMID:18718655

  6. A review of terminology for equine juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) based on anatomical and functional considerations.

    PubMed

    Denoix, J-M; Jeffcott, L B; McIlwraith, C W; van Weeren, P R

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript describes a new classification of the various joint-related lesions that can be seen in the young, growing horse based on their anatomical and functional aetiopathogenesis. Juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) is a term that brings together specific disorders according to their location in the joint and their biomechanical origin. When a biomechanical insult affects the process of endochondral ossification different types of osteochondrosis (OC) lesions may occur, including osteochondral fragmentation of the articular surface or of the periarticular margins, or the formation of juvenile subchondral bone cysts. In severe cases, osteochondral collapse of the articular surface or the epiphysis or even an entire small bone may occur. Tension on ligament attachments may cause avulsion fractures of epiphyseal (or metaphyseal) ossifying bone, which are classified as JOCC, but do not result from a disturbance of the process of endochondral ossification and are not therefore classified as a form of OC. The same applies to 'physitis' which can result from damage to the physeal growth plate.

  7. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  8. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes. PMID:25900444

  9. Mechanical loading regulates human MSC differentiation in a multi-layer hydrogel for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Neven J; Aisenbrey, Elizabeth A; Westbrook, Kristofer K; Qi, H Jerry; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    A bioinspired multi-layer hydrogel was developed for the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as a platform for osteochondral tissue engineering. The spatial presentation of biochemical cues, via incorporation of extracellular matrix analogs, and mechanical cues, via both hydrogel crosslink density and externally applied mechanical loads, were characterized in each layer. A simple sequential photopolymerization method was employed to form stable poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a soft cartilage-like layer of chondroitin sulfate and low RGD concentrations, a stiff bone-like layer with high RGD concentrations, and an intermediate interfacial layer. Under a compressive load, the variation in hydrogel stiffness within each layer produced high strains in the soft cartilage-like layer, low strains in the stiff bone-like layer, and moderate strains in the interfacial layer. When hMSC-laden hydrogels were cultured statically in osteochondral differentiation media, the local biochemical and matrix stiffness cues were not sufficient to spatially guide hMSC differentiation after 21 days. However dynamic mechanical stimulation led to differentially high expression of collagens with collagen II in the cartilage-like layer, collagen X in the interfacial layer and collagen I in the bone-like layer and mineral deposits localized to the bone layer. Overall, these findings point to external mechanical stimulation as a potent regulator of hMSC differentiation toward osteochondral cellular phenotypes.

  10. Development and characterisation of a decellularised bovine osteochondral biomaterial for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Fermor, Hazel L; Russell, Serena L; Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2015-05-01

    It is proposed that an acellular natural osteochondral scaffold will provide a successful repair material for the early intervention treatment of cartilage lesions, to prevent or slow the progression of cartilage deterioration to osteoarthritis. Here, we investigated the efficacy of methods for the decellularisation of bovine osteochondral plugs. The plugs were subject to four freeze/thaw cycles followed by two cycles of washes in hypotonic solution and low concentration (0.1% w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate with protease inhibitors. Plugs were treated with nuclease (DNase and RNase) treatment followed by sterilization in peracetic acid. Full tissue decellularisation was achieved as confirmed by histological analysis and DNA quantification, however the resultant acellular matrix had reduced glycosaminoglycan content which led to an increased percent deformation of cartilage. Furthermore, the acellular scaffold was not reproducibly biocompatible. Additional terminal washes were included in the process to improve biocompatibility, however, this led to visible structural damage to the cartilage. This damage was found to be minimised by reducing the cut edge to cartilage area ratio through decellularisation of larger cuts of osteochondral tissue. PMID:25893393

  11. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  12. Fabrication and development of artificial osteochondral constructs based on cancellous bone/hydrogel hybrid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Yan, Xinyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Yiwei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-06-01

    Using tissue engineering techniques, an artificial osteochondral construct was successfully fabricated to treat large osteochondral defects. In this study, porcine cancellous bones and chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds were used as substitutes to mimic bone and cartilage, respectively. The porosity and distribution of pore size in porcine bone was measured and the degradation ratio and swelling ratio for chitosan/gelatin hydrogel scaffolds was also determined in vitro. Surface morphology was analyzed with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The physicochemical properties and the composition were tested by using an infrared instrument. A double layer composite scaffold was constructed via seeding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) induced to chondrocytes and osteoblasts, followed by inoculation in cancellous bones and hydrogel scaffolds. Cell proliferation was assessed through Dead/Live staining and cellular activity was analyzed with IpWin5 software. Cell growth, adhesion and formation of extracellular matrix in composite scaffolds blank cancellous bones or hydrogel scaffolds were also analyzed. SEM analysis revealed a super porous internal structure of cancellous bone scaffolds and pore size was measured at an average of 410 ± 59 μm while porosity was recorded at 70.6 ± 1.7 %. In the hydrogel scaffold, the average pore size was measured at 117 ± 21 μm and the porosity and swelling rate were recorded at 83.4 ± 0.8 % and 362.0 ± 2.4 %, respectively. Furthermore, the remaining hydrogel weighed 80.76 ± 1.6 % of the original dry weight after hydration in PBS for 6 weeks. In summary, the cancellous bone and hydrogel composite scaffold is a promising biomaterial which shows an essential physical performance and strength with excellent osteochondral tissue interaction in situ. ADSCs are a suitable cell source for osteochondral composite reconstruction. Moreover, the bi-layered scaffold significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared to the cells seeded on

  13. Effect of He-Ne laser radiation on healing of osteochondral defect in rabbit: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Javadieh, Farshad; Dadpay, Masoomeh

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the healing of a large osteochondral defect in rabbits.An osteochondral defect with 5 mm diameter was surgically induced in the right femoral patellar groove of 48 adult male rabbits. They were divided into a control and an experimental group. The rabbits were treated at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after surgery, with six rabbits in each study period being tested at each biweekly period. The experimental group received LLLT with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm, 10 mW) of 148.4 J/cm(2) three times a week, and the control group received placebo LLLT with equipment switched off. The defects were examined macroscopically and microscopically. The results of the histological examination 2 weeks after surgery showed that the osteochondral healing of the control group was significantly accelerated compared with that of the experimental group. However, the osteochondral healing of the experimental group 4 weeks and 16 weeks after surgery showed that healing accelerated significantly compared with that of the control group. The conclusion was that LLLT with an He-Ne laser could not significantly accelerate healing of a large osteochondral defect in rabbits of the experimental group compared with that of the control group throughout the duration of the present study. PMID:20437320

  14. Rotational osteoplasty and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation in Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Tommaso; Micheloni, Gian Mario; Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Costanzo, Alessandro; Magnan, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Pipkin fractures are relative rare high-energy lesions characterized by an intra-articular fracture of the femoral head after posterior hip dislocation. Early anatomic reduction and stable fixation are the main goals of treatment. This case evaluates the outcome of managing Pipkin type 2 fracture with acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head using "rotational osteoplasty" and bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation. 24-year-old male patient was involved in a motorcycle accident, suffering from a left hip fracture-dislocation, and pelvic Computed Tomography revealed a Pipkin type 2 lesion. An open urgent treatment was performed. After  anatomic reduction of the femoral head fragment a large osteochondral defect in the anterior-superior weight bearing surface was evident. The pattern of the fracture allowed us to perform a "rotational osteoplasty" including rotation of the femoral head fragment, to obtain an osteochondral cartilage congruence of the anterior-superior surface. Stable fixation was obtained by three bioabsorbable polylactate pins. At four-year follow up the patient had an excellent outcome and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed fracture healing, minimal signs of arthritis, excluding osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The reported case confirms that Pipkin fractures are very insidious surgical urgencies. In selected cases, "rotational osteoplasty" may be an alternative to osteochondral transplant for acute osteochondral defect of the femoral head. Bioabsorbable polylactate pin fixation allowed us to have a stable fixation evaluating the bone healing process and vitality of femoral head by MRI. PMID:27104330

  15. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  16. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  17. Retrograde Percutaneous Drilling for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Head of the Talus: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Laura; Sanpera, Ignacio; Masrouha, Karim; Sanpera-Iglesias, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus might be a more common cause of pain than previously recognized, especially among those involved in athletic activities. However, the location of an osteochondral lesion on the talar head is much less common than such lesions localized to the dome of the talus and can pose diagnostic difficulties. We present the case of a 14-year-old soccer player who complained of longstanding pain in his left foot. After unsuccessful conservative treatment consisting of rest and bracing, he was ultimately treated with retrograde percutaneous drilling of the talar head performed by a medial approach. This was followed by casting and non-weightbearing for 6 weeks, after which physical therapy was undertaken. He was able to return to full activity and remained asymptomatic during a 5-year observation period. Although rare, osteochondritis dissecans of the talar head should be considered in young athletes with persistent foot pain that is unresponsive to reasonable therapy.

  18. Mosaicplasty for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans following Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gagala, Jacek; Tarczynska, Marta; Gaweda, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease leads to hip joint deformity. Osteochondritis dissecans following Perthes disease (OCDP) is a less common entity. Treatment options of OCDP are limited. Osteochondral autologous transfer (OATS) is an established method of treatment of full thickness cartilage defects in different locations. This paper presents the case of a 42-year-old patient diagnosed with symptomatic OCDP and treated with lesion fixation using autologous osteochondral grafts via surgical hip dislocation. At the most recent follow-up, 5.5 years after the surgery, the patient did not complain of any pain during rest or activity. He had painless motion with persisting abduction and internal rotation reduction. Harris hip score (HHS) improved from preoperative 62 to 92 points at most recent follow-up. Treatment protocol was discussed in relation to the literature regarding this clinical topic. PMID:26511699

  19. Retrograde Percutaneous Drilling for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Head of the Talus: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Laura; Sanpera, Ignacio; Masrouha, Karim; Sanpera-Iglesias, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus might be a more common cause of pain than previously recognized, especially among those involved in athletic activities. However, the location of an osteochondral lesion on the talar head is much less common than such lesions localized to the dome of the talus and can pose diagnostic difficulties. We present the case of a 14-year-old soccer player who complained of longstanding pain in his left foot. After unsuccessful conservative treatment consisting of rest and bracing, he was ultimately treated with retrograde percutaneous drilling of the talar head performed by a medial approach. This was followed by casting and non-weightbearing for 6 weeks, after which physical therapy was undertaken. He was able to return to full activity and remained asymptomatic during a 5-year observation period. Although rare, osteochondritis dissecans of the talar head should be considered in young athletes with persistent foot pain that is unresponsive to reasonable therapy. PMID:25459089

  20. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  1. Evaluation of the Early In Vivo Response of a Functionally Graded Macroporous Scaffold in an Osteochondral Defect in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Barron, Valerie; Neary, Martin; Mohamed, Khalid Merghani Salid; Ansboro, Sharon; Shaw, Georgina; O'Malley, Grace; Rooney, Niall; Barry, Frank; Murphy, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a multifactorial problem requiring a wide range of material property requirements from provision of biological cues to facilitation of mechanical support in load-bearing diarthrodial joints. The study aim was to design, fabricate and characterize a template to promote endogenous cell recruitment for enhanced cartilage repair. A polylactic acid poly-ε-caprolactone (PLCL) support structure was fabricated using laser micromachining technology and thermal crimping to create a functionally-graded open pore network scaffold with a compressive modulus of 9.98 ± 1.41 MPa and a compressive stress at 50% strain of 8.59 ± 1.35 MPa. In parallel, rabbit mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and their growth characteristics, morphology and multipotency confirmed. Sterilization had no effect on construct chemical structure and cellular compatibility was confirmed. After four weeks implantation in an osteochondral defect in a rabbit model to assess biocompatibility, there was no evidence of inflammation or giant cells. Moreover, acellular constructs performed better than cell-seeded constructs with endogenous progenitor cells homing through microtunnels, differentiating to form neo-cartilage and strengthening integration with native tissue. These results suggest, albeit at an early stage of repair, that by modulating the architecture of a macroporous scaffold, pre-seeding with MSCs is not necessary for hyaline cartilage repair.

  2. Evaluation of the Early In Vivo Response of a Functionally Graded Macroporous Scaffold in an Osteochondral Defect in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Barron, Valerie; Neary, Martin; Mohamed, Khalid Merghani Salid; Ansboro, Sharon; Shaw, Georgina; O'Malley, Grace; Rooney, Niall; Barry, Frank; Murphy, Mary

    2016-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a multifactorial problem requiring a wide range of material property requirements from provision of biological cues to facilitation of mechanical support in load-bearing diarthrodial joints. The study aim was to design, fabricate and characterize a template to promote endogenous cell recruitment for enhanced cartilage repair. A polylactic acid poly-ε-caprolactone (PLCL) support structure was fabricated using laser micromachining technology and thermal crimping to create a functionally-graded open pore network scaffold with a compressive modulus of 9.98 ± 1.41 MPa and a compressive stress at 50% strain of 8.59 ± 1.35 MPa. In parallel, rabbit mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and their growth characteristics, morphology and multipotency confirmed. Sterilization had no effect on construct chemical structure and cellular compatibility was confirmed. After four weeks implantation in an osteochondral defect in a rabbit model to assess biocompatibility, there was no evidence of inflammation or giant cells. Moreover, acellular constructs performed better than cell-seeded constructs with endogenous progenitor cells homing through microtunnels, differentiating to form neo-cartilage and strengthening integration with native tissue. These results suggest, albeit at an early stage of repair, that by modulating the architecture of a macroporous scaffold, pre-seeding with MSCs is not necessary for hyaline cartilage repair. PMID:26438451

  3. Osteochondral differentiation and the emergence of stage-specific osteogenic cell-surface molecules by bone marrow cells in diffusion chambers.

    PubMed

    Bruder, S P; Gazit, D; Passi-Even, L; Bab, I; Caplan, A I

    1990-11-01

    The osteochondral potential and emergence of osteogenic cell-surface molecules by avian marrow cells was evaluated in in vivo diffusion chamber cultures. The chambers were inoculated with unselected marrow cells from young chick tibiae and implanted intraperitoneally into athymic mice. At the light microscopic level, morphologic evidence of de novo bone and cartilage formation, including specific immunostaining by antibody probes, was observed in 14 out of 16 chambers incubated for 20 days or longer. In order to monitor the osteogenic differentiation of the marrow-derived cells, indirect immunofluorescence was performed with monoclonal antibodies against stage-specific cell surface antigens on cells of the embryonic osteogenic lineage. The binding of these and other specific monoclonal antibodies in the developing tissue indicates that the cell surface and extracellular matrix molecules expressed by descendants of marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells are indistinguishable from their in vivo counterparts found in embryonic skeletal structures. Furthermore, the experiments reported here describe the first molecular identification of osteogenic cells by probes which are selective for stage-specific surface antigens on cells of the osteogenic lineage. Importantly, bone formation by these marrow-derived cells appears to occur through a lineage progression which is similar to that observed for embryonic tibial osteoblasts. In summary, these data support the use of diffusion chambers inoculated with avian marrow to study aspects of osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  4. Arthroscopic removal of osteochondral fragments from the proximal interphalangeal joint of the pelvic limbs in three horses.

    PubMed

    Schneider, R K; Ragle, C A; Carter, B G; Davis, W E

    1994-07-01

    Osteochondral fragments detected in the proximal interphalangeal joint in the pelvic limbs of 3 horses (2 Standardbreds and 1 Thoroughbred) caused joint enlargement and lameness. Fragments were removed by use of arthroscopy. Accurate placement of the arthroscope into the dorsal joint space was necessary to obtain an adequate view of the fragments. After surgery, 2 of the horses resumed racing without joint problems, and the third was in training to race. High-detail radiographs are necessary to detect osteochondral fragments in horses with joint enlargement or lameness localized to the proximal interphalangeal joint.

  5. Arthroscopic technique for fragment fixation using absorbable pins for osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum: a report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Takeba, Jun; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hino, Kazunori; Watanabe, Seiji; Imai, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Haruyasu

    2010-06-01

    This is the first report to describe a method of arthroscopic osteochondral fixation using absorbable pins to treat osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum. Four adolescent baseball players with OCD of the capitellum were treated, and good short-term results were obtained. During this arthroscopic procedure, the elbow was maintained in the maximum flexed position, and posterolateral portals were used to visualize the lesion, perform drilling, and insert the pins. This procedure is less invasive and easier to perform than other fixation procedures that require harvesting or production of autologous bone pegs. This is an effective method of fragment fixation with absorbable pins.

  6. Osteochondral lesion of the talus in a recreational athlete: a case report

    PubMed Central

    deGraauw, Chris

    1999-01-01

    A 23-year-old recreational male athlete presented with intermittent pain of three weeks duration, localized to the left ankle. Pain was aggravated by walking, although his symptoms had not affected the patient’s jogging activity which was performed three times per week. Past history revealed an inversion sprain of the left ankle, sustained fifteen months previously. Examination showed mild swelling anterior to the ankle mortise joint while other tests including range of motion, strength and motion palpation of specific joints of the ankle were noted to be unremarkable. Radiographic findings revealed a defect in the medial aspect of the talus. An orthopaedic referral was made for further evaluation. Tomography revealed a Grade III osteochondral lesion of the talus. It was determined that follow-up views be taken in three months to demonstrate if the lesion was progressing or healing. Within the three month period, activity modifications and modalities for pain control were indicated. Surgery was considered a reasonable option should conservative measures fail. The present case illustrates an osteochondral lesion of the talus, a condition which has not previously been reported in the chiropractic literature. A review of the pertinent orthopaedic literature has indicated an average delay of three years in diagnosing the existence of this lesion. Although considered rare, the diagnostic frequency of the condition appears to be on the rise due to increased awareness and the use of bone and CT scans. The osteochondral lesion of the talus deserves particular consideration by practitioners working with athletes due to its higher incidence within this group. This diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with chronic ankle pain particularly when a history of an inversion sprain exists. The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of this condition, and review diagnosis and management strategies. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  7. Osteochondral lesions of the talus: clinical and functional assessment of conservative vs scope treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Maximiliano; Calvo, Ana Belén; Alvarez, Victoria; Lépore, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Osteochondral injuries involving the ankle joint are unusual (incidence of 0.09% according to Berndt and Harty), third in frequency after knee and elbow location. They are described as a cause of chronic pain after ankle sprains in the active population (thought to occur in 2-6% of sprains). MRI is the gold standard diagnostic method. Therapeutic strategies include both conservative and surgical treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and functional outcome of patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus treated in our department between January 2007 and December 2012. Sixty per cent were male with an average age of 42 years. Eleven patients were treated conservatively, one of them had clear surgical indication (LOC G III, as classified by Ferkel and Sgaglione) but refused to perform the procedure. Nine patients underwent arthroscopic surgery (debridement and microfracture), one of the procedures was a review of an arthroscopy performed in another service. No open surgery was performed. Clinical and functional evaluation was performed using the AOFAS score, Freiburg and VAS Score System. Results: Non-surgical treatment group had a pretreatment average AOFAS score of 58, which improved to 74.8 points; a Freiburg Score System that ranged from 65 to 79.3 points and a VAS average of 5,4. AOFAS surgical treatment group improved from 54.3 to 84.8 points, Freiburg Score System ranged from 60.6 to 81.4 points and VAS average was of 5,8. Discussion: It is difficult to compare our results with other series of patients, because we made a comparison between conservative versus artrhoscopic treatment, while other authors show results obtained when performing certain surgical technique Although surgical treatment has better results, we agree with the literature that conservative treatment presents acceptable results and should always be

  8. Wireless power transfer to a cardiac implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sanghoek; Ho, John S.; Chen, Lisa Y.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze wireless power transfer between a source and a weakly coupled implant on the heart. Numerical studies show that mid-field wireless powering achieves much higher power transfer efficiency than traditional inductively coupled systems. With proper system design, power sufficient to operate typical cardiac implants can be received by millimeter-sized coils.

  9. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  10. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  11. Positive effect of oral supplementation with glycosaminoglycans and antioxidants on the regeneration of osteochondral defects in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Handl, M; Amler, E; Bräun, K; Holzheu, J; Trc, T; Imhoff, A B; Lytvynets, A; Filová, E; Kolárová, H; Kotyk, A; Martínek, V

    2007-01-01

    The effect of oral supplementation with glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and radical scavengers (vitamin E/selenium) on the regeneration of osteochondral defects was investigated in rabbits. After introduction of defined osteochondral defects in the knee joint, groups of ten animals were given a GAG/vitamin E/selenium mixture or a placebo (milk sugar) for 6 weeks. Following sacrifice, histological and histochemical analysis was performed. The amount of synovial fluid was increased in the placebo group, while the viscosity of the synovial fluid was significantly enhanced in the GAG group. The amount of sulfated GAG in the osteochondral regenerates (8.8 +/- 3.6 % vs. 6.0 +/- 5.6 %; p <0.03) was significantly higher in the GAG group. In both groups, the GAG amount in the cartilage of the operated knee was significantly higher than in the non-involved knee (p <0.05). Histological analysis of the regenerates in the GAG group was superior in comparison with the placebo group. For the first time, a biological effect following oral supplementation with GAG was demonstrated in healing of osteochondral defects in vivo. These findings support the known positive clinical results.

  12. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering.

  13. The effect of interface microstructure on interfacial shear strength for osteochondral scaffolds based on biomimetic design and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Interface integration between chondral phase and osseous phase is crucial in engineered osteochondral scaffolds. However, the integration was poorly understood and commonly failed to meet the need of osteochondral scaffolds. In this paper, a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold with enhanced interfacial integration was developed. The chondral phase was a PEG hydrogel. The osseous phase was a β-TCP ceramic scaffold. The PEG hydrogel was directly cured on the ceramic interface layer by layer to fabricate osteochondral scaffolds by 3D printing technology. Meanwhile, a series of interface structure were designed with different interface pore area percentages (0/10/20/30/40/50/60%), and interfacial shear test was applied for interface structure optimization (n=6 samples/group). The interfacial shear strength of 30% pore area group was nearly three folds improved compared with that of 0% pore area percentage group, and more than fifty folds improved compared with that of traditional integration (5.91±0.59 kPa). In conclusion, the biomimetic PEG/β-TCP scaffolds with interface structure enhanced integration show promising potential application for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:25491954

  14. A Hydrogel-Mineral Composite Scaffold for Osteochondral Interface Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Khanarian, Nora T.; Jiang, Jie; Wan, Leo Q.; Mow, Van C.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of physical disability among Americans, and tissue engineered cartilage grafts have emerged as a promising treatment option for this debilitating condition. Currently, the formation of a stable interface between the cartilage graft and subchondral bone remains a significant challenge. This study evaluates the potential of a hybrid scaffold of hydroxyapatite (HA) and alginate hydrogel for the regeneration of the osteochondral interface. Specifically, the effects of HA on the response of chondrocytes were determined, focusing on changes in matrix production and mineralization, as well as scaffold mechanical properties over time. Additionally, the optimal chondrocyte population for interface tissue engineering was evaluated. It was observed that the HA phase of the composite scaffold promoted the formation of a proteoglycan- and type II collagen–rich matrix when seeded with deep zone chondrocytes. More importantly, the elevated biosynthesis translated into significant increases in both compressive and shear moduli relative to the mineral-free control. Presence of HA also promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy and type X collagen deposition. These results demonstrate that the hydrogel–calcium phosphate composite supported the formation of a calcified cartilage-like matrix and is a promising scaffold design for osteochondral interface tissue engineering. PMID:21919797

  15. Novel Vanadium-Loaded Ordered Collagen Scaffold Promotes Osteochondral Differentiation of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cortizo, Ana M.; Ruderman, Graciela; Mazzini, Flavia N.; Molinuevo, M. Silvina; Mogilner, Ines G.

    2016-01-01

    Bone and cartilage regeneration can be improved by designing a functionalized biomaterial that includes bioactive drugs in a biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold. Based on our previous studies, we designed a vanadium-loaded collagen scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. Collagen-vanadium loaded scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and permeability studies. Rat bone marrow progenitor cells were plated on collagen or vanadium-loaded membranes to evaluate differences in cell attachment, growth and osteogenic or chondrocytic differentiation. The potential cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay and by evaluation of morphological changes in cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our results show that loading of VOAsc did not alter the grooved ordered structure of the collagen membrane although it increased membrane permeability, suggesting a more open structure. The VOAsc was released to the media, suggesting diffusion-controlled drug release. Vanadium-loaded membranes proved to be a better substratum than C0 for all evaluated aspects of BMPC biocompatibility (adhesion, growth, and osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation). In addition, there was no detectable effect of collagen or vanadium-loaded scaffolds on macrophage viability or cytotoxicity. Based on these findings, we have developed a new ordered collagen scaffold loaded with VOAsc that shows potential for osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID:27293438

  16. Cell-laden biphasic scaffolds with anisotropic structure for the regeneration of osteochondral tissue.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Kathleen; Despang, Florian; Lode, Anja; Gelinsky, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Sufficient treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects to restore function of the respective tissue remains challenging in regenerative medicine. Biphasic scaffolds that mimic properties of bone and cartilage are appropriate to regenerate both tissues at the same time. The present study describes the development of biphasic, but monolithic scaffolds based on alginate, which are suitable for embedding of living cells in the chondral part. Scaffolds are fabricated under sterile and cell-compatible conditions according to the principle of diffusion-controlled, directed ionotropic gelation, which leads to the formation of channel-like, parallel aligned pores, running through the whole length of the biphasic constructs. The synthesis process leads to an anisotropic structure, as it is found in many natural tissues. The two different layers of the scaffolds are characterized by different microstructure and mechanical properties which provide a suitable environment for cells to form the respective tissue. Human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells were embedded within the chondral layer of the biphasic scaffolds during hydrogel formation and their chondrogenic (re)differentiation was successfully induced. Whereas viability of non-induced human mesenchymal stem cells decreased during culture, cell viability of human chondrocytes and chondrogenically induced human mesenchymal stem cells remained high within the scaffolds over the whole culture period of 3 weeks, demonstrating successful fabrication of cell-laden centimetre-scaled constructs for potential application in regenerative treatment of osteochondral defects. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evidence of a major gene from Bayesian segregation analyses of liability to osteochondral diseases in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kadarmideen, Haja N; Janss, Luc L G

    2005-11-01

    Bayesian segregation analyses were used to investigate the mode of inheritance of osteochondral lesions (osteochondrosis, OC) in pigs. Data consisted of 1163 animals with OC and their pedigrees included 2891 animals. Mixed-inheritance threshold models (MITM) and several variants of MITM, in conjunction with Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, were developed for the analysis of these (categorical) data. Results showed major genes with significant and substantially higher variances (range 1.384-37.81), compared to the polygenic variance (sigmau2). Consequently, heritabilities for a mixed inheritance (range 0.65-0.90) were much higher than the heritabilities from the polygenes. Disease allele frequencies range was 0.38-0.88. Additional analyses estimating the transmission probabilities of the major gene showed clear evidence for Mendelian segregation of a major gene affecting osteochondrosis. The variants, MITM with informative prior on sigmau2, showed significant improvement in marginal distributions and accuracy of parameters. MITM with a "reduced polygenic model" for parameterization of polygenic effects avoided convergence problems and poor mixing encountered in an "individual polygenic model." In all cases, "shrinkage estimators" for fixed effects avoided unidentifiability for these parameters. The mixed-inheritance linear model (MILM) was also applied to all OC lesions and compared with the MITM. This is the first study to report evidence of major genes for osteochondral lesions in pigs; these results may also form a basis for underpinning the genetic inheritance of this disease in other animals as well as in humans. PMID:16020792

  18. The adipokine lipocalin-2 in the context of the osteoarthritic osteochondral junction

    PubMed Central

    Villalvilla, Amanda; García-Martín, Adela; Largo, Raquel; Gualillo, Oreste; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Gómez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and osteoarthritis (OA) form a vicious circle in which obesity contributes to cartilage destruction in OA, and OA-associated sedentary behaviour promotes weight gain. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2), a novel adipokine with catabolic activities in OA joints, contributes to the obesity and OA pathologies and is associated with other OA risk factors. LCN2 is highly induced in osteoblasts in the absence of mechanical loading, but its role in osteoblast metabolism is unclear. Therefore, because osteochondral junctions play a major role in OA development, we investigated the expression and role of LCN2 in osteoblasts and chondrocytes in the OA osteochondral junction environment. Our results showed that LCN2 expression in human osteoblasts and chondrocytes decreased throughout osteoblast differentiation and was induced by catabolic and inflammatory factors; however, TGF-β1 and IGF-1 reversed this induction. LCN2 reduced osteoblast viability in the presence of iron and enhanced the activity of MMP-9 released by osteoblasts. Moreover, pre-stimulated human osteoblasts induced LCN2 expression in human chondrocytes, but the inverse was not observed. Thus, LCN2 is an important catabolic adipokine in osteoblast and chondrocyte metabolism that is regulated by differentiation, inflammation and catabolic and anabolic stimuli, and LCN2 expression in chondrocytes is regulated in a paracrine manner after osteoblast stimulation. PMID:27385438

  19. Characterization of mRNA expression for the endothelial differentiation G-protein-coupled (EDG) receptors in porcine endometrial tissue during the pre-implantation period of pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of pregnancy in the pig requires proper preparation of the uterine environment. Although the mechanisms by which the endometrium undergoes preparation for embryo implantation are not clear, recent evidence has suggested that lysophospholipids, such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and ...

  20. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  1. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation versus Debridement in the Treatment of Osteochondritis Dessicans of the Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Seth; Braunstein, Jacob; Rabinowitz, Justin; Barfield, William R.; Chhabra, Bobby; Haro, Marc Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this systematic review and meta- analysis is to compare clinical results and functional outcomes in patients with osteochondritis dessicans (OCD) lesions of the capitellum treated with either osteochondral autograft transplantation (OATS) or debridement with or without microfracture. Methods: Systematic review of multiple medical databases was performed after PROSPERO registration and using PRISMA guidelines. A literature search was performed using the multiple medical databases and the methodological quality of the individual studies was assessed by two review authors using the Cochrane Collaboration’s “Risk of Bias” tool. Case reports were excluded and only case series of more than five patients and higher level of evidence were included. All study, subject, and surgery parameters were collected. Data was analyzed using statistical software. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated when possible. Data were compared using Pearson Chi-Square and independent sample T tests when applicable. Results: Fifteen studies were included involving 368 patients (326 males and 42 females). There were a total of 197 patients in the debridement group and 171 patients in the OATS group. The mean age was 16.9 +/-4.1 for the debridement group and 14.6 +/-1.2 for the OATS group. Mean follow up was 29.0 +/-24.3 and 38.0 +/-12.8 for the debridement and OATS groups, respectively. Patients that underwent an OATS procedure had a statistically significant improvement in overall arc range of motion compared to patients that had a debridement (P≤0.001). When compared to patients with debridement, patients with OATS were 5.6 times more likely to return to at least their pre-injury level of sports participation (p≤0.002). Conclusion: Post-operative range of motion was significantly improved in patients undergoing an OATS procedure versus a debridement for OCD lesions of the capitellum. Patients with an OATS were 5.7 times more likely to return to at least the pre

  2. Reconstruction of complex osteochondral lesions of the talus with cylindrical sponge allograft and particulate juvenile cartilage graft: provisional results with a short-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott; Brigido, Stephen A

    2012-10-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus can be a challenging injury to treat for even the most experienced foot and ankle surgeon. Although the advances in imaging have made the diagnosis of chondral lesions more accurate, surgeons are still struggling to find ways to reliably treat advanced lesions with subchondral bone damage. This article looks at the use of allograft bone and particulate juvenile cartilage in patients with advanced subchondral bone damage and osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  3. Feasibility of ultrasound imaging of osteochondral defects in the ankle: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kok, A C; Terra, M P; Muller, S; Askeland, C; van Dijk, C N; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Tuijthof, G J M

    2014-10-01

    Talar osteochondral defects (OCDs) are imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). For extensive follow-up, ultrasound might be a fast, non-invasive alternative that images both bone and cartilage. In this study the potential of ultrasound, as compared with CT, in the imaging and grading of OCDs is explored. On the basis of prior CT scans, nine ankles of patients without OCDs and nine ankles of patients with anterocentral OCDs were selected and classified using the Loomer CT classification. A blinded expert skeletal radiologist imaged all ankles with ultrasound and recorded the presence of OCDs. Similarly to CT, ultrasound revealed typical morphologic OCD features, for example, cortex irregularities and loose fragments. Cartilage disruptions, Loomer grades IV (displaced fragment) and V (cyst with fibrous roof), were visible as well. This study encourages further research on the use of ultrasound as a follow-up imaging modality for OCDs located anteriorly or centrally on the talar dome.

  4. Bioglass®/chitosan-polycaprolactone bilayered composite scaffolds intended for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqing; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Detsch, Rainer; Roether, Judith A; Dong, Yanming; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-12-01

    Polymer-coated 45S5 Bioglass(®) (BG)/chitosan-polycaprolactone (BG/CS-PCL) bilayered composite scaffolds were prepared via foam replication and freeze-drying techniques for application in osteochondral tissue engineering. The CS-PCL coated and uncoated BG scaffolds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the coated scaffolds were significantly improved in comparison to uncoated scaffolds. The bioactivity and biodegradation behavior of scaffolds were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28 days. The interface between the BG scaffold and the polymer coating layer was observed by SEM and a suitable interpenetration of the polymer into the scaffold struts was found. The effects of coated and uncoated BG scaffolds on MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated by cell viability, adhesion and proliferation.

  5. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  6. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  7. Osteochondritis dissecans and Osgood Schlatter disease in a family with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is among the most common autosomal dominant connective tissue disorders but is often unrecognised and therefore not diagnosed by clinicians. Despite much speculation, the cause of osteochondrosis in general and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) in particular remain unclear. Etiological understanding is essential. We describe a pair of family subjects presented with OCD and OSS as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis. Methods Detailed clinical and radiographic examinations were undertaken with emphasis on the role of MRI imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may allow early prediction of articular lesion healing potential in patients with Stickler syndrome. Results The phenotype of Stickler syndrome can be diverse and therefore misleading. The expectation that the full clinical criteria of any given genetic disorder such as Stickler syndrome will always be present can easily lead to an underestimation of these serious inheritable disorders. We report here two family subjects, a male proband and his aunt (paternal sister), both presented with the major features of Stickler syndrome. Tall stature with marfanoid habitus, astigmatism/congenital vitreous abnormality and submucus cleft palate/cleft uvula, and enlarged painful joints with early onset osteoarthritis. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) and Osgood Schlatter syndrome (OSS) were the predominating joint abnormalities. Conclusion We observed that the nature of the articular and physeal abnormalities was consistent with a localised manifestation of a more generalised epiphyseal dysplasia affecting the weight-bearing joints. In these two patients, OCD and OSS appeared to be the predominant pathologic musculoskeletal consequences of an underlying Stickler's syndrome. It is empirical to consider generalised epiphyseal dysplasia as a major underlying causation that might drastically affect the weight-bearing joints. PMID:19193224

  8. Clinical outcome of internal fixation of unstable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the knee.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jonathan E; Lewallen, Laura W; Christophersen, Christy; Krych, Aaron J; McIntosh, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions of the knee are a common cause of knee pain in skeletally immature patients.The authors sought to determine lesion healing rates, the risk factors associated with failure to heal, and the clinical outcomes for patients who underwent internal fixation for unstable OCD lesions. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent internal fixation of OCD lesions from 1999 to 2009. Using validated scoring systems, clinical outcome and functional activity were evaluated at the follow-up. The study group comprised 19 patients (20 knees). Mean patient age was 14.5 years (range, 12-17 years). Mean clinical follow-up was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). Mean radiographic follow-up was 2.5 years (range, 0.5-9 years). Fourteen (70%) lesions were grade 3 and 6 (30%) were grade 4. Eleven knees had lateral condyle lesions and 9 had medial lesions. Bioabsorbable fixation was used in 13 knees, metal fixation was used in 5 knees, and 2 knees were fixed with a combination of methods. Osseous integration was evident in 15 (75%) of 20 knees at final follow-up. The 5 unhealed lesions were lateral condylar lesions. Mean Tegner activity scores improved from 3.3 preoperatively to 5.6 at final follow-up. Mean Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee scores were 86.8 and 88.7, respectively, at final follow-up. Further operative intervention was required in 11 knees, with 50% of patients undergoing removal of hardware and 15% requiring subsequent osteochondral allograft transplantation. The authors recommend bioabsorbable fixation for symptomatic stable lesions and metal compression screws with staged removal for unstable lesions.

  9. Return to Sport After Operative Management of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Robert W.; Hancock, Kyle J.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Kopp, Benjamin; Glass, Natalie; Wolf, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capitellar osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is commonly managed surgically in symptomatic adolesent throwers and gymnasts. Little is known about the impact that surgical technique has on return to sport. Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and return-to-sport rates after operative management of OCD lesions in adolescent athletes. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus (EBSCO), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were queried for studies evaluating outcomes and return to sport after surgical management of OCD of the capitellum. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies reporting patient outcomes with return-to-sport data and minimum 6-month follow-up were included in the review. Results: After review, 24 studies reporting outcomes in 492 patients (mean age ± SD, 14.3 ± 0.9 years) were analyzed. The overall return-to-sport rate was 86% at a mean 5.6 months. Return to the highest preoperative level of sport was most common after osteochondral autograft procedures (94%) compared with debridement and marrow stimulation procedures (71%) or OCD fixation surgery (64%). Elbow range of motion improved by 15.9° after surgery. The Timmerman-Andrews subjective and objective scores significantly improved after surgery. Complications were low (<5%), with 2 cases of donor site morbidity after osteoarticular autograft transfer (OAT) autograft harvest. The most common indications for reoperation were repeat debridement/loose body removal. Conclusion: A high rate of return to sport was observed after operative management of capitellar OCD. Patients were more likely to return to their highest level of preoperative sport after OAT autograft compared with debridement or fixation. Significant improvements in elbow range of motion and patient outcomes are

  10. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and ER-stress in the physiopathology of equine osteochondritis dissecans (OCD).

    PubMed

    Desjardin, Clémence; Chat, Sophie; Gilles, Mailys; Legendre, Rachel; Riviere, Julie; Mata, Xavier; Balliau, Thierry; Esquerré, Diane; Cribiu, Edmond P; Betch, Jean-Marc; Schibler, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental bone disorder affecting several mammalian species including the horse. Equine OC is described as a focal disruption of endochondral ossification, leading to osteochondral lesions (osteochondritis dissecans, OCD) that may release free bodies within the joint. OCD lesions trigger joint swelling, stiffness and lameness and affects about 30% of the equine population. OCD is considered as multifactorial but its physiopathology is still poorly understood and genes involved in genetic predisposition are still unknown. Our study compared two healthy and two OC-affected 18-month-old French Trotters diagnosed with OCD lesions at the intermediate ridge of the distal tibia. A comparative shot-gun proteomic analysis of non-wounded cartilage and sub-chondral bone from healthy (healthy samples) and OC-affected foals (predisposed samples) identified 83 and 53 modulated proteins, respectively. These proteins are involved in various biological pathways including matrix structure and maintenance, protein biosynthesis, folding and transport, mitochondrial activity, energy and calcium metabolism. Transmission electron microscopy revealed typical features of mitochondrial swelling and ER-stress, such as large, empty mitochondria, and hyper-dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, in the deep zone of both OC lesions and predisposed cartilage. Abnormal fibril organization surrounding chondrocytes and abnormal features at the ossification front were also observed. Combining these findings with quantitative trait loci and whole genome sequencing results identified about 140 functional candidate genes carrying putative damaging mutations in 30 QTL regions. In summary, our study suggests that OCD lesions may result from defective hypertrophic terminal differentiation associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and ER-stress, leading to impaired cartilage and bone biomechanical properties, making them prone to fractures. In addition, 11 modulated proteins and

  11. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  12. RFID technology for human implant devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Hervé

    2011-09-01

    This article presents an overview on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for human implants and investigates the technological feasibility of such implants for locating and tracking persons or for remotely controlling human biological functions. Published results on the miniaturization of implantable passive RFID devices are reported as well as a discussion on the choice of the transmission frequency in wireless communication between a passive RFID device implanted inside human body and an off-body interrogator. The two techniques (i.e., inductive coupling and electromagnetic coupling) currently used for wirelessly supplying power to and read data from a passive implantable RFID device are described and some documented biomedical and therapeutic applications of human RFID-implant devices are finally reported.

  13. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  14. Effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 and hyaluronic acid in experimentally produced osteochondral defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alemdar, Celil; Yücel, İstemi; Erbil, Barış; Erdem, Havva; Atiç, Ramazan; Özkul, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The common purpose of almost all methods used to treat the osteochondral injuries is to produce a normal cartilage matrix. However current methods are not sufficient to provide a normal cartilage matrix. For that reason, researchers have studied to increase the effectiveness of this methods using chondrogenic and chondroprotective molecules in recent experimental studies. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are two important agents used in this field. This study compared the effects of IGF-1 and HA in an experimental osteochondral defect in rat femora. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into three groups (n = 15 per group) as follows: The IGF-1 group, HA group, and control group. An osteochondral defect of a diameter of 1.5 mm and a depth of 2 mm was created on the patellar joint side of femoral condyles. The IGF-1 group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 15 μg/15 μl of IGF-1, and the HA group received an absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with 80 μg HA. The control group received only an absorbable gelatin sponge. Rats were sacrificed at the 6th week, and the femur condyles were evaluated histologically. Results: According to the total Mankin scale, there was a statistically significant difference between IGF-1 and HA groups and between IGF-1 and control groups. There was also a significant statistical difference between HA and control groups. Conclusion: It was shown histopathologically that IGF-1 is an effective molecule for osteochondral lesions. Although it is weaker than IGF-1, HA also strengthened the repair tissue. PMID:27512224

  15. Arthroscopic Treatment of Chondral and Osteochondral Defects in the Ankle Using the Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis Technique

    PubMed Central

    Piontek, Tomasz; Bąkowski, Paweł; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Naczk, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges nowadays facing orthopaedic surgeons around the world is the problem of articular cartilage defects and their treatment. The autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis technique is based on 2 elements—drilling into bones and matrix application. The purpose of this article is to present the surgical technique of arthroscopic treatment of chondral or osteochondral defects in the ankle using the autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis technique. PMID:26697305

  16. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants. PMID:26652644

  17. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants.

  18. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  19. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  20. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Niina; Wardale, John; Brooks, Roger; Power, Jonathan; Rushton, Neil; Henson, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC’s were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1) MSC alone; (2) MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3) MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4) PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair. Fresh PBMC samples were 90% positive for hematopoietic cell surface markers and negative for the MSC antibody panel (<1%, p = 0.006). However, the adherent PBMC population expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers in hypoxic culture and lacked CD34/45 positive cells (<0.2%). This finding demonstrated that the adherent cells had acquired an MSC-like phenotype and transformed in hypoxia from their original hematopoietic lineage. Four key genes in muskuloskeletal biology were significantly upregulated in adherent PBMCs by hypoxia: BMP2 4.2-fold (p = 0.0007), BMP6 10.7-fold (p = 0.0004), GDF5 2.0-fold (p = 0.002) and COL1 5.0-fold (p = 0.046). The monolayer multilineage analysis confirmed the trilineage mesenchymal potential of the adherent PBMCs. PBMC cell therapy was equally good as bone marrow MSC therapy for defects in the ovine large animal model. Our results show that PBMCs support cartilage healing and oxygen tension of the environment was found to have a key

  1. Evidence of a Major Gene From Bayesian Segregation Analyses of Liability to Osteochondral Diseases in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Janss, Luc L. G.

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian segregation analyses were used to investigate the mode of inheritance of osteochondral lesions (osteochondrosis, OC) in pigs. Data consisted of 1163 animals with OC and their pedigrees included 2891 animals. Mixed-inheritance threshold models (MITM) and several variants of MITM, in conjunction with Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, were developed for the analysis of these (categorical) data. Results showed major genes with significant and substantially higher variances (range 1.384–37.81), compared to the polygenic variance (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\pagestyle{empty} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{{\\sigma}}}_{{\\mathrm{u}}}^{2}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Consequently, heritabilities for a mixed inheritance (range 0.65–0.90) were much higher than the heritabilities from the polygenes. Disease allele frequencies range was 0.38–0.88. Additional analyses estimating the transmission probabilities of the major gene showed clear evidence for Mendelian segregation of a major gene affecting osteochondrosis. The variants, MITM with informative prior on \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\pagestyle{empty} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{{\\sigma}}}_{{\\mathrm{u}}}^{2}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}, showed significant improvement in marginal distributions and accuracy of parameters. MITM with a “reduced polygenic model” for parameterization of polygenic effects avoided convergence problems and poor mixing encountered in an “individual polygenic model.” In all cases, “shrinkage estimators” for fixed effects avoided unidentifiability for these parameters. The mixed

  2. The Incidence of Surgery in Osteochondritis Dissecans in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Nikizad, Hooman; Shea, Kevin G.; Gyurdzhyan, Samvel; Jacobs, John C.; Cannamela, Peter C.; Kessler, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), a disorder of the subchondral bone and articular cartilage, is not well described. Purpose: To assess the frequency of pediatric OCD lesions that progress to surgery based on sex, joint involvement, and age. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A retrospective chart review (2007-2011) was performed on OCD. Inclusion criteria included OCD of any joint and patients aged 2 to 19 years. Exclusion criteria included traumatic osteochondral fractures or coexistence of non-OCD intra-articular lesions. Differences in progression toward surgery were compared between age groups, sex, and joint location. Logistical regression analysis was performed by sex, age, and ethnicity. Results: Overall, 317 patients with a total of 334 OCD lesions were found. The majority of lesions (61.7%) were in the knee, with ankle, elbow, shoulder, and foot lesions representing 25.4%, 12.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3% of all lesions, respectively. The majority of joints needing surgery were in the knee (58.5%), with ankle and elbow lesions representing 22.9% and 18.6% of surgeries performed, respectively. The percentage of all OCD lesions progressing to surgery was 35.3%; surgical progression for knee, ankle, and elbow joints was 33.5%, 31.8%, and 55.0%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis found no statistically significant different risk of progressing to surgery for OCD of the knee, elbow, and ankle between sexes. Patients aged 12 to 19 years had a 7.4-times greater risk of progression to surgery for knee OCD lesions than 6- to 11-year-olds. Patients aged 12 to 19 years were 8.2 times more likely to progress to surgery for all OCD lesions than patients aged 6 to 11 years. Progression to surgery of ankle OCD did not significantly differ based on location. Three of 4 trochlear lesions progressed to surgery, along with 1 of 1 tibial, 1 of 3 patellar, 40.3% of lateral femoral condylar, and 28.2% of medial femoral condylar

  3. Cementable implant-supported prosthesis, serial extraction, and serial implant installation: case report.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Harry; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2004-12-01

    Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses are particularly indicated where access for screw placement is limited or impossible like in posterior locations or where there is limited jaw opening. The patient in this case report suffered from limited jaw opening as a result of a long history of temporomandibular joint ankylosis related to hemophilia. Cement-retained implant-supported prostheses coupled with serial extraction, serial implant installations, and chairside provisional restorations made uneventful treatment possible.

  4. Lunate Osteochondral Fracture Treated by Excision: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sadegh; Arabzadeh, Aidin; Farhoud, Amir Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lunate fracture is a rare injury. Most reports are associated with other wrist injuries such as perilunate dislocation and distal radius fracture. Isolated lunate fracture has been reported even more rarely. The choice of treatment and outcomes are consequently undetermined. Case Presentation In this case report we will describe a lunate avulsion fracture as an isolated injury after a fall from nine meters treated operatively by excision of the comminuted avulsed fragment. After 33 months of follow-up radiographs showed no sign of degenerative joint disorder on simple X-ray, but slight Volar Intercalated Segment Instability (VISI) by a capitolunate angle of 26 degrees was noted. Clinically, the patient was pain free near full wrist and forearm range of motion and could perform his previous vocational and recreational tasks without any limitations. Conclusions Despite apparently good short and mid-term clinical outcome, slight volar intercalated segment instability after 33 months of follow-up revealed that lunotriquetral ligament function was probably lost, which led to static instability. This ligament injury may be missed primarily. Excision of the avulsed osteochondral fragment should be the last option of treatment and most attempts should be tried to fix and/or restore the normal anatomy of ligamentous structure. PMID:27626007

  5. Evaluation of biomarkers following autologous osteochondral transplantation in the equine stifle joint - An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tuska, Pál; Tóth, Balázs; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Hangody, László; Papp, Miklós; Bodó, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in biomarker and synovial parameters following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in the equine stifle joint, to test the hypothesis whether synovial parameters would show significant differences at selected time points following the surgery (at days 3, 14, 60 and 180) compared to baseline level (at day 0). Surgical intervention was performed in both stifles of nine horses (n = 18). The joints were randomly assigned to operated and sham-operated groups. Grafts 8.5 mm in diameter were harvested from the femoropatellar (FP) joint under arthroscopic control and the medial femorotibial (MFT) joints had AOT using mosaicplasty (MP) instrumentation, while the sham FP and sham MFT joints underwent arthroscopy and miniarthrotomy without transplantation, respectively. Synovial fluid (SF) parameters were evaluated at days 4, 14, 60 and 180. Data were analysed by two-way repeated- measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and P < 0.05 was considered significant. During the first 10-14 days after surgery, lameness of degree 2-3/5 [American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) scores] was present, which disappeared after 60 days. Joints with transplantation showed significant increases in synovial white blood cell count (WBC), total protein (TP), substance P, C1,2C and CS846 epitope concentration at day 3 compared to baseline and shamoperated joints (P < 0.05). These parameters returned to the baseline values by two months after surgery and remained within normal levels at 6 months postoperatively. PMID:27342088

  6. Effects of management practices as risk factors for juvenile osteochondral conditions in 259 French yearlings.

    PubMed

    Praud, Anne; Dufour, Barbara; Robert, Céline; Valette, Jean-Paul; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a statistical association between management practices and juvenile osteochondral conditions (JOCC) in foals from birth to 6months of age, but this association has not been investigated in yearlings. The purpose of the current study was to determine the adjusted effects of management practices on the onset and evolution of JOCC in French yearlings. The study sample consisted of 259 yearlings born on 20 stud farms in Normandy. The breeding conditions of these horses were monitored from 6 to 17months. They were radiographed at 6 and 17months to determine their radiographic score (RS) and its evolution. Potential risk factors were investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. The prevalence of JOCC was 48% at 6months and 42% at 17months. Between 6 and 17months, the RS changed (for better or worse) in 52% of yearlings. The main risk factors leading to deterioration in the RS were traumatic. 'Mixed housing' during winter, pastures with rough ground and a bad RS at 6months were significantly associated with deterioration in RS between 6 and 17months. In the multivariate analysis, the breed was not significantly associated with any evolution in the yearlings' RS. This study provides some indications on protective measures to prevent the worsening of JOCC lesions between 6 and 17months, a crucial period since it precedes the sale of yearlings and the beginning of training.

  7. Challenges in engineering osteochondral tissue grafts with hierarchical structures Ivana Gadjanski, Gordana Vunjak Novakovic

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A major hurdle in treating osteochondral (OC) defects are the different healing abilities of two types of tissues involved - articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Biomimetic approaches to OC-construct-engineering, based on recapitulation of biological principles of tissue development and regeneration, have potential for providing new treatments and advancing fundamental studies of OC tissue repair. Areas covered This review on state of the art in hierarchical OC tissue graft engineering is focused on tissue engineering approaches designed to recapitulate the native milieu of cartilage and bone development. These biomimetic systems are discussed with relevance to bioreactor cultivation of clinically sized, anatomically shaped human cartilage/bone constructs with physiologic stratification and mechanical properties. The utility of engineered OC tissue constructs is evaluated for their use as grafts in regenerative medicine, and as high-fidelity models in biological research. Expert opinion A major challenge in engineering OC tissues is to generate a functionally integrated stratified cartilage-bone structure starting from one single population of mesenchymal cells, while incorporating perfusable vasculature into the bone, and in bone-cartilage interface. To this end, new generations of advanced scaffolds and bioreactors, implementation of mechanical loading regimens, and harnessing of inflammatory responses of the host will likely drive the further progress. PMID:26195329

  8. Osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum: a review of the literature and a distal ulnar portal.

    PubMed

    van den Ende, Kimberly I M; McIntosh, Amy L; Adams, Julie E; Steinmann, Scott P

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the humeral capitellum most commonly affects young athletes engaged in sports that repetitively stress the elbow. It is characterized by localized injury of subchondral bone of the humeral capitellum. To determine the best treatment option for OCD in young athletes, it is important to differentiate between stable and unstable OCD lesions. Stable lesions can be treated with rest, whereas unstable lesions, as well stable lesions that do not respond to conservative therapy, may require a surgical approach. Magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic study of choice to evaluate capitellar OCD lesions and loose bodies and to accurately determine the stability and viability of the OCD fragment. A variety of surgical approaches have been reported, from internal fixation of large fragments to autologous chondrocyte grafts. Arthroscopic surgery is becoming the standard treatment of capitellar OCD. This minimally invasive approach shows good results, a low risk of operative morbidity, and early recuperation postoperatively. The distal ulnar portal we describe here allows for ergonomic exposure to the posterolateral capitellum, providing easier access for drilling, burring, and local debridement of lesions amenable to arthroscopy.

  9. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  10. Reconfigurable Resonant Regulating Rectifier With Primary Equalization for Extended Coupling- and Loading-Range in Bio-Implant Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Meng, Xiaodong; Tsui, Chi-Ying; Ki, Wing-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Wireless power transfer using reconfigurable resonant regulating (R(3)) rectification suffers from limited range in accommodating varying coupling and loading conditions. A primary-assisted regulation principle is proposed to mitigate these limitations, of which the amplitude of the rectifier input voltage on the secondary side is regulated by accordingly adjusting the voltage amplitude Veq on the primary side. A novel current-sensing method and calibration scheme track Veq on the primary side. A ramp generator simultaneously provides three clock signals for different modules. Both the primary equalizer and the R(3) rectifier are implemented as custom integrated circuits fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process, with the global control implemented in FPGA. Measurements show that with the primary equalizer, the workable coupling and loading ranges are extended by 250% at 120 mW load and 300% at 1.2 cm coil distance compared to the same system without the primary equalizer. A maximum rectifier efficiency of 92.5% and a total system efficiency of 62.4% are demonstrated. PMID:26742141

  11. Reconfigurable Resonant Regulating Rectifier With Primary Equalization for Extended Coupling- and Loading-Range in Bio-Implant Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Meng, Xiaodong; Tsui, Chi-Ying; Ki, Wing-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Wireless power transfer using reconfigurable resonant regulating (R(3)) rectification suffers from limited range in accommodating varying coupling and loading conditions. A primary-assisted regulation principle is proposed to mitigate these limitations, of which the amplitude of the rectifier input voltage on the secondary side is regulated by accordingly adjusting the voltage amplitude Veq on the primary side. A novel current-sensing method and calibration scheme track Veq on the primary side. A ramp generator simultaneously provides three clock signals for different modules. Both the primary equalizer and the R(3) rectifier are implemented as custom integrated circuits fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process, with the global control implemented in FPGA. Measurements show that with the primary equalizer, the workable coupling and loading ranges are extended by 250% at 120 mW load and 300% at 1.2 cm coil distance compared to the same system without the primary equalizer. A maximum rectifier efficiency of 92.5% and a total system efficiency of 62.4% are demonstrated.

  12. Fate of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells following the allogeneic transplantation of cartilaginous aggregates into osteochondral defects of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Kaul, Zeenia; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Sakai, Shinsuke; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to track mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labelled with internalizing quantum dots (i-QDs) in the reparative tissues, following the allogeneic transplantation of three-dimensional (3D) cartilaginous aggregates into the osteochondral defects of rabbits. QDs were conjugated with a unique internalizing antibody against a heat shock protein-70 (hsp70) family stress chaperone, mortalin, which is upregulated and expressed on the surface of dividing cells. The i-QDs were added to the culture medium for 24 h. Scaffold-free cartilaginous aggregates formed from i-QD-labelled MSCs (i-MSCs), using a 3D culture system with chondrogenic supplements for 1 week, were transplanted into osteochondral defects of rabbits. At 4, 8 and 26 weeks after the transplantation, the reparative tissues were evaluated macroscopically, histologically and fluoroscopically. At as early as 4 weeks, the defects were covered with a white tissue resembling articular cartilage. In histological appearance, the reparative tissues resembled hyaline cartilage on safranin-O staining throughout the 26 weeks. In the deeper portion, subchondral bone and bone marrow were well remodelled. On fluoroscopic evaluation, QDs were tracked mainly in bone marrow stromata, with some signals detected in cartilage and the subchondral bone layer. We showed that the labelling of rabbit MSCs with anti-mortalin antibody-conjugated i-QDs is a tolerable procedure and provides a stable fluorescence signal during the cartilage repair process for up to 26 weeks after transplantation. The results suggest that i-MSCs did not inhibit, and indeed contributed to, the regeneration of osteochondral defects.

  13. Closed-Wedge osteotomy for osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum. A 7- to 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshige, Y; Takagi, M; Yuasa, K; Hamasaki, M

    2000-01-01

    This article details a 7- to 12-year follow-up of seven young male baseball players with osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum that we treated using closed-wedge osteotomy. This procedure was established by Yoshizu in 1986 for the treatment of "Little League elbow." The bone of the capitellum was revascularized and remodeled within 6 months in all seven patients. Six of the patients were able to return to full athletic activity and continued to play baseball. Radiographic assessment during the follow-up study revealed minimal osteoarthritic change and suggests that the treatment is useful for such an injury.

  14. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2nd group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Results: At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. Conclusion: The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged. PMID:26015603

  15. Hybrid quantum circuit with implanted erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Rotzinger, H.; Tkalčec, A.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Wünsch, S.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with focused ion beam implanted Er{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} coupled to an array of superconducting lumped element microwave resonators. The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal is divided into several areas with distinct erbium doping concentrations, each coupled to a separate resonator. The coupling strength is varied from 5 MHz to 18.7 MHz, while the linewidth ranges between 50 MHz and 130 MHz. We confirm the paramagnetic properties of the implanted spin ensemble by evaluating the temperature dependence of the coupling. The efficiency of the implantation process is analyzed and the results are compared to a bulk doped Er:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} sample. We demonstrate the integration of these engineered erbium spin ensembles with superconducting circuits.

  16. Photocrosslinked layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel with graded compositions for osteochondral defect repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengxuan; Yang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Yunhui; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    A layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel with graded composition was prepared via photocrosslinking to simulate the polysaccharide/collagen composition of the natural tissue and mimic the multi-layered gradient structure of the cartilage-bone interface tissue. Firstly, gelatin and carboxymethyl chitosan were reacted with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) to obtain methacrylated gelatin (Gtn-GMA) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CS-GMA). Then, the mixed solutions of Gtn-GMA in different methacrylation degrees with CS-GMA were prepared to form the superficial, transitional and deep layers of the hydrogel, respectively under the irradiation of ultraviolet light, while polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was introduced in the deep layer to improve the mechanical properties. Results suggested that the pore sizes of the superficial, transitional and deep layers of the layered hydrogel were 115 ± 30, 94 ± 34, 51 ± 12 μm, respectively and their porosities were all higher than 80 %. The compressive strengths of them were 165 ± 54, 565 ± 50 and 993 ± 108 kPa, respectively and the strain of the gradient hydrogel decreased along the thickness direction, similar to the natural tissue. The in vitro cytotoxicity results showed that the hydrogel had good cytocompatibility and the in vivo repair results of osteochondral defect demonstrated remarkable recovery by using the gradient gelatin-chitosan hydrogel, especially when the hydrogel loading transforming growth factor-β1. Therefore, it was suggested that the prepared layered gelatin-chitosan hydrogel in this study could be potentially used to promote cartilage-bone interface tissue repair.

  17. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  18. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus in athletes: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    VANNINI, FRANCESCA; COSTA, GIUSEPPE GIANLUCA; CARAVELLI, SILVIO; PAGLIAZZI, GHERARDO; MOSCA, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose ankle injuries make up 15% of all sports injuries and osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) are an increasingly frequent problem in active patients. There exist no widely shared guidelines on OLT treatment in the athletic population. The aim of this paper is to review all the existing literature evidence on the surgical treatment of OLTs in athletes, in order to determine the current state of the art in this specific population, underlining both the limits and the potential of the strategies used. Methods a systematic review of the literature was performed focusing on the different types of surgical treatment used for OLTs in athletes. The screening process and analysis were performed separately by two independent researchers. The inclusion criteria for relevant articles were: clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English, with no time limitation, or clinical reports describing the treatment of OLTs in the athletic population. Results with the consensus of the two observers, relevant data were then extracted and collected in a single database to be analyzed for the purposes of the present manuscript. At the end of the process, 16 papers met the selection criteria. These papers report a total of 642 athletic patients with OCTs. Conclusions the ideal treatment for cartilage lesions in athletes is a controversial topic, due to the need for an early return to sports, especially in elite players; this need leads to extensive use of microfractures in this population, despite the poor quality of repair associated with this technique. None of the surgical strategies described in this paper seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence systematic review of level IV studies, level IV.

  19. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus in athletes: what is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    VANNINI, FRANCESCA; COSTA, GIUSEPPE GIANLUCA; CARAVELLI, SILVIO; PAGLIAZZI, GHERARDO; MOSCA, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose ankle injuries make up 15% of all sports injuries and osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) are an increasingly frequent problem in active patients. There exist no widely shared guidelines on OLT treatment in the athletic population. The aim of this paper is to review all the existing literature evidence on the surgical treatment of OLTs in athletes, in order to determine the current state of the art in this specific population, underlining both the limits and the potential of the strategies used. Methods a systematic review of the literature was performed focusing on the different types of surgical treatment used for OLTs in athletes. The screening process and analysis were performed separately by two independent researchers. The inclusion criteria for relevant articles were: clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English, with no time limitation, or clinical reports describing the treatment of OLTs in the athletic population. Results with the consensus of the two observers, relevant data were then extracted and collected in a single database to be analyzed for the purposes of the present manuscript. At the end of the process, 16 papers met the selection criteria. These papers report a total of 642 athletic patients with OCTs. Conclusions the ideal treatment for cartilage lesions in athletes is a controversial topic, due to the need for an early return to sports, especially in elite players; this need leads to extensive use of microfractures in this population, despite the poor quality of repair associated with this technique. None of the surgical strategies described in this paper seems to be superior to the others. Level of evidence systematic review of level IV studies, level IV. PMID:27602351

  20. Osteochondral lesion located at the lateral femoral condyle reconstructed by the transplantation of tissue-engineered cartilage in combination with a periosteum with bone block: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Uchio, Yuji; Iwasa, Junji; Furukawa, Seiji; Deie, Masataka

    2004-09-01

    We report herein the successful treatment of a patient with an osteochondral defect extending to the edge of the lateral femoral condyle by transplantation of tissue-engineered cartilage made ex vivo using atelocollagen gel covered by periosteum with a bone block to reconstruct the normal contour of the femoral condyle.

  1. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  2. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  3. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  4. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  5. The effects of early or late treatment of osteochondral defects on joint homoeostasis: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mehmet Hakan; Aydogdu, Semih; Taskiran, Dilek; Sezak, Murat; Hayran, Mutlu; Oztop, Fikri; Ozsoy, Arzu

    2009-06-01

    A 3.5 x 4 mm tubular osteochondral defect was created on the right medial femoral condyles of 51 adult rabbits. In the control group (CG), defects were left untreated. In the early-(ETG) and late-(LTG) treatment groups, defects were treated by an osteoperiosteal graft 1 and 12 weeks, respectively, after the index procedure. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were collected regularly and proteoglycan fragments (PF), total collagen (TC) and collagenase (MMP-1) levels were measured. Rabbits were killed at 4 (early period), 12 (intermediate period), or 24 (late period) weeks postoperatively. Histological examination indicated a more successful healing in both grafting groups than in the CG, but without any difference at any time period between the grafting groups. In the CG, PF, and TC levels in SF increased continuously until the late period, indicating an ongoing degenerative activity in the joints. In contrast, SF marker levels in both grafting groups indicated that normalization in joint metabolism could be achieved-at least partially-after treatment. However, PF levels in the SF showed that the treatment of defects in earlier stages might result in better outcomes since the negative effects were more prominent in chronic stages, presumably due to the more prolonged period of disturbed homeostasis. Thus, histological values and SF marker levels indicated that treatment of osteochondral defects at any time of the disease had a positive effect on healing when compared to no treatment. Early treatment might better assist the recovery of joint homeostasis than late treatment.

  6. Expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 is associated with occurrence of osteochondral change in pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takehiro; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Kozawa, Eiji; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Hamada, Shunsuke; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Ishiguro, Naoki; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign, translocation-derived neoplasm. Because of its high local recurrence rate after surgery and occurrence of osteochondral destruction, a novel therapeutic target is required. The present study aimed to evaluate the significance of protein expression possibly associated with the pathogenesis during the clinical course of PVNS. In 40 cases of PVNS, positivity of colony-stimulated factor 1 (CSF1), its receptor (CSF1R), and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) were immunohistochemically determined. The relationship between the positivity and clinical outcomes was investigated. High positivity of CSF1 staining intensity was associated with an increased incidence of osteochondral lesions (bone erosion and osteoarthritis) (p = 0.009), but not with the rate of local recurrence. Positivity of CSF1R and RANKL staining was not associated with any clinical variables. The number of giant cells was not correlated with positivity of any of the three proteins, or with the clinical outcome. Focusing on knee cases, CSF1 positivity was also associated with the incidence of osteochondal change (p = 0.02). CSF1R positivity was high in cases which had local recurrence, but not significantly so (p = 0.129). Determination of CSF1 and CSF1R expression may be useful as a prognosticator of the clinical course and/or outcomes of PVNS.

  7. Composite scaffolds for osteochondral repair obtained by combination of additive manufacturing, leaching processes and hMSC-CM functionalization.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Alarcón Iniesta, Hernán; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación

    2016-02-01

    Articular repair is a relevant and challenging area for the emerging fields of tissue engineering and biofabrication. The need of significant gradients of properties, for the promotion of osteochondral repair, has led to the development of several families of composite biomaterials and scaffolds, using different effective approaches, although a perfect solution has not yet been found. In this study we present the design, modeling, rapid manufacturing and in vitro testing of a composite scaffold aimed at osteochondral repair. The presented composite scaffold stands out for having a functional gradient of density and stiffness in the bony phase, obtained in titanium by means of computer-aided design combined with additive manufacture using selective laser sintering. The chondral phase is obtained by sugar leaching, using a PDMS matrix and sugar as porogen, and is joined to the bony phase during the polymerization of PDMS, therefore avoiding the use of supporting adhesives or additional intermediate layers. The mechanical performance of the construct is biomimetic and the stiffness values of the bony and chondral phases can be tuned to the desired applications, by means of controlled modifications of different parameters. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is used for improving scaffold response. Cell culture results provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used.

  8. All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for the Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; de Girolamo, Laura; Grassi, Miriam; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Boga, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Several surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of talar chondral lesions. Among them, microfracture is well established. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), using microfracture and biomaterials, has shown promising results for the treatment of knee osteochondral lesions and has been proposed for the ankle as an open technique. We describe an all-arthroscopic AMIC technique. The benefits of an all-arthroscopic procedure include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, and a quicker recovery compared with open surgery. The use of matrix to support cartilage regeneration promotes good-quality cartilage tissue with satisfactory long-term outcomes. Our all-arthroscopic AMIC technique uses a type I–type III porcine collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhusen, Switzerland) and is characterized by 2 different arthroscopic surgical phases. First, adequate exposure is achieved through use of a Hintermann spreader (Integra LifeSciences, Plainsboro, NJ) with sufficient joint distraction and wet lesion preparation. The second surgical step is performed dry, involving matrix placement and fixation. The all-arthroscopic AMIC technique for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus allows a very precise reconstruction in the case of cartilage defects and avoids the need for a more invasive operation associated with higher morbidity and a longer surgical time. PMID:26258040

  9. All-Arthroscopic Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis for the Treatment of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; de Girolamo, Laura; Grassi, Miriam; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Boga, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Several surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of talar chondral lesions. Among them, microfracture is well established. Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), using microfracture and biomaterials, has shown promising results for the treatment of knee osteochondral lesions and has been proposed for the ankle as an open technique. We describe an all-arthroscopic AMIC technique. The benefits of an all-arthroscopic procedure include smaller incisions with less soft-tissue dissection, better visualization of the joint, and a quicker recovery compared with open surgery. The use of matrix to support cartilage regeneration promotes good-quality cartilage tissue with satisfactory long-term outcomes. Our all-arthroscopic AMIC technique uses a type I-type III porcine collagen matrix (Chondro-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhusen, Switzerland) and is characterized by 2 different arthroscopic surgical phases. First, adequate exposure is achieved through use of a Hintermann spreader (Integra LifeSciences, Plainsboro, NJ) with sufficient joint distraction and wet lesion preparation. The second surgical step is performed dry, involving matrix placement and fixation. The all-arthroscopic AMIC technique for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus allows a very precise reconstruction in the case of cartilage defects and avoids the need for a more invasive operation associated with higher morbidity and a longer surgical time.

  10. Composite scaffolds for osteochondral repair obtained by combination of additive manufacturing, leaching processes and hMSC-CM functionalization.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Alarcón Iniesta, Hernán; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación

    2016-02-01

    Articular repair is a relevant and challenging area for the emerging fields of tissue engineering and biofabrication. The need of significant gradients of properties, for the promotion of osteochondral repair, has led to the development of several families of composite biomaterials and scaffolds, using different effective approaches, although a perfect solution has not yet been found. In this study we present the design, modeling, rapid manufacturing and in vitro testing of a composite scaffold aimed at osteochondral repair. The presented composite scaffold stands out for having a functional gradient of density and stiffness in the bony phase, obtained in titanium by means of computer-aided design combined with additive manufacture using selective laser sintering. The chondral phase is obtained by sugar leaching, using a PDMS matrix and sugar as porogen, and is joined to the bony phase during the polymerization of PDMS, therefore avoiding the use of supporting adhesives or additional intermediate layers. The mechanical performance of the construct is biomimetic and the stiffness values of the bony and chondral phases can be tuned to the desired applications, by means of controlled modifications of different parameters. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is used for improving scaffold response. Cell culture results provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used. PMID:26652367

  11. Total implantation of the active hearing implant TICA for middle ear disease: a temporal bone study.

    PubMed

    Maassen, M M; Lehner, R; Leysieffer, H; Baumann, I; Zenner, H P

    2001-10-01

    A subpopulation of hearing-impaired patients has conductive hearing loss that cannot be improved by classic tympanoplasty. Other patients have a mixed hearing loss and cannot be helped by present forms of ear surgery or by hearing aids. Possible help for some patients may come from current implantable hearing devices if these are modified for the patient's specific anatomic situation. The TICA LZ 3001 is a hearing implant for total implantation used to treat moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss. Most patients who use it have a normal ossicular chain that allows coupling of the implant to the incus. The present temporal bone study demonstrates that the TICA can also be used in patients with an interrupted ossicular chain. If the incus long process shows a defect, the TICA may be coupled to the incus body, and connection between the stapes and the long process of the incus can be achieved with a commercially available titanium-angle prosthesis or liquid ionomeric cement. In cases of an absent incus, the coupling axis of the transducer may be coupled to the stapes head via a modified coupling element. With an absent stapes, the coupling axis may be coupled directly to the perilymph by a coupling element similar to a gold stapes prosthesis.

  12. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic fields after arthroscopic treatment for osteochondral defects of the talus: double-blind randomized controlled multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Christiaan JA; Blankevoort, Leendert; de Haan, Rob J; Sierevelt, Inger N; Meuffels, Duncan E; d'Hooghe, Pieter RN; Krips, Rover; van Damme, Geert; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteochondral talar defects usually affect athletic patients. The primary surgical treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement and microfracturing. Although this is mostly successful, early sport resumption is difficult to achieve, and it can take up to one year to obtain clinical improvement. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) may be effective for talar defects after arthroscopic treatment by promoting tissue healing, suppressing inflammation, and relieving pain. We hypothesize that PEMF-treatment compared to sham-treatment after arthroscopy will lead to earlier resumption of sports, and aim at 25% increase in patients that resume sports. Methods/Design A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (RCT) will be conducted in five centers throughout the Netherlands and Belgium. 68 patients will be randomized to either active PEMF-treatment or sham-treatment for 60 days, four hours daily. They will be followed-up for one year. The combined primary outcome measures are (a) the percentage of patients that resume and maintain sports, and (b) the time to resumption of sports, defined by the Ankle Activity Score. Secondary outcome measures include resumption of work, subjective and objective scoring systems (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society – Ankle-Hindfoot Scale, Foot Ankle Outcome Score, Numeric Rating Scales of pain and satisfaction, EuroQol-5D), and computed tomography. Time to resumption of sports will be analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Discussion This trial will provide level-1 evidence on the effectiveness of PEMFs in the management of osteochondral ankle lesions after arthroscopy. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR1636) PMID:19591674

  14. Osteochondral lesions in distal tarsal joints of Icelandic horses reveal strong associations between hyaline and calcified cartilage abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ley, C J; Ekman, S; Hansson, K; Björnsdóttir, S; Boyde, A

    2014-03-25

    Osteochondral lesions in the joints of the distal tarsal region of young Icelandic horses provide a natural model for the early stages of osteoarthritis (OA) in low-motion joints. We describe and characterise mineralised and non-mineralised osteochondral lesions in left distal tarsal region joint specimens from twenty-two 30 ±1 month-old Icelandic horses. Combinations of confocal scanning light microscopy, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy (including, importantly, iodine staining) and three-dimensional microcomputed tomography were used on specimens obtained with guidance from clinical imaging. Lesion-types were described and classified into groups according to morphological features. Their locations in the hyaline articular cartilage (HAC), articular calcified cartilage (ACC), subchondral bone (SCB) and the joint margin tissues were identified and their frequency in the joints recorded. Associations and correlations between lesion-types were investigated for centrodistal joints only. In centrodistal joints the lesion-types HAC chondrocyte loss, HAC fibrillation, HAC central chondrocyte clusters, ACC arrest and ACC advance had significant associations and strong correlations. These lesion-types had moderate to high frequency in centrodistal joints but low frequencies in tarsometatarsal and talocalcaneal-centroquartal joints. Joint margin lesion-types had no significant associations with other lesion-types in the centrodistal joints but high frequency in both the centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints. The frequency of SCB lesion-types in all joints was low. Hypermineralised infill phase lesion-types were detected. Our results emphasise close associations between HAC and ACC lesions in equine centrodistal joints and the importance of ACC lesions in the development of OA in low-motion compression-loaded equine joints.

  15. Rehabilitation and return-to-sports activity after debridement and bone marrow stimulation of osteochondral talar defects.

    PubMed

    van Eekeren, Inge C M; Reilingh, Mikel L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2012-10-01

    An osteochondral defect (OD) is a lesion involving the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone. ODs of the talus can severely impact on the quality of life of patients, who are usually young and athletic. The primary treatment for ODs that are too small for fixation, consists of arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation. This article delineates levels of activity, determines times for return to activity and reviews the factors that affect rehabilitation after arthroscopic debridement and bone marrow stimulation of a talar OD. Articles for review were obtained from a search of the MEDLINE database up to January 2012 using the search headings 'osteochondral defects', 'bone marrow stimulation', 'sports/activity', 'rehabilitation', various other related factors and 'talus'. English-, Dutch- and German-language studies were evaluated.The review revealed that there is no consensus in the existing literature about rehabilitation times or return-to-sports activity times, after treatment with bone marrow stimulation of ODs in the talus. Furthermore, scant research has been conducted on these issues. The literature also showed that potential factors that aid rehabilitation could include youth, lower body mass index, smaller OD size, mobilization and treatment with growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, biphosphonates, hyaluronic acid and pulse electromagnetic fields. However, most studies have been conducted in vitro or on animals. We propose a scheme, whereby return-to-sports activity is divided into four phases of increasing intensity: walking, jogging, return to non-contact sports (running without swerving) and return to contact sports (running with swerving and collision). We also recommend that research, conducted on actual sportsmen, of recovery times after treatment of talar ODs is warranted.

  16. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  17. Cumulative Incidence of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum in Child and Adolescent Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Iwame, Toshiyuki; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prevalence of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is high among individuals who have played baseball since childhood. Recently two cross-sectional studies according to prevalence of OCD have been published. In a study of 1040 baseball players aged 10 to 12 years, Matsuura et al found that 2.1% of players had OCD, with no differences in prevalence according to age or player position. Kida et al., in their study of 2433 baseball players aged 12 to 18 years, found OCD in 3.4% of subjects. Furthermore, they found that players with OCD began playing baseball at earlier ages, had played for longer periods, and had experienced more elbow pain. The player’s current baseball position may not be related to the existence of OCD lesions. Together, these findings led us to examine the longitudinal study for examining the risk factors for occurrence of OCD. Our objectives were to determine (1) cumulative incidence rates of OCD in the school child players aged 6-11 years old, (2) the relative risk of OCD by age, beginning age playing baseball, playing period, experimental hours per week, playing position, and elbow pain. Methods: A total of 1,275 players aged 6-11 years (mean, 9.4 years) belonged to youth baseball teams without OCD lesions received examination in the next year and were the subjects of this investigation. Subjects were examined by questionnaire, and ultrasonographic and radiographic examination. Questionnaire items included age, player position, beginning age of playing baseball, playing period of baseball, number of training hours per week and history of elbow pain. Ultrasonography of the lateral aspect of the elbow was performed. An irregularity of the subchondral bone of the capitellum was regarded as an abnormality. Radiographic examination was recommended to players who had an abnormal finding on ultrasonographic examination. We investigated the following risk factors for occurrence of OCD: age, player position, beginning age of

  18. Peri-implantation Intercourse Lowers Fecundability

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Anne Z.; Pritchard, David A.; Young, Steven L.; Herring, Amy H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of sexual intercourse around the time of implantation on the probability of achieving a pregnancy. Design Time-to-pregnancy cohort using day-specific probability of pregnancy modeling to account for intercourse during the fertile window. Setting Community cohort. Patient(s) Women trying to conceive naturally, ages 30-44 without known infertility. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Positive pregnancy test Result(s) A total of 564 women provided 1,332 complete cycles for analysis. Intercourse frequency during the fertile window and during the peri-implantation window was significantly correlated. Cycles in which couples had 2 or more days with intercourse during the implantation window were significantly less likely to result in a positive pregnancy test compared to cycles in which couples didn’t have intercourse in this window, after adjusting for age, race, history of regular menstrual cycles, previous pregnancy, and body mass index (Fecundability Ratio=0.62, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.42-0.91). Conclusions Intercourse during the peri-implantation window may be detrimental to natural fertility. Methods that allow couples to time intercourse to the fertile window may decrease time to pregnancy by not only increasing the probability of fertilization but also decreasing the probability of failed implantation. PMID:24746744

  19. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  20. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  1. A rare case of an osteochondral lesion of the tarsal navicular with a subacute stress fracture in a high level athlete.

    PubMed

    Nunag, Perrico; Quah, Colin; Pillai, Anand

    2014-12-01

    In this report, an osteochondral lesion of the tarsal navicular associated with a subacute stress fracture in a professional basketball player surgical treatment is presented. The surgical technique involved extra-articular curettage, bone grafting and plate stabilisation. Postoperative CT scan confirmed that both the osteochondral lesion and the stress fracture healed. The talonavicular joint showed no signs of arthritis on imaging. Clinical foot scores showed marked improvement after surgery. At 6 months patient managed to return to competitive play without pain in the foot and ankle. The outcome of this case indicates that the combination of curettage, bone grating and plate stabilisation works well for this rare and potentially career ending dual lesions.

  2. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  3. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  4. Implantation in IVF.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cristiano E; Melo, Marco A B; Fernandez, Manuel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simon, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The recent advances in assisted reproduction have made it possible to study and interfere in almost every step of the human reproductive process except for implantation. The most complex and important step remains in great part unknown. Implantation in human has proven to be less efficient compared with other species. However, in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, it has been evaluated to be even poorer. This paper highlights the factors related to infertile patients and IVF treatments that can affect implantation and implantation's clinical aspects related to these treatments: implantation failure and early pregnancy loss.

  5. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  6. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  7. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOEpatents

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  8. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  9. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  10. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  11. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Baddour LM, Epstein AE, Erickson CC, et al. Update on cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections and their management: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation . ...

  12. A Novel Ultrasound Technique for Detection of Osteochondral Defects in the Ankle Joint: A Parametric and Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J.; van Dongen, Koen W. A.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; Zadpoor, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced. PMID:25609040

  13. A novel ultrasound technique for detection of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint: a parametric and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J; van Dongen, Koen W A; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-01-01

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced.

  14. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  15. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  16. Reconstruction of a large osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia with an iliac crest graft and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC): a case report.

    PubMed

    Miska, Matthias; Wiewiorski, Martin; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Isolated osteochondral lesions (OCL) of the distal tibia are rare and lack clear treatment guidelines. With the case we present here, we suggest a novel surgical approach and report the successful use of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis-aided reconstruction for OCL of the distal tibia. A 29-year-old male patient complained about persisting pain of the left ankle joint and a restricted activity level 12 months after an ankle sprain. Imaging revealed edema of the subchondral bone and thinning of the cartilage above the osseous defect at the lateral distal tibia. The OCL was debrided followed by microfracturing of the underlying sclerotic bone. A cancellous bone plug was harvested from the iliac crest and impacted into the defect. A collagen matrix was then fixed on the defect. After 12 months, the patient was free of pain and returned to full activity. Conventional radiographs at 1 year showed successful osseous integration of the plug and a nearly anatomic shape of the tibial joint line. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage scans at 36 months showed an intact cartilage layer over the defect and glycosaminoglycan content, indicating hyaline-like cartilage repair. This case demonstrates autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis-aided reconstruction of large osteochondral lesions of distal tibia to be a promising treatment method. Our aim was to describe the case of a patient with a large isolated osteochondral lesion of the distal tibia treated by a novel operative technique using cancellous bone from the iliac crest and a collagen I/III matrix.

  17. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  18. Modified autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the treatment of a large osteochondral defect in a varus knee: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Quaglia, A; Bait, C; Cervellin, M; Prospero, E; Volpi, P

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a case report of a 27-year-old male patient affected by a large osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle (6 cm(2)) in a varus knee. He was treated with a combined approach consisting of high tibial osteotomy and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis technique enhanced by a bone marrow-enriched bone graft. Twelve months after surgery, the patient reported considerable reduction in pain and significant increase in his quality of life. A hyaline-like cartilage completely covered the defect and was congruent with the surrounding condyle cartilage as revealed by MRI and by a second-look arthroscopy. Level of evidence IV.

  19. Is Antegrade Transmalleolar Drilling Method for Osteochondral Lesion of Talus Necessary? Iatrogenic Cystic Formation at the Tibia: A Report of Five Cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Young; Reyes, Francis Joseph V; Yi, Young; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Antegrade transmalleolar drilling method is one of the options for the treatment of osteochondral lesion of talus (OLT). We present five patients who underwent tibial drilling for treatment of OLT and later developed distal tibial cystic formation induced by cartilage opening or heat necrosis during drilling. Antegrade transmalleolar drilling can be a possible option for the treatment of OLT if the lesion is not easily reachable; however, other viable treatment should be considered due to its possibility of distal tibial pathologic change. PMID:26929810

  20. Is Antegrade Transmalleolar Drilling Method for Osteochondral Lesion of Talus Necessary? Iatrogenic Cystic Formation at the Tibia: A Report of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Young; Reyes, Francis Joseph V.; Yi, Young

    2016-01-01

    Antegrade transmalleolar drilling method is one of the options for the treatment of osteochondral lesion of talus (OLT). We present five patients who underwent tibial drilling for treatment of OLT and later developed distal tibial cystic formation induced by cartilage opening or heat necrosis during drilling. Antegrade transmalleolar drilling can be a possible option for the treatment of OLT if the lesion is not easily reachable; however, other viable treatment should be considered due to its possibility of distal tibial pathologic change. PMID:26929810

  1. Role of Nuclear Receptors in Blastocyst Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, YM; DeMayo, FJ

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of blastocyst implantation in the uterus is orchestrated by the ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. These hormones act via their nuclear receptors to direct the transcriptional activity of the endometrial compartments and create a defined period in which the uterus is permissive to embryo implantation termed the “window of receptivity”. Additional members of the nuclear receptor family have also been described to have a potential role in endometrial function. Much of what we know about the function of these nuclear receptors during implantation we have learned from the use of mouse models. Transgenic murine models with targeted gene ablation have allowed us to identify a complex network of paracrine signaling between the endometrial epithelium and stroma. While some of the critical molecules have been identified, the mechanism underlying the intricate communication between endometrial compartments during the implantation window has not been fully elucidated. Defining this mechanism will help identify markers of a receptive uterine environment, ultimately providing a useful tool to help improve the fertility outlook for reproductively challenged couples. The aim of this review is to outline our current understanding of how nuclear receptors and their effector molecules regulate blastocyst implantation in the endometrium. PMID:23994285

  2. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line and electrode arrangement are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heat region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed swtiches. 5 figs.

  3. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.

    1987-01-01

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line, and electrode arrangment are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heated region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed switches.

  4. Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, Milton N.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Smith, Stephen F.; Hylton, James O.

    2009-11-24

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  5. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  6. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  7. Mobility implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Danz, W

    1990-01-01

    We present a brief review of mobility implants, their contribution, and the experiences derived after almost 40 years since the new concepts of full mobility implants were introduced. In early 1940, experiments with a new material for the making of plastic artificial eyes was also being considered for the making of orbital implants. Methyl-methacrylate (MMA) had proven inert and satisfactory for dental products. The Surgeon Generals office of the Armed Services encouraged further research and experimental work in the development of plastic eyes. The success of the new material sponsored the beginning of great expansion with new concepts for orbital implants. Through a period of more than a decade, the design and types of implants went through three stages. First, the buried implant was introduced, then the exposed integrated followed, and the buried integrated subsequently followed. The path of progress was not smooth. Theoretically correct designs and surgical procedures met unexpected practical difficulties for the ophthalmic surgeon, the patient, and the eye maker. Surgical and technical efforts were carefully reviewed to eliminate the problems encountered, only to have further unforeseen complications arise. Infections, extrusions, and migration of the implant were not uncommon. The exposed integrated implant was eventually abandoned. However, there were some extraordinary successes of mobility. A new era introduced fully buried mobility implants that were more successful. However, this procedure also produced some problems, causing infection (or allergy), extrusion, and migration. Tantalum mesh and gauze gave great promise with the inception of their use. Orbital tissue grew into the material in an astonishing way, making it possible to secure the extraocular muscles and tenons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  9. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  10. Spectroscopy of implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.

    1994-01-01

    The spectral criteria of selection of soft intraocular lens (IOL) implants of long service in an organism have been defined for ophthalmology. The analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra provides the required and sufficient level of material polymerization for manufacturing non-toxic lenses for the eye. The spectral limits for determining the biocompatibility of samples can be related to the intensity ratio of two bands only in the FTIR spectra of siloxane. Siloxane-poly(urethane) block copolymers and other materials for implants have been studied. Passivated surfaces of implants have been obtained and registered by methods of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy.

  11. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  12. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  13. Controlled Release Strategies for Bone, Cartilage, and Osteochondral Engineering—Part II: Challenges on the Evolution from Single to Multiple Bioactive Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Vítor E.; Mano, João F.; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of controlled release systems for the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and osteochondral interface is one of the hot topics in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, the majority of the developed systems consider only the release of a single growth factor, which is a limiting step for the success of the therapy. More recent studies have been focused on the design and tailoring of appropriate combinations of bioactive factors to match the desired goals regarding tissue regeneration. In fact, considering the complexity of extracellular matrix and the diversity of growth factors and cytokines involved in each biological response, it is expected that an appropriate combination of bioactive factors could lead to more successful outcomes in tissue regeneration. In this review, the evolution on the development of dual and multiple bioactive factor release systems for bone, cartilage, and osteochondral interface is overviewed, specifically the relevance of parameters such as dosage and spatiotemporal distribution of bioactive factors. A comprehensive collection of studies focused on the delivery of bioactive factors is also presented while highlighting the increasing impact of platelet-rich plasma as an autologous source of multiple growth factors. PMID:23249320

  14. Three-dimensional bioprinting of multilayered constructs containing human mesenchymal stromal cells for osteochondral tissue regeneration in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ki-Mo; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Hyuntae; Oh, Kyunghoon; Park, Kyeng Min; Yeom, Junseok; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    The use of cell-rich hydrogels for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has shown great potential for a variety of biomedical applications. However, the fabrication of appropriate constructs has been challenging. In this study, we describe a 3D printing process for the preparation of a multilayered 3D construct containing human mesenchymal stromal cells with a hydrogel comprised of atelocollagen and supramolecular hyaluronic acid (HA). This construct showed outstanding regenerative ability for the reconstruction of an osteochondral tissue in the knee joints of rabbits. We found that the use of a mechanically stable, host-guest chemistry-based hydrogel was essential and allowed two different types of extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels to be easily printed and stacked into one multilayered construct without requiring the use of potentially harmful chemical reagents or physical stimuli for post-crosslinking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to validate the potential of a 3D printed multilayered construct consisting of two different ECM materials (atelocollagen and HA) for heterogeneous tissue regeneration using an in vivo animal model. We believe that this 3D printing-based platform technology can be effectively exploited for regeneration of various heterogeneous tissues as well as osteochondral tissue.

  15. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing; Liu, Huanhuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair.

  16. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  17. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  18. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Microsystem technologies for implantable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Receveur, Rogier A. M.; Lindemans, Fred W.; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2007-05-01

    implantable primary batteries, rechargeable batteries were introduced or concepts in which energy is provided from the outside based on inductive coupling. Long-term developments aiming at autonomous power are, for example, based on electrostatic conversion of mechanical vibrations. Communication with the implantable device is usually done using an inductive link. A large range of materials commonly used in microfabrication are also used for implantable microsystems.

  20. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  1. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  2. In vivo determination of aluminum, cobalt, chromium, copper, nickel, titanium and vanadium in oral mucosa cells from orthodontic patients with mini-implants by Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Jos, Angeles; Puerto, Maria; Calleja, Ana; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-10-01

    Miniscrews are used as orthodontic anchorage devices in the dentistry clinical practice but the in vivo metallic release from these structures has been not previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the content of Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Ti and V in oral mucosa cells of control subjects, patients under orthodontic treatment and with both, orthodontic treatment and miniscrew, in order to know the contribution of these mini-implants to the total metallic content. ICP-MS measurements revealed the following ascending order: Cr

  3. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  4. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  5. Dexamethasone: intravitreal implant.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Macular oedema is one of the complications of retinal vein occlusion. About half of the patients recover spontaneously within 3 to 6 months. There is currently no drug that improves outcome. An intravitreal implant delivering 0.7 mg of dexamethasone has been authorised for the treatment of macular oedema in this setting. Clinical assessment is based on two double-blind randomised trials including a total of 1267 patients, comparing treatment with intravitreal implants delivering about 0.7 mg or 0.35 mg of dexamethasone, versus a sham procedure. Despite a more rapid initial improvement with dexamethasone, the number of patients whose reading ability improved at 6 months did not significantly differ between the groups. A retrospective subgroup analysis raised the possibility that dexamethasone implants may be beneficial in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. The adverse effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implants are the same as those of intraocular steroid injections, including elevated intraocular pressure (25% of patients), cataracts (27%), conjunctival haemorrhage (20%), and ocular pain. In practice, dexamethasone intravitreal implants do not have a positive harm-benefit balance in most patients with macular oedema following retinal vein occlusion. More rapid recovery after central vein occlusion remains to be confirmed. Pending such studies, it is better to avoid using dexamethasone implants. Patients should instead receive ophthalmologic monitoring to detect and manage possible complications, and any risk factors should be treated.

  6. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  7. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Pot, Michiel W.; Gonzales, Veronica K.; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  8. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Pot, Michiel W; Gonzales, Veronica K; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0-100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  9. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Pot, Michiel W; Gonzales, Veronica K; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0-100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  10. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Pot, Michiel W.; Gonzales, Veronica K.; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  11. Scuba diving with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kompis, Martin; Vibert, Dominique; Senn, Pascal; Vischer, Mattheus W; Häusler, Rudolf

    2003-05-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral cochlear implants (a Med-El Combi40 and a Med-El Combi40+), as well as considerable experience in scuba diving with both of his implants. After having been exposed to 68 and 89 dives, respectively, in depths of up to 43 m, both cochlear implants are in working order and the patient continues to receive excellent speech recognition scores with both cochlear implant systems. The presented data show that scuba diving after cochlear implantation is possible over a considerable number of dives without any major negative impact on the implants.

  12. [Subretinal visual implants].

    PubMed

    Stingl, K; Greppmaier, U; Wilhelm, B; Zrenner, E

    2010-12-01

    Visual implants are medical technologies that replace parts of the visual neuronal pathway. The subretinal implant developed by our group is being used in a human trials since 2005 and replaces the function of degenerated photoreceptors by an electronic device in blind patients. The subretinal implant consists of a 70-µm thin microchip with 1500 microphotodiodes each with an amplifier and an electrode with area of 3 mm × 3 mm. The power supply is provided by a subdermal power supply cable. The microchip is implanted under the macula and transforms the light signal into an electrical one, which is referred directly to the bipolar cells. Requirements for a good function of the implant are a preserved function of the inner retina, as well as clear optic media and a good visual acuity in the earlier life. The current technology can mediate a visual field of 10 - 12° and a computed resolution of up to 0.25° visual angle (corresponding to a visual acuity of 63 / 1000 - 80 / 1000) in blind patients. The so far best results from our studies reached a visual acuity of 21 / 1000 in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. This overview is intended to inform the ophthalmologist about the current state of the technology and help him/her to advise interested patients.

  13. Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices: issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The development of implanted devices is essential because of their direct effect on the lives and safety of humanity. This paper presents the current issues and challenges related to all methods used to harvest energy for implantable biomedical devices. The advantages, disadvantages, and future trends of each method are discussed. The concept of harvesting energy from environmental sources and human body motion for implantable devices has gained a new relevance. In this review, the harvesting kinetic, electromagnetic, thermal and infrared radiant energies are discussed. Current issues and challenges related to the typical applications of these methods for energy harvesting are illustrated. Suggestions and discussion of the progress of research on implantable devices are also provided. This review is expected to increase research efforts to develop the battery-less implantable devices with reduced over hole size, low power, high efficiency, high data rate, and improved reliability and feasibility. Based on current literature, we believe that the inductive coupling link is the suitable method to be used to power the battery-less devices. Therefore, in this study, the power efficiency of the inductive coupling method is validated by MATLAB based on suggested values. By further researching and improvements, in the future the implantable and portable medical devices are expected to be free of batteries. PMID:24950601

  14. Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-06-20

    The development of implanted devices is essential because of their direct effect on the lives and safety of humanity. This paper presents the current issues and challenges related to all methods used to harvest energy for implantable biomedical devices. The advantages, disadvantages, and future trends of each method are discussed. The concept of harvesting energy from environmental sources and human body motion for implantable devices has gained a new relevance. In this review, the harvesting kinetic, electromagnetic, thermal and infrared radiant energies are discussed. Current issues and challenges related to the typical applications of these methods for energy harvesting are illustrated. Suggestions and discussion of the progress of research on implantable devices are also provided. This review is expected to increase research efforts to develop the battery-less implantable devices with reduced over hole size, low power, high efficiency, high data rate, and improved reliability and feasibility. Based on current literature, we believe that the inductive coupling link is the suitable method to be used to power the battery-less devices. Therefore, in this study, the power efficiency of the inductive coupling method is validated by MATLAB based on suggested values. By further researching and improvements, in the future the implantable and portable medical devices are expected to be free of batteries.

  15. Immunological aspects of implantation and implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E; Vince, G S

    1999-12-01

    The human endometrium contains a significant proportion of leukocytes (8-35% of all cells), the absolute numbers and proportions varying during both the menstrual cycle and early in pregnancy. T cells, macrophages and a population of phenotypically unusual large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are commonly present, although B cells are absent. Relative T cell numbers decrease significantly in first trimester decidua, and hence are unlikely to play an important role in maintenance of human pregnancy, but T cells could be important in implantation where their relative numbers are greater. In addition to producing cytokines, local tissue macrophages may provide an immediate antigen non-specific host defence to infection. Most attention has, nevertheless, focused on a role for LGL in implantation and maintenance of pregnancy since, at the time of implantation, LGL comprise 70-80% of the total endometrial leukocyte population. Although endometrial LGL have been shown to express natural killer (NK) cell-type cytotoxicity against classical NK cell targets, such cytotoxicity against trophoblast is induced only after activation by interleukin (IL)-2. Selective expression of the unusual class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule, HLA-G, by extravillous cytotrophoblast may assist in protecting invasive cytotrophoblast from potential maternal NK cell attack, probably via interactions with killer inhibitory receptor molecules on LGL. Many cytokines have been demonstrated to be expressed at the maternal-fetal interface although, currently, in mice only two (IL-11 and leukaemia inhibitory factor) appear to be absolutely essential for successful pregnancy outcome. Immune effector cells and cytokines may also play a role in human pregnancy pathologies, such as recurrent early pregnancy loss.

  16. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  17. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  18. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  19. Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    2012-11-06

    Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

  20. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  1. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  2. Multichannel extracochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Pulec, J L; Smith, J C; Lewis, M L; Hortmann, G

    1989-03-01

    The transcutaneous eight-channel extracochlear implant has undergone continuous revision to simplify the surgical technique, to minimize patient morbidity, and to improve performance. The extracochlear electrode array has been miniaturized so that it can be inserted through the facial recess without disturbing the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane, or malleus. The use of the remote antenna placed around the external auditory canal has greatly increased battery life and patient comfort. With its simplified incisions, the surgical procedure can be performed as out-patient surgery. Preoperative cochlear nerve testing and use of evoked response cochlear nerve testing allow preadjustment of the speech processor. Current features and performance of the implant are discussed.

  3. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  4. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  5. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  6. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  7. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  8. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Kim, Jin Goo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus.

  9. Simultaneous Osteoperiosteal Autologous Iliac Crest Graft and Lateral Meniscus Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondral Lesion with Bony Defect and Lateral Discoid Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Woo Jong

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for combined osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) with considerable bony defect of the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and torn discoid lateral meniscus is unclear. We present a case of a 15-year-old female who was a gymnast and had a large OCD lesion in the LFC combined with deficiency of the lateral meniscus. The patient underwent the "one-step" technique of osteoperiosteal autologous iliac crest graft and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation after a failure of meniscectomy with repair at another hospital. Twenty-four months postoperatively, clinical results were significantly improved. Follow-up imaging tests and second-look arthroscopy showed well incorporated structured bone graft and fibrous cartilage regeneration as well as stabilized lateral meniscus allograft. She could return to her sport without any pain or swelling. This "one-step" surgical technique is worth considering as a joint salvage procedure for massive OCD lesions with torn discoid lateral meniscus. PMID:27274475

  10. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Hunter, Jerry L.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-06-01

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500-1625 °C, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  11. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  12. Recurrent Implantation Failure: The Role of the Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Timeva, Tanya; Shterev, Atanas; Kyurkchiev, Stanimir

    2014-01-01

    The success rate of reproductive treatment methods depends on many different factors. The most important and discussed ones in the literature are maternal age, the causes of infertility, the ovarian response to stimulation, the influence of the male factor and sperm quality, embryo quality and the various uterine pathologies. Some couples fail repeatedly after transferring good quality embryos without any obvious reason and this becomes a major continuing problem after IVF/ICSI procedures. It can be speculated that in these couples, insufficiency of the endometrium might be a possible reason for implantation failure. This review article summarized current literature describing the consecutive endomertial procedures involved in successful embryo implantation. It is believed that efforts to align criteria for definition of recurrent implantation failure (RIF) and attempts to classify different RIF types would develop guidelines for treatment procedures which would result in an increase in patients’ opportunities to conceive. PMID:25473625

  13. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  14. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV.

  15. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602347

  16. Automatic frequency controller for power amplifiers used in bio-implanted applications: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussein, Hussein A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  17. Automatic frequency controller for power amplifiers used in bio-implanted applications: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Mahammad A; Hussein, Hussein A; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A; Hussain, Aini

    2014-12-11

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  18. Automatic Frequency Controller for Power Amplifiers Used in Bio-Implanted Applications: Issues and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Mahammad A.; Hussein, Hussein A.; Mutashar, Saad; Samad, Salina A.; Hussain, Aini

    2014-01-01

    With the development of communication technologies, the use of wireless systems in biomedical implanted devices has become very useful. Bio-implantable devices are electronic devices which are used for treatment and monitoring brain implants, pacemakers, cochlear implants, retinal implants and so on. The inductive coupling link is used to transmit power and data between the primary and secondary sides of the biomedical implanted system, in which efficient power amplifier is very much needed to ensure the best data transmission rates and low power losses. However, the efficiency of the implanted devices depends on the circuit design, controller, load variation, changes of radio frequency coil's mutual displacement and coupling coefficients. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on various power amplifier classes and their characteristics, efficiency and controller techniques that have been used in bio-implants. The automatic frequency controller used in biomedical implants such as gate drive switching control, closed loop power control, voltage controlled oscillator, capacitor control and microcontroller frequency control have been explained. Most of these techniques keep the resonance frequency stable in transcutaneous power transfer between the external coil and the coil implanted inside the body. Detailed information including carrier frequency, power efficiency, coils displacement, power consumption, supplied voltage and CMOS chip for the controllers techniques are investigated and summarized in the provided tables. From the rigorous review, it is observed that the existing automatic frequency controller technologies are more or less can capable of performing well in the implant devices; however, the systems are still not up to the mark. Accordingly, current challenges and problems of the typical automatic frequency controller techniques for power amplifiers are illustrated, with a brief suggestions and discussion section concerning the progress of

  19. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  20. Elementary Implantable Force Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wachs, Rebecca A.; Ellstein, David; Drazan, John; Healey, Colleen P.; Uhl, Richard L.; Connor, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing implantable sensors which are robust enough to maintain long term functionality inside the body remains a significant challenge. The ideal implantable sensing system is one which is simple and robust; free from batteries, telemetry, and complex electronics. We have developed an elementary implantable sensor for orthopaedic smart implants. The sensor requires no telemetry and no batteries to communicate wirelessly. It has no on-board signal conditioning electronics. The sensor itself has no electrical connections and thus does not require a hermetic package. The sensor is an elementary L-C resonator which can function as a simple force transducer by using a solid dielectric material of known stiffness between two parallel Archimedean coils. The operating characteristics of the sensors are predicted using a simplified, lumped circuit model. We have demonstrated sensor functionality both in air and in saline. Our preliminary data indicate that the sensor can be reasonably well modeled as a lumped circuit to predict its response to loading. PMID:24883335

  1. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  2. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  3. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  4. Peritoneal trophoblastic implant.

    PubMed

    Rachagan, S P; Kutty, K; Govindan, K S

    1997-09-01

    A case of persistent trophoblastic tissue on the pelvic peritoneum is presented. While most cases are secondary to conservative surgery for tubal ectopic pregnancy, primary implantation can also occur as highlighted by this case. A brief pathophysiology of the condition is presented. The importance of monitoring the serum for beta subunit human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is emphasised.

  5. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  6. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  7. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  8. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  9. Swift and heavy ion implanted chalcogenide laser glass waveguides and their different refractive index distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Feng; Narusawa, Tadashi; Zheng Jie

    2011-02-10

    Planar waveguides have been fabricated in Nd- or Ho-doped gallium lanthanum sulfide laser glasses by 60 MeV Ar or 20 MeV N ion implantation. The refractive index profiles were reconstructed based on the results of prism coupling. The Ar implanted waveguides exhibit an approximate steplike distribution, while the N implanted ones show a ''well + barrier'' type. This difference can be attributed to the much lower dose of Ar ions. After annealing, the N implanted waveguides can support two modes at 1539 nm and have low propagation loss, which makes them candidates for novel waveguide lasers.

  10. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  11. Percutaneous osteoplasty for the treatment of a painful osteochondral lesion of the talus: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sung-Suk; Park, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Hae-Jin; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion of the talus (OLT) is a lesion involving the talar articular cartilage and its subchondral bone. OLT is a known cause of chronic ankle pain after ankle sprains in the active population. The lesion causes deep ankle pain associated with weight-bearing, impaired function, limited range of motion, stiffness, catching, locking, and swelling. There are 2 common patterns of OLTs. Anterolateral talar dome lesions result from inversion and dorsiflexion injuries of the ankle at the area impacting against the fibula. Posteromedial lesions result from inversion, plantar flexion, and external rotation injuries of the ankle at the area impacting against the tibial ceiling of the ankle joint. Early diagnosis of an OLT is particularly important because the tibiotalar joint is exposed to more compressive load per unit area than any other joint in the body. Failure of diagnosis can lead to the evolution of a small, stable lesion into a larger lesion or an unstable fragment, which can result in chronic pain, joint instability, and premature osteoarthritis. A 43-year-old man, with a history of ankle sprain one year previously, visited our pain clinic for continuous right ankle pain after walking or standing for more than 30 minutes. There was a focal tenderness on the posteromedial area of the right talus. Imaging studies revealed a posteromedial OLT classified as having a geode form according to the FOG (fractures, osteonecroses, geodes) radiological classification and categorized as a stage 2a lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was scheduled for aspiration and osteoplasty with hydroxyapatite under arthroscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. A 26-gauge needle was inserted to infiltrate local anesthetics into the skin over the cyst and ankle joint. An arthroscope was placed into the joint to approach the OLT. The arthroscopic view showed that there was no connection between the OLT and the cyst of the talus body. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was

  12. The use of osteochondral allograft with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells and hinge joint distraction in the treatment of post-collapse stage of osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Gagala, J; Tarczynska, M; Gaweda, K; Matuszewski, L

    2014-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is an entity which occurs mainly in young and active patients aged between 20 and 50. The success of hip joint preserving treatments ranges from 15% to 50% depending on the stage and amount of osteonecrotic lesion. Total hip replacement is indicated in late post-collapse hips but it has unsatisfactory survival because of the wear and osteolysis in young and active patients. Osteochondral allografts have been reported in the treatment of large articular lesions with defects in underlying bone in knee, talus and shoulder. By combining osteoconductive properties of osteochondral allograft with osteogenic abilities of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells it has a potential to be an alternative to an autologous graft. The adjunct of hinged joint distraction should minimize stresses in subchondral bone to promote creeping substitution and prevent femoral head collapse. Unlike current treatment modalities, it would provide both structural support and allow bony and articular substitution.

  13. Transcutaneous RF-Powered Implantable Minipump Driven by a Class-E Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Moore, William H.; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Givrad, Tina K.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design and testing of an inductive coupling system used to power an implantable minipump for applications in ambulating rats. A 2 MHz class-E oscillator driver powered a coil transmitter wound around a 33-cm-diameter rat cage. A receiver coil, a filtered rectifier, and a voltage-sensitive switch powered the implant. The implant DC current at the center of the primary coil (5.1 V) exceeded the level required to activate the solenoid valve in the pump. The variations of the implant current in the volume of the primary coil reflected the variations of the estimated coupling coefficient between the two coils. The pump could be activated in-vivo, while accommodating the vertical and horizontal movements of the animal. Advantages of this design include a weight reduction for the implant, an operation independent from a finite power source, and a remote activation/deactivation. PMID:16916107

  14. Wireless ultrasound-powered biotelemetry for implants.

    PubMed

    Towe, Bruce C; Larson, Patrick J; Gulick, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    A miniature piezoelectric receiver coupled to a diode is evaluated as a simple device for wireless transmission of bioelectric events to the body surface. The device converts the energy of a surface-applied ultrasound beam to a high frequency carrier current in solution. Bioelectrical currents near the implant modulate the carrier amplitude, and this signal is remotely detected and demodulated to recover the biopotential waveform. This technique achieves millivolt sensitivity in saline tank tests, and further attention to system design is expected to improve sensitivity.

  15. Biomechanics and strain mapping in bone as related to immediately-loaded dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Lee, Jihyun; Jang, Andrew; Gu, Allen; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Prevost, Richard; Curtis, Don; Ho, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The effects of alveolar bone socket geometry and bone-implant contact on implant biomechanics, and resulting strain distributions in bone were investigated. Following extraction of lateral incisors on a cadaver mandible, immediate implants were placed and bone-implant contact area, stability and bone strain were measured. In situ biomechanical testing coupled with micro X-ray microscope (μ-XRM) illustrated less stiff bone-implant complexes (701-822 N/mm) compared with bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth complexes (791-913 N/mm). X-ray tomograms illustrated that the cause of reduced stiffness was due to reduced and limited bone-implant contact. Heterogeneous elemental composition of bone was identified by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The novel aspect of this study was the application of a new experimental mechanics method, that is, digital volume correlation, which allowed mapping of strains in volumes of alveolar bone in contact with a loaded implant. The identified surface and subsurface strain concentrations were a manifestation of load transferred to bone through bone-implant contact based on bone-implant geometry, quality of bone, implant placement, and implant design. 3D strain mapping indicated that strain concentrations are not exclusive to the bone-implant contact regions, but also extend into bone not directly in contact with the implant. The implications of the observed strain concentrations are discussed in the context of mechanobiology. Although a plausible explanation of surgical complications for immediate implant treatment is provided, extrapolation of results is only warranted by future systematic studies on more cadaver specimens and/or in vivo small scale animal models. PMID:26162549

  16. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  17. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  18. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  19. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  20. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  1. Implants for cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, H B; McDermott, M W; Cooke, D D

    1995-04-01

    As long as there have been skull defects, there has been a recognized need to cover them in some way. Cranioplasty is the surgical correction of skull defects. The two major purposes of performing a cranioplasty are to protect the brain and to provide reasonable cosmesis. The two physical requirements of the implant are strength and malleability. Originally, foreign materials such as precious metals were used. Autogenous bone grafts have also achieved successful results. Over the past quarter-century, the popularization of acrylics and radiolucent metals has favored them over bone because of their ease of use, the absence of need to harvest donor bone, and, particularly, bone's tendency to resorb or scar. Yet foreign materials can cause excessive inflammation, producing a synovial membrane at the interface between the host bone and cranioplasty construct, increasing the risk of infection. Currently, hydroxyapatite-based ceramics, which may induce bone growth into the implant, are increasingly being used. Future applications will include antibiotic-impregnated implants and computer-generated models to improve the precision of cranioplasty fit and cosmesis.

  2. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  3. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability.

  4. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  5. Titanium: the mystery metal of implant dentistry. Dental materials aspects.

    PubMed

    Parr, G R; Gardner, L K; Toth, R W

    1985-09-01

    A number of important points concerning titanium and its alloys have been discussed. They are summarized as follows. Ti and its alloys, particularly the alpha-beta alloys, possess mechanical properties that make them ideal implant materials. Ti and its alloys oxidize readily in air. This surface oxide is extremely stable in the physiologic environment of the body. The stability and inertness of this surface oxide layer acts to protect Ti from corrosive breakdown when used in the body. The elimination of surface irregularities and contaminants is important when preparing a metal for implantation. Titanium can be coupled with equally passive metals in the body without causing galvanic corrosion.

  6. [Professional occupation after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kós, Maria-Izabel; Degive, Colette; Boëx, Colette; Maire, Raphaël; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2006-10-01

    This study verifies whether cochlear implants helps deaf adults to maintain or develop their professional occupations. Sixty-seven patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. At the time of implantation 34 were professionally active. After the implantation 29 remained active, 4 of them reporting positive developments in their careers. Five patients became inactive. The previously inactive patients remained inactive. There was no difference in auditory performances between professionally active or inactive patients. Cochlear implants enable most implanted adults to maintain and even progress in their professions. However, deafness still represents an obstacle to social integration as inactive patients who searched for a job were rejected after the job interviews. PMID:17076153

  7. The Evolution of Breast Implants.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Breast augmentation remains one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. However, shape, feel, safety, and longevity of the implants remain important areas of research. The data provided by manufacturers show the safety and efficacy of these medical devices. Clinicians should strive to provide ongoing data and sound science to continue to improve clinical outcomes in the future. This article explores the evolution of breast implants with special emphasis on the advancement of silicone implants.

  8. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  9. Professional occupation after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kos, M-I; Degive, C; Boex, C; Guyot, J-P

    2007-03-01

    The aims of this study were to verify whether cochlear implants helped profoundly deaf adults to maintain or even to develop their professional occupations, and to identify other elements that may contribute to or, on the contrary, impede such patients' professional success. All adult patients received a questionnaire concerning their professional activities before and after implantation. Demographic data, health information, hearing performance and degree of satisfaction with the implant were also considered. Sixty-seven adults had been implanted, with three different devices, since 1985. At the time of implantation, 34 had been professionally active. After implantation, 29 had remained professionally active, four of whom reported positive developments in their careers. Five patients had become professionally inactive. Those patients who had previously been professionally inactive remained so. There had been no difference in performance, either between different types of cochlear implants or between professionally active or inactive patients. The implanted patients had kept their jobs and many of them had developed their professional skills. In spite of this, cochlear implants may still be perceived as proving insufficiently satisfactory hearing to enable professionally inactive patients to reintegrate and to facilitate further learning or career developments. PMID:17052367

  10. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty. PMID:26350025

  11. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  12. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  13. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  14. Computer implants and death.

    PubMed

    Gert, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Although a patient whose whole brain has ceased to function may have his heart, lungs, and other organs continue to function if they are connected to the appropriate machines, the patient is still dead and the machines can be disconnected. In the future, nanotechnology, or other technology, may allow putting implants in the brainstem that can keep a patient's heart, lungs and other organs functioning, even though the whole natural brain has ceased to function. It would be useful to consider how this technology might affect the criterion of death before it is actually available.

  15. Bone cement implantation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Razuin, R; Effat, O; Shahidan, M N; Shama, D V; Miswan, M F M

    2013-06-01

    Bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, increased pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac arrest. It is a known cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing cemented orthopaedic surgeries. The rarity of the condition as well as absence of a proper definition has contributed to under-reporting of cases. We report a 59-year-old woman who sustained fracture of the neck of her left femur and underwent an elective hybrid total hip replacement surgery. She collapsed during surgery and was revived only to succumb to death twelve hours later. Post mortem findings showed multiorgan disseminated microembolization of bone marrow and amorphous cement material. PMID:23817399

  16. Outcomes of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee following Failed Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew Joseph; Yanke, Adam Blair; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marrow stimulation techniques such as drilling or microfracture are first-line treatment options for symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. For young patients who have failed microfracture, cartilage restoration techniques such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), OATS, and osteochondral allograft and are frequently employed. Nevertheless, there a few reports in the literature evaluating the results of ACI following failed microfracture and those available suggest inferior outcomes compared to primary ACI. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) following failed microfracture in the knee and compare these outcomes to those of primary ACI. Methods: Patients were identified who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic chondral lesions of the knee refractory to previous microfracture. Postoperative data were collected using several subjective scoring systems (Noyes, Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, KOOS, SF12). An age-matched cohort of 103 patients who underwent primary ACI of the knee was used as a control group. Statistics were performed in a paired manner using a Student’s t-test for ordinal data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Ninety-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age was 30.1 years (range, 14-49 years) at the time of ACI. The average duration from microfracture to ACI was 21.2 months (range, 1-88 months). ACI was performed in the tibiofemoral compartment in 42 patients, the patellofemoral compartments in 38 patients, and in both in 12 patients. The primary lesion treated with ACI involved the MFC in 38 patients, the trochlea in 25 patients, the patella in 19 patients, and the LFC in 10 patients. The lesions averaged 467mm3 in the trochlea, 445mm3 in the LFC, 265mm3 in the patella, and 295mm3 in the patella. Nineteen patients underwent concurrent ACI to multiple lesions. Thirty-one patients underwent concomitant

  17. Wearable Wireless Telemetry System for Implantable Bio-MEMS Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Miranda, Felix A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Renita E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The wearable garment pick-up antenna and the implantable chip antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry, the relative RF magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the distance and angle, and the current density on the strip conductors, for the implantable chip antenna.

  18. Wearable wireless telemetry system for implantable bio-MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Rainee N; Miranda, Félix A; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Renita E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The implantable chip antenna and the wearable garment pick-up antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry and the relative magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the angle, for the implantable chip antenna.

  19. Wearable wireless telemetry system for implantable bio-MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Rainee N; Miranda, Félix A; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Renita E

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a telemetry and contact-less powering system consisting of an implantable bio-MEMS sensor with a miniature printed square spiral chip antenna and an external wearable garment with printed loop antenna is investigated. The implantable chip antenna and the wearable garment pick-up antenna are in close proximity to each other and hence couple inductively through their near-fields and behave as the primary and the secondary circuits of a transformer, respectively. The numerical and experimental results are graphically presented, and include the design parameter values as a function of the geometry and the relative magnetic near-field intensity as a function of the angle, for the implantable chip antenna. PMID:17946365

  20. In vivo biocompatibility of Mg implants surface modified by nanostructured merwinite/PEO.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been suggested as biodegradable bone implant materials due to their good intrinsic biocompatibility and great mechanical properties. Although magnesium has attractive properties as an orthopedic implant material, its quick degradation and low bioactivity may lead to the loss of mechanical integrity of the implant during the bone healing process. In this paper, we endeavor to surmount the abovementioned defects using the surface coating technique. We have recently coated AZ91 magnesium implants with merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) through the coupling of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and electrophoretic deposition method. In this work, we are specifically focused on the in vivo examinations of the coated implants in comparison with the uncoated one. For the in vivo experiment, the rod samples, including the uncoated and merwinite/PEO coated implants, were imbedded into the greater trochanter of rabbits. The results of the in vivo animal test indicated an improvement in biodegradability including slower implant weight loss, reduction in Mg ion released from the coated implants in the blood plasma, lesser release of hydrogen bubbles and an improvement in biocompatibility including an increase in the amount of bone formation and ultimately a mild bone inflammation after the surgery according to the histological images. In summary, proper surface treatment of magnesium implants such as silicate bioactive ceramics may improve their biocompatibility under physiological conditions to making them suitable and applicable for future clinical applications.

  1. The Implantable Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, A. S.; Heimbecker, R. O.; Bigelow, W. G.

    1964-01-01

    The transistorized implanted pacemaker is proving to be an effective and reliable method for long-term pacing of the heart. All patients suffering from Stokes-Adams seizures were first given a trial period of conservative therapy, including isoproterenol (Isuprel), ephedrine, atropine and steroids. Twenty-four pacemaker implants were performed on 23 patients over a 21-month period. The preoperative insertion of a pacemaker cardiac catheter was a very valuable safety precaution. In this way the heart could be safely and reliably paced during the period of preoperative assessment and during the critical periods of anesthetic induction and thoracotomy. Infection did not occur, probably because of careful gas sterilization of the units. Various models of pacemakers are compared, and the reasons for two pacemaker failures are presented. There were two early deaths and one late death in the series. The relationship of progressive coronary disease to recent infarction is stressed. Patients having intermittent heart block frequently showed the picture of “competing pacemakers” postoperatively, but without deleterious effect. Twenty patients, between 54 and 88 years of age, are alive and well at the time of reporting, with excellent pacemaker response and no further Stokes-Adams attacks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14118681

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  3. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  4. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  5. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Photonic technologies for visual implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Ruediger; Praemassing, F.; Puettjer, D.; Stawski, N.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    In this paper two applications of photonic technologies for visual implants in the field of medicine are presented. Both are technical systems working as vision aid for people suffering from blindness due to damages in their visual system. The first system is a retinal implant (RI), the second an intraocular vision aid (IoVA) for people with opaque cornea.

  7. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  8. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  9. Arthroscopic removal of palmar/plantar osteochondral fragments (POF) in the metacarpo- and metatarso-phalangeal joints of standardbred trotters--outcome and possible genetic background to POF.

    PubMed

    Roneus, B; Arnason, T; Collinder, E; Rasmussen, M

    1998-01-01

    A clinical material of 133 Standardbred horses with palmar/plantar osteochondral fragments (POF) in the metacarpo- and metatarsophalangeal joints were studied. All horses had their fragments removed with arthroscopic surgery. 102 of the horses were 3 years old or younger when surgery was performed. Anatomical localisations of the fragments were in agreement with earlier reports. There was no statistical significant difference in month of birth in the POF--group compared to the total population. Eighty % of the horses that had raced before surgery came back to racing. The racing performance relative to their contemporaries remained the same after the POF operation. 65% of the horses that had not raced before surgery raced after the operation. The breeding index BLUP (Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) was used to evaluate if the POF-horses differed genetically in racing ability from the total population. The average BLUP value of the POF group was 103.4 (+/- 0.65), while the mean BLUP value of the total population was 98.9. This difference was highly significant and indicated that these POF horses belonged to a selected group. A homogeneity test of allele frequencies in blood type systems was performed to evaluate if any genetic difference was persistent between POF horses compared to the total population. The statistical analysis of gene frequencies for alleles in blood type systems indicated a genetic discrimination in blood type systems D and Tf.

  10. Scanning Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Microscopy Selectively Probes HA Content in Gelatin/Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Osteochondral Defect Repair.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Davide; Pastore, Stella G; Raucci, Maria G; Siliqi, Dritan; De Pascalis, Fabio; Nacucchi, Michele; Ambrosio, Luigi; Giannini, Cinzia

    2016-04-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the structure of a scaffold made of bovine gelatin and hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering purposes. In particular, the detailed characterization of such a material has a great relevance because of its application in the healing process of the osteochondral defect that consists of a damage of cartilage and injury of the adjacent subchondral bone, significantly compromising millions of patient's quality of life. Two different techniques exploiting X-ray radiation, with table-top setups, are used: microtomography (micro-CT) and microdiffraction. Micro-CT characterizes the microstructure in the three dimensions at the micrometer scale spatial resolution, whereas microdiffraction provides combined structural/morphological information at the atomic and nanoscale, in two dimensional microscopy images with a hundred micrometer spatial resolution. The combination of these two techniques allowed an appropriate structural characterization for the purpose of validating the engineering approach used for the realization of the hydroxyapatite gradient across the scaffold, with properties close to the natural model. PMID:27020229

  11. Osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow: excellent mid-term follow-up results in teenage athletes treated by arthroscopic debridement and microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Bojanić, Ivan; Smoljanović, Tomislav; Dokuzović, Stjepan

    2012-01-01

    Aim To extend the microfracture procedure, which has been proven successful on osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions in the knee and ankle, to OCD lesions in the elbow. Methods Nine young patients were treated by arthroscopic debridement and microfracture by a single surgeon. The average age at operation was 15.0 years (median 15; range 12-19). The average length of the follow-up was 5.3 years (median 5; range 2-9). The follow-up included physical examination and patient interview with elbow function scoring. Success of treatment was determined according to pre-operative and follow-up Mayo Elbow Performance Index scores and the patients’ return to sports. Results Eight patients scored excellent results on the follow-up and 1 scored a good result. Four out of 9 patients were able to increase their training intensity, 2 returned to the same level of activity, 2 changed sports (due to reasons unrelated to the health of their elbow), and 1 left professional sports and started training only recreationally. No patients stopped participating in sports altogether. Conclusions We advocate arthroscopic microfracturing, followed by a strict rehabilitation regime, as a highly effective treatment for OCD of the humeral capitellum. PMID:22351577

  12. Retention and release mechanisms of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkofler, M.; Reinelt, M.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2011-06-01

    The fraction of deuterium (D) that is retained upon irradiation of beryllium (Be) as well as the temperatures at which implanted D is released are of importance for the international fusion experiment ITER, where Be will be used as an armor material. The influence of single parameters on retention and release is investigated in laboratory experiments performed under well defined conditions with the aim to identify dominant underlying mechanisms and thus be able to predict the behavior of the Be wall in ITER. Recent progress in the quantification of retained fractions and release temperatures as well as in the understanding of the governing mechanisms is presented. The retained fraction upon implantation of D at 1 keV into Be(1 1 2¯ 0) to fluences far below the saturation threshold of 10 21 m -2 is almost 95%, the remaining 5% being attributed to reflection at the surface. At these low fluences, no dependence of the retained fractions on implantation energy is observed. At fluences of the order of 10 21 m -2 and higher, saturation of the irradiated material affects the retention, leading to lower retained fractions. Furthermore, at these fluences the retained fractions decrease with decreasing implantation energies. Differences in the retained fractions from implanted Be(1 1 2¯ 0) and polycrystalline Be are explained by anisotropic diffusion of interstitials during implantation, leading to an amount of surviving D-trap complexes that depends on surface-orientation. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra are recorded after implantation of fluences of the order of 10 19 m -2 at various energies and simulated by means of a newly developed code based on coupled reaction-diffusion systems (CRDS). The asymmetric shape of the TPD peaks is reproduced by introducing a local D accumulation process into the model.

  13. Tegress™ Urethral Implant Phase III Clinical Experience and Product Uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Roger R

    2005-01-01

    Advances in materials technology, coupled with a heightened understanding of wound healing and tissue-materials interactions in the lower urinary tract, have led to the development of a variety of new urethral bulking agents that are expected to be available in the near future. Experience with such bulking agents continues to grow and study results are disseminated as more clinical trials are initiated and completed. The intention of this report is to review the characteristics and initial clinical results for one of these new agents: Tegress™ Urethral Implant (C. R. Bard, Inc., Murray Hill, NJ). This material, with unique phase-change properties upon exposure to body temperature fluids, offers ease of injection and requires less volume for clinical effect than bovine collagen. Additionally, Tegress Urethral Implant performance in clinical trials has suggested improved durability and correspondingly higher continence and improvement rates versus bovine collagen. As these materials evolve, an understanding of preferential implant techniques is being gained also. Delivery method and implant site may prove to substantially alter the biologic activity of these compounds. As outlined in this review, experience with Tegress Implant resulted in changes in delivery technique that translated into improved materials and tissue interaction. PMID:16985873

  14. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  15. Speech Production Intelligibility of Early Implanted Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mirette G.; Waltzman, Susan B.; Tajudeen, Bobby; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the influence of age, and age at implantation, on speech production intelligibility in prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant recipients. Methods Forty prelingually, profoundly deaf children who received cochlear implants between 8 and 40 months of age. Their age at testing ranged between 2.5 – 18 years. Children were recorded repeating the ten sentences in the Beginner’s Intelligibility Test. These recordings were played back to normal-hearing listeners who were unfamiliar with deaf speech and who were instructed to write down what they heard. They also rated each subject for the intelligibility of their speech production on a 5-point rating scale. The main outcome measures were the percentage of target words correctly transcribed, and the intelligibility ratings, in both cases averaged across three normal-hearing listeners. Results The data showed a strong effect of age at testing, with older children being more intelligible. This effect was particularly pronounced for children implanted in the first 24 months of life, all of whom had speech production intelligibility scores of 80% or higher when they were tested at age 5.5 years or older. This was true for only five out of nine children implanted at age 25 to 36 months. Conclusions Profoundly deaf children who receive cochlear implants in the first two years of life produce highly intelligible speech before age 6. This is also true for most, but not all children implanted in their third year. PMID:20472308

  16. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  17. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  19. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, Milton N.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Smith, Stephen F.; Hylton, James O.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  20. [A fully-implantable active hearing device in congenital auricular atresia].

    PubMed

    Siegert, R; Neumann, C

    2014-07-01

    Active implantable hearing devices were primarily developed for sensorineural hearing loss. The vibrator coupling mechanisms were oriented towards normal middle ear anatomy and function. The aim of this project was to modify the only fully implantable hearing device with an implantable microphone for application in congenital auricular atresia, Carina™, and to introduce the modified device into the clinic. A special prosthesis was developed for the transducer and its individual coupling achieved by a special cramping system. The system was implanted in 5 patients with congenital auricular atresia. Audiological results were good; with patients' hearing gain exceeding 30 dB HL. Anatomic limits to the system's indications and technical drawbacks are also discussed. PMID:25056646

  1. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  3. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  4. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Siebert, Sean M; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J B; Brenckle, Mark A; Amsden, Jason J; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2012-11-27

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  5. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  6. Deterioration mechanisms of joint prosthesis materials. Several solutions by ion implantation surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Rieu, J; Pichat, A; Rabbe, L M; Chabrol, C; Robelet, M

    1990-07-01

    Materials for orthopaedic implants can fail for several combined reasons: corrosion, fatigue and wear for metals, wear and creep for polymers, fracture for ceramics. Some typical cases are analysed and it is demonstrated that ion implantation improves metals and polymers used for joint prosthesis. Implantations of nitrogen, oxygen and argon ions modify the structure of a 2-500 nm thick layer in the materials. The results of friction tests on the couple metal-polymer are correlated with the surface properties. PMID:2397260

  7. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  8. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  9. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  10. Effects of Vestibular Prosthesis Electrode Implantation and Stimulation on Hearing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/sec, with pulse frequency modulated from 48–222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5–10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ~5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2–14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  11. [Principles of the TCP-implantation system after 2 years of clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Riess, G

    1980-08-01

    The TCP implantation system is based on absorbable tricalcium phosphate ceramics which is used in different ways as porcelain-fused-to-metal material. The strict and complex application of preimplantologic and peri-implantologic principles, particularly the cleansing and preparation of the implant bed and of the bone tissue, as well as newly developed, internally cooled cutting and self-cleaning instructions are of special importance. The shape of the implant and the operative technique also play an important role in achieving a successful oral implant. The nonmetalic surface of the TCP implant has proved to be an important advantage. Since these implants induce a fusion with the bone tissue which does not include connective tissue, the use of elastic coupling elements that functionally imitate the periodontal tissue have proved to be an important factor in the primary and long-term success of the implant. The gnathologic formation of the chewing surfaces is just as important as the need for proper information, training, and supervision of the dentists as well as control of implants. PMID:7004847

  12. Autologous sclera-muscle flaps technique in evisceration with hydroxyapatite implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Song, Yin-Wei; Guo, Jing-Min; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM To provide superior cosmetic results and reduce complications, unlike traditional evisceration coupled with implant insertion technique and its modifications, we have developed a novel and simple technique for anophthalmic patients. METHODS All patients who underwent the scleral-muscle flaps procedure in evisceration with the placement of hydroxyapatite implant were included in the study. Main outcome measures were complications such as exposure, infection, chemosis, conjunctival inclusion cysts, granulomas. Meanwhile, implant motility was indirectly measured and the results were collected and analyzed. RESULTS A total of twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Eighteen were men (64.29%) and ten were women (35.71%). Ages ranged from 18 to 65y (mean age, 32 years old). Mean follow-up was 12.32mo (range, 9-16mo). All patients received a hydroxyapatite implant. The average diameter of the implant was 19.29±1.36 mm (range, 18-22 mm). Minor complications occurred in 3 patients, and a major complication was observed in 1 patient. Mean motility were 11.04±1.45 mm horizontally (range, 7-14 mm) and 8.57±1.50 mm vertically (range, 5-12 mm). CONCLUSION The sclera-muscle flaps technique in evisceration with hydroxyapatite implantation is simple and practical that eases the surgical procedure, enables a proper size hydroxyapatite implantation, distinctively reduces complications and provides superior surgery results, especially the motility of the implant. PMID:26309868

  13. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  14. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  15. Wireless microsensor network solutions for neurological implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    The design and development of wireless mocrosensor network systems for the treatment of many degenerative as well as traumatic neurological disorders is presented in this paper. Due to the advances in micro and nano sensors and wireless systems, the biomedical sensors have the potential to revolutionize many areas in healthcare systems. The integration of nanodevices with neurons that are in communication with smart microsensor systems has great potential in the treatment of many neurodegenerative brain disorders. It is well established that patients suffering from either Parkinson"s disease (PD) or Epilepsy have benefited from the advantages of implantable devices in the neural pathways of the brain to alter the undesired signals thus restoring proper function. In addition, implantable devices have successfully blocked pain signals and controlled various pelvic muscles in patients with urinary and fecal incontinence. Even though the existing technology has made a tremendous impact on controlling the deleterious effects of disease, it is still in its infancy. This paper presents solutions of many problems of today's implantable and neural-electronic interface devices by combining nanowires and microelectronics with BioMEMS and applying them at cellular level for the development of a total wireless feedback control system. The only device that will actually be implanted in this research is the electrodes. All necessary controllers will be housed in accessories that are outside the body that communicate with the implanted electrodes through tiny inductively-coupled antennas. A Parkinson disease patient can just wear a hat-system close to the implantable neural probe so that the patient is free to move around, while the sensors continually monitor, record, transmit all vital information to health care specialist. In the event of a problem, the system provides an early warning to the patient while they are still mobile thus providing them the opportunity to react and

  16. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  17. Implantable microwave antennas for thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the physical construction and power deposition characteristics of interstitial microwave antennas that may be used for highly localized heating of tissue at depth in the human body. Several different antenna designs are described and matched with potential clinical applications that range from moderate temperature Hyperthermia therapy to tissue- necrosing Thermal Ablation therapy. Typical clinical procedures are outlined for thermal treatment of target sites such as brain, prostate, heart, and gynecologic region tissues. Associated methods of implanting the antennas and coupling microwave energy into the surrounding tissue are also described, including the use of single or multi-chamber stiff, flexible or inflatable balloon type catheters, with or without circulating air or water cooling. With numerous references to the primary literature, this material should provide a framework for analyzing potential new applications for interstitial microwave antennas, as derived from the physical capabilities and limitations of the available hardware and techniques.

  18. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  19. Micro-CT evaluation of in vivo osteogenesis at implants processed by wire-type electric discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Koichi; Kataoka, Yu; Ohtsuka, Fukunaga; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Titanium surfaces processed by wire-type electric discharge machining (EDM) are microfabricated surfaces with an irregular morphology, and they exhibited excellent in vitro bone biocompatibility. In this study, the efficiency of in vivo osteogenesis on EDM surfaces was investigated by surgically placing screw-shaped EDM-processed and machined-surface implants into the femurs of four Japanese white rabbits. The volume and process of new bone formation were evaluated by an X-ray micro-CT scanner, coupled with histopathological observations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-implantation. Before surgical implantation, the surface topography and contact angle of each implant surface were examined. Bone formation increased over time on both implant surfaces, with both implant types yielding statistically equivalent bone volume at 4 weeks post-implementation. However, at 1 week post-implantation, amount of new bone at EDM-processed implant was markedly greater than that at machined-surface implant. Moreover, new bone appeared to initiate directly from the EDM surfaces, while new bone appeared to generate from pre-existing host bone to the machined surfaces. Thus, EDM seemed to be a promising method for surface modification of titanium implants to support enhanced osteogenesis.

  20. Micro-CT evaluation of in vivo osteogenesis at implants processed by wire-type electric discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Koichi; Kataoka, Yu; Ohtsuka, Fukunaga; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Titanium surfaces processed by wire-type electric discharge machining (EDM) are microfabricated surfaces with an irregular morphology, and they exhibited excellent in vitro bone biocompatibility. In this study, the efficiency of in vivo osteogenesis on EDM surfaces was investigated by surgically placing screw-shaped EDM-processed and machined-surface implants into the femurs of four Japanese white rabbits. The volume and process of new bone formation were evaluated by an X-ray micro-CT scanner, coupled with histopathological observations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-implantation. Before surgical implantation, the surface topography and contact angle of each implant surface were examined. Bone formation increased over time on both implant surfaces, with both implant types yielding statistically equivalent bone volume at 4 weeks post-implementation. However, at 1 week post-implantation, amount of new bone at EDM-processed implant was markedly greater than that at machined-surface implant. Moreover, new bone appeared to initiate directly from the EDM surfaces, while new bone appeared to generate from pre-existing host bone to the machined surfaces. Thus, EDM seemed to be a promising method for surface modification of titanium implants to support enhanced osteogenesis. PMID:22673455

  1. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  2. Orbital implants: potential new directions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Celia R; Morrison, David; Lou, Xia; Crawford, Geoffrey J; Gadjatsy, Adam; Constable, Ian J

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews orbital implants used to replace an eye after enucleation or evisceration. Advantages of implant placement are described, with discussion of implant and wrap material, and design features that affect clinical outcomes. Implants may be porous or nonporous, pegged for linkage with a cosmetic shell or unpegged, and may be wrapped with a covering material or tissue or unwrapped. Device shape, volume and material qualities affect tissue tolerance and the risk of exposure or extrusion. Limitations of currently available devices are discussed, with factors affecting surgeon and patient choice. Ideally, a device should be easy to insert, avoid the need for wrapping or adjunctive tissues, be light, biointegratable, comfortable after implantation and provide satisfactory orbital volume replacement, movement and cosmesis without requiring further surgery or pegging. This review briefly discusses developments in implant design and aspects of design that affect function, but is not a detailed clinical review; rather, it aims to stimulate thought on optimal design and discusses recent developments. Novel technology in the form of a prototype device with a soft, biointegratable anterior surface is described as an example of newer approaches.

  3. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  4. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  5. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  6. Retinal implants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Alice T; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-07-01

    Retinal implants present an innovative way of restoring sight in degenerative retinal diseases. Previous reviews of research progress were written by groups developing their own devices. This systematic review objectively compares selected models by examining publications describing five representative retinal prostheses: Argus II, Boston Retinal Implant Project, Epi-Ret 3, Intelligent Medical Implants (IMI) and Alpha-IMS (Retina Implant AG). Publications were analysed using three criteria for interim success: clinical availability, vision restoration potential and long-term biocompatibility. Clinical availability: Argus II is the only device with FDA approval. Argus II and Alpha-IMS have both received the European CE Marking. All others are in clinical trials, except the Boston Retinal Implant, which is in animal studies. Vision restoration: resolution theoretically correlates with electrode number. Among devices with external cameras, the Boston Retinal Implant leads with 100 electrodes, followed by Argus II with 60 electrodes and visual acuity of 20/1262. Instead of an external camera, Alpha-IMS uses a photodiode system dependent on natural eye movements and can deliver visual acuity up to 20/546. Long-term compatibility: IMI offers iterative learning; Epi-Ret 3 is a fully intraocular device; Alpha-IMS uses intraocular photosensitive elements. Merging the results of these three criteria, Alpha-IMS is the most likely to achieve long-term success decades later, beyond current clinical availability. PMID:24403565

  7. [Implantable hemodynamic monitoring devices].

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Butter, C

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure is one of the most frequent diagnoses in hospital admissions in Germany. In the majority of these admissions acute decompensation of an already existing chronic heart failure is responsible. New mostly wireless and remote strategies for monitoring, titration, adaptation and optimization are the focus for improvement of the treatment of heart failure patients and the poor prognosis. The implantation of hemodynamic monitoring devices follows the hypothesis that significant changes in hemodynamic parameters occur before the occurrence of acute decompensation requiring readmission. Three different hemodynamic monitoring devices have so far been investigated in clinical trials employing right ventricular pressure, left atrial pressure and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. Only one of these systems, the CardioMENS™ HF monitoring system, demonstrated a significant reduction of hospitalization due to heart failure over 6 months in the CHAMPION trial. The systematic adaptation of medication in the CHAMPION trial significantly differed from the usual care of the control arm over 6 months. This direct day to day management of diuretics is currently under intensive investigation; however, further studies demonstrating a positive effect on mortality are needed before translation of this approach into guidelines. Without this evidence a further implementation of pressure monitoring into currently used devices and justification of the substantial technical and personnel demands are not warranted.

  8. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  9. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  10. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  11. Examining the relation of osteochondral lesions of the talus to ligamentous and lateral ankle tendinous pathologic features: a comprehensive MRI review in an asymptomatic lateral ankle population.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Mandelker, Eiran M; Malhotra, Amit D; Schwartz, Edward; Brigido, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Given the frequency and burden of ankle sprains, the pathologic features identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are widely known in the symptomatic population. Ankle MRI pathologic features in the asymptomatic population, however, are poorly understood. Such examinations are rarely undertaken unless an ankle has been injured or is painful. We report the systematic MRI findings from the reports of 108 consecutive asymptomatic lateral ankles (104 patients). Our purpose was to (1) report the prevalence of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) and pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR); (2) correlate the presence of OLTs with the pathologic features of the medial and lateral ligaments, peroneal tendons, and SPR; and (3) correlate ligamentous discontinuity with the peroneal pathologic features, OLTs, and SPR pathologic features. A total of 16 OLTs (14.81%) were present (13 medial and 3 lateral). Of the 16 patients with OLTs, 8 (50.00%) had concomitant peroneal pathologic findings. Healthy medial and lateral ligaments were noted in 41 patients (37.96%), and ligamentous discontinuity was grade I in 25 (23.15%), II in 32 (29.63%), III in 5 (4.63%), and grade IV in 5 patients (4.63%). A weak positive correlation was found between attenuation or tears of the superficial deltoid and medial OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.23, p = .0191) and a moderate positive correlation between tears of the posterior talofibular ligament and lateral OLTs (phi coefficient = 0.30, p = .0017). Additionally, a moderate positive correlation between ligamentous discontinuity and tendinopathy of the peroneus brevis was noted [Spearman's coefficient(106) = 0.29, p = .0024]. These findings add to the evidence of concomitant pathologic features in the asymptomatic population. To definitively assess causation and evaluate the clinical evolution of radiologic findings, future, prospective, longitudinal

  12. Improved quality of cartilage repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of an osteochondral defect in a cynomolgus macaque model

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Susumu; Imai, Shinji; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Mimura, Tomohiro; Nishizawa, Kazuya; Ueba, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Kousuke; Kubo, Mitsuhiko; Mori, Kanji; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Integration of repaired cartilage with surrounding native cartilage is a major challenge for successful tissue-engineering strategies of cartilage repair. We investigated whether incorporation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the collagen scaffold improves integration and repair of cartilage defects in a cynomolgus macaque model. Methods Cynomolgus macaque bone marrow-derived MSCs were isolated and incorporated into type-I collagen gel. Full-thickness osteochondral defects (3 mm in diameter, 5 mm in depth) were created in the patellar groove of 36 knees of 18 macaques and were either left untreated (null group, n = 12), had collagen gel alone inserted (gel group, n = 12), or had collagen gel incorporating MSCs inserted (MSC group, n = 12). After 6, 12, and 24 weeks, the cartilage integration and tissue response were evaluated macroscopically and histologically (4 null, 4 gel, and 4 MSC knees at each time point). Results The gel group showed most cartilage-rich reparative tissue covering the defect, owing to formation of excessive cartilage extruding though the insufficient subchondral bone. Despite the fact that a lower amount of new cartilage was produced, the MSC group had better-quality cartilage with regular surface, seamless integration with neighboring naïve cartilage, and reconstruction of trabecular subchondral bone. Interpretation Even with intensive investigation, MSC-based cell therapy has not yet been established in experimental cartilage repair. Our model using cynomolgus macaques had optimized conditions, and the method using MSCs is superior to other experimental settings, allowing the possibility that the procedure might be introduced to future clinical practice. PMID:25175660

  13. The Effect of Exercise on the Early Stages of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Induced Cartilage Repair in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shoki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kiyan, Wataru; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage is challenging owing to the restriction in the ability of articular cartilage to repair itself. Therefore, cell supplementation therapy is possible cartilage repair method. However, few studies have verified the efficacy and safety of cell supplementation therapy. The current study assessed the effect of exercise on early the phase of cartilage repair following cell supplementation utilizing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) intra-articular injection. An osteochondral defect was created on the femoral grooves bilaterally of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stromal cells that were obtained from male Wistar rats were cultured in monolayer. After 4 weeks, MSCs were injected into the right knee joint and the rats were randomized into an exercise or no-exercise intervention group. The femurs were divided as follows: C group (no exercise without MSC injection); E group (exercise without MSC injection); M group (no exercise with MSC injection); and ME group (exercise with MSC injection). At 2, 4, and 8 weeks after the injection, the femurs were sectioned and histologically graded using the Wakitani cartilage repair scoring system. At 2 weeks after the injection, the total histological scores of the M and ME groups improved significantly compared with those of the C group. Four weeks after the injection, the scores of both the M and ME groups improved significantly. Additionally, the scores in the ME group showed a significant improvement compared to those in the M group. The improvement in the scores of the E, M, and ME groups at 8 weeks were not significantly different. The findings indicate that exercise may enhance cartilage repair after an MSC intra-articular injection. This study highlights the importance of exercise following cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26968036

  14. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  15. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  16. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  17. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load.

  18. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  19. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications.

  20. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  1. Implantable wireless battery recharging system for bladder pressure chronic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Cong, Peng; Suster, Michael A; Damaser, Margot

    2015-11-21

    This paper presents an implantable wireless battery recharging system design for bladder pressure chronic monitoring. The wireless recharging system consists of an external 15 cm-diameter 6-turn powering coil and a silicone-encapsulated implantable rectangular coil with a dimension of 7 mm × 17 mm × 2.5 mm and 18 turns, which further encloses a 3 mm-diameter and 12 mm-long rechargeable battery, two ferrite rods, an ASIC, and a tuning capacitor. For a constant recharging current of 100 μA, an RF power of 700 μW needs to be coupled into the implantable module through the tuned coils. Analyses and experiments confirm that with the two coils aligned coaxially or with a 6 cm axial offset and a tilting angle of 30°, an external power of 3.5 W or 10 W is required, respectively, at an optimal frequency of 3 MHz to cover a large implant depth of 20 cm.

  2. Development and initial testing of a permanently implantable centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, T; Takami, Y; Benkowski, R; Ohtsubo, S; Yukio, O; Tayama, E; Ohtsuka, G; Niimi, Y; Glueck, J; Sueoka, A; Schmallegger, H; Schima, H; Wolner, E; Nosé, Y

    1997-07-01

    To be able to salvage heart failure patients, the need for an economical permanent ventricular assist device is increasing. To meet this increasing demand, a miniaturized centrifugal blood pump has been developed as a permanently implantable device. The Gyro permanently implantable model (PI-601) incorporates a sealless design with a blood stagnation free structure. The pump impeller is magnetically coupled to the driver magnet in a sealless manner. This pump is atraumatic and antithrombogenic and incorporates a double pivot bearing system. A miniaturized actuator was utilized in this system in collaboration with the University of Vienna. The priming volume of this pump is 20 ml. The overall size of the pump actuator package is 53 mm in height and 65 mm in diameter, 145 ml of displacement volume, and 305 g in weight. Testing to date has included in vitro hydraulic performance and hemolysis. This pump can provide 5 L/min against a 110 mm Hg total pressure head at 2,000 rpm and 8 L/min against 150 mm Hg at 2,500 rpm. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) value of this pump was 0.0028 g/100 L at 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg. A preliminary anatomical study revealed the possibility of the implantability of 2 such systems in biventricular bypass at a preperitoneal location. This system is feasible for use as a permanently implantable biventricular assist device. PMID:9212924

  3. Wireless energizing system for an automated implantable sensor.

    PubMed

    Swain, Biswaranjan; Nayak, Praveen P; Kar, Durga P; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Laxmi P

    2016-07-01

    The wireless drive of an automated implantable electronic sensor has been explored for health monitoring applications. The proposed system comprises of an automated biomedical sensing system which is energized through resonant inductive coupling. The implantable sensor unit is able to monitor the body temperature parameter and sends back the corresponding telemetry data wirelessly to the data recoding unit. It has been observed that the wireless power delivery system is capable of energizing the automated biomedical implantable electronic sensor placed over a distance of 3 cm from the power transmitter with an energy transfer efficiency of 26% at the operating resonant frequency of 562 kHz. This proposed method ensures real-time monitoring of different human body temperatures around the clock. The monitored temperature data have been compared with a calibrated temperature measurement system to ascertain the accuracy of the proposed system. The investigated technique can also be useful for monitoring other body parameters such as blood pressure, bladder pressure, and physiological signals of the patient in vivo using various implantable sensors. PMID:27475582

  4. Wireless energizing system for an automated implantable sensor.

    PubMed

    Swain, Biswaranjan; Nayak, Praveen P; Kar, Durga P; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Laxmi P

    2016-07-01

    The wireless drive of an automated implantable electronic sensor has been explored for health monitoring applications. The proposed system comprises of an automated biomedical sensing system which is energized through resonant inductive coupling. The implantable sensor unit is able to monitor the body temperature parameter and sends back the corresponding telemetry data wirelessly to the data recoding unit. It has been observed that the wireless power delivery system is capable of energizing the automated biomedical implantable electronic sensor placed over a distance of 3 cm from the power transmitter with an energy transfer efficiency of 26% at the operating resonant frequency of 562 kHz. This proposed method ensures real-time monitoring of different human body temperatures around the clock. The monitored temperature data have been compared with a calibrated temperature measurement system to ascertain the accuracy of the proposed system. The investigated technique can also be useful for monitoring other body parameters such as blood pressure, bladder pressure, and physiological signals of the patient in vivo using various implantable sensors.

  5. Template-guided implantation of the Bonebridge: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nozomu; Takumi, Yutaka; Cho, Byunghyun; Mori, Kentaro; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Yamashita, Makoto; Hashizume, Makoto; Komune, Shizuo

    2015-12-01

    The surgical procedure for Bonebridge implantation cannot be done in some cases without exposing the dura mater or sigmoid sinus. Surgical simulation technology can help to identify such difficulties prior to surgery and be used to clarify the optimal location and orientation of the device to be implanted. However, there has not been a simple strategy to drill the temporal bone at exactly the same location as that simulated on the computer. Based on our previous development of the surface template-assisted marker positioning (STAMP) method for performing image-guided otologic surgery, we recently developed a noninvasive guiding method, the BB-STAMP method, for performing image-guided Bonebridge implantation. Three patients underwent Bonebridge implantation at our surgical center during the years of 2013-2014. The authors in the simulation center supported the surgery using the BB-STAMP method. The time and effort required to prepare for the surgery were evaluated. In addition, a postoperative analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of placing the device in the planned location. The BB-STAMP method enabled the surgeon to precisely replicate the computer simulation in the real patient with submillimetric accuracy without complexity. Thus, the use of experienced and elaborative simulation coupled with the creation of a tailor-made three-dimensional template (BB-STAMP) enables surgeons to perform quick, precise and safe surgical procedures at distant institutions.

  6. Wireless energizing system for an automated implantable sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Biswaranjan; Nayak, Praveen P.; Kar, Durga P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Laxmi P.

    2016-07-01

    The wireless drive of an automated implantable electronic sensor has been explored for health monitoring applications. The proposed system comprises of an automated biomedical sensing system which is energized through resonant inductive coupling. The implantable sensor unit is able to monitor the body temperature parameter and sends back the corresponding telemetry data wirelessly to the data recoding unit. It has been observed that the wireless power delivery system is capable of energizing the automated biomedical implantable electronic sensor placed over a distance of 3 cm from the power transmitter with an energy transfer efficiency of 26% at the operating resonant frequency of 562 kHz. This proposed method ensures real-time monitoring of different human body temperatures around the clock. The monitored temperature data have been compared with a calibrated temperature measurement system to ascertain the accuracy of the proposed system. The investigated technique can also be useful for monitoring other body parameters such as blood pressure, bladder pressure, and physiological signals of the patient in vivo using various implantable sensors.

  7. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  8. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  9. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  10. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into

  11. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  12. Prosthesis coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  13. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  14. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  15. Iridium 192 nomogram system for single plane implants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.J. Jr.; Memula, N.; Doss, L.L.

    1986-02-01

    Nomograms for square planar arrays spanning the range from 3 X 3 cm to 10 X 10 cm were developed. The nomograms are intended to be used for pretreatment planning of implant geometry, so that the therapist may enter the operating room with a plan for the optimal implant in mind. We show that clinically useful implants are those in which the reference isodoses are fully coupled. Decoupling occurs when ribbon spacing exceeds approximately 1.2 cm and leads to undesirable ''cold spots'' within the treatment volume. Ribbon spacing of 1.0 cm is recommended. This represents a trade-off between adequate ribbon coupling and minimum tissue damage from trocar placement. For clinically useful arrays, the area enclosed by the reference isodose contour (85% of the maximum dose rate) is approximately 50% of the array area. Reference isodose contour and its enclosed area are independent of seed strength for a given array, as long as all seeds within the array are of equal strength.

  16. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated,more » including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.« less

  17. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-06-06

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported.

  18. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  19. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  20. [Signal processing in contour implants].

    PubMed

    Ormezzano, Y; Deleurme, C; Vormès, E; Frachet, B

    1990-01-01

    Signal processing by cochlear implants is aimed at transmitting all the acoustic information carried by the human voice, whether in its semantic, esthetic or affective aspects, as an electrical signal. The "translating" approach, which encodes the signal according to the characteristics of the sounds, can only be ideally used in multiple-canal implants. On the contrary, our experience with various single-canal prostheses shows that our patients choose one of these according to the comfort of the signal and to its reliability rather than to the complexity of signal processing: all prostheses produce approximately the same results, whatever the method implemented. The contour implant allows an easy, effective and well-tolerated fitting at low costs.

  1. MRI artefacts after Bonebridge implantation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, C; Mader, I; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Hassepass, F

    2014-07-01

    The new transcutaneous bone conduction implant (BCI) Bonebridge (BB, MED-EL) allows the skin to remain intact and therefore overcomes some issues related to percutaneous systems, such as skin reaction around the external screw and cosmetic complaints. According to manufacturer, BB is MRI conditional up to 1,5 Tesla (T). The artefact of the neurocranium after BB implantation is extensive as shown in the present report. This has to be taken into account when patients suffering conductive, mixed or single-sided hearing loss with candidacy for a BCI are counselled. In patients with comorbid intracranial tumour or other diseases of the brain that require imaging control scans with MRI percutaneous, BCI should be the implant of choice considering the very small artefact of the percutaneous screw in MRI.

  2. Treatment of Infected Facial Implants.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Kriti; Cox, Joshua A; Dickey, Ryan M; Gravina, Paula; Echo, Anthony; Izaddoost, Shayan A; Nguyen, Anh H

    2016-05-01

    Alloplastic facial implants have a wide range of uses to achieve the appropriate facial contour. A variety of materials such as metals, polymers, ceramics and synthetic injectable fillers are available to the reconstructive and aesthetic surgeon. Besides choosing the right surgical technique and the adequate material, the surgeon must be prepared to treat complications. Infection is an uncommon but serious complication that can cause displeasing consequences for the patient. There are few references in literature regarding treatment and management of facial implant-related infections. This study aims to discuss the role of biofilm in predisposing alloplastic materials to infection, to provide a review of literature, to describe our own institutional experience, and to define a patient care pathway for facial implant-associated infection. PMID:27152100

  3. Oral Implant Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Sarika; PATIL, Neelkant; SOLANKI, Jitender; SINGH, Ravinder; LALLER, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Selecting an appropriate implant imaging technique has become a challenging task since the advent of advanced imaging modalities, and many of these are used for implant imaging. On imaging, the modality should not only consider the anatomy but should also provide dimensional accuracy. Many dentists use the conventional method, mostly orthopantograph (OPG), in their routine practice of implant placement. However, because of the drawbacks associated with OPG, higher technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), are better accepted. These help improve image sharpness and reduce distortion. These techniques are not used widely due to the cost effect. Therefore, to decide on the type of imaging technique, all associated advantages and disadvantages should be considered, which will be broadly discussed in this review. PMID:26715891

  4. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  5. Superior biofunctionality of dental implant fixtures uniformly coated with durable bioglass films by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Enculescu, M; Tanase, C; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glasses are currently considered the suitable candidates to stir the quest for a new generation of osseous implants with superior biological/functional performance. In congruence with this vision, this contribution aims to introduce a reliable technological recipe for coating fairly complex 3D-shaped implants (e.g. dental screws) with uniform and mechanical resistant bioactive glass films by the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering method. The mechanical reliability of the bioactive glass films applied to real Ti dental implant fixtures has been evaluated by a procedure comprised of "cold" implantation in pig mandibular bone from a dead animal, followed by immediate tension-free extraction tests. The effects of the complex mechanical strains occurring during implantation were analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron dispersive spectroscopy. Extensive biocompatibility assays (MTS, immunofluorescence, Western blot) revealed that the bioactive glass films stimulated strong cellular adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells, without promoting their differentiation. The ability of the implant coatings to conserve a healthy stem cell pool is promising to further endorse the fabrication of new osseointegration implant designs with extended lifetime.

  6. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  7. [Needle implantations--clinical report].

    PubMed

    Esswein, W

    1977-04-01

    In the last four years 27 patients with edentulous lower jaw were treated with implantation of rows of tantalum needles; 25 of them were followed up clinically and radiologically. After an average of two years and seven months where the success rate was found to be 72%. Reasons for failure were thought to be mistakes in operative technique, insufficient oral hygiene of the patients and less than optimal aftercare. These needle implants have proved their value also in cases with marked atrophy of the lower jaw where other prosthetic-surgical methods aimed at improving the prosthesis site have failed.

  8. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  9. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to improve focus ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small print and nearby objects ...

  10. Elderly Benefit from Using Implantable Defibrillators

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Learn More Elderly benefit from using implantable defibrillators June 17, 2013 Categories: Heart News Study Highlights: Older people may benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) as much as younger people. Overall health, ...

  11. Beyond cochlear implants: awakening the deafened brain.

    PubMed

    Moore, David R; Shannon, Robert V

    2009-06-01

    Cochlear implants have provided hearing to more than 120,000 deaf people. Recent surgical developments include direct electrical stimulation of the brain, bilateral implants and implantation in children less than 1 year old. However, research is beginning to refocus on the role of the brain in providing benefits to implant users. The auditory system is able to use the highly impoverished input provided by implants to interpret speech, but this only works well in those who have developed language before their deafness or in those who receive their implant at a very young age. We discuss recent evidence suggesting that developing the ability of the brain to learn how to use an implant may be as important as further improvements of the implant technology. PMID:19471266

  12. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. How Does an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Work? An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has wires with ... tune the programming of your ICD so it works better to correct irregular heartbeats. The type of ...

  13. Physiological and molecular determinants of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Lin, Haiyan; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Haibin; Armant, D. Randall

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation involves the intimate interaction between an implantation-competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus, which occurs in a limited time period known as the window of implantation. Emerging evidence shows that defects originating during embryo implantation induce ripple effects with adverse consequences on later gestation events, highlighting the significance of this event for pregnancy success. Although a multitude of cellular events and molecular pathways involved in embryo-uterine crosstalk during implantation have been identified through gene expression studies and genetically engineered mouse models, a comprehensive understanding of the nature of embryo implantation is still missing. This review focuses on recent progress with particular attention to physiological and molecular determinants of blastocyst activation, uterine receptivity, blastocyst attachment and uterine decidualization. A better understanding of underlying mechanisms governing embryo implantation should generate new strategies to rectify implantation failure and improve pregnancy rates in women. PMID:23290997

  14. Implants and Ethnocide: Learning from the Cochlear Implant Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the fictional case of the "Babel fish" to explore and illustrate the issues involved in the controversy about the use of cochlear implants in prelinguistically deaf children. Analysis of this controversy suggests that the development of genetic tests for deafness poses a serious threat to the continued flourishing of Deaf culture.…

  15. A Pelvic Implant Orthosis in Rodents, for Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, and for Brain Machine Interface Research: Construction, Surgical Implantation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Udoekwere, Ubong Ime; Oza, Chintan S.; Giszter, Simon F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rodents are important model systems used to explore Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) and rehabilitation, and Brain Machine Interfaces. We present a new method to provide mechanical interaction for BMI and rehabilitation in rat models of SCI. New Method We present the design and implantation procedures for a pelvic orthosis that allows direct force application to the skeleton in brain machine interface and robot rehabilitation applications in rodents. We detail the materials, construction, machining, surgery and validation of the device. Results We describe the statistical validation of the implant procedures by comparing stepping parameters of 8 rats prior to and after implantation and surgical recovery. An ANOVA showed no effects of the implantation on stepping. Paired tests in the individual rats also showed no effect in 7/8 rats and minor effects in the last rat, within the group's variance. Comparison with Existing Methods Our method allows interaction with rats at the pelvis without any perturbation of normal stepping in the intact rat. The method bypasses slings, and cuffs, avoiding cuff or slings squeezing the abdomen, or other altered sensory feedback. Our implant osseointegrates, and thus allows an efficient high bandwidth mechanical coupling to a robot. The implants support quadrupedal training and are readily integrated into either treadmill or overground contexts. Conclusions Our novel device and procedures support a range of novel experimental designs and motor tests for rehabilitative and augmentation devices in intact and SCI model rats, with the advantage of allowing direct force application at the pelvic bones. PMID:24269175

  16. Resonant ultrasonic wireless power transmission for bio-implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Youm, Woosub; Hwang, Gunn; Moon, Kee S.; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present the ultrasonic wireless power transmission system as part of a brain-machine interface (BMI) system in development to supply the required electric power. Making a small-size implantable BMI, it is essential to design a low power unit with a rechargeable battery. The ultrasonic power transmission system has two piezoelectric transducers, facing each other between skin tissues converting electrical energy to mechanical vibrational energy or vice versa. Ultrasound is free from the electromagnetic coupling effect and medical frequency band limitations which making it a promising candidate for implantable purposes. In this paper, we present the design of piezoelectric composite transducer, the rectifier circuit, and rechargeable battery that all packaged in biocompatible titanium can. An initial prototype device was built for demonstration purpose. The early experimental results demonstrate the prototype device can reach 50% of energy transmission efficiency in a water medium at 20mm distance and 18% in animal skin tissue at 18mm distance, respectively.

  17. In-plane biocompatible microfluidic interconnects for implantable microsystems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dean G; Frisina, Robert D; Borkholder, David A

    2011-04-01

    Small mammals, particularly mice, are very useful animal models for biomedical research. Extremely small anatomical dimensions, however, make design of implantable microsystems quite challenging. A method for coupling external fluidic systems to microfluidic channels via in-plane interconnects is presented. Capillary tubing is inserted into channels etched in the surface of a Si wafer with a seal created by Parylene-C deposition. Prediction of Parylene-C deposition into tapered channels based on Knudsen diffusion and deposition characterizations allows for design optimization. Low-volume interconnects using biocompatible, chemical resistant materials have been demonstrated and shown to withstand pressure as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) with an average pull test strength of 2.9 N. Each interconnect consumes less than 0.018 mm3 (18 nL) of volume. The low added volume makes this an ideal interconnect technology for medical applications where implant volume is critical.

  18. In-Plane Biocompatible Microfluidic Interconnects for Implantable Microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dean G.; Frisina, Robert D.; Borkholder, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Small mammals, particularly mice, are very useful animal models for biomedical research. Extremely small anatomical dimensions, however, make design of implantable microsystems quite challenging. A method for coupling external fluidic systems to microfluidic channels via in-plane interconnects is presented. Capillary tubing is inserted into channels etched in the surface of a Si wafer with a seal created by Parylene-C deposition. Prediction of Parylene-C deposition into tapered channels based on Knudsen diffusion and deposition characterizations allows for design optimization. Low-volume interconnects using biocompatible, chemical resistant materials have been demonstrated and shown to withstand pressure as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) with an average pull test strength of 2.9 N. Each interconnect consumes less than 0.018 mm3 (18 nL) of volume. The low added volume makes this an ideal interconnect technology for medical applications where implant volume is critical. PMID:21147591

  19. Environmental standards for intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, B A; Kaufman, D V

    1984-02-01

    Successful implantation of prosthetic devices depends upon their freedom from postoperative inflammation and infection. Techniques and lessons learned in orthopaedic and other implant surgery should be applied to intraocular lens implantation. The avoidance of contamination by particles and micro-organisms is one essential principle of the surgical procedure. Practical steps are described to reduce both types of contamination. These measures taken together are recommended for adoption as a standard of environmental safety for lens implantation.

  20. Detailed spectral analysis of decellularized skin implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Dolgushkin, D. A.; Shalkovsky, P. Y.; Pershutkina, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The resutls of detailed analysis of donor skin implants using Raman spectroscopy method are presented. Fourier-deconvolution method was used to separate overlapping spectrum lines and to improve its informativeness. Based on the processed spectra were introduced coefficients that represent changes in relative concentration of implant components, which determines the quality of implants. It was established that Raman spectroscopy method can be used in assessment of skin implants.

  1. Augmentation mammaplasty using implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Susumu

    2012-09-01

    One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Even though this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issues to be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture, leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, and recent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed. PMID:23094237

  2. Augmentation Mammaplasty Using Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    One of the techniques for augmentation mammaplasty is the procedure using implants. Even though this technique has been used for many years, there are still several controversial issues to be discussed and overcome for patient safety. In this review article, capsular contracture, leak or rupture of the implants, possible systemic disease, relation with breast cancer, and recent problems with Poly Implant Prothese implants are described and discussed. PMID:23094237

  3. Dental implants in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Jones, John D; Partida, M Norma; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2012-01-01

    A need for dental implant treatment in the older population is recognized considering the prevalence of partial and complete edentulism and the positive predictability of implant therapy. Even with a number of barriers to overcome for the older adult seeking implant care, dental implants provide stabilizing support for removable dental appliances and have been shown to be successful in that population. In this paper, we describe quality of life, systemic, surgical, and prosthodontic considerations of this prosthetic treatment along with maintenance challenges.

  4. Combined Subpectoral Implantation of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator and Augmentation Mammoplasty in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Je Wook; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Dong Won; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous implantation of a cardiac implantable electronic device is the standard method. Occasionally, subpectoral cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation via axillary incisions is performed in young female patients for cosmetic purposes. Because subpectoral CIED implantation and augmentation mammoplasty involve the same layer, it is feasible to perform both procedures simultaneously. We report a case of combined subpectoral implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and augmentation mammoplasty via the axillary approach in a young female patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and small breasts. PMID:27721868

  5. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCA and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral (ScB) and trabecular (TB) bone structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCA was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCA was lower than Non-Op and other OCA. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCA did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCA contained “basal” cysts, localized to deeper regions, some “subchondral” cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  6. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  7. Optical waveguides in magneto-optical glasses fabricated by proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Yu-Wen; Zheng, Rui-Lin; Fu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liao-Lin; Guo, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Li, Wei-Nan; Lin, She-Bao; Wei, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Planar waveguides in magneto-optical glasses (Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glasses) have been produced by a 550-keV proton implantation at a dose of 4.0×1016 ions/cm2 for the first time to our knowledge. After annealing at 260 °C for 1.0 h, the dark-mode spectra and near-field intensity distributions are measured by the prism-coupling and end-face coupling methods. The damage profile, refractive index distribution and light propagation mode of the planar waveguide are numerically calculated by SRIM 2010, RCM and FD-BPM, respectively. The effects of implantation on the structural and optical properties are investigated by Raman and absorption spectra. It suggests that the proton-implanted Tb3+-doped aluminum borosilicate glass waveguide is a good candidate for a waveguide isolator in optical fiber communication and all-optical communication.

  8. Planar optical waveguides in Nd:BSO crystals fabricated by He and C ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Guo, Sha-Sha; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Guan, Jing; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides in Nd:BSO crystals were fabricated by the implantation of 500 keV He ions and 6.0 MeV C ions at two different substrate temperatures. The guiding modes were measured by the prism-coupling method with a He-Ne beam at 633 nm. The intensity calculation method (ICM) and reflectivity calculation method (RCM) were used for reconstructing refractive index profiles. The near-field intensity distribution of the waveguide, formed by He and C ions implanted after annealing at 300 °C, was measured by the end-face coupling setup. It was in reasonable agreement with the intensity of the waveguide mode simulated by the finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM). The absorption spectra of the sample with He ions implanted at fluences of 3 × 1016 ions/cm2 were measured using a spectrophotometer.

  9. Myths about Cochlear Implants: A Family Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetke-Stahlman, B.

    1994-01-01

    A parent of two young children who received cochlear implant surgery addresses common myths about this procedure including "deaf people don't support the use of cochlear implants,""if you choose cochlear implant surgery, you are choosing the hearing world,""hearing parents are not qualified to decide," and "the deaf child him/herself should…

  10. An Uncommon Presentation of Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David I.; Dean, Nicola R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Late periprosthetic seroma has lately been concerning for breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The authors present an uncommon presentation of breast implant rupture with a seroma and skin rash forming 2 years after insertion of the implant. PMID:27579243

  11. The hydroxyapatite orbital implant: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J L; Rhatigan, M; Sampath, R; Brammar, R; Sunderland, S; Leatherbarrow, B

    1996-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite orbital implant was first released for use as an orbital implant in humans in August 1989. It has been shown to be well tolerated, providing good motility of the artificial eye with a low complication rate when used as a primary implant. This prospective study evaluated the hydroxyapatite orbital implant used as both a primary and a secondary implant. Sixty patients were implanted between October 1992 and November 1994, 28 being implanted as a primary procedure at the time of enucleation or evisceration, and 32 as a secondary procedure. Seven patients underwent second-stage drilling and pegging of the implant. The mean follow-up time was 13 months (range 2-26 months). A standardised operative and post-operative protocol was followed. The patients were evaluated post-operatively for the amount of enophthalmos, degree of upper lid sulcus deformity, motility of the prosthesis, location of the implant in the socket, socket status and the presence or absence of discharge, position of the drill hole and coverage of the implant. Complications and their management were documented. Both patient and surgeon made a subjective assessment of cosmesis and the patient's satisfaction with the overall result was noted. The results of this study show the hydroxyapatite orbital implant to provide excellent motility of the artificial eye and good cosmesis with a low rate of complications when used both as a primary and as a secondary implant.

  12. Design optimization of functionally graded dental implant.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Mahmoud, Nemat-Alla

    2004-01-01

    The continuous increase of man's life span, and the growing confidence in using artificial materials inside the human body necessities introducing more effective prosthesis and implant materials. However, no artificial implant has biomechanical properties equivalent to the original tissue. Recently, titanium and bioceramic materials, such as hydroxyapatite are extensively used as fabrication materials for dental implant due to their high compatibility with hard tissue and living bone. Titanium has reasonable stiffness and strength while hydroxyapatite has low stiffness, low strength and high ability to reach full integration with living bone. In order to obtain good dental implantation of the biomaterial; full integration of the implant with living bone should be satisfied. Minimum stresses in the implant and the bone must be achieved to increase the life of the implant and prevent bone resorption. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation is to design an implant made from functionally graded material (FGM) to achieve the above advantages. The finite element method and optimization technique are used to reach the required implant design. The optimal materials of the FGM dental implant are found to be hydroxyapatite/titanium. The investigations have shown that the maximum stress in the bone for the hydroxyapatite/titanium FGM implant has been reduced by about 22% and 28% compared to currently used titanium and stainless steel dental implants, respectively.

  13. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  14. An Uncommon Presentation of Breast Implant Rupture.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eugene; Watson, David I; Dean, Nicola R

    2016-05-01

    Late periprosthetic seroma has lately been concerning for breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The authors present an uncommon presentation of breast implant rupture with a seroma and skin rash forming 2 years after insertion of the implant. PMID:27579243

  15. Development of a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Rowles, J R; Khanwilkar, P S; Diegel, P D; Hansen, A C; Bearnson, G B; Smith, K D; Tatsumi, E; Olsen, D B

    1992-01-01

    The first generation of an integrated, totally implantable electrohydraulic total artificial heart was designed for long-term cardiac replacement. The system consists of an elliptical blood pump with an interatrial shunt, Medtronic-Hall 27 mm and 25 mm inflow and outflow valves, respectively, an energy converter consisting of an axial-flow, hydraulic pump driven by a brushless DC motor, and an electronics system with transcutaneous energy transmission and telemetry. Energy is supplied by internal nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries that supply power for 20 min and external silver-zinc batteries that are designed to supply energy to run the system for 5 hr. The blood pump consists of a single layer diaphragm cast from Biolon, with joined right and left ventricles sharing a common base. The dynamic stroke volume is 84 ml, and maximum cardiac output is 9.2 L/min at a heart rate of 110 beats/min on the mock circulation. A 4.3 mm diameter interatrial shunt is used to balance the volumetrically coupled ventricles. The energy converter pumps hydraulic fluid alternately between ventricles, with controlled, active filling in one ventricle during the systolic phase of the other ventricle. Internal or external controllers adjust the heart rate and motor speed to maintain normal atrial filling pressures and full stroke. Electromagnetic induction is used to transfer energy through the skin and a bidirectional infrared data link incorporated within the transcutaneous energy transmission coils is used to transmit information. The entire system is being assembled and refined for long-term animal implant studies. PMID:1457955

  16. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, B.; Gjedde, A.; Wallentin, M.; Vuust, P.

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca's area has been active prior to the loss of hearing. PMID:24377050

  17. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  18. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Mathias; McAlpine, David

    2015-12-30

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology-ABCIT-as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies.

  19. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  20. [Biomechanics of single dental implants].

    PubMed

    Zagorskiĭ, V A; Zagorskiĭ, V V

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissues of human skull, jawbones and hard dental tissues were formed formed by the influence of chewing loads which are functional irritants used for maintaining their physical qualities. Knowledge of tensions and deformations in bony structures allows to increase their joint work with dental implants installed.